Science.gov

Sample records for 2006-01-19 helix nebula

  1. High velocity knot in the Helix nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Meaburn, J.; Walsh, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A high velocity (about 66 km/s) split feature about 15 arcseconds in extent has been detected in forbidden O II emission over a dark knot in the loop of the Helix nebula. This velocity splitting is much greater than the 20 km/s large scale splitting observed previously, and several mechanisms are proposed to account for this feature.

  2. Comets Kick up Dust in Helix Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Helix nebula, a cosmic starlet often photographed by amateur astronomers for its vivid colors and eerie resemblance to a giant eye.

    The nebula, located about 700 light-years away in the constellation Aquarius, belongs to a class of objects called planetary nebulae. Discovered in the 18th century, these colorful beauties were named for their resemblance to gas-giant planets like Jupiter.

    Planetary nebulae are the remains of stars that once looked a lot like our sun. When sun-like stars die, they puff out their outer gaseous layers. These layers are heated by the hot core of the dead star, called a white dwarf, and shine with infrared and visible colors. Our own sun will blossom into a planetary nebula when it dies in about five billion years.

    In Spitzer's infrared view of the Helix nebula, the eye looks more like that of a green monster's. Infrared light from the outer gaseous layers is represented in blues and greens. The white dwarf is visible as a tiny white dot in the center of the picture. The red color in the middle of the eye denotes the final layers of gas blown out when the star died.

    The brighter red circle in the very center is the glow of a dusty disk circling the white dwarf (the disk itself is too small to be resolved). This dust, discovered by Spitzer's infrared heat-seeking vision, was most likely kicked up by comets that survived the death of their star. Before the star died, its comets and possibly planets would have orbited the star in an orderly fashion. But when the star blew off its outer layers, the icy bodies and outer planets would have been tossed about and into each other, resulting in an ongoing cosmic dust storm. Any inner planets in the system would have burned up or been swallowed as their dying star expanded.

    So far, the Helix nebula is one of only a few dead-star systems in which evidence for comet survivors has been found.

    This image

  3. Unraveling the Helix Nebula: Its Structure and Knots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; McCullough, Peter R.; Meixner, Margaret

    2004-11-01

    Through Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging of the inner part of the main ring of the Helix Nebula, together with CTIO 4 m images of the fainter outer parts, we have a view of unprecedented quality of the nearest bright planetary nebula. These images have allowed us to determine that the main ring of the nebula is composed of an inner disk of about 499" diameter (0.52 pc) surrounded by an outer ring (in reality a torus) of 742" diameter (0.77 pc) whose plane is highly inclined to the plane of the disk. This outer ring is surrounded by an outermost ring of 1500" (1.76 pc) diameter, which is flattened on the side colliding with the ambient interstellar medium. The inner disk has an extended distribution of low-density gas along its rotational axis of symmetry, and the disk is optically thick to ionizing radiation, as is the outer ring. Published radial velocities of the knots provide support for the two-component structure of the main ring of the nebula and for the idea that the knots found there are expanding along with the nebular material from which they recently originated. These velocities indicate a spatial expansion velocity of the inner disk of 40 and 32 km s-1 for the outer ring, which yields expansion ages of 6560 and 12,100 yr, respectively. The outermost ring may be partially ionized through scattered recombination continuum from the inner parts of the nebula, but shocks certainly are occurring in it. This outermost ring probably represents a third period of mass loss by the central star. There is one compact, outer object that is unexplained, showing shock structures indicating a different orientation of the gas flow from that of the nebula. There is a change in the morphology of the knots as a function of the distance from the local ionization front. This supports a scenario in which the knots are formed in or near the ionization front and are then sculpted by the stellar radiation from the central star as the ionization front advances beyond them

  4. Accessing commercial cloud resources within the European Helix Nebula cloud marketplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordeiro, C.; De Salvo, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Field, L.; Giordano, D.; Jones, R.; Villazon, L.

    2015-12-01

    Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud Initiative - is a public-private partnership between Europe's leading scientific research organisations and European IT cloud providers. CERN contributed to this initiative by providing a flagship use case: the workloads from the ATLAS experiment. Aiming to gain experience in managing and monitoring large-scale deployments, as well as in benchmarking the cloud resources, a sizable Monte Carlo production was performed using the Helix Nebula platform. This contribution describes the Helix Nebula initiative and summarizes the experience and the lessons learned from deploying ATLAS experiment application within large cloud setups involving several commercial providers.

  5. Hubble Space Telescope observations of Orion Nebula, Helix Nebula, and NGC 6822

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, Lyman; Fitzpatrick, Ed

    1999-01-01

    This grant covered the major part of the work of the Principal Investigator and his collaborators as a Guaranteed Time Observer on the Hubble Space Telescope. The work done naturally divided itself into two portions the first being study of nebular objects and the second investigation of the interstellar medium between stars. The latter investigation was pursued through a contract with Princeton University, with Professor Lyman Spitzer as the supervising astronomer, assisted by Dr. Ed Fitzpatrick. Following the abrupt death of Professor Spitzer, his responsibilities were shifted to Dr. Fitzpatrick. When Dr. Fitzpatrick relocated to Villanova University the concluding work on that portion of this grant was concluded under a direct service arrangement. This program has been highly successful and the resulting publications in scientific journals are listed below. To the scientist, this is the bottom line, so that I shall simply try to describe the general nature of what was accomplished. There were three nebular programs conducted, one on the Orion Nebula, the second on the Helix Nebula, and the third on NGC 6822. The largest program was that on the Orion Nebula. This involved both HST observations and supporting groundbased observations obtained with a variety of instruments, including the Coude Feed Telescope at the Kitt Peak National observatory in Arizona, the Cerro Tololo observatory in Chile, and the Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Moreover, considerable theoretical modeling was done and all of the data analysis was performed at the Rice University in Houston, except for the PI's period of sabbatical leave (6-96 through 7-97) when he was based at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, Germany. The Orion Nebula program was the most productive part, resulting in numerous papers, but more important in the discovery of a new class of objects, for which we coined the name "proplyds". The proplyds are protoplanetary disks surrounding very young

  6. DETAILED MOLECULAR OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE DOUBLE HELIX NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Torii, K.; Enokiya, R.; Hasegawa, K.; Kudo, N.; Fukui, Y.; Morris, M. R.

    2014-07-01

    The Double Helix Nebula (DHN), located 100 pc above Sgr A* in the Galactic center (GC), is a unique structure whose morphology suggests it is a magnetic feature. Recent molecular observations toward the DHN revealed two candidate molecular counterparts of the DHN at radial velocities of –35 km s{sup –1} and 0 km s{sup –1} and discussed the model in which the DHN has its origin at the circumnuclear disk in the GC. In this paper, new CO observations toward the DHN using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory and Mopra telescopes are presented. The higher-resolution observations of ∼1 pc scale reveal the detailed distributions and kinematics of the two CO counterparts (the 0 km s{sup –1} and –35 km s{sup –1} features) and provide new information on their physical conditions. As a result, we find that the 0 km s{sup –1} feature with a mass of 3.3 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} coincides with the infrared emission of the DHN, indicating clear association with the DHN. The association of the –35 km s{sup –1} feature, with a mass of 0.8 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉}, is less clear compared with the 0 km s{sup –1} feature, but the complementary distribution between the molecular gas and the DHN and velocity variation along the DHN support its association with the DHN. The two molecular features are highly excited, as shown by the relatively high CO J = 2-1/J = 1-0 intensity ratios of ∼1.0, and have kinetic temperatures of ∼30 K, consistent with the typical molecular clouds in the GC.

  7. Imaging and Spectroscopy of the Helix Nebula: The Ring Is Actually a Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'dell, C. R.

    1998-09-01

    The structure and conditions within the Helix Nebula have been determined from emission-line images in Hβ, [O iii], and He ii and using spectra tracing a radial from the central star almost out to the northern boundary of the optical object. The nebula is approximately like a thick disk, rather than the torus suggested by low-ionization ions. The central region, previously thought to be a cavity, is filled with He^+2 with a total gas density comparable to the main ring. The electron temperature in the outer part was determined from [N ii] line ratios to be 9400 +/- 200 K, while [O iii] lines gave 11700 +/- 700 K for the bulk of the main ring of intermediate-ionization material. The Hα/Hβ ratio is anomalously low in the central portion, suggesting that the electron temperature there is very high. The likely source of this elevated central temperature is heating by photoelectric electrons from grains mixed in with the nebular gas, since this process depends directly on the distance from the central star and becomes relatively more important than photoionization heating at the low nebular densities that apply for the helix. However, it is unlikely that the two-phase condition that can exist when photoelectric heating dominates has produced the cometary knots that freely populate this nearby planetary nebula. Based on observations obtained at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  8. Helix Nebula and CERN: A Symbiotic approach to exploiting commercial clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro Megino, Fernando H.; Jones, Robert; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Medrano Llamas, Ramón; van der Ster, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    The recent paradigm shift toward cloud computing in IT, and general interest in "Big Data" in particular, have demonstrated that the computing requirements of HEP are no longer globally unique. Indeed, the CERN IT department and LHC experiments have already made significant R&D investments in delivering and exploiting cloud computing resources. While a number of technical evaluations of interesting commercial offerings from global IT enterprises have been performed by various physics labs, further technical, security, sociological, and legal issues need to be address before their large-scale adoption by the research community can be envisaged. Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud is an initiative that explores these questions by joining the forces of three European research institutes (CERN, ESA and EMBL) with leading European commercial IT enterprises. The goals of Helix Nebula are to establish a cloud platform federating multiple commercial cloud providers, along with new business models, which can sustain the cloud marketplace for years to come. This contribution will summarize the participation of CERN in Helix Nebula. We will explain CERN's flagship use-case and the model used to integrate several cloud providers with an LHC experiment's workload management system. During the first proof of concept, this project contributed over 40.000 CPU-days of Monte Carlo production throughput to the ATLAS experiment with marginal manpower required. CERN's experience, together with that of ESA and EMBL, is providing a great insight into the cloud computing industry and highlighted several challenges that are being tackled in order to ease the export of the scientific workloads to the cloud environments.

  9. A magnetic torsional wave near the Galactic Centre traced by a 'double helix' nebula.

    PubMed

    Morris, Mark; Uchida, Keven; Do, Tuan

    2006-03-16

    The magnetic field in the central few hundred parsecs of the Milky Way has a dipolar geometry and is substantially stronger than elsewhere in the Galaxy, with estimates ranging up to a milligauss (refs 1-6). Characterization of the magnetic field at the Galactic Centre is important because it can affect the orbits of molecular clouds by exerting a drag on them, inhibit star formation, and could guide a wind of hot gas or cosmic rays away from the central region. Here we report observations of an infrared nebula having the morphology of an intertwined double helix about 100 parsecs from the Galaxy's dynamical centre, with its axis oriented perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The observed segment is about 25 parsecs in length, and contains about 1.25 full turns of each of the two continuous, helically wound strands. We interpret this feature as a torsional Alfvén wave propagating vertically away from the Galactic disk, driven by rotation of the magnetized circumnuclear gas disk. The direct connection between the circumnuclear disk and the double helix is ambiguous, but the images show a possible meandering channel that warrants further investigation. PMID:16541066

  10. Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud: a public-private partnership to build a multidisciplinary cloud platform for data intensive science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Bob; Casu, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    The feasibility of using commercial cloud services for scientific research is of great interest to research organisations such as CERN, ESA and EMBL, to the suppliers of cloud-based services and to the national and European funding agencies. Through the Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud [1] initiative and with the support of the European Commission, these stakeholders are driving a two year pilot-phase during which procurement processes and governance issues for a framework of public/private partnership will be appraised. Three initial flagship use cases from high energy physics, molecular biology and earth-observation are being used to validate the approach, enable a cost-benefit analysis to be undertaken and prepare the next stage of the Science Cloud Strategic Plan [2] to be developed and approved. The power of Helix Nebula lies in a shared set of services for initially 3 very different sciences each supporting a global community and thus building a common e-Science platform. Of particular relevance is the ESA sponsored flagship application SuperSites Exploitation Platform (SSEP [3]) that offers the global geo-hazard community a common platform for the correlation and processing of observation data for supersites monitoring. The US-NSF Earth Cube [4] and Ocean Observatory Initiative [5] (OOI) are taking a similar approach for data intensive science. The work of Helix Nebula and its recent architecture model [6] has shown that is it technically feasible to allow publicly funded infrastructures, such as EGI [7] and GEANT [8], to interoperate with commercial cloud services. Such hybrid systems are in the interest of the existing users of publicly funded infrastructures and funding agencies because they will provide "freedom of choice" over the type of computing resources to be consumed and the manner in which they can be obtained. But to offer such freedom-of choice across a spectrum of suppliers, various issues such as intellectual property, legal responsibility

  11. Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Formation of Molecular Columns Found toward the Double Helix Nebulae in the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, Yuta; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Ogawa, Takayuki

    NANTEN2 observations of the galactic molecular gas revealed that molecular columns surround the double helix nebulae at our Galactic center (Enokiya et al. 2014). In order to study the formation mechanism of the double helix nebulae and molecular columns, we carried out magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the interaction of a magnetic tower jet ejected from the galactic center with interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) gas taking into account the interstellar cooling. The HI gas compressed by the bow shock ahead of the jet is cooled down by cooling instability triggered by the density enhancement. As a result, cold, dense region is formed around the helical magnetic tower jet. These molecular columns can be the evidences of the past activity near the galactic center black hole.

  12. Helix Nebula: Enabling federation of existing data infrastructures and data services to an overarching cross-domain e-infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengert, Wolfgang; Farres, Jordi; Lanari, Riccardo; Casu, Francesco; Manunta, Michele; Lassalle-Balier, Gerard

    2014-05-01

    Helix Nebula has established a growing public private partnership of more than 30 commercial cloud providers, SMEs, and publicly funded research organisations and e-infrastructures. The Helix Nebula strategy is to establish a federated cloud service across Europe. Three high-profile flagships, sponsored by CERN (high energy physics), EMBL (life sciences) and ESA/DLR/CNES/CNR (earth science), have been deployed and extensively tested within this federated environment. The commitments behind these initial flagships have created a critical mass that attracts suppliers and users to the initiative, to work together towards an "Information as a Service" market place. Significant progress in implementing the following 4 programmatic goals (as outlined in the strategic Plan Ref.1) has been achieved: × Goal #1 Establish a Cloud Computing Infrastructure for the European Research Area (ERA) serving as a platform for innovation and evolution of the overall infrastructure. × Goal #2 Identify and adopt suitable policies for trust, security and privacy on a European-level can be provided by the European Cloud Computing framework and infrastructure. × Goal #3 Create a light-weight governance structure for the future European Cloud Computing Infrastructure that involves all the stakeholders and can evolve over time as the infrastructure, services and user-base grows. × Goal #4 Define a funding scheme involving the three stake-holder groups (service suppliers, users, EC and national funding agencies) into a Public-Private-Partnership model to implement a Cloud Computing Infrastructure that delivers a sustainable business environment adhering to European level policies. Now in 2014 a first version of this generic cross-domain e-infrastructure is ready to go into operations building on federation of European industry and contributors (data, tools, knowledge, ...). This presentation describes how Helix Nebula is being used in the domain of earth science focusing on geohazards. The

  13. The helix nebula viewed in HCO{sup +}: Large-scale mapping of the J = 1 → 0 transition

    SciTech Connect

    Zeigler, N. R.; Zack, L. N.; Ziurys, L. M.; Woolf, N. J.

    2013-11-20

    The J = 1 → 0 transition of HCO{sup +} at 89 GHz has been mapped across the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) with 70'' spatial resolution (1.68 km s{sup –1} velocity resolution) using the Arizona Radio Observatory 12 m telescope. This work is the first large-scale mapping project of a dense gas tracer (n(H{sub 2}) ∼ 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}) in old planetary nebulae. Observations of over 200 positions encompassing the classical optical image were conducted with a 3σ noise level of ∼20 mK. HCO{sup +} was detected at most positions, often exhibiting multiple velocity components indicative of complex kinematic structures in dense gas. The HCO{sup +} spectra suggest that the Helix is composed of a bipolar, barrel-like structure with red- and blue-shifted halves, symmetric with respect to the central star and oriented ∼10° east from the line of sight. A second bipolar, higher velocity outflow exists as well, situated along the direction of the Helix 'plumes'. The column density of HCO{sup +} across the Helix is N {sub tot} ∼ 1.5 × 10{sup 10}-5.0 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –2}, with an average value N {sub ave} ∼ 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –2}, corresponding to an abundance, relative to H{sub 2}, of f ∼ 1.4 × 10{sup –8}. This value is similar to that observed in young PN, and contradicts chemical models, which predict that the abundance of HCO{sup +} decreases with nebular age. This study indicates that polyatomic molecules readily survive the ultraviolet field of the central white dwarf, and can be useful in tracing nebular morphology in the very late stages of stellar evolution.

  14. "helix Nebula - the Science Cloud", a European Science Driven Cross-Domain Initiative Implemented in via AN Active Ppp Set-Up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengert, W.; Mondon, E.; Bégin, M. E.; Ferrer, M.; Vallois, F.; DelaMar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Helix Nebula, a European science cross-domain initiative building on an active PPP, is aiming to implement the concept of an open science commons[1] while using a cloud hybrid model[2] as the proposed implementation solution. This approach allows leveraging and merging of complementary data intensive Earth Science disciplines (e.g. instrumentation[3] and modeling), without introducing significant changes in the contributors' operational set-up. Considering the seamless integration with life-science (e.g. EMBL), scientific exploitation of meteorological, climate, and Earth Observation data and models open an enormous potential for new big data science. The work of Helix Nebula has shown that is it feasible to interoperate publicly funded infrastructures, such as EGI [5] and GEANT [6], with commercial cloud services. Such hybrid systems are in the interest of the existing users of publicly funded infrastructures and funding agencies because they will provide "freedom and choice" over the type of computing resources to be consumed and the manner in which they can be obtained. But to offer such freedom and choice across a spectrum of suppliers, various issues such as intellectual property, legal responsibility, service quality agreements and related issues need to be addressed. Finding solutions to these issues is one of the goals of the Helix Nebula initiative. [1] http://www.egi.eu/news-and-media/publications/OpenScienceCommons_v3.pdf [2] http://www.helix-nebula.eu/events/towards-the-european-open-science-cloud [3] e.g. https://sentinel.esa.int/web/sentinel/sentinel-data-access [5] http://www.egi.eu/ [6] http://www.geant.net/

  15. CHEMICAL COMPLEXITY IN THE HELIX NEBULA: MULTI-LINE OBSERVATIONS OF H{sub 2}CO, HCO{sup +}, AND CO

    SciTech Connect

    Zack, L. N.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2013-03-10

    Observations of CO, HCO{sup +}, and H{sub 2}CO have been carried out at nine positions across the Helix Nebula (NGC 7293) using the Submillimeter Telescope and the 12 m antenna of the Arizona Radio Observatory. Measurements of the J = 1 {yields} 0, 2 {yields} 1, and 3 {yields}2 transitions of CO, two transitions of HCO{sup +} (J = 1 {yields} 0 and 3 {yields}2), and five lines of H{sub 2}CO (J{sub Ka,Kc} = 1{sub 0,1} {yields} 0{sub 0,0}, 2{sub 1,2} {yields} 1{sub 1,1}, 2{sub 0,2} {yields} 1{sub 0,1}, 2{sub 1,1} {yields} 1{sub 1,0}, and 3{sub 0,3} {yields}2{sub 0,2}) were conducted in the 0.8, 1, 2, and 3 mm bands toward this highly evolved planetary nebula. HCO{sup +} and H{sub 2}CO were detected at all positions, along with three transitions of CO. From a radiative transfer analysis, the kinetic temperature was found to be T{sub K} {approx} 15-40 K across the Helix with a gas density of n(H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.1-5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}. The warmer gas appears to be closer to the central star, but high density material is distributed throughout the nebula. For CO, the column density was found to be N{sub tot} {approx} 0.25-4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}, with a fractional abundance of f (CO/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}. Column densities for HCO{sup +} and H{sub 2}CO were determined to be N{sub tot} {approx} 0.2-5.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2} and 0.2-1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, respectively, with fractional abundances of f (HCO{sup +}/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-7.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} and f (H{sub 2}CO/H{sub 2}) {approx} 0.3-2.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7}-several orders of magnitude higher than predicted by chemical models. Polyatomic molecules in the Helix appear to be well-protected from photodissociation and may actually seed the diffuse interstellar medium.

  16. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, W.S.

    1982-03-17

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the U sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  17. Helix coupling

    DOEpatents

    Ginell, William S.

    1989-04-25

    A coupling for connecting helix members in series, which consists of a pair of U-shaped elements, one of which is attached to each helix end with the "U" sections of the elements interlocked. The coupling is particularly beneficial for interconnecting helical Nitinol elements utilized in thermal actuators or engines. Each coupling half is attached to the associated helix at two points, thereby providing axial load while being easily removed from the helix, and reusable.

  18. Helix capping.

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R.; Rose, G. D.

    1998-01-01

    Helix-capping motifs are specific patterns of hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions found at or near the ends of helices in both proteins and peptides. In an alpha-helix, the first four >N-H groups and last four >C=O groups necessarily lack intrahelical hydrogen bonds. Instead, such groups are often capped by alternative hydrogen bond partners. This review enlarges our earlier hypothesis (Presta LG, Rose GD. 1988. Helix signals in proteins. Science 240:1632-1641) to include hydrophobic capping. A hydrophobic interaction that straddles the helix terminus is always associated with hydrogen-bonded capping. From a global survey among proteins of known structure, seven distinct capping motifs are identified-three at the helix N-terminus and four at the C-terminus. The consensus sequence patterns of these seven motifs, together with results from simple molecular modeling, are used to formulate useful rules of thumb for helix termination. Finally, we examine the role of helix capping as a bridge linking the conformation of secondary structure to supersecondary structure. PMID:9514257

  19. MOLECULAR SURVIVAL IN EVOLVED PLANETARY NEBULAE: DETECTION OF H{sub 2}CO, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, AND C{sub 2}H IN THE HELIX

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, E. D.; Woolf, N. J.; Ziurys, L. M.; Milam, S. N. E-mail: nwoolf@as.arizona.ed E-mail: Stefanie.N.Milam@nasa.go

    2009-10-20

    H{sub 2}CO, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H have been identified in the neutral envelope of the highly evolved planetary nebula (PN), the Helix (also know as NGC 7293). Emission from these species were detected toward a peak position in CO, 372'' east of the central star, using the facilities of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). C{sub 2}H and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} were identified on the basis of their 3 mm transitions, measured with the ARO 12 m, while five lines of H{sub 2}CO were observed using the 12 m at 2 and 3 mm and the ARO Submillimeter Telescope at 1 mm. From a radiative transfer analysis of the formaldehyde emission, the molecular material was determined to have a density of n(H{sub 2}) approx3 x 10{sup 5} cm{sup -3}, with a kinetic temperature of T {sub kin} approx20 K. Column densities for C{sub 2}H, H{sub 2}CO, and c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2} of N {sub tot} approx1.4 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, 1.1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}, and 3 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, respectively, were derived, corresponding to fractional abundances relative to H{sub 2} of f (H{sub 2}CO) = 1 x 10{sup -7}, f (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}) = 3 x 10{sup -8}, and f (C{sub 2}H) = 1 x 10{sup -6} {sub .} The physical conditions found support the notion that molecules in evolved PNe survive in dense clumps in pressure equilibrium, shielded from photodissociation. The presence of H{sub 2}CO, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H, along with the previously observed species CN, HNC, HCN, and HCO{sup +}, indicates that a relatively complex chemistry can occur in the late stages of PN evolution, despite potentially destructive ultraviolet radiation. These molecules have also been observed in diffuse clouds, suggesting a possible connection between molecular material in evolved PNe and the diffuse ISM.

  20. The Infrared Helix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Helix nebula exhibits complex structure on the smallest visible scales. It is composed of gaseous shells and disks puffed out by a dying sun-like star.

