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Sample records for 2006-01-19 helix nebula

  1. Molecular Content of the Helix Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zack, L. N.; Zeigler, N. R.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2012-06-01

    Multiple transitions of H_2CO, HCO^+, and CO were detected at nine positions across the planetary nebula NGC 7293, the Helix Nebula, using the 12m telescope and the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). A complete map of the nebula has also been made in the J = 1 → 0 transition of HCO^+ at 89 GHz. HCO^+ emission was found to be widespread across the Helix, and is coincident with the ionized gas as traced in optical images. A complex velocity structure is apparent in the HCO^+ spectra, as well. The CO and H_2CO data (J = 1 → 0, 2 → 1, and 3 → 2) were modeled using a radiative transfer code at the nine positions observed in the Helix. Kinetic temperatures were typically found to be in the range Tkin ≈ 20 - 45 K and the gas density on the order of n(H_2) ≈ 105 cm-3 at these positions. The column densities for CO, H_2CO, and HCO^+ were determined to be 1015, 1012, and 1011 cm-2 respectively, corresponding to fractional abundances, relative to H_2, of f ≈ 10-4, 10-7, and 10-8. The extended distribution of HCO^+ suggests that dense clumps may exist throughout the nebula. Hence, the chemistry of evolved planetary nebulae may be more active than previously thought.

  2. Comets Kick up Dust in Helix Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Helix nebula, a cosmic starlet often photographed by amateur astronomers for its vivid colors and eerie resemblance to a giant eye.

    The nebula, located about 700 light-years away in the constellation Aquarius, belongs to a class of objects called planetary nebulae. Discovered in the 18th century, these colorful beauties were named for their resemblance to gas-giant planets like Jupiter.

    Planetary nebulae are the remains of stars that once looked a lot like our sun. When sun-like stars die, they puff out their outer gaseous layers. These layers are heated by the hot core of the dead star, called a white dwarf, and shine with infrared and visible colors. Our own sun will blossom into a planetary nebula when it dies in about five billion years.

    In Spitzer's infrared view of the Helix nebula, the eye looks more like that of a green monster's. Infrared light from the outer gaseous layers is represented in blues and greens. The white dwarf is visible as a tiny white dot in the center of the picture. The red color in the middle of the eye denotes the final layers of gas blown out when the star died.

    The brighter red circle in the very center is the glow of a dusty disk circling the white dwarf (the disk itself is too small to be resolved). This dust, discovered by Spitzer's infrared heat-seeking vision, was most likely kicked up by comets that survived the death of their star. Before the star died, its comets and possibly planets would have orbited the star in an orderly fashion. But when the star blew off its outer layers, the icy bodies and outer planets would have been tossed about and into each other, resulting in an ongoing cosmic dust storm. Any inner planets in the system would have burned up or been swallowed as their dying star expanded.

    So far, the Helix nebula is one of only a few dead-star systems in which evidence for comet survivors has been found.

    This image

  3. The Nature of Cometary Knots in the Helix Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; O'dell, C. R.

    1996-12-01

    Recent HST observations have revealed heretofore unseen fine scale structure in the Helix Nebula. Thousands of well resolved neutral dark cores have been detected in extinction against the background emission of the nebula. These Cometary Knots (CK) have a remarkably uniform appearance with photoionized cusps and tails trailing away from the cusps on almost radial lines. The total mass of the CK is similar to the total mass of the ionized diffuse gas in the ring which means that they represent an important component of the nebula. We discuss the origin and future of the CK in the Helix. It has been suggested that the CK result from Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities arising at the ionization front of the nebula (Capriotti 1973, 1996). Our hydrodynamical simulations indicate that indeed Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities could lead to filamentary structures within planetary nebulae. The substructure of these fingers differs, however, from the observations in important ways. The observed CK therefore must have a different origin. The knots might represent local density fluctuations which remained behind and were compressed as the main ionization front advanced into the neutral material. Another formation scenario is a thin shell instability which results from the interaction of the nebula with a fast stellar wind. Although no stellar wind features have been detected so far, the brightness distribution of the ionized cusps of the knots indicates that this gas is in pressure equilibrium with a high-temperature surrounding gas which could be generated by a shocked stellar wind. If such a wind would have high velocities and low densities it could fall beneath the threshold for spectroscopic detection although it could be important for understanding the formation and structure of the CK. Detailed high-resolution numerical simulations which take into account a fast wind phase as well as the time variation of the Central Star's UV photon flux are presented.

  4. Accessing commercial cloud resources within the European Helix Nebula cloud marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordeiro, C.; De Salvo, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Field, L.; Giordano, D.; Jones, R.; Villazon, L.

    2015-12-01

    Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud Initiative - is a public-private partnership between Europe's leading scientific research organisations and European IT cloud providers. CERN contributed to this initiative by providing a flagship use case: the workloads from the ATLAS experiment. Aiming to gain experience in managing and monitoring large-scale deployments, as well as in benchmarking the cloud resources, a sizable Monte Carlo production was performed using the Helix Nebula platform. This contribution describes the Helix Nebula initiative and summarizes the experience and the lessons learned from deploying ATLAS experiment application within large cloud setups involving several commercial providers.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope observations of Orion Nebula, Helix Nebula, and NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spitzer, Lyman; Fitzpatrick, Ed

    1999-01-01

    This grant covered the major part of the work of the Principal Investigator and his collaborators as a Guaranteed Time Observer on the Hubble Space Telescope. The work done naturally divided itself into two portions the first being study of nebular objects and the second investigation of the interstellar medium between stars. The latter investigation was pursued through a contract with Princeton University, with Professor Lyman Spitzer as the supervising astronomer, assisted by Dr. Ed Fitzpatrick. Following the abrupt death of Professor Spitzer, his responsibilities were shifted to Dr. Fitzpatrick. When Dr. Fitzpatrick relocated to Villanova University the concluding work on that portion of this grant was concluded under a direct service arrangement. This program has been highly successful and the resulting publications in scientific journals are listed below. To the scientist, this is the bottom line, so that I shall simply try to describe the general nature of what was accomplished. There were three nebular programs conducted, one on the Orion Nebula, the second on the Helix Nebula, and the third on NGC 6822. The largest program was that on the Orion Nebula. This involved both HST observations and supporting groundbased observations obtained with a variety of instruments, including the Coude Feed Telescope at the Kitt Peak National observatory in Arizona, the Cerro Tololo observatory in Chile, and the Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Moreover, considerable theoretical modeling was done and all of the data analysis was performed at the Rice University in Houston, except for the PI's period of sabbatical leave (6-96 through 7-97) when he was based at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. The Orion Nebula program was the most productive part, resulting in numerous papers, but more important in the discovery of a new class of objects, for which we coined the name "proplyds". The proplyds are protoplanetary disks surrounding very young

  6. DETAILED MOLECULAR OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE DOUBLE HELIX NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, K.; Enokiya, R.; Hasegawa, K.; Kudo, N.; Fukui, Y.; Morris, M. R.

    2014-07-01

    The Double Helix Nebula (DHN), located 100 pc above Sgr A* in the Galactic center (GC), is a unique structure whose morphology suggests it is a magnetic feature. Recent molecular observations toward the DHN revealed two candidate molecular counterparts of the DHN at radial velocities of –35 km s{sup –1} and 0 km s{sup –1} and discussed the model in which the DHN has its origin at the circumnuclear disk in the GC. In this paper, new CO observations toward the DHN using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and Mopra telescopes are presented. The higher-resolution observations of ∼1 pc scale reveal the detailed distributions and kinematics of the two CO counterparts (the 0 km s{sup –1} and –35 km s{sup –1} features) and provide new information on their physical conditions. As a result, we find that the 0 km s{sup –1} feature with a mass of 3.3 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} coincides with the infrared emission of the DHN, indicating clear association with the DHN. The association of the –35 km s{sup –1} feature, with a mass of 0.8 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}, is less clear compared with the 0 km s{sup –1} feature, but the complementary distribution between the molecular gas and the DHN and velocity variation along the DHN support its association with the DHN. The two molecular features are highly excited, as shown by the relatively high CO J = 2-1/J = 1-0 intensity ratios of ∼1.0, and have kinetic temperatures of ∼30 K, consistent with the typical molecular clouds in the GC.

  7. A "Firework" of H2 Knots in the Planetary Nebula NGC 7293 (The Helix Nebula)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, M.; Speck, A. K.; McHunu, B. M.; Tanaka, I.; Wright, N. J.; Smith, M. D.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Viti, S.; Wesson, R.

    2009-08-01

    We present a deep and wide field-of-view (4' × 7') image of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7293 (the Helix Nebula) in the 2.12 μm H2 v = 1 → 0 S(1) line. The excellent seeing (0farcs4) at the Subaru Telescope, allows the details of cometary knots to be examined. The knots are found at distances of 2farcm2-6farcm4 from the central star (CS). At the inner edge and in the inner ring (up to 4farcm5 from the CS), the knot often show a "tadpole" shape, an elliptical head with a bright crescent inside and a long tail opposite to the CS. In detail, there are variations in the tadpole shapes, such as narrowing tails, widening tails, meandering tails, or multipeaks within a tail. In the outer ring (4farcm5-6farcm4 from the CS), the shapes are more fractured, and the tails do not collimate into a single direction. The transition in knot morphology from the inner edge to the outer ring is clearly seen. The number density of knots governs the H2 surface brightness in the inner ring: H2 exists only within the knots. Possible mechanisms which contribute to the shaping of the knots are discussed, including photoionization and streaming motions. A plausible interpretation of our images is that inner knots are being overrun by a faster wind, but that this has not (yet) reached the outer knots. Based on H2 formation and destruction rates, H2 gas can survive in knots from formation during the late asymptotic giant branch phase throughout the PN phase. These observations provide new constraints on the formation and evolution of knots, and on the physics of molecular gas embedded within ionized gas. Based on data taken with the Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (proposal ID S07B-054).

  8. Helix Nebula and CERN: A Symbiotic approach to exploiting commercial clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro Megino, Fernando H.; Jones, Robert; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Medrano Llamas, Ramón; van der Ster, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    The recent paradigm shift toward cloud computing in IT, and general interest in "Big Data" in particular, have demonstrated that the computing requirements of HEP are no longer globally unique. Indeed, the CERN IT department and LHC experiments have already made significant R&D investments in delivering and exploiting cloud computing resources. While a number of technical evaluations of interesting commercial offerings from global IT enterprises have been performed by various physics labs, further technical, security, sociological, and legal issues need to be address before their large-scale adoption by the research community can be envisaged. Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud is an initiative that explores these questions by joining the forces of three European research institutes (CERN, ESA and EMBL) with leading European commercial IT enterprises. The goals of Helix Nebula are to establish a cloud platform federating multiple commercial cloud providers, along with new business models, which can sustain the cloud marketplace for years to come. This contribution will summarize the participation of CERN in Helix Nebula. We will explain CERN's flagship use-case and the model used to integrate several cloud providers with an LHC experiment's workload management system. During the first proof of concept, this project contributed over 40.000 CPU-days of Monte Carlo production throughput to the ATLAS experiment with marginal manpower required. CERN's experience, together with that of ESA and EMBL, is providing a great insight into the cloud computing industry and highlighted several challenges that are being tackled in order to ease the export of the scientific workloads to the cloud environments.

  9. A 'FIREWORK' OF H{sub 2} KNOTS IN THE PLANETARY NEBULA NGC 7293 (THE HELIX NEBULA)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, M.; Speck, A. K.; McHunu, B. M.; Tanaka, I.; Wright, N. J.; Viti, S.; Wesson, R.; Smith, M. D.; Zijlstra, A. A. E-mail: mikako@star.ucl.ac.uk

    2009-08-01

    We present a deep and wide field-of-view (4' x 7') image of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 7293 (the Helix Nebula) in the 2.12 {mu}m H{sub 2} v = 1 {yields} 0 S(1) line. The excellent seeing (0.''4) at the Subaru Telescope, allows the details of cometary knots to be examined. The knots are found at distances of 2.'2-6.'4 from the central star (CS). At the inner edge and in the inner ring (up to 4.'5 from the CS), the knot often show a 'tadpole' shape, an elliptical head with a bright crescent inside and a long tail opposite to the CS. In detail, there are variations in the tadpole shapes, such as narrowing tails, widening tails, meandering tails, or multipeaks within a tail. In the outer ring (4.'5-6.'4 from the CS), the shapes are more fractured, and the tails do not collimate into a single direction. The transition in knot morphology from the inner edge to the outer ring is clearly seen. The number density of knots governs the H{sub 2} surface brightness in the inner ring: H{sub 2} exists only within the knots. Possible mechanisms which contribute to the shaping of the knots are discussed, including photoionization and streaming motions. A plausible interpretation of our images is that inner knots are being overrun by a faster wind, but that this has not (yet) reached the outer knots. Based on H{sub 2} formation and destruction rates, H{sub 2} gas can survive in knots from formation during the late asymptotic giant branch phase throughout the PN phase. These observations provide new constraints on the formation and evolution of knots, and on the physics of molecular gas embedded within ionized gas.

  10. A magnetic torsional wave near the Galactic Centre traced by a 'double helix' nebula.

    PubMed

    Morris, Mark; Uchida, Keven; Do, Tuan

    2006-03-16

    The magnetic field in the central few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way has a dipolar geometry and is substantially stronger than elsewhere in the Galaxy, with estimates ranging up to a milligauss (refs 1-6). Characterization of the magnetic field at the Galactic Centre is important because it can affect the orbits of molecular clouds by exerting a drag on them, inhibit star formation, and could guide a wind of hot gas or cosmic rays away from the central region. Here we report observations of an infrared nebula having the morphology of an intertwined double helix about 100 parsecs from the Galaxy's dynamical centre, with its axis oriented perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The observed segment is about 25 parsecs in length, and contains about 1.25 full turns of each of the two continuous, helically wound strands. We interpret this feature as a torsional Alfvén wave propagating vertically away from the Galactic disk, driven by rotation of the magnetized circumnuclear gas disk. The direct connection between the circumnuclear disk and the double helix is ambiguous, but the images show a possible meandering channel that warrants further investigation.

  11. Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud: a public-private partnership to build a multidisciplinary cloud platform for data intensive science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bob; Casu, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The feasibility of using commercial cloud services for scientific research is of great interest to research organisations such as CERN, ESA and EMBL, to the suppliers of cloud-based services and to the national and European funding agencies. Through the Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud [1] initiative and with the support of the European Commission, these stakeholders are driving a two year pilot-phase during which procurement processes and governance issues for a framework of public/private partnership will be appraised. Three initial flagship use cases from high energy physics, molecular biology and earth-observation are being used to validate the approach, enable a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken and prepare the next stage of the Science Cloud Strategic Plan [2] to be developed and approved. The power of Helix Nebula lies in a shared set of services for initially 3 very different sciences each supporting a global community and thus building a common e-Science platform. Of particular relevance is the ESA sponsored flagship application SuperSites Exploitation Platform (SSEP [3]) that offers the global geo-hazard community a common platform for the correlation and processing of observation data for supersites monitoring. The US-NSF Earth Cube [4] and Ocean Observatory Initiative [5] (OOI) are taking a similar approach for data intensive science. The work of Helix Nebula and its recent architecture model [6] has shown that is it technically feasible to allow publicly funded infrastructures, such as EGI [7] and GEANT [8], to interoperate with commercial cloud services. Such hybrid systems are in the interest of the existing users of publicly funded infrastructures and funding agencies because they will provide "freedom of choice" over the type of computing resources to be consumed and the manner in which they can be obtained. But to offer such freedom-of choice across a spectrum of suppliers, various issues such as intellectual property, legal responsibility

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Columns Found toward the Double Helix Nebulae in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, Yuta; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Ogawa, Takayuki

    NANTEN2 observations of the galactic molecular gas revealed that molecular columns surround the double helix nebulae at our Galactic center (Enokiya et al. 2014). In order to study the formation mechanism of the double helix nebulae and molecular columns, we carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the interaction of a magnetic tower jet ejected from the galactic center with interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) gas taking into account the interstellar cooling. The HI gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, cold, dense region is formed around the helical magnetic tower jet. These molecular columns can be the evidences of the past activity near the galactic center black hole.

  13. Discovery of possible molecular counterparts to the infrared Double Helix Nebula in the galactic center

    SciTech Connect

    Enokiya, R.; Torii, K.; Furuhashi, E.; Nakamura, K.; Yoshiike, S.; Sato, J.; Furukawa, N.; Moribe, N.; Ohama, A.; Sano, H.; Okamoto, R.; Mori, Y.; Hanaoka, N.; Hayakawa, T.; Okuda, T.; Schultheis, M.; Asahina, Y.; Matsumoto, R.; Dobashi, K.; Nishimura, A.; and others

    2014-01-01

    We have discovered two molecular features at radial velocities of –35 km s{sup –1} and 0 km s{sup –1} toward the infrared Double Helix Nebula (DHN) in the Galactic center with NANTEN2. The two features show good spatial correspondence with the DHN. We have also found two elongated molecular ridges at these two velocities distributed vertically to the Galactic plane over 0.°8. The two ridges are linked by broad features in velocity and are likely connected physically with each other. The ratio between the {sup 12}CO J = 2-1 and J = 1-0 transitions is 0.8 in the ridges which is larger than the average value 0.5 in the foreground gas, suggesting the two ridges are in the Galactic center. An examination of the K band extinction reveals a good coincidence with the CO 0 km s{sup –1} ridge and is consistent with a distance of 8 ± 2 kpc. We discuss the possibility that the DHN was created by a magnetic phenomenon incorporating torsional Alfvén waves launched from the circum-nuclear disk and present a first estimate of the mass and energy involved in the DHN.

  14. DISCOVERY OF A HALO AROUND THE HELIX NEBULA NGC 7293 IN THE WISE ALL-SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yong; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Kwok, Sun E-mail: xiazh@hku.hk

    2012-08-10

    We report the discovery of an extended halo ({approx}40' in diameter) around the planetary nebula NGC 7293 (the Helix Nebula) observed in the 12 {mu}m band from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer all-sky survey. The mid-infrared halo has an axisymmetric structure with a sharp boundary to the northeast and a more diffuse boundary to the southwest, suggesting an interaction between the stellar wind and the interstellar medium (ISM). The symmetry axis of the halo is well aligned with that of a northeast arc, suggesting that the two structures are physically associated. We have attempted to fit the observed geometry with a model of a moving steady-state stellar wind interacting with the ISM. Possible combinations of the ISM density and the stellar velocity are derived from these fittings. The discrepancies between the model and the observations suggest that the stellar mass loss has a more complicated history, including possible time and angle dependences.

  15. Helix Nebula: Enabling federation of existing data infrastructures and data services to an overarching cross-domain e-infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengert, Wolfgang; Farres, Jordi; Lanari, Riccardo; Casu, Francesco; Manunta, Michele; Lassalle-Balier, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    Helix Nebula has established a growing public private partnership of more than 30 commercial cloud providers, SMEs, and publicly funded research organisations and e-infrastructures. The Helix Nebula strategy is to establish a federated cloud service across Europe. Three high-profile flagships, sponsored by CERN (high energy physics), EMBL (life sciences) and ESA/DLR/CNES/CNR (earth science), have been deployed and extensively tested within this federated environment. The commitments behind these initial flagships have created a critical mass that attracts suppliers and users to the initiative, to work together towards an "Information as a Service" market place. Significant progress in implementing the following 4 programmatic goals (as outlined in the strategic Plan Ref.1) has been achieved: × Goal #1 Establish a Cloud Computing Infrastructure for the European Research Area (ERA) serving as a platform for innovation and evolution of the overall infrastructure. × Goal #2 Identify and adopt suitable policies for trust, security and privacy on a European-level can be provided by the European Cloud Computing framework and infrastructure. × Goal #3 Create a light-weight governance structure for the future European Cloud Computing Infrastructure that involves all the stakeholders and can evolve over time as the infrastructure, services and user-base grows. × Goal #4 Define a funding scheme involving the three stake-holder groups (service suppliers, users, EC and national funding agencies) into a Public-Private-Partnership model to implement a Cloud Computing Infrastructure that delivers a sustainable business environment adhering to European level policies. Now in 2014 a first version of this generic cross-domain e-infrastructure is ready to go into operations building on federation of European industry and contributors (data, tools, knowledge, ...). This presentation describes how Helix Nebula is being used in the domain of earth science focusing on geohazards. The

  16. The helix nebula viewed in HCO{sup +}: Large-scale mapping of the J = 1 → 0 transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, N. R.; Zack, L. N.; Ziurys, L. M.; Woolf, N. J.

    2013-11-20

    The J = 1 → 0 transition of HCO{sup +} at 89 GHz has been mapped across the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) with 70'' spatial resolution (1.68 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution) using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope. This work is the first large-scale mapping project of a dense gas tracer (n(H{sub 2}) ∼ 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) in old planetary nebulae. Observations of over 200 positions encompassing the classical optical image were conducted with a 3σ noise level of ∼20 mK. HCO{sup +} was detected at most positions, often exhibiting multiple velocity components indicative of complex kinematic structures in dense gas. The HCO{sup +} spectra suggest that the Helix is composed of a bipolar, barrel-like structure with red- and blue-shifted halves, symmetric with respect to the central star and oriented ∼10° east from the line of sight. A second bipolar, higher velocity outflow exists as well, situated along the direction of the Helix 'plumes'. The column density of HCO{sup +} across the Helix is N {sub tot} ∼ 1.5 × 10{sup 10}-5.0 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –2}, with an average value N {sub ave} ∼ 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –2}, corresponding to an abundance, relative to H{sub 2}, of f ∼ 1.4 × 10{sup –8}. This value is similar to that observed in young PN, and contradicts chemical models, which predict that the abundance of HCO{sup +} decreases with nebular age. This study indicates that polyatomic molecules readily survive the ultraviolet field of the central white dwarf, and can be useful in tracing nebular morphology in the very late stages of stellar evolution.

  17. "helix Nebula - the Science Cloud", a European Science Driven Cross-Domain Initiative Implemented in via AN Active Ppp Set-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengert, W.; Mondon, E.; Bégin, M. E.; Ferrer, M.; Vallois, F.; DelaMar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Helix Nebula, a European science cross-domain initiative building on an active PPP, is aiming to implement the concept of an open science commons[1] while using a cloud hybrid model[2] as the proposed implementation solution. This approach allows leveraging and merging of complementary data intensive Earth Science disciplines (e.g. instrumentation[3] and modeling), without introducing significant changes in the contributors' operational set-up. Considering the seamless integration with life-science (e.g. EMBL), scientific exploitation of meteorological, climate, and Earth Observation data and models open an enormous potential for new big data science. The work of Helix Nebula has shown that is it feasible to interoperate publicly funded infrastructures, such as EGI [5] and GEANT [6], with commercial cloud services. Such hybrid systems are in the interest of the existing users of publicly funded infrastructures and funding agencies because they will provide "freedom and choice" over the type of computing resources to be consumed and the manner in which they can be obtained. But to offer such freedom and choice across a spectrum of suppliers, various issues such as intellectual property, legal responsibility, service quality agreements and related issues need to be addressed. Finding solutions to these issues is one of the goals of the Helix Nebula initiative. [1] http://www.egi.eu/news-and-media/publications/OpenScienceCommons_v3.pdf [2] http://www.helix-nebula.eu/events/towards-the-european-open-science-cloud [3] e.g. https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/sentinel-data-access [5] http://www.egi.eu/ [6] http://www.geant.net/

  18. CHEMICAL COMPLEXITY IN THE HELIX NEBULA: MULTI-LINE OBSERVATIONS OF H{sub 2}CO, HCO{sup +}, AND CO

    SciTech Connect

    Zack, L. N.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2013-03-10

    Observations of CO, HCO{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO have been carried out at nine positions across the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) using the Submillimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory. Measurements of the J = 1 {yields} 0, 2 {yields} 1, and 3 {yields}2 transitions of CO, two transitions of HCO{sup +} (J = 1 {yields} 0 and 3 {yields}2), and five lines of H{sub 2}CO (J{sub Ka,Kc} = 1{sub 0,1} {yields} 0{sub 0,0}, 2{sub 1,2} {yields} 1{sub 1,1}, 2{sub 0,2} {yields} 1{sub 0,1}, 2{sub 1,1} {yields} 1{sub 1,0}, and 3{sub 0,3} {yields}2{sub 0,2}) were conducted in the 0.8, 1, 2, and 3 mm bands toward this highly evolved planetary nebula. HCO{sup +} and H{sub 2}CO were detected at all positions, along with three transitions of CO. From a radiative transfer analysis, the kinetic temperature was found to be T{sub K} {approx} 15-40 K across the Helix with a gas density of n(H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.1-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}. The warmer gas appears to be closer to the central star, but high density material is distributed throughout the nebula. For CO, the column density was found to be N{sub tot} {approx} 0.25-4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, with a fractional abundance of f (CO/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}. Column densities for HCO{sup +} and H{sub 2}CO were determined to be N{sub tot} {approx} 0.2-5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} and 0.2-1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, respectively, with fractional abundances of f (HCO{sup +}/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} and f (H{sub 2}CO/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-several orders of magnitude higher than predicted by chemical models. Polyatomic molecules in the Helix appear to be well-protected from photodissociation and may actually seed the diffuse interstellar medium.

  19. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  20. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  1. MOLECULAR SURVIVAL IN EVOLVED PLANETARY NEBULAE: DETECTION OF H{sub 2}CO, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, AND C{sub 2}H IN THE HELIX

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.; Milam, S. N. E-mail: nwoolf@as.arizona.ed E-mail: Stefanie.N.Milam@nasa.go

    2009-10-20

    H{sub 2}CO, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H have been identified in the neutral envelope of the highly evolved planetary nebula (PN), the Helix (also know as NGC 7293). Emission from these species were detected toward a peak position in CO, 372'' east of the central star, using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). C{sub 2}H and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} were identified on the basis of their 3 mm transitions, measured with the ARO 12 m, while five lines of H{sub 2}CO were observed using the 12 m at 2 and 3 mm and the ARO Submillimeter Telescope at 1 mm. From a radiative transfer analysis of the formaldehyde emission, the molecular material was determined to have a density of n(H{sub 2}) approx3 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, with a kinetic temperature of T {sub kin} approx20 K. Column densities for C{sub 2}H, H{sub 2}CO, and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} of N {sub tot} approx1.4 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, 1.1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, and 3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, respectively, were derived, corresponding to fractional abundances relative to H{sub 2} of f (H{sub 2}CO) = 1 x 10{sup -7}, f (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}) = 3 x 10{sup -8}, and f (C{sub 2}H) = 1 x 10{sup -6} {sub .} The physical conditions found support the notion that molecules in evolved PNe survive in dense clumps in pressure equilibrium, shielded from photodissociation. The presence of H{sub 2}CO, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H, along with the previously observed species CN, HNC, HCN, and HCO{sup +}, indicates that a relatively complex chemistry can occur in the late stages of PN evolution, despite potentially destructive ultraviolet radiation. These molecules have also been observed in diffuse clouds, suggesting a possible connection between molecular material in evolved PNe and the diffuse ISM.

  2. Into the Eye of the Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    A deep new image of the magnificent Helix planetary nebula has been obtained using the Wide Field Imager at ESO's La Silla Observatory. The image shows a rich background of distant galaxies, usually not seen in other images of this object. ESO PR Photo 07a/09 The Helix Nebula ESO PR Video 06a/09 Helix Nebula Zoom-in ESO PR Video 06b/09 Pan over the Helix Nebula ESO PR Video 06c/09 Zoom and pan over the Helix Nebula The Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, lies about 700 light-years away in the constellation of Aquarius (the Water Bearer). It is one of the closest and most spectacular examples of a planetary nebula. These exotic objects have nothing to do with planets, but are the final blooming of Sun-like stars before their retirement as white dwarfs. Shells of gas are blown off from a star's surface, often in intricate and beautiful patterns, and shine under the harsh ultraviolet radiation from the faint, but very hot, central star. The main ring of the Helix Nebula is about two light-years across or half the distance between the Sun and its closest stellar neighbour. Despite being photographically very spectacular the Helix is hard to see visually as its light is thinly spread over a large area of sky and the history of its discovery is rather obscure. It first appears in a list of new objects compiled by the German astronomer Karl Ludwig Harding in 1824. The name Helix comes from the rough corkscrew shape seen in the earlier photographs. Although the Helix looks very much like a doughnut, studies have shown that it possibly consists of at least two separate discs with outer rings and filaments. The brighter inner disc seems to be expanding at about 100 000 km/h and to have taken about 12 000 years to have formed. Because the Helix is relatively close -- it covers an area of the sky about a quarter of the full Moon -- it can be studied in much greater detail than most other planetary nebulae and has been found to have an unexpected and complex structure. All around the

  3. Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Giovanni; Reach, William

    2004-09-01

    The Trifid Nebula (M20) is a double-nebula, with a blue reflection nebula above a red ionized nebula, the latter being trisected by dark lanes. This observing program iamges the reflection and ionized nebulae and the dark lanes. The mid-infrared emission will trace the reflection nebula via aromatic hydrocarbon emissions and the dark lane via hot, small grains. Massive protostars have been detected in the dark lanes using submillimeter observations; the new mid-infrared observations will fully sample the lower-mass protostars. The Trifid is one of the youngest known HII regions, and the interaciton of its young, massive O-type star with its surrounding placental material is clearly affecting its ability to form new stars.

  4. Butterfly Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) is back at work, capturing this image of the 'butterfly wing'- shaped nebula, NGC 2346. The nebula is about 2,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Monoceros. It represents the spectacular 'last gasp' of a binary star system at the nebula's center. The image was taken on March 6, 1997 as part of the recommissioning of the Hubble Space Telescope's previously installed scientific instruments following the successful servicing of the HST by NASA shuttle astronauts in February. WFPC2 was installed in HST during the servicing mission in 1993. At the center of the nebula lies a pair of stars that are so close together that they orbit around each other every 16 days. This is so close that, even with Hubble, the pair of stars cannot be resolved into its two components. One component of this binary is the hot core of a star that has ejected most of its outer layers, producing the surrounding nebula. Astronomers believe that this star, when it evolved and expanded to become a red giant, actually swallowed its companion star in an act of stellar cannibalism. The resulting interaction led to a spiraling together of the two stars, culminating in ejection of the outer layers of the red giant. Most of the outer layers were ejected into a dense disk, which can still be seen in the Hubble image, surrounding the central star. Later the hot star developed a fast stellar wind. This wind, blowing out into the surrounding disk, has inflated the large, wispy hourglass-shaped wings perpendicular to the disk. These wings produce the butterfly appearance when seen in projection. The total diameter of the nebula is about one-third of a light-year, or 2 trillion miles.

  5. Horsehead nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Rising from a sea of dust and gas like a giant seahorse, the Horsehead nebula is one of the most photographed objects in the sky. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took a close-up look at this heavenly icon, revealing the cloud's intricate structure. This detailed view of the horse's head is being released to celebrate the orbiting observatory's eleventh anniversary. Produced by the Hubble Heritage Project, this picture is a testament to the Horsehead's popularity. Internet voters selected this object for the orbiting telescope to view.

    The Horsehead, also known as Barnard 33, is a cold, dark cloud of gas and dust, silhouetted against the bright nebula, IC 434. The bright area at the top left edge is a young star still embedded in its nursery of gas and dust. But radiation from this hot star is eroding the stellar nursery. The top of the nebula also is being sculpted by radiation from a massive star located out of Hubble's field of view.

    Only by chance does the nebula roughly resemble the head of a horse. Its unusual shape was first discovered on a photographic plate in the late 1800s. Located in the constellation Orion, the Horsehead is a cousin of the famous pillars of dust and gas known as the Eagle nebula. Both tower-like nebulas are cocoons of young stars.

    The Horsehead nebula lies just south of the bright star Zeta Orionis, which is easily visible to the unaided eye as the left-hand star in the line of three that form Orion's Belt. Amateur astronomers often use the Horsehead as a test of their observing skills; it is known as one of the more difficult objects to see visually in an amateur-sized telescope.

    The magnificent extent of the Horsehead is best appreciated in a new wide-field image of the nebula being released today by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, taken by Travis Rector with the National Science Foundation's 0.9 meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ.

    This popular celestial target was the clear

  6. Orion Nebula and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed at Rice University related to NASA-Ames University consortium grant NCC2-5199 during the two year period 1996 September 1 through 1998 August 31. The research program, titled Orion Nebula and Planetary Nebulae, involved the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imagery and spectroscopy of the Orion Nebula and of the planetary nebulae NGC 6818 and NGC 6210. In addition, we analyzed infrared spectra of the Orion Nebula taken with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) The primary collaborators at NASA-Ames were Drs. R. H. Rubin, A. G. C. M. Tielens, S. W. J. Colgan, and S. D. Lord (Tielens & Lord has since changed institutions). Other collaborators include Drs. P. G. Martin (CITA, Toronto), G. J. Ferland (U. KY), J. A. Baldwin (CTIO, Chile), J. J. Hester (ASU), D. K. Walter (SCSU), and P. Harrington (U. MD). In addition to the Principal Investigator, Professor Reginald J. Dufour of the Department of Space Physics & Astronomy, the research also involved two students, Mr. Matthew Browning and Mr. Brent Buckalew. Mr. Browning will be graduating from Rice in 1999 May with a B.A. degree in Physics and Mr. Buckalew continues as a graduate student in our department, having recently received a NASA GSRP research fellowship (sponsored by Ames). The collaboration was very productive, with two refereed papers already appearing in the literature, several others in preparation, numerous meeting presentations and two press releases. Some of our research accomplishments are highlighted below. Attached to the report are copies of the two major publications. Note that this research continues to date and related extensions of it recently has been awarded time with the HST for 1999-2000.

  7. Numerical nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijkhorst, Erik-Jan

    2005-12-01

    The late stages of evolution of stars like our Sun are dominated by several episodes of violent mass loss. Space based observations of the resulting objects, known as Planetary Nebulae, show a bewildering array of highly symmetric shapes. The interplay between gasdynamics and radiative processes determines the morphological outcome of these objects, and numerical models for astrophysical gasdynamics have to incorporate these effects. This thesis presents new numerical techniques for carrying out high-resolution three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamical simulations. Such calculations require parallelization of computer codes, and the use of state-of-the-art supercomputer technology. Numerical models in the context of the shaping of Planetary Nebulae are presented, providing insight into their origin and fate.

  8. Stingray Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image captures the infancy of the Stingray nebula (Hen-1357), the youngest known planetary nebula. In this image, the bright central star is in the middle of the green ring of gas. Its companion star is diagonally above it at 10 o'clock. A spur of gas (green) is forming a faint bridge to the companion star due to gravitational attraction. The image also shows a ring of gas (green) surrounding the central star, with bubbles of gas to the lower left and upper right of the ring. The wind of material propelled by radiation from the hot central star has created enough pressure to blow open holes in the ends of the bubbles, allowing gas to escape. The red curved lines represent bright gas that is heated by a 'shock' caused when the central star's wind hits the walls of the bubbles. The nebula is as large as 130 solar systems, but, at its distance of 18,000 light-years, it appears only as big as a dime viewed a mile away. The Stingray is located in the direction of the southern constellation Ara (the Altar). The colors shown are actual colors emitted by nitrogen (red), oxygen (green), and hydrogen (blue).

  9. Ant nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A new Hubble Space Telescope image of a celestial object called the Ant Nebula may shed new light on the future demise of our Sun. The image is available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc .

    The nebula, imaged on July 20, 1997, and June 30, 1998, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, was observed by Drs. Raghvendra Sahai and John Trauger of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Bruce Balick of the University of Washington in Seattle; and Vincent Icke of Leiden University in the Netherlands. JPL designed and built the camera.

    The Ant Nebula, whose technical name is Mz3, resembles the head and thorax of an ant when observed with ground-based telescopes. The new Hubble image, with 10 times the resolution revealing 100 times more detail, shows the 'ant's' body as a pair of fiery lobes protruding from a dying, Sun- like star. The Ant Nebula is located between 3,000 and 6,000 light years from Earth in the southern constellation Norma.

    The image challenges old ideas about what happens to dying stars. This observation, along with other pictures of various remnants of dying stars called planetary nebulae, shows that our Sun's fate will probably be much more interesting, complex and dramatic than astronomers previously believed.

    Although the ejection of gas from the dying star in the Ant Nebula is violent, it does not show the chaos one might expect from an ordinary explosion, but instead shows symmetrical patterns. One possibility is that the central star has a closely orbiting companion whose gravitational tidal forces shape the outflowing gas. A second possibility is that as the dying star spins, its strong magnetic fields are wound up into complex shapes like spaghetti in an eggbeater. Electrically charged winds, much like those in our Sun's solar wind but millions of times denser and moving at speeds up to 1,000 kilometers per second (more than 600 miles per second) from the star, follow the twisted field lines on their way

  10. Trifid Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 14.8' x 20.0' on the sky, of the Trifid Nebula, aka Messier 20 and NGC 6514. The Trifid is only about 1.5 degrees northwest on the sky of the larger Lagoon Nebula (Messier 8) in the constellation Sagittarius, and is at a distance from us of 1.68 kpc (or 5477 light years), near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. It gets its name from its optical appearance, from three dark dust lanes that divide it. Like the Lagoon, much of the optical emission is dominated by the red light from hydrogen, forming an 'H II region' of ionized gas around the bright small cluster of hot stars just to the southeast of the image center; the rest of the emission is reflected blue light from these hot stars, primarily from the brightest one, HD 164492A. In the near-infrared we can see through much of the obscuring dust in the Trifid, including the name-giving dust lanes, but still see much of the bluish light reflected by the dust. In the 2MASS image, much of the dark dust is still seen, but also many more stars than are seen optically. The Trifid is less than 1 million years old, and young, massive still-forming stellar objects can be seen as well. Visit the Trifid and other Messier objects in the 2MASSier Object Gallery. Image mosaic by E. Kopan (IPAC).

  11. Doradus Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A panoramic view of a vast, sculpted area of gas and dust where thousands of stars are being born has been captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/21 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The photo offers an unprecedented, detailed view of the entire inner region of the fertile, star-forming 30 Doradus Nebula. The mosaic picture shows that ultraviolet radiation and high-speed material unleashed by the stars in the cluster, called R136 (the large blue blob left of center), are weaving a tapestry of creation and destruction, triggering the collapse of looming gas and dust clouds and forming pillar-like structures that incubate newborn stars.

    The 30 Doradus Nebula is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 170,000 light-years from Earth. Nebulas like 30 Doradus are signposts of recent star birth. High-energy ultraviolet radiation from young, hot, massive stars in R136 causes surrounding gaseous material to glow. Previous Hubble telescope observations showed that R136 contains several dozen of the most massive stars known, each about 100 times the mass of the Sun and about 10 times as hot. These stellar behemoths formed about 2 million years ago.

    The stars in R136 produce intense 'stellar winds,' streams of material traveling at several million miles an hour. These winds push the gas away from the cluster and compress the inner regions of the surrounding gas and dust clouds (seen in the image as the pinkish material). The intense pressure triggers the collapse of parts of the clouds, producing a new star formation around the central cluster. Most stars in the nursery are not visible because they are still encased in cocoons of gas and dust.

    This mosaic image of 30 Doradus consists of five overlapping

  12. Revisting the Double Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Taekjip

    2010-12-08

    Properties of DNA double helix have been studied for over 60 years. Yet as more sensitive tools become available, fundamental assumptions in our understanding of these properties are being challenged. One such question is over the flexibility of DNA. Looping or bending of DNA on short length scales is essential for many cellular processes but it is highly controversial exactly how flexible the DNA is. Using a new, single-molecule based method, we found that DNA of lengths as short as 50 base pairs can form a circle more than 108 times faster than theoretical predictions. Another question concerns the physical principles governing the reversible, helix-coil transitions of DNA between the double helix and single strands. Using porous nanocontainers, we found that the rate of double helix formation shows an abrupt 100 fold change depending on whether there are 7 or more contiguous base pairs or not.

  13. Wolf-Rayet nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of nebulae around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the 1960s, it has been established that WR stars are massive stars at advanced evolutionary stages and that their surrounding nebulae result from the interactions between the stellar mass loss and the ambient interstellar medium. Surveys of WR nebulae have been made in the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds, and other nearby galaxies in the Local Group. Some WR nebulae exhibit He II λ4686 line emission, indicating stellar effective temperatures of 90 — 100 x 103 K. The shocked fast stellar winds from WR nebulae have been detected in soft X-rays, but theoretical models have not been able to reproduce the observed X-ray spectral properties. Elemental abundances of WR nebulae consisting of synthesized stellar material can constrain stellar evolution models, but high-dispersion spectra are needed to kinematically separate the expanding shell of a WR nebula and the background interstellar medium for accurate abundance analyses.

  14. Carbon Chemistry in Planetary Nebulae: Observations of the CCH Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Rose; Ziurys, Lucy

    2015-08-01

    The presence of infrared (IR) emission features observed in interstellar environments is consistent with models that suggest they are produced by complex organic species containing both aliphatic and aromatic components (Kwok & Zhang 2011). These IR signals change drastically over the course of the AGB, proto-planetary, and planetary nebulae phases, and this dramatic variation is yet to be understood. The radical CCH is a potential tracer of carbon chemistry and its evolution in dying stars. CCH is very common in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars, and is present in the proto-planetary nebulae. It has also been observed at one position in the very young planetary nebula, NGC 7027 (Hasegawa & Kwok 2001), as well as at one position in the Helix Nebula (Tenenbaum et al. 2009) - a dense clump east of the central white dwarf. In order to further probe the chemistry of carbon, we have initiated a search for CCH in eight PNe previously detected in HCN and HCO+ from a survey conducted by Schmidt and Ziurys, using the telescopes of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Observations of the N=1→0 transition of CCH at 87 GHz have been conducted using the new ARO 12-m ALMA prototype antenna, while measurements of the N=3→2 transition at 262 GHz are being made with the ARO Sub-Millimeter Telescope (SMT). We also have extended our study in the Helix Nebula. Thus far, CCH has been detected at 8 new positions across the Helix Nebula, and appears to be widespread in this source. The radical has also been identified in K4-47, M3-28, K3-17, and K3-58. These sources represent a range of nebular ages. Additional observations are currently being conducted for CCH in other PNe, as well as abundance analyses. These results will be presented.

  15. Super D-helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Oh, Phillial

    2001-11-01

    We study the ``Myers effect'' for a bunch of D1-branes with type-IIB superstrings moving in one direction along the branes. We show that the ``blown-up'' configuration is a helical D1-brane, which is self-supported from collapse by the axial momentum flow. The tilting angle of the helix is determined by the number of D1-branes. The radius of the helix is stabilized to a certain value depending on the number of D1-branes and the momentum carried by type-IIB superstrings. This helix is actually a T-dual version of the supertube recently found as the ``blown-up'' configuration of a bunch of type-IIA superstrings carrying a D0-brane charge. It is shown that the helical D1 configuration preserves one-quarter of the supersymmetry of the type-IIB Minkowski vacuum.

  16. [The helix of life].

    PubMed

    Kahn, Axel

    2003-04-01

    The discovery of DNA's double helix 50 years ago was the founding event of molecular biology. It was also the moment that forged the reputation of two of biology's most compelling figures, no doubt in perpetuity. However, Jim Watson and Francis Crick were not the only players of this outstanding fest whose certain circumstances remain today rather singular.

  17. Double Helix Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glickstein, Neil M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes the use of James Watson's book, "The Double Helix," as a multidisciplinary way of introducing students to actual science; the scientific method; dilemmas encountered in the world of research; and the rich setting of personalities, politics, and history in post-World War II Europe. (MKR)

  18. Helix Capping in RNA Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung C.; Gutell, Robin R.

    2014-01-01

    Helices are an essential element in defining the three-dimensional architecture of structured RNAs. While internal basepairs in a canonical helix stack on both sides, the ends of the helix stack on only one side and are exposed to the loop side, thus susceptible to fraying unless they are protected. While coaxial stacking has long been known to stabilize helix ends by directly stacking two canonical helices coaxially, based on analysis of helix-loop junctions in RNA crystal structures, herein we describe helix capping, topological stacking of a helix end with a basepair or an unpaired nucleotide from the loop side, which in turn protects helix ends. Beyond the topological protection of helix ends against fraying, helix capping should confer greater stability onto the resulting composite helices. Our analysis also reveals that this general motif is associated with the formation of tertiary structure interactions. Greater knowledge about the dynamics at the helix-junctions in the secondary structure should enhance the prediction of RNA secondary structure with a richer set of energetic rules and help better understand the folding of a secondary structure into its three-dimensional structure. These together suggest that helix capping likely play a fundamental role in driving RNA folding. PMID:24691270

  19. The Trifid Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of the Trifid Nebula reveals a stellar nursery being torn apart by a nearby massive star. Embryonic stars are forming within an ill-fated cloud of dust and gas, which is destined to be eaten away by the glare from the massive neighbor. The cloud is about 8 light years away from the nebula' s central star. This stellar activity is a beautiful example of how the life cycle of stars like our Sun is intimately cornected with their more powerful siblings. Residing in the constellation Sagittarius, the Trifid Nebula is about 9,000 light years from Earth.

  20. Far-UV Signature of Molecular Hydrogen in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCandliss, S.

    Recent observations of two planetary nebulae, NGC 6720 and NGC 7293 (the Ring and Helix Nebulae), find the peak in the near-infrared quadrupole vibrational transitions of H_2 to be coincident with the bright optical structure. Vibrational states of molecular hydrogen can be populated radiatively, following absorption and subsequent re-emission of far-UV photons or by thermal processes, such as shocks. Historically, there has been disagreement about the excitation mechanism of the molecular gas in planetary nebulae, and we propose to resolve these issues through FUSE observations. The electronic transitions responsible for the far-UV cascade of H_2 cannot be excited thermally, thus the detection of the fluorescent signature with FUSE would allow us to unambiguously determine the degree to which radiative excitation is responsible for the observed infrared emission. These observations would serve two purposes, clarifying the physical processes at work in NGC 6720 and 7293 while continuing our investigation of the far-UV characteristics of molecular hydrogen and dust in a range of environments. Planetary nebulae complement our existing program to observe reflection nebulae by exploring a new range of gas densities where a much harder ultraviolet radiation field is present. This diverse set of environments allows us to constrain models of the formation and destruction of molecular hydrogen in photodissociation regions.

  1. Lightning in the Protoplanetary Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning in the protoplanetary nebula has been proposed as a mechanism for creating meteoritic chondrules: enigmatic mm-sized silicate spheres formed in the nebula by the brief melting of cold precursors.

  2. A Tactile Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, Noreen A.; Mutchler, M.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomy was once considered a science restricted to fully sighted participants. But in the past two decades, accessible books with large print/Braille and touchable pictures have brought astronomy and space science to the hands and mind's eye of students, regardless of their visual ability. A new universally-designed tactile image featuring the Hubble mosaic of the Carina Nebula is being presented at this conference. The original dataset was obtained with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) hydrogen-alpha filter in 2005. It became an instant icon after being infused with additional color information from ground-based CTIO data, and released as Hubble's 17th anniversary image. Our tactile Carina Nebula promotes multi-mode learning about the entire life-cycle of stars, which is dramatically illustrated in this Hubble mosaic. When combined with descriptive text in print and Braille, the visual and tactile components seamlessly reach both sighted and blind populations. Specific touchable features of the tactile image identify the shapes and orientations of objects in the Carina Nebula that include star-forming regions, jets, pillars, dark and light globules, star clusters, shocks/bubbles, the Keyhole Nebula, and stellar death (Eta Carinae). Visit our poster paper to touch the Carina Nebula!

  3. Measuring the Double Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew-Fenn, R.S.; Das, R.; Harbury, P.A.B.

    2009-05-26

    DNA is thought to behave as a stiff elastic rod with respect to the ubiquitous mechanical deformations inherent to its biology. To test this model at short DNA lengths, we measured the mean and variance of end-to-end length for a series of DNA double helices in solution, using small-angle x-ray scattering interference between gold nanocrystal labels. In the absence of applied tension, DNA is at least one order of magnitude softer than measured by single-molecule stretching experiments. Further, the data rule out the conventional elastic rod model. The variance in end-to-end length follows a quadratic dependence on the number of base pairs rather than the expected linear dependence, indicating that DNA stretching is cooperative over more than two turns of the DNA double helix. Our observations support the idea of long-range allosteric communication through DNA structure.

  4. Clown Face Nebula (NGC 2392)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A planetary nebula, also known as the Eskimo Nebula, in the constellation Gemini, position RA 07 h 29.2 m, dec. +20° 55'. It is bluish, 13'' in diameter, and of ninth magnitude, with a tenth-magnitude central star. The blue-green nebula's hazy outer regions are thought to resemble an Eskimo's hood or clown's ruff....

  5. Catalogues of planetary nebulae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, A.

    Firstly, the general requirements concerning catalogues are studied for planetary nebulae, in particular concerning the objects to be included in a catalogue of PN, their denominations, followed by reflexions about the afterlife and comuterized versions of a catalogue. Then, the basic elements constituting a catalogue of PN are analyzed, and the available data are looked at each time.

  6. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  7. Formation of Twisted Elephant Trunks in the Rosette Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlqvist, P.; Gahm, G. F.; Kristen, H.

    New observations show that dark elephant trunks in the Rosette nebula are often built up by thin filaments. In several of the trunks the filaments seem to form a twisted pattern. This pattern is hard to reconcile with current theory. We propose a new model for the formation of twisted elephant trunks in which electromagnetic forces play an important role. The model considers the behaviour of a twisted magnetic filament in a molecular cloud, where a cluster of hot stars has been recently born. As a result of stellar winds, and radiation pressure, electromagnetic forces, and inertia forces part of the filament can develop into a double helix pointing towards the stars. The double helix represents the twisted elephant trunk. A simple analogy experiment visualizes and supports the trunk model.

  8. The Crab Nebula's progenitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nomoto, K.; Sugimoto, D.; Sparks, W. M.; Fesen, R. A.; Gull, T. R.; Miyaji, S.

    1982-01-01

    The initial mass of the Crab Nebula's progenitor star is estimated by comparing the observed nebular chemical abundances with detailed evolutionary calculations for 2.4- and 2.6-solar-mass helium cores of stars with masses of 8 to 10 solar masses. The results indicate that the mass of the Crab's progenitor was between the upper limit of about 8 solar masses for carbon deflagration and the lower limit of about 9.5 solar masses set by the dredge-up of the helium layer before the development of the helium-burning convective region. A scenario is outlined for the evolution of the progenitor star. It is suggested that the Crab Nebula was probably the product of an electron-capture supernova.

  9. Trifid reflection nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Lynds, B.T.; Oneil, E.J. Jr.

    1986-11-01

    CCD frames of reflected starlight in the blue continuum, 4693 A, associated with the Trifid emission nebulae have been used to deduce the optical depth, albedo, and phase function of the dust grains. The northern component of the Trifid, centered on the supergiant HD 164514, apparently has grains of higher albedo than those associated with the southern O star HD 164492A. IRAS data add further arguments to the assumption that the northern reflection nebula is illuminated by the supergiant, and that the dust grains surrounding the O star have a higher grain temperature. The entire complex is probably part of the Sgr OB I association and the short lifetime of the association puts constraints on the manner in which the properties of the grains can be modified by associated young stars. 26 references.

  10. The Trifid reflection nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynds, Beverly T.; Oneil, Earl J., Jr.

    1986-11-01

    CCD frames of reflected starlight in the blue continuum, λ 4693, associated with the Trifid emission nebulae have been used to deduce the optical depth, albedo, and phase function of the dust grains. The northern component of the Trifid, centered on the supergiant HD 164514, apparently has grains of higher albedo than those associated with the southern O star HD 164492A. IRAS data add further arguments to the assumption that the northern reflection nebula is illuminated by the supergiant and that the dust grains surrounding the O star have a higher grain temperature. The entire complex is probably part of the Sgr OB I association and the short lifetime of the association puts constraints on the manner in which the properties of the grains can be modified by associated young stars.

  11. The Cat's Eye Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen, NGC 6543, nicknamed the 'Cat's Eye Nebula.' Hubble reveals surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas. Estimated to be 1,000 years old, the nebula is a visual 'fossil record' of the dynamics and late evolution of a dying star. A preliminary interpretation suggests that the star might be a double-star system. The suspected companion star also might be responsible for a pair of high-speed jets of gas that lie at right angles to this equatorial ring. If the companion were pulling in material from a neighboring star, jets escaping along the companion's rotation axis could be produced. These jets would explain several puzzling features along the periphery of the gas lobes. Like a stream of water hitting a sand pile, the jets compress gas ahead of them, creating the 'curlicue' features and bright arcs near the outer edge of the lobes. The twin jets are now pointing in different directions than these features. This suggests the jets are wobbling, or precessing, and turning on and off episodically. This color picture, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2, is a composite of three images taken at different wavelengths. (red, hydrogen-alpha; blue, neutral oxygen, 6300 angstroms; green, ionized nitrogen, 6584 angstroms). The image was taken on September 18, 1994. NGC 6543 is 3,000 light- years away in the northern constellation Draco. The term planetary nebula is a misnomer; dying stars create these cocoons when they lose outer layers of gas. The process has nothing to do with planet formation, which is predicted to happen early in a star's life.

  12. Helix unfolding in unsolvated peptides.

    PubMed

    Kinnear, B S; Hartings, M R; Jarrold, M F

    2001-06-20

    The conformations of unsolvated Ac-K(AGG)(5)+H(+) and Ac-(AGG)(5)K+H(+) peptides (Ac = acetyl, A = alanine, G = glycine, and K = lysine) have been examined by ion mobility measurements over a wide temperature range (150-410 K). The Ac-K(AGG)(5)+H(+) peptide remains a globule (a compact, roughly spherical structure) over the entire temperature range, while both an alpha-helix and a globule are found for Ac-(AGG)(5)K+H(+) at low temperature. As the temperature is raised the alpha-helix unfolds. Rate constants for loss of the helix (on a millisecond time scale) have been determined as a function of temperature and yield an Arrhenius activation energy and preexponential factor of 38.2 +/- 1.0 kJ mol(-1) and 6.5 +/- 3.7 x 10(9) s(-1), respectively. The alpha-helix apparently does not unfold directly into the globule, but first converts into a long-lived intermediate which survives to a significantly higher temperature before converting. According to molecular dynamics simulations, there is a partially untwisted helical conformation that has both a low energy and a well-defined geometry. This special structure lies between the helix and globule and may be the long-lived intermediate. PMID:11403597

  13. THE 'SPIROGRAPH' NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    THE 'SPIROGRAPH' NEBULA Glowing like a multi-faceted jewel, the planetary nebula IC 418 lies about 2,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Lepus. This photograph is one of the latest from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. A planetary nebula represents the final stage in the evolution of a star similar to our Sun. The star at the center of IC 418 was a red giant a few thousand years ago, but then ejected its outer layers into space to form the nebula, which has now expanded to a diameter of about 0.1 light-year. The stellar remnant at the center is the hot core of the red giant, from which ultraviolet radiation floods out into the surrounding gas, causing it to fluoresce. Over the next several thousand years, the nebula will gradually disperse into space, and then the star will cool and fade away for billions of years as a white dwarf. Our own Sun is expected to undergo a similar fate, but fortunately this will not occur until some 5 billion years from now. The Hubble image of IC 418 is shown in a false-color representation, based on Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 exposures taken in February and September, 1999 through filters that isolate light from various chemical elements. Red shows emission from ionized nitrogen (the coolest gas in the nebula, located furthest from the hot nucleus), green shows emission from hydrogen, and blue traces the emission from ionized oxygen (the hottest gas, closest to the central star). The remarkable textures seen in the nebula are newly revealed by the Hubble telescope, and their origin is still uncertain. Credit: NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: Dr. Raghvendra Sahai (JPL) and Dr. Arsen R. Hajian (USNO). EDITOR'S NOTE: For additional information, please contact Dr. Raghvendra Sahai, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, (phone) 818-354-0452, (fax) 818-393-9088, (e-mail) sahai@bb8.jpl

  14. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Smith, L.M.; Tong, X.E.

    1995-03-28

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis. 4 figures.

  15. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Renfeng; Smith, Lloyd M.; Tong, Xinchun E.

    1995-01-01

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis.

  16. Revisiting the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Orion the Hunter is perhaps the best-known constellation in the sky, well placed in the winter for observers in both the northern and southern hemispheres, and instantly recognisable. Just below Orion's belt (three distinctive stars in a row), the hilt of his sword holds a great jewel in the sky, the beautiful Orion Nebula. Bright enough to be seen with the naked eye, the nebula, also known as Messier 42, is a wide complex of gas and dust, illuminated by several massive and hot stars at its core, the famous Trapezium stars. For astronomers, Orion is surely one of the most important constellations, as it contains one of the nearest and most active stellar nurseries in the Milky Way, the galaxy in which we live. Here tens of thousands of new stars have formed within the past ten million years or so - a very short span of time in astronomical terms. For comparison: our own Sun is now 4,600 million years old and has not yet reached half-age. Reduced to a human time-scale, star formation in Orion would have been going on for just one month as compared to the Sun's 40 years. In fact, located at a distance of 1500 light years, the Orion Nebula plays such an important role in astrophysics that it can be argued that our understanding of star formation is for a large part based on the Orion Nebula. It is thus no surprise that the Orion Nebula is one of the most studied objects in the night sky (see for example the various related ESO Press Photos and Releases: ESO Press Photo 03a/98, ESO Press Photos 03a-d/01, ESO Press Photos 12a-e/01, ESO Press Release 14/01,...). The richness of the stellar cluster inside the Orion Nebula makes it an ideal, and unique, target for high resolution and wide-field imaging. Following some pioneering work made a few years ago, an international team of astronomers [1], led by Massimo Robberto (European Space Agency and Space Telescope Science Institute), used the Wide Field Imager (WFI), a 67-million pixel digital camera that is installed at the

  17. Hubble's Variable Nebula (NGC 2261)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A reflection nebula in the constellation Monoceros, position RA 06 h 39.2 m, dec. +08° 44'. It is small (2' by 1') but of quite high surface brightness. The nebula's average magnitude is 10, but, as Edwin Hubble discovered in 1916, it varies in brightness, mirroring the variability of its illuminating star, R Monocerotis....

  18. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  19. Spectrometry of nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, A.

    2011-04-01

    Nebular emission lines are easy to observe, and their spectrum contains a lot of information. We explain the mechanisms of production of the emissions, and the relation between the intensity of the recombination and forbidden lines, and the physical parameters of the objects. A gallery of emission lines spectra is presented, and a rough analysis will clarify their differences. The case of Planetary Nebulae will be developed, in order to determine the extinction constant, the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature), the chemical abundances, and also the properties of the central star (temperature, mass, stellar wind velocity, age).

  20. Rotten Egg Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Violent gas collisions that produced supersonic shock fronts in a dying star are seen in a new, detailed image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The picture, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Stars like our Sun will eventually die and expel most of their material outward into shells of gas and dust. These shells eventually form some of the most beautiful objects in the universe, called planetary nebulae.

    'This new image gives us a rare view of the early death throes of stars like our Sun. For the first time, we can see phenomena leading to the formation of planetary nebulae. Until now, this had only been predicted by theory, but had never been seen directly,' said Dr. Raghvendra Sahai, research scientist and member of the science team at JPL for the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2.

    The object is sometimes called the Rotten Egg Nebula, because it contains a lot of sulphur, which would produce an awful odor if one could smell in space. The object is also known as the Calabash Nebula or by the technical name OH231.8+4.2.

    The densest parts of the nebula are composed of material ejected recently by the central star and accelerated in opposite directions. This material, shown as yellow in the image, is zooming away at speeds up to one and a half million kilometers per hour (one million miles per hour). Most of the star's original mass is now contained in these bipolar gas structures.

    A team of Spanish and American astronomers used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study how the gas stream rams into the surrounding material, shown in blue. They believe that such interactions dominate the formation process in planetary nebulae. Due to the high speed of the gas, shock-fronts are formed on impact and heat the surrounding gas. Although computer calculations have predicted the existence and

  1. Ghost Head Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth.

    The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas.

    NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000.

    The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas.

    In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center

  2. Infrared nebula in the Chamaeleon T association

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.D.; Henize, K.G.

    1983-11-01

    Data are tabulated for seven nebulae in the Chamaeleon T association. Three, which are large and clearly related to illuminating stars, appear to be typical reflection nebulae. Three are small wisps attached to stars and are probably cometary-type reflection nebulae. The remaining nebula is a triangular wisp having an unusually red spectral energy distribution and showing no illuminating star on visual wavelength photographs. The western tip of this nebula coincides closely with the position of a recently reported infrared source. The nebula is probably one lobe of a bipolar nebula.

  3. N44C nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Resembling the hair in Botticelli's famous portrait of the birth of Venus, an image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has captured softly glowing filaments streaming from hot young stars in a nearby nebula.

    The image, presented by the Hubble Heritage Project, was taken in 1996 by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The image is available online at

    http://heritage.stsci.edu , http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/12 orhttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc .

    On the top right of the image is a source of its artistic likeness, a network of nebulous filaments surrounding the Wolf-Rayet star. This type of rare star is characterized by an exceptionally vigorous 'wind' of charged particles. The shock of the wind colliding with the surrounding gas causes the gas to glow.

    The Wolf-Rayet star is part of N44C, a nebula of glowing hydrogen gas surrounding young stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Visible from the Southern Hemisphere, the Large Magellanic Cloud is a small companion galaxy to the Milky Way.

    What makes N44C peculiar is the temperature of the star that illuminates it. The most massive stars -- those that are 10 to 50 times more massive than the Sun -- have maximum temperatures of 30,000 to 50,000 degrees Celsius (54,000 to 90,000 degrees Fahrenheit). The temperature of this star is about 75,000 degrees Celsius (135,000 degrees Fahrenheit). This unusually high temperature may be due to a neutron star or black hole that occasionally produces X-rays but is now inactive.

    N44C is part of a larger complex that includes young, hot, massive stars, nebulae, and a 'superbubble' blown out by multiple supernova explosions. Part of the superbubble is seen in red at the very bottom left of the Hubble image.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard

  4. Planetary nebulae. V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseking, F.

    1984-01-01

    The characterization of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPN) using observations of their shells (SPN), is discussed. The observability, from earth and space, of the emission spectrum of a typical CSPN (represented by a 50,000-K blackbody) at a distance of several kpc is illustrated graphically. It is shown that the most important and intense portion of this spectrum, the Lyman quanta below 912 A, is absorbed by the interstellar medium, and specifically by the SPN itself. The method developed by Zanstra in 1927 to estimate the Lyman emission of the CSPN from the Balmer emission (or the optical He-recombination spectrum) of the SPN is explained. Recent satellite observations in the 100-300-nm range have confirmed the accuracy of the H and/or He Zanstra temperature as an estimate of CSPN effective temperature.

  5. The Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's new Spitzer Space Telescope, formerly known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, has captured in stunning detail the spidery filaments and newborn stars of the Tarantula Nebula, a rich star-forming region also known as 30 Doradus. This cloud of glowing dust and gas is located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the nearest galaxy to our own Milky Way, and is visible primarily from the Southern Hemisphere. This image of an interstellar cauldron provides a snapshot of the complex physical processes and chemistry that govern the birth - and death - of stars.

    At the heart of the nebula is a compact cluster of stars, known as R136, which contains very massive and young stars. The brightest of these blue supergiant stars are up to 100 times more massive than the Sun, and are at least 100,000 times more luminous. These stars will live fast and die young, at least by astronomical standards, exhausting their nuclear fuel in a few million years.

    The Spitzer Space Telescope image was obtained with an infrared array camera that is sensitive to invisible infrared light at wavelengths that are about ten times longer than visible light. In this four-color composite, emission at 3.6 microns is depicted in blue, 4.5 microns in green, 5.8 microns in orange, and 8.0 microns in red. The image covers a region that is three-quarters the size of the full moon.

    The Spitzer observations penetrate the dust clouds throughout the Tarantula to reveal previously hidden sites of star formation. Within the luminescent nebula, many holes are also apparent. These voids are produced by highly energetic winds originating from the massive stars in the central star cluster. The structures at the edges of these voids are particularly interesting. Dense pillars of gas and dust, sculpted by the stellar radiation, denote the birthplace of future generations of stars.

    The Spitzer image provides information about the composition of the material at the edges of the voids. The surface layers

  6. The Great Crab Nebula Superflare

    NASA Video Gallery

    There are strange goings-on in the Crab Nebula. On April 12, 2011, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected the most powerful in a series of gamma-ray flares occurring somewhere within the s...

  7. Video Zoom into Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video opens with a backyard view of the nighttime sky centered on the constellation Cygnus, the Swan. We zoom into a vast donut-shaped feature called the Veil Nebula. It is the tattered expand...

  8. HUBBLE'S PLANETARY NEBULA GALLERY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [Top left] - IC 3568 lies in the constellation Camelopardalis at a distance of about 9,000 light-years, and has a diameter of about 0.4 light-years (or about 800 times the diameter of our solar system). It is an example of a round planetary nebula. Note the bright inner shell and fainter, smooth, circular outer envelope. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Top center] - NGC 6826's eye-like appearance is marred by two sets of blood-red 'fliers' that lie horizontally across the image. The surrounding faint green 'white' of the eye is believed to be gas that made up almost half of the star's mass for most of its life. The hot remnant star (in the center of the green oval) drives a fast wind into older material, forming a hot interior bubble which pushes the older gas ahead of it to form a bright rim. (The star is one of the brightest stars in any planetary.) NGC 6826 is 2,200 light- years away in the constellation Cygnus. The Hubble telescope observation was taken Jan. 27, 1996 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Credits: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri Observatory, Italy) and NASA [Top right ] - NGC 3918 is in the constellation Centaurus and is about 3,000 light-years from us. Its diameter is about 0.3 light-year. It shows a roughly spherical outer envelope but an elongated inner balloon inflated by a fast wind from the hot central star, which is starting to break out of the spherical envelope at the top and bottom of the image. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Bottom left] - Hubble 5 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or bipolar (two-lobed) nebula. The heat generated by fast winds causes

  9. The Reflection Nebula in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Just weeks after NASA astronauts repaired the Hubble Space Telescope in December 1999, the Hubble Heritage Project snapped this picture of NGC 1999, a nebula in the constellation Orion. The Heritage astronomers, in collaboration with scientists in Texas and Ireland, used Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) to obtain the color image. NGC 1999 is an example of a reflection nebula. Like fog around a street lamp, a reflection nebula shines only because the light from an imbedded source illuminates its dust; the nebula does not emit any visible light of its own. NGC 1999 lies close to the famous Orion Nebula, about 1,500 light-years from Earth, in a region of our Milky Way galaxy where new stars are being formed actively. NGC 1999 was discovered some two centuries ago by Sir William Herschel and his sister Caroline, and was cataloged later in the 19th century as object 1999 in the New General Catalogue. This data was collected in January 2000 by the Hubble Heritage Team with the collaboration of star-formation experts C. Robert O'Dell (Rice University), Thomas P. Ray (Dublin Institute for Advanced Study), and David Corcoran (University of Limerick).

  10. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  11. The Formation of a Planetary Nebula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz, Amos

    1991-01-01

    Proposes a scenario to describe the formation of a planetary nebula, a cloud of gas surrounding a very hot compact star. Describes the nature of a planetary nebula, the number observed to date in the Milky Way Galaxy, and the results of research on a specific nebula. (MDH)

  12. The Trifid Nebula: Stellar Sibling Rivalry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A zoom into the Trifid Nebula starts with ground-based observations and ends with a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. Another HST image shows star formation in the nebula and the video concludes with a ground-based image of the Trifid Nebula.

  13. The Eagle Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    These eerie, dark pillar-like structures are columns of cool interstellar hydrogen gas and dust that are also incubators for new stars. The pillars protrude from the interior wall of a dark molecular cloud like stalagmites from the floor of a cavern. They are part of the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' objects that aren't comets), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. Ultraviolet light is responsible for illuminating the convoluted surfaces of the columns and the ghostly streamers of gas boiling away from their surfaces, producing the dramatic visual effects that highlight the three dimensional nature of the clouds. The tallest pillar (left) is about a light-year long from base to tip. As the pillars themselves are slowly eroded away by the ultraviolet light, small globules of even denser gas buried within the pillars are uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs.' EGGs is an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules,' but it is also a word that describes what these objects are. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars, stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually, the stars themselves emerge from the EGGs as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly- ionized oxygen atoms.

  14. Convective solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirellesfilho, C.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.

    1994-01-01

    Analyzing turbulent flows with rotation, Dubrulle and Valdettaro have concluded that some new effects come into play and may modify the standard picture we have concerning turbulence. In that respect the value of the Rossby number is of crucial importance since it will determine the transition between regimes where rotation is or is not important. With rotation there will be a tendency to constrain the motion to the plane perpendicular to the rotation axis and as a consequence the horizontal scale will increase as compared to the longitudinal one, which means that the turnover time in this direction will increase. The net effect is that the energy cascade down process is hindered by rotation. As a matter of fact, when rotation is present one observes two cascades: an enstrophy (vorticity) cascade from large scales to small scales; and an inverse energy cascade from small scales to large scales. Since the first process is not efficient on transporting energy to the dissipation range, what we see is energy storage in the large structures at the expense of the small structures. This kind of behavior has been confirmed experimentally. For a very large gamma we obtain, in the inertial range, a spectrum of k(exp -3) instead of the usual Kilmogorov's k(exp -5/3) spectrum. In reality, when rotation is dominant, energy gets stored in inertial waves that propagate it essentially in the longitudinal direction. In that case, we can no longer assign just one viscosity to the fluid and, what is most important, the concept of viscosity loses its meaning since we no longer have local transport of energy. Such results, however, were derived considering a hot disk, in which opacity is mainly given by electron scattering. In the present work we have applied the formulation developed in the previous work for the description of the viscous-stage solar nebula.

  15. Molecular Hydrogen in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Angela K.; Baldridge, Sean; Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) have long played the role of laboratories for investigating atomic, molecular, dust and plasma physics, which have applications to diverse other astrophysical environments. In this presentation we will discuss clumpy structures within planetary nebulae that are the hosts to, and protectors of molecular gas in an otherwise forbidding ionized zone. We will present new observations of the molecular hydrogen emission from several PNe and discuss their implications for the formation, evolution and survival/demise of such molecular globules. The science behind dust and molecule formation and survival that apply to many other astronomical objects and places.

  16. Messier's nebulae and star clusters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. G.

    Charles Messier's Catalogue of nebulae and star clusters, published in 1784, marked the start of a new era of deep sky astronomy. Today, this tradition of observing galaxies and clusters is kept alive by serious amateur astronomers who study the objects of the deep sky. Nearly all the objects are visible in a small telescope. The author has revised his definitive version of Messier's Catalogue. His own observations and drawings, together with maps and diagrams, make this a valuable introduction to deep sky observing. Historical and astrophysical notes bring the science of these nebulae right up to date.

  17. Lightweight S-band helix antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cribb, H. E.

    1970-01-01

    Pyrotechnically operated S-band helical antenna is developed in which helix is deployed subsequent to antenna placement. Antenna is small, lightweight, and novel in that deployable helix is used in place of fixed dish or horn. It can be designed to cover L- and X-band frequencies.

  18. Multiwalled ice helixes and ice nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaeil; Wang, Jun; Zeng, X. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report six phases of high-density nano-ice predicted to form within carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high pressure. High-density nano-ice self-assembled within smaller-diameter CNT (17,0) exhibits a double-walled helical structure where the outer wall consists of four double-stranded helixes, which resemble a DNA double helix, and the inner wall is a quadruple-stranded helix. Four other double-walled nano-ices, self-assembled respectively in two larger-diameter CNTs (20,0 and 22,0), display tubular structure. Within CNT (24,0), the confined water can freeze spontaneously into a triple-walled helical nano-ice where the outer wall is an 18-stranded helix and the middle and inner walls are hextuple-stranded helixes. PMID:17170136

  19. Imaging Polarimetry of Protoplanetary and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarrott, S. M.; Scarrott, R. M. J.

    1995-11-01

    Imaging polarimetry maps are presented for a sample of bipolar proto-planetary and planetary nebulae (Frosty Leo, Roberts 22, Hen 401, MZ 3, NGC 2346, IC 4406 and J 320). Each of the highly polarized proto-planetary nebulae possesses a `polarization disc' which has been observed more frequently in nebulae associated with star forming regions. In order to account for the observed high levels of polarization in protoplanetary nebulae we consider the effects of a thin coating of a volatile material on refractory grains with an original size distribution typical of the interstellar medium. The planetary nebulae are seen in a mixture of reflected and emission light and their polarization patterns suggest that, in many instances, they are emission nebulae surrounded by an extensive envelope of reflection nebulosity. The origin of the skew-symmetry and ansae in the isophotal maps of proto-planetary and planetary nebulae are discussed in terms of binary stars and magnetic fields.

  20. Helix-packing motifs in membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Walters, R F S; DeGrado, W F

    2006-09-12

    The fold of a helical membrane protein is largely determined by interactions between membrane-imbedded helices. To elucidate recurring helix-helix interaction motifs, we dissected the crystallographic structures of membrane proteins into a library of interacting helical pairs. The pairs were clustered according to their three-dimensional similarity (rmsd helix-helix packing. Thus, the universe of common transmembrane helix-pairing motifs is relatively simple. The largest cluster, which comprises 29% of the library members, consists of an antiparallel motif with left-handed packing angles, and it is frequently stabilized by packing of small side chains occurring every seven residues in the sequence. Right-handed parallel and antiparallel structures show a similar tendency to segregate small residues to the helix-helix interface but spaced at four-residue intervals. Position-specific sequence propensities were derived for the most populated motifs. These structural and sequential motifs should be quite useful for the design and structural prediction of membrane proteins.

  1. Transmembrane helix: simple or complex.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wing-Cheong; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Schneider, Georg; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2012-07-01

    Transmembrane helical segments (TMs) can be classified into two groups of so-called 'simple' and 'complex' TMs. Whereas the first group represents mere hydrophobic anchors with an overrepresentation of aliphatic hydrophobic residues that are likely attributed to convergent evolution in many cases, the complex ones embody ancestral information and tend to have structural and functional roles beyond just membrane immersion. Hence, the sequence homology concept is not applicable on simple TMs. In practice, these simple TMs can attract statistically significant but evolutionarily unrelated hits during similarity searches (whether through BLAST- or HMM-based approaches). This is especially problematic for membrane proteins that contain both globular segments and TMs. As such, we have developed the transmembrane helix: simple or complex (TMSOC) webserver for the identification of simple and complex TMs. By masking simple TM segments in seed sequences prior to sequence similarity searches, the false-discovery rate decreases without sacrificing sensitivity. Therefore, TMSOC is a novel and necessary sequence analytic tool for both the experimentalists and the computational biology community working on membrane proteins. It is freely accessible at http://tmsoc.bii.a-star.edu.sg or available for download.

  2. Helix promotion in polypeptides by polyols.

    PubMed

    Bello, J

    1993-03-01

    The helix content of [L-Lys(Me3)]n.ClO4 and [L-Lys(Me3)50,L-Ala50]n.ClO4 in water is markedly increased by the presence of sucrose and glycerol. For [L-Lys(Me3)]n.ClO4 the ellipticity at 222 nm changes from +2 x 10(3) deg cm2 dmole-1 in water to -44 x 10(3) in 50% glycerol. Sucrose does not promote helix formation in melittin at pH 7.2, but glycerol does. At pH 5.5 sucrose and, more so, glycerol, induce helix in melittin. Glycerol induces some helix in methylated melittin, but less than in melittin. The results are discussed in relation to excluded volume effects, delta G of transfer of peptide and hydrophobic groups from water to mixed solvents, electrostatic effects, and preferential hydration.

  3. The planetary nebula NGC 6826

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    Monochromatic photographs have established the NGC 6826 nebula as the third member of a group of very rare triple-shell planetaries (Feibelman, 1971, 1974). Kaler (1974) also characterized NGC 6826 as a giant halo planetary. Numerous errors and confusing statements regarding its size, structure and stratification are discussed, and the correct dimensions of the nebula are reported: the inner ring is 12.7 arcsec x 8.7 arcsec (Feibelman, 1971); the outer ring is 27 arcsec x 24 arcsec according to Curtis (1918), 25.7 arcsec x 24.4 arcsec according to Feibelman (1971), and 36 arcsec x 36 arcsec according to Coleman et al. (1975). The halo measurements range in diameter from 110 arcsec (Duncan, 1937) to 130 arcsec (Kaler, 1974) to 142 arcsec (Millikan, 1974). Values for the distance of NGC 6826 range from 0.75-1.16 kpc (Cahn and Kaler, 1971) to 2.265 kpc (Cudworth, 1974).

  4. The western Veil nebula (Image)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenny, M.

    2009-12-01

    The western Veil nebula in Cygnus. 15-part mosaic by Mike Glenny, Gloucestershire, taken over several months mostly in the autumn of 2008. 200mm LX90/f10 autoguided, Meade UHC filter, 0.3xFR/FF, Canon 20Da DSLR. Exposures each typically 10x360 secs at ISO1600, processed in Registax4, PixInsight (for flat field correction) & Photoshop CS.

  5. The Orion nebula star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Photography through filters which suppress nebular light reveal a clustering of faint red stars centered on the Trapezium, this evidences a distinct cluster within the larger OB1 association. Stars within about 20 ft of trapezium comprise the Orion Nebula star cluster are considered. Topics discussed re: (1) extinction by dust grains; (2) photometric peculiarities; (3) spectroscopic peculiarities; (4) young variables; (5) the distribution and motion of gas within the cluster.

  6. Birth and early evolution of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, M.

    2000-06-01

    Birth and early evolution of planetary nebulae is described. The study of the young planetary nebula Hen 1357 (Stingray Nebula) with HST is discussed. The observed characteristics of few interesting PPNe and PNe are described. The presence of multiple arcs or rings, knots, jets, collimated and bipolar out flows and disks shows the complex nature of mass loss process during the AGB and post-AGB phases of evolution.

  7. Lyman Alpha Photochemistry in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the project "Lyman Alpha Photochemistry in the Solar Nebula" was to model photochemistry in the primitive solar nebula and the early solar systems. As part of the modeling, it was necessary to model the composition of the gas and dust accreted by the solar nebula. This final report contains a list of publications where the results of this project have been published.

  8. A Helix Replacement Mechanism Directs Metavinculin Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Yogesha, S.D.; Izard, Tina

    2010-10-11

    Cells require distinct adhesion complexes to form contacts with their neighbors or the extracellular matrix, and vinculin links these complexes to the actin cytoskeleton. Metavinculin, an isoform of vinculin that harbors a unique 68-residue insert in its tail domain, has distinct actin bundling and oligomerization properties and plays essential roles in muscle development and homeostasis. Moreover, patients with sporadic or familial mutations in the metavinculin-specific insert invariably develop fatal cardiomyopathies. Here we report the high resolution crystal structure of the metavinculin tail domain, as well as the crystal structures of full-length human native metavinculin (1,134 residues) and of the full-length cardiomyopathy-associated {Delta}Leu954 metavinculin deletion mutant. These structures reveal that an {alpha}-helix (H1{prime}) and extended coil of the metavinculin insert replace {alpha}-helix H1 and its preceding extended coil found in the N-terminal region of the vinculin tail domain to form a new five-helix bundle tail domain. Further, biochemical analyses demonstrate that this helix replacement directs the distinct actin bundling and oligomerization properties of metavinculin. Finally, the cardiomyopathy associated {Delta}Leu954 and Arg975Trp metavinculin mutants reside on the replaced extended coil and the H1{prime} {alpha}-helix, respectively. Thus, a helix replacement mechanism directs metavinculin's unique functions.

  9. Stars in the Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the most active starburst region in the local universe lies a cluster of brilliant, massive stars, known to astronomers as Hodge 301. Hodge 301, seen in the lower right hand corner of this image, lives inside the Tarantula Nebula in our galactic neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This star cluster is not the brightest, or youngest, or most populous star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula, that honor goes to the spectacular R136. In fact, Hodge 301 is almost 10 times older than the young cluster R136. But age has its advantages; many of the stars in Hodge 301 are so old that they have exploded as supernovae. These exploded stars are blasting material out into the surrounding region at speeds of almost 200 miles per second. This high speed ejecta are plowing into the surrounding Tarantula Nebula, shocking and compressing the gas into a multitude of sheets and filaments, seen in the upper left portion of the picture. Hodge 301 contains three red supergiants - stars that are close to the end of their evolution and are about to go supernova, exploding and sending more shocks into the Tarantula. Also present near the center of the image are small, dense gas globules and dust columns where new stars are being formed today, as part of the overall ongoing star formation throughout the Tarantula region.

  10. Multipolar structures in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, S.

    2002-12-01

    In addition to the main nebular shells, planetary nebulae (PNe) are now known to possess secondary shell structures called crowns and haloes. These structures can be satisfactorily explained by coupled dynamical and stellar evolutionary models based on the interacting winds scenario. By introducing time-variability in the fast wind, these models also have some success in accounting for other microsctructures such as jets and FLIERs. A more surprising development has been the discovery of multipolar structures in PNe. A number of bipolar nebulae have been found to have 2 or 3 bipolar axes, sometimes superimposed with multiple 2-dimensional rings and concentric circular arcs. The existence of these features suggests that the fast wind may be changing in direction in addition to varying in magnitude. In this paper, we will summarize the current observations of multipolar nebulae and discuss their possible origins. This work is supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and by a Killam Fellowship from the Canada Council for the Arts.

  11. Abundances of Planetary Nebula NGC 5315

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Beintema, D. A.; Koorneef, J.; Salas, J. Bernard; Feibelman, W. A.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISO and IUE spectra of the elliptical nebula NGC 5315 is presented. These spectra axe combined with the spectra in the visual wavelength region to obtain a complete, extinction corrected, spectrum. The chemical composition of the nebulae is then calculated and compared to previous determinations. The HST Nicmos observations of the nebula in 3 emission lines are also presented. These observations are used to determine the helium abundance as a function of position in the nebula. A discussion is given of possible evolutionary effects.

  12. Owl Nebula (M97, NGC 3587)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A planetary nebula in the constellation Ursa Major, position RA 11 h 14.8 m, dec. +55° 01'. The Owl is 3' across and gets its name from two adjacent dark patches that have the appearance of large eyes. The nebula is eleventh magnitude, and the central star is a faint magnitude 16....

  13. Trifid Nebula (M20, NGC 6514)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    An emission nebula in the constellation Sagittarius, position RA 18 h 02.6 m, dec. -23° 02'. It is of ninth magnitude, with quite a high surface brightness, and measures 29' by 27'. It surrounds the multiple star HN 40, the light of whose brightest members energize the nebula. The Trifid gets its name from dark lanes that trisect it....

  14. Using Planetary Nebulae to Teach Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, Karen B.

    2011-05-01

    We have developed an interactive website, "Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra," (www.williams.edu/Astronomy/research/PN/nebulae/) that contains high-quality optical-to-near-infrared spectra, atlas information, and bibliographic references for more than 160 planetary nebulae that we have observed in the Milky Way Galaxy. To make the material more accessible to students, I have created three undergraduate-level exercises that explore physics-related aspects of planetary nebulae. "Emission Lines and Central Star Temperature” uses the presence or absence of emission lines from species with different ionization potentials to rank the temperatures of the exciting stars in a selection of nebulae. "Interstellar Reddening” uses the observed Balmer decrement in a sample of planetary nebulae at different Galactic latitudes to infer the distribution of interstellar dust in the Milky Way. Finally, "Determining the Gas Density in Planetary Nebulae,” which I will focus on here, uses the observed intensity ratio of the 6717 Å and 6731 Å emission lines from singly ionized sulfur to determine the electron density in the nebular gas. These exercises demonstrate that planetary nebula spectra are useful real-world examples illustrating a variety of physical principles, including the behavior of blackbodies, wavelength-dependent particle scattering, recombination-line ratios, atomic physics, and statistical mechanics.

  15. Nonlinear analysis of helix traveling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Zaidman, E.G.; Mankofsky, A.; Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A.

    1995-10-01

    A time-dependent nonlinear formulation of the interaction in the helix traveling wave tube is presented for a configuration in which an electron beam propagates through a sheath helix surrounded by a conducting wall. In order to describe both the variation in the wave dispersion and in the transverse inhomogeneity of the electromagnetic field with wave number, the field is represented as a superposition of waves in a vacuum sheath helix. An overall explicit sinusoidal variation of the form exp({ital ikz}{minus}{ital i}{omega}{ital t}) is assumed (where {omega} denotes the angular frequency corresponding to the wave number {ital k} in the vacuum sheath helix), and the polarization and radial variation of each wave is determined by the boundary conditions in a vacuum sheath helix. Thus, while the field is three-dimensional in nature, it is azimuthally symmetric. The propagation of each wave {ital in} {ital vacuo} as well as the interaction of each wave with the electron beam is included by allowing the amplitudes of the waves to vary in {ital z} and {ital t}. A dynamical equation for the field amplitudes is derived analogously to Poynting`s equation, and solved in conjunction with the three-dimensional Lorentz force equations for an ensemble of electrons. Numerical examples are presented corresponding to both single- and multiwave interactions. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  16. A model of Jupiter's sulfur nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model of Jupiter's S II emission nebula is developed on the basis of a complete treatment of electron-impact excitation of sulfur ions. Forbidden line emission from S II ions excited by electron collisions in the Jovian nebula is analyzed, and existing observations are interpreted using a simple model of an S II nebula which is uniform in depth. The results show that the depth of the nebula is 300,000 to 600,000 km, the electron density is about 3160 per cu cm, the electron temperature is approximately 25,000 K, and the S II concentration is roughly 79 ions per cu cm. It is noted that these plasma conditions are quite different from those reported for the same region on the basis of Pioneer 10 data, indicating that the S II nebula is a sporadic event. Io is suggested as the source of the sulfur.

  17. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Gruendl, Robert; Vaidya, Kaushar; White, Stephen M.; Petre, Rob; Chu, You-Hua

    2009-01-01

    The Carina Nebula is one of thc youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for approx.30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum. consistent with kT approx.130 eV blackbody radiation with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a, approx. 10(exp 6)-year-old neutron star housed in the Carina Nebula. Current star formation theory does not suggest that the progenitor of the neutron star and massive stars in the Carina Nebula, in particular (eta)Car, are coeval. This result demonstrates that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two major episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star would be responsible for remnants of high energy activity seen in multiple wavelengths.

  18. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Gruendl, Robert; Vaidya, Kaushar; White, Stephen M.; Strohmayer, Tod; Petre, Rob; Chu, You-Hua

    2009-04-01

    The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ~30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with kT ~ 128 eV blackbody radiation with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths indicates that it is a ~106 year old neutron star housed in the Carina Nebula. Current star formation theory does not suggest that the progenitors of the neutron star and massive stars in the Carina Nebula, in particular η Car, are coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two major episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for remnants of high-energy activity seen in multiple wavelengths.

  19. Epicyclic Twin-Helix Ionization Cooling Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson

    2011-04-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we earlier developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion. We now insert absorber plates with short energy-recovering units located next to them at the appropriate locations in the twin-helix channel. We first demonstrate conventional ionization cooling in such a system with the optics uncorrelated. We then adjust the correlated optics state and induce a parametric resonance to study ionization cooling under the resonant condition.

  20. Relativistic helix traveling wave tube amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A. )

    1992-07-01

    A relativistic field theory of a helix traveling wave tube (TWT) is described for the case in which a thin annular beam propagates through a sheath helix enclosed within a loss-free wall. The theory is applied to the study of a TWT with an intense relativistic electron beam. The analysis implicitly includes beam space-charge effects and is valid for arbitrary azimuthal mode number, and the coupled-wave Pierce theory is recovered in the [ital near]-[ital resonant] limit. The results indicate that impressive gains and efficiencies are possible in this regime. In addition, the interaction is relatively insensitive to the effects of a beam energy spread.

  1. Science on NIF Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Martinez, David; Pound, Marc; Heeter, Robert; Casner, Alexis; Villette, Bruno; Mancini, Roberto

    2014-10-01

    For over fifteen years astronomers at the University of Maryland and scientists at LLNL have investigated the origin and dynamics of the famous Pillars of the Eagle Nebula and similar parsec-scale structures at the boundaries of HII regions in molecular hydrogen clouds. Eagle Nebula is one of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Science programs, and has been awarded two days of NIF shots to study the cometary model of pillar formation. The NIF shots will feature a new long-duration x-ray source prototyped at the Omega EP laser, in which multiple hohlraums mimicking a cluster of stars are driven with UV light in series for 10 ns each to create a 30 ns output x-ray pulse. The drive generates deeply nonlinear hydrodynamics in the Eagle science package, which consists of a dense layered plastic and foam core embedded in lower-density background foam. The scaled Omega EP shots validated the multi-hohlraum concept, showing that earlier time hohlraums do not degrade later time hohlraums by preheat or by ejecting ablated plumes that deflect the later beams. The Omega EP shots illuminated three 2.8 mm long by 1.4 mm diameter Cu hohlraums with 4.3 kJ per hohlraum. At NIF each hohlraum will be 4 mm long by 3 mm in diameter and will be driven with 80-100 kJ. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. HUBBLE CAPTURES DYNAMICS OF CRAB NEBULA (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sequence of Hubble Space Telescope images of the remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion is giving astronomers a remarkable look at the dynamic relationship between the tiny Crab Pulsar and the vast nebula that it powers. This colorful photo shows a ground-based image of the entire Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion witnessed over 900 years ago. The nebula, which is 10 light-years across, is located 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. The green, yellow and red filaments concentrated toward the edges of the nebula are remnants of the star that were ejected into space by the explosion. At the center of the Crab Nebula lies the Crab Pulsar -- the collapsed core of the exploded star. The Crab Pulsar is a rapidly rotating neutron star -- an object only about six miles across, but containing more mass than our Sun. As it rotates at a rate of 30 times per second the Crab Pulsar's powerful magnetic field sweeps around, accelerating particles, and whipping them out into the nebula at speeds close to that of light. The blue glow in the inner part of the nebula -- light emitted by energetic electrons as they spiral through the Crab's magnetic field -- is powered by the Crab Pulsar. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  3. PULSAR WIND NEBULAE WITH THICK TOROIDAL STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P. E-mail: reynolds@ncsu.edu

    2011-10-10

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroidal structure are G106.6+2.9 and G76.9+1.0. Their structure contrasts with young pulsar nebulae like the Crab Nebula and 3C 38, which show a more chaotic, filamentary structure in the synchrotron emission. In both situations, a torus-jet structure is present where the pulsar wind passes through a termination shock, indicating the flow is initially toroidal. We suggest that the difference is due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that operates when the outer boundary of the nebula is accelerating into freely expanding supernova ejecta. The instability gives rise to mixing in the Crab and related objects, but is not present in the nebulae with thick toroidal regions.

  4. Stellar Evolution from AGB to Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun

    2008-10-01

    Planetary nebulae are formed by an interacting winds process where the remnant of the AGB wind is compressed and accelerated by a later-developed fast wind from the central star. One-dimensional dynamical models have successfully explained the multi-shell (bubble, shell, crown, haloes) structures and the kinematics of planetary nebulae. However, the origin of the diverse asymmetric morphology of planetary nebulae is still not understood. Recent observations in the visible, infrared, and the submillimeter have suggested that the AGB mass loss becomes aspherical in the very late stages, forming an expanding torus around the star. A fast, highly collimated wind then emerges in the polar directions and carves out a cavity in the AGB envelope to form a bipolar nebula. Newly discovered structures such as concentric arcs, 2-D rings, multiple lobes, and point-symmetric structures suggest that both the slow and fast winds may have temporal and directional variations, and precession can play a role in the shaping of planetary nebulae. In this paper, we review the latest observations of planetary nebulae and proto-planetary nebulae and discuss the various physical mechanisms (rotation, binary, magnetic field, etc) that could lead to the observed morphologies.

  5. Reconstruction and visualization of planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Magnor, Marcus; Kindlmann, Gordon; Hansen, Charles; Duric, Neb

    2005-01-01

    From our terrestrially confined viewpoint, the actual three-dimensional shape of distant astronomical objects is, in general, very challenging to determine. For one class of astronomical objects, however, spatial structure can be recovered from conventional 2D images alone. So-called planetary nebulae (PNe) exhibit pronounced symmetry characteristics that come about due to fundamental physical processes. Making use of this symmetry constraint, we present a technique to automatically recover the axisymmetric structure of many planetary nebulae from photographs. With GPU-based volume rendering driving a nonlinear optimization, we estimate the nebula's local emission density as a function of its radial and axial coordinates and we recover the orientation of the nebula relative to Earth. The optimization refines the nebula model and its orientation by minimizing the differences between the rendered image and the original astronomical image. The resulting model allows creating realistic 3D visualizations of these nebulae, for example, for planetarium shows and other educational purposes. In addition, the recovered spatial distribution of the emissive gas can help astrophysicists gain deeper insight into the formation processes of planetary nebulae.

  6. Reconstruction and visualization of planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Magnor, Marcus; Kindlmann, Gordon; Hansen, Charles; Duric, Neb

    2005-01-01

    From our terrestrially confined viewpoint, the actual three-dimensional shape of distant astronomical objects is, in general, very challenging to determine. For one class of astronomical objects, however, spatial structure can be recovered from conventional 2D images alone. So-called planetary nebulae (PNe) exhibit pronounced symmetry characteristics that come about due to fundamental physical processes. Making use of this symmetry constraint, we present a technique to automatically recover the axisymmetric structure of many planetary nebulae from photographs. With GPU-based volume rendering driving a nonlinear optimization, we estimate the nebula's local emission density as a function of its radial and axial coordinates and we recover the orientation of the nebula relative to Earth. The optimization refines the nebula model and its orientation by minimizing the differences between the rendered image and the original astronomical image. The resulting model allows creating realistic 3D visualizations of these nebulae, for example, for planetarium shows and other educational purposes. In addition, the recovered spatial distribution of the emissive gas can help astrophysicists gain deeper insight into the formation processes of planetary nebulae. PMID:16144246

  7. Processing NASA Earth Science Data on Nebula Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Aijun; Pham, Long; Kempler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three applications were successfully migrated to Nebula, including S4PM, AIRS L1/L2 algorithms, and Giovanni MAPSS. Nebula has some advantages compared with local machines (e.g. performance, cost, scalability, bundling, etc.). Nebula still faces some challenges (e.g. stability, object storage, networking, etc.). Migrating applications to Nebula is feasible but time consuming. Lessons learned from our Nebula experience will benefit future Cloud Computing efforts at GES DISC.

  8. THE ROTTEN EGG NEBULA A PLANETARY NEBULA IN THE MAKING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The object shown in these NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images is a remarkable example of a star going through death throes just as it dramatically transforms itself from a normal red giant star into a planetary nebula. This process happens so quickly that such objects are quite rare, even though astronomers believe that most stars like the Sun will eventually go through such a phase. This star, with the prosaic name of OH231.8+4.2, is seen in these infrared pictures blowing out gas and dust in two opposite directions. So much dust has been cast off and now surrounds the star that it cannot be seen directly, only its starlight that is reflected off the dust. The flow of gas is very fast, with a velocity up to 450,000 mph (700,000 km/h). With extreme clarity, these Hubble Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) images reveal that the fast-moving gas and dust are being collimated into several thin streamers (on the right) and a jet-like structure (on the left), which can be seen extending away from the centers of both pictures. On the right, wisps of material in jet-like streamers appear to strike some dense blobs of gas. This interaction must produce strong shock waves in the gas. The pictures represent two views of the object. The color image is a composite of four images taken with different NICMOS infrared filters on March 28, 1998. It shows that the physical properties of the material, both composition and temperature, vary significantly throughout the outflowing material. The black-and-white image was taken with one NICMOS infrared filter. That image is able to show more clearly the faint detail and structure in the nebula than can be achieved with the color composites. Observations by radio astronomers have found many unusual molecules in the gas around this star, including many containing sulfur, such as hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. These sulfur compounds are believed to be produced in the shock waves passing through the gas

  9. Nonlinear analysis of helix traveling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Zaidman, E.G.; Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A nonlinear formulation of the interaction in a helix traveling wave tube (TWT) is presented. The formulation is intended to treat a wide class of helix TWTs including both emission-gated and multi-tone operation. The essential feature of each of these configurations is that multiple waves must be included in the formulation. As a result, a fully time-dependent analysis is required. The numerical procedure for this in a helix TWT is complicated by the fact that the radial profile of the field varies with frequency. This contrasts, for example, with the case of a smooth bore waveguide in which the radial profile for each TE{sub ln} or TM{sub ln} mode is invariant in frequency. Because of this, a complete self-consistent particle-in-cell (PIC) formulation must be three-dimensional. In order to circumvent the computational expense of a 3D PIC formulation, the authors adopt an approach in which the electromagnetic field is represented as a superposition of azimuthally symmetric modes in a vacuum sheath helix. The specific electron distributions are chosen to model either a continuous beam for the multi-tone TWT and a pulsed beam for the emission-gated TWT. Numerical results of the simulation for examples of interest to an emission-gated TWT experiment at NRL will be presented.

  10. A Triple Helix-Loop-Helix/Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Cascade Controls Cell Elongation Downstream of Multiple Hormonal and Environmental Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ming-Yi; Fan, Min; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Environmental and endogenous signals, including light, temperature, brassinosteroid (BR), and gibberellin (GA), regulate cell elongation largely by influencing the expression of the paclobutrazol-resistant (PRE) family helix-loop-helix (HLH) factors, which promote cell elongation by interacting antagonistically with another HLH factor, IBH1. However, the molecular mechanism by which PREs and IBH1 regulate gene expression has remained unknown. Here, we show that IBH1 interacts with and inhibits a DNA binding basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, HBI1, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of HBI1 increased hypocotyl and petiole elongation, whereas dominant inactivation of HBI1 and its homologs caused a dwarf phenotype, indicating that HBI1 is a positive regulator of cell elongation. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that HBI1 directly bound to the promoters and activated two EXPANSIN genes encoding cell wall–loosening enzymes; HBI1’s DNA binding and transcriptional activities were inhibited by IBH1, but the inhibitory effects of IBH1 were abolished by PRE1. The results indicate that PREs activate the DNA binding bHLH factor HBI1 by sequestering its inhibitor IBH1. Altering each of the three factors affected plant sensitivities to BR, GA, temperature, and light. Our study demonstrates that PREs, IBH1, and HBI1 form a chain of antagonistic switches that regulates cell elongation downstream of multiple external and endogenous signals. PMID:23221598

  11. Search for continuous fluorescence in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.; Witt, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    Photometric and spectrophotometric observations have been made of the reflection nebulae NGC 1435, NGC 2068, NGC 7023, and IC 1287 in an attempt to detect continuous fluorescence by dust grains. Several effects of importance for observations of such faint objects are discussed, including instrumental light scattering, a photographic effect, and a time-delay effect which can occur if the illuminating star is a spectrum variable. It is found that continuous fluorescence by interstellar grains is not likely to exist and that it cannot account for more than 10% of the total surface brightness of these reflection nebulae. No evidence of diffuse interstellar features is found in the spectra of these nebulae.

  12. The size and shape of Gum's nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1971-01-01

    The ionizing light of the supernova which produced the Gum nebula is now fossilized in the still live, though failing, H II region. The main body of the nebula suggests a hollow center or shell form, with a characteristic radius of about half the distance to the outlying fragments. The edges of the main body patches are typically sharp and often bright. The structure of the Gum nebula appears to be dependent on the event of ionization and possibly on the details of heating. It is not now an unstructured ambient medium, as it may have been before the recent ionization. Several hypotheses are presented for a structured ambient medium.

  13. Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions studied by multicanonical algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Yuko; Hansmann, U.H.E.

    1995-07-13

    Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions in amino acid homo-oligomers are studied by the recently proposed multicanonical algorithms. Homo-oligomers of length 10 are considered for three characteristic amino acids, alanine (helix former), valine (helix indifferent), and glycine (helix breaker). For alanine other lengths (15 and 20) are also considered in order to examine the length dependence. From one multicanonical production run with completely random initial conformations, we have obtained the lowest-energy conformations and various thermodynamic quantities (average helicity, Zimm-Bragg s and {sigma} parameters, free energy differences between helix and coil states, etc.) as functions of temperature. The results confirm the fact that alanine is helix-forming, valine is helix-indifferent, and glycine is helix-breaking. 36 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. The Eagle Nebula on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Cooper, Amy; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Smalyuk, Vladimir; Pound, Marc

    2011-10-01

    In one of the eight Science on NIF campaigns, dynamics of molecular clouds such as the Eagle Nebula will be studied in scaled laboratory astrophysics experiments, focusing on new hydrodynamic stabilities of ablation fronts induced by strong directionality of a sustained radiation drive, and on the formation of cometary structures as a model for the famous Eagle Pillars. The NIF Radiation Transport Platform will be adapted to drive a foam target stood off several mm from the halfraum to simulate a molecular cloud illuminated by a distant O-type star, with the drive collimated by an aperture. Pulses of length 20-100 ns generating effective radiation temperatures of 100 eV are being sought. Design of the experiment, theory of the directional radiation instabilities, and supporting astrophysical modeling will be presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Planetary nebulae and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Newly defined characteristics of planetary nebulae (PN) derived from analysis of a photometric survey of 57 PN are reported. The data were combined with measurements of 27 other PN made since 1918 and were found to indicate core masses ranging from 0.55-1.0 solar mass. N/O elemental abundance ratios observed were correlated with the planetary nuclei masses, and were in direct proportion. IUE data on PN that overlapped a large part of the survey indicated that the PN in the galactic disk are more massive than PN in the halo. It is suggested that PN evolve into white dwarfs, a hypothesis supported by astrometric solutions for three nearby visual binaries featuring white dwarfs with well-determined masses. It is noted, however, that PN with masses exceeding one solar mass have been sighted in the Magellanic Clouds.

  16. 3-D Flyover Visualization of Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D visualization flies across a small portion of the Veil Nebula as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. This region is a small part of a huge expanding remnant from a star that explod...

  17. An Id-related helix-loop-helix protein encoded by a growth factor-inducible gene.

    PubMed Central

    Christy, B A; Sanders, L K; Lau, L F; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Nathans, D

    1991-01-01

    An mRNA encoding a helix-loop-helix protein that we have named HLH462 is induced in mouse 3T3 cells as part of the immediate early transcriptional response to growth factors and other signaling agents. The RNA is present in a number of mouse tissues and in the developing mouse fetus. The HLH462 gene has been mapped by interspecific backcross analysis to the distal region of mouse chromosome 4. In its helix-loop-helix region HLH462 is closely related to the Id protein and the Drosophila emc protein. Like Id, HLH462 lacks a basic region required for DNA binding, and it inhibits the DNA-binding activities of other helix-loop-helix proteins. On the basis of its structural and functional similarity to Id, we suggest that HLH462 may inhibit the activities of helix-loop-helix transcription factors during the cellular growth response and during development. Images PMID:2000388

  18. The Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D.; Gotthelf, E.; Halpern, J.

    2000-10-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations of the pulsar separated by one month to search for morphological changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a morphology remarkably similar to the torus-like structure observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. The flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75 %; the 3 sigma limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer torus; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propogation velocity is ~0.5c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright, arc-shaped X-ray wisps are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind which is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula which comprises the post-shock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter of the Vela pulsar wind is required to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B ~ 4 x 10-4G.

  19. Several evolutionary channels for bright planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, Michael G.; McCall, Marshall L.

    2016-08-01

    The populations of bright planetary nebulae in the discs of spirals appear to differ in their spectral properties from those in ellipticals and the bulges of spirals. The bright planetary nebulae from the bulge of the Milky Way are entirely compatible with those observed in the discs of spiral galaxies. The similarity might be explained if the bulge of the Milky Way evolved secularly from the disc, in which case the bulge should be regarded as a pseudo-bulge.

  20. Chemical composition of gaseous nebula NGC 6302.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J

    1978-01-01

    The irregular emission nebula NGC 6302 exhibits a rich spectrum of lines ranging in excitation from [NI] to [FeVII]. An assessment of available spectroscopic data, covering a large intensity range, indicates excess of helium and nitrogen as compared with average planetary nebulae, but deficiencies in iron and calcium. These metals are presumably tied up in solid grains, as suggested by Shields for iron in NGC 7027. PMID:16592476

  1. Properties of young clusters near reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1983-01-01

    Near infrared observations in the reflection nebulae NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068 are used to study clusters of young stars found associated with these nebulae. At least 30% to 60% of these stars are pre-main sequence objects, as indicated by their infrared excesses, hydrogen line emission, or irregular variability. The spatial distributions and observed luminosity functions of these young open clusters are derived, and the inferred mass function and star formation efficiencies are discussed.

  2. Magnetic dissipation in the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic dissipation is frequently invoked as a way of powering the observed emission of relativistic flows in Gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei. Pulsar Wind Nebulae provide closer to home cosmic laboratories which can be used to test the hypothesis. To this end, we reanalyze the observational data on the spindown power of the Crab pulsar, energetics of the Crab nebula and its magnetic field. We show that unless the magnetic inclination angle of the Crab pulsar is very close to 90 degrees the overall magnetization of the striped wind after total dissipation of its stripes is significantly higher than that deduced in the Kennel-Coroniti model and recent axisymmetric simulations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae. On the other hand, higher wind magnetization is in conflict with the observed low magnetic field of the Crab nebula, unless it is subject to efficient dissipation inside the nebula as well. For the likely inclination angle of 45 degrees the data require magnetic dissipation on the time-scale of about 80 years, which is short compared to the lifetime of the nebula but long compared to the time-scale of Crab's gamma-ray flares.

  3. Large scale processes in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    Most proposed chondrule formation mechanisms involve processes occurring inside the solar nebula, so the large scale (roughly 1 to 10 AU) structure of the nebula is of general interest for any chrondrule-forming mechanism. Chondrules and Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) might also have been formed as a direct result of the large scale structure of the nebula, such as passage of material through high temperature regions. While recent nebula models do predict the existence of relatively hot regions, the maximum temperatures in the inner planet region may not be high enough to account for chondrule or CAI thermal processing, unless the disk mass is considerably greater than the minimum mass necessary to restore the planets to solar composition. Furthermore, it does not seem to be possible to achieve both rapid heating and rapid cooling of grain assemblages in such a large scale furnace. However, if the accretion flow onto the nebula surface is clumpy, as suggested by observations of variability in young stars, then clump-disk impacts might be energetic enough to launch shock waves which could propagate through the nebula to the midplane, thermally processing any grain aggregates they encounter, and leaving behind a trail of chondrules.

  4. VLT Images the Horsehead Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Summary A new, high-resolution colour image of one of the most photographed celestial objects, the famous "Horsehead Nebula" (IC 434) in Orion, has been produced from data stored in the VLT Science Archive. The original CCD frames were obtained in February 2000 with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope on Paranal (Chile). The comparatively large field-of-view of the FORS2 camera is optimally suited to show this extended object and its immediate surroundings in impressive detail. PR Photo 02a/02 : View of the full field around the Horsehead Nebula. PR Photo 02b/02 : Enlargement of a smaller area around the Horse's "mouth" A spectacular object ESO PR Photo 02a/02 ESO PR Photo 02a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 485 pix - 63k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 970 pix - 896k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1951 x 2366 pix - 4.7M] ESO PR Photo 02b/02 ESO PR Photo 02b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 501 pix - 91k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1002 pix - 888k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1139 x 1427 pix - 1.9M] Caption : PR Photo 02a/02 is a reproduction of a composite colour image of the Horsehead Nebula and its immediate surroundings. It is based on three exposures in the visual part of the spectrum with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m KUEYEN telescope at Paranal. PR Photo 02b/02 is an enlargement of a smaller area. Technical information about these photos is available below. PR Photo 02a/02 shows the famous "Horsehead Nebula" , which is situated in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Its official name is Barnard 33 and it is a dust protrusion in the southern region of the dense dust cloud Lynds 1630 , on the edge of the HII region IC 434 . The distance to the region is about 1400 light-years (430 pc). This beautiful colour image was produced from three images obtained with the multi-mode FORS2 instrument at the second VLT Unit Telescope ( KUEYEN ), some months after it had "First Light", cf. PR 17/99. The image files were extracted from the VLT Science Archive Facility and the

  5. Double Engine for a Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    ESO has just released a stunning new image of a field of stars towards the constellation of Carina (the Keel). This striking view is ablaze with a flurry of stars of all colours and brightnesses, some of which are seen against a backdrop of clouds of dust and gas. One unusual star in the middle, HD 87643, has been extensively studied with several ESO telescopes, including the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Surrounded by a complex, extended nebula that is the result of previous violent ejections, the star has been shown to have a companion. Interactions in this double system, surrounded by a dusty disc, may be the engine fuelling the star's remarkable nebula. The new image, showing a very rich field of stars towards the Carina arm of the Milky Way, is centred on the star HD 87643, a member of the exotic class of B[e] stars [1]. It is part of a set of observations that provide astronomers with the best ever picture of a B[e] star. The image was obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the 2400-metre-high La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image shows beautifully the extended nebula of gas and dust that reflects the light from the star. The central star's wind appears to have shaped the nebula, leaving bright, ragged tendrils of gas and dust. A careful investigation of these features seems to indicate that there are regular ejections of matter from the star every 15 to 50 years. A team of astronomers, led by Florentin Millour, has studied the star HD 87643 in great detail, using several of ESO's telescopes. Apart from the WFI, the team also used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal. At the VLT, the astronomers used the NACO adaptive optics instrument, allowing them to obtain an image of the star free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere. To probe the object further, the team then obtained an image with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). The sheer range of this set of observations

  6. The double helix and the 'wronged heroine'.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Brenda

    2003-01-23

    In 1962, James Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins received the Nobel prize for the discovery of the structure of DNA. Notably absent from the podium was Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray photographs of DNA contributed directly to the discovery of the double helix. Franklin's premature death, combined with misogynist treatment by the male scientific establishment, cast her as a feminist icon. This myth overshadowed her intellectual strength and independence both as a scientist and as an individual. PMID:12540909

  7. The double helix and the 'wronged heroine'.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Brenda

    2003-01-23

    In 1962, James Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins received the Nobel prize for the discovery of the structure of DNA. Notably absent from the podium was Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray photographs of DNA contributed directly to the discovery of the double helix. Franklin's premature death, combined with misogynist treatment by the male scientific establishment, cast her as a feminist icon. This myth overshadowed her intellectual strength and independence both as a scientist and as an individual.