    In this new image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, 'cometary knots' show blue-green heads caused by excitation of their molecular material from shocks or ultraviolet radiation. The tails of the cometary knots appear redder due to being shielded from the central star's ultraviolet radiation and wind by the heads of the knots.

    This image was captured by the telescope's infrared array camera. The false color composite depicts wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), and 8.0 microns (red). The color saturation has been increased to intensify hues.

  1. Into the Eye of the Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-02-01

    A deep new image of the magnificent Helix planetary nebula has been obtained using the Wide Field Imager at ESO's La Silla Observatory. The image shows a rich background of distant galaxies, usually not seen in other images of this object. ESO PR Photo 07a/09 The Helix Nebula ESO PR Video 06a/09 Helix Nebula Zoom-in ESO PR Video 06b/09 Pan over the Helix Nebula ESO PR Video 06c/09 Zoom and pan over the Helix Nebula The Helix Nebula, NGC 7293, lies about 700 light-years away in the constellation of Aquarius (the Water Bearer). It is one of the closest and most spectacular examples of a planetary nebula. These exotic objects have nothing to do with planets, but are the final blooming of Sun-like stars before their retirement as white dwarfs. Shells of gas are blown off from a star's surface, often in intricate and beautiful patterns, and shine under the harsh ultraviolet radiation from the faint, but very hot, central star. The main ring of the Helix Nebula is about two light-years across or half the distance between the Sun and its closest stellar neighbour. Despite being photographically very spectacular the Helix is hard to see visually as its light is thinly spread over a large area of sky and the history of its discovery is rather obscure. It first appears in a list of new objects compiled by the German astronomer Karl Ludwig Harding in 1824. The name Helix comes from the rough corkscrew shape seen in the earlier photographs. Although the Helix looks very much like a doughnut, studies have shown that it possibly consists of at least two separate discs with outer rings and filaments. The brighter inner disc seems to be expanding at about 100 000 km/h and to have taken about 12 000 years to have formed. Because the Helix is relatively close -- it covers an area of the sky about a quarter of the full Moon -- it can be studied in much greater detail than most other planetary nebulae and has been found to have an unexpected and complex structure. All around the

  2. Butterfly Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) is back at work, capturing this image of the 'butterfly wing'- shaped nebula, NGC 2346. The nebula is about 2,000 light-years away from Earth in the direction of the constellation Monoceros. It represents the spectacular 'last gasp' of a binary star system at the nebula's center. The image was taken on March 6, 1997 as part of the recommissioning of the Hubble Space Telescope's previously installed scientific instruments following the successful servicing of the HST by NASA shuttle astronauts in February. WFPC2 was installed in HST during the servicing mission in 1993. At the center of the nebula lies a pair of stars that are so close together that they orbit around each other every 16 days. This is so close that, even with Hubble, the pair of stars cannot be resolved into its two components. One component of this binary is the hot core of a star that has ejected most of its outer layers, producing the surrounding nebula. Astronomers believe that this star, when it evolved and expanded to become a red giant, actually swallowed its companion star in an act of stellar cannibalism. The resulting interaction led to a spiraling together of the two stars, culminating in ejection of the outer layers of the red giant. Most of the outer layers were ejected into a dense disk, which can still be seen in the Hubble image, surrounding the central star. Later the hot star developed a fast stellar wind. This wind, blowing out into the surrounding disk, has inflated the large, wispy hourglass-shaped wings perpendicular to the disk. These wings produce the butterfly appearance when seen in projection. The total diameter of the nebula is about one-third of a light-year, or 2 trillion miles.

  3. Horsehead nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Rising from a sea of dust and gas like a giant seahorse, the Horsehead nebula is one of the most photographed objects in the sky. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took a close-up look at this heavenly icon, revealing the cloud's intricate structure. This detailed view of the horse's head is being released to celebrate the orbiting observatory's eleventh anniversary. Produced by the Hubble Heritage Project, this picture is a testament to the Horsehead's popularity. Internet voters selected this object for the orbiting telescope to view.

    The Horsehead, also known as Barnard 33, is a cold, dark cloud of gas and dust, silhouetted against the bright nebula, IC 434. The bright area at the top left edge is a young star still embedded in its nursery of gas and dust. But radiation from this hot star is eroding the stellar nursery. The top of the nebula also is being sculpted by radiation from a massive star located out of Hubble's field of view.

    Only by chance does the nebula roughly resemble the head of a horse. Its unusual shape was first discovered on a photographic plate in the late 1800s. Located in the constellation Orion, the Horsehead is a cousin of the famous pillars of dust and gas known as the Eagle nebula. Both tower-like nebulas are cocoons of young stars.

    The Horsehead nebula lies just south of the bright star Zeta Orionis, which is easily visible to the unaided eye as the left-hand star in the line of three that form Orion's Belt. Amateur astronomers often use the Horsehead as a test of their observing skills; it is known as one of the more difficult objects to see visually in an amateur-sized telescope.

    The magnificent extent of the Horsehead is best appreciated in a new wide-field image of the nebula being released today by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, taken by Travis Rector with the National Science Foundation's 0.9 meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ.

    This popular celestial target was the clear

  4. Orion Nebula and Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed at Rice University related to NASA-Ames University consortium grant NCC2-5199 during the two year period 1996 September 1 through 1998 August 31. The research program, titled Orion Nebula and Planetary Nebulae, involved the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imagery and spectroscopy of the Orion Nebula and of the planetary nebulae NGC 6818 and NGC 6210. In addition, we analyzed infrared spectra of the Orion Nebula taken with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) The primary collaborators at NASA-Ames were Drs. R. H. Rubin, A. G. C. M. Tielens, S. W. J. Colgan, and S. D. Lord (Tielens & Lord has since changed institutions). Other collaborators include Drs. P. G. Martin (CITA, Toronto), G. J. Ferland (U. KY), J. A. Baldwin (CTIO, Chile), J. J. Hester (ASU), D. K. Walter (SCSU), and P. Harrington (U. MD). In addition to the Principal Investigator, Professor Reginald J. Dufour of the Department of Space Physics & Astronomy, the research also involved two students, Mr. Matthew Browning and Mr. Brent Buckalew. Mr. Browning will be graduating from Rice in 1999 May with a B.A. degree in Physics and Mr. Buckalew continues as a graduate student in our department, having recently received a NASA GSRP research fellowship (sponsored by Ames). The collaboration was very productive, with two refereed papers already appearing in the literature, several others in preparation, numerous meeting presentations and two press releases. Some of our research accomplishments are highlighted below. Attached to the report are copies of the two major publications. Note that this research continues to date and related extensions of it recently has been awarded time with the HST for 1999-2000.

  5. Stingray Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image captures the infancy of the Stingray nebula (Hen-1357), the youngest known planetary nebula. In this image, the bright central star is in the middle of the green ring of gas. Its companion star is diagonally above it at 10 o'clock. A spur of gas (green) is forming a faint bridge to the companion star due to gravitational attraction. The image also shows a ring of gas (green) surrounding the central star, with bubbles of gas to the lower left and upper right of the ring. The wind of material propelled by radiation from the hot central star has created enough pressure to blow open holes in the ends of the bubbles, allowing gas to escape. The red curved lines represent bright gas that is heated by a 'shock' caused when the central star's wind hits the walls of the bubbles. The nebula is as large as 130 solar systems, but, at its distance of 18,000 light-years, it appears only as big as a dime viewed a mile away. The Stingray is located in the direction of the southern constellation Ara (the Altar). The colors shown are actual colors emitted by nitrogen (red), oxygen (green), and hydrogen (blue).

  6. Ant nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A new Hubble Space Telescope image of a celestial object called the Ant Nebula may shed new light on the future demise of our Sun. The image is available at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/pictures/wfpc .

    The nebula, imaged on July 20, 1997, and June 30, 1998, by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, was observed by Drs. Raghvendra Sahai and John Trauger of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.; Bruce Balick of the University of Washington in Seattle; and Vincent Icke of Leiden University in the Netherlands. JPL designed and built the camera.

    The Ant Nebula, whose technical name is Mz3, resembles the head and thorax of an ant when observed with ground-based telescopes. The new Hubble image, with 10 times the resolution revealing 100 times more detail, shows the 'ant's' body as a pair of fiery lobes protruding from a dying, Sun- like star. The Ant Nebula is located between 3,000 and 6,000 light years from Earth in the southern constellation Norma.

    The image challenges old ideas about what happens to dying stars. This observation, along with other pictures of various remnants of dying stars called planetary nebulae, shows that our Sun's fate will probably be much more interesting, complex and dramatic than astronomers previously believed.

    Although the ejection of gas from the dying star in the Ant Nebula is violent, it does not show the chaos one might expect from an ordinary explosion, but instead shows symmetrical patterns. One possibility is that the central star has a closely orbiting companion whose gravitational tidal forces shape the outflowing gas. A second possibility is that as the dying star spins, its strong magnetic fields are wound up into complex shapes like spaghetti in an eggbeater. Electrically charged winds, much like those in our Sun's solar wind but millions of times denser and moving at speeds up to 1,000 kilometers per second (more than 600 miles per second) from the star, follow the twisted field lines on their way

  7. Planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gieseking, F.

    1983-02-01

    The first planetary nebula (PN) was discovered by Darquier in 1779. In 1981, a compilation of galactic PN listed a total of 1455 objects. Outside the Milky Way Galaxy, PN are currently known in the Magellanic Clouds and in several members of the local group of galaxies. The PN have a rich emission-line spectrum, which makes it possible to recognize them at large distances. A central stellar object can be observed within the nebula. In 1927, spectral lines at 4959 A and 5007 A emitted by the PN could finally be identified as 'forbidden lines' of O(++). The life expectancy of a PN, estimated on the basis of the observed expansion rate, is only about 30,000 years. The PN have a number of interesting characteristics which are partly related to the high effective temperature and luminosity of the central stars, the presence of a particle system under extreme physical conditions, and the stellar material provided by the PN for the interstellar medium. Attention is given to the determination of the distance of PN, the Shklovsky distances, and two mysterious aspects related to the spectrum

  8. Doradus Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A panoramic view of a vast, sculpted area of gas and dust where thousands of stars are being born has been captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The image, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2001/21 and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    The photo offers an unprecedented, detailed view of the entire inner region of the fertile, star-forming 30 Doradus Nebula. The mosaic picture shows that ultraviolet radiation and high-speed material unleashed by the stars in the cluster, called R136 (the large blue blob left of center), are weaving a tapestry of creation and destruction, triggering the collapse of looming gas and dust clouds and forming pillar-like structures that incubate newborn stars.

    The 30 Doradus Nebula is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 170,000 light-years from Earth. Nebulas like 30 Doradus are signposts of recent star birth. High-energy ultraviolet radiation from young, hot, massive stars in R136 causes surrounding gaseous material to glow. Previous Hubble telescope observations showed that R136 contains several dozen of the most massive stars known, each about 100 times the mass of the Sun and about 10 times as hot. These stellar behemoths formed about 2 million years ago.

    The stars in R136 produce intense 'stellar winds,' streams of material traveling at several million miles an hour. These winds push the gas away from the cluster and compress the inner regions of the surrounding gas and dust clouds (seen in the image as the pinkish material). The intense pressure triggers the collapse of parts of the clouds, producing a new star formation around the central cluster. Most stars in the nursery are not visible because they are still encased in cocoons of gas and dust.

    This mosaic image of 30 Doradus consists of five overlapping

  9. Helix-helix interfaces and ligand binding.

    PubMed

    Kurochkina, Natalya; Choekyi, Tsering

    2011-08-21

    Helix-helix parallel interfaces can be characterized by certain combinations of amino acids, which repeatedly occur at core positions a and d (leucine zipper nomenclature) in homologous and nonhomologous proteins and influence interhelical angles. Applied for the prediction of interhelical angles in glutathione S-transferase, intracellular chloride channel and annexin molecules from various sources, correct results were achieved in 58 out of 62 proteins. Interhelical angles are found to correlate with the conformation of the glutathione S-transferase ligands glutathione, s-hexylglutathione, glutathione sulfonic acid, and glutathione-s-dinitrobenzene. PMID:21620863

  10. Wolf-Rayet nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, You-Hua

    2016-07-01

    Since the discovery of nebulae around Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars in the 1960s, it has been established that WR stars are massive stars at advanced evolutionary stages and that their surrounding nebulae result from the interactions between the stellar mass loss and the ambient interstellar medium. Surveys of WR nebulae have been made in the Galaxy, Magellanic Clouds, and other nearby galaxies in the Local Group. Some WR nebulae exhibit He II λ4686 line emission, indicating stellar effective temperatures of 90 — 100 x 103 K. The shocked fast stellar winds from WR nebulae have been detected in soft X-rays, but theoretical models have not been able to reproduce the observed X-ray spectral properties. Elemental abundances of WR nebulae consisting of synthesized stellar material can constrain stellar evolution models, but high-dispersion spectra are needed to kinematically separate the expanding shell of a WR nebula and the background interstellar medium for accurate abundance analyses.

  11. Carbon Chemistry in Planetary Nebulae: Observations of the CCH Radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Deborah Rose; Ziurys, Lucy

    2015-08-01

    The presence of infrared (IR) emission features observed in interstellar environments is consistent with models that suggest they are produced by complex organic species containing both aliphatic and aromatic components (Kwok & Zhang 2011). These IR signals change drastically over the course of the AGB, proto-planetary, and planetary nebulae phases, and this dramatic variation is yet to be understood. The radical CCH is a potential tracer of carbon chemistry and its evolution in dying stars. CCH is very common in carbon-rich circumstellar envelopes of AGB stars, and is present in the proto-planetary nebulae. It has also been observed at one position in the very young planetary nebula, NGC 7027 (Hasegawa & Kwok 2001), as well as at one position in the Helix Nebula (Tenenbaum et al. 2009) - a dense clump east of the central white dwarf. In order to further probe the chemistry of carbon, we have initiated a search for CCH in eight PNe previously detected in HCN and HCO+ from a survey conducted by Schmidt and Ziurys, using the telescopes of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Observations of the N=1→0 transition of CCH at 87 GHz have been conducted using the new ARO 12-m ALMA prototype antenna, while measurements of the N=3→2 transition at 262 GHz are being made with the ARO Sub-Millimeter Telescope (SMT). We also have extended our study in the Helix Nebula. Thus far, CCH has been detected at 8 new positions across the Helix Nebula, and appears to be widespread in this source. The radical has also been identified in K4-47, M3-28, K3-17, and K3-58. These sources represent a range of nebular ages. Additional observations are currently being conducted for CCH in other PNe, as well as abundance analyses. These results will be presented.

  12. Super D-helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jin-Ho; Oh, Phillial

    2001-11-01

    We study the ``Myers effect'' for a bunch of D1-branes with type-IIB superstrings moving in one direction along the branes. We show that the ``blown-up'' configuration is a helical D1-brane, which is self-supported from collapse by the axial momentum flow. The tilting angle of the helix is determined by the number of D1-branes. The radius of the helix is stabilized to a certain value depending on the number of D1-branes and the momentum carried by type-IIB superstrings. This helix is actually a T-dual version of the supertube recently found as the ``blown-up'' configuration of a bunch of type-IIA superstrings carrying a D0-brane charge. It is shown that the helical D1 configuration preserves one-quarter of the supersymmetry of the type-IIB Minkowski vacuum.

  13. Double-helix stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    1997-09-01

    A new stellarator configuration, the Double-Helix Stellarator (DHS), is introduced. This novel configuration features a double-helix center post as the only helical element of the stellarator coil system. The DHS configuration has many unique characteristics. One of them is the extreme low plasma aspect ratio, A {approx} 1--1.2. Other advantages include a high enclosed volume, appreciable rotational transform, and a possibility of extreme-high-{beta} MHD equilibria. Moreover, the DHS features improved transport characteristics caused by the absence of the magnetic field ripple on the outboard of the torus. Compactness, simplicity and modularity of the coil system add to the DHS advantages for fusion applications.

  14. Helix control in polymers

    PubMed Central

    Totsingan, Filbert; Jain, Vipul; Green, Mark M.

    2012-01-01

    The helix is a critical conformation exhibited by biological macromolecules and plays a key role in fundamental biological processes. Biological helical polymers exist in a single helical sense arising from the chiral effect of their primary units—for example, DNA and proteins adopt predominantly a right-handed helix conformation in response to the asymmetric conformational propensity of D-sugars and L-amino acids, respectively. In using these homochiral systems, nature blocks our observations of some fascinating aspects of the cooperativity in helical systems, although when useful for a specific purpose, “wrong” enantiomers may be incorporated in specific places. In synthetic helical systems, on the contrary, incorporation of non-racemic chirality is an additional burden, and the findings discussed in this review show that this burden may be considerably alleviated by taking advantage of the amplification of chirality, in which small chiral influences lead to large consequences. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA), which is a non-chiral synthetic DNA mimic, shows a cooperative response to a small chiral effect induced by a chiral amino acid, which is limited, however, due to the highly flexible nature of this oligomeric chimera. The lack of internal stereochemical bias is an important factor which makes PNA an ideal system to understand some cooperative features that are not directly accessible from DNA. PMID:22772039

  15. Measuring the Double Helix

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew-Fenn, R.S.; Das, R.; Harbury, P.A.B.

    2009-05-26

    DNA is thought to behave as a stiff elastic rod with respect to the ubiquitous mechanical deformations inherent to its biology. To test this model at short DNA lengths, we measured the mean and variance of end-to-end length for a series of DNA double helices in solution, using small-angle x-ray scattering interference between gold nanocrystal labels. In the absence of applied tension, DNA is at least one order of magnitude softer than measured by single-molecule stretching experiments. Further, the data rule out the conventional elastic rod model. The variance in end-to-end length follows a quadratic dependence on the number of base pairs rather than the expected linear dependence, indicating that DNA stretching is cooperative over more than two turns of the DNA double helix. Our observations support the idea of long-range allosteric communication through DNA structure.

  16. Lightning in the Protoplanetary Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning in the protoplanetary nebula has been proposed as a mechanism for creating meteoritic chondrules: enigmatic mm-sized silicate spheres formed in the nebula by the brief melting of cold precursors.

  17. A Tactile Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grice, Noreen A.; Mutchler, M.

    2010-01-01

    Astronomy was once considered a science restricted to fully sighted participants. But in the past two decades, accessible books with large print/Braille and touchable pictures have brought astronomy and space science to the hands and mind's eye of students, regardless of their visual ability. A new universally-designed tactile image featuring the Hubble mosaic of the Carina Nebula is being presented at this conference. The original dataset was obtained with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) hydrogen-alpha filter in 2005. It became an instant icon after being infused with additional color information from ground-based CTIO data, and released as Hubble's 17th anniversary image. Our tactile Carina Nebula promotes multi-mode learning about the entire life-cycle of stars, which is dramatically illustrated in this Hubble mosaic. When combined with descriptive text in print and Braille, the visual and tactile components seamlessly reach both sighted and blind populations. Specific touchable features of the tactile image identify the shapes and orientations of objects in the Carina Nebula that include star-forming regions, jets, pillars, dark and light globules, star clusters, shocks/bubbles, the Keyhole Nebula, and stellar death (Eta Carinae). Visit our poster paper to touch the Carina Nebula!

  18. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  19. The Ring Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Hubble Space Telescope has captured the sharpest view yet of the most famous of all planetary nebulae, the Ring Nebula (M57). In this October 1998 image, the telescope has looked down a barrel of gas cast off by a dying star thousands of years ago. This photo reveals elongated dark clumps of material embedded in the gas at the edge of the nebula; the dying central star floating in a blue haze of hot gas. The nebula is about a light-year in diameter and is located some 2,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Lyra. The colors are approximately true colors. The color image was assembled from three black-and-white photos taken through different color filters with the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Blue isolates emission from very hot helium, which is located primarily close to the hot central star. Green represents ionized oxygen, which is located farther from the star. Red shows ionized nitrogen, which is radiated from the coolest gas, located farthest from the star. The gradations of color illustrate how the gas glows because it is bathed in ultraviolet radiation from the remnant central star, whose surface temperature is a white-hot 216,000 degrees Fahrenheit (120,000 degrees Celsius).

  20. The Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This spectacular color panorama of the center the Orion nebula is one of the largest pictures ever assembled from individual images taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The picture, seamlessly composited from a mosaic of 15 separate fields, covers an area of sky about five percent the area covered by the full Moon. The seemingly infinite tapestry of rich detail revealed by Hubble shows a churning turbulent star factory set within a maelstrom of flowing, luminescent gas. Though this 2.5 light-years wide view is still a small portion of the entire nebula, it includes almost all of the light from the bright glowing clouds of gas and a star cluster associated with the nebula. The mosaic reveals at least 153 glowing protoplanetary disks (first discovered with the Hubble in 1992, and dubbed 'proplyds') that are believed to be embryonic solar systems that will eventually form planets. (Our solar system has long been considered the relic of just such a disk that formed around the newborn Sun). The proplyds that are closest to the Trapezium stars (image center) are shedding some of their gas and dust. The pressure of starlight from the hottest stars forms 'tails' which act like wind vanes pointing away from the Trapezium. These tails result from the light from the star pushing the dust and gas away from the outside layers of the proplyds. In addition to the luminescent proplyds, seven disks are silhouetted against the bright background of the nebula. Located 1,500 light-years away, along our spiral arm of the Milky Way, the Orion nebula is located in the middle of the sword region of the constellation Orion the Hunter, which dominates the early winter evening sky at northern latitudes.

  1. The Cat's Eye Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image shows one of the most complex planetary nebulae ever seen, NGC 6543, nicknamed the 'Cat's Eye Nebula.' Hubble reveals surprisingly intricate structures including concentric gas shells, jets of high-speed gas and unusual shock-induced knots of gas. Estimated to be 1,000 years old, the nebula is a visual 'fossil record' of the dynamics and late evolution of a dying star. A preliminary interpretation suggests that the star might be a double-star system. The suspected companion star also might be responsible for a pair of high-speed jets of gas that lie at right angles to this equatorial ring. If the companion were pulling in material from a neighboring star, jets escaping along the companion's rotation axis could be produced. These jets would explain several puzzling features along the periphery of the gas lobes. Like a stream of water hitting a sand pile, the jets compress gas ahead of them, creating the 'curlicue' features and bright arcs near the outer edge of the lobes. The twin jets are now pointing in different directions than these features. This suggests the jets are wobbling, or precessing, and turning on and off episodically. This color picture, taken with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2, is a composite of three images taken at different wavelengths. (red, hydrogen-alpha; blue, neutral oxygen, 6300 angstroms; green, ionized nitrogen, 6584 angstroms). The image was taken on September 18, 1994. NGC 6543 is 3,000 light- years away in the northern constellation Draco. The term planetary nebula is a misnomer; dying stars create these cocoons when they lose outer layers of gas. The process has nothing to do with planet formation, which is predicted to happen early in a star's life.

  2. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, R.; Smith, L.M.; Tong, X.E.

    1995-03-28

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis. 4 figures.

  3. Triple helix purification and sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Renfeng; Smith, Lloyd M.; Tong, Xinchun E.

    1995-01-01

    Disclosed herein are methods, kits, and equipment for purifying single stranded circular DNA and then using the DNA for DNA sequencing purposes. Templates are provided with an insert having a hybridization region. An elongated oligonucleotide has two regions that are complementary to the insert and the oligo is bound to a magnetic anchor. The oligo hybridizes to the insert on two sides to form a stable triple helix complex. The anchor can then be used to drag the template out of solution using a magnet. The system can purify sequencing templates, and if desired the triple helix complex can be opened up to a double helix so that the oligonucleotide will act as a primer for further DNA synthesis.

  4. THE 'SPIROGRAPH' NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    THE 'SPIROGRAPH' NEBULA Glowing like a multi-faceted jewel, the planetary nebula IC 418 lies about 2,000 light-years from Earth in the direction of the constellation Lepus. This photograph is one of the latest from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, obtained with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. A planetary nebula represents the final stage in the evolution of a star similar to our Sun. The star at the center of IC 418 was a red giant a few thousand years ago, but then ejected its outer layers into space to form the nebula, which has now expanded to a diameter of about 0.1 light-year. The stellar remnant at the center is the hot core of the red giant, from which ultraviolet radiation floods out into the surrounding gas, causing it to fluoresce. Over the next several thousand years, the nebula will gradually disperse into space, and then the star will cool and fade away for billions of years as a white dwarf. Our own Sun is expected to undergo a similar fate, but fortunately this will not occur until some 5 billion years from now. The Hubble image of IC 418 is shown in a false-color representation, based on Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 exposures taken in February and September, 1999 through filters that isolate light from various chemical elements. Red shows emission from ionized nitrogen (the coolest gas in the nebula, located furthest from the hot nucleus), green shows emission from hydrogen, and blue traces the emission from ionized oxygen (the hottest gas, closest to the central star). The remarkable textures seen in the nebula are newly revealed by the Hubble telescope, and their origin is still uncertain. Credit: NASA and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Acknowledgment: Dr. Raghvendra Sahai (JPL) and Dr. Arsen R. Hajian (USNO). EDITOR'S NOTE: For additional information, please contact Dr. Raghvendra Sahai, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109, (phone) 818-354-0452, (fax) 818-393-9088, (e-mail) sahai@bb8.jpl

  5. Revisiting the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-06-01

    Orion the Hunter is perhaps the best-known constellation in the sky, well placed in the winter for observers in both the northern and southern hemispheres, and instantly recognisable. Just below Orion's belt (three distinctive stars in a row), the hilt of his sword holds a great jewel in the sky, the beautiful Orion Nebula. Bright enough to be seen with the naked eye, the nebula, also known as Messier 42, is a wide complex of gas and dust, illuminated by several massive and hot stars at its core, the famous Trapezium stars. For astronomers, Orion is surely one of the most important constellations, as it contains one of the nearest and most active stellar nurseries in the Milky Way, the galaxy in which we live. Here tens of thousands of new stars have formed within the past ten million years or so - a very short span of time in astronomical terms. For comparison: our own Sun is now 4,600 million years old and has not yet reached half-age. Reduced to a human time-scale, star formation in Orion would have been going on for just one month as compared to the Sun's 40 years. In fact, located at a distance of 1500 light years, the Orion Nebula plays such an important role in astrophysics that it can be argued that our understanding of star formation is for a large part based on the Orion Nebula. It is thus no surprise that the Orion Nebula is one of the most studied objects in the night sky (see for example the various related ESO Press Photos and Releases: ESO Press Photo 03a/98, ESO Press Photos 03a-d/01, ESO Press Photos 12a-e/01, ESO Press Release 14/01,...). The richness of the stellar cluster inside the Orion Nebula makes it an ideal, and unique, target for high resolution and wide-field imaging. Following some pioneering work made a few years ago, an international team of astronomers [1], led by Massimo Robberto (European Space Agency and Space Telescope Science Institute), used the Wide Field Imager (WFI), a 67-million pixel digital camera that is installed at the

  6. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  7. Spectrometry of nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acker, A.

    2011-04-01

    Nebular emission lines are easy to observe, and their spectrum contains a lot of information. We explain the mechanisms of production of the emissions, and the relation between the intensity of the recombination and forbidden lines, and the physical parameters of the objects. A gallery of emission lines spectra is presented, and a rough analysis will clarify their differences. The case of Planetary Nebulae will be developed, in order to determine the extinction constant, the plasma parameters (electron density and temperature), the chemical abundances, and also the properties of the central star (temperature, mass, stellar wind velocity, age).

  8. Rotten Egg Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Violent gas collisions that produced supersonic shock fronts in a dying star are seen in a new, detailed image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

    The picture, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, is online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . The camera was designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Stars like our Sun will eventually die and expel most of their material outward into shells of gas and dust. These shells eventually form some of the most beautiful objects in the universe, called planetary nebulae.

    'This new image gives us a rare view of the early death throes of stars like our Sun. For the first time, we can see phenomena leading to the formation of planetary nebulae. Until now, this had only been predicted by theory, but had never been seen directly,' said Dr. Raghvendra Sahai, research scientist and member of the science team at JPL for the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2.

    The object is sometimes called the Rotten Egg Nebula, because it contains a lot of sulphur, which would produce an awful odor if one could smell in space. The object is also known as the Calabash Nebula or by the technical name OH231.8+4.2.

    The densest parts of the nebula are composed of material ejected recently by the central star and accelerated in opposite directions. This material, shown as yellow in the image, is zooming away at speeds up to one and a half million kilometers per hour (one million miles per hour). Most of the star's original mass is now contained in these bipolar gas structures.

    A team of Spanish and American astronomers used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to study how the gas stream rams into the surrounding material, shown in blue. They believe that such interactions dominate the formation process in planetary nebulae. Due to the high speed of the gas, shock-fronts are formed on impact and heat the surrounding gas. Although computer calculations have predicted the existence and

  9. Misclassified planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbadin, F.

    1986-08-01

    The classifications of 130 objects as planetary nebulae (PNs) in the catalogs of Kohoutek (1965, 1969, and 1972) are reexamined by analyzing their images on the IR (755-885-nm) and red (610-690-nm) plates of the NIR photographic survey of the Galactic plane of Hoessel et al. (1985). Factors affecting the IR and red brightness of normal stars and emission-line objects are discussed, and it is shown that PNs should be brighter in the red than in the IR. Thirty-six supposed PNs for which this is not the case are identified, and it is suggested that they have been improperly classified.

  10. Ghost Head Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Looking like a colorful holiday card, a new image from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope reveals a vibrant green and red nebula far from Earth.

    The image of NGC 2080, taken by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . Images like this help astronomers investigate star formation in nebulas.

    NGC 2080, nicknamed 'The Ghost Head Nebula,' is one of a chain of star-forming regions lying south of the 30 Doradus nebula in the Large Magellanic Cloud. 30 Doradus is the largest star-forming complex in the local group of galaxies. This 'enhanced color' picture is composed of three narrow-band-filter images obtained by Hubble on March 28, 2000.

    The red and blue light come from regions of hydrogen gas heated by nearby stars. The green light on the left comes from glowing oxygen. The energy to illuminate the green light is supplied by a powerful stellar wind, a stream of high-speed particles coming from a massive star just outside the image. The central white region is a combination of all three emissions and indicates a core of hot, massive stars in this star-formation region. Intense emission from these stars has carved a bowl-shaped cavity in surrounding gas.

    In the white region, the two bright areas (the 'eyes of the ghost') - named A1 (left) and A2 (right) -- are very hot, glowing 'blobs' of hydrogen and oxygen. The bubble in A1 is produced by the hot, intense radiation and powerful stellar wind from one massive star. A2 contains more dust and several hidden, massive stars. The massive stars in A1 and A2 must have formed within the last 10,000 years, since their natal gas shrouds are not yet disrupted by the powerful radiation of the newborn stars.

    The Space Telescope Science Institute is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., for NASA, under contract with the Goddard Space Flight Center

  11. Recent advances in helix-coil theory.

    PubMed

    Doig, Andrew J

    2002-12-10

    Peptide helices in solution form a complex mixture of all helix, all coil or, most frequently, central helices with frayed coil ends. In order to interpret experiments on helical peptides and make theoretical predictions on helices, it is therefore essential to use a helix-coil theory that takes account of this equilibrium. The original Zimm-Bragg and Lifson-Roig helix-coil theories have been greatly extended in the last 10 years to include additional interactions. These include preferences for the N-cap, N1, N2, N3 and C-cap positions, capping motifs, helix dipoles, side chain interactions and 3(10)-helix formation. These have been applied to determine energies for these preferences from experimental data and to predict the helix contents of peptides. This review discusses these newly recognised structural features of helices and how they have been included in helix-coil models. PMID:12488008

  12. Physical Structure of Planetary Nebulae. I. The Owl Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Martín A.; Chu, You-Hua; Manchado, Arturo; Kwitter, Karen B.

    2003-06-01

    The Owl Nebula is a triple-shell planetary nebula with the outermost shell being a faint bow-shaped halo. We have obtained deep narrowband images and high-dispersion echelle spectra in the Hα, [O III], and [N II] emission lines to determine the physical structure of each shell in the nebula. These spatiokinematic data allow us to rule out hydrodynamic models that can reproduce only the nebular morphology. Our analysis shows that the inner shell of the main nebula is slightly elongated with a bipolar cavity along its major axis, the outer nebula is a filled envelope coexpanding with the inner shell at 40 km s-1, and the halo has been braked by the interstellar medium as the Owl Nebula moves through it. To explain the morphology and kinematics of the Owl Nebula, we suggest the following scenario for its formation and evolution. The early mass loss at the TP-AGB phase forms the halo, and the superwind at the end of the AGB phase forms the main nebula. The subsequent fast stellar wind compressed the superwind to form the inner shell and excavated an elongated cavity at the center, but this has ceased in the past. At the current old age the inner shell is backfilling the central cavity. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope, operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, and with the Burrell Schmidt telescope of the Warner and Swasey Observatory, Case Western Reserve University.

  13. The Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's new Spitzer Space Telescope, formerly known as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, has captured in stunning detail the spidery filaments and newborn stars of the Tarantula Nebula, a rich star-forming region also known as 30 Doradus. This cloud of glowing dust and gas is located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, the nearest galaxy to our own Milky Way, and is visible primarily from the Southern Hemisphere. This image of an interstellar cauldron provides a snapshot of the complex physical processes and chemistry that govern the birth - and death - of stars.

    At the heart of the nebula is a compact cluster of stars, known as R136, which contains very massive and young stars. The brightest of these blue supergiant stars are up to 100 times more massive than the Sun, and are at least 100,000 times more luminous. These stars will live fast and die young, at least by astronomical standards, exhausting their nuclear fuel in a few million years.

    The Spitzer Space Telescope image was obtained with an infrared array camera that is sensitive to invisible infrared light at wavelengths that are about ten times longer than visible light. In this four-color composite, emission at 3.6 microns is depicted in blue, 4.5 microns in green, 5.8 microns in orange, and 8.0 microns in red. The image covers a region that is three-quarters the size of the full moon.

    The Spitzer observations penetrate the dust clouds throughout the Tarantula to reveal previously hidden sites of star formation. Within the luminescent nebula, many holes are also apparent. These voids are produced by highly energetic winds originating from the massive stars in the central star cluster. The structures at the edges of these voids are particularly interesting. Dense pillars of gas and dust, sculpted by the stellar radiation, denote the birthplace of future generations of stars.

    The Spitzer image provides information about the composition of the material at the edges of the voids. The surface layers

  14. Video Zoom into Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video opens with a backyard view of the nighttime sky centered on the constellation Cygnus, the Swan. We zoom into a vast donut-shaped feature called the Veil Nebula. It is the tattered expand...

  15. The Great Crab Nebula Superflare

    NASA Video Gallery

    There are strange goings-on in the Crab Nebula. On April 12, 2011, NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope detected the most powerful in a series of gamma-ray flares occurring somewhere within the s...

  16. Kinematics of planetary nebulae. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purgathofer, A.; Perinotto, M.

    1981-08-01

    In a program of study of radial velocities of planetary nebulae, 84 spectra of eight planetary nebulae in the direction of the galactic anticenter have been obtained at the L. Figl Observatory near Vienna with an image tube spectrograph giving a reciprocal dispersion of 26 A/mm. With this material, the kinematical behavior of the objects was studied, and it is shown that most of them deviate significantly from circular motion in the Galaxy.

  17. Improved detection of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs in protein sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, I B; Egan, J B

    1990-01-01

    We present an update of our method for systematic detection and evaluation of potential helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motifs in protein sequences [Dodd, I. and Egan, J. B. (1987) J. Mol. Biol. 194, 557-564]. The new method is considerably more powerful, detecting approximately 50% more likely helix-turn-helix sequences without an increase in false predictions. This improvement is due almost entirely to the use of a much larger reference set of 91 presumed helix-turn-helix sequences. The scoring matrix derived from this reference set has been calibrated against a large protein sequence database so that the score obtained by a sequence can be used to give a practical estimation of the probability that the sequence is a helix-turn-helix motif. PMID:2402433

  18. FMRFamide receptors of Helix aspersa

    SciTech Connect

    Payza, K.

    1988-01-01

    A receptor binding assay and an isolated heart bioassay were used to identify and characterize the FMRFamide receptors in Helix. In the heart bioassay, FMRFamide increased myocardial contraction force. A potent FMRFamide analog, desaminoTyr-Phe-norLeu-arg-Phe-amide (daYFnLRFamide), was used as a radioiodinated receptor ligand. The high affinity binding of {sup 125}I-daYFnLRFamide at 0{degree}C to Helix brain membranes was reversible, saturable, pH-dependent and specific, with a K{sub D} of 13-14 nM. A lower affinity (245 nM) site was also observed. Radioligand binding sites were also identified in the heart, male reproductive organs and digestive organs. The structure-activity relations (SAR) of cardiostimulation correlated with the specificity of {sup 125}I-daYFnLRFamide binding to brain and heart receptors. The SAR were similar to those of other molluscan FMRFamide bioassays, except that they showed a marked preference for some analogs with blocked amino-terminals.

  19. HUBBLE'S PLANETARY NEBULA GALLERY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [Top left] - IC 3568 lies in the constellation Camelopardalis at a distance of about 9,000 light-years, and has a diameter of about 0.4 light-years (or about 800 times the diameter of our solar system). It is an example of a round planetary nebula. Note the bright inner shell and fainter, smooth, circular outer envelope. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Top center] - NGC 6826's eye-like appearance is marred by two sets of blood-red 'fliers' that lie horizontally across the image. The surrounding faint green 'white' of the eye is believed to be gas that made up almost half of the star's mass for most of its life. The hot remnant star (in the center of the green oval) drives a fast wind into older material, forming a hot interior bubble which pushes the older gas ahead of it to form a bright rim. (The star is one of the brightest stars in any planetary.) NGC 6826 is 2,200 light- years away in the constellation Cygnus. The Hubble telescope observation was taken Jan. 27, 1996 with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. Credits: Bruce Balick (University of Washington), Jason Alexander (University of Washington), Arsen Hajian (U.S. Naval Observatory), Yervant Terzian (Cornell University), Mario Perinotto (University of Florence, Italy), Patrizio Patriarchi (Arcetri Observatory, Italy) and NASA [Top right ] - NGC 3918 is in the constellation Centaurus and is about 3,000 light-years from us. Its diameter is about 0.3 light-year. It shows a roughly spherical outer envelope but an elongated inner balloon inflated by a fast wind from the hot central star, which is starting to break out of the spherical envelope at the top and bottom of the image. Credits: Howard Bond (Space Telescope Science Institute), Robin Ciardullo (Pennsylvania State University) and NASA [Bottom left] - Hubble 5 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or bipolar (two-lobed) nebula. The heat generated by fast winds causes

  20. The Reflection Nebula in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Just weeks after NASA astronauts repaired the Hubble Space Telescope in December 1999, the Hubble Heritage Project snapped this picture of NGC 1999, a nebula in the constellation Orion. The Heritage astronomers, in collaboration with scientists in Texas and Ireland, used Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) to obtain the color image. NGC 1999 is an example of a reflection nebula. Like fog around a street lamp, a reflection nebula shines only because the light from an imbedded source illuminates its dust; the nebula does not emit any visible light of its own. NGC 1999 lies close to the famous Orion Nebula, about 1,500 light-years from Earth, in a region of our Milky Way galaxy where new stars are being formed actively. NGC 1999 was discovered some two centuries ago by Sir William Herschel and his sister Caroline, and was cataloged later in the 19th century as object 1999 in the New General Catalogue. This data was collected in January 2000 by the Hubble Heritage Team with the collaboration of star-formation experts C. Robert O'Dell (Rice University), Thomas P. Ray (Dublin Institute for Advanced Study), and David Corcoran (University of Limerick).

  1. COMPARING SYMBIOTIC NEBULAE AND PLANETARY NEBULAE LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Frankowski, Adam; Soker, Noam E-mail: soker@physics.technion.ac.i

    2009-10-01

    We compare the observed symbiotic nebulae (SyN) luminosity function (SyNLF) in the [O III] lambda5007 A line to the planetary nebulae (PN) luminosity function (PNLF) and find that the intrinsic SyNLF (ISyNLF) of galactic SyNs has-within its uncertainty of 0.5-0.8 mag-very similar cutoff luminosity and general shape to those of the PNLF. The [O III]/(Halpha+[N II]) line ratios of SyNs and PNs are shown to be also related. Possible implications of these results for the universality of the PNLF are briefly outlined.

  2. The Trifid Nebula: Stellar Sibling Rivalry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A zoom into the Trifid Nebula starts with ground-based observations and ends with a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. Another HST image shows star formation in the nebula and the video concludes with a ground-based image of the Trifid Nebula.

  3. The Formation of a Planetary Nebula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpaz, Amos

    1991-01-01

    Proposes a scenario to describe the formation of a planetary nebula, a cloud of gas surrounding a very hot compact star. Describes the nature of a planetary nebula, the number observed to date in the Milky Way Galaxy, and the results of research on a specific nebula. (MDH)

  4. The Eagle Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    These eerie, dark pillar-like structures are columns of cool interstellar hydrogen gas and dust that are also incubators for new stars. The pillars protrude from the interior wall of a dark molecular cloud like stalagmites from the floor of a cavern. They are part of the 'Eagle Nebula' (also called M16 -- the 16th object in Charles Messier's 18th century catalog of 'fuzzy' objects that aren't comets), a nearby star-forming region 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Serpens. Ultraviolet light is responsible for illuminating the convoluted surfaces of the columns and the ghostly streamers of gas boiling away from their surfaces, producing the dramatic visual effects that highlight the three dimensional nature of the clouds. The tallest pillar (left) is about a light-year long from base to tip. As the pillars themselves are slowly eroded away by the ultraviolet light, small globules of even denser gas buried within the pillars are uncovered. These globules have been dubbed 'EGGs.' EGGs is an acronym for 'Evaporating Gaseous Globules,' but it is also a word that describes what these objects are. Forming inside at least some of the EGGs are embryonic stars, stars that abruptly stop growing when the EGGs are uncovered and they are separated from the larger reservoir of gas from which they were drawing mass. Eventually, the stars themselves emerge from the EGGs as the EGGs themselves succumb to photoevaporation. The picture was taken on April 1, 1995 with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The color image is constructed from three separate images taken in the light of emission from different types of atoms. Red shows emission from singly-ionized sulfur atoms. Green shows emission from hydrogen. Blue shows light emitted by doubly- ionized oxygen atoms.

  5. Entrapment of Water at the Transmembrane Helix-Helix Interface of Quiescin Sulfhydryl Oxidase 2.

    PubMed

    Ried, Christian L; Scharnagl, Christina; Langosch, Dieter

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about how a membrane can regulate interactions between transmembrane helices. Here, we show that strong self-interaction of the transmembrane helix of human quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 2 rests on a motif of conserved amino acids comprising one face of the helix. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations suggest that water molecules enter the helix-helix interface and connect serine residues of both partner helices. In addition, an interfacial tyrosine can interact with noninterfacial water or lipid. Dimerization of this transmembrane helix might therefore be controlled by membrane properties controlling water permeation and/or by the lipid composition of the membrane. PMID:26894260

  6. Multiwalled ice helixes and ice nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaeil; Wang, Jun; Zeng, X. C.

    2006-01-01

    We report six phases of high-density nano-ice predicted to form within carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at high pressure. High-density nano-ice self-assembled within smaller-diameter CNT (17,0) exhibits a double-walled helical structure where the outer wall consists of four double-stranded helixes, which resemble a DNA double helix, and the inner wall is a quadruple-stranded helix. Four other double-walled nano-ices, self-assembled respectively in two larger-diameter CNTs (20,0 and 22,0), display tubular structure. Within CNT (24,0), the confined water can freeze spontaneously into a triple-walled helical nano-ice where the outer wall is an 18-stranded helix and the middle and inner walls are hextuple-stranded helixes. PMID:17170136

  7. Molecular Hydrogen in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speck, Angela K.; Baldridge, Sean; Matsuura, Mikako

    2015-08-01

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) have long played the role of laboratories for investigating atomic, molecular, dust and plasma physics, which have applications to diverse other astrophysical environments. In this presentation we will discuss clumpy structures within planetary nebulae that are the hosts to, and protectors of molecular gas in an otherwise forbidding ionized zone. We will present new observations of the molecular hydrogen emission from several PNe and discuss their implications for the formation, evolution and survival/demise of such molecular globules. The science behind dust and molecule formation and survival that apply to many other astronomical objects and places.

  8. Ultraviolet photometry of planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holm, A. V.

    1972-01-01

    Nine of the planetary nebulae observed by the Wisconsin filter photometers are compared with 15 Monocerotis in the spectral region 1430-4250 A. The data are corrected for the degradation of the filters of stellar photometer number four with time. Comparisons with simple models indicate that most of the observed nebulae are subject to some interstellar extinction in the far ultraviolet. However, NGC 246 and NGC 1360 appear to be nearly unreddened. Thus far no unexpected features have been found in the observations.

  9. Terminal residue hydrophobicity modulates transmembrane helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Ng, Derek P; Deber, Charles M

    2014-06-17

    Central to the formation of tertiary structure in membrane protein folding is the presence of amino acid sequence motifs (such as "small-XXX-small" segments) in the TM segments that promote interaction-compatible surfaces through which the TM α-helices interact. Here, we sought to elucidate additional factors that may work in tandem to dictate the ultimate interaction fate of TM-embedded segments. In this context, we used proteolipid protein (PLP), the major protein from central nervous system myelin for which mutant-dependent non-native oligomerization has been implicated in neurological disorders, to explore the specific effects of TM boundary residues (the membrane entry and exit points), keying on the secondary structure and self-association of peptides corresponding to the PLP TM2 α-helix (wild-type sequence ⁶⁶AFQYVIYGTASFFFLYGALLLAEGF⁹⁰). Using gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, and Förster resonance energy transfer in the membrane-mimetic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), we found that mutation of F90 to residues such as A, I, L, or V maintains the onset of TM2-TM2 dimerization, whereas mutation to E, G, Q, N, S, or T abrogates dimer formation. We attribute this sensitivity to changes in local hydrophobicity, viz., a decrease in hydrophobicity reduces local lipid-peptide interactions, which in turn disrupts peptide α-helicity and hence the effectiveness of an incipient interaction-compatible surface. Our results show that the secondary structure and oligomeric state of PLP TM2 Lys-tagged peptides are significantly modulated by the specific nature of their C-terminal boundary residue, thus providing insight as to how point mutations, particularly where they produce disease states, can compromise the folding process. PMID:24857611

  10. Rosalind Franklin and the Double Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elkin, Lynne Osman

    2003-03-01

    Although she made essential contributions toward elucidating the structure of DNA, Rosalind Franklin is known to many only as seen through the distorting lens of James Watson's book, The Double Helix.

  11. A Helix Replacement Mechanism Directs Metavinculin Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Yogesha, S.D.; Izard, Tina

    2010-10-11

    Cells require distinct adhesion complexes to form contacts with their neighbors or the extracellular matrix, and vinculin links these complexes to the actin cytoskeleton. Metavinculin, an isoform of vinculin that harbors a unique 68-residue insert in its tail domain, has distinct actin bundling and oligomerization properties and plays essential roles in muscle development and homeostasis. Moreover, patients with sporadic or familial mutations in the metavinculin-specific insert invariably develop fatal cardiomyopathies. Here we report the high resolution crystal structure of the metavinculin tail domain, as well as the crystal structures of full-length human native metavinculin (1,134 residues) and of the full-length cardiomyopathy-associated {Delta}Leu954 metavinculin deletion mutant. These structures reveal that an {alpha}-helix (H1{prime}) and extended coil of the metavinculin insert replace {alpha}-helix H1 and its preceding extended coil found in the N-terminal region of the vinculin tail domain to form a new five-helix bundle tail domain. Further, biochemical analyses demonstrate that this helix replacement directs the distinct actin bundling and oligomerization properties of metavinculin. Finally, the cardiomyopathy associated {Delta}Leu954 and Arg975Trp metavinculin mutants reside on the replaced extended coil and the H1{prime} {alpha}-helix, respectively. Thus, a helix replacement mechanism directs metavinculin's unique functions.