  8. Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2001-07-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR B0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations separated by 1 month to search for changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a toroidal morphology remarkably similar to that observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. Between the two observations, taken ~3×105 s and ~3×106 s after the glitch, the flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75% the 3 σ limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <~10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer arc; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propagation velocity is >~0.7c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright X-ray arcs are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind that is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula comprising the postshock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter σ of the Vela pulsar wind is allowed to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B<=4×10-4 G. The inclination angle of the axis of the equatorial torus with respect to the line of sight is identical to that of the rotation axis of the pulsar as previously measured from the polarization of the radio pulse. The projection of the rotation axis on the sky may also be close to the direction of proper motion of the pulsar if previous radio measurements were confused by

  9. Size distribution of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asvarov, Abdul; Allahverdiyev, Ahad

    2015-08-01

    Despite a very long history of investigations, the nature and origin of planetary nebulae (PNe) are not fully understood. It is obvious that the observational properties of PNe are influenced by the properties of the central star and the conditions in the environment. In this presentation in order to understand the effects of these components we have modeled the evolution of radio luminosity and the expansion of PNe in the framework of different hypothesis on the origin of these objects. In this we have used the observational data on the central stars and clustered this data into gourps with the similar parameters of the central stars. For the each of these groups of PNe we have built statistical dependences radio luminosity - diameter, number of PNe - diameter which are then compared to the modeled ones. Unfortunately, the comparison of simulations with observations did not allow us to choose between the known models of the evolution of the PN shell. However with the increase of statistics the approach considered in this presentation may become more productive.

  10. Zinc abundances of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. L.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    2014-07-01

    Zinc is a useful surrogate element for measuring Fe/H as, unlike iron, it is not depleted in the gas phase media. Zn/H and O/Zn ratios have been derived using the [Zn IV] emission line at 3.625 μm for a sample of nine Galactic planetary nebulae, seven of which are based upon new observations using the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Based on photoionization models, O/O++ is the most reliable ionization correction factor for zinc that can readily be determined from optical emission lines, with an estimated accuracy of 10 per cent or better for all targets in our sample. The majority of the sample is found to be subsolar in [Zn/H]. [O/Zn] in half of the sample is found to be consistent with solar within uncertainties, whereas the remaining half are enhanced in [O/Zn]. [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] as functions of Galactocentric distance have been investigated and there is little evidence to support a trend in either case.

  11. Properties of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, Kristin

    1988-01-01

    Observations of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae are the closest analog in the interstellar medium to studies of cometary dust in our solar system. The presence of a bright star near the reflection nebula dust provides the opportunity to study both the reflection and emission characteristics of interstellar dust. At 0.1 to 1 micrometer, the reflection nebula emission is due to starlight scattered by dust. The albedo and scattering phase function of the dust is determined from observations of the scattered light. At 50 to 200 micrometers, thermal emission from the dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field is observed. The derived dust temperature determines the relative values of the absorption coefficient of the dust at wavelengths where the stellar energy is absorbed and at far infrared wavelengths where the absorbed energy is reradiated. These emission mechanisms directly relate to those seen in the near and mid infrared spectra of comets. In a reflection nebula the dust is observed at much larger distances from the star than in our solar system, so that the equilibrium dust temperature is 50 K rather than 300 K. Thus, in reflection nebulae, thermal emission from dust is emitted at 50 to 200 micrometer.

  12. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Gruendl, Robert A.; Vaidya, Kaushar; White, Stephen M.; Strohmayer, Tod; Petre, Rob; Chu, You-Hua

    2010-07-01

    Massive stars are born from giant molecular clouds along with many lower mass stars, forming a stellar cluster or association. They dominate the pressure of the interstellar gas through their strong UV radiation, stellar winds and, ultimately, supernova explosions at the end of their life. These processes help the formation of the next generation of stars, but this trigger of star formation is not yet well understood. The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ~30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with a kT~128 eV lackbody with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the optical and infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a 106 year-old neutron star. Current star formation theory does not allow the progenitor of the neutron star and the other massive stars in the Carina Nebula (in particular η Carinae) to be coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for part or all of the diffuse X-ray emission which permeates the Nebula.

  13. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, M. F.; Ezoe, Y.; Townsley, L.; Broos, P.; Gruendl, R.; Vaidya, K.; White, S. M.; Strohmayer, T.; Petre, R.; Chu, Y.-H.

    2009-09-01

    Massive stars are born from giant molecular clouds along with many lower mass stars, forming a stellar cluster or association. They dominate the pressure of the interstellar gas through their strong UV radiation, stellar winds and, ultimately, supernova explosions at the end of their life. These processes help the formation of the next generation of stars, but this trigger of star formation is not yet well understood. The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ˜30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with a kT ˜128 eV blackbody with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the optical and infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a 106 year-old neutron star. Current star formation theory does not allow the progenitor of the neutron star and the other massive stars in the Carina Nebula (in particular Eta Carinae) to be coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for part or all of the diffuse X-ray emission which permeates the Nebula.

  14. Hydroxyl Emission in the Westbrook Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, Angelica; Araya, Esteban; Ghosh, Tapasi; Arce, Hector G.; Lebron, Mayra E.; Salter, Christopher J.; Minchin, Robert F.; Pihlstrom, Ylva; Kurtz, Stan; Hofner, Peter; Olmi, Luca

    2016-06-01

    CRL 618, also known as the Westbrook Nebula, is a carbon-rich pre-planetary nebula. Hydroxyl (OH) transitions are typically not detected in carbon-rich late-type stellar objects, however observations conducted with the 305m Arecibo Telescope in 2008 resulted in the detection of 4765 MHz OH emission in CRL 618. We present results of observations carried out a few months after the original detection that confirm the line. This is the first detection of 4765 MHz OH emission (most likely a maser) in a pre-planetary nebula. Follow up observations conducted in 2015 resulted in non-detection of the 4765 MHz OH transition. This behavior is consistent with the high level of variability of excited OH lines that have been detected toward a handful of other pre-planetary nebulae. Our work supports that excited OH masers are short-lived during the pre-planetary nebula phase. We also conducted a search for other OH transitions from 1612 MHz to 8611 MHz with the Arecibo Telescope; we report no other detections at rms levels of ~5 mJy.This work has made use of the computational facilities donated by Frank Rodeffer to the WIU Astrophysics Research Laboratory. We also acknowledge support from M. & C. Wong RISE scholarships and a grant from the WIU College of Arts and Sciences.

  15. New insights into the physical state of gaseous nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peimbert, M.

    1981-01-01

    The impact of knowledge of H II regions, planetary nebulae and supernova remnants due to International Ultraviolet Explorer is examined. The more relevant aspects related to the physical conditions of gaseous nebulae are reviewed. The following properties of gaseous nebulae are discussed: (1) density and temperature distribution; (2) ionization structure; (3) chemical composition; (4) internal dust; and (5) shock velocity for supernova remnants. The CNO abundances of planetary nebulae are compared with stellar evolution models.

  16. The Stingray nebula: watching the rapid evolution of a newly born planetary nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, M.; Sahu, K. C.; Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, Pedro

    The formation and early evolution of planetary nebulae represent one of the most poorly understood phases of stellar evolution ( Kwok, 1987; Maddox, 1995). One of the youngest, the Stingray Nebula (He3-1357) ( Henize, 1967; Henize, 1976), shows all the tell-tale signs of a newly born planetary nebula: it has become ionized only within the past few decades ( Parthasarathy et al., 1993); the mass-loss from the central star has ceased within the past few years; and the central star is becoming hotter and fainter as expected from a star on its way to becoming a DA white dwarf ( Parthasarathy et al., 1995). The Stingray Nebula thus provides the ideal laboratory for examining the early structure and evolution of this class of objects. Images of the Stingray Nebula, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, show for the first time that its multiple expulsions of matter are focused by an equatorial ring and bubbles of gas located on opposite sides of the ring ( Bobrowsky et al., 1995). The position angle of the outflows has changed, possibly as a result of precessional motion induced by the presence of a companion star. This is consistent with the precessing jet model by Livio & Pringle (1996). Indeed, we have reported the discovery of a companion star in the Stingray Nebula ( Bobrowsky et al., 1998). Finally, we present evidence of the companion star dynamically distorting the gas in this newly-born planetary nebula.

  17. Monitoring the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo

    The VYSOS (Variable Young Stars Optical Survey) project has at its disposal five small telescopes: a 5-inch and a 20-inch robotic optical imaging telescope in Hawaii funded by the NSF, and a 6-inch robotic optical imaging telescope, a 32-inch robotic infrared imaging telescope, and a 60-inch optical spectroscopic telescope in Chile, funded and operated from Germany. Through an agreement between the leaders of the two sites (B. Reipurth and R. Chini), it has been decided to devote a significant fraction of time on these facilities to a large Key Project, conducting a massive monitoring survey of the Orion Nebula Cluster. The vast data streams are being reduced through automated customized pipelines. The applicant seeks funding to employ a postdoc and an undergraduate assistant to work at the University of Hawaii and collaborate on the analysis of the data. Virtually all young stars are variable, with a wide range of amplitudes and characteristic timescales. This is mainly due to accretion shocks as material from circumstellar disks fall onto the stars along magnetic funnel flows, but also giant star spots, magnetic flares, occultations by orbiting dust condensations, and eclipses by companions can modulate the light from the nascent star. It is increasingly recognized that the rather static view of pre-main sequence evolution that has prevailed for many years is misleading, and that time-dependent phenomena may hold the key to an understanding of the way young stars grow and their circumstellar environments evolve. The VYSOS project is designed to bring sophisticated modern techniques to bear on the long neglected problem of variability in young solar type stars. To interpret the observations they will be compared to sophisticated MHD models of circumstellar disks around young stars. The Orion Nebula Cluster is the nearest rich region of star formation, and numerous, albeit heterogeneous, studies exist of the cluster members. The present study will provide the first

  18. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this sturning image provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the Omega Nebula (M17) resembles the fury of a raging sea, showing a bubbly ocean of glowing hydrogen gas and small amounts of other elements such as oxygen and sulfur. The nebula, also known as the Swan Nebula, is a hotbed of newly born stars residing 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The wavelike patterns of gas have been sculpted and illuminated by a torrent of ultraviolet radiation from the young massive stars, which lie outside the picture to the upper left. The ultraviolet radiation is carving and heating the surfaces of cold hydrogen gas clouds. The warmed surfaces glow orange and red in this photograph. The green represents an even hotter gas that masks background structures. Various gases represented with color are: sulfur, represented in red; hydrogen, green; and oxygen blue.

  19. Most Detailed Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This new Hubble image -- one among the largest ever produced with the Earth-orbiting observatory -- shows the most detailed view so far of the entire Crab Nebula ever made. The Crab is arguably the single most interesting object, as well as one of the most studied, in all of astronomy. The image is the largest image ever taken with Hubble's WFPC2 workhorse camera.

    The Crab Nebula is one of the most intricately structured and highly dynamical objects ever observed. The new Hubble image of the Crab was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and is the highest resolution image of the entire Crab Nebula ever made.

  20. Barnard's Merope Nebula Revisited: New Observational Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbig, G. H.; Simon, Theodore

    2001-06-01

    IC 349 is a small, fan-shaped reflection nebula located only 30" from 23 Tau; its nucleus is, by a factor 15, the brightest area of the Pleiades nebulosity. We propose that IC 349 is a fragment of the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud that has been encountered by the Pleiades in that cluster's southward motion and is being illuminated and shaped by the radiation field of 23 Tau. New Hubble Space Telescope multicolor imagery and the structure, colors, and surface brightness of IC 349 are discussed in terms of that hypothesis. What is known of the proper motion of the nebula, what can be inferred of the properties of the nebula from its color, and what is expected from radiation pressure theory appear to be compatible with this cloudlet-encounter hypothesis.

  1. The temperature gradient in the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J S

    1974-11-01

    The available compositional data on planets and satellites can be used to place stringent limits on the thermal environment in the solar nebula. The densities of the terrestrial planets, Ceres and Vesta, the Galilean satellites, and Titan; the atmospheric compositions of several of these bodies; and geochemical and geophysical data on the earth combine to define a strong dependence of formation temperature on heliocentric distance. The pressure and temperature dependences of the condensation process are separable in the sense that the variation of the deduced formation temperatures with heliocentric distance is insensitive to even very diverse assumptions regarding the pressure profile in the nebula. It is impossible to reconcile the available compositional data with any model in which the formation temperatures of these bodies are determined by radiative equilibrium with the sun, regardless of the sun's luminosity. Rather, the data support Cameron's hypothesis of a dense, convective solar nebula, opaque to solar radiation, with an adiabatic temperature-pressure profile.

  2. Condensation Front Migration in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2004-01-01

    Condensation front dynamics are investigated in the mid-solar nebula region. A quasi-steady model of the evolving nebula is combined with equilibrium vapor pressure curves to determine evolutionary condensation fronts for selected species. These fronts are found to migrate inwards from the far-nebula to final positions during a period of 10(exp 7) years. The physical process governing this movement is a combination of local viscous heating and luminescent heating from the central star. Two luminescent heating models are used and their effects on the ultimate radial position of the condensation front are discussed. At first the fronts move much faster than the nebular accretion velocity, but after a time the accreting gas and dust overtakes the slowing condensation front.

  3. Monitoring the Crab Nebula with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008-2010, the Crab Nebula was found to decline by 7% in the 15-50 keV band, consistently in Fermi GBM, INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEMX, RXTE PCA, and Swift BAT. From 2001-2010, the 15-50 keV flux from the Crab Nebula typically varied by about 3.5% per year. Analysis of RXTE PCA data suggests possible spectral variations correlated with the flux variations. I will present estimates of the LOFT sensitivity to these variations. Prior to 2001 and since 2010, the observed flux variations have been much smaller. Monitoring the Crab with the LOFT WFM and LAD will provide precise measurements of flux variations in the Crab Nebula if it undergoes a similarly active episode.

  4. Compact reflection nebulae, a transit phase of evolution from post-AGB to planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Slijkhuis, S.

    1989-01-01

    In a search of the optical counter-part of candidates of protoplanetary nebulae on the plates of UK Schmidt, ESO Schmidt, and POSS, five compact reflection nebulae associated with post-AGB stars were found. A simplified model (dust shell is spherical symmetric, expansion velocity of dust shell is constant, Q(sub sca)(lambda) is isotropic, and the dust grain properties are uniform) is used to estimate the visible condition of the dust shell due to the scattering of the core star's light. Under certain conditions the compact reflection nebulae can be seen of the POSS or ESO/SRC survey plates.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This sturning image, taken by the newly installed Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is an image of the center of the Omega Nebula. It is a hotbed of newly born stars wrapped in colorful blankets of glowing gas and cradled in an enormous cold, dark hydrogen cloud. The region of nebula shown in this photograph is about 3,500 times wider than our solar system. The nebula, also called M17 and the Swan Nebula, resides 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The Swan Nebula is illuminated by ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars, located just beyond the upper-right corner of the image. The powerful radiation from these stars evaporates and erodes the dense cloud of cold gas within which the stars formed. The blistered walls of the hollow cloud shine primarily in the blue, green, and red light emitted by excited atoms of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Particularly striking is the rose-like feature, seen to the right of center, which glows in the red light emitted by hydrogen and sulfur. As the infant stars evaporate the surrounding cloud, they expose dense pockets of gas that may contain developing stars. One isolated pocket is seen at the center of the brightest region of the nebula. Other dense pockets of gas have formed the remarkable feature jutting inward from the left edge of the image. The color image is constructed from four separate images taken in these filters: blue, near infrared, hydrogen alpha, and doubly ionized oxygen. Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (USCS/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA.

  6. A Classification of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Karen A.; Hudson, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of soybean allows an unprecedented opportunity for the discovery of the genes controlling important traits. In particular, the potential functions of regulatory genes are a priority for analysis. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors is known to be involved in controlling a wide range of systems critical for crop adaptation and quality, including photosynthesis, light signalling, pigment biosynthesis, and seed pod development. Using a hidden Markov model search algorithm, 319 genes with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor domains were identified within the soybean genome sequence. These were classified with respect to their predicted DNA binding potential, intron/exon structure, and the phylogeny of the bHLH domain. Evidence is presented that the vast majority (281) of these 319 soybean bHLH genes are expressed at the mRNA level. Of these soybean bHLH genes, 67% were found to exist in two or more homeologous copies. This dataset provides a framework for future studies on bHLH gene function in soybean. The challenge for future research remains to define functions for the bHLH factors encoded in the soybean genome, which may allow greater flexibility for genetic selection of growth and environmental adaptation in this widely grown crop. PMID:25763382

  7. Site-specific unfolding thermodynamics of a helix-turn-helix protein.

    PubMed

    Amunson, Krista E; Ackels, Loren; Kubelka, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The thermal unfolding of a 40-residue helix-turn-helix subdomain of the P22 viral coat protein was investigated using circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) with site-specific 13C isotopic labeling. Helix-turn-helix is the simplest alpha-helical structural motif that combines both secondary and tertiary structural elements. The CD of individual helical fragments reveals that the P22 subdomain is stabilized by tertiary interhelical interactions. Overall the temperature-dependent CD and FTIR data can be described by a three-state process with a partially folded intermediate. However, the analysis of the site-specific 13C IR signals reveals distinct unfolding thermodynamics for each of the labeled sites. The thermodynamic parameters of the thermal unfolding of each of the labeled segments were obtained using singular value decomposition in combination with target transformation and global fitting. The P22 subdomain unfolds from the N-terminus toward the helical segments near the turn. Our results show that as few as two 13C labeled residues can be detected in a 40 residue protein and provide local, site-specific structural information about protein unfolding, which is not resolved by standard, nonsite-specific spectroscopic probes.

  8. A helix-turn-helix structure unit in human centromere protein B (CENP-B).

    PubMed Central

    Iwahara, J; Kigawa, T; Kitagawa, K; Masumoto, H; Okazaki, T; Yokoyama, S

    1998-01-01

    CENP-B has been suggested to organize arrays of centromere satellite DNA into a higher order structure which then directs centromere formation and kinetochore assembly in mammalian chromosomes. The N-terminal portion of CENP-B is a 15 kDa DNA binding domain (DBD) consisting of two repeating units, RP1 and RP2. The DBD specifically binds to the CENP-B box sequence (17 bp) in centromere DNA. We determined the solution structure of human CENP-B DBD RP1 by multi-dimensional 1H, 13C and 15N NMR methods. The CENP-B DBD RP1 structure consists of four helices and has a helix-turn-helix structure. The overall folding is similar to those of some other eukaryotic DBDs, although significant sequence homology with these proteins was not found. The DBD of yeast RAP1, a telomere binding protein, is most similar to CENP-B DBD RP1. We studied the interaction between CENP-B DBD RP1 and the CENP-B box by the use of NMR chemical shift perturbation. The results suggest that CENP-B DBD RP1 interacts with one of the essential regions of the CENP-B box DNA, mainly at the N-terminal basic region, the N-terminal portion of helix 2 and helix 3. PMID:9451007

  9. Turbulent transport in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1989-01-01

    It is likely that turbulence played a major role in the evolution of the solar nebula, which is the flattened disk of dust and gas out of which our solar system formed. Relevant turbulent processes include the transport of angular momentum, mass, and heat, which were critically important to the formation of the solar system. This research will break ground in the modeling of compressible turbulence and its effects on the evolution of the solar nebula. The computational techniques which were developed should be of interest to researchers studying other astrophysical disk systems (e.g., active galactic nuclei), as well as turbulence modelers outside the astrophysics community.

  10. HELIX: The High Energy Light Isotope Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarle, Gregory

    This is the lead proposal for a new suborbital program, HELIX (High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment), designed to make measurements of the isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei from ~200 MeV/nuc to ~10 GeV/nuc. Past measurements of this kind have provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information on acceleration and confinement time scales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. The most detailed information currently available comes from the ACE/CRIS mission, but is restricted to energies below a few 100 MeV/nuc. HELIX aims at extending this energy range by over an order of magnitude, where, in most cases, no measurements of any kind exist, and where relativistic time dilation affects the apparent lifetime of radioactive clock nuclei. The HELIX measurements will provide essential information for understanding the propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy. This is crucial for properly interpreting several intriguing anomalies reported in recent cosmic-ray measurements, pertaining to the energy spectra of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei, and to the anomalous rise in the positron fraction at higher energy. HELIX employs a high-precision magnet spectrometer to provide measurements which are not achievable by any current or planned instrument. The superconducting magnet originally used for the HEAT payload in five successful high-altitude flights will be combined with state-of-the-art detectors to measure the charge, time-of-flight, magnetic rigidity, and velocity of cosmic-ray particles with high precision. The instrumentation includes plastic scintillators, silicon-strip detectors repurposed from Fermilab's CDF detector, a high-performance gas drift chamber, and a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter employing aerogel radiators and silicon photomultipliers. To reduce cost and technical risk, the HELIX program will be structured in two stages. The first

  11. Mechanical performance of PPy helix tube microactuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrami Samani, Mehrdad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Cook, Christopher

    2004-02-01

    Conducting polymer actuators with favourable properties such as linearity, high power density and compliance are of increasing demand in micro applications. These materials generate forces over two times larger than produced by mammalian skeletal muscles. They operate to convert electro chemical energy to mechanical stress and strain. On the other hand, the application of conducting polymers is limited by the lack of a full description of the relation between four essential parameters: stress, strain, voltage and current. In this paper, polypyrrole helix tube micro actuator mechanical characteristics are investigated. The electrolyte is propylene carbonate and the dopant is TBA. PF6. The experiments are both in isotonic and isometric conditions and the input parameters are both electrical and mechanical. A dual mode force and length control and potentiostat / galvanostat are utilized for this purpose. Ultimately, the viscoelastic behaviour of the actuator is presented in this paper by a standard stress relaxation test. The effect of electrical stimulus on mechanical parameters is also explored by cyclic voltametry at different scan rates to obtain the best understanding of the actuation mechanism. The results demonstrate that the linear viscoelastic model, which performed well on conducting polymer film actuators, has to be modified to explain the mechanical behaviour of PPy helix tube fibre micro actuators. Secondly, the changes in mechanical properties of PPy need to be considered when modelling electromechanical behaviour.

  12. Orbital dynamics in the Tevatron double helix

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, L.; Saritepe, S.

    1989-03-01

    A key feature of the Tevatron upgrade is the placement of proton and anti-proton bunches on the branches of a double helix which winds around the current closed orbit. Electrostatic separators will transfer the bunches on and off the double helix so that they experience head-on collisions only at the experimental areas, BO and DO, all other encounters occurring at large transverse separation. In this way the number of bunches, and the luminosity, can be increased without a proportional growth in the beam-beam tune shift. The scenario raises a number of beam dynamics issues, especially the consequences of sampling magnetic fields far from the magnets' center lines, and the effects of the long-range beam-beam interaction. This report presents the results of (admittedly incomplete) calculations and simulations done to date to explore: a Fermilab team have been studying, both experimentally and theoretically, but we shall not review those efforts here. The constraint of a page limit has forced us to bound this discussion rather stringently, but a more complete paper will be available as a Fermilab Technical Memo. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Food allergy to Helix terrestre (snail).

    PubMed

    de la Cuesta, C G; García, B E; Córdoba, H; Diéguez, I; Oehling, A

    1989-01-01

    Among the rare foods capable of producing food allergies is the snail (Helix terrestre). The snail is a delicacy eaten in Spain, France and Portugal. This study presents the findings of an allergic study of 10 patients with this infrequent food allergy during the past 10 years. The shock organ in the majority (80%) of these patients was the bronchial tree. Six of them did not have any digestive or skin symptoms which are usually seen in cases of food allergy. All patients manifested the symptomatology after ingestion of Helix terrestre. Two also had reactions after eating Patella vulgata (limpet). The snail and the limpet are within the phylogenetic line of molluscs, i.e. of gastropods. All patients tolerated the ingestion of cephalopods and bivalves which belong to two other phylogenetic lines. Skin tests to seafoods (squids, prawns, lobsters and clams) were negative for all patients. This suggests that the sensitizing antigen is probably a protein found only in gastropod molluscs. Skin tests along with the histamine release test were valid diagnostic methods for this food allergy. The limited bibliography on this subject is probably due to the fact that the consumption of snails as well as limpets is limited to specific geographical areas.

  14. [Quaternion-based Characterization of Protein α Helix].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghong; Chu, Zefei

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a method based on quaternion for characterization a helix of proteins. The method defines the parameter called Quaternion Helix Axis Spherical Distance (QHASD) on the basis of mapping protein Cα frames' helical axis onto a unit sphere, and uses QHASD to characterize the a helix of the protein secondary structure. Application of this method has been verified based on the PDBselect database, with an a helix characterization accuracy of 91.7%. This method possesses significant advantages of high detection accuracy, low computation and clear geometric significance. PMID:27382757

  15. Solar nebula origin for volatile gases in Halley's comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Steffi; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Lewis, John S.

    1990-01-01

    The conditions for Comet Halley formation are presently considered in light of the application of physical and chemical processes in the solar nebula environments to the present data base on the composition of the comet's gases. Key molecular ratios are compared to solar nebula model predictions, and the nebular thermochemistry is quantified for a range of solar elemental compositions which correspond to varying water depletion states in the inner nebula. Assuming that inner nebula chemistry is catalyzed by reaction on grains, it is judged that the abundances of the volatile C species CH4, CO, and CO2 in Halley could have been supplied by the solar nebula.

  16. Planck intermediate results. XVIII. The millimetre and sub-millimetre emission from planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Arnaud, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Buemi, C. S.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Casassus, S.; Catalano, A.; Cerrigone, L.; Chamballu, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Couchot, F.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Dupac, X.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hora, J. L.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; Leto, P.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Martin, P. G.; Masi, S.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Procopio, P.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Trigilio, C.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Zacchei, A.; Zijlstra, A.; Zonca, A.

    2015-01-01

    Late stages of stellar evolution are characterized by copious mass-loss events whose signature is the formation of circumstellar envelopes (CSE). Planck multi-frequency measurements have provided relevant information on a sample of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) in the important and relatively unexplored observational band between 30 and 857 GHz. Planck enables the assembly of comprehensive PNe spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from radio to far-IR frequencies. Modelling the derived SEDs provides us with information on physical properties of CSEs and the mass content of both main components: ionized gas, traced by the free-free emission at cm-mm waves; and thermal dust, traced by the millimetre and far-IR emission. In particular, the amount of ionized gas and dust has been derived here. Such quantities have also been estimated for the very young PN CRL 618, where the strong variability observed in its radio and millimetre emission has previously prevented constructing its SED. A morphological study of the Helix Nebula was also performed. Planck maps reveal, for the first time, the spatial distribution of the dust inside the envelope, allowing us to identify different components, the most interesting of which is a very extended component (up to 1 pc) that may be related to a region where the slow expanding envelope is interacting with the surrounding interstellar medium.

  17. Importance of Hydrophilic Hydration and Intramolecular Interactions in the Thermodynamics of Helix-Coil Transition and Helix-Helix Assembly in a Deca-Alanine Peptide.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Asthagiri, D

    2016-01-14

    For a model deca-alanine peptide the cavity (ideal hydrophobic) contribution to hydration favors the helix state over extended states and the paired helix bundle in the assembly of two helices. The energetic contributions of attractive protein-solvent interactions are separated into quasi-chemical components consisting of a short-range part arising from interactions with solvent in the first hydration shell and the remaining long-range part that is well described by a Gaussian. In the helix-coil transition, short-range attractive protein-solvent interactions outweigh hydrophobic hydration and favor the extended coil states. Analysis of enthalpic effects shows that it is the favorable hydration of the peptide backbone that favors the unfolded state. Protein intramolecular interactions favor the helix state and are decisive in favoring folding. In the pairing of two helices, the cavity contribution outweighs the short-range attractive protein-water interactions. However, long-range, protein-solvent attractive interactions can either enhance or reverse this trend depending on the mutual orientation of the helices. In helix-helix assembly, change in enthalpy arising from change in attractive protein-solvent interactions favors disassembly. In helix pairing as well, favorable protein intramolecular interactions are found to be as important as hydration effects. Overall, hydrophilic protein-solvent interactions and protein intramolecular interactions are found to play a significant role in the thermodynamics of folding and assembly in the system studied. PMID:26649757

  18. Importance of Hydrophilic Hydration and Intramolecular Interactions in the Thermodynamics of Helix-Coil Transition and Helix-Helix Assembly in a Deca-Alanine Peptide.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Asthagiri, D

    2016-01-14

    For a model deca-alanine peptide the cavity (ideal hydrophobic) contribution to hydration favors the helix state over extended states and the paired helix bundle in the assembly of two helices. The energetic contributions of attractive protein-solvent interactions are separated into quasi-chemical components consisting of a short-range part arising from interactions with solvent in the first hydration shell and the remaining long-range part that is well described by a Gaussian. In the helix-coil transition, short-range attractive protein-solvent interactions outweigh hydrophobic hydration and favor the extended coil states. Analysis of enthalpic effects shows that it is the favorable hydration of the peptide backbone that favors the unfolded state. Protein intramolecular interactions favor the helix state and are decisive in favoring folding. In the pairing of two helices, the cavity contribution outweighs the short-range attractive protein-water interactions. However, long-range, protein-solvent attractive interactions can either enhance or reverse this trend depending on the mutual orientation of the helices. In helix-helix assembly, change in enthalpy arising from change in attractive protein-solvent interactions favors disassembly. In helix pairing as well, favorable protein intramolecular interactions are found to be as important as hydration effects. Overall, hydrophilic protein-solvent interactions and protein intramolecular interactions are found to play a significant role in the thermodynamics of folding and assembly in the system studied.

  19. Dusty disks around central stars of planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; De Marco, Orsola; Nordhaus, Jason; Green, Joel; Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus; Chu, You-Hua E-mail: orsola@science.mq.edu.au E-mail: joel@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: werner@astro.uni-tuebingen.de

    2014-06-01

    Only a few percent of cool, old white dwarfs (WDs) have infrared excesses interpreted as originating in small hot disks due to the infall and destruction of single asteroids that come within the star's Roche limit. Infrared excesses at 24 μm were also found to derive from the immediate vicinity of younger, hot WDs, most of which are still central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe). The incidence of CSPNe with this excess is 18%. The Helix CSPN, with a 24 μm excess, has been suggested to have a disk formed from collisions of Kuiper belt-like objects (KBOs). In this paper, we have analyzed an additional sample of CSPNe to look for similar infrared excesses. These CSPNe are all members of the PG 1159 class and were chosen because their immediate progenitors are known to often have dusty environments consistent with large dusty disks. We find that, overall, PG 1159 stars do not present such disks more often than other CSPNe, although the statistics (five objects) are poor. We then consider the entire sample of CSPNe with infrared excesses and compare it to the infrared properties of old WDs, as well as cooler post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We conclude with the suggestion that the infrared properties of CSPNe more plausibly derive from AGB-formed disks rather than disks formed via the collision of KBOs, although the latter scenario cannot be ruled out. Finally, there seems to be an association between CSPNe with a 24 μm excess and confirmed or possible binarity of the central star.

  20. OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB NEBULA'S ASYMMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, A. M.; Desch, S. J.; Scowen, P. A.; Foy, J. P.

    2013-03-10

    We present the first Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 imaging survey of the entire Crab Nebula, in the filters F502N ([O III] emission), F673N ([S II]), F631N ([O I]), and F547M (continuum). We use our mosaics to characterize the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its three-dimensional structure, the ionizational structure in the filaments forming at its periphery, the speed of the shock driven by the PWN into surrounding ejecta (by inferring the cooling rates behind the shock), and the morphology and ionizational structure of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) fingers. We quantify a number of asymmetries between the northwest (NW) and southeast (SE) quadrants of the Crab Nebula. The lack of observed filaments in the NW, and our observations of the spatial extent of [O III] emission lead us to conclude that cooling rates are slower, and therefore the shock speeds are greater, in the NW quadrant of the nebula, compared with the SE. We conclude that R-T fingers are longer, more ionizationally stratified, and apparently more massive in the NW than in the SE, and the R-T instability appears more fully developed in the NW.

  1. INTERNAL PROPER MOTIONS IN THE ESKIMO NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    García-Díaz, Ma. T.; Gutiérrez, L.; Steffen, W.; López, J. A.; Beckman, J. E-mail: leonel@astro.unam.mx E-mail: jal@astro.unam.mx

    2015-01-10

    We present measurements of internal proper motions at more than 500 positions of NGC 2392, the Eskimo Nebula, based on images acquired with WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by 7.695 yr. Comparisons of the two observations clearly show the expansion of the nebula. We measured the amplitude and direction of the motion of local structures in the nebula by determining their relative shift during that interval. In order to assess the potential uncertainties in the determination of proper motions in this object, in general, the measurements were performed using two different methods, used previously in the literature. We compare the results from the two methods, and to perform the scientific analysis of the results we choose one, the cross-correlation method, because it is more reliable. We go on to perform a ''criss-cross'' mapping analysis on the proper motion vectors, which helps in the interpretation of the velocity pattern. By combining our results of the proper motions with radial velocity measurements obtained from high resolution spectroscopic observations, and employing an existing 3D model, we estimate the distance to the nebula to be 1.3 kpc.

  2. Search for excess showers from Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirov, I. N.; Stamenov, J. N.; Ushev, S. Z.; Janminchev, V. D.; Aseikin, V. S.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Nikolskaja, N. M.; Yakovlev, V. I.; Morozov, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival directions of muon poor showers registrated in the Tien Shan experiment during an effective running time about I,8.IO(4)h were analyzed. It is shown that there is a significant excess of these showers coming the direction of Crab Nebula.

  3. Molecular line mapping of (young) planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, I will review recent results obtained from high-resolution observations of molecular emission of planetary nebulae in the millimeter and submillimeter waves, stressing the easy interpretation of the data and the great amount of quantitative results obtained from them. Radio interferometers have been shown to be very efficient in the observation of our objects and, particularly since the arrival of ALMA, the amount of results is becoming impressive. We will deal mainly with young planetary nebulae or protoplanetary nebulae, since, as we will see, molecular lines tend to be weak in evolved objects because of photodissociation. In relatively young nebulae, the molecular gas represents most of the nebular material and can be well observed in line emission in mm- and submm-waves. Those observations have yielded many quantitative and accurate results on the structure, dynamics, and physical conditions of this largely dominant nebular component. In more evolved sources, we can follow the evolution of the chemical composition, although the data become rare.

  4. Argon and neon in Galactic nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, Dan F.; Rank, David M.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wooden, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    KAO observations of the 6.98 micron line of (Ar II), and KAO and ground-based observations of the 8.99 micron line of (Ar III) and the 12.8 micron line of (Ne II) are presented for a number of Galactic H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  5. On the possible wind nebula of magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846: a magnetism-powered synchrotron nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846 has been reported to have a possible wind nebula. It is shown that both the magnetar and its wind nebula are understandable in the wind braking scenario. The magnetar's rotational energy loss rate is not enough to power the particle luminosity. The required particle luminosity should be about 1036 erg s-1 to 1038 erg s-1. It is obtained in three different approaches: considering wind braking of Swift J1834.9-0846 the spectral and spatial observations of the wind nebula; and an empirical upper bound on wind nebula X-ray luminosity. The nebula magnetic field is about 10-4 G. The possible wind nebula of Swift J1834.9-0846 should be a magnetar wind nebula. It is powered by the magnetic energy released from the magnetar.

  6. On the possible wind nebula of magnetar Swift J1834.9–0846: a magnetism-powered synchrotron nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the magnetar Swift J1834.9–0846 has been reported to have a possible wind nebula. It is shown that both the magnetar and its wind nebula are understandable in the wind braking scenario. The magnetar's rotational energy loss rate is not enough to power the particle luminosity. The required particle luminosity should be about 1036 erg s‑1 to 1038 erg s‑1. It is obtained in three different approaches: considering wind braking of Swift J1834.9–0846 the spectral and spatial observations of the wind nebula; and an empirical upper bound on wind nebula X-ray luminosity. The nebula magnetic field is about 10‑4 G. The possible wind nebula of Swift J1834.9–0846 should be a magnetar wind nebula. It is powered by the magnetic energy released from the magnetar.

  7. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-09-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  8. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  9. The DNA double helix fifty years on.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, Robert B; Poon, Gregory M K

    2003-10-01

    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the proposal of a double helical structure for DNA by James Watson and Francis Crick. The place of this proposal in the history and development of molecular biology is discussed. Several other discoveries that occurred in the middle of the twentieth century were perhaps equally important to our understanding of cellular processes; however, none of these captured the attention and imagination of the public to the same extent as the double helix. The existence of multiple forms of DNA and the uses of DNA in biological technologies is presented. DNA is also finding increasing use as a material due to its rather unusual structural and physical characteristics as well as its ready availability.

  10. Regional Dimensions of the Triple Helix Model: Setting the Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todeva, Emanuela; Danson, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the rationale for the special issue and its contributions, which bridge the literature on regional development and the Triple Helix model. The concept of the Triple Helix at the sub-national, and specifically regional, level is established and examined, with special regard to regional economic development founded on…

  11. Government and Governance of Regional Triple Helix Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danson, Mike; Todeva, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual paper contributes to the discussion of the role of regional government and regional Triple Helix constellations driving economic development and growth within regional boundaries. The impact of regionalism and subsidiarity on regional Triple Helix constellations, and the questions of governmentality, governance and institutional…

  12. E Proteins and ID Proteins: Helix-Loop-Helix Partners in Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan-Hsin; Baker, Nicholas E

    2015-11-01

    The basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins represent a well-known class of transcriptional regulators. Many bHLH proteins act as heterodimers with members of a class of ubiquitous partners, the E proteins. A widely expressed class of inhibitory heterodimer partners-the Inhibitor of DNA-binding (ID) proteins-also exists. Genetic and molecular analyses in humans and in knockout mice implicate E proteins and ID proteins in a wide variety of diseases, belying the notion that they are non-specific partner proteins. Here, we explore relationships of E proteins and ID proteins to a variety of disease processes and highlight gaps in knowledge of disease mechanisms.

  13. Hexa Helix: Modified Quad Helix Appliance to Correct Anterior and Posterior Crossbites in Mixed Dentition

    PubMed Central

    Yaseen, Syed Mohammed; Acharya, Ravindranath

    2012-01-01

    Among the commonly encountered dental irregularities which constitute developing malocclusion is the crossbite. During primary and mixed dentition phase, the crossbite is seen very often and if left untreated during these phases then a simple problem may be transformed into a more complex problem. Different techniques have been used to correct anterior and posterior crossbites in mixed dentition. This case report describes the use of hexa helix, a modified version of quad helix for the management of anterior crossbite and bilateral posterior crossbite in early mixed dentition. Correction was achieved within 15 weeks with no damage to the tooth or the marginal periodontal tissue. The procedure is a simple and effective method for treating anterior and bilateral posterior crossbites simultaneously. PMID:23119188

  14. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongtao; Li, Xia; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate determination is an important process in multicellular organisms. Plant epidermis is a readily-accessible, well-used model for the study of cell fate determination. Our knowledge of cell fate determination is growing steadily due to genetic and molecular analyses of root hairs, trichomes, and stomata, which are derived from the epidermal cells of roots and aerial tissues. Studies have shown that a large number of factors are involved in the establishment of these cell types, especially members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) superfamily, which is an important family of transcription factors. In this mini-review, we focus on the role of bHLH transcription factors in cell fate determination in Arabidopsis. PMID:23073001

  15. Thymocyte selection is regulated by the helix-loop-helix inhibitor protein, Id3.

    PubMed

    Rivera, R R; Johns, C P; Quan, J; Johnson, R S; Murre, C

    2000-01-01

    E2A, HEB, E2-2, and daughterless are basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins that play key roles in multiple developmental pathways. The DNA binding activity of E2A, HEB, and E2-2 is regulated by a distinct class of inhibitor HLH proteins, the Id gene products. Here, we show that Id3 is required for major histocompatability (MHC) class I- and class II-restricted thymocyte positive selection. Additionally, H-Y TCR-mediated negative selection is severely perturbed in Id3 null mutant mice. Finally, we show that E2A and Id3 interact genetically to regulate thymocyte development. These observations identify the HLH inhibitory protein Id3 as an essential component required for proper thymocyte maturation.

  16. The membrane- and soluble-protein helix-helix interactome: similar geometry via different interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Qing; Kulp, Daniel W; Schramm, Chaim A; Mravic, Marco; Samish, Ilan; DeGrado, William F

    2015-03-01

    α Helices are a basic unit of protein secondary structure and therefore the interaction between helices is crucial to understanding tertiary and higher-order folds. Comparing subtle variations in the structural and sequence motifs between membrane and soluble proteins sheds light on the different constraints faced by each environment and elucidates the complex puzzle of membrane protein folding. Here, we demonstrate that membrane and water-soluble helix pairs share a small number of similar folds with various interhelical distances. The composition of the residues that pack at the interface between corresponding motifs shows that hydrophobic residues tend to be more enriched in the water-soluble class of structures and small residues in the transmembrane class. The latter group facilitates packing via sidechain- and backbone-mediated hydrogen bonds within the low-dielectric membrane milieu. The helix-helix interactome space, with its associated sequence preferences and accompanying hydrogen-bonding patterns, should be useful for engineering, prediction, and design of protein structure.

  17. The membrane- and soluble-protein helix-helix interactome: similar geometry via different interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Qing; Kulp, Daniel W; Schramm, Chaim A; Mravic, Marco; Samish, Ilan; DeGrado, William F

    2015-03-01

    α Helices are a basic unit of protein secondary structure and therefore the interaction between helices is crucial to understanding tertiary and higher-order folds. Comparing subtle variations in the structural and sequence motifs between membrane and soluble proteins sheds light on the different constraints faced by each environment and elucidates the complex puzzle of membrane protein folding. Here, we demonstrate that membrane and water-soluble helix pairs share a small number of similar folds with various interhelical distances. The composition of the residues that pack at the interface between corresponding motifs shows that hydrophobic residues tend to be more enriched in the water-soluble class of structures and small residues in the transmembrane class. The latter group facilitates packing via sidechain- and backbone-mediated hydrogen bonds within the low-dielectric membrane milieu. The helix-helix interactome space, with its associated sequence preferences and accompanying hydrogen-bonding patterns, should be useful for engineering, prediction, and design of protein structure. PMID:25703378

  18. Planetesimal Formation in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.; Mrad, Susan (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    In this talk we will address two distinct phases of planetesimal formation, each of which is fundamentally dependent upon the coupled interactions of particles and turbulent nebula gas. It has been shown both numerically and experimentally that 3-D (three dimensional) turbulence concentrates aerodynamically size-selected particles by orders of magnitude. In a previous review chapter we illustrated the initial predictions of Turbulent Concentration (TC) as applied to the solar nebula. We predicted the particle size which will be most effectively concentrated by turbulence; it is the particle which has a gas drag stopping time equal to the overturn time of the smallest (Kolmogorov scale) eddy. The primary uncertainty is the level of nebula turbulence, or Reynolds number Re, which can be expressed in terms of the standard nebula eddy viscosity parameter alpha = Rev(sub m)/cH, where v(sub m) is molecular viscosity, c is sound speed, and H is vertical scale height. Several studies, and observed lifetimes of circumstellar disks, have suggested that the level of nebula turbulence can be described by alpha = 10(exp -2) - 10(exp -4). There is some recent concern about how energy is provided to maintain this turbulence, but the issue remains open. We adopt a canonical minimum mass nebula with a range of alpha is greater than 0. We originally showed that chondrule-sized particles are selected for concentration in the terrestrial planet region if alpha = 10(exp -3) - 10(exp -4). In addition, Paque and Cuzzi found that the size distribution of chondrules is an excellent match for theoretical predictions. One then asks by what concentration factor C these particles can be concentrated; our early numerical results indicated an increase of C with alpha, and were supported by simple scaling arguments, but the extrapolation range was quite large and the predictions (C is approximately equal to 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 6) not unlikely) uncertain. The work presented here, which makes use of

  19. 'Peony Nebula' Star Settles for Silver Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Movie

    If our galaxy, the Milky Way, were to host its own version of the Olympics, the title for the brightest known star would go to a massive star called Eta Carina. However, a new runner-up now the second-brightest star in our galaxy has been discovered in the galaxy's dusty and frenzied interior. This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the new silver medalist, circled in the inset above, in the central region of our Milky Way.

    Dubbed the 'Peony nebula' star, this blazing ball of gas shines with the equivalent light of 3.2 million suns. The reigning champ, Eta Carina, produces the equivalent of 4.7 million suns worth of light though astronomers say these estimates are uncertain, and it's possible that the Peony nebula star could be even brighter than Eta Carina.

    If the Peony star is so bright, why doesn't it stand out more in this view? The answer is dust. This star is located in a very dusty region jam packed with stars. In fact, there could be other super bright stars still hidden deep in the stellar crowd. Spitzer's infrared eyes allowed it to pierce the dust and assess the Peony nebula star's true brightness. Likewise, infrared data from the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope in Chile were integral in calculating the Peony nebula star's luminosity.

    The Peony nebula, which surrounds the Peony nebular star, is the reddish cloud of dust in and around the white circle.

    The movie begins by showing a stretch of the dusty and frenzied central region of our Milky Way galaxy. It then zooms in to reveal the 'Peony nebula' star the new second-brightest star in the Milky Way, discovered in part by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both

  20. HUBBLE SEES SUPERSONIC EXHAUST FROM NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. Ground-based studies have shown that the nebula's size increases with time, suggesting that the stellar outburst that formed the lobes occurred just 1,200 years ago. The central star in M2-9 is known to be one of a very close pair which orbit one another at perilously close distances. It is even possible that one star is being engulfed by the other. Astronomers suspect the gravity of one star pulls weakly bound gas from the surface of the other and flings it into a thin, dense disk which surrounds both stars and extends well into space. The disk can actually be seen in shorter exposure images obtained with the Hubble telescope. It measures approximately 10 times the diameter of Pluto's orbit. Models of the type that are used to design jet engines ('hydrodynamics') show that such a disk can successfully account for the jet-exhaust-like appearance of M2-9. The high-speed wind from one of the stars rams into the surrounding disk, which serves as a nozzle. The wind is deflected in a perpendicular direction and forms the pair of jets that we see in the nebula's image. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in

  1. Birth and early evolution of a planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, Matthew; Sahu, Kailash C.; Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, Pedro

    1998-04-01

    The final expulsion of gas by a star as it forms a planetary nebula - the ionized shell of gas often observed surrounding a young white dwarf - is one of the most poorly understood stages of stellar evolution,. Such nebulae form extremely rapidly (about 100 years for the ionization) and so the formation process is inherently difficult to observe. Particularly puzzling is how a spherical star can produce a highly asymmetric nebula with collimated outflows. Here we report optical observations of the Stingray nebula,, which has become an ionized planetary nebula within the past few decades. We find that the collimated outflows are already evident, and we have identified the nebular structure that focuses the outflows. We have also found a companion star, reinforcing previous suspicions that binary companions play an important role in shaping planetary nebulae and changing the direction of successive outflows.

  2. Shell nebulae around luminous evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1989-01-01

    Shell nebulae around luminous Population I Wolf-Rayet, Of, and P-Cygni stars are astrophysically interesting since they are indicators of pre-supernova mass loss and how such massive stars prepare their surrounding interstellar medium prior to explosion. Some twenty-odd such nebulae are known, for which detailed study of their morphological and spectroscopic characteristics have only begun in this decade. In this paper, some of these characteristics are reviewed in general, and new observations are reported. Emphasis has been placed on several 'prototype 'objects (NGC 7635, NGC 2359, NGC 6888, and the Eta Carinae condensations) to illustrate the varied massive-star mass-loss, the physics of their winds and shell ejecta, and related nucleosynthesis effects in the compositions of the winds and shells.

  3. Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, J. M.

    2008-12-01

    M16 (the Eagle Nebula) is a striking star forming region, with a complex morphology of gas and dust sculpted by the massive stars in NGC 6611. Detailed studies of the famous ``elephant trunks'' dramatically increased our understanding of the massive star feedback into the parent molecular cloud. A rich young stellar population (2-3 Myr) has been identified, from massive O-stars down to substellar masses. Deep into the remnant molecular material, embedded protostars, Herbig-Haro objects and maser sources bear evidence of ongoing star formation in the nebula, possibly triggered by the massive cluster members. M 16 is a excellent template for the study of star formation under the hostile environment created by massive O-stars. This review aims at providing an observational overview not only of the young stellar population but also of the gas remnant of the star formation process.

  4. Temperature anisotropy of the Jovian sulfur nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eviatar, A.; Siscoe, G. L.; Mekler, Y.

    1979-01-01

    The apparent paradox between the reported observation of a 3-eV gyration energy of Jupiter's ionized sulfur nebula and its observed thickness is discussed. An observation of the thickness of the cloud taken nearly edge-on is presented and shown to imply a large bounce-averaged anisotropy of the sulfur in temperature. These observations are used to construct a self-consistent model of the sulfur nebula in which the sulfur ions are injected by Io as ions and remain sufficiently collisionless in the magnetosphere to maintain the anisotropy for a time longer than a characteristic diffusion time. It is also shown that the proton-electron plasma is collisionally thermalized and provides an adequate means of tapping the rotational energy of the planet to provide the power radiated in the sulfur lines.

  5. The temperature gradient in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The available compositional data on planets and satellites can be used to place stringent limits on the thermal environment in the solar nebula. The densities of the terrestrial planets, Ceres and Vesta, the Galilean satellites, and Titan; the atmospheric compositions of several of these bodies; and geochemical and geophysical data on the earth combine to define a strong dependence of formation temperature on heliocentric distance. It is impossible to reconcile the available compositional data with any model in which the formation temperatures of these bodies are determined by radiative equilibrium with the sun, regardless of the sun's luminosity. Rather, the data support Cameron's hypothesis of a dense, convective solar nebula, opaque to solar radiation, with an adiabatic temperature-pressure profile.

  6. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  7. Chemical Abundances of Compact Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Hui; Shaw, Richard A.; Stanghellini, letizia; Riley, Ben

    2015-08-01

    We present preliminary results from an optical spectroscopic survey of compact planetary nebulae (PNe) in the Galactic disk. This is an ongoing optical+infrared spectral survey of 150 compact PNe to build a deep sample of PN chemical abundances. We obtained optical spectra of PNe with the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) Telescope and Goodman High-Throughput Spectrograph between 2012 and 2015. These data were used to calculate the nebulae diagnostics such as electron temperature and density for each PN, and to derive the elemental abundances of He, N, O Ne, S and Ar. These abundances are vital to understanding the nature of the PNe, and their low- to intermediate-mass progenitor stars.

  8. The albedo of particles in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relation between the apparent angular extent of a reflection nebula and the apparent magnitude of its illuminating star was reconsidered under a less restrictive set of assumptions. A computational technique was developed which permits the use of fits to the observed m-log a values to determine the albedo of particles composing reflection nebulae, providing only that a phase function and average optical thickness are assumed. Multiple scattering, anisotropic phase functions, and illumination by the general star field are considered, and the albedo of reflection nebular particles appears to be the same as that for interstellar particles in general. The possibility of continuous fluorescence contributions to the surface brightness is also considered.

  9. Interstellar molecules - Formation in solar nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Herbig's (1970) hypothesis that solar nebulae might be the principal source of interstellar grains and molecules is investigated. The investigation includes the determination of physical and chemical conditions in the early solar system. The production of organic compounds in the solar nebula is studied, and the compounds in meteorites are compared with those obtained in Miller-Urey and Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions, taking into consideration aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, porphyrins, and aspects of carbon-isotope fractionation. It is found that FTT reactions account reasonably well for all well-established features of organic matter in meteorites investigated. The distribution of compounds produced by FTT reactions is compared with the distribution of interstellar molecules. Biological implications of the results are considered.

  10. Direct photography of the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Roosen, R. G.; Thompson, J.; Ludden, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses a series of wide-angle photographs taken of the Gum Nebula in the traditional region including H-alpha with the aid of a 40-cm and an 80-cm lens in both the red and the green. The photographs support the large dimensions (75 deg in galactic longitude by 40 deg in galactic latitude) of the Gum Nebula suggested earlier, and the appearance is consistent with an origin due to photons from a supernova outburst. The relatively high-density gas has cooled and is visible on the red plates. The low-density gas has remained at a high temperature and may be visible as diffuse emission on the green plates.

  11. The Gum nebula and related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.; Brandt, J. C.; Stecher, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Papers were presented in conference sessions on the Gum nebula, the Vela X remnant, the hot stars gamma Velorum and zeta Puppis, the B associations in the Vela-Puppis complex, and pulsars. Ground-based optical and radio astronomy; rocket and satellite observations in the radio, visible, ultraviolet, and X-ray regions; and theoretical problems in the physical state of the interstellar medium, stellar evolution, and runaway star dynamics were considered.

  12. PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN YOUNG PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    The model for pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) as a result of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) downstream flow from a shocked, relativistic pulsar wind has been successful in reproducing many features of the nebulae observed close to central pulsars. However, observations of well-studied young nebulae like the Crab Nebula, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9 do not show the toroidal magnetic field on a larger scale that might be expected in the MHD flow model; in addition, the radial variation of spectral index due to synchrotron losses is smoother than expected in the MHD flow model. We find that pure diffusion models can reproduce the basic data on nebular size and spectral index variation for the Crab, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9. Most of our models use an energy-independent diffusion coefficient; power-law variations of the coefficient with energy are degenerate with variation in the input particle energy distribution index in the steady state, transmitting boundary case. Energy-dependent diffusion is a possible reason for the smaller diffusion coefficient inferred for the Crab. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport allowing for advection and diffusion of particles suggest that diffusion dominates over much of the total nebular volume of the Crab. Advection dominates close to the pulsar and is likely to play a role in the X-ray half-light radius. The source of diffusion and mixing of particles is uncertain, but may be related to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the outer boundary of a young PWN or to instabilities in the toroidal magnetic field structure.

  13. Magnetic fields in Proto Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, L.; Zhang, Q.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Patel, N. A.; Vázquez, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Contreras, M. E.; Guillén, P. F.

    2014-08-01

    The role of magnetic field in late type stars such as proto-planetary and planetary nebulae (PPNe/PNe), is poorly known from an observational point of view. We present submillimetric observations realized with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) which unveil the dust continuum polarization in the envelopes of two well known PPNe: CRL 618 and OH 231.8+4.2. Assuming the current grain alignment theory, we were then able to trace the geometry of the magnetic field.

  14. Nebulae at keratoconus--the result after excimer laser removal.

    PubMed

    Fagerholm, P; Fitzsimmons, T; Ohman, L; Orndahl, M

    1993-12-01

    Ten patients underwent excimer laser ablation due to nebula formation at keratoconus. The nebulae interfered significantly with contact lens fit or wearing time. The mean follow-up time in these patients was 16.5 months. Following surgery all patients could be successfully fitted with a contact lens and thereby obtain good visual acuity. Furthermore, contact lens wearing time was 8 hours or more in all cases. In 2 patients the nebulae recurred but were successfully retreated. PMID:8154261

  15. New portrait of Omega Nebula's glistening watercolours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    The Omega Nebula, sometimes called the Swan Nebula, is a dazzling stellar nursery located about 5500 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). An active star-forming region of gas and dust about 15 light-years across, the nebula has recently spawned a cluster of massive, hot stars. The intense light and strong winds from these hulking infants have carved remarkable filigree structures in the gas and dust. When seen through a small telescope the nebula has a shape that reminds some observers of the final letter of the Greek alphabet, omega, while others see a swan with its distinctive long, curved neck. Yet other nicknames for this evocative cosmic landmark include the Horseshoe and the Lobster Nebula. Swiss astronomer Jean-Philippe Loys de Chéseaux discovered the nebula around 1745. The French comet hunter Charles Messier independently rediscovered it about twenty years later and included it as number 17 in his famous catalogue. In a small telescope, the Omega Nebula appears as an enigmatic ghostly bar of light set against the star fields of the Milky Way. Early observers were unsure whether this curiosity was really a cloud of gas or a remote cluster of stars too faint to be resolved. In 1866, William Huggins settled the debate when he confirmed the Omega Nebula to be a cloud of glowing gas, through the use of a new instrument, the astronomical spectrograph. In recent years, astronomers have discovered that the Omega Nebula is one of the youngest and most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way. Active star-birth started a few million years ago and continues through today. The brightly shining gas shown in this picture is just a blister erupting from the side of a much larger dark cloud of molecular gas. The dust that is so prominent in this picture comes from the remains of massive hot stars that have ended their brief lives and ejected material back into space, as well as the cosmic detritus from which future suns form. The

  16. HUBBLE CAPTURES UNVEILING OF PLANETARY NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image captures the infancy of the Stingray nebula (Hen-1357), the youngest known planetary nebula. In this image, the bright central star is in the middle of the green ring of gas. Its companion star is diagonally above it at 10 o'clock. A spur of gas (green) is forming a faint bridge to the companion star due to gravitational attraction. The image also shows a ring of gas (green) surrounding the central star, with bubbles of gas to the lower left and upper right of the ring. The wind of material propelled by radiation from the hot central star has created enough pressure to blow open holes in the ends of the bubbles, allowing gas to escape. The red curved lines represent bright gas that is heated by a 'shock' caused when the central star's wind hits the walls of the bubbles. The nebula is as large as 130 solar systems, but, at its distance of 18,000 light-years, it appears only as big as a dime viewed a mile away. The Stingray is located in the direction of the southern constellation Ara (the Altar). The colors shown are actual colors emitted by nitrogen (red), oxygen (green), and hydrogen (blue). The filters used were F658N ([N II]), F502N ([O III]), and F487N (H-beta). The observations were made in March 1996. Credit: Matt Bobrowsky, Orbital Sciences Corporation and NASA

  17. Wavelet Technique Applications in Planetary Nebulae Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal Ferreira, M. L.; Rabaça, C. R.; Cuisinier, F.; Epitácio Pereira, D. N.