  12. Recent work on bipolar nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.

    1983-01-01

    The results of recent studies of bipolar nebulae (BPN) using nebular-polarization mapping, spectropolarimetry, near-IR spectroscopy, far-IR photometry, and radio-maser and continuum observations are surveyed. The characteristics of several BPN of different evolutionary types are discussed and illustrated with spectra, model drawings, and maps. As shown in a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram of 19 BPN, this morphological class includes pre-main-sequence stars, red giants in transition to ordinary planetary nebulae, pre-white-dwarfs, a dust-shrouded carbon star, and a visual binary with a type-O primary. VLA 6-cm observations of the latter object, MWC 349, reveal a morphology similar to the optical structure of the Red Rectangle illuminated by HD 44179: it is suggested that equatorial dusty tori may occur commonly at different phases of stellar evolution, and hence that BPN may be relatively abundant, although short-lived, phenomena.

  13. The Orion nebula star cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panek, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Photography through filters which suppress nebular light reveal a clustering of faint red stars centered on the Trapezium, this evidences a distinct cluster within the larger OB1 association. Stars within about 20 ft of trapezium comprise the Orion Nebula star cluster are considered. Topics discussed re: (1) extinction by dust grains; (2) photometric peculiarities; (3) spectroscopic peculiarities; (4) young variables; (5) the distribution and motion of gas within the cluster.

  14. The western Veil nebula (Image)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenny, M.

    2009-12-01

    The western Veil nebula in Cygnus. 15-part mosaic by Mike Glenny, Gloucestershire, taken over several months mostly in the autumn of 2008. 200mm LX90/f10 autoguided, Meade UHC filter, 0.3xFR/FF, Canon 20Da DSLR. Exposures each typically 10x360 secs at ISO1600, processed in Registax4, PixInsight (for flat field correction) & Photoshop CS.

  15. Lyman Alpha Photochemistry in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the project "Lyman Alpha Photochemistry in the Solar Nebula" was to model photochemistry in the primitive solar nebula and the early solar systems. As part of the modeling, it was necessary to model the composition of the gas and dust accreted by the solar nebula. This final report contains a list of publications where the results of this project have been published.

  16. Stars in the Tarantula Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the most active starburst region in the local universe lies a cluster of brilliant, massive stars, known to astronomers as Hodge 301. Hodge 301, seen in the lower right hand corner of this image, lives inside the Tarantula Nebula in our galactic neighbor, the Large Magellanic Cloud. This star cluster is not the brightest, or youngest, or most populous star cluster in the Tarantula Nebula, that honor goes to the spectacular R136. In fact, Hodge 301 is almost 10 times older than the young cluster R136. But age has its advantages; many of the stars in Hodge 301 are so old that they have exploded as supernovae. These exploded stars are blasting material out into the surrounding region at speeds of almost 200 miles per second. This high speed ejecta are plowing into the surrounding Tarantula Nebula, shocking and compressing the gas into a multitude of sheets and filaments, seen in the upper left portion of the picture. Hodge 301 contains three red supergiants - stars that are close to the end of their evolution and are about to go supernova, exploding and sending more shocks into the Tarantula. Also present near the center of the image are small, dense gas globules and dust columns where new stars are being formed today, as part of the overall ongoing star formation throughout the Tarantula region.

  17. Abundances of Planetary Nebula NGC 5315

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pottasch, S. R.; Beintema, D. A.; Koorneef, J.; Salas, J. Bernard; Feibelman, W. A.; Oegerle, William R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The ISO and IUE spectra of the elliptical nebula NGC 5315 is presented. These spectra axe combined with the spectra in the visual wavelength region to obtain a complete, extinction corrected, spectrum. The chemical composition of the nebulae is then calculated and compared to previous determinations. The HST Nicmos observations of the nebula in 3 emission lines are also presented. These observations are used to determine the helium abundance as a function of position in the nebula. A discussion is given of possible evolutionary effects.

  18. Owl Nebula (M97, NGC 3587)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A planetary nebula in the constellation Ursa Major, position RA 11 h 14.8 m, dec. +55° 01'. The Owl is 3' across and gets its name from two adjacent dark patches that have the appearance of large eyes. The nebula is eleventh magnitude, and the central star is a faint magnitude 16....

  19. 3-D structures of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, W.

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in the 3-D reconstruction of planetary nebulae are reviewed. We include not only results for 3-D reconstructions, but also the current techniques in terms of general methods and software. In order to obtain more accurate reconstructions, we suggest to extend the widely used assumption of homologous nebula expansion to map spectroscopically measured velocity to position along the line of sight.

  20. Relativistic helix traveling wave tube amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A. )

    1992-07-01

    A relativistic field theory of a helix traveling wave tube (TWT) is described for the case in which a thin annular beam propagates through a sheath helix enclosed within a loss-free wall. The theory is applied to the study of a TWT with an intense relativistic electron beam. The analysis implicitly includes beam space-charge effects and is valid for arbitrary azimuthal mode number, and the coupled-wave Pierce theory is recovered in the [ital near]-[ital resonant] limit. The results indicate that impressive gains and efficiencies are possible in this regime. In addition, the interaction is relatively insensitive to the effects of a beam energy spread.

  1. Epicyclic Twin-Helix Ionization Cooling Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson

    2011-04-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we earlier developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion. We now insert absorber plates with short energy-recovering units located next to them at the appropriate locations in the twin-helix channel. We first demonstrate conventional ionization cooling in such a system with the optics uncorrelated. We then adjust the correlated optics state and induce a parametric resonance to study ionization cooling under the resonant condition.

  2. A model of Jupiter's sulfur nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A simple model of Jupiter's S II emission nebula is developed on the basis of a complete treatment of electron-impact excitation of sulfur ions. Forbidden line emission from S II ions excited by electron collisions in the Jovian nebula is analyzed, and existing observations are interpreted using a simple model of an S II nebula which is uniform in depth. The results show that the depth of the nebula is 300,000 to 600,000 km, the electron density is about 3160 per cu cm, the electron temperature is approximately 25,000 K, and the S II concentration is roughly 79 ions per cu cm. It is noted that these plasma conditions are quite different from those reported for the same region on the basis of Pioneer 10 data, indicating that the S II nebula is a sporadic event. Io is suggested as the source of the sulfur.

  3. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Gruendl, Robert; Vaidya, Kaushar; White, Stephen M.; Petre, Rob; Chu, You-Hua

    2009-01-01

    The Carina Nebula is one of thc youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for approx.30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum. consistent with kT approx.130 eV blackbody radiation with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the near- and mid-infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a, approx. 10(exp 6)-year-old neutron star housed in the Carina Nebula. Current star formation theory does not suggest that the progenitor of the neutron star and massive stars in the Carina Nebula, in particular (eta)Car, are coeval. This result demonstrates that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two major episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star would be responsible for remnants of high energy activity seen in multiple wavelengths.

  4. Helix propensities of conformationally restricted amino acids. Non-natural substitutes for helix breaking proline and helix forming alanine.

    PubMed

    Alías, Miriam; Ayuso-Tejedor, Sara; Fernández-Recio, Juan; Cativiela, Carlos; Sancho, Javier

    2010-02-21

    Alpha helices are useful scaffolds to build biologically active peptides. The intrinsic stability of an alpha-helix is a key feature that can be successfully designed, and it is governed by the constituting amino acid residues. Their individual contributions to helix stability are given, according to Lifson-Roig theory, by their w parameters, which are known for all proteinogenic amino acids, but not for non-natural ones. On the other hand, non-natural, conformationally-restricted amino acids can be used to impart biochemical stability to peptides intended for in vivo administration. Efficient design of peptides based on these amino acids requires the previous determination of their w parameters. We begin here this task by determining the w parameters of two restricted analogs of alanine: (alpha-methyl)alanine and 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid. According to their w values (alpha-methyl)alanine is almost as good a helix forming residue as alanine, while 1-aminocyclopropanecarboxylic acid is, similarly to proline, a helix breaker. PMID:20135035

  5. Orion Nebula and Bow Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have found a bow shock around a very young star in the nearby Orion nebula, an intense star-forming region of gas and dust.

    A picture, from the Hubble Heritage team, is available at http://heritage.stsci.edu or http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/pr/2002/05 or http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/wfpc . It was taken in February 1995 as part of the Hubble Orion Nebula mosaic by Hubble's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, designed and built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.

    Named for the crescent-shaped wave a ship makes as it moves through water, a bow shock can form in space when two gas streams collide. In this case, the young star, LL Ori, emits a vigorous wind, a stream of charged particles moving rapidly outward from the star. Our own Sun has a less energetic version of this wind that is responsible for auroral displays on the Earth.

    The material spewed from LL Ori collides with slow-moving gas evaporating away from the center of the Orion nebula, located to the lower right of the image. The surface where the two winds collide is seen as the crescent-shaped bow shock.

    Unlike a water wave from a ship, this interstellar bow shock is three-dimensional. The filamentary emission has a distinct boundary on the side facing away from LL Ori, but is diffuse on the side closest to the star, a trait common to many bow shocks.

    A second, fainter bow shock can be seen around a star near the upper right-hand corner of the image. Astronomers have identified numerous shock fronts in this complex star-forming region and are using this data to understand the complex phenomena associated with star birth.

    The Orion nebula is a close neighbor in our Milky Way galaxy, at only 1,500 light-years from Earth. The filters used in this color composite represent oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen emissions.

  6. Astrophysics and the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph; Duley, Walter; Goebel, John; Greenberg, J. Mayo; Kerridge, John; Lin, Douglas; Mackinnon, Ian; Rietmeijer, Frans; Stephens, John; Tomasko, Martin; Nuth, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    The following types of experiments for a proposed Space Station Microgravity Particle Research Facility are described: (1) nucleation of refractory vapors at low pressure/high temperature; (2) coagulation of refractory grains; (3) optical properties of refractory grains; (4) mantle growth on refractory cores; (5) coagulation of core-mantle grains; (6) optical properties of core-mantle grains; (7) lightning strokes in the primitive solar nebula; and (8) separation of dust from a grain/gas mixture that interacts with a meter-sized planetesimal to determine if accretion occurs. The required capabilities and desired hardware for the facility are detailed.

  7. Deletion of the N- or C-Terminal Helix of Apolipophorin III To Create a Four-Helix Bundle Protein.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Pankaj; Rodriguez, Johana; Ibe, Nnejiuwa U; Weers, Paul M M

    2016-07-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) is an exchangeable apolipoprotein found in insects and plays an important function in lipid transport. The protein has an unusual five-helix bundle architecture, deviating from the common four-helix bundle motif. To understand the role of the additional helix in apoLp-III, the N-terminal or C-terminal helix was deleted to create a putative four-helix bundle protein. While the protein lacking helix-1 could be expressed in bacteria albeit at reduced yields, apoLp-III lacking helix-5 could not be produced. Mutational analysis by truncating helix-5 showed that a minimum segment of approximately one-third of the C-terminal helix is required for protein expression. The variant lacking helix-5 was produced by inserting a methionine residue between helix-4 and -5; subsequent cyanogenbromide cleavage generated the four-helix variant. Both N- and C-terminal helix deletion variants displayed significantly reduced helical content, protein stability, and tertiary structure. Despite the significantly altered structure, the variants were still fully functional. The rate of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine vesicle solubilization was enhanced 4-5-fold compared to the wild-type protein, and the deletion variants were effective in binding to lipolyzed low density lipoprotein thereby preventing lipoprotein aggregation. These results show that the additional helix of apoLp-III is not essential for lipid binding but is required for proper folding to keep the protein into a stable conformation. PMID:27280697

  8. Nonlinear analysis of helix traveling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Zaidman, E.G.; Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A nonlinear formulation of the interaction in a helix traveling wave tube (TWT) is presented. The formulation is intended to treat a wide class of helix TWTs including both emission-gated and multi-tone operation. The essential feature of each of these configurations is that multiple waves must be included in the formulation. As a result, a fully time-dependent analysis is required. The numerical procedure for this in a helix TWT is complicated by the fact that the radial profile of the field varies with frequency. This contrasts, for example, with the case of a smooth bore waveguide in which the radial profile for each TE{sub ln} or TM{sub ln} mode is invariant in frequency. Because of this, a complete self-consistent particle-in-cell (PIC) formulation must be three-dimensional. In order to circumvent the computational expense of a 3D PIC formulation, the authors adopt an approach in which the electromagnetic field is represented as a superposition of azimuthally symmetric modes in a vacuum sheath helix. The specific electron distributions are chosen to model either a continuous beam for the multi-tone TWT and a pulsed beam for the emission-gated TWT. Numerical results of the simulation for examples of interest to an emission-gated TWT experiment at NRL will be presented.

  9. Conformational Diffusion and Helix Formation Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Hummer, Gerhard; Garcia, Angel E.; Garde, Shekhar

    2000-09-18

    The time, temperature, and sequence dependences of helix formation kinetics of fully atomistic peptide models in explicit solvent are described quantitatively by a diffusive search within the coil state with barrierless transitions into the helical state. Conformational diffusion leads to nonexponential kinetics and jump-width dependences in temperature jump experiments. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  10. Effective harmonic approach to helix proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sung Nam Peter

    Recent laser-induced experiments have shown that on the time scale of long range tertiary contact formation, the kinetics of the helix-coil interconversion are very rapid (1). The notion that secondary structures form first before long range tertiary contacts are made, suggests that the helix-coil interconversion is one key in understanding the protein folding problem. We developed a method of generating an alpha-helix conformation of any residue using AMBER 4.0, the Protein Data Bank (PDB), and a series of pattern matching translation and rotation operations. We have chosen to study Alanine for its highly non polar nature, and Glutamine for its highly polar characteristic. Using the information obtained from the above method, analysis of vibrational lattice dynamics are carried out on polymers Poly-alpha-L alanine (PLA) and Poly-alpha-L glutamic acid (PLGA). The lattice dynamics method called Modified Self- consistent Harmonic Approach theory (MSHA) was used in carrying out the analysis of the PLA and PLGA helix-coil transition. MSHA was originally developed for the DNA molecule by Prohofsky et al. In this model, the molecule is considered as a one dimensional, repeating unit cell of an infinite helix. The lattice was modeled with harmonic force constants. Anharmonicity of hydrogen bond force constants at different temperatures are introduced along with the effects of water on the polar PLGA and the non polar PLA. Using MSHA, we calculated the opening bond probabilities of PLGA at different temperatures. The experimentally observed helix to coil relaxation time τ* of PLGA was inversely compared to our results with a correlation coefficient of 0.8424 (5, 13, 58). These experiments were done at temperatures ranging from 295 K to 310 K. Our calculation also yielded critical melting temperatures of Tc=317 K for PLGA and Tc=347 K for PLA. The calculated acoustic compressional velocities were 4.78 km/s and 4.84 km/s for PLA and PLGA respectively. Our calculation

  11. Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions studied by multicanonical algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Yuko; Hansmann, U.H.E.

    1995-07-13

    Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions in amino acid homo-oligomers are studied by the recently proposed multicanonical algorithms. Homo-oligomers of length 10 are considered for three characteristic amino acids, alanine (helix former), valine (helix indifferent), and glycine (helix breaker). For alanine other lengths (15 and 20) are also considered in order to examine the length dependence. From one multicanonical production run with completely random initial conformations, we have obtained the lowest-energy conformations and various thermodynamic quantities (average helicity, Zimm-Bragg s and {sigma} parameters, free energy differences between helix and coil states, etc.) as functions of temperature. The results confirm the fact that alanine is helix-forming, valine is helix-indifferent, and glycine is helix-breaking. 36 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Reconstruction and visualization of planetary nebulae.

    PubMed

    Magnor, Marcus; Kindlmann, Gordon; Hansen, Charles; Duric, Neb

    2005-01-01

    From our terrestrially confined viewpoint, the actual three-dimensional shape of distant astronomical objects is, in general, very challenging to determine. For one class of astronomical objects, however, spatial structure can be recovered from conventional 2D images alone. So-called planetary nebulae (PNe) exhibit pronounced symmetry characteristics that come about due to fundamental physical processes. Making use of this symmetry constraint, we present a technique to automatically recover the axisymmetric structure of many planetary nebulae from photographs. With GPU-based volume rendering driving a nonlinear optimization, we estimate the nebula's local emission density as a function of its radial and axial coordinates and we recover the orientation of the nebula relative to Earth. The optimization refines the nebula model and its orientation by minimizing the differences between the rendered image and the original astronomical image. The resulting model allows creating realistic 3D visualizations of these nebulae, for example, for planetarium shows and other educational purposes. In addition, the recovered spatial distribution of the emissive gas can help astrophysicists gain deeper insight into the formation processes of planetary nebulae. PMID:16144246

  13. PULSAR WIND NEBULAE WITH THICK TOROIDAL STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P. E-mail: reynolds@ncsu.edu

    2011-10-10

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroidal structure are G106.6+2.9 and G76.9+1.0. Their structure contrasts with young pulsar nebulae like the Crab Nebula and 3C 38, which show a more chaotic, filamentary structure in the synchrotron emission. In both situations, a torus-jet structure is present where the pulsar wind passes through a termination shock, indicating the flow is initially toroidal. We suggest that the difference is due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability that operates when the outer boundary of the nebula is accelerating into freely expanding supernova ejecta. The instability gives rise to mixing in the Crab and related objects, but is not present in the nebulae with thick toroidal regions.

  14. HUBBLE CAPTURES DYNAMICS OF CRAB NEBULA (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sequence of Hubble Space Telescope images of the remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion is giving astronomers a remarkable look at the dynamic relationship between the tiny Crab Pulsar and the vast nebula that it powers. This colorful photo shows a ground-based image of the entire Crab Nebula, the remnant of a supernova explosion witnessed over 900 years ago. The nebula, which is 10 light-years across, is located 7,000 light-years away in the constellation Taurus. The green, yellow and red filaments concentrated toward the edges of the nebula are remnants of the star that were ejected into space by the explosion. At the center of the Crab Nebula lies the Crab Pulsar -- the collapsed core of the exploded star. The Crab Pulsar is a rapidly rotating neutron star -- an object only about six miles across, but containing more mass than our Sun. As it rotates at a rate of 30 times per second the Crab Pulsar's powerful magnetic field sweeps around, accelerating particles, and whipping them out into the nebula at speeds close to that of light. The blue glow in the inner part of the nebula -- light emitted by energetic electrons as they spiral through the Crab's magnetic field -- is powered by the Crab Pulsar. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  15. THE ROTTEN EGG NEBULA A PLANETARY NEBULA IN THE MAKING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The object shown in these NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images is a remarkable example of a star going through death throes just as it dramatically transforms itself from a normal red giant star into a planetary nebula. This process happens so quickly that such objects are quite rare, even though astronomers believe that most stars like the Sun will eventually go through such a phase. This star, with the prosaic name of OH231.8+4.2, is seen in these infrared pictures blowing out gas and dust in two opposite directions. So much dust has been cast off and now surrounds the star that it cannot be seen directly, only its starlight that is reflected off the dust. The flow of gas is very fast, with a velocity up to 450,000 mph (700,000 km/h). With extreme clarity, these Hubble Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) images reveal that the fast-moving gas and dust are being collimated into several thin streamers (on the right) and a jet-like structure (on the left), which can be seen extending away from the centers of both pictures. On the right, wisps of material in jet-like streamers appear to strike some dense blobs of gas. This interaction must produce strong shock waves in the gas. The pictures represent two views of the object. The color image is a composite of four images taken with different NICMOS infrared filters on March 28, 1998. It shows that the physical properties of the material, both composition and temperature, vary significantly throughout the outflowing material. The black-and-white image was taken with one NICMOS infrared filter. That image is able to show more clearly the faint detail and structure in the nebula than can be achieved with the color composites. Observations by radio astronomers have found many unusual molecules in the gas around this star, including many containing sulfur, such as hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide. These sulfur compounds are believed to be produced in the shock waves passing through the gas

  16. Processing NASA Earth Science Data on Nebula Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Aijun; Pham, Long; Kempler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Three applications were successfully migrated to Nebula, including S4PM, AIRS L1/L2 algorithms, and Giovanni MAPSS. Nebula has some advantages compared with local machines (e.g. performance, cost, scalability, bundling, etc.). Nebula still faces some challenges (e.g. stability, object storage, networking, etc.). Migrating applications to Nebula is feasible but time consuming. Lessons learned from our Nebula experience will benefit future Cloud Computing efforts at GES DISC.

  17. Search for continuous fluorescence in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.; Witt, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    Photometric and spectrophotometric observations have been made of the reflection nebulae NGC 1435, NGC 2068, NGC 7023, and IC 1287 in an attempt to detect continuous fluorescence by dust grains. Several effects of importance for observations of such faint objects are discussed, including instrumental light scattering, a photographic effect, and a time-delay effect which can occur if the illuminating star is a spectrum variable. It is found that continuous fluorescence by interstellar grains is not likely to exist and that it cannot account for more than 10% of the total surface brightness of these reflection nebulae. No evidence of diffuse interstellar features is found in the spectra of these nebulae.

  18. Planetary nebulae and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.

    1983-01-01

    Newly defined characteristics of planetary nebulae (PN) derived from analysis of a photometric survey of 57 PN are reported. The data were combined with measurements of 27 other PN made since 1918 and were found to indicate core masses ranging from 0.55-1.0 solar mass. N/O elemental abundance ratios observed were correlated with the planetary nuclei masses, and were in direct proportion. IUE data on PN that overlapped a large part of the survey indicated that the PN in the galactic disk are more massive than PN in the halo. It is suggested that PN evolve into white dwarfs, a hypothesis supported by astrometric solutions for three nearby visual binaries featuring white dwarfs with well-determined masses. It is noted, however, that PN with masses exceeding one solar mass have been sighted in the Magellanic Clouds.

  19. Abundance patterns in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Richard B. C.

    1990-06-01

    Abundances of He, N, O, and Ne have been uniformly calculated for 192 planetary nebulas residing in the Galactic disk and halo, the LMC, the SMC, and M31. Direct correlations appear to exist for type I as well as non-type I objects for the following pairs of parameters: N/O-He/H, N/O-N/H, and Ne/H-O/H. Separately, type I planetaries show a weak anticorrelation between N/O and O/H, while non-type I's exhibit direct correlations between N/H and O/H and between N/O and O/H. From these patterns, it is inferred that non-type I's synthesize N via the CN cycle. Type I planetaries, on the other hand, manufacture N at least partially via the ON cycle, destroying O in the process. Neither type appears to synthesize O or Ne.

  20. VLT Images the Horsehead Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Summary A new, high-resolution colour image of one of the most photographed celestial objects, the famous "Horsehead Nebula" (IC 434) in Orion, has been produced from data stored in the VLT Science Archive. The original CCD frames were obtained in February 2000 with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope on Paranal (Chile). The comparatively large field-of-view of the FORS2 camera is optimally suited to show this extended object and its immediate surroundings in impressive detail. PR Photo 02a/02 : View of the full field around the Horsehead Nebula. PR Photo 02b/02 : Enlargement of a smaller area around the Horse's "mouth" A spectacular object ESO PR Photo 02a/02 ESO PR Photo 02a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 485 pix - 63k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 970 pix - 896k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1951 x 2366 pix - 4.7M] ESO PR Photo 02b/02 ESO PR Photo 02b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 501 pix - 91k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1002 pix - 888k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1139 x 1427 pix - 1.9M] Caption : PR Photo 02a/02 is a reproduction of a composite colour image of the Horsehead Nebula and its immediate surroundings. It is based on three exposures in the visual part of the spectrum with the FORS2 multi-mode instrument at the 8.2-m KUEYEN telescope at Paranal. PR Photo 02b/02 is an enlargement of a smaller area. Technical information about these photos is available below. PR Photo 02a/02 shows the famous "Horsehead Nebula" , which is situated in the Orion molecular cloud complex. Its official name is Barnard 33 and it is a dust protrusion in the southern region of the dense dust cloud Lynds 1630 , on the edge of the HII region IC 434 . The distance to the region is about 1400 light-years (430 pc). This beautiful colour image was produced from three images obtained with the multi-mode FORS2 instrument at the second VLT Unit Telescope ( KUEYEN ), some months after it had "First Light", cf. PR 17/99. The image files were extracted from the VLT Science Archive Facility and the

  1. 3-D Flyover Visualization of Veil Nebula

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 3-D visualization flies across a small portion of the Veil Nebula as photographed by the Hubble Space Telescope. This region is a small part of a huge expanding remnant from a star that explod...