    2009-05-01

    Through the application of the wavelet technique to a planetary nebulae image, we are able to identify different scale sizes structures present in its wavelet coefficient decompositions. In a multiscale vision model, an object is defined as a hierarchical set of these structures. We can then use this model to independently reconstruct the different objects that compose the nebulae. The result is the separation and identification of superposed objects, some of them with very low surface brightness, what makes them, in general, very difficult to be seen in the original images due to the presence of noise. This allows us to make a more detailed analysis of brightness distribution in these sources. In this project, we use this method to perform a detailed morphological study of some planetary nebulae and to investigate whether one of them indeed shows internal temperature fluctuations. We have also conducted a series of tests concerning the reliability of the method and the confidence level of the objects detected. The wavelet code used in this project is called OV_WAV and was developed by the UFRJ's Astronomy Departament team.

  18. Radio continuum properties of young planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerrigone, L.; Umana, G.; Trigilio, C.; Leto, P.; Buemi, C. S.; Hora, J. L.

    2008-10-01

    We have selected a small sample of post-AGB (Asymptotic Giant Branch) stars in transition towards the planetary nebula and present new Very Large Array multi-frequency high-angular resolution radio observations of them. The multi-frequency data are used to create and model the targets' radio continuum spectra, proving that these stars started their evolution as very young planetary nebulae. In the optically thin range, the slopes are compatible with the expected spectral index (-0.1). Two targets (IRAS 18062+2410 and 17423-1755) seem to be optically thick even at high frequency, as observed in a handful of other post-AGB stars in the literature, while a third one (IRAS 20462+3416) shows a possible contribution from cold dust. In IRAS 18062+2410, where we have three observations spanning a period of four years, we detect an increase in its flux density, similar to that observed in CRL 618. High-angular resolution imaging shows bipolar structures that may be due to circumstellar tori, although a different hypothesis (i.e. jets) could also explain the observations. Further observations and monitoring of these sources will enable us to test the current evolutionary models of planetary nebulae.

  19. Plasma effect in tape helix traveling-wave tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saviz, S.; Salehizadeh, F.

    2014-05-01

    A linearized relativistic field theory of a plasma-loaded helix traveling-wave tube is presented for a configuration where a solid electron beam propagate through a sheath helix enclosed within a loss-free wall in which the gap between the helix and the outer wall is filled with a dielectric. Numerical study of the effect of plasma density on the phase velocity and growth rate has been done. Numerical results show that the plasma have different behaviors in different density limits.

  20. Colors of reflection nebulae. I - Phase function effects in the Merope nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. N.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of color differences between reflection nebulae and their illuminating stars is reexamined in the light of developments of observational techniques, permitting accurate surface-brightness photometry over an expanded spectral region from the UV to the IR. Color-color diagrams for reflection nebulae can yield useful information about the wavelength dependence of the scattering properties of nebular dust without excessive sensitivity to the specific nebular geometry or the presence of multiple scattering, resulting in considerable savings in computational efforts. As an illustration, the color-difference method was applied to existing data for the Merope nebula, covering the spectral region 1550-5500 A. Strong evidence for a monotonically changing phase function of scattering at wavelengths less than or equal to 3500 A is found. The result is interpreted in the context of a plausible geometry for the Merope environment as providing support for a bimodal size distribution of nebular dust grains.

  1. Ultraviolet spectra of planetary nebulae. X - Physical conditions in the compact planetary nebula Sw St 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. R.; Goharji, A.; Cohen, M.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectric visual and ultraviolet observations of the compact planetary nebula Sw St 1 are analyzed. The electron density, determined from the C III 1907/1909 A line ratio, is N(e) = (1.1 + or - 0.1) x 10 to the 5th/cu cm, consistent with the high emission measure and high critical frequency determined from observations of the thermal radio emission. The C/O abundance ratio in the nebula is found to be N(C)/N(O) = 0.72 + or - 0.1, i.e. the envelope is oxygen-rich, as suggested by the identification of the silicate feature in the 8-13 micron infrared spectrum. Difficulties remain in accurately determining the reddening constant to the nebula and its electron temperature.

  2. Effects of radiation on DNA's double helix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The blueprint of life, DNA's double helix is found in the cells of everything from bacteria to astronauts. Exposure to radiation(depicted at right) such as X-rays (upper) or heavy ion particles (lower), can damage DNA and cause dire consequences both to the organism itself and to future generations. One of NASA's main goals is to develop better radiation shielding materials to protect astronauts from destructive radiation in space. This is particularly important for long space missions. NASA has selected researchers to study materials that provide better shielding. This research is managed by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research and is supported by the Microgravity Science and Applications Department at NASA's Marshall Center. During International Space Station Expedition Six, the Extravehicular Activity Radiation Monitoring (EVARM) will continue to measure radiation dosage encountered by the eyes, internal organs and skin during specific spacewalks, and relate it to the type of activity, location and other factors. An analysis of this information may be useful in mitigating potential exposure to space walkers in the future. (Illustration by Dr. Frank Cucinotta, NASA/Johnson Space Center, and Prem Saganti, Lockheed Martin)

  3. A supramolecular helix that disregards chirality.

    PubMed

    Roche, Cécile; Sun, Hao-Jan; Leowanawat, Pawaret; Araoka, Fumito; Partridge, Benjamin E; Peterca, Mihai; Wilson, Daniela A; Prendergast, Margaret E; Heiney, Paul A; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    The functions of complex crystalline systems derived from supramolecular biological and non-biological assemblies typically emerge from homochiral programmed primary structures via first principles involving secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures. In contrast, heterochiral and racemic compounds yield disordered crystals, amorphous solids or liquids. Here, we report the self-assembly of perylene bisimide derivatives in a supramolecular helix that in turn self-organizes in columnar hexagonal crystalline domains regardless of the enantiomeric purity of the perylene bisimide. We show that both homochiral and racemic perylene bisimide compounds, including a mixture of 21 diastereomers that cannot be deracemized at the molecular level, self-organize to form single-handed helical assemblies with identical single-crystal-like order. We propose that this high crystalline order is generated via a cogwheel mechanism that disregards the chirality of the self-assembling building blocks. We anticipate that this mechanism will facilitate access to previously inaccessible complex crystalline systems from racemic and homochiral building blocks. PMID:26673268

  4. A PHOTOMETRICALLY AND MORPHOLOGICALLY VARIABLE INFRARED NEBULA IN L483

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Fuller, Gary A.

    2009-03-15

    We present narrow and broad K-band observations of the Class 0/I source IRAS 18148-0440 that span 17 years. The infrared nebula associated with this protostar in the L483 dark cloud is both morphologically and photometrically variable on a timescale of only a few months. This nebula appears to be an infrared analog to other well known optically visible variable nebulae associated with young stars, such as Hubble's Variable Nebula. Along with Cepheus A, this is one of the first large variable nebulae to be found that is only visible in the infrared. The variability of this nebula is most likely due to changing illumination of the cloud rather than any motion of the structure in the nebula. Both morphological and photometric changes are observed on a timescale only a few times longer than the light crossing time of the nebula, suggesting very rapid intrinsic changes in the illumination of the nebula. Our narrowband observations also found that H{sub 2} knots are found nearly twice as far to the east of the source as to its west, and that H{sub 2} emission extends farther east of the source than the previously known CO outflow.

  5. The current research of planetary nebulae distance measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuan-yuan; Zhu, Hui; Tian, Wen-wu; Wu, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Planetary Nebula is an important tracer of Galactic chemical history and evolution, star and interstellar evolution. Distance as a basic physical parameter of planetary nebula, is crucial to study its size, luminosity, ionized mass, formation rate, space density and Galactic distribution. Distance of planetary nebula has been studied for several decades, but most of their distances are not well determined, e.g. only thirty-one planetary nebulae have distance measurement with uncertainty within 20%. We summarize major distance measurement methods of planetary nebulae, i.e., trigonometric parallax, cluster member, expansion parallax, spectroscopic parallax, reddening, Na D absorption, determinations of central star gravities, Shklovsky method, kinematics method, and then discuss the limitations and applications scope of each method in detail. Actually, applying different methods to the same planetary nebulae can have a huge difference in distance, and even the same method can lead to great difference for the same planetary nebula. We focus on the kinematics method applied to planetary nebulae either seriously effected by Galactic extinction or having no observable centra star but being radio bright. The kinematics distance has been used in our on-going project of radio planetary nebulae distance measurement.

  6. Physical characteristics of diffuse nebulae and nonstationary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonov, A. V.

    Papers are presented on a variety of topics, including a one-dimensional scattering model for the interpretation of emission from globules and dust nebulae; the properties of silicate particles in the IR range connected with gas-dust nebulae; the central stars of planetary nebulae; and spectrophotometry of the Triffid nebula (NGC 6514, M20). Attention is also given to Be-star spectrophotometry, the use of a scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer to observe extended objects of low surface brightness, and star-identification techniques.

  7. Utilitarian models of the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1994-01-01

    Models of the primitive solar nebula based on a combination of theory, observations of T Tauri stars, and global conservation laws are presented. The models describe the motions of nebular gas, mixing of interstellar material during the formation of the nebula, and evolution of thermal structure in terms of several characteristic parameters. The parameters describe key aspects of the protosolar cloud (its rotation rate and collapse rate) and the nebula (its mass relative to the Sun, decay time, and density distribution). For most applications, the models are heuristic rather than predicted. Their purpose is to provide a realistic context for the interpretation of solar system data, and to distinquish those nebular characteristics that can be specified with confidence, independently of the assumtions of particular models, form those that are poorly constrained. It is demonstrated that nebular gas typically experienced large radial excursions during the evolution of the nebula and that both inward and outward mean radial velocities on the order of meters per second occured in the terrestrial planet region, with inward velocities predominant for most ofthe evolution. However, the time history of disk size, surface density, and radial velocities are sensitive to the total angular momentun of the protosolar cloud, which cannot be constrained by purely theoretical considerations.It is shown that a certain amount of 'formational' mixing of interstellar material was an inevitable consequenc of nebular mass and angular momentum transport during protostellar collapse, regardless of the specific transport mechanisms invloved. Even if the protosolar cloud was initially homogeneous, this mixing was important because it had the effect of mingling presolar material that had experienced different degrees of thermal processing during collapse and passage through the accertion shock. Nebular thermal structure is less sensitive to poorly constrained parameters than is dynamical

  8. Utilitarian models of the solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassen, Patrick

    1994-12-01

    Models of the primitive solar nebula based on a combination of theory, observations of T Tauri stars, and global conservation laws are presented. The models describe the motions of nebular gas, mixing of interstellar material during the formation of the nebula, and evolution of thermal structure in terms of several characteristic parameters. The parameters describe key aspects of the protosolar cloud (its rotation rate and collapse rate) and the nebula (its mass relative to the Sun, decay time, and density distribution). For most applications, the models are heuristic rather than predicted. Their purpose is to provide a realistic context for the interpretation of solar system data, and to distinquish those nebular characteristics that can be specified with confidence, independently of the assumtions of particular models, form those that are poorly constrained. It is demonstrated that nebular gas typically experienced large radial excursions during the evolution of the nebula and that both inward and outward mean radial velocities on the order of meters per second occured in the terrestrial planet region, with inward velocities predominant for most ofthe evolution. However, the time history of disk size, surface density, and radial velocities are sensitive to the total angular momentun of the protosolar cloud, which cannot be constrained by purely theoretical considerations.It is shown that a certain amount of 'formational' mixing of interstellar material was an inevitable consequenc of nebular mass and angular momentum transport during protostellar collapse, regardless of the specific transport mechanisms invloved. Even if the protosolar cloud was initially homogeneous, this mixing was important because it had the effect of mingling presolar material that had experienced different degrees of thermal processing during collapse and passage through the accertion shock. Nebular thermal structure is less sensitive to poorly constrained parameters than is dynamical

  9. The Rings Around the Egg Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpaz, Amos; Rappaport, Saul; Soker, Noam

    1997-01-01

    We present an eccentric binary model for the formation of the proto-planetary nebula CRL 2688 (the Egg Nebula) that exhibits multiple concentric shells. Given the apparent regularity of the structure in the Egg Nebula, we postulate that the shells are caused by the periodic passages of a companion star. Such an orbital period would have to lie in the range of 100-500 yr, the apparent time that corresponds to the spacing between the rings. We assume, in this model, that an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, which is the origin of the matter within the planetary nebula, loses mass in a spherically symmetric wind. We further suppose that the AGB star has an extended atmosphere (out to approximately 10 stellar radii) in which the outflow speed is less than the escape speed; still farther out, grains form and radiation pressure accelerates the grains along with the trapped gas to the escape speed. Once escape speed has been attained, the presence of a companion star will not significantly affect the trajectories of the matter leaving in the wind and the mass loss will be approximately spherically symmetric. On the other hand, if the companion star is sufficiently close that the Roche lobe of the AGB star moves inside the extended atmosphere, then the slowly moving material will be forced to flow approximately along the critical potential surface (i.e., the Roche lobe) until it flows into the potential lobe of the companion star. Therefore, in our model, the shells are caused by periodic cessations of the isotropic wind rather than by any periodic enhancement in the mass-loss process. We carry out detailed binary evolution calculations within the context of this scenario, taking into account the nuclear evolution and stellar wind losses of the giant as well as the effects of mass loss and mass transfer on the evolution of the eccentric binary orbit. From the initial binary parameters that we find are required to produce a multiple concentric shell nebula and the known

  10. THE TRIFID NEBULA: STELLAR SIBLING RIVALRY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Trifid Nebula reveals a stellar nursery being torn apart by radiation from a nearby, massive star. The picture also provides a peek at embryonic stars forming within an ill-fated cloud of dust and gas, which is destined to be eaten away by the glare from the massive neighbor. This stellar activity is a beautiful example of how the life cycles of stars like our Sun is intimately connected with their more powerful siblings. The Hubble image shows a small part of a dense cloud of dust and gas, a stellar nursery full of embryonic stars. This cloud is about 8 light-years away from the nebula's central star, which is beyond the top of this picture. Located about 9,000 light-years from Earth, the Trifid resides in the constellation Sagittarius. A stellar jet [the thin, wispy object pointing to the upper left] protrudes from the head of a dense cloud and extends three-quarters of a light-year into the nebula. The jet's source is a very young stellar object that lies buried within the cloud. Jets such as this are the exhaust gases of star formation. Radiation from the massive star at the center of the nebula is making the gas in the jet glow, just as it causes the rest of the nebula to glow. The jet in the Trifid is a 'ticker tape,' telling the history of one particular young stellar object that is continuing to grow as its gravity draws in gas from its surroundings. But this particular ticker tape will not run for much longer. Within the next 10,000 years the glare from the central, massive star will continue to erode the nebula, overrunning the forming star, and bringing its growth to an abrupt and possibly premature end. Another nearby star may have already faced this fate. The Hubble picture shows a 'stalk' [the finger-like object] pointing from the head of the dense cloud directly toward the star that powers the Trifid. This stalk is a prominent example of the evaporating gaseous globules, or 'EGGs,' that were seen

  11. 6th Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Day: pharmacogenomics and individualized therapy.

    PubMed

    Stojiljkovic, Maja; Fazlagic, Amira; Dokmanovic-Krivokapic, Lidija; Nikcevic, Gordana; Patrinos, George P; Pavlovic, Sonja; Zukic, Branka

    2012-09-25

    The Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days are international scientific meetings aiming to educate healthcare professionals and biomedical scientists about pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. In this meeting report, we provide an overview of the scientific lectures and the topics discussed during the 6th Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Day that was held in Belgrade, Serbia last June 5, 2012. The scientific program included lectures by the local and international speakers from Europe and the United States.

  12. Misplaced helix slows down ultrafast pressure-jump protein folding.

    PubMed

    Prigozhin, Maxim B; Liu, Yanxin; Wirth, Anna Jean; Kapoor, Shobhna; Winter, Roland; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin

    2013-05-14

    Using a newly developed microsecond pressure-jump apparatus, we monitor the refolding kinetics of the helix-stabilized five-helix bundle protein λ*YA, the Y22W/Q33Y/G46,48A mutant of λ-repressor fragment 6-85, from 3 μs to 5 ms after a 1,200-bar P-drop. In addition to a microsecond phase, we observe a slower 1.4-ms phase during refolding to the native state. Unlike temperature denaturation, pressure denaturation produces a highly reversible helix-coil-rich state. This difference highlights the importance of the denatured initial condition in folding experiments and leads us to assign a compact nonnative helical trap as the reason for slower P-jump-induced refolding. To complement the experiments, we performed over 50 μs of all-atom molecular dynamics P-drop refolding simulations with four different force fields. Two of the force fields yield compact nonnative states with misplaced α-helix content within a few microseconds of the P-drop. Our overall conclusion from experiment and simulation is that the pressure-denatured state of λ*YA contains mainly residual helix and little β-sheet; following a fast P-drop, at least some λ*YA forms misplaced helical structure within microseconds. We hypothesize that nonnative helix at helix-turn interfaces traps the protein in compact nonnative conformations. These traps delay the folding of at least some of the population for 1.4 ms en route to the native state. Based on molecular dynamics, we predict specific mutations at the helix-turn interfaces that should speed up refolding from the pressure-denatured state, if this hypothesis is correct. PMID:23620522

  13. Nanoparticle biofabrication using English ivy (Hedera helix)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background English ivy (Hedera helix) is well known for its adhesive properties and climbing ability. Essential to its ability to adhere to vertical surfaces is the secretion of a nanocomposite adhesive containing spherical nanoparticles, 60–85 nm in diameter, produced exclusively by root hairs present on adventitious roots. These organic nanoparticles have shown promise in biomedical and cosmetic applications, and represent a safer alternative to metal oxide nanoparticles currently available. Results It was discovered that the maximum adventitious root production was achieved by a 4 h application of 1 mg/ml indole-3 butyric acid (IBA) to juvenile English ivy shoot segments cultured in custom vessels. After incubation of the shoots under continuous light at 83 μmol/m2 s at 20°C for 2 weeks, the adventitious roots were harvested from the culture system and it was possible to isolate 90 mg of dry weight nanoparticles per 12 g of roots. The nanoparticle morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy, and found to be similar to previous studies. Conclusions An enhanced system for the production of English ivy adventitious roots and their nanoparticles by modifying GA7 Magenta boxes and identifying the optimal concentration of IBA for adventitious root growth was developed. This system is the first such platform for growing and harvesting organic nanoparticles from plants, and represents an important step in the development of plant-based nanomanufacturing. It is a significant improvement on the exploitation of plant systems for the formation of metallic nanoparticles, and represents a pathway for the generation of bulk ivy nanoparticles for translation into biomedical applications. PMID:23095780

  14. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-07-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix.

  15. Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway in a developmental checkpoint monitoring Helix-Loop-Helix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan-Hsin; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    The E-proteins and Id-proteins are, respectively, the positive and negative heterodimer partners for the basic-helix-loop-helix protein family, and as such contribute to a remarkably large number of cell fate decisions. E-proteins and Id-proteins also function to inhibit or promote cell proliferation and cancer. Using a genetic modifier screen in Drosophila, we show that the Id-protein Extramacrochaetae enables growth by suppressing activation of the Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway of tumor suppressors, activation that requires transcriptional activation of the expanded gene by the E-protein Daughterless. Daughterless protein binds to an intronic enhancer in the expanded gene, both activating the SWH pathway independently of the transmembrane protein Crumbs, and bypassing the negative feedback regulation that targets the same expanded enhancer. Thus the Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway has a cell-autonomous function to prevent inappropriate differentiation due to transcription factor imbalance, and monitors the intrinsic developmental status of progenitor cells, distinct from any responses to cell-cell interactions. PMID:25579975

  16. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-10-12

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers.

  17. Macrocyclization and labeling of helix-loop-helix peptide with intramolecular bis-thioether linkage.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Toshio; Kitada, Hidekazu; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Fujii, Ikuo

    2016-11-01

    Conformationally constrained peptides have been developed as an inhibitor for protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and we have de novo designed cyclized helix-loop-helix (cHLH) peptide with a disulfide bond consisting of 40 amino acids to generate molecular-targeting peptides. However, synthesis of long peptides has sometimes resulted in low yield according to the respective amino acid sequences. Here we developed a method for efficient synthesis and labeling for cHLH peptides. First, we synthesized two peptide fragments and connected them by the copper-mediated alkyne and azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Cyclization was performed by bis-thioether linkage using 1,3-dibromomethyl-5-propargyloxybenzene, and subsequently, the cHLH peptide was labeled with an azide-labeled probe. Finally, we designed and synthesized a peptide inhibitor for the p53-HDM2 interaction using a structure-guided design and successfully labeled it with a fluorescent probe or a functional peptide, respectively, by click chemistry. This macrocyclization and labeling method for cHLH peptide would facilitate the discovery of de novo bioactive ligands and therapeutic leads. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 415-421, 2016. PMID:26917088

  18. Origin and Diversification of Basic-Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Nuno; Dolan, Liam

    2010-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a class of transcription factors found throughout eukaryotic organisms. Classification of the complete sets of bHLH proteins in the sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (rice) has defined the diversity of these proteins among flowering plants. However, the evolutionary relationships of different plant bHLH groups and the diversity of bHLH proteins in more ancestral groups of plants are currently unknown. In this study, we use whole-genome sequences from nine species of land plants and algae to define the relationships between these proteins in plants. We show that few (less than 5) bHLH proteins are encoded in the genomes of chlorophytes and red algae. In contrast, many bHLH proteins (100–170) are encoded in the genomes of land plants (embryophytes). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that plant bHLH proteins are monophyletic and constitute 26 subfamilies. Twenty of these subfamilies existed in the common ancestors of extant mosses and vascular plants, whereas six further subfamilies evolved among the vascular plants. In addition to the conserved bHLH domains, most subfamilies are characterized by the presence of highly conserved short amino acid motifs. We conclude that much of the diversity of plant bHLH proteins was established in early land plants, over 440 million years ago. PMID:19942615

  19. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix. PMID:26220399

  20. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, P.; Hara, E.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are precisely coordinated during the development and maturation of the mammary gland, and this balance invariably is disrupted during carcinogenesis. Little is known about the cell-specific transcription factors that regulate these processes in the mammary gland. The mouse mammary epithelial cell line SCp2 grows well under standard culture conditions but arrests growth, forms alveolus-like structures, and expresses {beta}-casein, a differentiation marker, 4 to 5 days after exposure to basement membrane and lactogenic hormones (differentiation signals). The authors show that this differentiation entails a marked decline in the expression of Id-1, a helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein that inactivates basic HLH transcription factors in other cell types. SCp2 cells stably transfected with an Id-1 expression vector grew more rapidly than control cells under standard conditions, but in response to differentiation signals, they lost three-dimensional organization, invaded the basement membrane, and then resumed growth. SCp2 cells expressing an Id-1 antisense vector grew more slowly than controls; in response to differentiation signals, they remained stably growth arrested and fully differentiated, as did control cells. The authors suggest that Id-1 renders cells refractory to differentiation signals and receptive to growth signals by inactivating one or more basic HLH proteins that coordinate growth and differentiation in the mammary epithelium. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Transcriptional Activation by ETS and Leucine Zipper-Containing Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Gang; Erman, Batu; Ishii, Haruhiko; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S.; Sen, Ranjan

    1999-01-01

    The immunoglobulin μ heavy-chain gene enhancer contains closely juxtaposed binding sites for ETS and leucine zipper-containing basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH-zip) proteins. To understand the μ enhancer function, we have investigated transcription activation by the combination of ETS and bHLH-zip proteins. The bHLH-zip protein TFE3, but not USF, cooperated with the ETS domain proteins PU.1 and Ets-1 to activate a tripartite domain of this enhancer. Deletion mutants were used to identify the domains of the proteins involved. Both TFE3 and USF enhanced Ets-1 DNA binding in vitro by relieving the influence of an autoinhibitory domain in Ets-1 by direct protein-protein associations. Several regions of Ets-1 were found to be necessary, whereas the bHLH-zip domain was sufficient for this effect. Our studies define novel interactions between ETS and bHLH-zip proteins that may regulate combinatorial transcription activation by these protein families. PMID:10082562

  2. An exploration of alternative visualisations of the basic helix-loop-helix protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Brian J; Pinney, John W; Lovell, Simon C; Amoutzias, Grigoris D; Robertson, David L

    2007-01-01

    Background Alternative representations of biochemical networks emphasise different aspects of the data and contribute to the understanding of complex biological systems. In this study we present a variety of automated methods for visualisation of a protein-protein interaction network, using the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors as an example. Results Network representations that arrange nodes (proteins) according to either continuous or discrete information are investigated, revealing the existence of protein sub-families and the retention of interactions following gene duplication events. Methods of network visualisation in conjunction with a phylogenetic tree are presented, highlighting the evolutionary relationships between proteins, and clarifying the context of network hubs and interaction clusters. Finally, an optimisation technique is used to create a three-dimensional layout of the phylogenetic tree upon which the protein-protein interactions may be projected. Conclusion We show that by incorporating secondary genomic, functional or phylogenetic information into network visualisation, it is possible to move beyond simple layout algorithms based on network topology towards more biologically meaningful representations. These new visualisations can give structure to complex networks and will greatly help in interpreting their evolutionary origins and functional implications. Three open source software packages (InterView, TVi and OptiMage) implementing our methods are available. PMID:17683601

  3. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hand1 regulates mouse development as a homodimer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong; Scott, Ian C; Snider, Fran; Geary-Joo, Colleen; Zhao, Xiang; Simmons, David G; Cross, James C

    2013-10-15

    Hand1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is essential for development of the placenta, yolk sac and heart during mouse development. While Hand1 is essential for trophoblast giant cell (TGC) differentiation, its potential heterodimer partners are not co-expressed in TGCs. To test the hypothesis that Hand1 functions as homodimer, we generated knock-in mice in which the Hand1 gene was altered to encode a tethered homodimer (TH). Some Hand1(TH/-) conceptuses in which the only form of Hand1 is Hand1(TH) are viable and fertile, indicating that homodimer Hand1 is sufficient for mouse survival. ~2/3 of Hand1(TH/-) and all Hand1(TH/TH) mice died in utero and displayed severe placental defects and variable cardial and cranial-facial abnormalities, indicating a dosage-dependent effect of Hand1(TH). Meanwhile, expression of the Hand1(TH) protein did not have negative effects on viability or fertility in all Hand1(TH/+) mice. These data imply that Hand1 homodimer plays a dominant role during development and its expression dosage is critical for survival, whereas Hand1 heterodimers can be either dispensable or play a regulatory role to modulate the activity of Hand1 homodimer in vivo.

  4. Gene replacement strategies to test the functional redundancy of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Firulli, Anthony B; Firulli, Beth A; Wang, Jian; Rogers, Rhonda H; Conway, Simon J

    2010-04-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors control developmental decisions for a wide range of embryonic cell types. Hand1 and Hand2 are closely related bHLH proteins that control cardiac, craniofacial, and limb development. Within the developing heart, Hand1 expression becomes restricted predominantly to the left ventricle, whereas Hand2 becomes restricted predominantly to the left ventricle, for which findings have shown each Hand factor to be necessary for normal chamber formation. Forced overexpression of Hand1 throughout the early developing heart induces abnormal interventricular septal development, with resulting pathogenesis of congenital heart defects. To investigate the potential transcriptional mechanisms involved in heart morphogenesis by Hand2, this study used a replacement targeting approach to knock Hand2 into the Hand1 locus and ectopically express one copy of Hand2 within the endogenous Hand1 expression domain in the developing hearts of transgenic mice. The findings show that high-percentage Hand1 ( Hand2 ) chimeras die at birth and exhibit a range of congenital heart defects. These findings suggest that Hand factors may act via unique transcriptional mechanisms mediated by bHLH factor partner choice, supporting the notion that alterations of Hand factor stoichiometry may be as deleterious to normal heart morphogenesis as Hand factor loss of function.

  5. Helix-loop-helix transcription factors mediate activation and repression of the p75LNGFR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A; Neuman, K; Palm, K; Metsis, M; Neuman, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of rat and human low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75LNGFR gene promoter regions revealed a single E-box cis-acting element, located upstream of the major transcription start sites. Deletion analysis of the E-box sequence demonstrated that it significantly contributes to p75LNGFR promoter activity. This E box has a dual function; it mediates either activation or repression of the p75LNGFR promoter activity, depending on the interacting transcription factors. We showed that the two isoforms of the class A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ME1 (ME1a and ME1b), the murine homolog of the human HEB transcription factor, specifically repress p75LNGFR promoter activity. This repression can be released by coexpression of the HLH Id2 transcriptional regulator. In vitro analyses demonstrated that ME1a forms a stable complex with the p75LNGFR E box and likely competes with activating E-box-binding proteins. By using ME1a-overexpressing PC12 cells, we showed that the endogenous p75LNGFR gene is a target of ME1a repression. Together, these data demonstrate that the p75LNGFR E box and the interacting bHLH transcription factors are involved in the regulation of p75LNGFR gene expression. These results also show that class A bHLH transcription factors can repress and Id-like negative regulators can stimulate gene expression. PMID:7565756

  6. Preferred sequences for DNA recognition by the TAL1 helix-loop-helix proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, H L; Huang, L; Tsan, J T; Funk, W; Wright, W E; Hu, J S; Kingston, R E; Baer, R

    1994-01-01

    Tumor-specific activation of the TAL1 gene is the most common genetic alteration seen in patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The TAL1 gene products contain the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain, a protein dimerization and DNA-binding motif common to several known transcription factors. A binding-site selection procedure has now been used to evaluate the DNA recognition properties of TAL1. These studies demonstrate that TAL1 polypeptides do not have intrinsic DNA-binding activity, presumably because of their inability to form bHLH homodimers. However, TAL1 readily interacts with any of the known class A bHLH proteins (E12, E47, E2-2, and HEB) to form heterodimers that bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner. The TAL1 heterodimers preferentially recognize a subset of E-box elements (CANNTG) that can be represented by the consensus sequence AACAGATGGT. This consensus is composed of half-sites for recognition by the participating class A bHLH polypeptide (AACAG) and the TAL1 polypeptide (ATGGT). TAL1 heterodimers with DNA-binding activity are readily detected in nuclear extracts of Jurkat, a leukemic cell line derived from a patient with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Hence, TAL1 is likely to bind and regulate the transcription of a unique subset of subordinate target genes, some of which may mediate the malignant function of TAL1 during T-cell leukemogenesis. Images PMID:8289805

  7. A directional nucleation-zipping mechanism for triple helix formation.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Patrizia; Arimondo, Paola B; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Garestier, Thérèse; Hélène, Claude; Sun, Jian-Sheng

    2002-12-15

    A detailed kinetic study of triple helix formation was performed by surface plasmon resonance. Three systems were investigated involving 15mer pyrimidine oligonucleotides as third strands. Rate constants and activation energies were validated by comparison with thermodynamic values calculated from UV-melting analysis. Replacement of a T.A base pair by a C.G pair at either the 5' or the 3' end of the target sequence allowed us to assess mismatch effects and to delineate the mechanism of triple helix formation. Our data show that the association rate constant is governed by the sequence of base triplets on the 5' side of the triplex (referred to as the 5' side of the target oligopurine strand) and provides evidence that the reaction pathway for triple helix formation in the pyrimidine motif proceeds from the 5' end to the 3' end of the triplex according to the nucleation-zipping model. It seems that this is a general feature for all triple helices formation, probably due to the right-handedness of the DNA double helix that provides a stronger base stacking at the 5' than at the 3' duplex-triplex junction. Understanding the mechanism of triple helix formation is not only of fundamental interest, but may also help in designing better triple helix-forming oligonucleotides for gene targeting and control of gene expression.

  8. Translocation of α-helix chains through a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Li, Shiben; Zhang, Linxi; ur Rehman, Ateeq; Liang, Haojun

    2010-10-01

    The translocation of α-helix chains through a nanopore is studied through Langevin dynamics simulations. The α-helix chains exhibit several different characteristics about their average translocation times and the α-helix structures when they transport through the nanopores under the driving forces. First, the relationship between average translocation times τ and the chain length N satisfies the scaling law, τ ˜Nα, and the scaling exponent α depends on the driving force f for the small forces while it is close to the Flory exponent (ν) in the other force regions. For the chains with given chain lengths, it is observed that the dependence of the average translocation times can be expressed as τ ˜f-1/2 for the small forces while can be described as τ ˜f in the large force regions. Second, for the large driving force, the average number of α-helix structures Nh decreases first and then increases in the translocation process. The average waiting time of each bead, especially of the first bead, is also dependent on the driving forces. Furthermore, an elasticity spring model is presented to reasonably explain the change of the α-helix number during the translocation and its elasticity can be locally damaged by the large driving forces. Our results demonstrate the unique behaviors of α-helix chains transporting through the pores, which can enrich our insights into and knowledge on biopolymers transporting through membranes.

  9. The helix-turn-helix motif of sigma 54 is involved in recognition of the -13 promoter region.

    PubMed Central

    Merrick, M; Chambers, S

    1992-01-01

    Residue Arg-383 in the proposed helix-turn-helix motif of the novel RNA polymerase sigma factor sigma 54 has been changed by site-directed mutagenesis to all possible alternative amino acids. Only two mutants, RK383 and RH383, are active in promoting transcription from either the glnAp2 promoter or the nifL promoter. We constructed a set of mutant derivatives of glnAp2 such that each base in the conserved GG and GC doublets at -24 and -12 was changed to all possible alternatives. All 12 mutant glnAp2 promoters showed a marked promoter-down phenotype with wild-type sigma 54, but RK383 suppressed changes of both G to C and G to T at -13. This result suggests that the sigma 54 helix-turn-helix is involved in recognition of the -13 region of sigma 54-dependent promoters. Images PMID:1429447

  10. Molecular hydrogen ion /H2+/ absorption in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Boggess, A.; Mccracken, C. W.; Hobbs, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Several IUE spectra of planetary nebulae show an absorption feature shortward of 1500 A which is believed to be due to H2(+). The nebulae are excited by stars of spectral type O3-O7 or continuum, and all but one have double-shell structure.

  11. Three-dimensional evolution of early solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1991-01-01

    The progress is reported toward the goal of a complete theory of solar nebula formation, with an emphasis on three spatial dimension models of solar nebular formation and evolution. The following subject areas are covered: (1) initial conditions for protostellar collapse; (2) single versus binary star formation; (3) angular momentum transport mechanisms; (4) three dimensional solar nebula models; and (5) implications for planetary formation.

  12. Herschel/HIFI observations of molecular emission in protoplanetary nebulae and young planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, V.; Alcolea, J.; Soria-Ruiz, R.; Planesas, P.; Teyssier, D.; Cernicharo, J.; Decin, L.; Dominik, C.; Justtanont, K.; de Koter, A.; Marston, A. P.; Melnick, G.; Menten, K. M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Olofsson, H.; Schmidt, M.; Schöier, F. L.; Szczerba, R.; Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims: We aim to study the physical conditions, particularly the excitation state, of the intermediate-temperature gas in protoplanetary nebulae and young planetary nebulae (PPNe, PNe). The information that the observations of the different components deliver is of particular importance for understanding the evolution of these objects. Methods: We performed Herschel/HIFI observations of intermediate-excitation molecular lines in the far-infrared/submillimeter range in a sample of ten nebulae. The high spectral resolution provided by HIFI allows the accurate measurement of the line profiles. The dynamics and evolution of these nebulae are known to result from the presence of several gas components, notably fast bipolar outflows and slow shells (that often are the fossil AGB shells), and the interaction between them. Because of the diverse kinematic properties of the different components, their emissions can be identified in the line profiles. The observation of these high-energy transitions allows an accurate study of the excitation conditions, particularly in the warm gas, which cannot be properly studied from the low-energy lines. Results: We have detected FIR/sub-mm lines of several molecules, in particular of 12CO, 13CO, and H2O. Emission from other species, like NH3, OH, H218O, HCN, SiO, etc., has been also detected. Wide profiles showing sometimes spectacular line wings have been found. We have mainly studied the excitation properties of the high-velocity emission, which is known to come from fast bipolar outflows. From comparison with general theoretical predictions, we find that CRL 618 shows a particularly warm fast wind, with characteristic kinetic temperature Tk ≳ 200 K. In contrast, the fast winds in OH 231.8+4.2 and NGC 6302 are cold, Tk ~ 30 K. Other nebulae, like CRL 2688, show intermediate temperatures, with characteristic values around 100 K. We also discuss how the complex structure of the nebulae can affect our estimates, considering two

  13. Peptide mimics of the M13 coat protein transmembrane segment. Retention of helix-helix interaction motifs.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Deber, C M

    2000-05-26

    Sequence-specific noncovalent helix-helix interactions between transmembrane (TM) segments in proteins are investigated by incorporating selected TM sequences into synthetic peptides using the construct CKKK-TM-KKK. The peptides are of suitable hydrophobicity for spontaneous membrane insertion, whereas formation of an N-terminal S-S bond can bring pairs of TM helices into proximity and promote their parallel orientation. Using the propensity of the protein to undergo thermally induced alpha-helix --> beta-sheet transitions as a parameter for helix stability, we compared the wild type and mutant (V29A and V31A) bacteriophage M13 coat proteins with their corresponding TM peptide constructs (M13 residues 24-42). Our results demonstrated that the relevant helix-helix tertiary contacts found in the intact proteins persist in the peptide mimics. Molecular dynamics simulations support the tight "two in-two out" dimerization motif for V31A consistent with mutagenesis data. The overall results reinforce the notion of TM segments as autonomous folding domains and suggest that the generic peptide construct provides a viable reductionist system for membrane protein structural and computational analysis.

  14. Tunable Control of Polyproline Helix (PPII) Structure via Aromatic Electronic Effects: An Electronic Switch of Polyproline Helix

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic rings exhibit defined interactions via the unique aromatic π face. Aromatic amino acids interact favorably with proline residues via both the hydrophobic effect and aromatic–proline interactions, C−H/π interactions between the aromatic π face and proline ring C–H bonds. The canonical aromatic amino acids Trp, Tyr, and Phe strongly disfavor a polyproline helix (PPII) when they are present in proline-rich sequences because of the large populations of cis amide bonds induced by favorable aromatic–proline interactions (aromatic–cis-proline and proline–cis-proline–aromatic interactions). We demonstrate the ability to tune polyproline helix conformation and cis–trans isomerism in proline-rich sequences using aromatic electronic effects. Electron-rich aromatic residues strongly disfavor polyproline helix and exhibit large populations of cis amide bonds, while electron-poor aromatic residues exhibit small populations of cis amide bonds and favor polyproline helix. 4-Aminophenylalanine is a pH-dependent electronic switch of polyproline helix, with cis amide bonds favored as the electron-donating amine, but trans amide bonds and polyproline helix preferred as the electron-withdrawing ammonium. Peptides with block proline–aromatic PPXPPXPPXPP sequences exhibited electronically switchable pH-dependent structures. Electron-poor aromatic amino acids provide special capabilities to integrate aromatic residues into polyproline helices and to serve as the basis of aromatic electronic switches to change structure. PMID:25075447

  15. CRL 618: A Nascent Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafoya, D.; Loinard, L.; Fonfría, J. P.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Pech, G.

    2014-04-01

    CRL 618 is an object that exhibits characteristics of both AGB and post-AGB star. It also displays a spectacular array of bipolar lobes with a dense equatorial region, which makes it an excellent object to study the development of asymmetries in evolved stars. In the recent decades, an elliptical compact HII region located in the center of the nebula has been seen to be increasing in size and flux. This seems to be due to the ionization of the circumstellar envelope by the central star, and it would be indicating the beginning of the planetary nebula phase for CRL 618. We analyzed interferometric radio continuum data at ~5 and 22 GHz from observations carried out at seven epochs with the VLA. We traced the increase of the flux of the ionized region over a period of ~26 years. We measured the dimensions of the HII region directly from the brightness distribution images to determine the increase of its size over time. For one of the epochs we analyzed observations at six frequencies from which we estimated the electron density distribution. We carried out model calculations of the spectral energy distribution at two different epochs to corroborate our observational results. We found that the radio continuum flux and the size of the ionized region have been increasing monotonically in the last three decades. The size of the major axis of the HII region shows a dependance with frequency, which has been interpreted as a result of a gradient of the electron density in this direction. The growth of the HII region is due to the expansion of an ionized wind whose mass-loss rate increased continuously for a period of ~100 years until a few decades ago, when the mass-loss rate experienced a sudden decline. Our results indicate that the beginning of the ionization of the circumstellar envelope began around 1971, which marks the start of the planetary nebula phase of CRL 618.

  16. Extreme Particle Acceleration via Magnetic Reconnection in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerutti, Benoit; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery by Agile and Fermi of intense day-long synchrotron gamma-ray flares above 100 MeV in the Crab Nebula challenges classical models of pulsar wind nebulae and particle acceleration. We argue that the flares are powered by magnetic reconnection in the nebula. Using relativistic test-particle simulations, we show that particles are naturally focused into a thin fan beam, deep inside the reconnection layer where the magnetic field is small. The particles then suffer less from synchrotron losses and pile up at the maximum energy given by the electric potential drop in the layer. Applying this model to the Crab Nebula, we find that the emerging synchrotron emission spectrum above 100 MeV is consistent with the September 2010 flare observations. No detectable emission is expected at other wavelengths. This scenario provides a viable explanation for the Crab Nebula gamma-ray flares.

  17. Element Masses in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibley, Adam R.; Katz, Andrea M.; Satterfield, Timothy J.; Vanderveer, Steven J.; MacAlpine, Gordon M.

    2016-10-01

    Using our previously published element abundance or mass-fraction distributions in the Crab Nebula, we derived actual mass distributions and estimates for overall nebular masses of hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and sulfur. As with the previous work, computations were carried out for photoionization models involving constant hydrogen density and also constant nuclear density. In addition, employing new flux measurements for [Ni ii] λ7378, along with combined photoionization models and analytic computations, a nickel abundance distribution was mapped and a nebular stable nickel mass estimate was derived.

  18. Planetary nebulae and the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    In addition to available published data on planetary nebulae (PN), some 40 objects largely concentrated towards the galactic center and anticenter regions were included. All were observed with the Lick 3(sup m) telescope and image tube scanner. Abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Cl, and Ar were determined by a procedure in which theoretical models were used to obtain ionization correction factors (ICF). Of the 106 PN, 66 are N-rich and 40 are N-poor. There appear to be no significant differences between the average compositions in the solar neighborhood and the average taken over the entire observable portion of the galaxy.

  19. Eagle Nebula Pillars: From Models to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc W.; Kane, Jave O.; Remington, Bruce A.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Mizuta, Akira; Takabe, Hideaki

    Over the past few years, our group has been developing hydrodynamic models to simulate formation of the Eagle Nebula pillars. The true test of any model is, of course, how well it can reproduce the observations. Here, we discuss how we go about testing our models against observations. We describe the process by which we "observe" the model data to create synthetic maps. We show an example of this technique using one of our model runs and compare the resultant synthetic map to the real one.

  20. Eagle Nebula Pillars: From Models to Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pound, Marc W.; Kane, Jave O.; Remington, Bruce A.; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Mizuta, Akira; Takabe, Hideaki

    2005-07-01

    Over the past few years, our group has been developing hydrodynamic models to simulate formation of the Eagle Nebula pillars. The true test of any model is, of course, how well it can reproduce the observations. Here, we discuss how we go about testing our models against observations. We describe the process by which we “observe” the model data to create synthetic maps. We show an example of this technique using one of our model runs and compare the resultant synthetic map to the real one.

  1. MCNeil's Nebula in Orion: The Outburst History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, C.; Vivas, A. K.; Hernández, J.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Megeath, T.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M.; Hoyer, S.

    2004-05-01

    We present a sequence of I-band images obtained at the Venezuela 1 m Schmidt telescope during the outburst of the nebula recently discovered by J. W. McNeil in the Orion L1630 molecular cloud. We derive photometry spanning the preoutburst state and the brightening itself, which is a unique record including 14 epochs and spanning a timescale of ~5 years. We constrain the beginning of the outburst at some time between 2003 October 28 and November 15. The light curve of the object at the vertex of the nebula, the likely exciting source of the outburst, reveals that it has brightened ~5 mag in about 4 months. The timescale for the nebula to develop is consistent with the light-travel time, indicating that we are observing light from the central source scattered by the ambient cloud into the line of sight. We also show recent FLWO optical spectroscopy of the exciting source and of the nearby HH 22. The spectrum of the source is highly reddened; in contrast, the spectrum of HH 22 shows a shock spectrum superposed on a continuum, most likely the result of reflected light from the exciting source reaching the HH object through a much less reddened path. The blue portion of this spectrum is consistent with an early B spectral type, similar to the early outburst spectrum of the FU Orionis variable star V1057 Cygni; we estimate a luminosity of L~219 Lsolar. The eruptive behavior of McNeil's Nebula, its spectroscopic characteristics and luminosity, suggest that we may be witnessing an FU Ori event on its way to maximum. By further monitoring this object, we will be able decide whether or not it qualifies as a member of this rare class of objects. Based on observations obtained at the Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory of Venezuela, operated by CIDA for the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología, and at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Institution.

  2. Kinematic Distances of Galactic Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, A. Y.; Tian, W. W.; Zhu, H.; Leahy, D. A.; Wu, D.

    2016-03-01

    We construct H i absorption spectra for 18 planetary nebulae (PNs) and their background sources using data from the International Galactic Plane Survey. We estimate the kinematic distances of these PNs, among which 15 objects’ kinematic distances are obtained for the first time. The distance uncertainties of 13 PNs range from 10% to 50%, which is a significant improvement with uncertainties of a factor of two or three smaller than most previous distance measurements. We confirm that PN G030.2-00.1 is not a PN because of its large distance found here.

  3. The Gum Nebula and Related Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Proceedings of a symposium concerning the Gum Nebula (GN) and related topics are reported. Papers presented include: Colin Gum and the discovery of the GN; identification of the GN as the fossil Stromgren sphere of Vela X Supernova; size and shape of GN; formation of giant H-2 regions following supernova explosions; radio astronomy Explorer 1 observations of GN; cosmic ray effects in the GN; low intensity H beta emission from the interstellar medium; and how to recognize and analyze GN. Astronomical charts and diagrams are included.

  4. X-ray emission from Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.

    1998-09-01

    The Trifid Nebula is one of the best-studied astrophysical objects, a classical nebula of ionized gas from an O6V star glowing red light, and it is trisected by obscuring dust lanes. Our ROSAT/PSPC image for the first time reveals that the Trifid Nebula emits X-rays and its emitting region is ~ 7' diameter--as large as the HII region itself. %The only previously reported X-ray emission Three main X-ray peaks appear within ~ 4 pc diameter of diffuse emission, roughly spherical. The strongest peak has 2' size near the O star, but the centroid of the X-ray peak appears 25'' away from HD 164492. % which is larger than the PSPC point spread function. Thus the emission may be a shell surrounding the O star as observed in eta Carina, originating from the interaction of a stellar wind with a circumstellar shell. There are a few other X-ray peaks: along the northeastern dust lane and in the east, none of which coincide with any identified optical stars. The PSPC spectrum extracted from the entire Trifid nebula does not clearly distinguish between thermal, bremsstrahlung, and power-law models, due to lack of counts. However, all of these models imply the X-ray luminosity (0.3 - 2.4 keV) is greater than 0.2 - 3*E(34) ergs s(-1) . The diffuse emission is possibly thermal with a temperature of 0.3-1 keV, as in the other HII regions eta Carina and RCW 49. The strong stellar wind from an O star alone can inject an energy of ~ 10(36) ergs s(-1) into ISM; this energy can be converted to heat the ionized gas to X-ray temperature. While the global diffuse X-ray emitting region is similar to the optical HII region, the bright X-ray peaks coincide with the structures in the infrared, suggesting possible embedded stars and their interaction with the circumstellar medium.

  5. A large bubble around the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Reach, William T.; Koo, Bon Chul; Heiles, Carl

    1990-01-01

    IRAS and 21 cm observations of the interstellar medium around the Crab nebula show evidence of a large bubble surrounded by a partial shell. If located at the canonical 2 kpc distance of the Crab pulsar, the shell is estimated to have a radius of about 90 pc and to contain about 50,000 solar masses of swept-up gas. The way in which interior conditions of this bubble can have important implications for observations of the Crab are described, and the fashion in which presupernova evolution of the pulsar progenitor has affected its local environment is described.

  6. Investigation of the cometary nebula Parsamyan 21

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosyan, V.M.

    1985-05-01

    The results are given of an isodensitometric and spectrophotometric investigation of the cometary nebula P 21 and its associated nucleus. The shape of the isodensities of the nucleus differs from those for normal stars, and in this the nucleus recalls R Mon. A spectral investigation of the nucleus of P 21 made on the basis of observations during 1981-1982 shows that it is a star of the class F2-F5V with an envelope expanding at about 120 km/sec.

  7. Structure, stability and folding of the alpha-helix.

    PubMed

    Doig, A J; Andrew, C D; Cochran, D A; Hughes, E; Penel, S; Sun, J K; Stapley, B J; Clarke, D T; Jones, G R

    2001-01-01

    Pauling first described the alpha-helix nearly 50 years ago, yet new features of its structure continue to be discovered, using peptide model systems, site-directed mutagenesis, advances in theory, the expansion of the Protein Data Bank and new experimental techniques. Helical peptides in solution form a vast number of structures, including fully helical, fully coiled and partly helical. To interpret peptide results quantitatively it is essential to use a helix/coil model that includes the stabilities of all these conformations. Our models now include terms for helix interiors, capping, side-chain interactions, N-termini and 3(10)-helices. The first three amino acids in a helix (N1, N2 and N3) and the preceding N-cap are unique, as their amide NH groups do not participate in backbone hydrogen bonding. We surveyed their structures in proteins and measured their amino acid preferences. The results are predominantly rationalized by hydrogen bonding to the free NH groups. Stabilizing side-chain-side-chain energies, including hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding and polar/non-polar interactions, were measured accurately in helical peptides. Helices in proteins show a preference for having approximately an integral number of turns so that their N- and C-caps lie on the same side. There are also strong periodic trends in the likelihood of terminating a helix with a Schellman or alpha L C-cap motif. The kinetics of alpha-helix folding have been studied with stopped-flow deep ultraviolet circular dichroism using synchrotron radiation as the light source; this gives a far superior signal-to-noise ratio than a conventional instrument. We find that poly(Glu), poly(Lys) and alanine-based peptides fold in milliseconds, with longer peptides showing a transient overshoot in helix content.

  8. Suppression of Chondrogenesis by Id Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins in Murine Embryonic Orofacial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Rezzoug, Francine; Webb, Cynthia L.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of differentiation (Id) proteins are helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factors lacking a DNA binding domain. Id proteins modulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation in embryonic/fetal tissue. Perturbation of any of these processes in cells of the developing orofacial region results in orofacial anomalies. Chondrogenesis, a process integral to normal orofacial ontogenesis, is known to be modulated, in part, by Id proteins. In the present study, the mRNA and protein expression patterns of Id1, Id2, Id3 and Id4 were examined in developing murine orofacial tissue in vivo, as well as in murine embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells in vitro. The functional role of Ids during chondrogenesis was also explored in vitro. Results reveal that cells derived from developing murine orofacial tissue: (1) express Id1, Id2, Id3 and Id4 mRNAs and proteins on each of gestational days 12-14, (2) express all four Id proteins in a developmentally regulated manner, (3) undergo chondrogenesis and express genes encoding various chondrogenic marker proteins (e.g. Runx2, Type X collagen, Sox9) when cultured under micromass conditions, and (4) can have their chondrogenic potential regulated via alteration of Id protein function through overexpression of a basic HLH factor. In summary, results from the current report reveal for the first time, the expression of all four Id proteins in cells derived from developing murine orofacial tissue, and demonstrate a functional role for the Ids in regulating the ability of these cells to undergo chondrogenesis. PMID:19349107

  9. Regulation of Arabidopsis Brassinosteroid Signaling by Atypical Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhu, Yongyou; Fujioka, Shozo; Asami, Tadao; Li, Jiayang; Li, Jianming

    2009-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are highly conserved transcription factors critical for cell proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies have implicated bHLH proteins in many plant signaling processes, including brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Here, we report identification of two families of atypical bHLH proteins capable of modulating BR signaling. We found that activation-tagged bri1 suppressor 1-Dominant (atbs1-D), previously identified as a dominant suppressor of a weak BR receptor mutant bri1-301, was caused by overexpression of a 93–amino acid atypical bHLH protein lacking amino acids critical for DNA binding. Interestingly, atbs1-D only suppresses weak BR mutants, while overexpression of a truncated ATBS1 lacking the basic motif also rescues bri1-301, suggesting that ATBS1 likely stimulates BR signaling by sequestering negative BR signaling components. A yeast two-hybrid screen using ATBS1 as bait discovered four ATBS1-Interacting Factors (AIFs) that are members of another atypical bHLH protein subfamily. AIF1 exhibits an overlapping expression pattern with ATBS1 and its homologs and interacts with ATBS1 in vitro and in vivo. AIF1 overexpression nullifies the suppressive effect of atbs1-D on bri1-301 and results in dwarf transgenic plants resembling BR mutants. By contrast, silencing of AIF1 partially suppressed the bri1-301 phenotype. Our results suggested that plants use these atypical bHLH proteins to regulate BR signaling. PMID:20023194

  10. The HAND1 basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor regulates trophoblast differentiation via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scott, I C; Anson-Cartwright, L; Riley, P; Reda, D; Cross, J C

    2000-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes Hand1 and Mash2 are essential for placental development in mice. Hand1 promotes differentiation of trophoblast giant cells, whereas Mash2 is required for the maintenance of giant cell precursors, and its overexpression prevents giant cell differentiation. We found that Hand1 expression and Mash2 expression overlap in the ectoplacental cone and spongiotrophoblast, layers of the placenta that contain the giant cell precursors, indicating that the antagonistic activities of Hand1 and Mash2 must be coordinated. MASH2 and HAND1 both heterodimerize with E factors, bHLH proteins that are the DNA-binding partners for most class B bHLH factors and which are also expressed in the ectoplacental cone and spongiotrophoblast. In vitro, HAND1 could antagonize MASH2 function by competing for E-factor binding. However, the Hand1 mutant phenotype cannot be solely explained by ectopic activity of MASH2, as the Hand1 mutant phenotype was not altered by further mutation of Mash2. Interestingly, expression of E-factor genes (ITF2 and ALF1) was down-regulated in the trophoblast lineage prior to giant cell differentiation. Therefore, suppression of MASH2 function, required to allow giant cell differentiation, may occur in vivo by loss of its E-factor partner due to loss of its expression and/or competition from HAND1. In giant cells, where E-factor expression was not detected, HAND1 presumably associates with a different bHLH partner. This may account for the distinct functions of HAND1 in giant cells and their precursors. We conclude that development of the trophoblast lineage is regulated by the interacting functions of HAND1, MASH2, and their cofactors.