  2. MHD Solutions for Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, G.; López, J. A.; Franco, J.

    2004-07-01

    This paper provides solutions for the origin of post-AGB winds, their acceleration up to high speed, and the subsequent formation of extremely collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of kms up to 103 kms are calculated, which produce proto-planetary nebulae with linear momentum in the range 1036-1040 gcms and with kinetic energies in the range 1042-1047 erg. These results match available observations of proto-planetary nebulae. In the present simplistic scheme, the driver of the wind is just the magnetic pressure at the stellar surface. Other forces are not taken into account in this study, except gravity. We conclude that mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars and transition times from late AGB up to planetary nebula central stars could be directly linked with the production of magnetic field at the stellar core.

  3. The Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D.; Gotthelf, E.; Halpern, J.

    2000-10-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations of the pulsar separated by one month to search for morphological changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a morphology remarkably similar to the torus-like structure observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. The flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75 %; the 3 sigma limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer torus; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propogation velocity is ~0.5c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright, arc-shaped X-ray wisps are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind which is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula which comprises the post-shock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter of the Vela pulsar wind is required to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B ~ 4 x 10-4G.

  4. Chemical composition of gaseous nebula NGC 6302.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J

    1978-01-01

    The irregular emission nebula NGC 6302 exhibits a rich spectrum of lines ranging in excitation from [NI] to [FeVII]. An assessment of available spectroscopic data, covering a large intensity range, indicates excess of helium and nitrogen as compared with average planetary nebulae, but deficiencies in iron and calcium. These metals are presumably tied up in solid grains, as suggested by Shields for iron in NGC 7027. PMID:16592476

  5. Several evolutionary channels for bright planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richer, Michael G.; McCall, Marshall L.

    2016-08-01

    The populations of bright planetary nebulae in the discs of spirals appear to differ in their spectral properties from those in ellipticals and the bulges of spirals. The bright planetary nebulae from the bulge of the Milky Way are entirely compatible with those observed in the discs of spiral galaxies. The similarity might be explained if the bulge of the Milky Way evolved secularly from the disc, in which case the bulge should be regarded as a pseudo-bulge.

  6. Properties of young clusters near reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1983-01-01

    Near infrared observations in the reflection nebulae NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068 are used to study clusters of young stars found associated with these nebulae. At least 30% to 60% of these stars are pre-main sequence objects, as indicated by their infrared excesses, hydrogen line emission, or irregular variability. The spatial distributions and observed luminosity functions of these young open clusters are derived, and the inferred mass function and star formation efficiencies are discussed.

  7. The double helix and the 'wronged heroine'.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Brenda

    2003-01-23

    In 1962, James Watson, Francis Crick and Maurice Wilkins received the Nobel prize for the discovery of the structure of DNA. Notably absent from the podium was Rosalind Franklin, whose X-ray photographs of DNA contributed directly to the discovery of the double helix. Franklin's premature death, combined with misogynist treatment by the male scientific establishment, cast her as a feminist icon. This myth overshadowed her intellectual strength and independence both as a scientist and as an individual. PMID:12540909

  8. Large scale processes in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    Most proposed chondrule formation mechanisms involve processes occurring inside the solar nebula, so the large scale (roughly 1 to 10 AU) structure of the nebula is of general interest for any chrondrule-forming mechanism. Chondrules and Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) might also have been formed as a direct result of the large scale structure of the nebula, such as passage of material through high temperature regions. While recent nebula models do predict the existence of relatively hot regions, the maximum temperatures in the inner planet region may not be high enough to account for chondrule or CAI thermal processing, unless the disk mass is considerably greater than the minimum mass necessary to restore the planets to solar composition. Furthermore, it does not seem to be possible to achieve both rapid heating and rapid cooling of grain assemblages in such a large scale furnace. However, if the accretion flow onto the nebula surface is clumpy, as suggested by observations of variability in young stars, then clump-disk impacts might be energetic enough to launch shock waves which could propagate through the nebula to the midplane, thermally processing any grain aggregates they encounter, and leaving behind a trail of chondrules.

  9. Double Engine for a Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-08-01

    ESO has just released a stunning new image of a field of stars towards the constellation of Carina (the Keel). This striking view is ablaze with a flurry of stars of all colours and brightnesses, some of which are seen against a backdrop of clouds of dust and gas. One unusual star in the middle, HD 87643, has been extensively studied with several ESO telescopes, including the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). Surrounded by a complex, extended nebula that is the result of previous violent ejections, the star has been shown to have a companion. Interactions in this double system, surrounded by a dusty disc, may be the engine fuelling the star's remarkable nebula. The new image, showing a very rich field of stars towards the Carina arm of the Milky Way, is centred on the star HD 87643, a member of the exotic class of B[e] stars [1]. It is part of a set of observations that provide astronomers with the best ever picture of a B[e] star. The image was obtained with the Wide Field Imager (WFI) attached to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the 2400-metre-high La Silla Observatory in Chile. The image shows beautifully the extended nebula of gas and dust that reflects the light from the star. The central star's wind appears to have shaped the nebula, leaving bright, ragged tendrils of gas and dust. A careful investigation of these features seems to indicate that there are regular ejections of matter from the star every 15 to 50 years. A team of astronomers, led by Florentin Millour, has studied the star HD 87643 in great detail, using several of ESO's telescopes. Apart from the WFI, the team also used ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal. At the VLT, the astronomers used the NACO adaptive optics instrument, allowing them to obtain an image of the star free from the blurring effect of the atmosphere. To probe the object further, the team then obtained an image with the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). The sheer range of this set of observations

  10. Vela Pulsar and Its Synchrotron Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfand, D. J.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Halpern, J. P.

    2001-07-01

    We present high-resolution Chandra X-ray observations of PSR B0833-45, the 89 ms pulsar associated with the Vela supernova remnant. We have acquired two observations separated by 1 month to search for changes in the pulsar and its environment following an extreme glitch in its rotation frequency. We find a well-resolved nebula with a toroidal morphology remarkably similar to that observed in the Crab Nebula, along with an axial Crab-like jet. Between the two observations, taken ~3×105 s and ~3×106 s after the glitch, the flux from the pulsar is found to be steady to within 0.75% the 3 σ limit on the fractional increase in the pulsar's X-ray flux is <~10-5 of the inferred glitch energy. We use this limit to constrain parameters of glitch models and neutron star structure. We do find a significant increase in the flux of the nebula's outer arc; if associated with the glitch, the inferred propagation velocity is >~0.7c, similar to that seen in the brightening of the Crab Nebula wisps. We propose an explanation for the X-ray structure of the Vela synchrotron nebula based on a model originally developed for the Crab Nebula. In this model, the bright X-ray arcs are the shocked termination of a relativistic equatorial pulsar wind that is contained within the surrounding kidney-bean shaped synchrotron nebula comprising the postshock, but still relativistic, flow. In a departure from the Crab model, the magnetization parameter σ of the Vela pulsar wind is allowed to be of order unity; this is consistent with the simplest MHD transport of magnetic field from the pulsar to the nebula, where B<=4×10-4 G. The inclination angle of the axis of the equatorial torus with respect to the line of sight is identical to that of the rotation axis of the pulsar as previously measured from the polarization of the radio pulse. The projection of the rotation axis on the sky may also be close to the direction of proper motion of the pulsar if previous radio measurements were confused by

  11. Lanthanide-binding helix-turn-helix peptides: Solution structure of a designed metallonuclease

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Joel T.; Kearney, William R.; Franklin, Sonya J.

    2003-01-01

    A designed lanthanide-binding chimeric peptide based on the strikingly similar geometries of the EF-hand and helix-turn-helix (HTH) motifs was investigated by NMR and CD spectroscopy and found to retain the same overall solution structure of the parental motifs. CD spectroscopy showed that the 33-mer peptide P3W folds on binding lanthanides, with an increase in α-helicity from 20% in the absence of metal to 38% and 35% in the presence of excess Eu(III) and La(III) ions, respectively. The conditional binding affinities of P3W for La(III) (5.9 ± 0.3 μM) and for Eu(III) (6.2 ± 0.3 μM) (pH 7.8, 5 mM Tris) were determined by tryptophan fluorescence titration. The La(III) complex of peptide P3, which differs from P3W by only one Trp-to-His substitution, has much less signal dispersion in the proton NMR spectra than LaP3W, indicating that the Trp residue is a critical hydrophobic anchor for maintaining a well-folded helix-turn-helix structure. A chemical-shift index analysis indicates the metallopeptide has a helix-loop-helix secondary structure. A structure calculated by using nuclear Overhauser effect and other NMR constraints reveals that P3W not only has a tightly folded metal-binding loop but also retains the α−α corner supersecondary structure of the parental motifs. Although the solution structure is undefined at both the N and C termini, the NMR structure confirms the successful incorporation of a metal-binding loop into a HTH sequence. PMID:12644701

  12. Zinc abundances of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C. L.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    2014-07-01

    Zinc is a useful surrogate element for measuring Fe/H as, unlike iron, it is not depleted in the gas phase media. Zn/H and O/Zn ratios have been derived using the [Zn IV] emission line at 3.625 μm for a sample of nine Galactic planetary nebulae, seven of which are based upon new observations using the Very Large Telescope (VLT). Based on photoionization models, O/O++ is the most reliable ionization correction factor for zinc that can readily be determined from optical emission lines, with an estimated accuracy of 10 per cent or better for all targets in our sample. The majority of the sample is found to be subsolar in [Zn/H]. [O/Zn] in half of the sample is found to be consistent with solar within uncertainties, whereas the remaining half are enhanced in [O/Zn]. [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] as functions of Galactocentric distance have been investigated and there is little evidence to support a trend in either case.

  13. GALEX Observations of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panda, Swayamtrupta

    2016-05-01

    The first ultraviolet (UV) photometric observations of planetary nebulae (PNe) are presented using observations made by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX). We have found 108 PNe detected by GALEX and resolved their angular diameters in near-UV (NUV) and also in far-UV (FUV) for 28 PNe considering a 3σ emission level beyond the background. Of the PNe, 57 are elliptical, 41 are circular and the rest 10 are bipolar in NUV. The emission lines that contribute to the NUV intrinsic flux are C III] and He II. The measured intrinsic luminosities considering the sole contribution from the central stars have been found to lie in the range of 10^37-10^51 erg/s. The comparative study of the angular sizes against effective wavelengths in 5 distinct regimes has shown that the listed PNe are bright in NUV which opens up the discussion related to the extent of hotness, the very high temperatures of the CSPNe and the exact nature of it. The intensity contour plots of the PNe have also provided us with over 10 well-defined candidates having bipolar morphological signatures, the origin and evolution of whose can be traced back to the dynamics of stellar winds in the post-AGB stage.

  14. High power, high frequency helix TWT's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloley, H. J.; Willard, J.; Paatz, S. R.; Keat, M. J.

    The design and performance characteristics of a 34-GHz pulse tube capable of 75 W peak power output at 30 percent duty cycle and a broadband CW tube are presented. Particular attention is given to the engineering problems encountered during the development of the tubes, including the suppression of backward wave oscillation, the design of electron guns for small-diameter high-current beams, and the thermal capability of small helix structures. The discussion also covers the effects of various design parameters and choice of engineering materials on the ultimate practical limit of power and gain at the operating frequencies. Measurements are presented for advanced experimental tubes.

  15. Properties of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, Kristin

    1988-01-01

    Observations of interstellar dust in reflection nebulae are the closest analog in the interstellar medium to studies of cometary dust in our solar system. The presence of a bright star near the reflection nebula dust provides the opportunity to study both the reflection and emission characteristics of interstellar dust. At 0.1 to 1 micrometer, the reflection nebula emission is due to starlight scattered by dust. The albedo and scattering phase function of the dust is determined from observations of the scattered light. At 50 to 200 micrometers, thermal emission from the dust in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field is observed. The derived dust temperature determines the relative values of the absorption coefficient of the dust at wavelengths where the stellar energy is absorbed and at far infrared wavelengths where the absorbed energy is reradiated. These emission mechanisms directly relate to those seen in the near and mid infrared spectra of comets. In a reflection nebula the dust is observed at much larger distances from the star than in our solar system, so that the equilibrium dust temperature is 50 K rather than 300 K. Thus, in reflection nebulae, thermal emission from dust is emitted at 50 to 200 micrometer.

  16. Turbulent transport in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the current state of an ongoing project to simulate turbulent flow in a solar nebula, which is the flattened disk of dust and gas out of which a solar system forms. The goal of this project is to determine a model for the transport of mass and angular momentum in the nebula. The nebula flow exhibits compressibility, thermal conduction, viscosity, internal heating through viscous dissipation, a stable shear due to Keplerian rotation, and a gravitational acceleration in the vertical direction which is linear with altitude. These properties combine to give flow patterns not seen in terrestrial applications. Primordial solar systems are known to exist and are presumably undergoing an evolution similar to the early stages of our own solar system; for example, the IRAS infrared telescope has discovered such a protoplanetary system around the star Vega. Solar nebula evolution is the subject of much research in the astrophysical community. In the long run, researchers hope to gain a better understanding of planetary formation and the processes which dissipate the solar nebula with time.

  17. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, M. F.; Ezoe, Y.; Townsley, L.; Broos, P.; Gruendl, R.; Vaidya, K.; White, S. M.; Strohmayer, T.; Petre, R.; Chu, Y.-H.

    2009-09-01

    Massive stars are born from giant molecular clouds along with many lower mass stars, forming a stellar cluster or association. They dominate the pressure of the interstellar gas through their strong UV radiation, stellar winds and, ultimately, supernova explosions at the end of their life. These processes help the formation of the next generation of stars, but this trigger of star formation is not yet well understood. The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ˜30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with a kT ˜128 eV blackbody with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the optical and infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a 106 year-old neutron star. Current star formation theory does not allow the progenitor of the neutron star and the other massive stars in the Carina Nebula (in particular Eta Carinae) to be coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for part or all of the diffuse X-ray emission which permeates the Nebula.

  18. A Smoking Gun in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Townsley, Leisa; Broos, Patrick; Gruendl, Robert A.; Vaidya, Kaushar; White, Stephen M.; Strohmayer, Tod; Petre, Rob; Chu, You-Hua

    2010-07-01

    Massive stars are born from giant molecular clouds along with many lower mass stars, forming a stellar cluster or association. They dominate the pressure of the interstellar gas through their strong UV radiation, stellar winds and, ultimately, supernova explosions at the end of their life. These processes help the formation of the next generation of stars, but this trigger of star formation is not yet well understood. The Carina Nebula is one of the youngest, most active sites of massive star formation in our Galaxy. In this nebula, we have discovered a bright X-ray source that has persisted for ~30 years. The soft X-ray spectrum, consistent with a kT~128 eV lackbody with mild extinction, and no counterpart in the optical and infrared wavelengths indicate that it is a 106 year-old neutron star. Current star formation theory does not allow the progenitor of the neutron star and the other massive stars in the Carina Nebula (in particular η Carinae) to be coeval. This result suggests that the Carina Nebula experienced at least two episodes of massive star formation. The neutron star may be responsible for part or all of the diffuse X-ray emission which permeates the Nebula.

  19. Hydroxyl Emission in the Westbrook Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strack, Angelica; Araya, Esteban; Ghosh, Tapasi; Arce, Hector G.; Lebron, Mayra E.; Salter, Christopher J.; Minchin, Robert F.; Pihlstrom, Ylva; Kurtz, Stan; Hofner, Peter; Olmi, Luca

    2016-06-01

    CRL 618, also known as the Westbrook Nebula, is a carbon-rich pre-planetary nebula. Hydroxyl (OH) transitions are typically not detected in carbon-rich late-type stellar objects, however observations conducted with the 305m Arecibo Telescope in 2008 resulted in the detection of 4765 MHz OH emission in CRL 618. We present results of observations carried out a few months after the original detection that confirm the line. This is the first detection of 4765 MHz OH emission (most likely a maser) in a pre-planetary nebula. Follow up observations conducted in 2015 resulted in non-detection of the 4765 MHz OH transition. This behavior is consistent with the high level of variability of excited OH lines that have been detected toward a handful of other pre-planetary nebulae. Our work supports that excited OH masers are short-lived during the pre-planetary nebula phase. We also conducted a search for other OH transitions from 1612 MHz to 8611 MHz with the Arecibo Telescope; we report no other detections at rms levels of ~5 mJy.This work has made use of the computational facilities donated by Frank Rodeffer to the WIU Astrophysics Research Laboratory. We also acknowledge support from M. & C. Wong RISE scholarships and a grant from the WIU College of Arts and Sciences.

  20. A Classification of Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Karen A.; Hudson, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of soybean allows an unprecedented opportunity for the discovery of the genes controlling important traits. In particular, the potential functions of regulatory genes are a priority for analysis. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family of transcription factors is known to be involved in controlling a wide range of systems critical for crop adaptation and quality, including photosynthesis, light signalling, pigment biosynthesis, and seed pod development. Using a hidden Markov model search algorithm, 319 genes with basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor domains were identified within the soybean genome sequence. These were classified with respect to their predicted DNA binding potential, intron/exon structure, and the phylogeny of the bHLH domain. Evidence is presented that the vast majority (281) of these 319 soybean bHLH genes are expressed at the mRNA level. Of these soybean bHLH genes, 67% were found to exist in two or more homeologous copies. This dataset provides a framework for future studies on bHLH gene function in soybean. The challenge for future research remains to define functions for the bHLH factors encoded in the soybean genome, which may allow greater flexibility for genetic selection of growth and environmental adaptation in this widely grown crop. PMID:25763382

  1. Helix Nucleation by the Smallest Known α-Helix in Water.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Huy N; Driver, Russell W; Beyer, Renée L; Hill, Timothy A; D de Araujo, Aline; Plisson, Fabien; Harrison, Rosemary S; Goedecke, Lena; Shepherd, Nicholas E; Fairlie, David P

    2016-07-11

    Cyclic pentapeptides (e.g. Ac-(cyclo-1,5)-[KAXAD]-NH2 ; X=Ala, 1; Arg, 2) in water adopt one α-helical turn defined by three hydrogen bonds. NMR structure analysis reveals a slight distortion from α-helicity at the C-terminal aspartate caused by torsional restraints imposed by the K(i)-D(i+4) lactam bridge. To investigate this effect on helix nucleation, the more water-soluble 2 was appended to N-, C-, or both termini of a palindromic peptide ARAARAARA (≤5 % helicity), resulting in 67, 92, or 100 % relative α-helicity, as calculated from CD spectra. From the C-terminus of peptides, 2 can nucleate at least six α-helical turns. From the N-terminus, imperfect alignment of the Asp5 backbone amide in 2 reduces helix nucleation, but is corrected by a second unit of 2 separated by 0-9 residues from the first. These cyclic peptides are extremely versatile helix nucleators that can be placed anywhere in 5-25 residue peptides, which correspond to most helix lengths in protein-protein interactions. PMID:27226426

  2. The Stingray nebula: watching the rapid evolution of a newly born planetary nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrowsky, M.; Sahu, K. C.; Parthasarathy, M.; García-Lario, Pedro

    The formation and early evolution of planetary nebulae represent one of the most poorly understood phases of stellar evolution ( Kwok, 1987; Maddox, 1995). One of the youngest, the Stingray Nebula (He3-1357) ( Henize, 1967; Henize, 1976), shows all the tell-tale signs of a newly born planetary nebula: it has become ionized only within the past few decades ( Parthasarathy et al., 1993); the mass-loss from the central star has ceased within the past few years; and the central star is becoming hotter and fainter as expected from a star on its way to becoming a DA white dwarf ( Parthasarathy et al., 1995). The Stingray Nebula thus provides the ideal laboratory for examining the early structure and evolution of this class of objects. Images of the Stingray Nebula, obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope, show for the first time that its multiple expulsions of matter are focused by an equatorial ring and bubbles of gas located on opposite sides of the ring ( Bobrowsky et al., 1995). The position angle of the outflows has changed, possibly as a result of precessional motion induced by the presence of a companion star. This is consistent with the precessing jet model by Livio & Pringle (1996). Indeed, we have reported the discovery of a companion star in the Stingray Nebula ( Bobrowsky et al., 1998). Finally, we present evidence of the companion star dynamically distorting the gas in this newly-born planetary nebula.

  3. [Quaternion-based Characterization of Protein α Helix].

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonghong; Chu, Zefei

    2016-02-01

    This paper proposes a method based on quaternion for characterization a helix of proteins. The method defines the parameter called Quaternion Helix Axis Spherical Distance (QHASD) on the basis of mapping protein Cα frames' helical axis onto a unit sphere, and uses QHASD to characterize the a helix of the protein secondary structure. Application of this method has been verified based on the PDBselect database, with an a helix characterization accuracy of 91.7%. This method possesses significant advantages of high detection accuracy, low computation and clear geometric significance. PMID:27382757

  4. Monitoring the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reipurth, Bo

    The VYSOS (Variable Young Stars Optical Survey) project has at its disposal five small telescopes: a 5-inch and a 20-inch robotic optical imaging telescope in Hawaii funded by the NSF, and a 6-inch robotic optical imaging telescope, a 32-inch robotic infrared imaging telescope, and a 60-inch optical spectroscopic telescope in Chile, funded and operated from Germany. Through an agreement between the leaders of the two sites (B. Reipurth and R. Chini), it has been decided to devote a significant fraction of time on these facilities to a large Key Project, conducting a massive monitoring survey of the Orion Nebula Cluster. The vast data streams are being reduced through automated customized pipelines. The applicant seeks funding to employ a postdoc and an undergraduate assistant to work at the University of Hawaii and collaborate on the analysis of the data. Virtually all young stars are variable, with a wide range of amplitudes and characteristic timescales. This is mainly due to accretion shocks as material from circumstellar disks fall onto the stars along magnetic funnel flows, but also giant star spots, magnetic flares, occultations by orbiting dust condensations, and eclipses by companions can modulate the light from the nascent star. It is increasingly recognized that the rather static view of pre-main sequence evolution that has prevailed for many years is misleading, and that time-dependent phenomena may hold the key to an understanding of the way young stars grow and their circumstellar environments evolve. The VYSOS project is designed to bring sophisticated modern techniques to bear on the long neglected problem of variability in young solar type stars. To interpret the observations they will be compared to sophisticated MHD models of circumstellar disks around young stars. The Orion Nebula Cluster is the nearest rich region of star formation, and numerous, albeit heterogeneous, studies exist of the cluster members. The present study will provide the first

  5. Condensation Front Migration in a Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford S.

    2004-01-01

    Condensation front dynamics are investigated in the mid-solar nebula region. A quasi-steady model of the evolving nebula is combined with equilibrium vapor pressure curves to determine evolutionary condensation fronts for selected species. These fronts are found to migrate inwards from the far-nebula to final positions during a period of 10(exp 7) years. The physical process governing this movement is a combination of local viscous heating and luminescent heating from the central star. Two luminescent heating models are used and their effects on the ultimate radial position of the condensation front are discussed. At first the fronts move much faster than the nebular accretion velocity, but after a time the accreting gas and dust overtakes the slowing condensation front.

  6. Monitoring the Crab Nebula with LOFT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008-2010, the Crab Nebula was found to decline by 7% in the 15-50 keV band, consistently in Fermi GBM, INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEMX, RXTE PCA, and Swift BAT. From 2001-2010, the 15-50 keV flux from the Crab Nebula typically varied by about 3.5% per year. Analysis of RXTE PCA data suggests possible spectral variations correlated with the flux variations. I will present estimates of the LOFT sensitivity to these variations. Prior to 2001 and since 2010, the observed flux variations have been much smaller. Monitoring the Crab with the LOFT WFM and LAD will provide precise measurements of flux variations in the Crab Nebula if it undergoes a similarly active episode.