  11. Elucidation of the aggregation pathways of helix-turn-helix peptides: Stabilization at the turn region is critical for fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thanh D.; Chamas, Ali; Zheng, Xueyun; Barnes, Aaron; Chang, Dayna; Veldstra, Tjitske; Takhar, Harmeet; Dressler, Nicolette; Trapp, Benjamin; Miller, Kylie; McMahon, Audrene; Meredith, Stephen C.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Cantrell, Kristi Lazar; Bowers, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins to fiber-like aggregates often involves a transformation of native monomers to β-sheet-rich oligomers. This general observation underestimates the importance of α-helical segments in the aggregation cascade. Here, using a combination of experimental techniques and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the aggregation of a 43-residue, apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide and its E21Q and D26N mutants. Our study indicates a strong propensity of helical segments not to adopt cross-β fibrils. The helix-turn-helix monomeric conformation of the peptides is preserved in the mature fibrils. Furthermore, we reveal opposite effects of mutations on and near the turn region in the self-assembly of these peptides. We show that the E21-R24 salt bridge is a major contributor to helix-turn-helix folding, subsequently leading to abundant fibril formation. On the other hand, the K19-D26 interaction is not required to fold the native helix-turn-helix. However, removal of the charged D26 residue decreases the stability of helix-turn-helix monomer, and consequently reduces aggregation. Finally, we provide a more refined assembly model for the helix-turn-helix peptides from apolipoprotein A-I based on the parallel stacking of helix-turn-helix dimers. PMID:26070092

  12. Elucidation of the Aggregation Pathways of Helix-Turn-Helix Peptides: Stabilization at the Turn Region Is Critical for Fibril Formation.

    PubMed

    Do, Thanh D; Chamas, Ali; Zheng, Xueyun; Barnes, Aaron; Chang, Dayna; Veldstra, Tjitske; Takhar, Harmeet; Dressler, Nicolette; Trapp, Benjamin; Miller, Kylie; McMahon, Audrene; Meredith, Stephen C; Shea, Joan-Emma; Lazar Cantrell, Kristi; Bowers, Michael T

    2015-07-01

    Aggregation of proteins to fiberlike aggregates often involves a transformation of native monomers to β-sheet-rich oligomers. This general observation underestimates the importance of α-helical segments in the aggregation cascade. Here, using a combination of experimental techniques and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the aggregation of a 43-residue, apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide and its E21Q and D26N mutants. Our study indicates a strong propensity of helical segments not to adopt cross-β-fibrils. The helix-turn-helix monomeric conformation of the peptides is preserved in the mature fibrils. Furthermore, we reveal opposite effects of mutations on and near the turn region in the self-assembly of these peptides. We show that the E21-R24 salt bridge is a major contributor to helix-turn-helix folding, subsequently leading to abundant fibril formation. On the other hand, the K19-D26 interaction is not required to fold the native helix-turn-helix peptide. However, removal of the charged D26 residue decreases the stability of the helix-turn-helix monomer and consequently reduces the level of aggregation. Finally, we provide a more refined assembly model for the helix-turn-helix peptides from apolipoprotein A-I based on the parallel stacking of helix-turn-helix dimers.

  13. HUBBLE CAPTURES DYNAMICS OF CRAB NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sequence of Hubble Space Telescope images of the remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion is giving astronomers a remarkable look at the dynamic relationship between the tiny Crab Pulsar and the vast nebula that it powers. This picture shows a Hubble Space Telescope image of the inner parts of the Crab. The pulsar itself is visible as the left of the pair of stars near the center of the frame. Surrounding the pulsar is a complex of sharp knots and wisp-like features. This image is one of a sequence of Hubble images taken over the course of several months. This sequence shows that the inner part of the Crab Nebula is far more dynamic than previously understood. The Crab literally 'changes it stripes' every few days as these wisps stream away from the pulsar at half the speed of light. The Hubble Space Telescope photo was taken Nov. 5, 1995 by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 at a wavelength of around 550 nanometers, in the middle of the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  14. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  15. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  16. The Eagle Nebula Science on NIF experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave; Heeter, Robert; Martinez, David; Pound, Marc; Remington, Bruce; Ryutov, Dmitri; Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    The Eagle Nebula NIF experiment was one of nine selected for laser time through the Science on NIF program. The goal of this scale laboratory experiment is to study the dynamic evolution of distinctive structures in star forming regions of astrophysical molecular clouds such as the Pillars of the Eagle Nebula. That evolution is driven by photoionizing radiation from nearby stars. A critical aspect of the radiation is its very directional nature at the photoionization front. The long duration of the drive and its directionality can generate new classes of instabilities and dynamic flows at the front that may be responsible for the shapes of Pillars and other structures. The experiment will leverage and modify the existing NIF Radiation Transport platform, replacing the target at the back end of the halfraum with a collimating aperture, and extending the existing 20 ns drive to longer times, using a combination of gas fill and other new design features. The apertured, quasi-collimated drive will be used to drive a target placed 2 mm away from the aperture. The astrophysical background and the status of the experimental design will be presented.

  17. Physics and chemistry of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Lunine, J I

    1997-06-01

    The solar system is thought to have begun in a flattened disk of gas and dust referred to traditionally as the solar nebula. Such a construct seems to be a natural product of the collapse of dense parts of giant molecular clouds, the vast star-forming regions that pepper the Milky Way and other galaxies. Gravitational, magnetic and thermal forces within the solar nebula forced a gradual evolution of mass toward the center (where the sun formed) and angular momentum (borne by a small fraction of the mass) toward the outer more distant regions of the disk. This evolution was accompanied by heating and a strong temperature contrast from the hot, inner regions to the cold, more remote parts of the disk. The resulting chemistry in the disk determined the initial distribution of organic matter in the planets; most of the reduced carbon species, in condensed form, were located beyond the asteroid belt (the 'outer' solar system). The Earth could have received much of its inventory of pre-biological material from comets and other icy fragments of the process of planetary formation in the outer solar system.

  18. A HYPERSPECTRAL VIEW OF THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P.; Grandmont, F.; Binette, L. E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.c

    2010-05-15

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the H{beta}, [O III] {lambda}4959, {lambda}5007, H{alpha}, [N II] {lambda}6548, {lambda}6584, and [S II] {lambda}6717, {lambda}6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Megantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Cadez et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [S II] {lambda}6717 /[S II] {lambda}6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  19. Optical line intensities in the Trifid nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Lynds, B.T.; Oneil, E.J. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Observations of the Trifid nebula (M20) obtained in H-alpha; He I (587.6 nm); and the forbidden lines of N II (658.3 nm), S II (671.6 and 673 nm), O III (500.7 nm), and O II (272.6 and 372.9 nm) using either the CIT long-slit spectrograph or a direct-mode CCD with narrow-band interference filters on the 92-cm telescope at KPNO are reported. The data are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail and a model is proposed to explain the scattering measurements. Findings discussed include a single central O7 V star with Teff = about 37,500 K, a dusty plasma ionized by this star, mean nebular electron density 150/cu cm, a central hole of radius 0.2 times that of the ionized zone, dust extending beyond the ionized region, overall temperature 7000-8000 K, filament temperatures up to 9000 K, dust optical depth 1.5 at H-beta, dust albedo 0.5, emission-nebula radius 2.8 pc, and total mass about 1700 solar mass (comprising 340 solar mass ionized material, about 800 solar mass unionized cloud material, and about 600 solar mass in an outer dust sphere). 18 references.

  20. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric; Jackson, Matthew G.; Barrat, Jean-Alix E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  1. Optical line intensities in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynds, B. T.; Oneil, E. J., Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Observations of the Trifid nebula (M20) obtained in H-alpha; He I (587.6 nm); and the forbidden lines of N II (658.3 nm), S II (671.6 and 673 nm), O III (500.7 nm), and O II (272.6 and 372.9 nm) using either the CIT long-slit spectrograph or a direct-mode CCD with narrow-band interference filters on the 92-cm telescope at KPNO are reported. The data are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail and a model is proposed to explain the scattering measurements. Findings discussed include a single central O7 V star with Teff = about 37,500 K, a dusty plasma ionized by this star, mean nebular electron density 150/cu cm, a central hole of radius 0.2 times that of the ionized zone, dust extending beyond the ionized region, overall temperature 7000-8000 K, filament temperatures up to 9000 K, dust optical depth 1.5 at H-beta, dust albedo 0.5, emission-nebula radius 2.8 pc, and total mass about 1700 solar mass (comprising 340 solar mass ionized material, about 800 solar mass unionized cloud material, and about 600 solar mass in an outer dust sphere).

  2. The Other Double Helix--The Fascinating Chemistry of Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Robert D.; Tarbet, Bryon J.

    2000-08-01

    Current textbooks deal only briefly with the chemistry of starch. A short review with 21 references is presented, describing the structure of starch and indicating the double helix structure of A-type and B-type starch. The structure of the starch granule is examined, pointing out the existence of growth rings of alternating crystalline and noncrystalline starch, with growing amylopectin molecules extending from the hilum (point of origin) to the surface of the starch granule. The swelling of starch granules in water, above the gelatinization temperature of about 60 °C, is discussed. The process of gelatinization involves unraveling of the starch helix and a manyfold increase in volume of the starch granule as water is imbibed and bound to the unraveled starch polymer by hydrogen bonding. Baking bread or pastries causes unraveling of the starch helix, and the process by which these products become stale corresponds primarily to the re-forming of the starch helix. The importance of this phenomenon in food science is discussed. The absorption of nonpolar linear molecules such as I2, or linear nonpolar portions of molecules such as n-butanol or fats and phospholipids, by the C-type helix of starch is examined. The way in which starch is structurally modified to retard staling is discussed in relation to food technology.

  3. Evaluation of Doxorubicin-loaded 3-Helix Micelles as Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Nikhil; Shu, Jessica Y.; Dong, He; Seo, Jai W.; Ingham, Elizabeth; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Forsayeth, John; Bankiewicz, Krystof; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Xu, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Designing stable drug nanocarriers, 10-30 nm in size, would have significant impact on their transport in circulation, tumor penetration and therapeutic efficacy. In the present study, biological properties of 3-helix micelles loaded with 8 wt% doxorubicin (DOX), ~15 nm in size, were characterized to validate their potential as a nanocarrier platform. DOX-loaded micelles exhibited high stability in terms of size and drug retention in concentrated protein environments similar to conditions after intravenous injections. DOX-loaded micelles were cytotoxic to PPC-1 and 4T1 cancer cells at levels comparable to free DOX. 3-helix micelles can be disassembled by proteolytic degradation of peptide shell to enable drug release and clearance to minimize long-term accumulation. Local administration to normal rat striatum by convection enhanced delivery (CED) showed greater extent of drug distribution and reduced toxicity relative to free drug. Intravenous administration of DOX-loaded 3-helix micelles demonstrated improved tumor half-life and reduced toxicity to healthy tissues in comparison to free DOX. In vivo delivery of DOX-loaded 3-helix micelles through two different routes clearly indicates the potential of 3-helix micelles as safe and effective nanocarriers for cancer therapeutics. PMID:24050265

  4. Forming Planets in the Hostile Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Can protoplanetary disks form and be maintained around low-mass stars in the harsh environment of a highly active, star-forming nebula? A recent study examines the Carina nebula to answer this question.Crowded ClustersStars are often born in clusters that contain both massive and low-mass stars. The most massive stars in these clusters emit far-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet light that irradiates the region around them, turning the surrounding area into a hostile environment for potential planet formation.Planet formation from protoplanetary disks typically requires timescales of at least 12 million years. Could the harsh radiation from massive stars destroy the protoplanetary disks around low-mass stars by photoevaporation before planets even have a chance to form?Artists impression of a protoplanetary disk. Such disks can be photoevaporated by harsh ultraviolet light from nearby massive stars, causing the disk to be destroyed before planets have a chance to form within them. [ESO/L. Calada]Turning ALMA Toward CarinaA perfect case study for exploring hostile environments is the Carina nebula, located about 7500 lightyears away and home to nearly 100 O-type stars as well as tens of thousands of lower-mass young stars. The Carina population is ~14 Myr old: old enough to form planets within protoplanetary disks, but also old enough that photoevaporation could already have wreaked havoc on those disks.Due to the dense stellar populations in Carinas clusters, this is a difficult region to explore, but the Atacama Large Millimeter-submillimeter Array (ALMA) is up to the task. In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Adal Mesa-Delgado (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) made use of ALMAs high spatial resolution to image four regions spaced throughout Carina, searching for protoplanetary disks.Detections and Non-DetectionsTwo evaporating gas globules in the Carina nebula, 104-593 and 105-600, that each contain a protoplanetary disk. The top panels are

  5. Stabilization of magnetic helix in exchange-coupled thin films

    PubMed Central

    Dzemiantsova, L. V.; Meier, G.; Röhlsberger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Based on micromagnetic simulations, we report on a novel magnetic helix in a soft magnetic film that is sandwiched between and exchange-coupled to two hard magnetic layers with different anisotropies. We show that such a confined helix stays stable without the presence of an external magnetic field. The magnetic stability is determined by the energy minimization and is a result of an internal magnetic field created by the exchange interaction. We show that this internal field stores a magnetic energy density of a few kJ/m3. We also find that it dramatically modifies ferromagnetic resonances, such that the helix can be used as a ferromagnetic resonance filter and a fast acting attenuator. PMID:26537574

  6. Conformation dependent electronic transport in a DNA double-helix

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Sourav Karmakar, S. N.

    2015-10-15

    We present a tight-binding study of conformation dependent electronic transport properties of DNA double-helix including its helical symmetry. We have studied the changes in the localization properties of DNA as we alter the number of stacked bases within every pitch of the double-helix keeping fixed the total number of nitrogen bases within the DNA molecule. We take three DNA sequences, two of them are periodic and one is random and observe that in all the cases localization length increases as we increase the radius of DNA double-helix i.e., number of nucleobases within a pitch. We have also investigated the effect of backbone energetic on the I-V response of the system and found that in presence of helical symmetry, depending on the interplay of conformal variation and disorder, DNA can be found in either metallic, semiconducting and insulating phases, as observed experimentally.

  7. Universal kinetics of helix-coil transition in gelatin.

    PubMed

    Gornall, J L; Terentjev, E M

    2008-03-01

    By covering a much wider concentration range than previous studies we find a very unusual exponential dependence of the rate of helix formation on concentration of gelatin in water and ethylene glycol solutions. By applying a procedure of concentration-temperature superposition we build a master curve describing the initial renaturation rates in both solvents. The growth of the normalized helical fraction chi(t) is a first-order process, with a rate constant consistent with cis-trans isomerization, in most situations. We propose that association of three separate chains to form a triple helical nucleus occurs rapidly and contributes less to the helical onset than previously thought. The measured helix content is a result of lengthening of the triple helix after nucleation, by zipping from the associated nuclei.

  8. X-Ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula trailing the high-velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the "Guitar Nebula"). This X-ray flux gives evidence of gamma approximately 10(exp 7) eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the postshock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near-equipartition values.

  9. Planetary nebulae and their central stars - origin and evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iben, I., Jr.

    This very detailed review deals with the following topics: star evolution to the AGB phase, thermally pulsating AGB stars, evolution from the AGB to the planetary nebula phase and from there to the white dwarf stage, pulsation, dust and mass loss, OH/IR sources, carbon-rich IR sources, and protoplanetary nebulae, classical planetary nebulae and their central stars, chemistry of the central stars and the born-again phenomenon, common-envelope PNe and binary central stars and final fate of central stars.

  10. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  11. Infrared polarimetry of the NGC 6334 V bipolar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Okuda, Haruyuki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Nagata, Tetsuya Kyoto Univ. )

    1990-03-01

    Exceptionally high degrees (up to about 100 percent) of polarization were observed in the L-prime band (3.8 microns) toward the NGC 6334 V bipolar nebula. The observed symmetric polarization pattern indicates that the nebula is a reflection nebula consisting of two lobes illuminated by a central obscured star. The distribution of polarization requires that one of the lobes consist of a lemon-shaped cavity which scatters light mainly at its surface, whereas a conical cavity model is appropriate for the other lobe. This asymmetry of the lobes is probably due to a density gradient in the ambient cloud material in this region. 17 refs.

  12. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling in Twin-Helix.

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Erdelyi. B., J.A. Maloney

    2011-09-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated optics. Wedge-shaped absorbers immediately followed by short rf cavities are placed into the twin-helix channel. Parametric resonances are induced in both planes using helical quadrupole harmonics. We demonstrate resonant dynamics and cooling with stochastic effects off using GEANT4/G4beamline. We illustrate compensation of spherical aberrations and benchmark COSY Infinity, a powerful tool for aberration analysis and compensation.

  13. Planetary Nebulae with Supporting IR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    We present new HST/WFPC2 imagery for the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 6818. Observations were made in line filters F437N, F487N, F502N, and F656N plus continuum filter F547M. The primary goal was to develop a high spatial resolution (approx. 0.1 in.) map of the intrinsic line ratio [O III] 4363/5007 and thereby evaluate the electron temperature (T(sub e)) and the mean-square T(sub e) variation (t(sup 2) across the PN. In this process we developed an extinction map from the F487N (H(beta)) and F656N (H(alpha)) images by comparing the observed line ratios in each pixel to the theoretical ratio and computing a c(H(beta)) map which was used to correct the observed 4363/5007 ratios for reddening. We also adjust for the continuum contribution to the line filter data. We present color-coded pictures of the reddening (c(H(beta))) map, the [O III] T(sub e) map, as well as our determinations of t(sup 2). The T(sub e) map shows a decline from approx. 14000 K in the inner regions to approx. 11000 K at the outer edge. Such a radial T(sub e) gradient is expected for a high-excitation nebula with a prominent He(++) zone such as NGC 6818. A composite of images taken in 3 filters (F656N, red; F487N, blue; and F502N, [O III] 5007, green) shows a roughly spherical outer envelope as well as a brighter vase-shaped interior "bubble". There is a prominent orifice to the North and a smaller one to the South, along the major axis, possibly caused by a blow-out from a fast wind. This nebula has an appearance remarkably similar to that of the PN NGC 3918 previously imaged with HST by H. Bond. We note from the continuum images (F547M) two stars in the nebular field that are fainter than the prominent central star; these are roughly 2-4 sec. N and NE of the central star. Further study is needed to establish whether or not there may be a physical association of either star with the central star.

  14. Converting One-Face α-Helix Mimetics into Amphiphilic α-Helix Mimetics as Potent Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Oh, Misook; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Huisun; Im, Wonpil; Lim, Hyun-Suk

    2016-01-11

    Many biologically active α-helical peptides adopt amphiphilic helical structures that contain hydrophobic residues on one side and hydrophilic residues on the other side. Therefore, α-helix mimetics capable of mimicking such amphiphilic helical peptides should possess higher binding affinity and specificity to target proteins. Here we describe an efficient method for generating amphiphilic α-helix mimetics. One-face α-helix mimetics having hydrophobic side chains on one side was readily converted into amphiphilic α-helix mimetics by introducing appropriate charged residues on the opposite side. We also demonstrate that such two-face amphiphilic α-helix mimetics indeed show remarkably improved binding affinity to a target protein, compared to one-face hydrophobic α-helix mimetics. We believe that generating a large combinatorial library of these amphiphilic α-helix mimetics can be valuable for rapid discovery of highly potent and specific modulators of protein-protein interactions.

  15. The Arabidopsis Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor FamilyW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Huq, Enamul; Quail, Peter H.

    2003-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a superfamily of transcription factors that bind as dimers to specific DNA target sites and that have been well characterized in nonplant eukaryotes as important regulatory components in diverse biological processes. Based on evidence that the bHLH protein PIF3 is a direct phytochrome reaction partner in the photoreceptor's signaling network, we have undertaken a comprehensive computational analysis of the Arabidopsis genome sequence databases to define the scope and features of the bHLH family. Using a set of criteria derived from a previously defined consensus motif, we identified 147 bHLH protein–encoding genes, making this one of the largest transcription factor families in Arabidopsis. Phylogenetic analysis of the bHLH domain sequences permits classification of these genes into 21 subfamilies. The evolutionary and potential functional relationships implied by this analysis are supported by other criteria, including the chromosomal distribution of these genes relative to duplicated genome segments, the conservation of variant exon/intron structural patterns, and the predicted DNA binding activities within subfamilies. Considerable diversity in DNA binding site specificity among family members is predicted, and marked divergence in protein sequence outside of the conserved bHLH domain is observed. Together with the established propensity of bHLH factors to engage in varying degrees of homodimerization and heterodimerization, these observations suggest that the Arabidopsis bHLH proteins have the potential to participate in an extensive set of combinatorial interactions, endowing them with the capacity to be involved in the regulation of a multiplicity of transcriptional programs. We provide evidence from yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays that two related phytochrome-interacting members in the Arabidopsis family, PIF3 and PIF4, can form both homodimers and heterodimers and that all three dimeric

  16. ISO Spectroscopy of Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the chemical properties of the dust shells around protoplanetary nebulae (PPNs) through a study of their short-wavelength (6-45 micron) infrared spectra. PPNs are evolved stars in transition from the asymptotic giant branch to the planetary nebula stages. Spectral features in the 10 to 20 gm region indicate the chemical nature (oxygen- or carbon-rich), and the strengths of the features relate to the physical properties of the shells. A few bright carbon-rich PPNs have been observed to show PAH features and an unidentified 21 micron emission feature. We used the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to observe a sample of IRAS sources that have the expected properties of PPNs and for which we have accurate positions. Some of these have optical counterparts (proposal SWSPPN01) and some do not (SWSPPN02). We had previously observed these from the ground with near-infrared photometry and, for those with visible counterparts, visible photometry and spectroscopy, which we have combined with these new ISO data in the interpretation of the spectra. We have completed a study of the unidentified emission feature at 21 micron in eight sources. We find the shape of the feature to be the same in all of the sources, with no evidence of any substructure. The ratio of the emission peak to continuum ranges from 0.13 to 1.30. We have completed a study of seven PPNs and two other carbon-rich objects for which we had obtained ISO 2-45 micron observations. The unidentified emission features at 21 and 30 micron were detected in six sources, including four new detections of the 30 micron feature. This previously unresolved 30 micron feature was resolved and found to consist of a broad feature peaking at 27.2 micron (the "30 micron" feature) and a narrower feature peaking at 25.5 micron (the "26 micron" feature). This new 26 micron feature is detected in eight sources and is particularly strong in IRAS Z02229+6208 and 16594-4656. The unidentified

  17. Atlas of monochromatic images of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Schmidt, E. O.; Vena Valdarenas, R. R.; Ahumada, J. A.; Volpe, M. G.; Mudrik, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present an atlas of more than one hundred original images of planetary nebulae (PNe). These images were taken in a narrow-band filter centred on the nebular emission of the [N ii] during several observing campaigns using two moderate-aperture telescopes, at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), and the Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre (EABA), both in Argentina. The data provided by this atlas represent one of the most extensive image surveys of PNe in [N ii]. We compare the new images with those available in the literature, and briefly describe all cases in which our [N ii] images reveal new and interesting structures. The reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A103

  18. Watching Young Planetary Nebulae Grow: The Movie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Bruce

    2009-07-01

    The development of magneto-hydro gas dynamical models is the key to the understanding of both the physics {processes} and astronomy {initial conditions} of astrophysical nebulae of all sorts. The models are reaching their highest degree of accuracy when applied to and compared against pre Planetary Nebulae {pPNe} thanks to the simplicity, relative lack of extinction, and the detail of the imaging and kinematic data that have bcome available for these objects. The primary barrier to progress is inadequate kinematic data of pPNe against which the predictions models can be tested. Unlike PNe, pPNe do not emit emission lines for detailed Doppler measurements. Therefore it is essential to find another way to monitor the morphological evolution. Only HST can uncover the dynamics of the growth patterns by subtracting multi-epoch images spanning a decade or more. We have selected four pPNe with highly collimated outflows in different evolutionary stages for which high-quality first-epoch images were obtained from 1996 to 2002. All of them display regularly shaped thin rims, sharp edges, and symmetric pairs of knots or bowshocks that are ideal for our purposes. We will closely mimic many of the earlier exposures using ACS and to monitor changes in structures. The morphology and its evolution will be compared to 3-D MHD models with adaptive grids in order to build a far clearer picture of the nuclear geometry which shaped the outflows and constrained their propagation to the present. We shall also obtain R, J, and H images for use with a 3-D dust radiative transfer code LELUYA to model the dust distribution deep into the nuclear zones.

  19. Temperature Scale of Central Stars Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffry

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain new insight into both the true temperatures of the central stars of planetary nebulae and their evolutionary histories. The temperature scale of the hottest central stars of planetary nebulae is poorly known. The temperature diagnostics available at visible wavelengths are not useful for these very hot stars, or suffer from as-yet unresolved systematic uncertainties. However, the combination of FUSE FUV spectra and HST NUV spectra allows precise temperature determinations by utilizing ionization balances of C III, C IV and O V, O VI lines. The sample comprises hot hydrogen-rich central stars covering the hottest phase of post-AGB evolution (T_eff greater than 70,000K). The spectra were analyzed with fully metal line blanketed NLTE model atmospheres in order to determine T_eff, surface gravity, and chemical composition. In addition to the temperature scale, the spectra help address the question of metal abundances at the surface of these stars. Depending on the particular star, the metal abundances are either dominated by ongoing diffusion processes or they originate from dredge-up phases during previous AGB evolution. The sample was selected so as to include objects that were expected to exhibit both processes, in order to assess their relative importance and to gain insight into the evolutionary history of the stars. The objects that show qualitatively a metal abundance pattern which points at dredge-up phases, can be used to quantitatively check against abundance predictions of stellar evolution theory. The other objects, where gravitational diffusion and radiative acceleration determine the photospheric metal abundances, will be used to check our NLTE models which for the first time include diffusion processes self-consistently.

  20. Peculair Abundances in the Crab Nebula's Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fesen, Robert A.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances of supernova remnants can provide invaluable information concerning the properties of the progenitor star as well as details of stellar nucleosynthesis. In this regard, the Crab Nebula is especially useful, it being the youngest supernova remnant observable with IUE. Despite being fairly heavily reddened, UV emission-lines from its filaments have been successfully obtained many times early in the history of IUE. These UV spectra provided important and unique data for determining elemental composition of the filamentary ejecta, especially for C, N, and O. Analysis of these data by Davidson et al (1982) indicated nearly solar C/O and N/O ratios despite the large general enrichment of helium in the remnant. Although not realized at the time, there is considerable recent evidence which indicates that significant abundance variations do exist among the filaments. The strongest anomalies in composition are puzzlingly confined to a few relatively bright northern filaments which exhibit nearly solar He abundance yet show possibly large Ni enrichment. If we hope to understand the elemental composition of remnants in general and the Crab Nebula in particular, we then need to determine the composition of these peculiar filaments and to what extent they differ from the rest of the remnant. Towards that goal, we therefore propose to obtain IUE low dispersion SWP spectra on the brightest of these peculiar filaments where we have already obtained matching optical data. Analysis will follow that of Davidson el al but with much more detailed photoionization models for the Crab already developed by us. These data should help determine the true range of abundances present in the Crab's filamentary ejecta.

  1. Infrared studies of dust grains in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    IR reflection nebulae, regions of dust which are illuminated by nearby embedded sources, were observed in several regions of ongoing star formation. Near IR observation and theoretical modelling of the scattered light form IR reflection nebulae can provide information about the dust grain properties in star forming regions. IR reflection nebulae were modelled as plane parallel slabs assuming isotropically scattering grains. For the grain scattering properties, graphite and silicate grains were used with a power law grain size distribution. Among the free parameters of the model are the stellar luminosity and effective temperature, the optical depth of the nebula, and the extinction by foreground material. The typical results from this model are presented and discussed.

  2. The near-infrared continuum emission of visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1984-01-01

    In the past, reflection nebulae have provided an astrophysical laboratory well suited for the study of the reflection properties of interstellar dust grains at visual and ultraviolet wavelengths. The present investigation is concerned with observations which were begun with the objective to extend to near-infrared wavelengths the study of grains in reflection. Observations of three classical visual reflection nebulae were conducted in the wavelength range from 1.25 to 2.2 microns, taking into account NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. All three nebulae were found to have similar near-infrared colors, despite widely different colors of their illuminating stars. The brightness level shown by two of the nebulae at 2.2 microns was too high to be easily accounted for on the basis of reflected light. Attention is given to a wide variety of possible emission mechanisms.

  3. Chondrule formation by clumpy accretion onto the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.; Graham, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Chondrule textures and compositions appear to require rapid heating of precursor grain aggregates to temperatures in the range 1500 K to 2100 K, cooling times on the order of hours, and episodic and variable intensity events in order to produce chondrule rims and chemically distinct groups. Nebula shock waves have been proposed by Hood and Horanyi as a physical mechanism that may be capable of meeting the meteoritical constraints. Motivated by astronomical observations of the close environments of young stars, we suggest that the source of the nebula shock waves may be clumpy accretion onto the solar nebula - that is, episodic impacts onto the nebula by discrete cloud clumps with masses of at least 10(exp 22) g. If the cloud clumps are massive enough (10(exp 26) g), the resulting shockwave may be able to propagate to the midplane and process precursor aggregates residing in a dust sub-disk.

  4. Solar nebula condensates and the composition of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1989-01-01

    Interpretation of the volatile abundances in Halley's comet in terms of models for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula are discussed. Key ratios of the oxidized and reduced species of nitrogen and carbon are identified which tell something of the chemical history of the environment in which cometary grains accreted to form the nucleus. Isotopic abundances are also applied to this problem. It will be shown that the abundances of methane and carbon monoxide are consistent both with models of solar nebula chemistry and chemical processing on grains in star-forming regions. Ultimately, limitations of the current data set on molecular abundances in comets and star-forming regions prevent a definitive choice between the two. Processes important to the composition of outer solar system bodies are: (1) gas phase chemistry in the solar nebula; (2) imperfect mixing in the solar nebula; (3) condensation; (4) clathration; (5) adsorption; and (6) processing of interstellar material.

  5. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the planetary nebula in the Fornax galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.; Gull, T. R.; Stecher, T. P.; Aller, L. H.; Keyes, C. D.

    1984-01-01

    The planetary nebula in the Fornax dwarf spheroidal galaxy is carbon rich, according to calculations based on measurements of the 1909 A emission line doublet of semiforbidden C III obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer. The ratio N(C)/N(O) is approximately equal to 3.7, comparable to the largest reliably determined carbon/oxygen ratios in high excitation planetaries of the Milky Way. The present result is based on four low-dispersion spectra with a combined exposure time of 27.2 hours; the Fornax planetary nebula is probably the most distant known planetary that can be observed with IUE. The IUE data were analyzed together with visible-wavelength emission-line fluxes reported by Danziger et al. (1978) to compute abundances for various elements. In terms of chemical composition, the Fornax nebula resembles planetary nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds more closely than it does typical or carbon-rich planetaries in the Galaxy.

  6. The Crab Nebula: A Flickering X-ray Candle

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Crab Nebula, created by a supernova seen nearly a thousand years ago, is one of the sky's most famous "star wrecks." For decades, most astronomers have regarded it as the steadiest beacon at X-...

  7. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Simonelli, D.P.; Pollack, J.B.; Mckay, C.P.; Reynolds, R.T.; Summers, A.L. )

    1989-11-01

    The compositional contrast between the giant-planet satellites and the significantly rockier Pluto/Charon system is indicative of different formation mechanisms; cosmic abundance calculations, in conjunction with an assumption of the Pluto/Charon system's direct formation from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that most of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in CO form, in keeping with both the inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium, and/or the Lewis and Prinn (1980) kinetic-inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Laboratory studies of carbonaceous chondrites and Comet Halley flyby studies suggest that condensed organic material, rather than elemental carbon, is the most likely candidate for the small percentage of the carbon-bearing solid in the outer solar nebula. 71 refs.

  8. A New Color Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscoat, R. J.; Kormendy, K.

    1997-03-01

    A new color image of the Crab Nebula is presented. This is a $2782 \\times 1904$ pixel mosaic of CCD frames taken through \\B\\ (blue), \\V\\ (green), and \\R\\ (red) filters; it was carefully color balanced so that the Sun would appear white. The resolution of the final image is approximately 0\\farcs8 FWHM. The technique by which this image was constructed is described, and some aspects of the structure of the Crab Nebula revealed by the image are discussed. We also discuss the weaknesses of this technique for producing ``true-color'' images, and describe how our image would differ from what the human eye might see in a very large wide-field telescope. The structure of the inner part of the synchrotron nebula is compared with recent high-resolution images from the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope\\/} and from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. (SECTION: Interstellar Medium and Nebulae)

  9. Polarization observations of the nebula M 20 with filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voshchinnikov, N. V.

    1983-01-01

    Results are presented of polarization observations using six filters of five regions of the nebula M 20 and the star HD 164514 which is located behind the nebula. It is found that the degree of polarization in the continuum is higher than in the emission lines for three regions in the southern part of the nebula. The polarization is determined to arise due to the scattering of the radiation of the exciting star HD 164492 by dust particles (probably consisting mostly of dirty ice) in M 20. In the northern part of the nebula, it is shown that the nonspherical grains are probably oriented in such a way that their major axes are in a plane approximately perpendicular to the direction to the star HD 164492.

  10. A single peptide loop in an alpha-Helix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pitch is not a height but a ratio of rise/run. In an alpha-helix, run can be as the radius (r) from the center of the circle, as a diameter (d) measured across/bisecting a circumference, or as a distance (c) along a circumference; rise in each case can corresponds to same height (h) increase. For ...

  11. Talent Development as a University Mission: The Quadruple Helix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm-Nielsen, Lauritz B.; Thorn, Kristian; Olesen, Jeppe Dorup; Huey, Tina

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the rationale behind making talent development at the PhD, post-doctoral and early career levels an equal fourth pillar of the university's mission, alongside the more traditional pillars of the triple helix. Using Denmark and Aarhus University as a case study, the paper describes how increased institutional…

  12. Probabilistic grammatical model for helix‐helix contact site classification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hidden Markov Models power many state‐of‐the‐art tools in the field of protein bioinformatics. While excelling in their tasks, these methods of protein analysis do not convey directly information on medium‐ and long‐range residue‐residue interactions. This requires an expressive power of at least context‐free grammars. However, application of more powerful grammar formalisms to protein analysis has been surprisingly limited. Results In this work, we present a probabilistic grammatical framework for problem‐specific protein languages and apply it to classification of transmembrane helix‐helix pairs configurations. The core of the model consists of a probabilistic context‐free grammar, automatically inferred by a genetic algorithm from only a generic set of expert‐based rules and positive training samples. The model was applied to produce sequence based descriptors of four classes of transmembrane helix‐helix contact site configurations. The highest performance of the classifiers reached AUCROC of 0.70. The analysis of grammar parse trees revealed the ability of representing structural features of helix‐helix contact sites. Conclusions We demonstrated that our probabilistic context‐free framework for analysis of protein sequences outperforms the state of the art in the task of helix‐helix contact site classification. However, this is achieved without necessarily requiring modeling long range dependencies between interacting residues. A significant feature of our approach is that grammar rules and parse trees are human‐readable. Thus they could provide biologically meaningful information for molecular biologists. PMID:24350601

  13. Three-dimensional simulation of helix traveling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Zaidman, E.G.; Mankofsky, A.; Kodis, M.A.; Vanderplaats, N.R.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present a three-dimensional nonlinear formulation and simulation of a helix traveling wave tube (TWT) using a sheath helix model. The simulation is capable of treating both DC and pulsed electron beams as well as single-frequency or multi-tone operation. The model relies upon a spectral decomposition of the electromagnetic fields in terms of the vacuum sheath helix polarizations. The field equations are integrated on a grid and advanced in time using a MacCormack predictor-corrector scheme, and the electron orbit equations are integrated using a fourth order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Charge is accumulated on the grid and the field is interpolated to the particle location by a linear map. Several numerical cases are considered. Simulation of the injection of a DC beam and a signal at a single frequency is compared with a linear field theory of the helix TWT interaction, and good agreement is found. Simulation of a prebunched beam is also discussed, and compared with an experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  14. Ly(alpha) Photolysis in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for the third year of work on this project. Our proposal was to quantitatively investigate the importance of photochemistry in the solar nebula. In the generally accepted theory for the chemical evolution of the primitive solar nebula, Prinn and Fegley argued that photochemistry is unimportant, and that thermochemistry controls the relative abundances of molecular species throughout the planet-forming region. They provided useful estimates of the chemical energy available to the solar nebula from a variety of sources, and established that even the small photolysis rate due to starlight is more important than the photolysis rate from direct sunlight (although small, the UV flux from starlight could have processed a non-negligible fraction of the solar nebula. The reason for this is that the opacity of the disk was so large that direct sunlight could only penetrate to 0.1 AU or so, despite the expectation that the protosun, if comparable to a T-Tauri star, would be emitting up to 104 more H I Ly(alpha) photons than the current sun. We developed a Monte Carlo resonance fine radiative transfer code, capable of accurately calculating the radiation field of H I Ly(alpha), He I 584 A, and He II 304 A emissions throughout the nebula and the nearby interstellar medium in which it is embedded. We applied the code to two appropriate models of the primitive solar nebula. Our model provided the photolysis rates of various species over the entire surface layer of the nebula, and from this we evaluated the importance of UV photochemistry due to backscattered solar UV resonance line emissions on different parts of the nebula. The results discussed below were presented.

  15. Dust to planetesimals - Settling and coagulation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of solid particles in a low-mass solar nebula during settling to the central plane and the formation of planetesimals is discussed. The gravitational instability in a dust layer and collisional accretion are examined as possible mechanisms of planetesimal formation. The shear between the gas and a dust layer is considered along with the differences in the planetesimal formation mechanisms between the inner and outer nebula. A numerical model for computing simultaneous coagulation and settling is described.

  16. Ly(alpha) Photolysis in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for the third year of work on this project. Our proposal was to quantitatively investigate the importance of photochemistry in the solar nebula. In the generally accepted theory for the chemical evolution of the primitive solar nebula, Prinn and Fegley argued that photochemistry is unimportant, and that thermochemistry controls the relative abundances of molecular species throughout the planet-forming region. They provided useful estimates of the chemical energy available to the solar nebula from a variety of sources, and established that even the small photolysis rate due to starlight is more important than the photolysis rate from direct sunlight (although small, the UV flux from starlight could have processed a non-negligible fraction of the solar nebula. The reason for this is that the opacity of the disk was so large that direct sunlight could only penetrate to 0.1 AU or so, despite the expectation that the protosun, if comparable to a T-Tauri star, would be emitting up to 10(exp 4) more H I Ly(alpha) photons than the current sun. We developed a Monte Carlo resonance fine radiative transfer code, capable of accurately calculating the radiation field of H I Ly(alpha), He I 584 A, and He II 304 A emissions throughout the nebula and the nearby interstellar medium in which it is embedded. We applied the code to two appropriate models of the primitive solar nebula. Our model provided the photolysis rates of various species over the entire surface layer of the nebula, and from this we evaluated the importance of UV photochemistry due to backscattered solar UV resonance line emissions on different parts of the nebula. The results discussed below were presented.

  17. Collimated Outflows in the Stingray Nebula (He 3-1357)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, M.; Sahu, K. C.; Parthasarathy, M.; Garcia-Lario, P.

    1997-12-01

    Observations over the past four decades have revealed significant changes in the spectrum of the Stingray Nebula (He 3-1357). Here we present HST images and spectra showing the most recent developments. In 1950, Henize saw only Hα in emission; but more recent observations by Parthasarathy et al. in 1992 showed strong forbidden lines consistent with a young planetary nebula. The spherically aberrated 1992 HST images, in which Bobrowsky first optically resolved the nebula, showed a compact nebula surrounding the central star. Nebular gas appeared most strongly concentrated in an ellipse with its major axis subtending 1.('') 6 from NE to SW. If this ellipse is actually a circular ring viewed obliquely, then our line of sight is inclined from the symmetry axis by 56deg . Above and below the ring of gas are two bubbles containing lower-density gas. At the tip of each bubble, there is a hole where the gas inside the bubbles has broken through and is now escaping. While images of focused jets have been obtained previously (Borkowski et al.), this is the first case where the nebular structure responsible for the focusing of an outflow can be clearly seen. The windblown appearance of the nebula is consistent with the blueshifted Si IV (1394-1403 Angstroms) and Al III (1855-1863 Angstroms) doublets observed by Parthasarathy et al. that indicated the presence of a strong stellar wind. The N V (1239-1243 Angstroms) to C IV (1548-1551 Angstroms) ratio has increased in recent years, consistent with a young nebula becoming increasingly ionized. Our new spectra reveal additional developments that show the real-time development of this young nebula. Finally, the new HST Planetary Camera images of the nebula show detailed structure indicating a much more complex object than previously known, including the presence of a companion star 0.('') from the central star.

  18. Giant Hα Nebula Surrounding the Starburst Merger NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yagi, Masafumi; Ohyama, Youichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Tanaka, Hisashi; Okamura, Sadanori

    2016-03-01

    We revealed the detailed structure of a vastly extended Hα-emitting nebula (“Hα nebula”) surrounding the starburst/merging galaxy NGC 6240 by deep narrow-band imaging observations with the Subaru Suprime-Cam. The extent of the nebula is ˜90 kpc in diameter and the total Hα luminosity amounts to LHα ≈ 1.6 × 1042 erg s-1. The volume filling factor and the mass of the warm ionized gas are ˜10-4-10-5 and ˜5 × 108 M⊙, respectively. The nebula has a complicated structure, which includes numerous filaments, loops, bubbles, and knots. We found that there is a tight spatial correlation between the Hα nebula and the extended soft-X-ray-emitting gas, both in large and small scales. The overall morphology of the nebula is dominated by filamentary structures radially extending from the center of the galaxy. A large-scale bipolar bubble extends along the minor axis of the main stellar disk. The morphology strongly suggests that the nebula was formed by intense outflows—superwinds—driven by starbursts. We also found three bright knots embedded in a looped filament of ionized gas that show head-tail morphologies in both emission-line and continuum, suggesting close interactions between the outflows and star-forming regions. Based on the morphology and surface brightness distribution of the Hα nebula, we propose the scenario that three major episodes of starburst/superwind activities, which were initiated ˜102 Myr ago, formed the extended ionized gas nebula of NGC 6240. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  19. Diffusive redistribution of water vapor in the solar nebula revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Stevenson and Lunine presented a model for enhancing the abundance of solid material in the region of the solar nebula at the water condensation point. This was used to provide a means to produce a much more rapid formation of Jupiter than the standard solar nebula models. However, they underestimated the drag induced sun-ward radial drift of the planetesimals of interest. Reanalysis reveals that these particles would spread over the inner solar system and might influence the formation of the asteroids.

  20. PROBING THE ROSETTE NEBULA STELLAR BUBBLE WITH FARADAY ROTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Allison H.; Spangler, Steven R.; Fischer, Patrick D.

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of Faraday rotation measurements of 23 background radio sources whose lines of sight pass through or close to the Rosette Nebula. We made linear polarization measurements with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at frequencies of 4.4 GHz, 4.9 GHz, and 7.6 GHz. We find the background Galactic contribution to the rotation measure in this part of the sky to be +147 rad m{sup -2}. Sources whose lines of sight pass through the nebula have an excess rotation measure of 50-750 rad m{sup -2}, which we attribute to the plasma shell of the Rosette Nebula. We consider two simple plasma shell models and how they reproduce the magnitude and sign of the rotation measure, and its dependence on distance from the center of the nebula. These two models represent different modes of interaction of the Rosette Nebula star cluster with the surrounding interstellar medium. Both can reproduce the magnitude and spatial extent of the rotation measure enhancement, given plausible free parameters. We contend that the model based on a stellar bubble more closely reproduces the observed dependence of rotation measure on distance from the center of the nebula.

  1. On planetary nebulae as sources of carbon dust: Infrared emission from planetary nebulae of the galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Lester, Daniel F.

    1990-01-01

    Planetary nebulae of the galactic disk are generally seen to emit a thermal continuum due to dust grains heated by stellar and nebular photons. This continuum typically peaks between 25 and 60 micron m, so that the total power emitted by the dust is sampled well by the broad-band measurements made by IRAS. Researchers examine here the characteristics of the infrared emission from the four planetary nebulae which are believed on the basis of their low overall metallicities to belong to the halo population. These nebulae are of particular interest because they are the most metal-poor ionized nebulae known in our Galaxy, and offer the opportunity to probe possible dependences of the dust properties on nebular composition. Researchers present fluxes extracted from co-addition of the IRAS data, as well as ground-based near infrared measurements. Each of the four halo objects, including the planetary nebula in the globular cluster M15, is detected in at least one infrared band. Researchers compare the estimated infrared excesses of these nebulae (IRE, the ratio of measured infrared power to the power available in the form of resonantly-trapped Lyman alpha photons) to those of disk planetary nebulae with similar densities but more normal abundances. Three of the halo planetaries have IRE values similar to those of the disk nebulae, despite the fact that their Fe- and Si-peak gas phase abundances are factors of 10 to 100 lower. However, these halo nebulae have normal or elevated C/H ratios, due to nuclear processing and mixing in their red giant progenitors. Unlike the other halo planetaries, DDDM1 is deficient in carbon as well as in the other light metals. This nebula has a substantially lower IRE than the other halo planetaries, and may be truly dust efficient. Researchers suggest that the deficiency is due to a lack of the raw material for producing carbon-based grains, and that the main bulk constituent of the dust in these planetary nebulae is carbon.

  2. The Orion Nebula: Still Full of Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This ethereal-looking image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This nebula is much more than just a pretty face, offering astronomers a close-up view of a massive star-forming region to help advance our understanding of stellar birth and evolution. The data used for this image were selected by Igor Chekalin (Russia), who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Igor's composition of the Orion Nebula was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, although another of Igor's images was the eventual overall winner. The Orion Nebula, also known as Messier 42, is one of the most easily recognisable and best-studied celestial objects. It is a huge complex of gas and dust where massive stars are forming and is the closest such region to the Earth. The glowing gas is so bright that it can be seen with the unaided eye and is a fascinating sight through a telescope. Despite its familiarity and closeness there is still much to learn about this stellar nursery. It was only in 2007, for instance, that the nebula was shown to be closer to us than previously thought: 1350 light-years, rather than about 1500 light-years. Astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile to observe the stars within Messier 42. They found that the faint red dwarfs in the star cluster associated with the glowing gas radiate much more light than had previously been thought, giving us further insights into this famous object and the stars that it hosts. The data collected for this science project, with no original intention to make a colour image, have now been reused to create the richly detailed picture of Messier 42 shown here. The image is a composite of several exposures taken through a total of five different filters. Light that passed through a red filter as well as light from a filter that

  3. The Orion Nebula: Still Full of Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This ethereal-looking image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This nebula is much more than just a pretty face, offering astronomers a close-up view of a massive star-forming region to help advance our understanding of stellar birth and evolution. The data used for this image were selected by Igor Chekalin (Russia), who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Igor's composition of the Orion Nebula was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, although another of Igor's images was the eventual overall winner. The Orion Nebula, also known as Messier 42, is one of the most easily recognisable and best-studied celestial objects. It is a huge complex of gas and dust where massive stars are forming and is the closest such region to the Earth. The glowing gas is so bright that it can be seen with the unaided eye and is a fascinating sight through a telescope. Despite its familiarity and closeness there is still much to learn about this stellar nursery. It was only in 2007, for instance, that the nebula was shown to be closer to us than previously thought: 1350 light-years, rather than about 1500 light-years. Astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile to observe the stars within Messier 42. They found that the faint red dwarfs in the star cluster associated with the glowing gas radiate much more light than had previously been thought, giving us further insights into this famous object and the stars that it hosts. The data collected for this science project, with no original intention to make a colour image, have now been reused to create the richly detailed picture of Messier 42 shown here. The image is a composite of several exposures taken through a total of five different filters. Light that passed through a red filter as well as light from a filter that

  4. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, D P; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Reynolds, R T; Summers, A L

    1989-01-01

    Detailed models of the internal structures of Pluto and Charon, assuming rock and water ice as the only constituents, indicate that the mean silicate mass fraction of this two-body system is on the order of 0.7; thus the Pluto/Charon system is significantly "rockier" than the satellites of the giant planets (silicate mass fraction approximately 0.55). This compositional contrast reflects different formation mechanisms: it is likely that Pluto and Charon formed directly from the solar nebula, while the circumplanetary nebulae that produced the giant planet satellites were derived from envelopes that surrounded the forming giant planets (envelopes in which icy planetesimals dissolved more readily than rocky planetesimals). Simple cosmic abundance calculations, and the assumption that the Pluto/Charon system formed directly from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that the majority of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of carbon monoxide; these results are consistent with (1) inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium (where CH4/CO < 10(-2) in the gas phase) and/or (2) of the Lewis and Prinn kinetic inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Theoretical predictions of the C/H enhancements in the atmospheres of the giant planets, when compared to the actual observed enhancements, suggest that 10%, or slightly more, of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of condensed materials (although the amount of condensed C may have dropped slightly with increasing heliocentric distance). Strict compositional limits computed for the Pluto/Charon system using the densities of CH4 and CO ices indicate that these pure ices are at best minor components in the interiors of these bodies, and imply that CH4 and CO ices were not the dominant C-bearing solids in the outer nebula. Clathrate-hydrates could not have appropriated enough CH4 or CO to be the major form of condensed carbon, although such clathrates may be

  5. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, D P; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Reynolds, R T; Summers, A L

    1989-01-01

    Detailed models of the internal structures of Pluto and Charon, assuming rock and water ice as the only constituents, indicate that the mean silicate mass fraction of this two-body system is on the order of 0.7; thus the Pluto/Charon system is significantly "rockier" than the satellites of the giant planets (silicate mass fraction approximately 0.55). This compositional contrast reflects different formation mechanisms: it is likely that Pluto and Charon formed directly from the solar nebula, while the circumplanetary nebulae that produced the giant planet satellites were derived from envelopes that surrounded the forming giant planets (envelopes in which icy planetesimals dissolved more readily than rocky planetesimals). Simple cosmic abundance calculations, and the assumption that the Pluto/Charon system formed directly from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that the majority of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of carbon monoxide; these results are consistent with (1) inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium (where CH4/CO < 10(-2) in the gas phase) and/or (2) of the Lewis and Prinn kinetic inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Theoretical predictions of the C/H enhancements in the atmospheres of the giant planets, when compared to the actual observed enhancements, suggest that 10%, or slightly more, of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of condensed materials (although the amount of condensed C may have dropped slightly with increasing heliocentric distance). Strict compositional limits computed for the Pluto/Charon system using the densities of CH4 and CO ices indicate that these pure ices are at best minor components in the interiors of these bodies, and imply that CH4 and CO ices were not the dominant C-bearing solids in the outer nebula. Clathrate-hydrates could not have appropriated enough CH4 or CO to be the major form of condensed carbon, although such clathrates may be

  6. Structural and functional aspects of winged-helix domains at the core of transcription initiation complexes.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, Martin; Dumay-Odelot, Hélène; Fribourg, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    The winged helix (WH) domain is found in core components of transcription systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. It represents a sub-class of the helix-turn-helix motif. The WH domain participates in establishing protein-DNA and protein-protein-interactions. Here, we discuss possible explanations for the enrichment of this motif in transcription systems.

  7. OVERVIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), WITH ANTENNA TOWERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), WITH ANTENNA TOWERS, HELIX HOUSE NO. 1 (S-3) AND TRANSMITTER BLDG. (S-2) AT REAR, LOOKING WEST SOUTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  8. Mixing and Transport in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2003-01-01

    Boss & Vanhala (2000, 2001) prepared reviews of triggered collapse and injection models, using Prudence Foster's finite differences code at very high spatial resolution (440 x 1440 cells) to demonstrate the convergence of the R-T fingers in triggered injection models. A two dimensional hydrodynamical calculation with unprecedentedly high spatial resolution (960 x 2880 zones, or almost 3 million grid points) demonstrated that it suitable shock front can both trigger the collapse of an otherwise stable presolar cloud, and inject shock front particles into the collapsing cloud through the formation of what become Rayleigh-Taylor fingers of compressed fluid layers falling into the gravitational potential well of the growing protostar. These calculations suggest that heterogeneity derived from these R-T fingers will persist down to the scale of their injection onto the surface of the solar nebula. Haghighipour developed a numerical code capable of calculating the orbital evolution of dust grains of varied sizes in a gaseous nebula, subject to Epstein and Stokes drag as well as the self-gravity of the disk. In collaboration with the PI and George W. Wetherill, Haghighipour has been involved in development of a new idea on the possibility of rapid formation of ice giant planets via the disk instability mechanism. Haghighipour studied the stability of a five-body system consisting of the Sun and four protoplanets by numerically integrating their equations of motions. Using Levison and Duncan s SWIFT integrator, Haghighipour showed that, depending on the orbital parameters of the bodies, such a system can be stable for 0.1-10 Myr. Time periods of 1 Myr or more are long enough to be consistent with the time scale proposed for the formation of giant planets by the disk instability mechanism and the photoevaporation of the gaseous envelopes of the outermost protoplanets by a nearby OB star, resulting in the formation of ice giant planets. The PI has used his three dimensional

  9. Signatures of Chemical Evolution in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago observers began to take serious notice of the presence of crystalline silicate grains in the dust flowing away from some comets. While crystallinity had been seen in such objects previously, starting with the recognitions by Campins and Ryan (1990) that the 10 micron feature of Comet Halley resembled that of the mineral forsterite, most such observations were either ignored or dismissed as no path to explain such crystalline grains was available in the literature. When it was first suggested that an outward flow must be present to carry annealed silicate grains from the innermost regions of the Solar Nebula out to the regions where comets could form (Nuth, 1999; 2001) this suggestion was also dismissed because no such transport mechanism was known at the time. Since then not only have new models of nebular dynamics demonstrated the reality of long distance outward transport (Ciesla, 2007; 2008; 2009) but examination of older models (Boss, 2004) showed that such transport had been present but had gone unrecognized for many years. The most unassailable evidence for outward nebular transport came with the return of the Stardust samples from Comet Wild2, a Kuiper-belt comet that contained micron-scale grains of high temperature minerals resembling the Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions found in primitive meteorites (Zolensky et aI., 2006) that formed at T > 1400K. Now that outward transport in protostellar nebulae has been firmly established, a re-examination of its consequences for nebular gas is in order that takes into account both the factors that regulate both the outward flow as well as those that likely control the chemical composition of the gas. Laboratory studies of surface catalyzed reactions suggest that a trend toward more highly reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds in the gas phase should be correlated with a general increase in the crystallinity of the dust (Nuth et aI., 2000), but is such a trend actually observable? Unlike the Fischer-Tropsch or

  10. Three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Keppens, Rony

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, we give a detailed account of the first three-dimensional (3D) relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of pulsar wind nebulae, with parameters most suitable for the Crab nebula. In contrast to the previous 2D simulations, we also consider pulsar winds with much stronger magnetization, up to σ ≃ few. The 3D models preserve the separation of the post-termination shock flow into the equatorial and polar components, but the polar jets are disrupted by the kink mode of the current driven instability and `dissolve' into the main body of the nebula after propagation of several shock radii. With the exception of the region near the termination shock, the 3D models do not exhibit the strong z-pinch configuration characteristic of the 1D and 2D models. Contrary to the expectations based on 1D analytical and semi-analytical models, the 3D solutions with highly magnetized pulsar winds still produce termination shocks with radii comparable to those deduced from the observations. The reason for this is not only the randomization of magnetic field observed in the 3D solutions, but also the magnetic dissipation inside the nebula. Assuming that the particle acceleration occurs only at the termination shock, we produced synthetic maps of the Crab nebula synchrotron emission. These maps retain most of the features revealed in the previous 2D simulations, including thin wisps and the inner knot. The polarization and variability of the inner knot is in a particularly good agreement with the observations of the Crab nebula and the overall polarization of the inner nebula is also reproduced quite well. However, the polar jet is not as bright as observed, suggesting that an additional particle acceleration, presumably related to the magnetic dissipation, has to be invoked.

  11. Planetary nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Di Criscienzo, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell'Agli, F.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the planetary nebulae (PNe) population of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based on evolutionary models of stars with metallicities in the range 10-3 ≤ Z ≤ 4 × 10-3 and mass 0.9 M⊙ < M < 8 M⊙, evolved through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. The models used account for dust formation in the circumstellar envelope. To characterize the PNe sample of the SMC, we compare the observed abundances of the various species with the final chemical composition of the AGB models: this study allows us to identify the progenitors of the PNe observed, in terms of mass and chemical composition. According to our interpretation, most of the PNe descend from low-mass (M < 2 M⊙) stars, which become carbon rich, after experiencing repeated third dredge-up episodes, during the AGB phase. A fraction of the PNe showing the signature of advanced CNO processing are interpreted as the progeny of massive AGB stars, with mass above ˜6 M⊙, undergoing strong hot bottom burning. The differences with the chemical composition of the PNe population of the Large Magellanic Cloud is explained on the basis of the diverse star formation history and age-metallicity relation of the two galaxies. The implications of this study for some still highly debated points regarding the AGB evolution are also commented.

  12. Planetary nebula progenitors that swallow binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I propose that some irregular messy planetary nebulae (PNe) owe their morphologies to triple-stellar evolution where tight binary systems evolve inside and/or on the outskirts of the envelope of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In some cases, the tight binary system can survive, in others, it is destroyed. The tight binary system might break up with one star leaving the system. In an alternative evolution, one of the stars of the broken-up tight binary system falls towards the AGB envelope with low specific angular momentum, and drowns in the envelope. In a different type of destruction process, the drag inside the AGB envelope causes the tight binary system to merge. This releases gravitational energy within the AGB envelope, leading to a very asymmetrical envelope ejection, with an irregular and messy PN as a descendant. The evolution of the triple-stellar system can be in a full common envelope evolution or in a grazing envelope evolution. Both before and after destruction (if destruction takes place), the system might launch pairs of opposite jets. One pronounced signature of triple-stellar evolution might be a large departure from axisymmetrical morphology of the descendant PN. I estimate that about one in eight non-spherical PNe is shaped by one of these triple-stellar evolutionary routes.

  13. Black Widow Nebula Hiding in the Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In this Spitzer image, the two opposing bubbles are being formed in opposite directions by the powerful outflows from massive groups of forming stars. The baby stars can be seen as specks of yellow where the two bubbles overlap.

    When individual stars form from molecular clouds of gas and dust they produce intense radiation and very strong particle winds. Both the radiation and the stellar winds blow the dust outward from the star creating a cavity or, bubble.

    In the case of the Black Widow Nebula, astronomers suspect that a large cloud of gas and dust condensed to create multiple clusters of massive star formation. The combined winds from these groups of large stars probably blew out bubbles into the direction of least resistance, forming a double bubble.

    The infrared image was captured by the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) Legacy project. The Spitzer picture is a four-channel false-color composite, showing emission from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8.0 microns (red).

  14. Eagle Nebula Flaunts its Infrared Feathers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Figure 3

    This set of images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Eagle nebula in different hues of infrared light. Each view tells a different tale. The left picture shows lots of stars and dusty structures with clarity. Dusty molecules found on Earth called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons produce most of the red; gas is green and stars are blue.

    The middle view is packed with drama, because it tells astronomers that a star in this region violently erupted, or went supernova, heating surrounding dust (orange). This view also reveals that the hot dust is shell shaped, another indication that a star exploded.

    The final picture highlights the contrast between the hot, supernova-heated dust (green) and the cooler dust making up the region's dusty star-forming clouds and towers (red, blue and purple).

    The left image is a composite of infrared light with the following wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue); 4.5 microns (green); 5.8 microns (orange); and 8 microns (red). The right image includes longer infrared wavelengths, and is a composite of light of 4.5 to 8.0 microns (blue); 24 microns (green); and 70 microns (red). The middle image is made up solely of 24-micron light.

  15. Radio Observations of Elongated Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Stephen C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    The majority of pulsars' rotational energy is carried away by relativistic winds, which are energetic particles accelerated in the magnetosphere. The confinement of the winds by the ambient medium result in synchrotron bubbles with broad-band emission, which are commonly referred to as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Due to long synchrotron cooling time, a radio PWN reflects the integrated history of the system, complementing information obtained from the X-ray and higher energy bands. In addition, radio polarization measurements can offer a powerful probe of the PWN magnetic field structure. Altogether these can reveal the physical conditions and evolutionary history of a system.I report on preliminary results from high-resolution radio observations of PWNe associated with G327.1-1.1, PSRs J1015-5719, B1509-58, and J1549-4848 taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Their magnetic field structure and multiwavelength comparison with other observations are discussed.This work is supported by a ECS grant of the Hong Kong Government under HKU 709713P. The Australia Telescope is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO.

  16. Star Formation Sequence in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, N.; Hanawa, T.; Sugitani, K.

    We report high density gas clouds observed in molecular pillars in the Eagle Nebula. They were observed with the Nobeyama Millimeter Array in the 13{CO}(J = 1 - 0) line, {C}18{O}(J = 1 - 0) line and 2.7-mm continuum. The 13CO line emission traces the head of the northern molecular pillar (π1). In the head, two 2.7-mm continuum sources and three C18O cores are embedded. The western continuum source is associated with a class I like source, and is the nearest object to the O5 star. The eastern 2.7-mm source over-wrapped with a C18O core, a Class 0 candidate, is the second nearest. The central C18O core associated with an NIR jet-like feature, is the third. The western C18O core is starless, and is the most distant from the O5 star. Thus, these sources are arranged in order of age. This arrangement suggests the propagation of star formation activity from west to east. A similar sequence of a young stellar object and a C18O core was found in the central molecular pillar (π2). The 2.7-mm continuum with a class I like source is the nearest object to the O5 star. A starless core is on the far side from the O5 star. These sources are also arranged in order of age.

  17. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  18. A nebula around Nova BT Monocerotis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, T. R.; Oke, J. B.; Wade, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    H-alpha observations of Nova BT Mon obtained on December 15, 1981 using an 800x800-pixel CCD detector on the double spectrograph of the 5-m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory are reported. The reciprocal dispersion at H-alpha was 6.04 A/pixel and the angular scale along the 1.0-arcsec-wide east-west slit was 0.58 arcsec/pixel; resolution of the combined, processed image is about 12 A. A ring-shaped nebular emission with a center displaced slightly from the stellar image and an expansion distance to BT Mon of about 1800 pc was detected. The velocity diameter is found to be about 1500 km/sec along the ridge line and 2100 km/sec along the 10-unit contour. The mass of the visible nebula is estimated as 0.00003 solar mass, similar to the BT Mon ejection mass determined by Schaefer and Patterson (1983).

  19. ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, Timothy J.; Katz, Andrea M.; Sibley, Adam R.; MacAlpine, Gordon M.; Uomoto, Alan

    2012-07-15

    Images of the Crab Nebula have been obtained through custom interference filters that transmit emission from the expanding supernova remnant in He II {lambda}4686, H{beta}, He I {lambda}5876, [O I] {lambda}{lambda}6300, 6364, [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548, 6583, [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6716, 6731, [S III] {lambda}9069, and [C I] {lambda}{lambda}9823, 9850. We present both raw and flux-calibrated emission-line images. Arrays of 19,440 photoionization models, with extensive input abundance ranges, were matched pixel by pixel to the calibrated data in order to derive corresponding element abundance or mass-fraction distributions for helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. These maps show distinctive structure, and they illustrate regions of gas in which various stages of nucleosynthesis have apparently occurred, including the CNO cycle, helium burning, carbon burning, and oxygen burning. It is hoped that the calibrated observations and chemical abundance distribution maps will be useful for developing a better understanding of the precursor star evolution and the supernova explosive process.

  20. Edwin Hubble. Mariner of the nebulae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianson, G. E.

    This biography of Edwin Hubble has been acclaimed by professionals and laymen alike. It is both the biography of an extraordinary human being and the story of the greatest quest in the history of astronomy since the Copernican revolution. Born in 1889 and reared in the village of Marshfield, Missouri, Edwin Powell Hubble became one of the towering figures in 20th century science. Hubble worked with the great 100 inch Hooker telescope at California's Mount Wilson Observatory and made a series of discoveries that revolutionized humanity's vision of the cosmos. In 1923 he was able to confirm the existence of other nebulae beyond our own Milky Way. By the end of the decade, he had proven that the universe is expanding, thus laying the very cornerstone of the "Big Bang" theory of creation. It was Hubble who developed the elegant scheme by which the galaxies are classified as ellipticals and spirals, and it was Hubble who first provided reliable evidence that the universe is homogeneous, the same in all directions as far as the telescope can see.

  1. The Planetary Nebula System of M94

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George; Feldmeier, John

    2006-02-01

    Our understanding of galaxy formation is severely limited by poorly known galaxy mass profiles. Rotation curves reveal dark matter halos around disk galaxies, but halo and visible disk mass profiles cannot be decoupled using rotation curves alone. Most analyses therefore rely on the ``maximal disk'' method that assumes the disk mass-to-light ratio (M/L) is constant with radius. Absorption-line spectroscopy has shown that the constant M/L hypothesis is reasonable in a galaxy's inner regions. However, only two galaxies have data more than ~ 1.5 scale lengths from their nuclei: M33 and M83. Planetary nebula (PN) velocity measurements over the central ~ 6 disk scale lengths in M33 indicate that the galaxy's disk M/L increases by a factor of ~ 5 radially outward. Preliminary PN results for M83 also suggest a varying disk M/L. We propose to study the distribution of disk mass in normal spiral galaxies by measuring the z-motions of PNe in nearby, face-on systems. Last year, we conducted an [O III] (lambda) 5007 survey of M94 with the WIYN telescope and discovered ~ 200 PN candidates. We now propose to use Hydra to measure the PN radial velocities so we may trace the system's disk surface-mass density over ~ 6 scale lengths, and thereby better constrain the radial profiles of the galaxy's dark halo.

  2. The Nineteenth-Century Spiral Nebula Whodunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    2010-06-01

    The discovery of the first spiral nebula was a milestone in the history of astronomy, but the initial observations of it are shrouded in mystery. The discovery came within months of the commissioning of the Third Earl of Rosse’s very large 72-inch optical telescope at Birr Castle in the center of Ireland. Unfortunately, no observing records have survived, and while there is no doubt that the observations took place in the spring of 1845, there is some uncertainty as to whom was actually present when the discovery was made. The construction of the Earl’s telescope (the Leviathan) was a magnificent achievement, since it was entirely of his design, built with his own funds, and constructed by his own workers who were literally taken “from the plough” on his estate. The summer of 1845 saw the first appearance of the Irish Potato Famine of 1845-1848, which would seriously curtail astronomical activity when Lord Rosse’s 72-inch telescope was in prime condition.

  3. Bent helix formation between RNA hairpins with complementary loops.

    PubMed

    Marino, J P; Gregorian, R S; Csankovszki, G; Crothers, D M

    1995-06-01

    The initial interaction between the ColE1 plasmid specific transcripts RNA I and RNA II, which function as antisense regulators of plasmid replication, comprises a transient complex between complementary loops found within the RNA secondary structures. Multidimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize complexes formed between model RNA hairpins having seven nucleotide complementary loops. Seven base pairs are formed in the loop-loop helix, with continuous helical stacking of the loop residues on the 3' side of their helical stems. A sharp bend in the loop-loop helix, documented by gel electrophoresis, narrows the major groove and allows bridging of the phosphodiester backbones across the major groove in order to close the hairpin loops at their 5'-ends. The bend is further enhanced by the binding of Rom, a ColE1 encoded protein that regulates replication. PMID:7539549

  4. A 20 GHz, 75 watt helix TWT for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heney, J. F.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A space-qualified, helix-type traveling wave tube is being developed for satellite communication systems in the frequency band of 17.7 to 21.2 GHz. The design approach stresses very high efficiency operation, but with very low distortion. The tube provides multi-mode operation, permitting CW saturated power output levels of 75 watts, 40 watt and 7.5 watts. Operation is also anticipated at 5 dB below these saturation levels to achieve the required low distortion levels. Advanced construction features include a 5 stage depressed collector, a diamond supported helix slow-wave circuit, and a type M dispenser cathode. High reliability and long life (10 years) are objectives of the tube design. The status of the development and recent experimental results are presented.

  5. Triple Helix Formation in a Topologically Controlled DNA Nanosystem.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Yutaro; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Endo, Masayuki

    2016-04-11

    In the present study, we demonstrate single-molecule imaging of triple helix formation in DNA nanostructures. The binding of the single-molecule third strand to double-stranded DNA in a DNA origami frame was examined using two different types of triplet base pairs. The target DNA strand and the third strand were incorporated into the DNA frame, and the binding of the third strand was controlled by the formation of Watson-Crick base pairing. Triple helix formation was monitored by observing the structural changes in the incorporated DNA strands. It was also examined using a photocaged third strand wherein the binding of the third strand was directly observed using high-speed atomic force microscopy during photoirradiation. We found that the binding of the third strand could be controlled by regulating duplex formation and the uncaging of the photocaged strands in the designed nanospace.

  6. Nonlinear time-dependent simulation of helix traveling wave tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Wei-Feng; Yang, Zhong-Hai; Hu, Yu-Lu; Li, Jian-Qing; Lu, Qi-Ru; Li, Bin

    2011-07-01

    A one-dimensional nonlinear time-dependent theory for helix traveling wave tubes is studied. A generalized electromagnetic field is applied to the expression of the radio frequency field. To simulate the variations of the high frequency structure, such as the pitch taper and the effect of harmonics, the spatial average over a wavelength is substituted by a time average over a wave period in the equation of the radio frequency field. Under this assumption, the space charge field of the electron beam can be treated by a space charge wave model along with the space charge coefficient. The effects of the radio frequency and the space charge fields on the electrons are presented by the equations of the electron energy and the electron phase. The time-dependent simulation is compared with the frequency-domain simulation for a helix TWT, which validates the availability of this theory.

  7. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a graphene helix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Kap; Lee, Sohyung; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Min, Bong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Il; Lee, Kyung-Il; An, Kay Hyeok; John, Phillip

    2014-08-27

    Evidence is presented in this paper that certain single-wall carbon nanotubes are not seamless tubes, but rather adopt a graphene helix resulting from the spiral growth of a nano-graphene ribbon. The residual traces of the helices are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The analysis also shows that the tubular graphene material may exhibit a unique armchair structure and the chirality is not a necessary condition for the growth of carbon nanotubes. The description of the structure of the helical carbon nanomaterials is generalized using the plane indices of hexagonal space groups instead of using chiral vectors. It is also proposed that the growth model, via a graphene helix, results in a ubiquitous structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:24838196

  8. Bent helix formation between RNA hairpins with complementary loops.

    PubMed

    Marino, J P; Gregorian, R S; Csankovszki, G; Crothers, D M

    1995-06-01

    The initial interaction between the ColE1 plasmid specific transcripts RNA I and RNA II, which function as antisense regulators of plasmid replication, comprises a transient complex between complementary loops found within the RNA secondary structures. Multidimensional heteronuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to characterize complexes formed between model RNA hairpins having seven nucleotide complementary loops. Seven base pairs are formed in the loop-loop helix, with continuous helical stacking of the loop residues on the 3' side of their helical stems. A sharp bend in the loop-loop helix, documented by gel electrophoresis, narrows the major groove and allows bridging of the phosphodiester backbones across the major groove in order to close the hairpin loops at their 5'-ends. The bend is further enhanced by the binding of Rom, a ColE1 encoded protein that regulates replication.

  9. Transmembrane helix dimerization: beyond the search for sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Li, Edwin; Wimley, William C; Hristova, Kalina

    2012-02-01

    Studies of the dimerization of transmembrane (TM) helices have been ongoing for many years now, and have provided clues to the fundamental principles behind membrane protein (MP) folding. Our understanding of TM helix dimerization has been dominated by the idea that sequence motifs, simple recognizable amino acid sequences that drive lateral interaction, can be used to explain and predict the lateral interactions between TM helices in membrane proteins. But as more and more unique interacting helices are characterized, it is becoming clear that the sequence motif paradigm is incomplete. Experimental evidence suggests that the search for sequence motifs, as mediators of TM helix dimerization, cannot solve the membrane protein folding problem alone. Here we review the current understanding in the field, as it has evolved from the paradigm of sequence motifs into a view in which the interactions between TM helices are much more complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane protein structure and function.

  10. Highly twisted double-helix carbon nanotube yarns.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yibin; He, Xiaodong; Du, Shanyi; Zhang, Luhui; Shi, Enzheng; Wu, Shiting; Li, Zhen; Li, Peixu; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Cao, Anyuan

    2013-02-26

    The strength and flexibility of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) allow them to be constructed into a variety of innovated architectures with fascinating properties. Here, we show that CNTs can be made into a highly twisted yarn-derived double-helix structure by a conventional twist-spinning process. The double-helix is a stable and hierarchical configuration consisting of two single-helical yarn segments, with controlled pitch and unique mechanical properties. While one of the yarn components breaks early under tension due to the highly twisted state, the second yarn produces much larger tensile strain and significantly prolongs the process until ultimate fracture. In addition, these elastic and conductive double-helix yarns show simultaneous and reversible resistance change in response to a wide range of input sources (mechanical, photo, and thermal) such as applied strains or stresses, light illumination, and environmental temperature. Our results indicate that it is possible to create higher-level, more complex architectures from CNT yarns and fabricate multifunctional nanomaterials with potential applications in many areas. PMID:23289799

  11. A 20 GHz, 75 watt, helix TWT for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heney, J. F.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    A space-qualified, helix-type traveling wave tube is being developed for satellite communication systems in the frequency band of 17.7 to 21.2 GHz. The design approach stresses very high efficiency operation, but with very low distortion. The tube provides multi-mode operation, permitting CW saturated power output levels of 75, 40, and 7.5 W. Operation is also anticipated at 5 dB below these saturation levels to achieve the required low distortion levels. Advanced construction features include a five-stage depressed collector, a diamond supported helix slow-wave circuit, and a type M dispenser cathode. High reliability and long life (10 yr) are objectives of the tube design. Preliminary test results on early developmental models of this tube are very encouraging. An output power of 75 to 90 W has been achieved over the full bandwidth with about 40 dB of saturated gain. More importantly, the basic electronic efficiency of the interaction process has been increased from about 7.5-11 percent by the use of the diamond helix support compared to earlier tubes using BeO support rods. This effort is supported by NASA Lewis Research Center and is aimed toward application in the NASA Advanced Communications Satellite Technology Program.

  12. Field analysis of helix traveling wave tube interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A.; Freund, H.P.

    1994-12-31

    Recent results are presented for the linear field analysis of the coupled beam-wave system for the traveling wave tube (TWT) and numerical techniques for TWT design. The basic model includes an electron beam of constant current density located inside the helix. The helix is loaded externally by lossy dielectric material, a conducting shell and vanes for dispersion modification. The model is further divided into axial regions which may include severs, lossy materials, or circuit velocity steps, with the helix geometry varied arbitrarily in each region. The backward-wave root of the coupled dispersion equation is discarded and the sum of the fields for the three forward waves is followed to the circuit output. The dispersion equations are expressed in terms of equating admittance functions at radial boundaries. The numerical procedures to solve the dispersion equations will be described. Results obtained using the field analysis will be compared with those from the conventional coupled-mode Pierce theory for the same geometry. The issue of weak (Brillouin) vs. strong focusing will be discussed and recent refinements to the field theory will be described.

  13. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Safi-Harb, S.; Landecker, T.L.; Kothes, R.; Camilo, F.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nontherma1 nebula 40" in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.63, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. Morphologically, the nebula appears to be slightly extended along a direction, in projection on the sky, previously demonstrated to be of significance in radio and ASCA observations; we argue that this represents the orientation of the pulsar spin axis. At smaller scales, a narrow X-ray feature is seen extending out 5" from the point source, but energetic arguments suggest that it is not the resolved termination shock of the pulsar wind against the ambient medium. Finally, we argue based on synchrotron lifetimes in the nebular magnetic field that DA 495 represents the first example of a pulsar wind nebula in which electromagnetic flux makes up a significant part, together with particle flux, of the neutron star's wind.

  14. MORPHOLOGY OF THE RED RECTANGLE PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, N.; Kwok, Sun; Steffen, W. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2011-10-10

    The morphology of the Red Rectangle (RR) exhibits several singular attributes. Most prominent are a series of linear features perpendicular to the symmetry axis which appear as 'ladder rungs' across the nebula. At the edge of each 'rung' gas seemingly flows from bright knots in a parabolic shape toward the center of the nebula. We present a new model of the RR which explains these features as a projection effect of the more common concentric arcs seen in other proto-planetary nebulae (e.g., Egg Nebula). Using the three-dimensional morpho-kinematic modeling software SHAPE, we have created a model of the RR that consists of spherical shells evacuated by a bi-conical outflow. When the symmetry axis is oriented perpendicular to the line of sight, the spherical shells become linear, thereby reproducing the 'rungs' seen in the RR. When oriented at different inclinations, the linear features become spherical as observed in the Egg Nebula. The model also accurately reproduces the bright knots and the parabolic outflows from these knots that have proven difficult to explain in the past. Using this model, we are able to place a lower limit on the speed of the outflow of {approx}158 km s{sup -1}.

  15. The spatial distribution of infrared radiation from visible reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luan, Ling; Werner, Michael W.; Dwek, Eli; Sellgren, Kris

    1989-01-01

    The emission at IRAS 12 and 25 micron bands of reflection nebulae is far in excess of that expected from the longer wavelength equilibrium thermal emission. The excess emission in the IRAS 12 micron band is a general phenomenon, seen in various components of interstellar medium such as IR cirrus clouds, H II regions, atomic and molecular clouds, and also normal spiral galaxies. This excess emission has been attributed to UV excited fluorescence in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules or to the effect of temperature fluctuations in very small grains. Results are presented of studies of IRAS data on reflection nebulae selected from the van den Bergh reflection nebulae sample. Detailed scans of flux ratio and color temperature across the nebulae were obtained in order to study the spatial distribution of IR emission. A model was used to predict the spatial distribution of IR emission from dust grains illuminated by a B type star. The model was also used to explore the excitation of the IRAS 12 micron band emission as a function of stellar temperature. The model predictions are in good agreement with the analysis of reflection nebulae, illuminated by stars with stellar temperature ranging from 21,000 down to 3,000 K.

  16. HUBBLE HERITAGE PROJECT'S FIRST ANNIVERSARY HUBBLE'S VARIABLE NEBULA (NGC 2261)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Hubble's variable nebula is named (like the Hubble telescope itself) after the American astronomer Edwin P. Hubble, who carried out some of the early studies of this object. It is a fan-shaped cloud of gas and dust which is illuminated by R Monocerotis (R Mon), the bright star at the bottom end of the nebula. Dense condensations of dust near the star cast shadows out into the nebula, and as they move the illumination changes, giving rise to the variations first noted by Hubble. The star itself, lying about 2,500 light-years from Earth, cannot be seen directly, but only through light scattered off of dust particles in the surrounding nebula. R Mon is believed to have a mass of about 10 times that of the Sun, and to have an age of only 300,000 years. There is probably a symmetrical counterpart of the fan-shaped nebula on the southern side of the star, but it is heavily obscured from view by dust lying between this lobe and our line of sight. The Hubble Heritage team made this image from observations of R Mon acquired by William Sparks (STScI), Sylvia Baggett (STScI) and collaborators. Image Credit: NASA/The Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI).

  17. The Galactic Bulge: the stellar and planetary nebulae populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuisinier, F.; Koppen, J.; Acker, A.; Maciel, W. J.

    2000-11-01

    How the Galactic Bulge formed, what was the duration of this episode, are qu ite controversary subjects. It is even unclear wether stars are still forming there. These questions are generaly adressed with stars, but planetary nebulae are very apropriate tools to trace the Bulge history as well, due to the great variety of their progenitor lifetimes. In particular, because diferent elements are detectable in planetary nebulae and in stars, a combined analysis of the abundances patterns detected in stars and in planetary nebulae offers new insight in this problem. In long lived stars, most elements have their abundances unmodified and keep the fingerprints of the ISM when it was born. Analysing element abundances both in planetary nebulae and in stars allow thus to have a very good idea of the chemical enrichment of the ISM. We will see how we can understand these patterns in terms of supernovae of type II and type Ia explosions. Because the lifetimes of the progenitors of type II and type Ia supernovae are quite different, they offer very good chronometers for the Bulge evolution. As well, we will see how the abundances of elements synthetised in planetary nebulae progenitors can be unterstood in terms of recent star formation.

  18. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database in which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  19. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    DOE PAGES

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database inmore » which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  20. Design and synthesis of peptides with hybrid helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif and their conformational study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gangavaram V M; Thodupunuri, Prashanth; Sirisha, Katukuri; Basha, Shaik Jeelani; Gurava Reddy, Pottireddygari; Sarma, Akella V S

    2014-09-19

    The present study is aimed at the design and synthesis of peptides with hybrid helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif and their conformational analysis (NMR, MD, and CD studies). The requisite peptides with heterogeneous backbones were prepared from β-, γ-, and δ-amino acids with carbohydrate side chains and α-amino acid, L-Ala. The α/β-peptides were prepared from (S)-β-Caa(l) (C-linked carbo-β-amino acid with D-lyxo furanoside side chain) and L-Ala with a 1:1 alternation. The α/β-peptides with "helix-turn" motif displayed a 11/9-helix nucleating a 13-atom H-bonding turn. The α/β-octapeptides showed the presence of HTH structures with bifurcated 11/15-H-bonded turn. Further, the α/β-hexapeptide with HT motif, independently on coupling with γ/α/γ/α- and δ/α/δ/α-tetrapeptides at the C-terminus provided access to the decapeptides with "hybrid HTH" motifs. The decapeptide ("α-β-α-β-α-β-γ-α-γ-α") showed a hybrid HTH with "11/9/11/9/11/16/9/12/10" H-bonding, while the decapeptide ("α-β-α-β-α-β-δ-α-δ-α") revealed the presence of a "11/9/11/9/11/17/9/13/11" helical pattern. The above peptides thus have shown compatibility between different types of helices and serendipitous bifurcated 11/16- and 11/17-turns. The present study thus provided the first opportunity for the design and study of "hybrid HTH" motifs with more than one kind of helical structures in them.

  1. Design and synthesis of peptides with hybrid helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif and their conformational study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gangavaram V M; Thodupunuri, Prashanth; Sirisha, Katukuri; Basha, Shaik Jeelani; Gurava Reddy, Pottireddygari; Sarma, Akella V S

    2014-09-19

    The present study is aimed at the design and synthesis of peptides with hybrid helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif and their conformational analysis (NMR, MD, and CD studies). The requisite peptides with heterogeneous backbones were prepared from β-, γ-, and δ-amino acids with carbohydrate side chains and α-amino acid, L-Ala. The α/β-peptides were prepared from (S)-β-Caa(l) (C-linked carbo-β-amino acid with D-lyxo furanoside side chain) and L-Ala with a 1:1 alternation. The α/β-peptides with "helix-turn" motif displayed a 11/9-helix nucleating a 13-atom H-bonding turn. The α/β-octapeptides showed the presence of HTH structures with bifurcated 11/15-H-bonded turn. Further, the α/β-hexapeptide with HT motif, independently on coupling with γ/α/γ/α- and δ/α/δ/α-tetrapeptides at the C-terminus provided access to the decapeptides with "hybrid HTH" motifs. The decapeptide ("α-β-α-β-α-β-γ-α-γ-α") showed a hybrid HTH with "11/9/11/9/11/16/9/12/10" H-bonding, while the decapeptide ("α-β-α-β-α-β-δ-α-δ-α") revealed the presence of a "11/9/11/9/11/17/9/13/11" helical pattern. The above peptides thus have shown compatibility between different types of helices and serendipitous bifurcated 11/16- and 11/17-turns. The present study thus provided the first opportunity for the design and study of "hybrid HTH" motifs with more than one kind of helical structures in them. PMID:25180942

  2. Probing galactic disks with planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.

    Our understanding of galaxy formation and evolution is severely limited by poorly known galaxy mass profiles. Flat rotation curves indicate the presence of dark matter in the outer regions of spirals and determine total galactic mass, but rotation curves alone cannot decouple the mass contribution of the dark halo from that of the disk. Thus astronomers typically assume a constant disk mass-to-light ratio ( M/L ) in models. While studies indicate that M/L is constant in the inner regions of spirals, nothing is known about the M/L of outer disks. To determine this quantity, one must measure the surface mass of a disk directly from the z -motions of its old disk stars. Planetary nebulae (PNe) are ideal test particles because they are: bright and abundant to >5 scale lengths ( h R ), representative of the old disk, relatively easy to distinguish from H II regions, and their velocities are measurable to ~2 kms - 1 with fiber-fed spectrographs. The first step, then, is to use narrow-band imaging to identify large (~100) samples of PNe in face-on spirals. The magnitudes of the PN samples also provide reliable distances to the galaxies themselves via the Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function (PNLF). I discovered 165, 153, 241, 150, 19, and 71 PNe in IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), NGC 5068, and NGC 6946, respectively, and determined distances of 3.5±0.3 Mpc, 8.6±0.3 Mpc, 4.8±0.1 Mpc, [Special characters omitted.] Mpc, [Special characters omitted.] Mpc and 6.1 ± 0.6 Mpc, which agree well with values in the literature. I also explored minor fluctuations in the PNLFs as a function of position in the galaxies. The next step is to perform follow-up spectroscopy to measure as many velocities as possible and yet also obtain a high precision. I used the Hydra multi-fiber spectrographs on the WIYN 3.5-m and CTIO Blanco 4-m telescopes, as well as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's Medium Resolution Spectrograph, to measure velocities of 99, 102, 162, 127, and 48

  3. Lipid solvation effects contribute to the affinity of Gly-xxx-Gly motif-mediated helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Melnyk, Roman A; Deber, Charles M

    2006-07-18

    Interactions between transmembrane helices are mediated by the concave Gly-xxx-Gly motif surface. Whether Gly residues per se are sufficient for selection of this motif has not been established. Here, we used the in vivo TOXCAT assay to measure the relative affinities of all 18 combinations of Gly, Ala, and Ser "small-xxx-small" mutations in glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 major coat protein (MCP) homodimers. Affinity values were compared with the accessibility to a methylene-sized probe of the total surface area of each helix monomer as a measure of solvation by membrane components. A strong inverse correlation was found between nonpolar-group lipid accessibility and dimer affinity (R = 0.75 for GpA, p = 0.013, and R = 0.81 for MCP, p = 0.004), suggesting that lipid as a poor membrane protein solvent, conceptually analogous to water in soluble protein folding, can contribute to dimer stability and help to define helix-helix interfaces.

  4. Evaluation of a high-precision gear measuring machine for helix measurement using helix and wedge artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yohan

    2016-08-01

    High-precision gears are required for advanced motion and power transmission. The reliability of the measured value becomes important as the gear accuracy increases, and the establishment of a traceability system is needed. Therefore, a high-precision gear measuring machine (GMM) with a smaller uncertainty is expected to improve the gear calibration uncertainty. For this purpose, we developed a prototype of a high-precision GMM that adopts a direct drive mechanism and other features. Then, the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified using gear artifacts. Recently, some new measurement methods using simple shapes such as spheres and planes have been proposed as standards. We have verified the tooth profile measurement using a sphere artifact and reported the results that the developed GMM had a high capability in tooth profile measurement. Therefore, we attempted to devise a new evaluation method for helix measurement using a wedge artifact (WA) whose plane was treated as the tooth flank, and the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified. The results will provide a part of information to fully assess measurement uncertainty as our future work. This paper describes the evaluation results of the developed GMM for helix measurement using both a helix artifact and the WA, and discusses the effectiveness of the WA as a new artifact to evaluate the GMMs.

  5. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion Molecular Cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New observations of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 have been made from 1 to 100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry, and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near-infrared sources, IRS 1 and IRS 4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS 1 and IRS 4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far-infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS 1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS 1 can be characterized by L of 500 solar luminosities or less and T of roughly 1000 K. The near-infrared albedo of the grains in the IRS 1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  6. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion molecular cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y.; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New obervations of Orion Molecular Cloud-2 have been made from 1-100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near infrared sources, IRS1 and IRS4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS1 and IRS4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS1 can be characterized by L less than or equal to 500 Solar luminosities and T approx. 1000 K. The near infrared (1-5) micron albedo of the grains in the IRS1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  7. Newest insights from MHD numerical modeling of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmi, B.; Del Zanna, L.; Amato, E.; Bucciantini, N.; Bandiera, R.

    2016-06-01

    Numerical MHD models are considered very successful in accounting for many of the observed properties of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), especially those concerning the high energy emission morphology and the inner nebula dynamics. Although PWNe are known to be among the most powerful accelerators in nature, producing particles up to PeV energies, the mechanisms responsible of such an efficient acceleration are still a deep mystery. Indeed, these processes take place in one of the most hostile environment for particle acceleration: the relativistic and highly magnetized termination shock of the pulsar wind. The newest results from numerical simulations of the Crab Nebula, the PWN prototype, will be presented, with special attention to the problem of particle acceleration. In particular it will be shown how a multi-wavelengths analysis of the wisps properties can be used to constrain the particle acceleration mechanisms working at the Crab's termination shock, by identifying the particle acceleration site at the shock front.

  8. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae. PMID:24913306

  9. MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULAE: NOT AS GEOMETRICALLY DIVERSIFIED AS THOUGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.-N.; Imai, H.; Chibueze, J.; Kwok, Sun; Tafoya, D. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2012-12-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) have diverse morphological shapes, including point-symmetric and multipolar structures. Many PNe also have complicated internal structures such as tori, lobes, knots, and ansae. A complete accounting of all the morphological structures through physical models is difficult. A first step toward such an understanding is to derive the true three-dimensional structure of the nebulae. In this paper, we show that a multipolar nebula with three pairs of lobes can explain many such features, if orientation and sensitivity effects are taken into account. Using only six parameters-the inclination and position angles of each pair-we are able to simulate the observed images of 20 PNe with complex structures. We suggest that multipolar structure is an intrinsic structure of PNe and the statistics of multipolar PNe have been severely underestimated in the past.

  10. Oscillating ion streamline model of Jupiter's neutral sodium nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Brian

    1993-10-01

    Recent observations of neutral sodium D line emissions within 10 jovian radii (RJ) of Jupiter have led to the proposal of a new mechanism for the production of fast neutral sodium. The mechanism involves corotating, sodium-bearing molecular ions from Io's exosphere which undergo dissociation and/or dissociative recombination, resulting in fast neutral sodium atoms on escape trajectories from Jupiter. Fast neutral sodium atoms ejected near Io are also required to explain observations of the 1000 RJ-wide neutral sodium nebula surrounding Jupiter. A new Monte Carlo model explicitly computes particle trajectories resulting from molecular ion velocities at the time of dissociation or dissociative recombination. Initial simulations compare favorably with the general morphology of the nebula. Model estimates of nebula parameters are given.

  11. EVOLUTION OF THE CRAB NEBULA IN A LOW ENERGY SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2015-06-20

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼10{sup 50} erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  12. THE PHASES OF WATER ICE IN THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesla, Fred J.

    2014-03-20

    Understanding the phases of water ice that were present in the solar nebula has implications for understanding cometary and planetary compositions as well as the internal evolution of these bodies. Here we show that amorphous ice formed more readily than previously recognized, with formation at temperatures <70 K being possible under protoplanetary disk conditions. We further argue that photodesorption and freeze-out of water molecules near the surface layers of the solar nebula would have provided the conditions needed for amorphous ice to form. This processing would be a natural consequence of ice dynamics and would allow for the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles in water ice in the outer solar nebula.

  13. Production of Gamma-Rays in the Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.; Bartosik, M.

    2004-10-01

    We construct the time dependent hadronic-leptonic radiation model for the high energy processes inside the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). This model is based on the hypothesis that heavy nuclei are effi- ciently accelerated in the vicinity of young pulsars. Different energy loss processes of nuclei and accel- erated by them leptons are considered in order to obtain the equilibrium spectra of these particles in- side the nebula at an arbitrary time after the pulsar formation. We calculate the multiwavelength spec- tra from specific PWNe expected from different lep- tonic and hadronic processes. From normalization of the calculated synchrotron spectrum to the observed spectrum at low energies, the expected TeV gamma- ray fluxes from a few PWNe are predicted and its possible detectability by the future TeV telescopes is discussed. Key words: Pulsars: nebulae - radiation mecha- nisms: gamma-rays.

  14. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae.

  15. A search for planetary nebulae on the 'POSS'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengel, J.; Hartl, H.; Weinberger, R.

    1980-05-01

    Results of a search for new planetary nebulae on a quarter of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) E plates are reported. A total of 218 prints evenly scattered over all accessible galactic longitudes and latitudes was examined, in addition to the entire region between longitudes 33 and 213 deg and latitudes + or - 2 deg. Five objects satisfying the criteria of emission nebulosity characteristic of planetary nebulae and/or a central blue star were detected, as well as another three dozen very faint, roundish unlisted objects. The coordinates, dimensions, central star magnitudes, surfaces brightnesses, nebular magnitudes, volumes and estimated distances of the five probable planetary nebulae are presented, and it is noted that all but one of them are of considerably low surface brightness.

  16. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  17. Facilitating NASA Earth Science Data Processing Using Nebula Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Pham, L.; Kempler, S.; Theobald, M.; Esfandiari, A.; Campino, J.; Vollmer, B.; Lynnes, C.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud Computing technology has been used to offer high-performance and low-cost computing and storage resources for both scientific problems and business services. Several cloud computing services have been implemented in the commercial arena, e.g. Amazon's EC2 & S3, Microsoft's Azure, and Google App Engine. There are also some research and application programs being launched in academia and governments to utilize Cloud Computing. NASA launched the Nebula Cloud Computing platform in 2008, which is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) to deliver on-demand distributed virtual computers. Nebula users can receive required computing resources as a fully outsourced service. NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) migrated several GES DISC's applications to the Nebula as a proof of concept, including: a) The Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Processor for Measurements (S4PM) for processing scientific data; b) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data process workflow for processing AIRS raw data; and c) the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (GIOVANNI) for online access to, analysis, and visualization of Earth science data. This work aims to evaluate the practicability and adaptability of the Nebula. The initial work focused on the AIRS data process workflow to evaluate the Nebula. The AIRS data process workflow consists of a series of algorithms being used to process raw AIRS level 0 data and output AIRS level 2 geophysical retrievals. Migrating the entire workflow to the Nebula platform is challenging, but practicable. After installing several supporting libraries and the processing code itself, the workflow is able to process AIRS data in a similar fashion to its current (non-cloud) configuration. We compared the performance of processing 2 days of AIRS level 0 data through level 2 using a Nebula virtual computer and a local Linux computer. The result shows that Nebula has significantly

  18. Evolution of the Crab Nebula in a Low Energy Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2015-06-01

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼1050 erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  19. IUE observations of the 'Butterfly' Nebula M2-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    IUE observations of the peculiar 'Butterfy' nebula M2-9 indicate that it is not a normal planetary nebula. The ultraviolet spectrum is characterized by few emission lines and a weak continuum. Mg II 2800 A is the strongest emission line present and may be indicative of a binary nucleus. Lines of N v, Q I, N III, N IV, Si III, and C III are seen, but C IV and O III are conspicuous by their absence. T(e) = 10,250 + or - 400 K was determined for the core. Nitrogen in the core is found to be overabundant by about a factor of 5 over the solar value. M2-9 may be an object in the early stages of becoming a planetary nebula.

  20. Electrical discharge heating of chondrules in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Keil, Klaus; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1995-01-01

    We present a rudimentary theoretical assessment of electrical discharge heating as a candidate mechanism for the formation of chondrules in the solar nebula. The discharge model combines estimates of the properties of the nebula, a mechanism for terrestrial thunderstorm electrification, and some fundamental electrical properties of gases. Large uncertainties in the model inputs limit these calculations to order-or-magnitude accuracy. Despite the uncertainty, it is possible to estimate an upper limit to the efficiency of nebular discharges at melting millimeter-sized stony objects. We find that electrical arcs analogous to terrestrial lightning could have occurred in the nebula, but that under most conditions these discharges probably could not have melted chondrules. Despite our difficulties, we believe the topic worthy of further investigation and suggest some experiments which could improve our understanding of nebular discharges.

  1. Induced massive star formation in the trifid nebula?

    PubMed

    Cernicharo; Lefloch; Cox; Cesarsky; Esteban; Yusef-Zadeh; Mendez; Acosta-Pulido; Garcia Lopez RJ; Heras

    1998-10-16

    The Trifid nebula is a young (10(5) years) galactic HII region where several protostellar sources have been detected with the infrared space observatory. The sources are massive (17 to 60 solar masses) and are associated with molecular gas condensations at the edges or inside the nebula. They appear to be in an early evolutionary stage and may represent the most recent generation of stars in the Trifid. These sources range from dense, apparently still inactive cores to more evolved sources, undergoing violent mass ejection episodes, including a source that powers an optical jet. These observations suggest that the protostellar sources may have evolved by induced star formation in the Trifid nebula. PMID:9774270

  2. An Interactive Gallery of Planetary Nebula Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwitter, K. B.; Henry, R. B. C.

    2002-12-01

    We have created a website containing high-quality moderate-resolution spectra of 88 planetary nebulae (PNe) from 3600 to 9600 Å, obtained at KPNO and CTIO. Spectra are displayed in a zoomable window, and there are templates available that show wavelength and ion identifications. In addition to the spectra themselves, the website also contains a brief discussion of PNe as astronomical objects and as contributors to our understanding of stellar evolution, and a table with atlas information for each object along with a link to an image. This table can be re-ordered by object name, galactic or equatorial coordinates, distance from the sun, the galactic center, or the galactic plane. We envision that this website, which concentrates a large amount of data in one place, will be of interest to a variety of users. PN researchers might need to check the spectrum of a particular object of interest; the non-specialist astronomer might simply be interested in perusing such a collection of spectra; and finally, teachers of introductory astronomy can use this database to illustrate basic principles of atomic physics and radiation. To encourage such use, we have written two simple exercises at a basic level to introduce beginning astronomy students to the wealth of information that PN spectra contain. We are grateful to Adam Wang of the Williams College OIT and to his summer student teams who worked on various apects of the implementation of this website. This work has been supported by NSF grant AST-9819123 and by Williams College and the University of Oklahoma.

  3. Embedded Star Formation in the Eagle Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Rodger I.; Smith, Bradford A.; Hester, J. Jeff

    2002-05-01

    M16 (=NGC 6611), the Eagle Nebula, is a well-studied region of star formation and the source of a widely recognized Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. High spatial resolution infrared observations with the Near-Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) on HST reveal the detailed morphology of two embedded star formation regions that are heavily obscured at optical wavelengths. It is striking that only limited portions of the visually obscured areas are opaque at 2.2 μm. Although the optical images imply substantial columns of material, the infrared images show only isolated clumps of dense gas and dust. Rather than being an active factory of star production, only a few regions are capable of sustaining current star formation. Most of the volume in the columns may be molecular gas and dust, protected by capstones of dense dust. Two active regions of star formation are located at the tips of the optical northern and central large ``elephant trunk'' features shown in the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) images. They are embedded in two capstones of infrared opaque material that contains and trails behind the sources. Although the presence of these sources was evident in previous observations at the same and longer wavelengths, the NICMOS images provide a high-resolution picture of their morphology. Two bright stars appear at the tip of the southern column and may be the result of recent star formation at the top of that column. These observations suggest that the epoch of star formation in M16 may be near its endpoint.

  4. Molecular excitation in the Eagle nebula's fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuller, F.; Leurini, S.; Hieret, C.; Menten, K. M.; Philipp, S. D.; Güsten, R.; Schilke, P.; Nyman, L.-Å.

    2006-08-01

    Context: .The M 16 nebula is a relatively nearby Hii region, powered by O stars from the open cluster NGC 6611, which borders to a Giant Molecular Cloud. Radiation from these hot stars has sculpted columns of dense obscuring material on a few arcmin scales. The interface between these pillars and the hot ionised medium provides a textbook example of a Photodissociation Region (PDR). Aims: .To constrain the physical conditions of the atomic and molecular material with submillimeter spectroscopic observations. Methods: .We used the APEX submillimeter telescope to map a ˜ 3'×3' region in the CO J= 3-2, 4-3 and 7-6 rotational lines, and a subregion in atomic carbon lines. We also observed C18O(3-2) and CO(7-6) with longer integrations on five peaks found in the CO(3-2) map. The large scale structure of the pillars is derived from the molecular lines' emission distribution. We estimate the magnitude of the velocity gradient at the tips of the pillars and use LVG modelling to constrain their densities and temperatures. Excitation temperatures and carbon column densities are derived from the atomic carbon lines. Results: .The atomic carbon lines are optically thin and excitation temperatures are of order 60 K to 100 K, well consistent with observations of other Hii region-molecular cloud interfaces. We derive somewhat lower temperatures from the CO line ratios, of order 40 K. The Ci/CO ratio is around 0.1 at the fingers tips.

  5. Planetary Nebula Kinematics in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2011-02-01

    Look at a spiral; what do you see? Stars zooming `round in the galaxy! Their motions indicate total mass, but how much is DM, stars, and gas? Study motions in and out; first find monochromatic stars- that's my kind. Find us, get our velocities, then: determine disk mass! I'm a PN! Rotation curves indicate the total mass of spirals, but halo mass profiles cannot be decoupled from the visible disk mass using rotation curves alone. To break this disk-halo degeneracy, we have been using planetary nebulae (PNe) to measure the z-component of the stellar velocity dispersion in the disks of face-on spirals. These measurements of σ_z, coupled with straightforward assumptions, have yielded disk surface mass estimates over several scale lengths (h_R) in 6 spirals. We find that in the inner regions of galaxies (R < 3.5 h_R), the values of σ_z are consistent with those expected from a constant mass-to-light ratio (M/L), constant scale-height disk and this trend continues into the outer regions of M74 and IC 342. However, in M83 and M94, σ_z flattens and becomes constant with radius. We have interpreted this as evidence for satellite accretion with disk flaring, but an increasing disk M/L may also contribute to the behavior. To investigate this phenomenon more thoroughly, we are proposing to extend the survey of an additional galaxy, M101, to R > 8 h_R. Last year we imaged M101 with the wide-field Mosaic camera on the KPNO 4-m telescope. This proposal is to perform follow-up spectroscopy on ~240 PNe in M101 with WIYN/Hydra.

  6. IFU spectroscopy of southern planetary nebulae - III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Dopita, M. A.; Basurah, H. M.; Amer, M. A.; Alsulami, R.; Alruhaili, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we describe integral field spectroscopic observations of four southern Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe), M3-4, M3-6, Hen2-29 and Hen2-37 covering the spectral range 3400-7000 Å. We derive the ionization structure, the physical conditions, the chemical compositions and the kinematical characteristics of these PNe and find good agreement with previous studies that relied upon the long-slit technique in their co-spatial area. From their chemical compositions as well as their spatial and kinematic characteristics, we determined that Hen2-29 is of the Peimbert type I (He- and N-rich), while the other three are of type II. The strength of the nebular He II line reveals that M3-3, Hen2-29 and Hen2-37 are of mid to high excitation classes while M3-6 is a low-excitation PN. A series of emission-line maps extracted from the data cubes were constructed for each PN to describe its overall structure. These show remarkable morphological diversity. Spatially resolved spectroscopy of M3-6 shows that the recombination lines of C II, C III, C IV and N III are of nebular origin, rather than arising from the central star as had been previously proposed. This result increases doubts regarding the weak emission-line star (WELS) classification raised by Basurah et al. In addition, they reinforce the probability that most genuine cases of WELS arise from irradiation effects in close binary central stars.

  7. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during...

  8. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy for proud nebulae in keratoconus.

    PubMed Central

    Moodaley, L; Liu, C; Woodward, E G; O'Brart, D; Muir, M K; Buckley, R

    1994-01-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy was performed as an outpatients with proud nebulae as treatment patients with proud nebulae as treatment for their contact lens intolerance. The mean period of contact lens wear before the development of intolerance was 13.4 years (range 2 to 27 years). Following the development of intolerance, three patients abandoned contact lens wear in the affected eye while the remainder experienced a reduction in comfortable wearing time (mean = 3.75 hours; range: 0-14 hours). All patients had good potential Snellen visual acuity with a contact lens of 6/9 (nine eyes) and 6/12 (one eye). The proud nebulae were directly ablated with a 193 nm ArF excimer laser using a 1 mm diameter beam. Between 100-150 pulses were sufficient to ablate the raised area. Patients experienced no pain during the procedure and reported minimal discomfort postoperatively. In all cases flattening of the proud nebulae was achieved. Seven patients were able to resume regular contact lens wear (mean wearing time = 10.17 hours; range 8 to 16 hours). In three patients, resumption of contact lens wear was unsuccessful because of cone steepness. All patients achieved postoperative Snellen visual acuity of 6/12 or better with a contact lens. Four patients experienced a loss of one line in Snellen acuity. The mean follow up period was 8.3 months (range 2 to 17 months). Excimer laser superficial keratectomy is a useful technique for the treatment of contact lens intolerance caused by proud nebulae in patients with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty is thus avoided. Images PMID:8060928

  9. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy for proud nebulae in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Moodaley, L; Liu, C; Woodward, E G; O'Brart, D; Muir, M K; Buckley, R

    1994-06-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy was performed as an outpatients with proud nebulae as treatment patients with proud nebulae as treatment for their contact lens intolerance. The mean period of contact lens wear before the development of intolerance was 13.4 years (range 2 to 27 years). Following the development of intolerance, three patients abandoned contact lens wear in the affected eye while the remainder experienced a reduction in comfortable wearing time (mean = 3.75 hours; range: 0-14 hours). All patients had good potential Snellen visual acuity with a contact lens of 6/9 (nine eyes) and 6/12 (one eye). The proud nebulae were directly ablated with a 193 nm ArF excimer laser using a 1 mm diameter beam. Between 100-150 pulses were sufficient to ablate the raised area. Patients experienced no pain during the procedure and reported minimal discomfort postoperatively. In all cases flattening of the proud nebulae was achieved. Seven patients were able to resume regular contact lens wear (mean wearing time = 10.17 hours; range 8 to 16 hours). In three patients, resumption of contact lens wear was unsuccessful because of cone steepness. All patients achieved postoperative Snellen visual acuity of 6/12 or better with a contact lens. Four patients experienced a loss of one line in Snellen acuity. The mean follow up period was 8.3 months (range 2 to 17 months). Excimer laser superficial keratectomy is a useful technique for the treatment of contact lens intolerance caused by proud nebulae in patients with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty is thus avoided. PMID:8060928

  10. Binarity and the Abundance Discrepancy Problem in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corradi, Romano L. M.; García-Rojas, Jorge; Jones, David; Rodríguez-Gil, Pablo

    2015-04-01

    The discrepancy between abundances computed using optical recombination lines and collisionally excited lines is a major unresolved problem in nebular astrophysics. Here, we show that the largest abundance discrepancies are reached in planetary nebulae with close binary central stars. We illustrate this using deep spectroscopy of three nebulae with a post common-envelope (CE) binary star. Abell 46 and Ou 5 have O2+/H+ abundance discrepancy factors larger than 50, and as high as 300 in the inner regions of Abell 46. Abell 63 has a smaller discrepancy factor around 10, which is still above the typical values in ionized nebulae. Our spectroscopic analysis supports previous conclusions that, in addition to “standard” hot ({{T}e} ˜ 104 K) gas, there exists a colder ({{T}e} ˜ 103 K), ionized component that is highly enriched in heavy elements. These nebulae have low ionized masses, between 10-3 and 10-1 M⊙ depending on the adopted electron densities and temperatures. Since the much more massive red giant envelope is expected to be entirely ejected in the CE phase, the currently observed nebulae would be produced much later, during post-CE mass loss episodes when the envelope has already dispersed. These observations add constraints to the abundance discrepancy problem. We revise possible explanations. Some explanations are naturally linked to binarity such as, for instance, high-metallicity nova ejecta, but it is difficult at this stage to depict an evolutionary scenario consistent with all of the observed properties. We also introduce the hypothesis that these nebulae are the result of tidal destruction, accretion, and ejection of Jupiter-like planets.

  11. Diffuse X-ray emission from the Dumbbell Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kwitter, Karen B.; Kaler, James B.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter pointed observations of the Dumbbell Nebula and find that the previously reported 'extended' X-ray emission is an instrumental electronic ghost image at the softest energy band. At slightly higher energy bands, the image of the Dumbbell is not very different from that of the white dwarf HZ43. We conclude that the X-ray emission of the Dumbbell Nebula comes from its central star. A blackbody model is fitted to the spectrum and the best-fit temperature of not greater than 136,000 +/- 10,000 K is in excellent agreement with the Zanstra temperatures.

  12. Interpretation of the [ClIII] Lines in Gaseous Nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J; Walker, M F; Krueger, T K

    1970-05-01

    The intensity ratio of the green lambdalambda5517 and 5537 lines of [ClIII] serves as an indicatrix of the electron density in many gaseous nebulae whose spectra can be observed with an image converter. Quantitative interpretation of the line ratio requires accurate values of the collisional strengths and transition probabilities. With improved values of these parameters we have revised electron densities for a number of nebulae; the results seem to be in good accord with those derived from other criteria. PMID:16591829

  13. Stability of Small Grains in HII Regions and Reflection Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.; Gauthier, T. N., III; Cawlfield, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed IRAS data to assess the relative amounts of small and large grains in HII regions and reflection nebulae. Our most important finding is that no evidence for small grain destruction is seen in reflection nebulae, even for [high] values of the radiation energy density at which significant grain destruction apparently occurs in HII regions. This suggests that it is not only the total radiant energy density but also the energy per photon which determines the stability of small grains in astrophysical environments.

  14. Turbulent diffusion and concentration of chondrules in the protoplanetary nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Hogan, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    Turbulence is known to possess structure on many scales. The largest or integral scale L is usually taken to be the largest dimension of the system. Two different turbulent regimes are likely to be of importance. Early stage convective turbulence in a hot nebula probably extends over the entire nebula scale height, and probably has typical eddy frequency comparable to the orbit frequency. At a later stage, midplane shear layer turbulence can be driven by the presence of a differently rotating, densely settled particle layer, with different length and timescales.