  7. Most Detailed Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This new Hubble image -- one among the largest ever produced with the Earth-orbiting observatory -- shows the most detailed view so far of the entire Crab Nebula ever made. The Crab is arguably the single most interesting object, as well as one of the most studied, in all of astronomy. The image is the largest image ever taken with Hubble's WFPC2 workhorse camera.

    The Crab Nebula is one of the most intricately structured and highly dynamical objects ever observed. The new Hubble image of the Crab was assembled from 24 individual exposures taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and is the highest resolution image of the entire Crab Nebula ever made.

  8. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In this sturning image provided by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the Omega Nebula (M17) resembles the fury of a raging sea, showing a bubbly ocean of glowing hydrogen gas and small amounts of other elements such as oxygen and sulfur. The nebula, also known as the Swan Nebula, is a hotbed of newly born stars residing 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The wavelike patterns of gas have been sculpted and illuminated by a torrent of ultraviolet radiation from the young massive stars, which lie outside the picture to the upper left. The ultraviolet radiation is carving and heating the surfaces of cold hydrogen gas clouds. The warmed surfaces glow orange and red in this photograph. The green represents an even hotter gas that masks background structures. Various gases represented with color are: sulfur, represented in red; hydrogen, green; and oxygen blue.

  9. HELIX: The High Energy Light Isotope Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarle, Gregory

    This is the lead proposal for a new suborbital program, HELIX (High-Energy Light Isotope eXperiment), designed to make measurements of the isotopic composition of light cosmic-ray nuclei from ~200 MeV/nuc to ~10 GeV/nuc. Past measurements of this kind have provided profound insights into the nature and origin of cosmic rays, revealing, for instance, information on acceleration and confinement time scales, and exposing some conspicuous discrepancies between solar and cosmic-ray abundances. The most detailed information currently available comes from the ACE/CRIS mission, but is restricted to energies below a few 100 MeV/nuc. HELIX aims at extending this energy range by over an order of magnitude, where, in most cases, no measurements of any kind exist, and where relativistic time dilation affects the apparent lifetime of radioactive clock nuclei. The HELIX measurements will provide essential information for understanding the propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy. This is crucial for properly interpreting several intriguing anomalies reported in recent cosmic-ray measurements, pertaining to the energy spectra of protons, helium, and heavier nuclei, and to the anomalous rise in the positron fraction at higher energy. HELIX employs a high-precision magnet spectrometer to provide measurements which are not achievable by any current or planned instrument. The superconducting magnet originally used for the HEAT payload in five successful high-altitude flights will be combined with state-of-the-art detectors to measure the charge, time-of-flight, magnetic rigidity, and velocity of cosmic-ray particles with high precision. The instrumentation includes plastic scintillators, silicon-strip detectors repurposed from Fermilab's CDF detector, a high-performance gas drift chamber, and a ring-imaging Cherenkov counter employing aerogel radiators and silicon photomultipliers. To reduce cost and technical risk, the HELIX program will be structured in two stages. The first

  10. Compact reflection nebulae, a transit phase of evolution from post-AGB to planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, J. Y.; Slijkhuis, S.

    1989-01-01

    In a search of the optical counter-part of candidates of protoplanetary nebulae on the plates of UK Schmidt, ESO Schmidt, and POSS, five compact reflection nebulae associated with post-AGB stars were found. A simplified model (dust shell is spherical symmetric, expansion velocity of dust shell is constant, Q(sub sca)(lambda) is isotropic, and the dust grain properties are uniform) is used to estimate the visible condition of the dust shell due to the scattering of the core star's light. Under certain conditions the compact reflection nebulae can be seen of the POSS or ESO/SRC survey plates.

  11. Asymmetry of planetary nebulae: Collimated ionized jets in butterfly nebulae and dust extinction effects in compact planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ting-Hui

    Planetary Nebulae (PNe) are the transition phase between asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and white dwarfs for stars with masses between 1 and 8 [Special characters omitted.] . Though originally thought to be explainable with simple models, the shapes of PNe have been found to be much more complex in striking images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ). I have investigated two possible causes of the asymmetric appearances of PNe: collimated ionized winds and dust extinction. Narrow-waist bipolar nebulae (butterfly nebulae) may be sculpted by a collimated ionized wind from the central binary star system (Livio & Soker 2001). The system consists of a mass-losing AGB star that is responsible for the nebular material and a white dwarf companion star that is responsible for the ionizing flux. Motivated by the discovery of an ionized jet in the bipolar nebula M 2-9 (Lim & Kwok 2003) that may be responsible for sculpting the nebula's mirror-symmetric structure, I have searched for optically thick cores at radio wavelengths--a characteristic signature of collimated ionized winds-- in sixteen butterfly nebulae. 11 northern nebulae were observed with the Very Large Array (VLA) at 1.3 cm and 0.7 cm, and 5 southern nebulae were observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) at 6 cm and 3.6 cm. Two northern objects, 19W32 and M 1-91, and two southern objects, He 2-84 and Mz 3, were found to exhibit a compact radio core with a rising spectrum consistent with an ionized jet. Here I present an analysis of these four radio cores and discuss the implications of the results. The shape of PNe is predominantly axisymmetric. However, many PNe also exhibit non-axisymmetric structures. Non-axisymmetry, such as unequal intensity or size at the two sides, could be caused by the two sides having different amounts of dust extinction along the line of sight. To investigate whether dust extinction might cause the observed asymmetry, I use an indirect method to probe the

  12. Hubble Space Telescope Image of Omega Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This sturning image, taken by the newly installed Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), is an image of the center of the Omega Nebula. It is a hotbed of newly born stars wrapped in colorful blankets of glowing gas and cradled in an enormous cold, dark hydrogen cloud. The region of nebula shown in this photograph is about 3,500 times wider than our solar system. The nebula, also called M17 and the Swan Nebula, resides 5,500 light-years away in the constellation Sagittarius. The Swan Nebula is illuminated by ultraviolet radiation from young, massive stars, located just beyond the upper-right corner of the image. The powerful radiation from these stars evaporates and erodes the dense cloud of cold gas within which the stars formed. The blistered walls of the hollow cloud shine primarily in the blue, green, and red light emitted by excited atoms of hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Particularly striking is the rose-like feature, seen to the right of center, which glows in the red light emitted by hydrogen and sulfur. As the infant stars evaporate the surrounding cloud, they expose dense pockets of gas that may contain developing stars. One isolated pocket is seen at the center of the brightest region of the nebula. Other dense pockets of gas have formed the remarkable feature jutting inward from the left edge of the image. The color image is constructed from four separate images taken in these filters: blue, near infrared, hydrogen alpha, and doubly ionized oxygen. Credit: NASA, H. Ford (JHU), G. Illingworth (USCS/LO), M. Clampin (STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), the ACS Science Team, and ESA.

  13. Importance of Hydrophilic Hydration and Intramolecular Interactions in the Thermodynamics of Helix-Coil Transition and Helix-Helix Assembly in a Deca-Alanine Peptide.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Weber, Valéry; Pettitt, B Montgomery; Asthagiri, D

    2016-01-14

    For a model deca-alanine peptide the cavity (ideal hydrophobic) contribution to hydration favors the helix state over extended states and the paired helix bundle in the assembly of two helices. The energetic contributions of attractive protein-solvent interactions are separated into quasi-chemical components consisting of a short-range part arising from interactions with solvent in the first hydration shell and the remaining long-range part that is well described by a Gaussian. In the helix-coil transition, short-range attractive protein-solvent interactions outweigh hydrophobic hydration and favor the extended coil states. Analysis of enthalpic effects shows that it is the favorable hydration of the peptide backbone that favors the unfolded state. Protein intramolecular interactions favor the helix state and are decisive in favoring folding. In the pairing of two helices, the cavity contribution outweighs the short-range attractive protein-water interactions. However, long-range, protein-solvent attractive interactions can either enhance or reverse this trend depending on the mutual orientation of the helices. In helix-helix assembly, change in enthalpy arising from change in attractive protein-solvent interactions favors disassembly. In helix pairing as well, favorable protein intramolecular interactions are found to be as important as hydration effects. Overall, hydrophilic protein-solvent interactions and protein intramolecular interactions are found to play a significant role in the thermodynamics of folding and assembly in the system studied. PMID:26649757

  14. Turbulent transport in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Kevin W.

    1989-01-01

    It is likely that turbulence played a major role in the evolution of the solar nebula, which is the flattened disk of dust and gas out of which our solar system formed. Relevant turbulent processes include the transport of angular momentum, mass, and heat, which were critically important to the formation of the solar system. This research will break ground in the modeling of compressible turbulence and its effects on the evolution of the solar nebula. The computational techniques which were developed should be of interest to researchers studying other astrophysical disk systems (e.g., active galactic nuclei), as well as turbulence modelers outside the astrophysics community.

  15. CHUK, a conserved helix-loop-helix ubiquitous kinase, maps to human chromosome 10 and mouse chromosome 19

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, B.A.; McBride, O.W.; Kozak, C.A.

    1995-05-20

    Helix-loop-helix proteins contain stretches of DNA that encode two amphipathic {alpha}-helices joined by a loop structure and are involved in protein dimerization and transcriptional regulation essential to a variety of cellular processes. CHUK, a newly described conserved helix-loop-helix ubiquitous kinase, was mapped by somatic cell hybrid analyses to human Chr 10q24-q25. Chuk and a related sequence, Chuk-rs1, were mapped to mouse chromosomes 19 and 16, respectively, by a combination of somatic cell hybrid, recombinant inbred, and backcross analyses. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Solar nebula origin for volatile gases in Halley's comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Steffi; Lunine, Jonathan I.; Lewis, John S.

    1990-01-01

    The conditions for Comet Halley formation are presently considered in light of the application of physical and chemical processes in the solar nebula environments to the present data base on the composition of the comet's gases. Key molecular ratios are compared to solar nebula model predictions, and the nebular thermochemistry is quantified for a range of solar elemental compositions which correspond to varying water depletion states in the inner nebula. Assuming that inner nebula chemistry is catalyzed by reaction on grains, it is judged that the abundances of the volatile C species CH4, CO, and CO2 in Halley could have been supplied by the solar nebula.

  17. Dusty disks around central stars of planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, Geoffrey C.; De Marco, Orsola; Nordhaus, Jason; Green, Joel; Rauch, Thomas; Werner, Klaus; Chu, You-Hua E-mail: orsola@science.mq.edu.au E-mail: joel@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: werner@astro.uni-tuebingen.de

    2014-06-01

    Only a few percent of cool, old white dwarfs (WDs) have infrared excesses interpreted as originating in small hot disks due to the infall and destruction of single asteroids that come within the star's Roche limit. Infrared excesses at 24 μm were also found to derive from the immediate vicinity of younger, hot WDs, most of which are still central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe). The incidence of CSPNe with this excess is 18%. The Helix CSPN, with a 24 μm excess, has been suggested to have a disk formed from collisions of Kuiper belt-like objects (KBOs). In this paper, we have analyzed an additional sample of CSPNe to look for similar infrared excesses. These CSPNe are all members of the PG 1159 class and were chosen because their immediate progenitors are known to often have dusty environments consistent with large dusty disks. We find that, overall, PG 1159 stars do not present such disks more often than other CSPNe, although the statistics (five objects) are poor. We then consider the entire sample of CSPNe with infrared excesses and compare it to the infrared properties of old WDs, as well as cooler post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We conclude with the suggestion that the infrared properties of CSPNe more plausibly derive from AGB-formed disks rather than disks formed via the collision of KBOs, although the latter scenario cannot be ruled out. Finally, there seems to be an association between CSPNe with a 24 μm excess and confirmed or possible binarity of the central star.

  18. Regional Dimensions of the Triple Helix Model: Setting the Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todeva, Emanuela; Danson, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the rationale for the special issue and its contributions, which bridge the literature on regional development and the Triple Helix model. The concept of the Triple Helix at the sub-national, and specifically regional, level is established and examined, with special regard to regional economic development founded on…

  19. Government and Governance of Regional Triple Helix Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danson, Mike; Todeva, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual paper contributes to the discussion of the role of regional government and regional Triple Helix constellations driving economic development and growth within regional boundaries. The impact of regionalism and subsidiarity on regional Triple Helix constellations, and the questions of governmentality, governance and institutional…

  20. Multi-Facial, Non-Peptidic α-Helix Mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Lanning, Maryanna E.; Fletcher, Steven

    2015-01-01

    α-Helices often recognize their target proteins at protein–protein interfaces through more than one recognition face. This review describes the state-of-the-art in the design of non-peptidic α-helix mimetics that reproduce functionality from multiple faces of an α-helix. PMID:26404384

  1. Thermal Heterogeneity in the Solar Nebula: Paradox?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    1995-09-01

    Chondritic meteorites contain components which have experienced widely varying degrees of thermal processing, yet eventually accumulated into the same planetesimal. The strong correlation of the depletion of volatile elements in the bulk compositions of CV3 carbonaceous chondrites with condensation temperature implies that either evaporation or incomplete condensation was responsible for volatile depletion [1]. The absence of any evidence for isotopic fraction of potassium in chondrites rules out evaporation of solids in a cool nebula, as nearly any conceivable evaporative process would have led to isotopic fractionation [2]. Survival of solids condensed during a relatively hot (about 1200 K) phase of nebular evolution seems to be required [1]. Flash heating to much higher temperatures (about 2000 K) is required to melt and thermally process chondrules [3]. Fluffy Type A calcium, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) appear to have condensed from a hot (about 1400 K) nebular gas [4], while Type B CAIs seem to have been flash heated [5]. However, chondrules contain FeS, possibly implying that the ambient nebula temperature was less than 700 K during the flash heating event [3]. The retention of noble gases in presolar grains found in chondrite matrices similarly limits ambient temperatures to less than about 700 K at the time of their addition [6]. Regardless of the requirements of CAI and chondrule flash heating processes, we see that chondrites contain components that appear to have been formed when the ambient nebula temperature was about 700 K, 1200 K, and 1400 K -- hence the paradox. Two types of solutions to this thermal heterogeneity paradox are possible, namely spatial or temporal thermal variations. Provided that the midplane is hot enough [7,8,9], nebular temperatures spanning the range of 1400 K to 700 K (and considerably lower temperatures) could occur at increasing altitude at fixed orbital radius and at a given time. Considering that small dust grains may

  2. Search for excess showers from Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirov, I. N.; Stamenov, J. N.; Ushev, S. Z.; Janminchev, V. D.; Aseikin, V. S.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Nikolskaja, N. M.; Yakovlev, V. I.; Morozov, A. E.

    1985-01-01

    The arrival directions of muon poor showers registrated in the Tien Shan experiment during an effective running time about I,8.IO(4)h were analyzed. It is shown that there is a significant excess of these showers coming the direction of Crab Nebula.

  3. Argon and neon in Galactic nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Janet P.; Bregman, Jesse D.; Dinerstein, H. L.; Lester, Dan F.; Rank, David M.; Witteborn, F. C.; Wooden, D. H.

    1995-01-01

    KAO observations of the 6.98 micron line of (Ar II), and KAO and ground-based observations of the 8.99 micron line of (Ar III) and the 12.8 micron line of (Ne II) are presented for a number of Galactic H II regions and planetary nebulae.

  4. INTERNAL PROPER MOTIONS IN THE ESKIMO NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    García-Díaz, Ma. T.; Gutiérrez, L.; Steffen, W.; López, J. A.; Beckman, J. E-mail: leonel@astro.unam.mx E-mail: jal@astro.unam.mx

    2015-01-10

    We present measurements of internal proper motions at more than 500 positions of NGC 2392, the Eskimo Nebula, based on images acquired with WFPC2 on board the Hubble Space Telescope at two epochs separated by 7.695 yr. Comparisons of the two observations clearly show the expansion of the nebula. We measured the amplitude and direction of the motion of local structures in the nebula by determining their relative shift during that interval. In order to assess the potential uncertainties in the determination of proper motions in this object, in general, the measurements were performed using two different methods, used previously in the literature. We compare the results from the two methods, and to perform the scientific analysis of the results we choose one, the cross-correlation method, because it is more reliable. We go on to perform a ''criss-cross'' mapping analysis on the proper motion vectors, which helps in the interpretation of the velocity pattern. By combining our results of the proper motions with radial velocity measurements obtained from high resolution spectroscopic observations, and employing an existing 3D model, we estimate the distance to the nebula to be 1.3 kpc.

  5. Molecular line mapping of (young) planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, I will review recent results obtained from high-resolution observations of molecular emission of planetary nebulae in the millimeter and submillimeter waves, stressing the easy interpretation of the data and the great amount of quantitative results obtained from them. Radio interferometers have been shown to be very efficient in the observation of our objects and, particularly since the arrival of ALMA, the amount of results is becoming impressive. We will deal mainly with young planetary nebulae or protoplanetary nebulae, since, as we will see, molecular lines tend to be weak in evolved objects because of photodissociation. In relatively young nebulae, the molecular gas represents most of the nebular material and can be well observed in line emission in mm- and submm-waves. Those observations have yielded many quantitative and accurate results on the structure, dynamics, and physical conditions of this largely dominant nebular component. In more evolved sources, we can follow the evolution of the chemical composition, although the data become rare.

  6. OBSERVATIONS OF THE CRAB NEBULA'S ASYMMETRICAL DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Loll, A. M.; Desch, S. J.; Scowen, P. A.; Foy, J. P.

    2013-03-10

    We present the first Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera-2 imaging survey of the entire Crab Nebula, in the filters F502N ([O III] emission), F673N ([S II]), F631N ([O I]), and F547M (continuum). We use our mosaics to characterize the pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its three-dimensional structure, the ionizational structure in the filaments forming at its periphery, the speed of the shock driven by the PWN into surrounding ejecta (by inferring the cooling rates behind the shock), and the morphology and ionizational structure of the Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) fingers. We quantify a number of asymmetries between the northwest (NW) and southeast (SE) quadrants of the Crab Nebula. The lack of observed filaments in the NW, and our observations of the spatial extent of [O III] emission lead us to conclude that cooling rates are slower, and therefore the shock speeds are greater, in the NW quadrant of the nebula, compared with the SE. We conclude that R-T fingers are longer, more ionizationally stratified, and apparently more massive in the NW than in the SE, and the R-T instability appears more fully developed in the NW.

  7. MHD Solutions for Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Segura, G.; López, J. A.; Franco, J.

    2003-09-01

    This paper provides solutions for the origin of post-AGB winds, their acceleration up to high speed, and the subsequent formation of extremely collimated proto-planetary nebulae. Several wind models with terminal velocities from a few tens of voidb @xkms-1 up to 10^3 voidb @xkms-1 are calculated, which produce proto-planetary nebulae with linear momentum in the range 10^36 - 10^40 voidb @xgcms-1 and with kinetic energies in the range 10^42 - 10^47 erg. These results match available observations of proto-planetary nebulae. In the present simplistic scheme, the driver of the wind is just the magnetic pressure at the stellar surface. Other forces are not taken into account in this study, except gravity. We conclude that mass-loss rates of post-AGB stars and transition times from late AGB up to planetary nebula central stars could be directly linked with the production of magnetic field at the stellar core. As an example, mass-loss rates as large as 8×10^-5 M[ scriptstyle sun ]yr-1 and transition times as short as 5,000 years are predicted.

  8. Nebular UV Absorption Lines in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet

    We propose to continue our Cycle 1 program of studying the Lyman and Werner bands of H_2, seen in absorption against the UV continua of planetary nebula central stars, which arise within neutral-molecular envelopes surrounding the ionized gas. These are the pump lines for a fluorescent cascade of near-infrared emission lines which are observed in many planetary nebulae. By observing the UV lines we can probe the chemical and thermal structure of the envelopes, as well as measure molecular column densities and clarify the excitation processes for the infrared lines. In Cycle 1 we were granted time for three targets, one of which was successfully observed shortly before submission of this proposal. Although the data were not yet available for examination, similar target observed by the project team revealed a rich set of H_2 circumstellar absorption features, demonstrating the feasibility of our program. FUSE spectra also include absorption features from atomic species such as O I and C II, which give rise to important far-infrared fine-structure cooling lines that likewise have been observed from planetary nebulae. In Cycle 2, we add as a secondary goal a search for nebular components of the O VI 032, 1038 AA absorption lines, which trace the presence of hot shocked gas, in nebulae with anomalously strong optical recombination lines of ions of oxygen and nitrogen. This will test a plausible hypothesis for the origin of this anomaly.

  9. E Proteins and ID Proteins: Helix-Loop-Helix Partners in Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan-Hsin; Baker, Nicholas E

    2015-11-01

    The basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proteins represent a well-known class of transcriptional regulators. Many bHLH proteins act as heterodimers with members of a class of ubiquitous partners, the E proteins. A widely expressed class of inhibitory heterodimer partners-the Inhibitor of DNA-binding (ID) proteins-also exists. Genetic and molecular analyses in humans and in knockout mice implicate E proteins and ID proteins in a wide variety of diseases, belying the notion that they are non-specific partner proteins. Here, we explore relationships of E proteins and ID proteins to a variety of disease processes and highlight gaps in knowledge of disease mechanisms. PMID:26555048

  10. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors and epidermal cell fate determination in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongtao; Li, Xia; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Cell fate determination is an important process in multicellular organisms. Plant epidermis is a readily-accessible, well-used model for the study of cell fate determination. Our knowledge of cell fate determination is growing steadily due to genetic and molecular analyses of root hairs, trichomes, and stomata, which are derived from the epidermal cells of roots and aerial tissues. Studies have shown that a large number of factors are involved in the establishment of these cell types, especially members of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) superfamily, which is an important family of transcription factors. In this mini-review, we focus on the role of bHLH transcription factors in cell fate determination in Arabidopsis. PMID:23073001

  11. Helix-coiled gold nanowires for molecular sensing.

    PubMed

    Chae, Weon-Sik; Kim, Eun-Mee; Yu, Hyunung; Jeon, Seokwoo; Jung, Jin-Seung

    2012-04-01

    Helix-coiled gold nanowires were fabricated by a templating route using unique composite templates consisting of anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) nanotubular membrane and confined mesoporous silica therein. A different degree of confinement energy induces a different degree of helix curvature of confined porous silica nanochannels in an AAO, which works as a hard template for the electrochemical deposition of gold, thereby rationally enabling a different degree of helix curvature of gold nano-replicas. From surface-enhanced Raman scattering experiments, we first found that helix-coiled gold nanowires show more distinctly enhanced molecule sensing efficiency than those from simple smooth gold nanowires, and gold nanowires with the narrower lateral width show more enhanced molecule sensing efficiency than those of thicker width helix nanowires. PMID:22849155

  12. NMR-based approach to measure the free energy of transmembrane helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Mineev, Konstantin S; Lesovoy, Dmitry M; Usmanova, Dinara R; Goncharuk, Sergey A; Shulepko, Mikhail A; Lyukmanova, Ekaterina N; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Bocharov, Eduard V; Arseniev, Alexander S

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the energetic parameters of transmembrane helix-helix interactions is necessary for the establishment of a structure-energy relationship for α-helical membrane domains. A number of techniques have been developed to measure the free energies of dimerization and oligomerization of transmembrane α-helices, and all of these have their advantages and drawbacks. In this study we propose a methodology to determine the magnitudes of the free energy of interactions between transmembrane helices in detergent micelles. The suggested approach employs solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to determine the population of the oligomeric states of the transmembrane domains and introduces a new formalism to describe the oligomerization equilibrium, which is based on the assumption that both the dimerization of the transmembrane domains and the dissociation of the dimer can occur only upon the collision of detergent micelles. The technique has three major advantages compared with other existing approaches: it may be used to analyze both weak and relatively strong dimerization/oligomerization processes, it works well for the analysis of complex equilibria, e.g. when monomer, dimer and high-order oligomer populations are simultaneously present in the solution, and it can simultaneously yield both structural and energetic characteristics of the helix-helix interaction under study. The proposed methodology was applied to investigate the oligomerization process of transmembrane domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) and vascular endothelium growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2), and allowed the measurement of the free energy of dimerization of both of these objects. In addition the proposed method was able to describe the multi-state oligomerization process of the VEGFR2 transmembrane domain. PMID:24036227

  13. The accessory helix of complexin functions by stabilizing central helix secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Radoff, Daniel T; Dong, Yongming; Snead, David; Bai, Jihong; Eliezer, David; Dittman, Jeremy S

    2014-01-01

    The presynaptic protein complexin (CPX) is a critical regulator of synaptic vesicle fusion, but the mechanisms underlying its regulatory effects are not well understood. Its highly conserved central helix (CH) directly binds the ternary SNARE complex and is required for all known CPX functions. The adjacent accessory helix (AH) is not conserved despite also playing an important role in CPX function, and numerous models for its mechanism have been proposed. We examined the impact of AH mutations and chimeras on CPX function in vivo and in vitro using C. elegans. The mouse AH fully restored function when substituted into worm CPX suggesting its mechanism is evolutionarily conserved. CPX inhibitory function was impaired when helix propagation into the CH was disrupted whereas replacing the AH with a non-native helical sequence restored CPX function. We propose that the AH operates by stabilizing CH secondary structure rather than through protein or lipid interactions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04553.001 PMID:25383924

  14. Folding and unfolding of helix-turn-helix motifs in the gas phase.

    PubMed

    Zilch, Lloyd W; Kaleta, David T; Kohtani, Motoya; Krishnan, Ranjani; Jarrold, Martin F

    2007-07-01

    Ion mobility measurements and molecular dynamic simulations have been performed for a series of peptides designed to have helix-turn-helix motifs. For peptides with two helical sections linked by a short loop region: AcA(14)KG(3)A(14)K+2H(+), AcA(14)KG(5)A(14)K+2H(+), AcA(14)KG(7)A(14)K+2H(+), and AcA(14)KSar(3)A(14)K+2H(+) (Ac = acetyl, A = alanine, G = glycine, Sar = sarcosine and K = lysine); a coiled-coil geometry with two anti-parallel helices is the lowest energy conformation. The helices uncouple and the coiled-coil unfolds as the temperature is raised. Equilibrium constants determined as a function of temperature yield enthalpy and entropy changes for the unfolding of the coiled-coil. The enthalpy and entropy changes depend on the length and nature of the loop region. For a peptide with three helical sections: protonated AcA(14)KG(3)A(14)KG(3)A(14)K; a coiled-coil bundle with three helices side-by-side is substantially less stable than a geometry with two helices in an antiparallel coiled-coil and the third helix collinear with one of the other two. PMID:17521916

  15. Folding and Unfolding of Helix-Turn-Helix Motifs in the Gas Phase

    PubMed Central

    Zilch, Lloyd W.; Kaleta, David T.; Kohtani, Motoya; Krishnan, Ranjani; Jarrold, Martin F.

    2009-01-01

    Ion mobility measurements and molecular dynamic simulations have been performed for a series of peptides designed to have helix-turn-helix motifs. For peptides with two helical sections linked by a short loop region: AcA14KG3A14K+2H+, AcA14KG5A14K+2H+, AcA14KG7A14K+2H+, and AcA14KSar3A14K+2H+ (Ac = acetyl, A = alanine, G = glycine, Sar = sarcosine and K = lysine); a coiled-coil geometry with two anti-parallel helices is the lowest energy conformation. The helices uncouple and the coiled-coil unfolds as the temperature is raised. Equilibrium constants determined as a function of temperature yield enthalpy and entropy changes for the unfolding of the coiled-coil. The enthalpy and entropy changes depend on the length and nature of the loop region. For a peptide with three helical sections: protonated AcA14KG3A14KG3A14K; a coiled-coil bundle with three helices side-by-side is substantially less stable than a geometry with two helices in an antiparallel coiled-coil and the third helix collinear with one of the other two. PMID:17521916

  16. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-01-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  17. Abundances, planetary nebulae, and stellar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Lawrence H.

    1994-09-01

    Among Henry Norris Russell's many achievements were his contributions to solar and stellar spectroscopy, in particular, to an analysis of the chemical composition of the solar atmosphere. The question of composition differences between stars was hotly debated; some distinguished astronomers argued that all stars had the solar composition. Some early challenges to this doctrine are described. Determinations of chemical compositions of gaseous nebulae were much more difficult. If we observe the lines of a given chemical element in one ionization stage in a stellar spectrum, we can deduce readily the abundance of that element. No such luxury is available for a planetary or diffuse gaseous nebula. We must measure lines of as many ionization stages as we can. Furthermore, a nebula is an extended object. Often detailed spectroscopy is at hand only for narrow pencil columns taken through the image. Different observers use a variety of apertures. Fortunately it is possible to calculate theoretical spectra for any arbitrary cross section taken through a symmetrical model, so UV, optical, and IR observations all can be compared properly with a prediction. The value of high-resolution spectra obtained with instruments such as the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory is emphasized. Improved fluxes for weak but important transitions are found. Close blends of lines of different ions can be resolved, and checks can be made on predictions of atomic parameters such as Einstein A-values and collision strengths. High spectral resolution data have been obtained and reduced for 22 planetary nebulae of varying size, structure, stellar population membership, dustiness, level of excitation, evolutionary status, and chemical compositions. The promise seems justified that with such extensive, high quality data, additional insights on nebular genesis and late states of stellar evolution can be found. The present survey is confined to nebulae of high surface brightness, but

  18. On the possible wind nebula of magnetar Swift J1834.9–0846: a magnetism-powered synchrotron nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Recently, the magnetar Swift J1834.9–0846 has been reported to have a possible wind nebula. It is shown that both the magnetar and its wind nebula are understandable in the wind braking scenario. The magnetar's rotational energy loss rate is not enough to power the particle luminosity. The required particle luminosity should be about 1036 erg s‑1 to 1038 erg s‑1. It is obtained in three different approaches: considering wind braking of Swift J1834.9–0846 the spectral and spatial observations of the wind nebula; and an empirical upper bound on wind nebula X-ray luminosity. The nebula magnetic field is about 10‑4 G. The possible wind nebula of Swift J1834.9–0846 should be a magnetar wind nebula. It is powered by the magnetic energy released from the magnetar.

  19. The Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor PIF5 Acts on Ethylene Biosynthesis and Phytochrome Signaling by Distinct Mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    HYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR5 (PIF5), a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, interacts specifically with the photoactivated form of phytochrome B (phyB). Here, we report that dark-grown Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings overexpressing PIF5 (PIF5-OX) exhibit exaggerated apical hooks and short h...

  20. Recognition and binding of a helix-loop-helix peptide to carbonic anhydrase occurs via partly folded intermediate structures.

    PubMed

    Lignell, Martin; Becker, Hans-Christian

    2010-02-01

    We have studied the association of a helix-loop-helix peptide scaffold carrying a benzenesulfonamide ligand to carbonic anhydrase using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The helix-loop-helix peptide, developed for biosensing applications, is labeled with the fluorescent probe dansyl, which serves as a polarity-sensitive reporter of the binding event. Using maximum entropy analysis of the fluorescence lifetime of dansyl at 1:1 stoichiometry reveals three characteristic fluorescence lifetime groups, interpreted as differently interacting peptide/protein structures. We characterize these peptide/protein complexes as mostly bound but unfolded, bound and partly folded, and strongly bound and folded. Furthermore, analysis of the fluorescence anisotropy decay resulted in three different dansyl rotational correlation times, namely 0.18, 1.2, and 23 ns. Using the amplitudes of these times, we can correlate the lifetime groups with the corresponding fluorescence anisotropy component. The 23-ns rotational correlation time, which appears with the same amplitude as a 17-ns fluorescence lifetime, shows that the dansyl fluorophore follows the rotational diffusion of carbonic anhydrase when it is a part of the folded peptide/protein complex. A partly folded and partly hydrated interfacial structure is manifested in an 8-ns dansyl fluorescence lifetime and a 1.2-ns rotational correlation time. This structure, we believe, is similar to a molten-globule-like interfacial structure, which allows segmental movement and has a higher degree of solvent exposure of dansyl. Indirect excitation of dansyl on the helix-loop-helix peptide through Förster energy transfer from one or several tryptophans in the carbonic anhydrase shows that the helix-loop-helix scaffold binds to a tryptophan-rich domain of the carbonic anhydrase. We conclude that binding of the peptide to carbonic anhydrase involves a transition from a disordered to an ordered structure of the helix-loop-helix

  1. HUBBLE SEES SUPERSONIC EXHAUST FROM NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. Ground-based studies have shown that the nebula's size increases with time, suggesting that the stellar outburst that formed the lobes occurred just 1,200 years ago. The central star in M2-9 is known to be one of a very close pair which orbit one another at perilously close distances. It is even possible that one star is being engulfed by the other. Astronomers suspect the gravity of one star pulls weakly bound gas from the surface of the other and flings it into a thin, dense disk which surrounds both stars and extends well into space. The disk can actually be seen in shorter exposure images obtained with the Hubble telescope. It measures approximately 10 times the diameter of Pluto's orbit. Models of the type that are used to design jet engines ('hydrodynamics') show that such a disk can successfully account for the jet-exhaust-like appearance of M2-9. The high-speed wind from one of the stars rams into the surrounding disk, which serves as a nozzle. The wind is deflected in a perpendicular direction and forms the pair of jets that we see in the nebula's image. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in

  2. 'Peony Nebula' Star Settles for Silver Medal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version Movie

    If our galaxy, the Milky Way, were to host its own version of the Olympics, the title for the brightest known star would go to a massive star called Eta Carina. However, a new runner-up now the second-brightest star in our galaxy has been discovered in the galaxy's dusty and frenzied interior. This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the new silver medalist, circled in the inset above, in the central region of our Milky Way.

    Dubbed the 'Peony nebula' star, this blazing ball of gas shines with the equivalent light of 3.2 million suns. The reigning champ, Eta Carina, produces the equivalent of 4.7 million suns worth of light though astronomers say these estimates are uncertain, and it's possible that the Peony nebula star could be even brighter than Eta Carina.

    If the Peony star is so bright, why doesn't it stand out more in this view? The answer is dust. This star is located in a very dusty region jam packed with stars. In fact, there could be other super bright stars still hidden deep in the stellar crowd. Spitzer's infrared eyes allowed it to pierce the dust and assess the Peony nebula star's true brightness. Likewise, infrared data from the European Southern Observatory's New Technology Telescope in Chile were integral in calculating the Peony nebula star's luminosity.

    The Peony nebula, which surrounds the Peony nebular star, is the reddish cloud of dust in and around the white circle.

    The movie begins by showing a stretch of the dusty and frenzied central region of our Milky Way galaxy. It then zooms in to reveal the 'Peony nebula' star the new second-brightest star in the Milky Way, discovered in part by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

    This is a three-color composite showing infrared observations from two Spitzer instruments. Blue represents 3.6-micron light and green shows light of 8 microns, both

  3. Effect of opening helix on flying wire emittance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pruss, Stan; /Fermilab

    1996-04-01

    It has been noted for some time that after the protons are injected, when the helix is opened the proton normalized vertical emittance (as measured by the flying wires) increases by about two {pi} mm-mr. The horizontal emittance decreases by about the same amount. This has been recognized as a false result, but there has been uncertainty as to whether it was due to the flying wires not measuring the beam sigma correctly when the beam center moved at the wires or whether the effective beta at the wires changed when the helix was opened and the orbit changed all around the machine. This study attempts to answer that question. The study took place Sunday, Feb. 25, 1996, from 18:30 to 22:30. The study consisted of injecting P1, P2 and P3 as normal, coalesced bunches and P4 and P5 as uncoalesced bunch trains of nominally 11 bunches. The purpose in using more than a single bunch was to increase statistical sampling and to investigate whether there was any significant difference between coalesced and uncoalesced bunches. Because the injection kicker had a long flat-top for 36 bunch studies, P6 could not be injected and when P5 was injected, P1 emittance increased by about two {pi} mm-mr. The flying wires were flown several times, the helix was turned on, the wires flown several times, the helix turned off, and the wires flown several times. The helix cycling was performed by knobbing the power supplies to avoid any possible emittance dilution from a non-adiabatic change. note that during the helix off state during helix cycling, one of the power supplies for the horizontal separators was inadvertently not turned down to zero, leaving the horizontal part of the helix at {approx} 16% of normal. After three cycles of helix on-off, a local horizontal three bump was made to duplicate the horizontal orbit change at the E11 wires and the wires were flown several times. The local bump was removed and the wires flown several times. Finally, the protons were put onto the pbar helix

  4. Direct folding simulation of a long helix in explicit water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ya; Lu, Xiaoliang; Duan, Lili; Zhang, Dawei; Mei, Ye; Zhang, John Z. H.

    2013-05-01

    A recently proposed Polarizable Hydrogen Bond (PHB) method has been employed to simulate the folding of a 53 amino acid helix (PDB ID 2KHK) in explicit water. Under PHB simulation, starting from a fully extended structure, the peptide folds into the native state as confirmed by measured time evolutions of radius of gyration, root mean square deviation (RMSD), and native hydrogen bond. Free energy and cluster analysis show that the folded helix is thermally stable under the PHB model. Comparison of simulation results under, respectively, PHB and standard nonpolarizable force field demonstrates that polarization is critical for stable folding of this long α-helix.

  5. A supramolecular helix that disregards chirality.

    PubMed

    Roche, Cécile; Sun, Hao-Jan; Leowanawat, Pawaret; Araoka, Fumito; Partridge, Benjamin E; Peterca, Mihai; Wilson, Daniela A; Prendergast, Margaret E; Heiney, Paul A; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    The functions of complex crystalline systems derived from supramolecular biological and non-biological assemblies typically emerge from homochiral programmed primary structures via first principles involving secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures. In contrast, heterochiral and racemic compounds yield disordered crystals, amorphous solids or liquids. Here, we report the self-assembly of perylene bisimide derivatives in a supramolecular helix that in turn self-organizes in columnar hexagonal crystalline domains regardless of the enantiomeric purity of the perylene bisimide. We show that both homochiral and racemic perylene bisimide compounds, including a mixture of 21 diastereomers that cannot be deracemized at the molecular level, self-organize to form single-handed helical assemblies with identical single-crystal-like order. We propose that this high crystalline order is generated via a cogwheel mechanism that disregards the chirality of the self-assembling building blocks. We anticipate that this mechanism will facilitate access to previously inaccessible complex crystalline systems from racemic and homochiral building blocks. PMID:26673268

  6. A supramolecular helix that disregards chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Cécile; Sun, Hao-Jan; Leowanawat, Pawaret; Araoka, Fumito; Partridge, Benjamin E.; Peterca, Mihai; Wilson, Daniela A.; Prendergast, Margaret E.; Heiney, Paul A.; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W.; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    The functions of complex crystalline systems derived from supramolecular biological and non-biological assemblies typically emerge from homochiral programmed primary structures via first principles involving secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures. In contrast, heterochiral and racemic compounds yield disordered crystals, amorphous solids or liquids. Here, we report the self-assembly of perylene bisimide derivatives in a supramolecular helix that in turn self-organizes in columnar hexagonal crystalline domains regardless of the enantiomeric purity of the perylene bisimide. We show that both homochiral and racemic perylene bisimide compounds, including a mixture of 21 diastereomers that cannot be deracemized at the molecular level, self-organize to form single-handed helical assemblies with identical single-crystal-like order. We propose that this high crystalline order is generated via a cogwheel mechanism that disregards the chirality of the self-assembling building blocks. We anticipate that this mechanism will facilitate access to previously inaccessible complex crystalline systems from racemic and homochiral building blocks.

  7. Effects of radiation on DNA's double helix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The blueprint of life, DNA's double helix is found in the cells of everything from bacteria to astronauts. Exposure to radiation(depicted at right) such as X-rays (upper) or heavy ion particles (lower), can damage DNA and cause dire consequences both to the organism itself and to future generations. One of NASA's main goals is to develop better radiation shielding materials to protect astronauts from destructive radiation in space. This is particularly important for long space missions. NASA has selected researchers to study materials that provide better shielding. This research is managed by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research and is supported by the Microgravity Science and Applications Department at NASA's Marshall Center. During International Space Station Expedition Six, the Extravehicular Activity Radiation Monitoring (EVARM) will continue to measure radiation dosage encountered by the eyes, internal organs and skin during specific spacewalks, and relate it to the type of activity, location and other factors. An analysis of this information may be useful in mitigating potential exposure to space walkers in the future. (Illustration by Dr. Frank Cucinotta, NASA/Johnson Space Center, and Prem Saganti, Lockheed Martin)

  8. The temperature gradient in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    The available compositional data on planets and satellites can be used to place stringent limits on the thermal environment in the solar nebula. The densities of the terrestrial planets, Ceres and Vesta, the Galilean satellites, and Titan; the atmospheric compositions of several of these bodies; and geochemical and geophysical data on the earth combine to define a strong dependence of formation temperature on heliocentric distance. It is impossible to reconcile the available compositional data with any model in which the formation temperatures of these bodies are determined by radiative equilibrium with the sun, regardless of the sun's luminosity. Rather, the data support Cameron's hypothesis of a dense, convective solar nebula, opaque to solar radiation, with an adiabatic temperature-pressure profile.

  9. The albedo of particles in reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rush, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    The relation between the apparent angular extent of a reflection nebula and the apparent magnitude of its illuminating star was reconsidered under a less restrictive set of assumptions. A computational technique was developed which permits the use of fits to the observed m-log a values to determine the albedo of particles composing reflection nebulae, providing only that a phase function and average optical thickness are assumed. Multiple scattering, anisotropic phase functions, and illumination by the general star field are considered, and the albedo of reflection nebular particles appears to be the same as that for interstellar particles in general. The possibility of continuous fluorescence contributions to the surface brightness is also considered.

  10. An Infrared Study of the Juggler Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holbrook, J. C.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.; Bregman, J.

    1996-01-01

    This work is an examination of the infrared reflection nebula surrounding a protostellar source, IRS 1, in the CRL 2136 region at 2.2, 3.08, and 3.45 micron. The greatest absorption due to water ice occurs within 5 arcsec (10,000 AU, D = 2000 pc) of IRS 1. The water ice absorption decreases with increasing radius from IRS 1. This Tau(sub ice) structure suggests that the water ice is primarily associated with IRS 1. The flux from IRS 1 has a (2.2) - (3.45) color of 5, much redder than the nebula. The color structure combined with the Tau(sub ice) structure suggests the presence of an icy-dusty disk around IRS 1 orientated NE to SW. Radio CO maps presented by Kastner et al. reveal a molecular outflow orientated perpendicular to the disk. The south and east reflection lobes line the conical cavity created by the blueshifted molecular outflow.

  11. Hot relativistic winds and the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujimura, F. S.; Kennel, C. F.

    1981-01-01

    Efforts to formulate a self-consistent model of pulsar magnetospheres which links the particle source near the pulsar to the outflowing relativistic wind and couples the wind to the surrounding nebula are reviewed. The use of a relativistic MHD wind is recommended to account for global photon emission and the invisibility of the method of plasma transport. Consideration of a magnetic monopole relativistic wind due to an axially symmetric aligned rotator is combined with calculations of the initial velocity of the wind to show that the flow velocity in such a model will never exceed Mach 1. Extending the solution to the case of a hot relativistic wind at supersonic speeds is noted to yield results consistent with observations of the Crab Nebula

  12. Heat conduction fronts in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1994-01-01

    We present arguments which suggest that many of the x-ray, some optical, and some UV observations of planetary nebulae, can be explained by the presence of heat conduction fronts. The heat flows from the hot bubble formed by the shocked fast wind to the cool shell and halo. Heat conduction fronts are likely to account for emission of x rays from plasma at lower temperature than the expected temperature of the hot bubble. In the presence of magnetic fields, only a small fraction of the fast wind luminosity emerges as radiation. Heat conduction fronts can naturally produce some unusual line flux ratios, which are observed in some planetary nebulae. Heat conduction fronts may heat the halo and cause some material at the inner surface of the shell to expand slower than the rest of the shell. In the presence of an asymmetrical magnetic field, this flow, the x-ray intensity, and the emission lines, may acquire asymmetrical structure as well.

  13. Shell nebulae around luminous evolved stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufour, Reginald J.

    1989-01-01

    Shell nebulae around luminous Population I Wolf-Rayet, Of, and P-Cygni stars are astrophysically interesting since they are indicators of pre-supernova mass loss and how such massive stars prepare their surrounding interstellar medium prior to explosion. Some twenty-odd such nebulae are known, for which detailed study of their morphological and spectroscopic characteristics have only begun in this decade. In this paper, some of these characteristics are reviewed in general, and new observations are reported. Emphasis has been placed on several 'prototype 'objects (NGC 7635, NGC 2359, NGC 6888, and the Eta Carinae condensations) to illustrate the varied massive-star mass-loss, the physics of their winds and shell ejecta, and related nucleosynthesis effects in the compositions of the winds and shells.

  14. Interstellar molecules - Formation in solar nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Herbig's (1970) hypothesis that solar nebulae might be the principal source of interstellar grains and molecules is investigated. The investigation includes the determination of physical and chemical conditions in the early solar system. The production of organic compounds in the solar nebula is studied, and the compounds in meteorites are compared with those obtained in Miller-Urey and Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions, taking into consideration aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, porphyrins, and aspects of carbon-isotope fractionation. It is found that FTT reactions account reasonably well for all well-established features of organic matter in meteorites investigated. The distribution of compounds produced by FTT reactions is compared with the distribution of interstellar molecules. Biological implications of the results are considered.

  15. Formation of iron sulphide in solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerridge, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Noting that the iron sulfide in the Orgueil carbonaceous meteorite is an Fe-deficient monosulfide (pyrrhotite), it is suggested that such mineral chemistry is inconsistent with equilibrium condensation of the solar nebula and that the course of condensation may have been modified by kinetic effects. The effect of Ni on the reaction between Fe and S to produce FeS is examined, and possible reasons are considered for the fact that the cited meteorite differs in both crystal structure and Ni content from the predictions of equilibrium condensation. It is proposed that sulfide formation in the solar nebula may have been inhibited by sluggish diffusion, so that sulfur began to react with previously condensed troilite to form pyrrhotite. On this basis, observations of the Orgueil sulfides are shown to suggest that the course of solar-system condensation was modified by kinetic effects below about 700 K and that equilibrium may not have been achieved.

  16. Direct photography of the Gum Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, J. C.; Roosen, R. G.; Thompson, J.; Ludden, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses a series of wide-angle photographs taken of the Gum Nebula in the traditional region including H-alpha with the aid of a 40-cm and an 80-cm lens in both the red and the green. The photographs support the large dimensions (75 deg in galactic longitude by 40 deg in galactic latitude) of the Gum Nebula suggested earlier, and the appearance is consistent with an origin due to photons from a supernova outburst. The relatively high-density gas has cooled and is visible on the red plates. The low-density gas has remained at a high temperature and may be visible as diffuse emission on the green plates.

  17. The ultraviolet spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    New observations of the Crab Nebula by OAO 2 stellar photometers are reported. Processed image data of the Crab give the logarithm of the integrated relative intensity per wavelength interval, corrected for sky background, and the rms error from 11 passbands in the ultraviolet range. The data are converted to logarithms of flux density per frequency interval and plotted on logarithmic scales with corrections for interstellar extinction.