  15. Planetary nebulae in 2014: A review of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Planetary nebulae had a double anniversary in 2014, 250 years since their discovery and 150 years since the correct spectroscopic identification. This paper gives an overview of planetary nebula research published in 2014. Topics include surveys, central stars, abundances, morphologies, magnetic fields, stellar population and galactic dynamics. An important continuing controversy is the discrepancy between recombination-line and forbidden-line abundances. A new controversy is the relation between symbiotic stars and [WC] stars. PN of the year is undoubtedly CRL 618, with papers on its binary symbiotic/[WC] nucleus, rapid stellar evolution, expanding jets and magnetic fields.

  16. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Gregory S.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Cheng, Kwang P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hintzen, Paul; Isensee, Joan E.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Smith, Eric P.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-08-01

    We obtained ultraviolet images of the Crab Nebula with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission in 1990 December. The UV continuum morphology of the Crab is generally similar to that in the optical region, but the wispy structures are less conspicuous in the UV and X-ray. UV line emission from the thermal filaments is not strong. UV spectral index maps with a resolution of 10 arcsecs show a significant gradient across the nebula, with the outer parts being redder, as expected from synchrotron losses. The location of the bluest synchrotron continuum does not coincide with the pulsar.

  17. Facilitating NASA Earth Science Data Processing Using Nebula Cloud Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Long; Chen, Aijun; Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Theobald, Michael; Asghar, Esfandiari; Campino, Jane; Vollmer, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Cloud Computing has been implemented in several commercial arenas. The NASA Nebula Cloud Computing platform is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) built in 2008 at NASA Ames Research Center and 2010 at GSFC. Nebula is an open source Cloud platform intended to: a) Make NASA realize significant cost savings through efficient resource utilization, reduced energy consumption, and reduced labor costs. b) Provide an easier way for NASA scientists and researchers to efficiently explore and share large and complex data sets. c) Allow customers to provision, manage, and decommission computing capabilities on an as-needed bases

  18. Massive star-formation in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Perez-Martinez, S.; Cesarsky, D.

    1999-03-01

    The Trifid nebula is a young galactic HII region where several protostellar sources have been detected using ISO and ground-based telescopes. The sources are massive (17 to 60 0.20em Modot) and are associated with molecular gas condensations at the edges or inside the nebula. They appear to be in an early evolutionary stage and may represent the most recent generation of stars in the Trifid. These sources range from dense apparently still inactive cores to somewhat more evolved sources, undergoing violent mass ejection episodes, including a source which powers an optical jet. these observations suggest that the protostellar sources may have evolved by induced star formation.

  19. A multiwavelength study of the Stingray Nebula; properties of the nebula, central star, and dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Parthasarathy, Mudumba; Tajitsu, Akito; Hubrig, Swetlana

    2016-07-01

    We performed a detail chemical abundance analysis and photo-ionization modeling of the Stingray Nebula (Hen3-1357, Parthasarathy et al. 1993[1]) to more characterize this PN. We calculated nine elemental abundances using collisionally excited lines (CELs) and recombination lines (RLs). The RL C/O ratio indicates that this PN is O-rich, which is supported by the detection of the broad amorphous silicate features at 9 and 18 μm By photo-ionization modeling, we investigated properties of the central star and derived the gas and dust masses. The nebular elemental abundances, the core-mass of the central star, and the gas mass are in agreement with the AGB model for the initially 1.5 M ⊙ stars with the Z = 0.008.

  20. Autoinhibition of ETV6 DNA Binding Is Established by the Stability of Its Inhibitory Helix.

    PubMed

    De, Soumya; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-04-24

    The ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6 (or TEL) is autoinhibited by an α-helix that sterically blocks its DNA-binding ETS domain. The inhibitory helix is marginally stable and unfolds when ETV6 binds to either specific or non-specific DNA. Using NMR spectroscopy, we show that folding of the inhibitory helix requires a buried charge-dipole interaction with helix H1 of the ETS domain. This interaction also contributes directly to autoinhibition by precluding a highly conserved dipole-enhanced hydrogen bond between the phosphodiester backbone of bound DNA and the N terminus of helix H1. To probe further the thermodynamic basis of autoinhibition, ETV6 variants were generated with amino acid substitutions introduced along the solvent exposed surface of the inhibitory helix. These changes were designed to increase the intrinsic helical propensity of the inhibitory helix without perturbing its packing interactions with the ETS domain. NMR-monitored amide hydrogen exchange measurements confirmed that the stability of the folded inhibitory helix increases progressively with added helix-promoting substitutions. This also results in progressively reinforced autoinhibition and decreased DNA-binding affinity. Surprisingly, locking the inhibitory helix onto the ETS domain by a disulfide bridge severely impairs, but does not abolish DNA binding. Weak interactions still occur via an interface displaced from the canonical ETS domain DNA-binding surface. Collectively, these studies establish a direct thermodynamic linkage between inhibitory helix stability and ETV6 autoinhibition, and demonstrate that helix unfolding does not strictly precede DNA binding. Modulating inhibitory helix stability provides a potential route for the in vivo regulation of ETV6 activity.

  1. Expression of a chimeric helix-loop-helix gene, Id-SCL, in K562 human leukemic cells is associated with nuclear segmentation.

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, A. N.; Wolf, M. L.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    We have designed a chimeric gene, Id-SCL, in which the 3' helix-loop-helix encoding portion of the presumptive oncogene SCL/tal is joined to the 5' coding portion of Id, an inhibitory helix-loop-helix gene. The predicted protein product of this chimeric gene contains the helix-loop-helix dimerization domain of SCL/tal, but, lacking a basic DNA binding domain, is predicted to have the inhibitory function of the Id product. Expression of the Id-SCL fusion gene in stably transfected K562 cells reproducibly resulted in nuclear segmentation and depressed growth rates; both of these phenotypic effects demonstrated a dosage dependence on the levels of Id-SCL mRNA and protein expressed in the various clones. Electron microscopy of cells expressing high levels of Id-SCL mRNA showed a significant increase in cytoplasmic perinuclear thin filaments and diminution of marginal heterochromatin in the nuclei. No other changes in hematopoietic differentiation status were observed in association with Id-SCL expression. Expression of intact Id and SCL/tal genes, as well as deletion mutants of Id and SCL/tal, independently transfected into K562 cells, indicated that the nuclear segmentation effect is dependent on the presence of a protein possessing a helix-loop-helix domain but lacking a basic domain. Our studies suggest that the balance of transcriptional inhibitory and stimulatory helix-loop-helix proteins in cells may be important determinants of proliferation and of structural organization within cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 Figure 11 PMID:1443047

  2. Photoelectric photometry of diffuse gaseous nebulae in the H-alpha line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, J.-L.

    1980-04-01

    Results are given of the H-alpha photometry of diffuse gaseous nebulae observed with a nebula photometer attached to the 60-cm reflector of the Pic du Midi Observatory. Isophote maps are given for the following objects: the Orion nebula, the Rosette nebula, IC 410, IC 434 and NGC 2024, and M 8 (NGC 6523); several scans are presented for NGC 6514, NGC 7000, and Barnard's Loop. In cases where the spherical model approximation may be performed, the variation of electron density with radius was determined; for the Rosette nebula a steeper decrease toward the center than previously established was found.

  3. Designing Covalently Linked Heterodimeric Four-Helix Bundles.

    PubMed

    Chino, M; Leone, L; Maglio, O; Lombardi, A

    2016-01-01

    De novo design has proven a powerful methodology for understanding protein folding and function, and for mimicking or even bettering the properties of natural proteins. Extensive progress has been made in the design of helical bundles, simple structural motifs that can be nowadays designed with a high degree of precision. Among helical bundles, the four-helix bundle is widespread in nature, and is involved in numerous and fundamental processes. Representative examples are the carboxylate bridged diiron proteins, which perform a variety of different functions, ranging from reversible dioxygen binding to catalysis of dioxygen-dependent reactions, including epoxidation, desaturation, monohydroxylation, and radical formation. The "Due Ferri" (two-irons; DF) family of proteins is the result of a de novo design approach, aimed to reproduce in minimal four-helix bundle models the properties of the more complex natural diiron proteins, and to address how the amino acid sequence modulates their functions. The results so far obtained point out that asymmetric metal environments are essential to reprogram functions, and to achieve the specificity and selectivity of the natural enzymes. Here, we describe a design method that allows constructing asymmetric four-helix bundles through the covalent heterodimerization of two different α-helical harpins. In particular, starting from the homodimeric DF3 structure, we developed a protocol for covalently linking the two α2 monomers by using the Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. The protocol was then generalized, in order to include the construction of several linkers, in different protein positions. Our method is fast, low cost, and in principle can be applied to any couple of peptides/proteins we desire to link. PMID:27586346

  4. Fluctuations in the DNA double helix: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.; Prakash, Shikha

    2014-06-01

    A critical overview of the extensive literature on fluctuations in the DNA double helix is presented. Both theory and experiment are comprehensively reviewed and analyzed. Fluctuations, which open up the DNA double helix making bases accessible for hydrogen exchange and chemical modification, are the main focus of the review. Theoretical descriptions of the DNA fluctuations are discussed with special emphasis on most popular among them: the nonlinear-dynamic Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model and the empirical two-state (or helix-coil) model. The experimental data on the issue are comprehensibly overviewed in the historical retrospective with main emphasis on the hydrogen exchange data and formaldehyde kinetics. The theoretical descriptions are critically evaluated from the viewpoint of their applicability to describe DNA in water environment and from the viewpoint of agreement of their predictions with the reliable experimental data. The presented analysis makes it possible to conclude that, while the two-state model is most adequate from theoretical viewpoint and its predictions, based on an empirical parametrization, agree with experimental data very well, the PBD model is inapplicable to DNA in water from theoretical viewpoint on one hand and it makes predictions totally incompatible with reliable experimental data on the other. In particular, it is argued that any oscillation movements of nucleotides, assumed by the PBD model, are severely damped in water, that no "bubbles", which the PBD model predicts, exist in reality in linear DNA well below the melting range and the lifetime of an open state in DNA is actually 5 orders of magnitude longer than the value predicted by the PBD model.

  5. Stretched versus compressed exponential kinetics in α-helix folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamm, Peter; Helbing, Jan; Bredenbeck, Jens

    2006-03-01

    In a recent paper (J. Bredenbeck, J. Helbing, J.R. Kumita, G.A. Woolley, P. Hamm, α-helix formation in a photoswitchable peptide tracked from picoseconds to microseconds by time resolved IR spectroscopy, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA 102 (2005) 2379), we have investigated the folding of a photo-switchable α-helix with a kinetics that could be fit by a stretched exponential function exp(-( t/ τ) β). The stretching factor β became smaller as the temperature was lowered, a result which has been interpreted in terms of activated diffusion on a rugged energy surface. In the present paper, we discuss under which conditions diffusion problems occur with stretched exponential kinetics ( β < 1) and under which compressed exponential kinetics is obtained ( β > 1). We show that diffusion problems do have a strong tendency to yield stretched exponential kinetics, yet, that there are conditions (strong perturbation from equilibrium, performing the experiment in the folding direction) under which compressed exponential kinetics would be expected instead. We discuss the kinetics on free energy surfaces predicted by simple initiation-propagation models (zipper models) of α-helix folding, as well as by folding funnel models. We show that our recent experiment has been performed under condition for which models with strong downhill driving force, such as the zipper model, would predict compressed, rather than stretched exponential kinetics, in disagreement with the experimental observation. We therefore propose that the free energy surface along a reaction coordinate that governs the folding kinetics must be relatively flat and has a shape similar to a 1D golf course. We discuss how this conclusion can be unified with the thermodynamically well established zipper model by introducing an additional kinetic reaction coordinate.

  6. Investigating potential planetary nebula/cluster pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Majaess, D.; Bonatto, C.; Mauro, F.; Turner, D.; Geisler, D.; Chené, A.-N.; Gormaz-Matamala, A. C.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R. G.; Minniti, D.; Carraro, G.; Gieren, W.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Fundamental parameters characterizing the end-state of intermediate-mass stars may be constrained by discovering planetary nebulae (PNe) in open clusters (OCs). Cluster membership may be exploited to establish the distance, luminosity, age, and physical size for PNe, and the intrinsic luminosity and mass of its central star. Aims: Four potential PN-OC associations were investigated to assess the cluster membership for the PNe. Methods: Radial velocities were measured from intermediate-resolution optical spectra, complemented with previous estimates in the literature. When the radial velocity study supported the PN/OC association, we analyzed whether other parameters (e.g., age, distance, reddening, central star brightness) were consistent with this conclusion. Results: Our measurements imply that the PNe VBe 3 and HeFa 1 are not members of the OCs NGC 5999 and NGC 6067, respectively, and that they very likely belong to the background bulge population. Conversely, consistent radial velocities indicate that NGC 2452/NGC 2453 could be associated, but our results are not conclusive so additional observations are warranted. Finally, we demonstrate that all the available information point to He 2-86 being a young, highly internally obscured PN member of NGC 4463. New near-infrared photometry acquired via the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea ESO public survey was used in tandem with existing UBV photometry to measure the distance, reddening, and age of NGC 4463, finding d = 1.55 ± 0.10 kpc, E(B - V) = 0.41 ± 0.02, and τ = 65 ± 10 Myr, respectively. The same values should be adopted for the PN if the proposed cluster membership is confirmed. Based on observations gathered with ESO-VISTA telescope (program ID 172.B-2002).Based on observations gathered at Las Campanas observatory (program ID CN2012A-080).The spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  7. INFRARED STUDY OF FULLERENE PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Garcia-Lario, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Cataldo, F. E-mail: amt@iac.es E-mail: Pedro.Garcia-Lario@sciops.esa.int E-mail: letizia@noao.edu

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) where fullerenes have been detected in their Spitzer Space Telescope spectra. This large sample of objects offers a unique opportunity to test conditions of fullerene formation and survival under different metallicity environments because we are analyzing five sources in our own Galaxy, four in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and seven in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Among the 16 PNe studied, we present the first detection of C{sub 60} (and possibly also C{sub 70}) fullerenes in the PN M 1-60 as well as of the unusual {approx}6.6, 9.8, and 20 {mu}m features (attributed to possible planar C{sub 24}) in the PN K 3-54. Although selection effects in the original samples of PNe observed with Spitzer may play a potentially significant role in the statistics, we find that the detection rate of fullerenes in C-rich PNe increases with decreasing metallicity ({approx}5% in the Galaxy, {approx}20% in the LMC, and {approx}44% in the SMC) and we interpret this as a possible consequence of the limited dust processing occurring in Magellanic Cloud (MC) PNe. CLOUDY photoionization modeling matches the observed IR fluxes with central stars that display a rather narrow range in effective temperature ({approx}30,000-45,000 K), suggesting a common evolutionary status of the objects and similar fullerene formation conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest that fullerene PNe likely evolve from low-mass progenitors and are usually of low excitation. We do not find a metallicity dependence on the estimated fullerene abundances. The observed C{sub 60} intensity ratios in the Galactic sources confirm our previous finding in the MCs that the fullerene emission is not excited by the UV radiation from the central star. CLOUDY models also show that line- and wind-blanketed model atmospheres can explain many of the observed [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios using photoionization, suggesting that possibly the UV radiation from the central star, and

  8. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  9. Kn 26, a new quadrupolar planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M. A.; Miranda, L. F.; Ramos-Larios, G.; Vázquez, R.

    2013-03-01

    Once classified as an emission line source, the planetary nebula (PN) nature of the source Kn 26 has only recently been recognized in digital sky surveys. To investigate the spectral properties and spatio-kinematical structure of Kn 26, we have obtained high spatial-resolution optical and near-IR narrow-band images, high-dispersion long-slit echelle spectra, and intermediate-resolution spectroscopic observations. The new data reveal an hourglass morphology typical of bipolar PNe. A detailed analysis of its morphology and kinematics discloses the presence of a second pair of bipolar lobes, making Kn 26 a new member of the subclass of quadrupolar PNe. The time lapse between the ejection of the two pairs of bipolar lobes is much shorter than their dynamical ages, implying a rapid change in the preferential direction of the central engine. The chemical composition of Kn 26 is particularly unusual among PNe, with a low N/O ratio (as for type II PNe) and a high helium abundance (as for type I PNe), although not atypical among symbiotic stars. Such an anomalous chemical composition may have resulted from the curtailment of the time in the asymptotic giant branch by the evolution of the progenitor star through a common envelope phase. Based on observations made with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) and the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) on the island of La Palma in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), the 2.1-m telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional at the Sierra de San Pedro Mártir (OAN-SPM), and the 1.5-m telescope at the Observatorio de Sierra Nevada (OSN), Granada, Spain. NOT is operated jointly by Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden. WHT is operated by the Isaac Newton Group. The 2.1-m telescope at the OAN-SPM is a national facility operated by the Instituto de Astronomía of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. The 1.5-m telescope at the OSN is operated by the

  10. On the distances of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Haywood

    2015-05-01

    Past calibrations of statistical distance scales for planetary nebulae have been problematic, especially with regard to `short' versus `long' scales. Reconsidering the calibration process naturally involves examining the precision and especially the systematic errors of various distance methods. Here, we present a different calibration strategy, new for planetaries, that is anchored by precise trigonometric parallaxes for 16 central stars published by Harris et al. of USNO, with four improved by Benedict et al. using the Hubble Space Telescope. We show how an internally consistent system of distances might be constructed by testing other methods against those and each other. In such a way, systematic errors can be minimized. Several of the older statistical scales have systematic errors that can account for the short-long dichotomy. In addition to scale-factor errors, all show signs of radius dependence, i.e. the distance ratio [scale/true] is some function of nebular radius. These systematic errors were introduced by choices of data sets for calibration, by the methodologies used, and by assumptions made about nebular evolution. The statistical scale of Frew and collaborators is largely free of these errors, although there may be a radius dependence for the largest objects. One set of spectroscopic parallaxes was found to be consistent with the trigonometric ones while another set underestimates distance consistently by a factor of 2, probably because of a calibration difference. `Gravity' distances seem to be overestimated for nearby objects but may be underestimated for distant objects, i.e. distance dependent. Angular expansion distances appear to be suitable for calibration after correction for astrophysical effects. We find extinction distances to be often unreliable individually though sometimes approximately correct overall (total sample). Comparison of the Hipparcos parallaxes for large planetaries with our `best estimate' distances confirms that those

  11. Broadband circular polarizers constructed using helix-like chiral metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ruonan; Wang, Shao-Wei; Liu, Xingxing; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, one kind of helix-like chiral metamaterial which can be realized by multiple conventional lithography or electron beam lithographic techniques is proposed to have a broadband bianisotropic optical response analogous to helical metamaterials. On the basis of twisted metamaterials, via tailoring the relative orientation within the lattice, the anisotropy of arcs is converted into magneto-electric coupling of closely spaced arc pairs, which leads to a broad bianisotropic optical response. By connecting the adjacent upper and lower arcs, the coupling of metasurface pairs is transformed into the coupling of the three-dimensional inclusions, and provides a much broader and higher bianisotropic optical response. For only a four-layer helix-like metamaterial, the maximum extinction ratio can reach 19.7. The operation band is in the wavelength range of 4.69 μm to 8.98 μm with an average extinction ratio of 6.9. And the transmittance for selective polarization is above 0.8 in the entire operation band. Such a structure is a promising candidate for integratable and scalable broadband circular polarizers, especially it has great potential to act as a broadband circular micropolarizer in the field of the full-Stokes division of focal plane polarimeters.In this paper, one kind of helix-like chiral metamaterial which can be realized by multiple conventional lithography or electron beam lithographic techniques is proposed to have a broadband bianisotropic optical response analogous to helical metamaterials. On the basis of twisted metamaterials, via tailoring the relative orientation within the lattice, the anisotropy of arcs is converted into magneto-electric coupling of closely spaced arc pairs, which leads to a broad bianisotropic optical response. By connecting the adjacent upper and lower arcs, the coupling of metasurface pairs is transformed into the coupling of the three-dimensional inclusions, and provides a much broader and higher bianisotropic optical

  12. Direct imaging of DNA fibers: the visage of double helix.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Moretti, Manola; Limongi, Tania; Falqui, Andrea; Bertoni, Giovanni; Scarpellini, Alice; Santoriello, Stefania; Maragliano, Luca; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2012-12-12

    Direct imaging becomes important when the knowledge at few/single molecule level is requested and where the diffraction does not allow to get structural and functional information. Here we report on the direct imaging of double stranded (ds) λ-DNA in the A conformation, obtained by combining a novel sample preparation method based on super hydrophobic DNA molecules self-aggregation process with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental breakthrough is the production of robust and highly ordered paired DNA nanofibers that allowed its direct TEM imaging and the double helix structure revealing.

  13. Toxic effects of Cadmium on the garden snail (Helix aspersa)

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.K.; DeHaven, J.I.; Botts, R.P.

    1981-05-01

    Spreading treated municipal wastes on agricultural and forest lands is becoming an established method of disposal. However, there is concern about the deleterious effects of toxicants, particularly cadmium, in the sludges. Cadmium concentrations in sewage sludge have been reported as high as 1500 ppM. The work reported here is a part of a larger project to investigate the ecological effects of municipal wastes on forest lands. Snails, Helix aspersa, were chosen to examine the entrance of cadmium into terrestrial food chains. This experiment was designed to determine cadmium accumulation, acute toxicity, and behavioral, reproductive and growth responses with increasing levels of cadmium.

  14. Scattering of linearly polarized microwave radiation from a dielectric helix.

    PubMed

    Haracz, R D; Cohen, L D; Cohen, A; Wang, R T

    1987-11-01

    A method for calculating the electric field scattered from a helical dielectric target is compared to an equivalent experiment. The wavelength of the incident light is 3.18 cm, and the right-handed helix has a radius of 1.83 cm and wire radius of 0.24 cm, a pitch of 0.553 cm, and seven turns. The index of refraction of, the target is 1.626-i 0.012. A brief description of the Shifrin theory generalized to this application is given along with a discussion of the experiment, and the experimental intensities are compared to the first-order theory. PMID:20523417

  15. Folding Dynamics of an α Helix and a β Hairpin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofrichter, James

    1998-03-01

    What processes limit the rate at which proteins fold? In an effort to address this question we have begun to study the dynamics of the formation of loops, α helices and the minimal β structural element, a β hairpin, which must occur on the pathway from random coils to folded proteins. Because these processes occur on time scales of 10-5-10-9 seconds and experimental access to these time scales has been limited, the kinetics of these processes have not been extensively studied. The expectation is that a more complete understanding of the dynamics of these microprocesses will provide constraints on possible mechanisms for the overall folding of more complex structures. We have explored the kinetics of the helix-coil transition of a synthetic, 21-residue peptide: Ac-WAAAH^+(AAARA)_3A-NH2 and of the folding of a 16 residue β hairpin from protein G B1 using the nanosecond temperature jump technique. Both processes were studied by monitoring tryptophan fluorescence. In the helical peptide, the quantum yield of tryptophan decreases as a result of the interaction between tryptophan in position 1 with the protonated histidine in position 5. In the native conformation of the hairpin, it increases because it forms part of a hydrophobic cluster which stabilizes the native conformation (in a peptide in which a dansylated lysine is incorporated at the C-terminus the fluorescence is quenched). At 300 K, the relaxation time for the helix-coil transition is ~ 250 ns and that for the hairpin-coil transition is ~ 2.2 μs, about 10 times slower. The apparent activation energies are 6.8 kcal/mol for the helix and 10 kcal/mol for the hairpin. We have developed simple kinetic models for these processes which incorporate the sequence- and position-dependent properties known from equilibrium studies and the single-sequence approximation. These models provide a remarkably consistent picture of the dynamics, permitting us to extract information on both the microscopic rates for the c

  16. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgarter, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Lund, N.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, a approx.7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approx.3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  17. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.; Skinner, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, approximately 7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approximately 3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  18. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.; Skinner, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, approximately 7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/ PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approximately 3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab Nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  19. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    A model has been developed for reflection nebulae around luminous IR sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The shape of the IR spectrum is shown to be the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of the model results with IR observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse ISM, or consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains. By adding water-ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, the 3.08 micron ice-band feature observed in the spectra of several IR reflection nebulae has been modeled. It is shown that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains.

  20. Solution to the Sigma Problem of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Keppens, Rony

    2014-03-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) provide a unique test-bed for the study of highly relativistic processes right at our astronomical doorstep. In this contribution we will show results from the first 3D RMHD simulations of PWN. Of key interest to our study is the long standing "sigma-problem" that challenges MHD models of Pulsars and their nebulae now for 3 decades. Earlier 2D MHD models were very successful in reproducing the morphology of the inner Crab nebula showing a jet, torus, concentric wisps and a variable knot. However, these models are limited to a purely toroidal field geometry which leads to an exaggerated compression of the termination shock and polar jet — in contrast to the observations. In three dimensions, the toroidal field structure is susceptible to current driven instabilities; hence kink instability and magnetic dissipation govern the dynamics of the nebula flow. This leads to a resolution of the sigma-problem once also the pulsar's obliqueness (striped wind) is taken into account. In addition, we present polarized synchrotron maps constructed from the 3D simulations, showing the wealth of morphological features reproduced in 2D is preserved in the 3D case.

  1. The [NeIV] Lines in High Excitation Gaseous Nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H

    1970-04-01

    The "forbidden" lines of three times ionized neon are among the most precious indicators of electron temperature and excitation. They are also predicted to be among the strongest lines observed in the far ultraviolet spectra of high excitation nebulae. PMID:16591822

  2. High-energy flux evolution of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Mattana, F.; Falanga, M.; Goetz, D.

    2008-12-24

    The very high energy {gamma}-ray spectra of Pulsar Wind Nebulae are interpreted as due to inverse Compton scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons on the ambient photons, whereas their X-ray spectra are due to synchrotron emission. We investigate the relation between the {gamma}- and X-ray emission and the pulsars' spin-down luminosity and characteristic age. We find that the {gamma}-to X-ray flux ratio of the nebulae is inversely proportional to the spin-down luminosity ({proportional_to}E{sup -1.9}) and to the characteristic age ({proportional_to}{tau}{sub c}{sup 2.2}) of the parent pulsar. We interpret these results as due to the evolution of the electron energy distribution and the nebular dynamics, supporting the idea of so-called relic pulsar wind nebulae. These empirical relations provide a new tool to classify unidentified diffuse {gamma}-ray sources and to estimate the spin-down luminosity and characteristic age for four rotation powered pulsars with no detected pulsation from the X- and {gamma}--ray properties of the associated pulsar wind nebulae.

  3. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  4. A HOT GAP AROUND JUPITER'S ORBIT IN THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Choukroun, M.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Bryden, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Sun was an order of magnitude more luminous during the first few hundred thousand years of its existence, due in part to the gravitational energy released by material accreting from the solar nebula. If Jupiter was already near its present mass, the planet's tides opened an optically thin gap in the nebula. Using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that sunlight absorbed by the nebula and re-radiated into the gap raised temperatures well above the sublimation threshold for water ice, with potentially drastic consequences for the icy bodies in Jupiter's feeding zone. Bodies up to a meter in size were vaporized within a single orbit if the planet was near its present location during this early epoch. Dust particles lost their ice mantles, and planetesimals were partially to fully devolatilized, depending on their size. Scenarios in which Jupiter formed promptly, such as those involving a gravitational instability of the massive early nebula, must cope with the high temperatures. Enriching Jupiter in the noble gases through delivery trapped in clathrate hydrates will be more difficult, but might be achieved by either forming the planet much farther from the star or capturing planetesimals at later epochs. The hot gap resulting from an early origin for Jupiter also would affect the surface compositions of any primordial Trojan asteroids.

  5. Why convective heat transport in the solar nebula was inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The radial distributions of the effective temperatures of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence (T Tauri) stars are relatively well-constrained by ground-based and spacecraft infrared photometry and radio continuum observations. If the mechanisms by which energy is transported vertically in the disks are understood, these data can be used to constrain models of the thermal structure and evolution of solar nebula. Several studies of the evolution of the solar nebula have included the calculation of the vertical transport of heat by convection. Such calculations rely on a mixing length theory of transport and some assumption regarding the vertical distribution of internal dissipation. In all cases, the results of these calculations indicate that transport by radiation dominates that by convection, even when the nebula is convectively unstable. A simple argument that demonstrates the generality (and limits) of this result, regardless of the details of mixing length theory or the precise distribution of internal heating is presented. It is based on the idea that the radiative gradient in an optically thick nebula generally does not greatly exceed the adiabatic gradient.

  6. A MODEL OF THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shuta J.; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-06-01

    We study the spectral evolution of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) taking into account the energy injected when they are young. We model the evolution of the magnetic field inside a uniformly expanding PWN. Considering time-dependent injection from the pulsar and coolings by radiative and adiabatic losses, we solve the evolution of the particle distribution function. The model is calibrated by fitting the calculated spectrum to the observations of the Crab Nebula at an age of a thousand years. The spectral evolution of the Crab Nebula in our model shows that the flux ratio of TeV {gamma}-rays to X-rays increases with time, which implies that old PWNe are faint in X-rays, but not in TeV {gamma}-rays. The increase of this ratio is because the magnetic field decreases with time and is not because the X-ray emitting particles are cooled more rapidly than the TeV {gamma}-ray emitting particles. Our spectral evolution model matches the observed rate of the radio flux decrease of the Crab Nebula. This result implies that our magnetic field evolution model is close to the reality. Finally, from the viewpoint of the spectral evolution, only a small fraction of the injected energy from the Crab Pulsar needs to go to the magnetic field, which is consistent with previous studies.

  7. Crab Nebula Variations in Hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula was surprisingly variable from 2001-2010, with less variability before 2001 and since mid-2010. We presented evidence for spectral softening from RXTE, Swift/BAT, and Fermi GBM during the mid-2008-2010 flux decline. We see no clear connections between the hard X-ray variations and the GeV flares

  8. The Crab Nebula: The gift that keeps on giving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, J. Jeff

    2001-05-01

    In many ways the Crab Nebula is the object that started off the study of supernova remnants, yet hundreds of years after its discovery it is still poorly understood in many respects. Recently, a number of observational and theoretical results have shed new light on longstanding questions and misconceptions about the Crab. We are taught in graduate school that the Crab is a freely expanding ejecta-dominated remnant, with the slight added complication that it contains a pulsar and synchrotron nebula. This conception of the Crab is incorrect. Instead, when we think of the Crab we should think first of the powerful and dynamic axisymmetric wind from an energetic pulsar as it powers a high pressure synchrotron nebula. That synchrotron nebula is sweeping up and concentrating thermal ejecta into dense, complex Rayleigh-Taylor filaments as it pushes its way out through a large, freely expanding remnant. This larger remnant is all but unseen, but probably carries the bulk of the mass and kinetic energy from the explosion. Every aspect of the visible Crab-from its overall size and shape, to the complex structure of its filaments, to the highly dynamical structure at its heart-is a direct result of the action of the wind from the Crab pulsar. .

  9. Hubble Hatches Image of Rotten Egg Nebula Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Some 5,000 light years (2,900 trillion miles) from Earth, in the constellation Puppis, is the 1.4 light years (more than 8 trillion miles) long Calabash Nebula, referred to as the Rotten Egg Nebula because of its sulfur content which would produce an awful odor if one could smell in space. This image of the nebula captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) depicts violent gas collisions that produced supersonic shock fronts in a dying star. Stars, like our sun, will eventually die and expel most of their material outward into shells of gas and dust These shells eventually form some of the most beautiful objects in the universe, called planetary nebulae. The yellow in the image depicts the material ejected from the central star zooming away at speeds up to one and a half million kilometers per hour (one million miles per hour). Due to the high speeds of the gas, shock-fronts are formed on impact and heat the surrounding gas. Although computer calculations have predicted the existence and structure of such shocks for some time, previous observations have not been able to prove the theory.

  10. Optical Spectrum of the Compact Planetary Nebula IC 5117

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Seong-Jae; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution spectroscopic data of the very compact planetary nebula IC 5117 are obtained in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10050A, with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory, and which have been analyzed along with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) UV archive data. Although a diagnostic diagram shows significant density and temperature fluctuations, our analysis indicates that the nebular gas may be represented by a homogeneous shell of extremely high density gas, N(sub epsilon) approx. 90 000 /cu cm. The average electron temperatures, e.g. indicated by the [OIII] diagnostics, are around 12 000 K. We construct a photoionization model to represent most of the observed line intensities, and the physical condition of this compact nebulosity. Based on the semi-empirical ionization correction approach, and model indications, we derived the elemental abundances: He, C, N, O, Ne, and Ar appear to be normal or marginally depleted compared to the average planetary nebula, while the remaining elements, S, Cl, and K appear to be enhanced. IC 5117 is perhaps a very young compact planetary nebula, slightly more evolved than the other well-known compact planetary nebula IC 4997. The central stellar temperature is likely to be around 120 000 K, evolved from a C-rich AGB progenitor.

  11. Millimeter-wave Molecular Line Observations of the Tornado Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, 13CO, and HCO+ with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V LSR = -14 km s-1 and +5 km s-1. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado "head" in the -14 km s-1 cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s-1 cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the -14 km s-1 cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s-1 cloud collided into the -14 km s-1 cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  12. The Extended Region Around the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows NGC 3242, a planetary nebula frequently referred to as 'Jupiter's Ghost.'

    The unfortunate name of 'planetary nebula' for this class of celestial object is a historical legacy credited to William Herschel during the 18th century a time when telescopes where small and objects like these, at least the central region, looked very similar to gas-giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter. In fact, NGC 3242 has no relation to Jupiter or any other planet.

    Telescopes and their detectors have dramatically improved over the past few centuries. Our understanding of what planetary nebulae truly are has improved accordingly.

    When stars with a mass similar to our sun approach the end of their lives by exhausting supplies of hydrogen and helium fuel in their cores, they swell up into cool red-giant stars. In a last gasp before death, they expel the layers of gas in their outer atmosphere. This exposes the core of the dying star, a dense hot ball of carbon and oxygen called a white dwarf. The white dwarf is so hot that it shines very brightly in the ultraviolet. The ultraviolet light from the white dwarf, in turn, ionizes the gaseous material expelled by the star causing it to glow. A planetary nebula is really the death of a low-mass star.

    Although low-mass stars like our sun live for billions of years, planetary nebulae only last for about ten thousand years. As the central white dwarf quickly cools and the ultraviolet light dwindles, the surrounding gas also cools and fades.

    In this image of NGC 3242 from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the extended region around the planetary nebula is shown in dramatic detail. The small circular white and blue area at the center of the image is the well-known portion of the famous planetary nebula. The precise origin and composition of the extended wispy white features is not known for certain. It is most likely material ejected during the star's red

  13. Three-dimensional simulation of helix traveling-wave tube cold-test characteristics using MAFIA

    SciTech Connect

    Kory, C.L.

    1996-08-01

    The cold-test parameters including dispersion, impedance, and attenuation have been calculated for a helix traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuit using MAFIA, the three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic finite-integration computer code. The helix model includes tape thickness, rectangular dielectric supports, and material properties consistent with the actual circuit. Measured cold-test data and computer-derived results for the helix circuit are presented with excellent agreement.

  14. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Werner, M W

    1990-01-20

    We have developed a model for reflection nebulae around luminous infrared sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The aim of this study is to determine the sizes of the scattering grains. In our analysis, we have adopted an MRN-like power-law size distribution (Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck) of graphite and silicate grains, but other current dust models would give results which were substantially the same. In the optically thin limit, the intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the dust column density, while in the optically thick limit, it reflects the grain albedo. The results show that the shape of the infrared spectrum is the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of our model results with infrared observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse interstellar medium, or one consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains (approximately 5000 angstroms). By adding water ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, we have modeled the 3.08 micrometers ice band feature, which has been observed in the spectra of several infrared reflection nebulae. We show that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains. We show that the shape of the ice band is diagnostic of the presence of large grains, as previously suggested by Knacke and McCorkle. Comparison with observations of the BN/KL reflection nebula in the OMC-1 cloud shows that large ice grains (approximately 5000 angstroms) contribute substantially to the scattered light. PMID:11538693

  15. Formation of Primitive Bodies in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a simple model of global transport of solids in the protoplanetary nebula, including radial drift of large particles and diffusion of small ones. The model has been applied to the formation and redistribution of the Ca-A1 rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found in primitive chondrites. These objects form at much higher temperatures, and appear to be 1-3 million years older than, the dominant (chondrule) components found in the same parent bodies. A widespread concern has been the retention of CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can overwhelm inward drift, and prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for tines on the order of several Myr. An element of this model is rapid inward radial drift of boulder-sized primitive (carbon-rich) silicate material, more like Halley-dust than CI chondrites in the early days of the nebula. Thls process can enrich the abundance of silicate and carbon material in the inner nebula, and may provide possible explanations for both chemical and isotopic properties of CAIs. The predicted enhancement of CO relative to water might be of relevance to recent IR astronomical observations of CO in the inner disks of several actively accreting T Tauri stars. This process has applications to the transport and redistribution of volatiles in general. Depending on the rubble particle size distribution, rapid radial drift of boulder-sized solids can bring more material inwards across a condensation front, to evaporate, than can subsequently be removed by nebula advection or diffusion, until a strong local enhancement is produced which allows diffusive loss to balance the drifting source. Application of this process to enhancement of the abundance of water near the "ice line" will be discussed. Supported by the Origins of Solar Systems program.

  16. The Shock-Excited P-Cygni Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, M. J.; Drew, J. E.; Meaburn, J.; Massey, R. M.

    1994-05-01

    We have obtained images in the [N II] λ6584 line of the nebula around the luminous blue variable star P Cygni, using a 4 arcsec wide occulting strip. A nearly circular inner nebula is found, containing many bright condensations, with angular diameters of 21.4 arcsec in the east-west direction and 23.8 arcsec in the north-south direction. Two fainter outer arcs of [N II] emission are also visible, with angular diameters of 1 and 1.5 arcmin. A high-resolution 4900-9000 Å UES spectrum, obtained at a position 9 arcsec west of P Cygni, shows the [N II] λλ7378, 7412 doublet to be the strongest feature emitted by the nebula. High-resolution long-slit MES spectra were obtained at multiple positions across the bright inner nebula in order to investigate the density, dynamics and age of the nebula. Our [N II] λ6584 spectra show broad velocity components with an overall expansion velocity of 140 km s-1, while our [N II] λ7412 spectra show much narrower velocity components with an overall expansion velocity of only 110 km s-1. Our results are consistent with the narrow [N II] emission originating from dense, mainly neutral knots which are being overtaken by the stellar wind from P Cyg at a relative velocity of 100 km s-1, with the broader irregular [N II] and [S II] emission arising from bow shocks around the knots. This model provides a natural explanation for the larger [N II] expansion velocities compared to those of [N II].

  17. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Werner, M W

    1990-01-20

    We have developed a model for reflection nebulae around luminous infrared sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The aim of this study is to determine the sizes of the scattering grains. In our analysis, we have adopted an MRN-like power-law size distribution (Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck) of graphite and silicate grains, but other current dust models would give results which were substantially the same. In the optically thin limit, the intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the dust column density, while in the optically thick limit, it reflects the grain albedo. The results show that the shape of the infrared spectrum is the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of our model results with infrared observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse interstellar medium, or one consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains (approximately 5000 angstroms). By adding water ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, we have modeled the 3.08 micrometers ice band feature, which has been observed in the spectra of several infrared reflection nebulae. We show that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains. We show that the shape of the ice band is diagnostic of the presence of large grains, as previously suggested by Knacke and McCorkle. Comparison with observations of the BN/KL reflection nebula in the OMC-1 cloud shows that large ice grains (approximately 5000 angstroms) contribute substantially to the scattered light.

  18. HelixFlex: bioinspired maneuverable instrument for skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Gerboni, Giada; Henselmans, Paul W J; Arkenbout, Ewout A; van Furth, Wouter R; Breedveld, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Endoscopic endonasal surgery is currently regarded as the 'gold standard' for operating on pituitary gland tumors, and is becoming more and more accepted for treatment of other skull base lesions. However, endoscopic surgical treatment of most skull base pathologies, including certain pituitary tumors, is severely impaired by current instruments lack of maneuverability. Especially, gaining access to, and visibility of, difficult-to-reach anatomical corners without interference with surrounding neurovascular structures or other instruments, is a challenge. In this context there is the need for instruments that are able to provide a stable shaft position, while both the orientation and the position of the end-effector can be independently controlled. Current instruments that allow for this level of maneuverability are usually mechanically complex, and hence less suitable for mass production. This study therefore focuses on the development of a new actuation technique that allows for the required maneuverability while reducing the construction complexity. This actuation technique, referred to as multi-actuation, integrates multiple cable routings into a single steerable structure. Multi-actuation has been successfully integrated and tested in a handheld prototype instrument called HelixFlex. HelixFlex contains a 4 degrees of freedom maneuverable 5.8 mm (diameter) tip and shows promising results concerning its maneuverability and potential rigidity.

  19. Genes and the physics of the DNA double-helix.

    PubMed

    Yeramian, E

    2000-09-19

    The processing of the genetic information stored in the double-helical DNA implies the separation of the two strands, the physics of which is described by the helix-coil transition model. Is there a relationship between genetic maps and DNA physical stability maps that plot the sequence-specific propensity for the thermal disruption of the double-helix? Here, with appropriate methodological formulations, such maps are derived for a large set of sequences, including complete genomes. The superposition of the two maps leads to a contrasted picture with correlations ranging between two extremes: from almost perfect (with the genes precisely delineated as stable regions) to more or less complete unrelatedness. The simplest explanation for the results is that the observed striking correlations correspond to the relics of a primeval organisation of the genetic message, with the physics of DNA playing a role in the delimitation of coding regions. In order to trace the evolutionary fate of this signal further, a detailed study of the yeast complete genome is performed. In this study, the superposition of the genetic and physical stability maps is examined in the light of information concerning gene duplication. On the basis of this analysis it is concluded that the 'signature' associated with the supposed archaic signal is in the process of being erased, most probably because the underlying feature is no longer under selective pressure. There are many evolutionary implications for the results presented and for their proposed interpretations, notably concerning models of mutational dynamics in relation to erasure processes.

  20. Broadband circular polarizers constructed using helix-like chiral metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ruonan; Wang, Shao-Wei; Liu, Xingxing; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, one kind of helix-like chiral metamaterial which can be realized by multiple conventional lithography or electron beam lithographic techniques is proposed to have a broadband bianisotropic optical response analogous to helical metamaterials. On the basis of twisted metamaterials, via tailoring the relative orientation within the lattice, the anisotropy of arcs is converted into magneto-electric coupling of closely spaced arc pairs, which leads to a broad bianisotropic optical response. By connecting the adjacent upper and lower arcs, the coupling of metasurface pairs is transformed into the coupling of the three-dimensional inclusions, and provides a much broader and higher bianisotropic optical response. For only a four-layer helix-like metamaterial, the maximum extinction ratio can reach 19.7. The operation band is in the wavelength range of 4.69 μm to 8.98 μm with an average extinction ratio of 6.9. And the transmittance for selective polarization is above 0.8 in the entire operation band. Such a structure is a promising candidate for integratable and scalable broadband circular polarizers, especially it has great potential to act as a broadband circular micropolarizer in the field of the full-Stokes division of focal plane polarimeters.

  1. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  2. Broadband circular polarizers constructed using helix-like chiral metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ruonan; Wang, Shao-Wei; Liu, Xingxing; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, one kind of helix-like chiral metamaterial which can be realized by multiple conventional lithography or electron beam lithographic techniques is proposed to have a broadband bianisotropic optical response analogous to helical metamaterials. On the basis of twisted metamaterials, via tailoring the relative orientation within the lattice, the anisotropy of arcs is converted into magneto-electric coupling of closely spaced arc pairs, which leads to a broad bianisotropic optical response. By connecting the adjacent upper and lower arcs, the coupling of metasurface pairs is transformed into the coupling of the three-dimensional inclusions, and provides a much broader and higher bianisotropic optical response. For only a four-layer helix-like metamaterial, the maximum extinction ratio can reach 19.7. The operation band is in the wavelength range of 4.69 μm to 8.98 μm with an average extinction ratio of 6.9. And the transmittance for selective polarization is above 0.8 in the entire operation band. Such a structure is a promising candidate for integratable and scalable broadband circular polarizers, especially it has great potential to act as a broadband circular micropolarizer in the field of the full-Stokes division of focal plane polarimeters. PMID:27352818

  3. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  4. Genome-wide identification and analysis of basic helix-loop-helix domains in dog, Canis lupus familiaris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yong; Liu, A-Ke; Liu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2015-04-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain is a highly conserved amino acid motif that defines a group of DNA-binding transcription factors. bHLH proteins play essential regulatory roles in a variety of biological processes in animal, plant, and fungus. The domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, is a good model organism for genetic, physiological, and behavioral studies. In this study, we identified 115 putative bHLH genes in the dog genome. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, 51, 26, 14, 4, 12, and 4 dog bHLH genes were assigned to six separate groups (A-F); four bHLH genes were categorized as ''orphans''. Within-group evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis were consistent with positional conservation, other conserved domains flanking the bHLH motif, and highly conserved intron/exon patterns in other vertebrates. Our analytical results confirmed the GenBank annotations of 89 dog bHLH proteins and provided information that could be used to update the annotations of the remaining 26 dog bHLH proteins. These data will provide good references for further studies on the structures and regulatory functions of bHLH proteins in the growth and development of dogs, which may help in understanding the mechanisms that underlie the physical and behavioral differences between dogs and wolves. PMID:25403511

  5. A novel basic helix-loop-helix protein is expressed in muscle attachment sites of the Drosophila epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Armand, P; Knapp, A C; Hirsch, A J; Wieschaus, E F; Cole, M D

    1994-01-01

    We have found that a novel basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein is expressed almost exclusively in the epidermal attachments sites for the somatic muscles of Drosophila melanogaster. A Drosophila cDNA library was screened with radioactively labeled E12 protein, which can dimerize with many HLH proteins. One clone that emerged from this screen encoded a previously unknown protein of 360 amino acids, named delilah, that contains both basic and HLH domains, similar to a group of cellular transcription factors implicated in cell type determination. Delilah protein formed heterodimers with E12 that bind to the muscle creatine kinase promoter. In situ hybridization with the delilah cDNA localized the expression of the gene to a subset of cells in the epidermis which form a distinct pattern involving both the segmental boundaries and intrasegmental clusters. This pattern was coincident with the known sites of attachment of the somatic muscles to tendon cells in the epidermis. delilah expression persists in snail mutant embryos which lack mesoderm, indicating that expression of the gene was not induced by attachment of the underlying muscles. The similarity of this gene to other bHLH genes suggests that it plays an important role in the differentiation of epidermal cells into muscle attachment sites. Images PMID:8196652

  6. Genome-wide features of neuroendocrine regulation in Drosophila by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor DIMMED

    PubMed Central

    Hadžić, Tarik; Park, Dongkook; Abruzzi, Katharine C.; Yang, Lin; Trigg, Jennifer S.; Rohs, Remo; Rosbash, Michael; Taghert, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) cells use large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) to traffic, process, store and secrete neuropeptide hormones through the regulated secretory pathway. The dimmed (DIMM) basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor of Drosophila controls the level of regulated secretory activity in NE cells. To pursue its mechanisms, we have performed two independent genome-wide analyses of DIMM's activities: (i) in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to define genomic sites of DIMM occupancy and (ii) deep sequencing of purified DIMM neurons to characterize their transcriptional profile. By this combined approach, we showed that DIMM binds to conserved E-boxes in enhancers of 212 genes whose expression is enriched in DIMM-expressing NE cells. DIMM binds preferentially to certain E-boxes within first introns of specific gene isoforms. Statistical machine learning revealed that flanking regions of putative DIMM binding sites contribute to its DNA binding specificity. DIMM's transcriptional repertoire features at least 20 LDCV constituents. In addition, DIMM notably targets the pro-secretory transcription factor, creb-A, but significantly, DIMM does not target any neuropeptide genes. DIMM therefore prescribes the scale of secretory activity in NE neurons, by a systematic control of both proximal and distal points in the regulated secretory pathway. PMID:25634895

  7. DNA recognition for virus assembly through multiple sequence-independent interactions with a helix-turn-helix motif

    PubMed Central

    Greive, Sandra J.; Fung, Herman K.H.; Chechik, Maria; Jenkins, Huw T.; Weitzel, Stephen E.; Aguiar, Pedro M.; Brentnall, Andrew S.; Glousieau, Matthieu; Gladyshev, Grigory V.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2016-01-01

    The helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif features frequently in protein DNA-binding assemblies. Viral pac site-targeting small terminase proteins possess an unusual architecture in which the HTH motifs are displayed in a ring, distinct from the classical HTH dimer. Here we investigate how such a circular array of HTH motifs enables specific recognition of the viral genome for initiation of DNA packaging during virus assembly. We found, by surface plasmon resonance and analytical ultracentrifugation, that individual HTH motifs of the Bacillus phage SF6 small terminase bind the packaging regions of SF6 and related SPP1 genome weakly, with little local sequence specificity. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation studies with an arbitrary single-site substrate suggest that the HTH motif contacts DNA similarly to how certain HTH proteins contact DNA non-specifically. Our observations support a model where specificity is generated through conformational selection of an intrinsically bent DNA segment by a ring of HTHs which bind weakly but cooperatively. Such a system would enable viral gene regulation and control of the viral life cycle, with a minimal genome, conferring a major evolutionary advantage for SPP1-like viruses. PMID:26673721

  8. Akt regulates basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor-coactivator complex formation and activity during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vojtek, Anne B; Taylor, Jennifer; DeRuiter, Stacy L; Yu, Jenn-Yah; Figueroa, Claudia; Kwok, Roland P S; Turner, David L

    2003-07-01

    Neural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors regulate neurogenesis in vertebrates. Signaling by peptide growth factors also plays critical roles in regulating neuronal differentiation and survival. Many peptide growth factors activate phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and subsequently the Akt kinases, raising the possibility that Akt may impact bHLH protein function during neurogenesis. Here we demonstrate that reducing expression of endogenous Akt1 and Akt2 by RNA interference (RNAi) reduces neuron generation in P19 cells transfected with a neural bHLH expression vector. The reduction in neuron generation from decreased Akt expression is not solely due to decreased cell survival, since addition of the caspase inhibitor z-VAD-FMK rescues cell death associated with loss of Akt function but does not restore neuron formation. This result indicates that Akt1 and Akt2 have additional functions during neuronal differentiation that are separable from neuronal survival. We show that activated Akt1 enhances complex formation between bHLH proteins and the transcriptional coactivator p300. Activated Akt1 also significantly augments the transcriptional activity of the bHLH protein neurogenin 3 in complex with the coactivators p300 or CBP. In addition, inhibition of endogenous Akt activity by the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 abolishes transcriptional cooperativity between the bHLH proteins and p300. We propose that Akt regulates the assembly and activity of bHLH-coactivator complexes to promote neuronal differentiation.

  9. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  10. Characterization of ABF-1, a novel basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor expressed in activated B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Massari, M E; Rivera, R R; Voland, J R; Quong, M W; Breit, T M; van Dongen, J J; de Smit, O; Murre, C

    1998-06-01

    Proteins of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family are required for a number of different developmental pathways, including neurogenesis, lymphopoiesis, myogenesis, and sex determination. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, we have identified a new bHLH transcription factor, ABF-1, from a human B-cell cDNA library. Within the bHLH region, ABF-1 shows a remarkable conservation with other HLH proteins, including tal-1, NeuroD, and paraxis. Its expression pattern is restricted to a subset of lymphoid tissues, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines, and activated human B cells. ABF-1 is capable of binding an E-box element either as a homodimer or as a heterodimer with E2A. Furthermore, a heterodimeric complex containing ABF-1 and E2A can be detected in EBV-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. ABF-1 contains a transcriptional repression domain and is capable of inhibiting the transactivation capability of E47 in mammalian cells. ABF-1 represents the first example of a B-cell-restricted bHLH protein, and its expression pattern suggests that ABF-1 may play a role in regulating antigen-dependent B-cell differentiation.

  11. Genome-wide identification and analysis of basic helix-loop-helix domains in dog, Canis lupus familiaris.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yong; Liu, A-Ke; Liu, Xiao-Ting; Zhou, Yang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2015-04-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) domain is a highly conserved amino acid motif that defines a group of DNA-binding transcription factors. bHLH proteins play essential regulatory roles in a variety of biological processes in animal, plant, and fungus. The domestic dog, Canis lupus familiaris, is a good model organism for genetic, physiological, and behavioral studies. In this study, we identified 115 putative bHLH genes in the dog genome. Based on a phylogenetic analysis, 51, 26, 14, 4, 12, and 4 dog bHLH genes were assigned to six separate groups (A-F); four bHLH genes were categorized as ''orphans''. Within-group evolutionary relationships inferred from the phylogenetic analysis were consistent with positional conservation, other conserved domains flanking the bHLH motif, and highly conserved intron/exon patterns in other vertebrates. Our analytical results confirmed the GenBank annotations of 89 dog bHLH proteins and provided information that could be used to update the annotations of the remaining 26 dog bHLH proteins. These data will provide good references for further studies on the structures and regulatory functions of bHLH proteins in the growth and development of dogs, which may help in understanding the mechanisms that underlie the physical and behavioral differences between dogs and wolves.

  12. A novel initiator regulates expression of the nontissue-specific helix-loop-helix gene ME1.

    PubMed Central

    Shain, D H; Neuman, T; Zuber, M X

    1995-01-01

    The mouse ME1 gene (HEB, REB and GE1, homologues in human, rat and chick, respectively) is a member of the nontissue-specific helix-loop-helix (HLH) gene family that includes E2A, E2-2 and Drosophila daughterless. We have examined the factors that control ME1 gene expression. ME1 is a single copy gene that spans > or = 150 kb of DNA and contains > 10 exons. Transcription was directed by an unusual initiator element that contained a 13 bp poly d(A) tract flanked by palindromic and inverted repeat sequences. Both RNase protection and primer extension analyses mapped the ME1 transcriptional start site to the center of the 13 bp poly d(A) tract. The ME1 initiator and its proximal sequences were required for promoter activity, supported basal levels of transcription, and contributed to cell type-specific gene expression. Other cis-elements utilized by the TATA-less ME1 promoter included a cluster of Sp1 response elements, E-boxes and a strong repressor. Collectively, our results suggest that the ME1 initiator and other cis-elements in the proximal promoter play an important role in regulating ME1 gene expression. Images PMID:7784173

  13. A DNA glycosylase from Pyrobaculum aerophilum with an 8-oxoguanine binding mode and a noncanonical helix-hairpin-helix structure.

    PubMed

    Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M; Sartori, Alessandro A; Kostrewa, Dirk; Prota, Andrea E; Jiricny, Josef; Winkler, Fritz K

    2005-01-01

    Studies of DNA base excision repair (BER) pathways in the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Pyrobaculum aerophilum identified an 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase, Pa-AGOG (archaeal GO glycosylase), with distinct functional characteristics. Here, we describe its crystal structure and that of its complex with 8-oxoguanosine at 1.0 and 1.7 A resolution, respectively. Characteristic structural features are identified that confirm Pa-AGOG to be the founding member of a functional class within the helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) superfamily of DNA repair enzymes. Its hairpin structure differs substantially from that of other proteins containing an HhH motif, and we predict that it interacts with the DNA backbone in a distinct manner. Furthermore, the mode of 8-oxoguanine recognition, which involves several hydrogen-bonding and pi-stacking interactions, is unlike that observed in human OGG1, the prototypic 8-oxoguanine HhH-type DNA glycosylase. Despite these differences, the predicted kinked conformation of bound DNA and the catalytic mechanism are likely to resemble those of human OGG1. PMID:15642264

  14. The basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper transcription factor Mitf is conserved in Drosophila and functions in eye development.

    PubMed Central

    Hallsson, Jón H; Haflidadóttir, Benedikta S; Stivers, Chad; Odenwald, Ward; Arnheiter, Heinz; Pignoni, Francesca; Steingrímsson, Eiríkur

    2004-01-01

    The MITF protein is a member of the MYC family of basic helix-loop-helix leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors and is most closely related to the TFE3, TFEC, and TFEB proteins. In the mouse, MITF is required for the development of several different cell types, including the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells of the eye. In Mitf mutant mice, the presumptive RPE cells hyperproliferate, abnormally express the retinal transcriptional regulator Pax6, and form an ectopic neural retina. Here we report the structure of the Mitf gene in Drosophila and demonstrate expression during embryonic development and in the eye-antennal imaginal disc. In vitro, transcriptional regulation by Drosophila Mitf, like its mouse counterpart, is modified by the Eyeless (Drosophila Pax6) transcription factor. In vivo, targeted expression of wild-type or dominant-negative Drosophila Mitf results in developmental abnormalities reminiscent of Mitf function in mouse eye development. Our results suggest that the Mitf gene is the original member of the Mitf-Tfe subfamily of bHLH-Zip proteins and that its developmental function is at least partially conserved between vertebrates and invertebrates. These findings further support the common origin of the vertebrate and invertebrate eyes. PMID:15166150

  15. Genome-Wide Analysis of Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Family in Rice and Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxing; Duan, Xuepeng; Jiang, Haixiong; Sun, Yujin; Tang, Yuanping; Yuan, Zheng; Guo, Jingkang; Liang, Wanqi; Chen, Liang; Yin, Jingyuan; Ma, Hong; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Dabing

    2006-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors and their homologs form a large family in plant and animal genomes. They are known to play important roles in the specification of tissue types in animals. On the other hand, few plant bHLH proteins have been studied functionally. Recent completion of whole genome sequences of model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) allows genome-wide analysis and comparison of the bHLH family in flowering plants. We have identified 167 bHLH genes in the rice genome, and their phylogenetic analysis indicates that they form well-supported clades, which are defined as subfamilies. In addition, sequence analysis of potential DNA-binding activity, the sequence motifs outside the bHLH domain, and the conservation of intron/exon structural patterns further support the evolutionary relationships among these proteins. The genome distribution of rice bHLH genes strongly supports the hypothesis that genome-wide and tandem duplication contributed to the expansion of the bHLH gene family, consistent with the birth-and-death theory of gene family evolution. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that rice bHLH proteins can potentially participate in a variety of combinatorial interactions, endowing them with the capacity to regulate a multitude of transcriptional programs. In addition, similar expression patterns suggest functional conservation between some rice bHLH genes and their close Arabidopsis homologs. PMID:16896230

  16. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor DvIVS determines flower color intensity in cyanic dahlia cultivars.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Sho; Deguchi, Ayumi; Hosokawa, Munetaka; Tatsuzawa, Fumi; Doi, Motoaki

    2013-08-01

    The study was aimed to identify the factors that regulate the intensity of flower color in cyanic dahlia (Dahlia variabilis), using fifteen cultivars with different color intensities in their petals. The cultivars were classified into three groups based on their flavonoid composition: ivory white cultivars with flavones; purple and pink cultivars with flavones and anthocyanins; and red cultivars with flavones, anthocyanins, and chalcones. Among the purple, pink, and ivory white cultivars, an inverse relationship was detected between lightness, which was used as an indicator for color intensity and anthocyanin content. A positive correlation was detected between anthocyanin contents and the expression of some structural genes in the anthocyanin synthesis pathway that are regulated by DvIVS, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor. A positive correlation between anthocyanin content and expression of DvIVS was also found. The promoter region of DvIVS was classified into three types, with cultivars carrying Type 1 promoter exhibited deep coloring, those carrying Type 2 and/or Type 3 exhibited pale coloring, and those carrying Type 1 and Type 2 and/or Type 3 exhibited medium coloring. The transcripts of the genes from these promoters encoded full-length predicted proteins. These results suggested that the genotype of the promoter region in DvIVS is one of the key factors determining the flower color intensity. PMID:23689377

  17. GLABRA2 Directly Suppresses Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Genes with Diverse Functions in Root Hair Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Yohei; Kato, Mariko; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana GLABRA2 (GL2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the cell differentiation of various epidermal tissues. During root hair pattern formation, GL2 suppresses root hair development in non-hair cells, acting as a node between the gene regulatory networks for cell fate determination and cell differentiation. Despite the importance of GL2 function, its molecular basis remains obscure because the GL2 target genes leading to the network for cell differentiation are unknown. We identified five basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes (ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 [RHD6], RHD6-LIKE1 [RSL1], RSL2, Lj-RHL1-LIKE1 [LRL1], and LRL2) as GL2 direct targets using transcriptional and posttranslational induction systems. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed GL2 binding to upstream regions of these genes in planta. Reporter gene analyses showed that these genes are expressed in various stages of root hair development and are suppressed by GL2 in non-hair cells. GL2 promoter-driven GFP fusions of LRL1 and LRL2, but not those of the other bHLH proteins, conferred root hair development on non-hair cells. These results indicate that GL2 directly suppresses bHLH genes with diverse functions in root hair development. PMID:26486447

  18. The space density, environments, and physical properties of large Lyalpha nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prescott, Moire Kathleen Murphy

    Powerful forces are at work in giant Lya nebulae, a rare and mysterious population in the high redshift universe. Much like the spatially extended emission line halos around high redshift radio galaxies--but without the strong radio emission-- Lya nebulae (or Lya 'blobs') boast copious Lya emission (10^44 erg s -1 ), large sizes (~100 kpc), complex gas morphologies, and the company of numerous compact, star-forming galaxies, and may offer a window into dramatic episodes of massive galaxy formation. The small sample sizes and complex inner workings of Lya nebulae have limited progress on understanding the their space density, environments, and physical conditions. This thesis strives to answer fundamental questions about Lya nebulae and pave the way for understanding their role in the build up of massive galaxy systems. To address the frequency of collapse of these massive structures, we carried out the largest systematic Lya nebula survey to date and measured the Lya nebula space density. As an unbiased test of the environment of Lya nebulae, we studied the surroundings of a Lya nebula and confirmed that Lya nebulae reside preferentially in overdense regions. To disentangle the sources of ionization, we took a census of all the compact ionization sources within a large Lya nebula using high resolution imaging. Finally, we used photoionization modeling to put constraints on the physical conditions, the metallicity, and the sources of ionization within Lya nebulae. Future work will be able to build on this thesis by expanding the systematic search for Lya nebulae to other existing deep broad-band datasets, mapping the three-dimensional overdense structures in which Lya nebulae live out to >=50 (comoving) Mpc scales, and disentangling multiple sources of ionization within a larger sample of individual systems using deep optical and near-infrared spectroscopy and detailed photoionization modeling.

  19. The planetary nebula system and dynamics of NGC 5128. I - Planetary nebulae as standard candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Xiaohui; Ford, Holland C.; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.

    1993-01-01

    We present the result of a planetary nebula (PN) survey of the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 performed with CCD cameras at the prime focus of the CTIO 4 m telescope. By comparing CCD images centered on the characteristic emission line forbidden O III 5007 A and on the adjacent continuum, we identify a total of 785 PNs in areas extending 20 kpc along the photometric major axis and covering the whole galaxy to 10 kpc. From these data, we form a complete sample of 224 PNs extending to a dereddened limiting magnitude of m5007 = 24.8, which extends 1.5 mag down the PN luminosity function (PNLF). Adopting a foreground extinction of E(B-V) = 0.1, we derive a distance to the galaxy of 3.5 +/- 0.2 Mpc, in excellent agreement with the surface brightness fluctuation method. No population effect on the bright cutoff of PNLF is observed in the isophotal radius range of 2-16 kpc, but the luminosity specific PN density seems to increase with radius inside of 7 kpc, in agreement with the alpha(2.5)-color relation observed for other galaxies.

  20. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. III. PLANETARY NEBULA KINEMATICS AND DISK MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-11-10

    Much of our understanding of dark matter halos comes from the assumption that the mass-to-light ratio (Y) of spiral disks is constant. The best way to test this hypothesis is to measure the disk surface mass density directly via the kinematics of old disk stars. To this end, we have used planetary nebulae (PNe) as test particles and have measured the vertical velocity dispersion (sigma{sub z}) throughout the disks of five nearby, low-inclination spiral galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). By using H I to map galactic rotation and the epicyclic approximation to extract sigma{sub z} from the line-of-sight dispersion, we find that, with the lone exception of M101, our disks do have a constant Y out to approx3 optical scale lengths (h{sub R} ). However, once outside this radius, sigma{sub z} stops declining and becomes flat with radius. Possible explanations for this behavior include an increase in the disk mass-to-light ratio, an increase in the importance of the thick disk, and heating of the thin disk by halo substructure. We also find that the disks of early type spirals have higher values of Y and are closer to maximal than the disks of later-type spirals, and that the unseen inner halos of these systems are better fit by pseudo-isothermal laws than by NFW models.

  1. Evolution of planetary nebulae. III. Position-velocity images of butterfly-type nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Icke, V.; Preston, H.L.; Balick, B.

    1989-02-01

    Observations of the motions of the shells of the planetary nebulae NGC 2346, NGC 2371-2, NGC 2440, NGC 6058, NGC 6210, IC 1747, IC 5217, J-320, and M2-9 are presented. These are all 'butterfly' type PNs, and show evidence for bipolar shocks. The observations are interpreted in terms of a fast spherical wind, driven by the central star into a quasi-toroidal envelope deposited earlier by the star, during its slow-wind phase on the asymptotic giant branch. It is shown that this model, which is a straightforward extension of a mechanism previously invoked to account for elliptical PNs, reproduces the essential kinematic features of butterfly PNs. It is inferred that the envelopes of butterflies must have a considerable equator-to-pole density gradient, and it is suggested that the origin of this asphericity must be sought in an as yet unknown mechanism during the AGB, Mira, or OH/IR phases of late stellar evolution. 28 references.

  2. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. II. PLANETARY NEBULA SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-09-20

    As the second step in our investigation of the mass-to-light ratio of spiral disks, we present the results of a spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in five nearby, low-inclination galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). Using 50 setups of the WIYN/Hydra and Blanco/Hydra spectrographs, and 25 observations with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's Medium Resolution Spectrograph, we determine the radial velocities of 99, 102, 162, 127, and 48 PNe, respectively, to a precision better than 15 km s{sup -1}. Although the main purpose of this data set is to facilitate dynamical mass measurements throughout the inner and outer disks of large spiral galaxies, our spectroscopy has other uses as well. Here, we co-add these spectra to show that, to first order, the [O III] and Balmer line ratios of PNe vary little over the top {approx}1.5 mag of the PN luminosity function. The only obvious spectral change occurs with [N II], which increases in strength as one proceeds down the luminosity function. We also show that typical [O III]-bright planetaries have E(B - V) {approx} 0.2 of circumstellar extinction, and that this value is virtually independent of [O III] luminosity. We discuss the implications this has for understanding the population of PN progenitors.

  3. Planetary Nebulae in Face-On Spiral Galaxies. II. Planetary Nebula Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2009-09-01

    As the second step in our investigation of the mass-to-light ratio of spiral disks, we present the results of a spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in five nearby, low-inclination galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). Using 50 setups of the WIYN/Hydra and Blanco/Hydra spectrographs, and 25 observations with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's Medium Resolution Spectrograph, we determine the radial velocities of 99, 102, 162, 127, and 48 PNe, respectively, to a precision better than 15 km s-1. Although the main purpose of this data set is to facilitate dynamical mass measurements throughout the inner and outer disks of large spiral galaxies, our spectroscopy has other uses as well. Here, we co-add these spectra to show that, to first order, the [O III] and Balmer line ratios of PNe vary little over the top ~1.5 mag of the PN luminosity function. The only obvious spectral change occurs with [N II], which increases in strength as one proceeds down the luminosity function. We also show that typical [O III]-bright planetaries have E(B - V) ~ 0.2 of circumstellar extinction, and that this value is virtually independent of [O III] luminosity. We discuss the implications this has for understanding the population of PN progenitors.

  4. RFID Tag Helix Antenna Sensors for Wireless Drug Dosage Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyu; Zhao, Peisen; Chen, Pai-Yen; Ren, Yong; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Hu, Ye; Akinwande, Deji

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized helix antennas are integrated with drug reservoirs to function as RFID wireless tag sensors for real-time drug dosage monitoring. The general design procedure of this type of biomedical antenna sensors is proposed based on electromagnetic theory and finite element simulation. A cost effective fabrication process is utilized to encapsulate the antenna sensor within a biocompatible package layer using PDMS material, and at the same time form a drug storage or drug delivery unit inside the sensor. The in vitro experiment on two prototypes of antenna sensor-drug reservoir assembly have shown the ability to monitor the drug dosage by tracking antenna resonant frequency shift from 2.4-2.5-GHz ISM band with realized sensitivity of 1.27 [Formula: see text] for transdermal drug delivery monitoring and 2.76-[Formula: see text] sensitivity for implanted drug delivery monitoring. PMID:27170865

  5. Helix versus sheet formation in a small peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Hansmann, Ulrich H.

    2003-10-01

    Segments with the amino acid sequence EKAYLRT (glutamine-lysine-alanine-tyrosine-leucine-arginine-threonine) appear in naturally occurring proteins both in α-helices and β-sheets. For this reason, we have used this peptide to study how secondary structure formation in proteins depends on the local environment. Our data rely on multicanonical Monte Carlo simulations where the interactions among all atoms are taken into account. Results in gas phase are compared with that in an implicit solvent. We find that both the solvated molecule and EKAYLRT in gas phase form an α-helix when not interacting with other molecules. However, in the vicinity of a β-strand, the peptide forms a β-strand. Because of this change in secondary structure our peptide may provide a simple model for the α→β transition that is supposedly related to the outbreak of prion diseases and similar illnesses.

  6. Spontaneous and stable uniform lying helix liquid-crystal alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outram, B. I.; Elston, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    The flexoelectro-optic effect in the uniform lying helix (ULH) geometry could provide many advantages over existing liquid-crystal technologies, however reliably forming the ULH has been problematic. Here, we achieve spontaneous, stable, and repeatable ULH alignment for materials with both positive and negative dielectric anisotropy in devices ranging from 1 to 7 μm in thickness without the need for any field application or flow-induced alignment, using a combination of weak homeotropic alignment conditions and unidirectional grooved surface profiles. The technique requires slow cooling from the isotropic phase and through the blue phase. Devices made using the technique display sub-millisecond and linear electro-optical responses.

  7. Helix Bundle Quaternary Structure from [alpha]/[beta]-Peptide Foldamers

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, W. Seth; Price, Joshua L.; Keck, James L.; Gellman, Samuel H.

    2008-11-18

    The function of a protein generally depends on adoption of a specific folding pattern, which in turn is determined by the side chain sequence along the polypeptide backbone. Here we show that the sequence-encoded structural information in peptides derived from yeast transcriptional activator GCN4 can be used to prepare hybrid {alpha}/{beta}-peptide foldamers that adopt helix bundle quaternary structures. Crystal structures of two hybrid {alpha}/{beta}-peptides are reported along with detailed structural comparison to {alpha}-peptides of analogous side chain sequence. There is considerable homology between {alpha}- and {alpha}/{beta}-peptides at the level of helical secondary structure, with modest but significant differences in the association geometry of helices in the quaternary structure.

  8. VIEW OF SOUTH ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTH ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87) SHOWING MAIN ENTRY DOOR, LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  9. VIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), WITH ANTENNA TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), WITH ANTENNA TOWER CABLE SUPPORT IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  10. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), LOOKING WEST (with scale stick). - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  11. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), LOOKING WEST (without scale stick). - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  12. Triple Helix Systems: An Analytical Framework for Innovation Policy and Practice in the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranga, Marina; Etzkowitz, Henry

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of Triple Helix systems as an analytical construct that synthesizes the key features of university--industry--government (Triple Helix) interactions into an "innovation system" format, defined according to systems theory as a set of components, relationships and functions. Among the components of Triple…

  13. Is NGC 3199 the Third Wolf-Rayet Nebula with Diffuse X-ray emission?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toala, J. a.

    2013-10-01

    X-ray emission from Wolf-Rayet (WR) nebulae is thought to be produced by the powerful winds from their central stars slamming into the circumstellar medium. Only 4 WR nebulae have been observed with the latest generation of X-ray satellites: S 308 (WR6), RCW58 (WR40), NGC6888 (WR136), and the nebula of WR16, but only S 308 and NGC6888 have been detected. ROSAT observations toward the WR nebula NGC3199 hinted at the presence of soft X-ray emission associated with this nebula, but the low angular resolution does not allow us to disentangle the different contributions to this emission. We request a 40 ks XMM-Newton EPIC-pn observation to help us study the distribution of the diffuse hot gas within the WR nebula NGC3199 around WR18.

  14. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a `fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures.

  15. Design of Tip Loss Profile on Support Rod for a Helix TWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Sinha, A. K.; Srivastava, V.

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the design of tip loss profile on support rod for a high gain, high efficiency helix TWT. The tip loss profile at sever ends for the input and the output section of the helix slow wave structure has been designed for return loss at severs ends better than -20 dB. The experimental results have been carried out in the input and the output section of the helix assemblies for the high gain helix TWT to find the return loss in the region of carbon coated tip loss on the support rods. The experimental result has been compared with the simulated performance for the return loss at the sever ends. The design of tip loss profile on the support rod for helix TWT has been carried out in real situation using Ansoft HFSS. A good agreement has been found in the simulated and experimental results.

  16. Analysis of Helix Slow Wave Structure for High Efficiency Space TWT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaria, Mukesh Kumar; Bera, A.; Sinha, A. K.; Srivastava, V.

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes the analysis of helix slow-wave structure (SWS) for a high efficiency space traveling wave tube that is carried out using Ansoft HFSS and CST microwave studio, which is a 3D electromagnetic field simulators. Two approaches of simulating the dispersion and impedance characteristics of the helix slow wave structure have been discussed and compared with measured results. The dispersion characteristic gives the information about axial propagation constant (Beta). Which in turn yields the phase velocity at a particular frequency. The dispersion and impedance characteristics can be used in finding the pertinent design parameters of the helix slow-wave structure. Therefore a new trend has been initiated at CEERI to use Ansoft HFSS code to analysis of the helix slow wave structure in its real environment. The analysis of the helix SWS for Ku-band 140W space TWT has been carried out and compared with experimental results, and found is close agreement.

  17. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a ‘fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures. PMID:26980593

  18. PAH and H2 emission in the Ring Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.; Pilleri, P.; Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Joblin, C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the Spitzer IRS (Infra Red Spectrograph) detection of mid-infrared polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features and H2 associated with dense knots in the ring of the “oxygen-rich” (C/O∼⃒0.6-0.8) planetary nebula (PN) NGC6720 (Ring Nebula). We explored a further three oxygen-rich extended PNe with similar dataset available. These turned out to be non-detection of PAHs, although two of these do contain H2 emission knots. The presence of PAHs is discussed in the context of a bottom-up formation mechanism, in which first small hydrocarbons, and later PAHs, are formed in warm dense knots inside the ionised regions of PNe.

  19. Super Star Cluster Nebula in the Starburst Galaxy NGC 660

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naiman, J. P.; Turner, J. L.; Tsai, C.-W.; Beck, S. C.; Ho, P. T. P.

    2004-12-01

    We have mapped the starburst galaxy NGC 660 at 100mas resolution at K band (1.3 cm) with the NRAO Very Large Array. A peculiar galaxy at a distance of 13 Mpc, NGC 660 contains concentrated central star formation of power ˜ 2 x 1010 Lsun. Our 1.3 cm continuum image reveals a bright, compact source of less than 10 pc extent with a rising spectral index. We infer that this is optically thick free-free emission from a super star cluster nebula. The nebula is less than 10 pc in size, comparable in luminosity to the ``supernebula" in the dwarf galaxy, NGC 5253. We estimate that there are a few thousand O stars contained in this single young cluster. There are a number of other weaker continuum sources, either slightly smaller or more evolved clusters of similar size within the central 300 parsecs of the galaxy. This work is supported in part by the National Science Foundation.

  20. Extended near-infrared emission from visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.; Werner, M. W.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    Extended near infrared (2 to 5 microns) emission was observed from three visual reflection nebulae, NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. The emission from each nebula consists of a smooth continuum, which can be described by a greybody with a color temperature of 1000 K, and emission features at 3.3 and 3.4 microns. The continuum emission cannot be explained by free-free emission, reflected light, or field stars, or by thermal emission from grains, with commonly accepted ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, which are in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field. A possible explanation is thermal emission from grains with extremely low ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, or from grains with a temperature determined by mechanisms other than equilibrium radiative heating. Another possibility is continuum fluorescence. Previously announced in STAR N83-25629

  1. Extended near infrared emission from visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.; Werner, M. W.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Extended near infrared (2 to 5 microns) emission was observed from three visual reflection nebulae, NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. The emission from each nebula consists of a smooth continuum, which can be described by a greybody with a color temperature of 1000 K, and emission features at 3.3 and 3.4 microns. The continuum emission cannot be explained by free-free emission, reflected light, or field stars, or by thermal emission from grains, with commonly accepted ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, which are in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field. A possible explanation is thermal emission from grains with extremely low ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, or from grains with a temperature determined by mechanisms other than equilibrium radiative heating. Another possibility is continuum fluorescence.

  2. The jovian nebula: a post-voyager perspective.

    PubMed

    Trauger, J T

    1984-10-19

    Voyager 1 carried a diverse collection of magnetospheric probes through the inner Jovian magnetosphere in March 1979. The ensuing data analysis and theoretical investigation provided a comprehensive description of the Jovian nebula, a luminous torus populated with newly released heavy ions drawn from Io's surface. Recent refinements in Earth-based imaging instrumentation are used to extend the Voyager in situ picture in temporal and spatial coverage. An analysis of [SIII] and [SII] optical emissions observed during the Jovian apparitions of 1981 through 1983 reveals three distinct torus components. Regularities have been identified in the ion partitioning and ion densities in the hot outer and inner tori, sharply defined radial structure is found in the plasma near Io, and the relative permanence of the cool inner torus is inferred. An extended cloud of neutral material is required as a source of fresh ions in the nebula.

  3. Ionized magnesium in the planetary nebula NGC 7027

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II; Natta, A.; Russell, R. W.; Wyant, J.; Beckwith, S.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of NGC 7027 are presented for six ionic lines: Mg(+3) (4.48 microns), Mg(+4) (5.61 microns), H(0) (4.05 and 7.46 microns), Ne(+5) (7.64 microns), and Ar(+5) (4.53 microns). The magnesium lines are consistent with the measurements of Russell, Soifer, and Willner (1977), and the hydrogen lines are consistent with the line strengths predicted from the radio flux. Upper limits were obtained for the neon and argon lines. The abundance of magnesium in the central part of the nebula is highly uncertain because the fine-structure collision strengths are poorly known. The strong gradient of magnesium abundance from the inner to the outer portions of the nebula derived by Pequignot and Stasinska (1980) could be an artifact of this uncertainty. A brief analysis of the effective stellar temperature derived from the magnesium line ratios is given.

  4. Magellanic cloud planetary nebula with suspected strong forbidden iron lines.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J

    1983-03-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair lambda4724, 4726, [Ca V] lambda5309, [Fe V] lambda4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially "normal" helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries. PMID:16593294

  5. X-RAY EVOLUTION OF PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Anada, Takayasu; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Yamazaki, Ryo; Vink, Jacco

    2010-08-20

    During the search for counterparts of very high energy gamma-ray sources, we serendipitously discovered large, extended, low surface brightness emission from pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) around pulsars with the ages up to {approx}100 kyr, a discovery made possible by the low and stable background of the Suzaku X-ray satellite. A systematic study of a sample of eight of these PWNe, together with Chandra data sets, has revealed that the nebulae keep expanding up to {approx}100 kyr, although the timescale of the synchrotron X-ray emission is only {approx}60 yr for typical magnetic fields of 100 {mu}G. Our result suggests that the accelerated electrons up to {approx}80 TeV can escape from the PWNe without losing most energies. Moreover, in order to explain the observed correlation between the X-ray size and the pulsar spin-down age, the magnetic field strength in the PWNe must decrease with time.

  6. The violent interstellar medium associated with the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, C.; Paul, J. A.; Pettini, M.

    1982-06-01

    The physical conditions and chemical composition of the interstellar medium in line to HD 93205, an O3V star in the Great Carina Nebula, were studied, using UV spectra. The two main high velocity components show different relative abundance patterns. The red shifted component shows no depletion. For the blue shifted component, the relative abundance pattern seems difficult to explain in terms of elements locked into grains. Its composition is attributed to mixing with freshly synthetized material ejected by a recent supernova explosion. One low velocity component is identified with the normal interstellar gas in the disk of the Galaxy. In this component, column densities of interstellar CIV and SiIV, free from contamination by circumstellar material, were measured. The other low velocity component is identified with the approaching part of the expanding ionized nebula around the Carina OB associations. It consists of a dense HII region in which the two conspicuous OI fine structure lines originate.

  7. Determination of the Galactic Rotation Curve Based on Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diara, C. M.; Maciel, W. J.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT:Planetary nebulae of types I, lIa, and llb are considered in order to determine the galactic rotation curve. It is shown that the curves defined by the first two types do not differ substantially from the one derived on the basis of young population I objects, such as CO-H II molecular complexes. RESUMO:Um grupo de nebulosas planetarias de tipos I, lIa, e lIb e utilizado para determinar a curva de rota o galatica. Mostra-se que as curvas definidas pelos dois primeiros tipos de nebulosas diferem substancialmente da curva obtida a partir de objetos jovens, de popuIa o I, como Os complexos moleculares CO-H II. Koy words: GALAXY-STRUCTURE - NEBULAE-PLANETARY

  8. High dispersion observations of selected regions in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeshaar, G. O.; Harvel, C. A.; Mallama, A. D.; Perry, P. M.; Thompson, R. W.; Turnrose, B.

    High resolution spectral observations were made of several regions of the Orion Nebula near theta (2) Ori A using the IUE. The positions were selected using a moderate spatial resolution map from a previous low dispersion IUE survery of this section of the nebula. With the SWP and LWR cameras, 28 pectra were obtained of the bright bar, three Taylor-Munch cloudlets, and several surrounding locations. Emission lines of He, C, N, O, Mg, and Si allow a characterization of these cloudlets and of the gas in and around the bar. Small aperture observations provide radial velocity information for the ultraviolet emission of these features. These data show ionization variations from region to region and are suggestive of stellar wind interactions between the cloudlets and theta(2) Ori A.

  9. A Rapidly Moving Shell in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Donald K.; O'Dell, C. R.; Hu, Xihai; Dufour, Reginald J.

    1995-01-01

    A well-resolved elliptical shell in the inner Orion Nebula has been investigated by monochromatic imaging plus high- and low-resolution spectroscopy. We find that it is of low ionization and the two bright ends are moving at -39 and -49 km/s with respect to OMC-1. There is no central object, even in the infrared J bandpass although H2 emission indicates a possible association with the nearby very young pre-main-sequence star J&W 352, which is one of the youngest pre-main-sequence stars in the inner Orion Nebula. Many of the characteristics of this object (low ionization, blue shift) are like those of the Herbig-Haro objects, although the symmetric form would make it an unusual member of that class.

  10. The VERITAS Supernova Remnant / Pulsar Wind Nebula Observation Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humensky, Thomas Brian; VERITAS Collaboration

    2011-09-01

    Supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae together constitute the vast majority of galactic gamma-ray sources seen at TeV energies. Supernova remnants are widely considered to be the strongest candidate for the source of cosmic rays below the knee around 1015 eV. Pulsar wind nebulae, powered by the spin-down energy released by pulsars and visible due to synchrotron and inverse Compton radiation emitted by their constituent electrons, comprise one of the most populous VHE gamma-ray source classes. VERITAS, an array of four imaging Cherenkov telescopes located at the Whipple Observatory in southern Arizona, has made significant contributions to the study of both classes of objects. This poster will summarize the results of this observation program and prospects for the future.

  11. Near-Infrared Polarimetry of the Eagle Nebula (M 16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugitani, Koji; Watanabe, Makoto; Tamura, Motohide; Kandori, Ryo; Hough, James H.; Nishiyama, Shogo; Nakajima, Yasushi; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko; Hashimoto, Jun; Nagayama, Takahiro; Nagashima, Chie; Kato, Daisuke; Fukuda, Naoya

    2007-06-01

    We carried out deep and wide (˜ 8 × 8) JHKs imaging polarimetry in the southern region of the Eagle Nebula (M 16). The polarization intensity map reveals that two YSOs with near-IR reflection nebulae are located at the tips of two famous molecular pillars (Pillars 1 and 2) facing toward the exciting stars of M 16. The centrosymmetric polarization pattern are consistent with those around Class I objects having circumstellar envelopes, confirming that star formation is now taking place at the two tips of the pillars under the influence of UV radiation from the exciting stars. Polarization measurements of point sources show that magnetic fields are aligned along some of the pillars, but in a direction that is quite different to the global structure in M 16.

  12. Al-Sufi's Investigation of Stars, Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihsan; Stephenson, F. R.; Orchiston, W.

    2011-01-01

    The distinguished Arabic astronomer, Al-Sufi (AD 903-986) is justly famous for his Book of the Fixed Stars, an outstanding Medieval treatise on astronomy that was assembled in 964. Developed from Ptolemy's Algamest, but based upon al-Sufi's own stellar observations, the Book of the Fixed Stars has been copied down through the ages, and currently 35 copies are known to exist in various archival repositories around the world. Among other things, this major work contains 55 astronomical tables, plus star charts for 48 constellations. For the first time a long-overdue English translation of this important early work is in active preparation. In this paper we provide biographical material about Al-Sufi and the contents of his Book of the Fixed Stars, before examining his novel stellar magnitude system, and his listing of star clusters and nebulae (including the first-ever mention of the Great Nebula in Andromeda).

  13. Radial Migration of Phyllosilicates in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, F. J.; Lauretta, D. S.; Hood, L. L.

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the high temperatures of the inner solar nebula (within approx. 3 AU) would not have allowed water to be incorporated into solids. However, the presence of water on the surface of Earth, as well as evidence for it on the surface of an early Mars imply that water was incorporated into solid bodies in this region. How this water was delivered to the solid bodies has yet to be identified. In this abstract we explore the possibility that hydrous minerals, such as phyllosilicates, formed somewhere in the asteroid belt region of the solar nebula or beyond, and then migrated inward where they would be accreted into larger bodies.

  14. Million-degree plasma pervading the extended Orion Nebula.

    PubMed

    Güdel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R; Montmerle, Thierry; Audard, Marc; Rebull, Luisa; Skinner, Stephen L

    2008-01-18

    Most stars form as members of large associations within dense, very cold (10 to 100 kelvin) molecular clouds. The nearby giant molecular cloud in Orion hosts several thousand stars of ages less than a few million years, many of which are located in or around the famous Orion Nebula, a prominent gas structure illuminated and ionized by a small group of massive stars (the Trapezium). We present x-ray observations obtained with the X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite XMM-Newton, revealing that a hot plasma with a temperature of 1.7 to 2.1 million kelvin pervades the southwest extension of the nebula. The plasma flows into the adjacent interstellar medium. This x-ray outflow phenomenon must be widespread throughout our Galaxy.

  15. Magellanic cloud planetary nebula with suspected strong forbidden iron lines

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair λ4724, 4726, [Ca V] λ5309, [Fe V] λ4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially “normal” helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries. PMID:16593294

  16. UNRAVELING THE GEOMETRY OF THE CRAB NEBULA's 'INNER RING'

    SciTech Connect

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2012-02-10

    Chandra images of the Crab Nebula resolve the detailed structure of its 'inner ring', possibly a termination shock where pulsar-accelerated relativistic particles begin to emit X radiation. Analysis of these images finds that the center of the ellipse-presumably a circular ring in projection-lies about 0.''9 (10 light days at 2 kpc) from the pulsar's image, at a position angle of about 300 Degree-Sign (east of north). This analysis also measures properties of the ellipse: the position angle of the semi-major axis is about 210 Degree-Sign (east of north); the aspect ratio is 0.49. In a simple-albeit, not unique-de-projection of the observed geometry, a circular ring is centered on the axis of symmetry of the pulsar wind nebula. This ring is not equatorial but rather lies near +4.{sup 0}5 latitude in pulsar-centered coordinates. Alternative geometries are briefly discussed.

  17. Outflows, Jets and Shocks in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, C. R.; Bally, John

    2000-01-01

    The rich young cluster of stars associated with the Orion Nebula provides a unique laboratory for the study of plasma phenomena. We see five types of flows and shocks. Photoablation outflow from the proplyds nearest theta (exp 1) Ori C form nearly stationary shocks with the high velocity wind from that star. Microjets, with scales of less than 10 (exp 4) AU, are seen around some 20 low mass stars. Isolated jets, with high velocities and scales of about, 104 AU, are less numerous but common. One also sees the shocks formed when these jets impinge on the ionized nebular gas and the neutral gas in the foreground lid. The final type of object is the stationary shock formed by the interaction from the stellar wind that arises during disk formation with the ambient, gas flowing away from the main body of the nebula.

  18. The rapidly evolving planetary nebula Hen 3-1357

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gry, C.

    Hen 3-1357 (known as the 'Stingray Nebula') is the youngest Planetary Nebula known in the sky. It has become ionized within the past few decades and its central star seems to be still rapidly evolving in the H-R diagram towards hotter effective temperatures. With this proposal we want to determine the current effective temperature of the central star and the characteristics of the stellar wind thirteen years after its discovery with IUE. This will enable us to determine whether the rapid spectral changes observed in the last few years are the consequence of an episodic post-AGB mass loss event or the result of a continuous evolution in the H-R digram. In any of these cases, the observations will help us to understand this short and, thus, still poorly known transition phase which leads to the formation of a new PN.

  19. Dust polarisation and magnetic field geometry in Proto Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabin, L.; Zhang, Q.; Zijlstra, A.; Patel, N. A.; Vázquez, R.; Zauderer, B. A.; Contreras, M. E.; Guillén, P. F.

    2014-04-01

    The role of magnetic fields in late type stars and their nebulae, such as proto-planetary (PPNe) and planetary nebulae (PNe), is poorly known from an observational point of view. We therefore present new submillimeter observations realised with the Sub-Millimeter Array (SMA) which unveil the dust continuum polarisation in two well known PPNe: CRL 618 and OH 231.8+4.2. Assuming the current grain alignment theory, we also trace the geometry of the magnetic field in these two objects. The combination of this study with previous submillimeter observations, done with SCUBA at JCMT, will then pave the way for a better understanding of the evolution of magnetic fields in the envelopes of PPNe and PNe.

  20. Detection of submillimeter polarization in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, R. H.; Dragovan, M.; Novak, G.

    1984-01-01

    Linear polarization of the submillimeter (270 micron) continuum radiation from two regions of Orion was observed: one centered on the Kleinmann-Low Nebula and one centered on the 400 micron peak 1.5' south of the nebula. The polarizations measured for these regions are P = (1.7 +/-0.4)% at phi = 23 deg +/-7 deg and P=(1.7 +/- 0.5)% at phi = 27 deg +/- 7 deg respectively. A 2(sigma) upper limit, P or = 1.6%, was found for the nebular W3(OH). The position angle at KL is orthogonal to that measured at 11 microns by Dyck and Beichman and at 11 and 20 microns by Knacke and Capps. The far-IR values for KL reported by Gull et. al. (approx 2%) and by Cudlip et al. (1 to 2% level) are consistent with the submillimeter results.

  1. Catalysis by Dust Grains in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, Monika E.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to determine whether grain-catalyzed reactions played an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula, we have applied our time-dependent model of methane formation via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis to pressures from 10(exp -5) to 1 bar and temperatures from 450 to 650 K. Under these physical conditions, the reaction 3H2 + CO yields CH4 + H2O is readily catalyzed by an iron or nickel surface, whereas the same reaction is kinetically inhibited in the gas phase. Our model results indicate that under certain nebular conditions, conversion of CO to methane could be extremely efficient in the presence of iron-nickel dust grains over timescales very short compared to the lifetime of the solar nebula.

  2. Spectral properties and variability of the Vela pulsar wind nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangelov, Blagoy; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George; Klingler, Noel; Kropotina, Julia

    2015-08-01

    The non-thermal emission around young pulsars (seen in radio and X-rays) is known to be synchrotron radiation from a relativistic pulsar wind shocked in the ambient medium. One of the best examples is the Vela pulsar wind nebula (PWN), which shows spectacular structure, such as jets, arcs, knots, and diffuse extended emission, detected with Chandra. The morphology of the Vela PWN is determined by the properties of the pulsar wind and surrounding medium. We will present the results of our multi-year Chandra campaign. We will present our analysis of the variability and spectral properties of the compact nebula and discuss their implications for pulsar wind models and for the interaction of the relativistic pulsar wind with the ambient medium.

  3. The Jovian nebula - A post-Voyager perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager 1 carried a diverse collection of magnetospheric probes through the inner Jovian magnetosphere in March 1979. The ensuing data analysis and theoretical investigation provided a comprehensive description of the Jovian nebula, a luminous torus populated with newly released heavy ions drawn from Io's surface. Recent refinements in earth-based imaging instrumentation are used to extend the Voyager in situ picture in temporal and spatial coverage. An analysis of S III and S II forbidden-line optical emissions observed during the Jovian apparitions of 1981 through 1983 reveals three distinct torus components. Regularities have been identified in the ion partitioning and ion densities in the hot outer and inner tori, sharply defined radial structure is found in the plasma near Io, and the relative permanence of the cool inner torus is inferred. An extended cloud of neutral material is required as a source of fresh ions in the nebula.

  4. Modeling Gamma-ray Flares in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yajie; Blandford, R. D.; Simeon, P.

    2013-04-01

    The gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula shows variations on a wide range of time scales, with the most dramatic events being the flares observed by Fermi and AGILE: the flux can increase by a factor of ~10 within ~10 hours; the spectrum is characterized by a peak energy ~300 MeV, while no variation in other wavebands was detected. These variations present a great challenge to particle acceleration mechanisms. We consider two possible explanations of these flares. Firstly, we consider emission from a moving relativistic shock terminating the pulsar wind. Secondly, we treat the pulsar and its wind as a current generator and suppose that the current filaments into individual pinches that can undergo radial collapse and become strongly dissipative when the electric field becomes as strong as the magnetic field and Larmor radius of the highest energy particles becomes comparable with the radius. The application of these models to pulsar wind nebulae and relativistic jets will be outlined.

  5. BY POPULAR DEMAND: HUBBLE OBSERVES THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Rising from a sea of dust and gas like a giant seahorse, the Horsehead nebula is one of the most photographed objects in the sky. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took a close-up look at this heavenly icon, revealing the cloud's intricate structure. This detailed view of the horse's head is being released to celebrate the orbiting observatory's eleventh anniversary. Produced by the Hubble Heritage Project, this picture is a testament to the Horsehead's popularity. Internet voters selected this object for the orbiting telescope to view. The Horsehead, also known as Barnard 33, is a cold, dark cloud of gas and dust, silhouetted against the bright nebula, IC 434. The bright area at the top left edge is a young star still embedded in its nursery of gas and dust. But radiation from this hot star is eroding the stellar nursery. The top of the nebula also is being sculpted by radiation from a massive star located out of Hubble's field of view. Only by chance does the nebula roughly resemble the head of a horse. Its unusual shape was first discovered on a photographic plate in the late 1800s. Located in the constellation Orion, the Horsehead is a cousin of the famous pillars of dust and gas known as the Eagle nebula. Both tower-like nebulas are cocoons of young stars. The Horsehead nebula lies just south of the bright star Zeta Orionis, which is easily visible to the unaided eye as the left-hand star in the line of three that form Orion's Belt. Amateur astronomers often use the Horsehead as a test of their observing skills; it is known as one of the more difficult objects to see visually in an amateur-sized telescope. The magnificent extent of the Horsehead is best appreciated in a new wide-field image of the nebula being released today by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, taken by Travis Rector with the National Science Foundation's 0.9 meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ. This popular celestial target was the clear winner among more

  6. Warm Dust around Hot Stars in the Trifid Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Cesarsky, D.; Demyk, K.; Rodriguez, L. F.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on mid-infrared observations of the central region in the Trifid nebula, carried out with ISOCAM in several broad-band filters and in the low-resolution spectroscopic mode provided by the Circular Variable Filter. Analysis of the emission indicates the presence of a hot dust component (500-1000 K) and a warm dust component at lower temperatures (150-200 K) around several members of the cluster exciting the HII region and other stars undetected at optical wavelengths. Complementary VLA observations suggest that the mid-IR emission could arise from the a dust cocoon or a circumstellar disk, evaporated under the ionization of the central source and the exciting star of the nebula. In several sources the 9.7 micron silicate band is seen in emission. Around one young stellar source we found the presence of crystalline silicates in the circumstellar dust.

  7. Disks around hot stars in the Trifid nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefloch, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Cesarsky, D.; Demyk, K.; Rodriguez, L. F.

    2001-03-01

    We report on mid-IR observations of the central region in the Trifid nebula, carried out with ISOCAM in several broad-band infrared filters and in the low resolution spectroscopic mode provided by the circular variable filter. Analysis of the emission indicates the presence of a hot dust component (500 to 1000 K) and a warm dust component at lower temperatures (~ 150-200 K) around several members of the cluster exciting the H II region, and other stars undetected at optical wavelengths. Complementary VLA observations suggest that the mid-IR emission could arise from a dust cocoon or a circumstellar disk, evaporated under the ionization of the central source and the exciting star of the nebula. In several sources the 9.7 kern 0.20em mu m silicate band is seen in emission. One young stellar source shows indications of crystalline silicates in the circumstellar dust.

  8. Spectrophotometry of Bowen resonance fluorescence lines in three planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Miller, Christopher O.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented of a uniquely complete, carefully reduced set of observations of the O III Bowen fluorescence lines in the planetary nebulae NGC 6210, NGC 7027, and NGC 7662. A detailed comparison with the predictions of radiative excitation verify that some secondary lines are enhanced by selective population by the charge exchange mechanism involving O IV. Charge exchange is most important in NGC 6210, which is of significantly lower ionization than the other nebulae. In addition to the principal Bowen lines arising from Ly-alpha pumping of the O III O1 line, lines arising from pumping of the O3 line are also observed. Comparison of lines produced by O1 and O3 with the theoretical predictions of Neufeld indicate poor agreement; comparison with the theoretical predictions of Harrington show agreement with NGC 7027 and NGC 7662.

  9. THE LINE POLARIZATION WITHIN A GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Smith, Paul S.; Schmidt, Gary D.; Dey, Arjun

    2011-04-01

    Recent theoretical work has suggested that Ly{alpha} nebulae could be substantially polarized in the Ly{alpha} emission line, depending on the geometry, kinematics, and powering mechanism at work. Polarization observations can therefore provide a useful constraint on the source of ionization in these systems. In this Letter, we present the first Ly{alpha} polarization measurements for a giant Ly{alpha} nebula at z{approx} 2.656. We do not detect any significant linear polarization of the Ly{alpha} emission: P{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.6% {+-} 2.8% (corrected for statistical bias) within a single large aperture. The current data also do not show evidence for the radial polarization gradient predicted by some theoretical models. These results rule out singly scattered Ly{alpha} (e.g., from the nearby active galactic nucleus, AGN) and may be inconsistent with some models of backscattering in a spherical outflow. However, the effects of seeing, diminished signal-to-noise ratio, and angle averaging within radial bins make it difficult to put strong constraints on the radial polarization profile. The current constraints may be consistent with higher density outflow models, spherically symmetric infall models, photoionization by star formation within the nebula or the nearby AGN, resonant scattering, or non-spherically symmetric cold accretion (i.e., along filaments). Higher signal-to-noise ratio data probing to higher spatial resolution will allow us to harness the full diagnostic power of polarization observations in distinguishing between theoretical models of giant Ly{alpha} nebulae.

  10. Millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-10

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, {sup 13}CO, and HCO{sup +} with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V{sub LSR} = –14 km s{sup –1} and +5 km s{sup –1}. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado 'head' in the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud collided into the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  11. Planetary nebulae and their mimics: The MASH-MEN Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissay, Rozenn; Parker, Quentin A.; Frew, David J.; Bojicic, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The total number of true, likely and possible planetary nebulae (PN) now known in the Milky Way is about 3000, approximately twice the number known a decade ago. The new discoveries are a legacy of the recent availability of wide-field, narrowband imaging surveys, primarily in the light of Hα. The two most important are the AAO/UKST SuperCOSMOS Hα survey SHS and the Isaac Newton photometric Hα survey IPHAS, which are responsible for most of the new discoveries. A serious problem with previous PN catalogs is that several different kinds of astrophysical objects are able to mimic PN in some of their observed properties leading to significant contamination. These objects include H~II regions and Strömgren zones around young O/B stars, reflection nebulae, Wolf-Rayet ejecta, supernova remnants, Herbig-Haro objects, young stellar objects, B[e] stars, symbiotic stars and outflows, late-type stars, cataclysmic variables, low redshift emission-line galaxies, and even image/detector flaws. PN catalogs such as the Macquarie/AAO/Strasbourg Hα Planetary Nebula catalog (MASH) have been carefully vetted to remove these mimics using the wealth of new wide-field multi-wavelength data and our 100% follow-up spectroscopy to produce a compilation of new PN discoveries of high purity. During this process significant numbers of PN mimics have been identified. The aim of this project is to compile these MASH rejects into a catalog of Miscellaneous Emission Nebulae (MEN) and to highlight the most unusual and interesting examples. A new global analysis of these MEN objects is underway before publishing the MEN catalog online categorizing objects by type together with their spectra and multi-wavelength images.

  12. Planetary nebulae near the Galactic Centre: chemical abundances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavichia, O.; Costa, R. D. D.; Maciel, W. J.; Mollá, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, we report physical parameters and abundances derived for a sample of high extinction planetary nebulae located in the Galactic bulge, near the Galactic Centre, based on low dispersion spectroscopy secured at the SOAR telescope using the Goodman spectrograph. The results show that the abundances of our sample are similar to those from other regions of the bulge. Nevertheless, the average abundances of the Galactic bulge do not follow the observed trend of the radial abundance gradient in the disk.

  13. Interstellar Organics, the Solar Nebula, and Saturn's Satellite Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar medium inventory of organic material (Pendleton et al. 1994, Pe 2002) was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed. This provided the feedstock for the fo planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Saturn's satellites Phoeb open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cass Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saturn. VIMS spectral maps of Phoebe's surface reveal a complex consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and aliphatic hydrocarbon (CH2, CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 µm). Phoebe is the source encircling Saturn, and from which particles (5-20 µm size) spiral inward toward Saturn. They encounter Iapetus and Hyperion wh blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aroma abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, com carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2013). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis o itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 4, which is larger than the value found in the di as Phoebe is a primitive body that formed in the outer regions of the solar nebula and has preserved some of the original nebula inv understanding the content and degree of processing of that nebular material. There are other Phoebe-like TNOs that are presently b in the organic spectral region, but JWST will open that possibility for a number of objects. We now need to explore and understand organic-bearing Solar System material to the solar nebula and the inventory of ISM materials incorporated therein.

  14. Hubble Space Telescope Image: Planetary Nebula IC 4406

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This Hubble Space Telescope image reveals a rainbow of colors in this dying star, called IC 446. Like many other so-called planetary nebulae, IC 4406 exhibits a high degree of symmetry. The nebula's left and right halves are nearly mirror images of the other. If we could fly around IC 446 in a spaceship, we would see that the gas and dust form a vast donut of material streaming outward from the dying star. We do not see the donut shape in this photograph because we are viewing IC 4406 from the Earth-orbiting HST. From this vantage point, we are seeing the side of the donut. This side view allows us to see the intricate tendrils of material that have been compared to the eye's retina. In fact, IC 4406 is dubbed the 'Retina Nebula.' The donut of material confines the intense radiation coming from the remnant of the dying star. Gas on the inside of the donut is ionized by light from the central star and glows. Light from oxygen atoms is rendered blue in this image; hydrogen is shown as green, and nitrogen as red. The range of color in the final image shows the differences in concentration of these three gases in the nebula. This image is a composite of data taken by HST's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in June 2001 and in January 2002 by Bob O'Dell (Vanderbilt University) and collaborators, and in January by the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI). Filters used to create this color image show oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas glowing in this object.

  15. Improved Probing of the Rosette Nebula Superbubble with Faraday Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, Allison H.; Buffo, J. J.; Spangler, S. R.

    2014-01-01

    In a recent paper Savage et al. 2013, ApJ 765, 42, we reported the results of our investigation of the super bubble associated with the Rosette Nebula (NGC 2244). We made linear polarization measurements of 23 extra-galactic radio sources whose lines of sight passed through or close to the Rosette Nebula. The observations were made at frequencies of 4.4GHz, 4.9GHz, and 7.6GHz using the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). We measured an excess rotation measure (RM) of 50-750 rad m-2 for sources whose lines of sight passed through the nebula. We compared our data with two simple plasma models that can reproduce the magnitude and sign of the measured RM. We argued that one of these models, a wind-blown bubble with an outer shock, better represented our data. However, distinguishing between these models requires measurements on more lines of sight. In NRAO project 12A-039, we observed 11 additional radio sources whose lines of sight pass through the shell of the Rosette Nebula to supplement the previous measurements and to further constrain the simple shell models. The 2012 observations cover two 1.024 GHz bands centered at 4.85GHz and 7.25GHz, with sixteen 128MHz sub-bands. This receiver configuration potentially allows for sixteen measurements of the polarization position angle across the sub-bands, which is a vast improvement over the three polarization position angle measurements of the previous data. We report preliminary results of Faraday rotation measurements for these 11 new lines of sight. We also describe similar Faraday rotation observations of the HII region W4/IC1805 undertaken in NRAO program 13A-035. This research was supported at the University of Iowa by grant AST09-07911 and ATM09-56901 from the National Science Foundation.

  16. Simulating the Outer Nebula of SN 1987A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, Ben; Morris, Thomas; Podsiadlowski, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    As has been shown previously, the triple-ring nebula around SN 1987A can be understood as a direct consequence of the merger of two stars, some 20,000 yr before the explosion. Here we present new SPH simulations that also include the pre-merger mass loss and show that this may be able to explain other structures observed around SN 1987A, such as Napoleon's hat and various light echoes.

  17. A Broadband Emission Model of Magnetar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuta J.

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum loss by the plasma wind is considered as a universal feature of isolated neutron stars including magnetars. The wind nebulae that are powered by magnetars allow us to compare the wind properties and the spin evolution of magnetars with those of rotation-powered pulsars (RPPs). In this paper, we construct a broadband emission model of magnetar wind nebulae (MWNe). This model is similar to past studies of young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) around RPPs, but is modified for the application to MWNe that have far less observational information than the young PWNe. We apply the model to the MWN around the youngest (˜1 kyr) magnetar, 1E 1547.0-5408, which has the largest spin-down power L spin among all the magnetars. However, the MWN is faint because of the low L spin of 1E 1547.0-5408 when compared to the young RPPs. Since most parameters are not well constrained by only an X-ray flux upper limit of the MWN, we adopt the model’s parameters from the young PWN Kes 75 around PSR J1846-0258, which is a peculiar RPP showing magnetar-like behaviors. The model predicts that γ-ray flux will be detected in a future TeV γ-ray observation by CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array). The MWN spectrum does not allow us to test the hypothesis that 1E 1547.0-5408 had a period of milliseconds at its birth because the particles injected during the early phase of evolution suffered from severe adiabatic and synchrotron losses. Furthermore, both observational and theoretical studies of the wind nebulae around magnetars are required to constrain the wind and the spin-down properties of magnetars.

  18. The first published chart of the Andromeda Nebula, 1667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2014-06-01

    The Parisian astronomer Ismaél Bullialdus (1605-1694) is known for his planetary tables (Astronomia philolaica, 1645) based on a geometrical approximation to the Keplerian ellipse, and for his long correspondence with the Danzig astronomer Johannes Hevelius and with Christiaan Huygens. Bullialdus became interested in the nascent study of variable stars, and in 1667 published a small pamphlet with two contributions, one on Mira Ceti and the other on the nebula in Andromeda. He found a manuscript portraying the nebula with the date 1428, and because Tycho Brahe never mentioned a nebula in Andromeda, Bullialdus conjectured that this object was a variable that had disappeared in the intervening era. “We conclude this since this conglomeration was observed neither by Hipparchus nor anyone else in antiquity, nor in the previous age by Tycho, nor in the age of our forefathers like Bayer.” His publication included a handsome engraving of the image of Andromeda and the position of the nebula, its first printed chart. I recently acquired a copy of this rare pamphlet, Ad astronomos monita duo, and realized that the image matched a manuscript now in the Gotha Research Library, a 15th-century Latin version based on the work of the tenth-century Islamic astronomer, al-Sufi. The manuscript does not carry the name of al-Sufi, and hence Bullialdus had no real clue about its origin or its date of composition. Paul Kunitzsch (The Arabs and the Stars, 1989, Article XI, “The Astronomer Abu ’l-Husayn al-Sufi”) has identified a group of eight “Latin al-Sufi” manuscripts from this period, scattered in European libraries, but only the one now in Gotha is an exact match to Bullialdus’ engraving. The al-Sufi manuscript was given to the Gotha Library in 1798 by Duke Ernst II of Saxonia-Gotha-Altenburg, who must have acquired it from France sometime in the 18th century.

  19. The Dust and Gas Content of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, P. J.; Barlow, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    We have constructed mocassin photoionization plus dust radiative transfer models for the Crab Nebula core-collapse supernova (CCSN) remnant, using either smooth or clumped mass distributions, in order to determine the chemical composition and masses of the nebular gas and dust. We computed models for several different geometries suggested for the nebular matter distribution but found that the observed gas and dust spectra are relatively insensitive to these geometries, being determined mainly by the spectrum of the pulsar wind nebula which ionizes and heats the nebula. Smooth distribution models are ruled out since they require 16-49 M ⊙ of gas to fit the integrated optical nebular line fluxes, whereas our clumped models require 7.0 M ⊙ of gas. A global gas-phase C/O ratio of 1.65 by number is derived, along with a He/H number ratio of 1.85, neither of which can be matched by current CCSN yield predictions. A carbonaceous dust composition is favored by the observed gas-phase C/O ratio: amorphous carbon clumped model fits to the Crab’s Herschel and Spitzer infrared spectral energy distribution imply the presence of 0.18-0.27 M ⊙ of dust, corresponding to a gas to dust mass ratio of 26-39. Mixed dust chemistry models can also be accommodated, comprising 0.11-0.13 M ⊙ of amorphous carbon and 0.39-0.47 M ⊙ of silicates. Power-law grain size distributions with mass distributions that are weighted toward the largest grain radii are derived, favoring their longer-term survival when they eventually interact with the interstellar medium. The total mass of gas plus dust in the Crab Nebula is 7.2 ± 0.5 M ⊙ , consistent with a progenitor star mass of ˜9 M ⊙ .

  20. The Jets of the Proto-Planetary Nebula CRL 618

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riera, Angels; Raga, Alejandro C.; Velázquez, Pablo F.; Haro-Corzo, Sinhue; Kajdic, Primoz

    We present here the kinematic structure and the excitation conditions of the collimated outflows of the proto-planetary nebula CRL 618 based on high spatial resolution spectroscopy obtained with STIS onboard HST. The spectra obtained show a linear increase of the radial velocity with distance to the central source. We find that the emission line ratios observed in the clumpy lobes of CRL 618 are similar to high or low-excitation HH excitation class depending on the emission line ratio.