  18. PARTICLE TRANSPORT IN YOUNG PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Xiaping; Chevalier, Roger A. E-mail: rac5x@virginia.edu

    2012-06-20

    The model for pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) as a result of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) downstream flow from a shocked, relativistic pulsar wind has been successful in reproducing many features of the nebulae observed close to central pulsars. However, observations of well-studied young nebulae like the Crab Nebula, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9 do not show the toroidal magnetic field on a larger scale that might be expected in the MHD flow model; in addition, the radial variation of spectral index due to synchrotron losses is smoother than expected in the MHD flow model. We find that pure diffusion models can reproduce the basic data on nebular size and spectral index variation for the Crab, 3C 58, and G21.5-0.9. Most of our models use an energy-independent diffusion coefficient; power-law variations of the coefficient with energy are degenerate with variation in the input particle energy distribution index in the steady state, transmitting boundary case. Energy-dependent diffusion is a possible reason for the smaller diffusion coefficient inferred for the Crab. Monte Carlo simulations of the particle transport allowing for advection and diffusion of particles suggest that diffusion dominates over much of the total nebular volume of the Crab. Advection dominates close to the pulsar and is likely to play a role in the X-ray half-light radius. The source of diffusion and mixing of particles is uncertain, but may be related to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the outer boundary of a young PWN or to instabilities in the toroidal magnetic field structure.

  19. Light and Shadow in the Carina Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Previously unseen details of a mysterious, complex structure within the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) are revealed by this image of the 'Keyhole Nebula,' obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The picture is a montage assembled from four different April 1999 telescope pointings with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, which used six different color filters. The picture is dominated by a large, approximately circular feature, which is part of the Keyhole Nebula, named in the 19th century by Sir John Herschel. This region, about 8000 light-years from Earth, is located adjacent to the famous explosive variable star Eta Carinae, which lies just outside the field of view toward the upper right. The high resolution of the Hubble images reveals the relative three- dimensional locations of many of these features, as well as showing numerous small dark globules that may be in the process of collapsing to form new stars. Two striking large, sharp-edged dust clouds are located near the bottom center and upper left edges of the image. The former is immersed within the ring and the latter is just outside the ring. The pronounced pillars and knobs of the upper left cloud appear to point toward a luminous, massive star located just outside the field further toward the upper left, which may be responsible for illuminating and sculpting them by means of its high-energy radiation and stellar wind of high-velocity ejected material. These large dark clouds may eventually evaporate, or if there are sufficiently dense condensations within them, give birth to small star clusters. The Carina Nebula, with an overall diameter of more than 200 light- years, is one of the outstanding features of the Southern Hemisphere portion of the Milky Way. The diameter of the Keyhole ring structure shown here is about 7 light-years. These data were collected by the Hubble Heritage Team and Nolan R. Walborn (STScI), Rodolfo H. Barba' (La Plata Observatory, Argentina), and Adeline Caulet (France).

  20. The Gum nebula and related problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maran, S. P.; Brandt, J. C.; Stecher, T. P.

    1971-01-01

    Papers were presented in conference sessions on the Gum nebula, the Vela X remnant, the hot stars gamma Velorum and zeta Puppis, the B associations in the Vela-Puppis complex, and pulsars. Ground-based optical and radio astronomy; rocket and satellite observations in the radio, visible, ultraviolet, and X-ray regions; and theoretical problems in the physical state of the interstellar medium, stellar evolution, and runaway star dynamics were considered.

  1. A newly discovered compact planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappellaro, E.; Turatto, M.; Sabbadin, F.

    1989-07-01

    An H-alpha emission object is identified in a 103a-E + RG1 objective prism plate taken with the 92/67-cm Schmidt telescope of the Astronomical Observatory of Padua at Asiago (Italy). The object turns out to be a compact planetary nebula located at alpha(1950.0) = 18 h 4.3 min and delta(1950.0) = -8 deg 56.4 arcmin (classification code: 19 + 5 deg 1).

  2. Nebulae at keratoconus--the result after excimer laser removal.

    PubMed

    Fagerholm, P; Fitzsimmons, T; Ohman, L; Orndahl, M

    1993-12-01

    Ten patients underwent excimer laser ablation due to nebula formation at keratoconus. The nebulae interfered significantly with contact lens fit or wearing time. The mean follow-up time in these patients was 16.5 months. Following surgery all patients could be successfully fitted with a contact lens and thereby obtain good visual acuity. Furthermore, contact lens wearing time was 8 hours or more in all cases. In 2 patients the nebulae recurred but were successfully retreated. PMID:8154261

  3. The ultraviolet spectrum of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, K.; Gull, T. R.; Maran, S. P.; Stecher, T. P.; Fesen, R. A.; Parise, R. A.; Harvel, C. A.; Kafatos, M.; Trimble, V. L.

    1982-01-01

    Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the Crab Nebula done by the International Ultraviolet Explorer satellite is described, and an estimate of the carbon abundance is made, noting data reduction to remove spectral defects caused by radiation hits. The important C IV 1549, He II 1640, and semiforbidden C III 1908 emission line intensities were measured and upper limits placed on other ultraviolet features for the brightest filamentary region in the Nebula. The emission lines imply an average ionic abundance ratio n(C+2)/n(O+2) in the range from 0.4 to 1.5 in the observed gaseous condensations. The elemental abundance ratio of carbon to oxygen is probably in the same range. Analysis shows that there is no perceptible excess of carbon due to presupernova nucleosynthesis in the observed region. The large helium abundance, small carbon and oxygen abundances, and presence of a neutron star in the Crab Nebula suggest that the presupernova star had a mass close to eight solar masses.

  4. New portrait of Omega Nebula's glistening watercolours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-07-01

    The Omega Nebula, sometimes called the Swan Nebula, is a dazzling stellar nursery located about 5500 light-years away towards the constellation of Sagittarius (the Archer). An active star-forming region of gas and dust about 15 light-years across, the nebula has recently spawned a cluster of massive, hot stars. The intense light and strong winds from these hulking infants have carved remarkable filigree structures in the gas and dust. When seen through a small telescope the nebula has a shape that reminds some observers of the final letter of the Greek alphabet, omega, while others see a swan with its distinctive long, curved neck. Yet other nicknames for this evocative cosmic landmark include the Horseshoe and the Lobster Nebula. Swiss astronomer Jean-Philippe Loys de Chéseaux discovered the nebula around 1745. The French comet hunter Charles Messier independently rediscovered it about twenty years later and included it as number 17 in his famous catalogue. In a small telescope, the Omega Nebula appears as an enigmatic ghostly bar of light set against the star fields of the Milky Way. Early observers were unsure whether this curiosity was really a cloud of gas or a remote cluster of stars too faint to be resolved. In 1866, William Huggins settled the debate when he confirmed the Omega Nebula to be a cloud of glowing gas, through the use of a new instrument, the astronomical spectrograph. In recent years, astronomers have discovered that the Omega Nebula is one of the youngest and most massive star-forming regions in the Milky Way. Active star-birth started a few million years ago and continues through today. The brightly shining gas shown in this picture is just a blister erupting from the side of a much larger dark cloud of molecular gas. The dust that is so prominent in this picture comes from the remains of massive hot stars that have ended their brief lives and ejected material back into space, as well as the cosmic detritus from which future suns form. The

  5. HUBBLE CAPTURES UNVEILING OF PLANETARY NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image captures the infancy of the Stingray nebula (Hen-1357), the youngest known planetary nebula. In this image, the bright central star is in the middle of the green ring of gas. Its companion star is diagonally above it at 10 o'clock. A spur of gas (green) is forming a faint bridge to the companion star due to gravitational attraction. The image also shows a ring of gas (green) surrounding the central star, with bubbles of gas to the lower left and upper right of the ring. The wind of material propelled by radiation from the hot central star has created enough pressure to blow open holes in the ends of the bubbles, allowing gas to escape. The red curved lines represent bright gas that is heated by a 'shock' caused when the central star's wind hits the walls of the bubbles. The nebula is as large as 130 solar systems, but, at its distance of 18,000 light-years, it appears only as big as a dime viewed a mile away. The Stingray is located in the direction of the southern constellation Ara (the Altar). The colors shown are actual colors emitted by nitrogen (red), oxygen (green), and hydrogen (blue). The filters used were F658N ([N II]), F502N ([O III]), and F487N (H-beta). The observations were made in March 1996. Credit: Matt Bobrowsky, Orbital Sciences Corporation and NASA

  6. Dust processing in the Carina nebula region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Mori, Tamami I.; Okada, Yoko

    2015-10-01

    Dust processing in the Carina nebula is investigated based on mid- to far-infrared spectroscopy with Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Mapping observations over a central 40‧ ×20‧ area of the nebula with PHT-S, SWS, and LWS onboard ISO not only reveal spectroscopically that the mid-infrared unidentified infrared (UIR) bands at 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 μm are absent in the ionized region, but also indicate that the 11.3 μm may behave differently from the other three UIR bands near the edge of the ionized region, suggesting a variation either in the size distribution or in the ionization fraction of the band carriers. The correlation of [NII]122 μm and [SiII]35 μm line emissions observed with SWS and LWS is reinvestigated based on the recent atomic data as well as the latest cosmic abundance, suggesting that a large fraction (> 70%), if not all, of silicon returns to the gas phase in the Carina nebula, suggesting that silicates cannot survive under harsh conditions, such as massive star-forming regions. The present observations clearly show dust processing taking place in active regions in the Galaxy.

  7. Colors of reflection nebulae. I - Phase function effects in the Merope nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. N.

    1985-01-01

    The subject of color differences between reflection nebulae and their illuminating stars is reexamined in the light of developments of observational techniques, permitting accurate surface-brightness photometry over an expanded spectral region from the UV to the IR. Color-color diagrams for reflection nebulae can yield useful information about the wavelength dependence of the scattering properties of nebular dust without excessive sensitivity to the specific nebular geometry or the presence of multiple scattering, resulting in considerable savings in computational efforts. As an illustration, the color-difference method was applied to existing data for the Merope nebula, covering the spectral region 1550-5500 A. Strong evidence for a monotonically changing phase function of scattering at wavelengths less than or equal to 3500 A is found. The result is interpreted in the context of a plausible geometry for the Merope environment as providing support for a bimodal size distribution of nebular dust grains.

  8. Ultraviolet spectra of planetary nebulae. X - Physical conditions in the compact planetary nebula Sw St 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. R.; Goharji, A.; Cohen, M.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectric visual and ultraviolet observations of the compact planetary nebula Sw St 1 are analyzed. The electron density, determined from the C III 1907/1909 A line ratio, is N(e) = (1.1 + or - 0.1) x 10 to the 5th/cu cm, consistent with the high emission measure and high critical frequency determined from observations of the thermal radio emission. The C/O abundance ratio in the nebula is found to be N(C)/N(O) = 0.72 + or - 0.1, i.e. the envelope is oxygen-rich, as suggested by the identification of the silicate feature in the 8-13 micron infrared spectrum. Difficulties remain in accurately determining the reddening constant to the nebula and its electron temperature.

  9. A Study of the Planetary Nebula M57

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archie, Deithra; Moore, Brian

    2000-01-01

    We present an overview of the objects known as planetary nebulae. These emission nebulae are the end-product of the evolution of a dying star. our ground-based imagery is of the most famous of these objects, M57, also known as the Ring Nebula. Taken with the 2.12-meter telescope at San Pedro Matir in Baja, Mexico, these seeing-limited images show variations in ionization, density and temperature as a function of position in the nebula. Our ground-based imagery is compared to similar HST archival images.

  10. A PHOTOMETRICALLY AND MORPHOLOGICALLY VARIABLE INFRARED NEBULA IN L483

    SciTech Connect

    Connelley, Michael S.; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Fuller, Gary A.

    2009-03-15

    We present narrow and broad K-band observations of the Class 0/I source IRAS 18148-0440 that span 17 years. The infrared nebula associated with this protostar in the L483 dark cloud is both morphologically and photometrically variable on a timescale of only a few months. This nebula appears to be an infrared analog to other well known optically visible variable nebulae associated with young stars, such as Hubble's Variable Nebula. Along with Cepheus A, this is one of the first large variable nebulae to be found that is only visible in the infrared. The variability of this nebula is most likely due to changing illumination of the cloud rather than any motion of the structure in the nebula. Both morphological and photometric changes are observed on a timescale only a few times longer than the light crossing time of the nebula, suggesting very rapid intrinsic changes in the illumination of the nebula. Our narrowband observations also found that H{sub 2} knots are found nearly twice as far to the east of the source as to its west, and that H{sub 2} emission extends farther east of the source than the previously known CO outflow.

  11. The expansion velocity field within the planetary nebula NGC 7008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbadin, F.; Ortolani, S.; Bianchini, A.; Hamzaoglu, E.

    1983-06-01

    The forbidden O III, H-alpha, and forbidden N II expansion velocity fields within the planetary nebula NGC 7008 have been obtained from high dispersion spectrograms. The photographic and spectroscopic data indicate that this nebula is very inhomogeneous. A rough model consists of two coaxial prolate spheroids of moderate ellipticity. Evidence is presented that K 4-44 (93 + 5 deg 1), classified as a distinct planetary nebula in the Catalogue of Galactic Planetary Nebulae of Perek and Kohoutek (1967) is a condensation within NGC 7008.

  12. Brightening event seen in observations of Jupiter's extended sodium nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, M.; Kagitani, M.; Tsuchiya, F.; Sakanoi, T.; Okano, S.

    2015-11-01

    Jupiter's sodium nebula, which originates from Io's volcanic gas, shows variations in its brightness due to the volcanic activity on Io. Imaging observation of D-line brightness in the sodium nebula was performed from 2013 through 2015 in a conjunction with the HISAKI mission. The D-line brightness of the sodium nebula had been stably faint and dim until January 2015, but it showed a distinct enhancement from February through March, 2015. The brightness increased by three times during this enhancement. Details in variations of Jupiter's sodium nebula are shown in this paper.

  13. Misplaced helix slows down ultrafast pressure-jump protein folding.

    PubMed

    Prigozhin, Maxim B; Liu, Yanxin; Wirth, Anna Jean; Kapoor, Shobhna; Winter, Roland; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin

    2013-05-14

    Using a newly developed microsecond pressure-jump apparatus, we monitor the refolding kinetics of the helix-stabilized five-helix bundle protein λ*YA, the Y22W/Q33Y/G46,48A mutant of λ-repressor fragment 6-85, from 3 μs to 5 ms after a 1,200-bar P-drop. In addition to a microsecond phase, we observe a slower 1.4-ms phase during refolding to the native state. Unlike temperature denaturation, pressure denaturation produces a highly reversible helix-coil-rich state. This difference highlights the importance of the denatured initial condition in folding experiments and leads us to assign a compact nonnative helical trap as the reason for slower P-jump-induced refolding. To complement the experiments, we performed over 50 μs of all-atom molecular dynamics P-drop refolding simulations with four different force fields. Two of the force fields yield compact nonnative states with misplaced α-helix content within a few microseconds of the P-drop. Our overall conclusion from experiment and simulation is that the pressure-denatured state of λ*YA contains mainly residual helix and little β-sheet; following a fast P-drop, at least some λ*YA forms misplaced helical structure within microseconds. We hypothesize that nonnative helix at helix-turn interfaces traps the protein in compact nonnative conformations. These traps delay the folding of at least some of the population for 1.4 ms en route to the native state. Based on molecular dynamics, we predict specific mutations at the helix-turn interfaces that should speed up refolding from the pressure-denatured state, if this hypothesis is correct. PMID:23620522

  14. Hierarchies of Models: Toward Understanding Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Hajian, Arsen R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Stars like our sun (initial masses between 0.8 to 8 solar masses) end their lives as swollen red giants surrounded by cool extended atmospheres. The nuclear reactions in their cores create carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, which are transported by convection to the outer envelope of the stellar atmosphere. As the star finally collapses to become a white dwarf, this envelope is expelled from the star to form a planetary nebula (PN) rich in organic molecules. The physics, dynamics, and chemistry of these nebulae are poorly understood and have implications not only for our understanding of the stellar life cycle but also for organic astrochemistry and the creation of prebiotic molecules in interstellar space. We are working toward generating three-dimensional models of planetary nebulae (PNe), which include the size, orientation, shape, expansion rate and mass distribution of the nebula. Such a reconstruction of a PN is a challenging problem for several reasons. First, the data consist of images obtained over time from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and spectra obtained from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). These images are of course taken from a single viewpoint in space, which amounts to a very challenging tomographic reconstruction. Second, the fact that we have two disparate and orthogonal data types requires that we utilize a method that allows these data to be used together to obtain a solution. To address these first two challenges we employ Bayesian model estimation using a parameterized physical model that incorporates much prior information about the known physics of the PN. In our previous works we have found that the forward problem of the comprehensive model is extremely time consuming. To address this challenge, we explore the use of a set of hierarchical models, which allow us to estimate increasingly more detailed sets of model parameters. These hierarchical models of increasing complexity are akin

  15. The Rings Around the Egg Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpaz, Amos; Rappaport, Saul; Soker, Noam

    1997-01-01

    We present an eccentric binary model for the formation of the proto-planetary nebula CRL 2688 (the Egg Nebula) that exhibits multiple concentric shells. Given the apparent regularity of the structure in the Egg Nebula, we postulate that the shells are caused by the periodic passages of a companion star. Such an orbital period would have to lie in the range of 100-500 yr, the apparent time that corresponds to the spacing between the rings. We assume, in this model, that an asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star, which is the origin of the matter within the planetary nebula, loses mass in a spherically symmetric wind. We further suppose that the AGB star has an extended atmosphere (out to approximately 10 stellar radii) in which the outflow speed is less than the escape speed; still farther out, grains form and radiation pressure accelerates the grains along with the trapped gas to the escape speed. Once escape speed has been attained, the presence of a companion star will not significantly affect the trajectories of the matter leaving in the wind and the mass loss will be approximately spherically symmetric. On the other hand, if the companion star is sufficiently close that the Roche lobe of the AGB star moves inside the extended atmosphere, then the slowly moving material will be forced to flow approximately along the critical potential surface (i.e., the Roche lobe) until it flows into the potential lobe of the companion star. Therefore, in our model, the shells are caused by periodic cessations of the isotropic wind rather than by any periodic enhancement in the mass-loss process. We carry out detailed binary evolution calculations within the context of this scenario, taking into account the nuclear evolution and stellar wind losses of the giant as well as the effects of mass loss and mass transfer on the evolution of the eccentric binary orbit. From the initial binary parameters that we find are required to produce a multiple concentric shell nebula and the known

  16. Hierarchies of Models: Toward Understanding Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Hajian, Arsen R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Stars like our sun (initial masses between 0.8 to 8 solar masses) end their lives as swollen red giants surrounded by cool extended atmospheres. The nuclear reactions in their cores create carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, which are transported by convection to the outer envelope of the stellar atmosphere. As the star finally collapses to become a white dwarf, this envelope is expelled from the star to form a planetary nebula (PN) rich in organic molecules. The physics, dynamics, and chemistry of these nebulae are poorly understood and have implications not only for our understanding of the stellar life cycle but also for organic astrochemistry and the creation of prebiotic molecules in interstellar space. We are working toward generating three-dimensional models of planetary nebulae (PNe), which include the size, orientation, shape, expansion rate and mass distribution of the nebula. Such a reconstruction of a PN is a challenging problem for several reasons. First, the data consist of images obtained over time from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and spectra obtained from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). These images are of course taken from a single viewpoint in space, which amounts to a very challenging tomographic reconstruction. Second, the fact that we have two disparate and orthogonal data types requires that we utilize a method that allows these data to be used together to obtain a solution. To address these first two challenges we employ Bayesian model estimation using a parameterized physical model that incorporates much prior information about the known physics of the PN. In our previous works we have found that the forward problem of the comprehensive model is extremely time consuming. To address this challenge, we explore the use of a set of hierarchical models, which allow us to estimate increasingly more detailed sets of model parameters. These hierarchical models of increasing complexity are akin

  17. A directional nucleation-zipping mechanism for triple helix formation

    PubMed Central

    Alberti, Patrizia; Arimondo, Paola B.; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Garestier, Thérèse; Hélène, Claude; Sun, Jian-Sheng

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic study of triple helix formation was performed by surface plasmon resonance. Three systems were investigated involving 15mer pyrimidine oligonucleotides as third strands. Rate constants and activation energies were validated by comparison with thermodynamic values calculated from UV-melting analysis. Replacement of a T·A base pair by a C·G pair at either the 5′ or the 3′ end of the target sequence allowed us to assess mismatch effects and to delineate the mechanism of triple helix formation. Our data show that the association rate constant is governed by the sequence of base triplets on the 5′ side of the triplex (referred to as the 5′ side of the target oligopurine strand) and provides evidence that the reaction pathway for triple helix formation in the pyrimidine motif proceeds from the 5′ end to the 3′ end of the triplex according to the nucleation-zipping model. It seems that this is a general feature for all triple helices formation, probably due to the right-handedness of the DNA double helix that provides a stronger base stacking at the 5′ than at the 3′ duplex–triplex junction. Understanding the mechanism of triple helix formation is not only of fundamental interest, but may also help in designing better triple helix-forming oligonucleotides for gene targeting and control of gene expression. PMID:12490709

  18. Translocation of α-helix chains through a nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhiyong; Li, Shiben; Zhang, Linxi; ur Rehman, Ateeq; Liang, Haojun

    2010-10-01

    The translocation of α-helix chains through a nanopore is studied through Langevin dynamics simulations. The α-helix chains exhibit several different characteristics about their average translocation times and the α-helix structures when they transport through the nanopores under the driving forces. First, the relationship between average translocation times τ and the chain length N satisfies the scaling law, τ ˜Nα, and the scaling exponent α depends on the driving force f for the small forces while it is close to the Flory exponent (ν) in the other force regions. For the chains with given chain lengths, it is observed that the dependence of the average translocation times can be expressed as τ ˜f-1/2 for the small forces while can be described as τ ˜f in the large force regions. Second, for the large driving force, the average number of α-helix structures Nh decreases first and then increases in the translocation process. The average waiting time of each bead, especially of the first bead, is also dependent on the driving forces. Furthermore, an elasticity spring model is presented to reasonably explain the change of the α-helix number during the translocation and its elasticity can be locally damaged by the large driving forces. Our results demonstrate the unique behaviors of α-helix chains transporting through the pores, which can enrich our insights into and knowledge on biopolymers transporting through membranes.

  19. Suppression of mammary epithelial cell differentiation by the helix-loop-helix protein Id-1

    SciTech Connect

    Desprez, P.; Hara, E.; Bissell, M.J.

    1995-06-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation are precisely coordinated during the development and maturation of the mammary gland, and this balance invariably is disrupted during carcinogenesis. Little is known about the cell-specific transcription factors that regulate these processes in the mammary gland. The mouse mammary epithelial cell line SCp2 grows well under standard culture conditions but arrests growth, forms alveolus-like structures, and expresses {beta}-casein, a differentiation marker, 4 to 5 days after exposure to basement membrane and lactogenic hormones (differentiation signals). The authors show that this differentiation entails a marked decline in the expression of Id-1, a helix-loop-helix (HLH) protein that inactivates basic HLH transcription factors in other cell types. SCp2 cells stably transfected with an Id-1 expression vector grew more rapidly than control cells under standard conditions, but in response to differentiation signals, they lost three-dimensional organization, invaded the basement membrane, and then resumed growth. SCp2 cells expressing an Id-1 antisense vector grew more slowly than controls; in response to differentiation signals, they remained stably growth arrested and fully differentiated, as did control cells. The authors suggest that Id-1 renders cells refractory to differentiation signals and receptive to growth signals by inactivating one or more basic HLH proteins that coordinate growth and differentiation in the mammary epithelium. 53 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-01-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix. PMID:26220399

  1. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts.

    PubMed

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers. PMID:26456005

  2. Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway in a developmental checkpoint monitoring Helix-Loop-Helix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan-Hsin; Baker, Nicholas E.

    2014-01-01

    The E-proteins and Id-proteins are, respectively, the positive and negative heterodimer partners for the basic-helix-loop-helix protein family, and as such contribute to a remarkably large number of cell fate decisions. E-proteins and Id-proteins also function to inhibit or promote cell proliferation and cancer. Using a genetic modifier screen in Drosophila, we show that the Id-protein Extramacrochaetae enables growth by suppressing activation of the Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway of tumor suppressors, activation that requires transcriptional activation of the expanded gene by the E-protein Daughterless. Daughterless protein binds to an intronic enhancer in the expanded gene, both activating the SWH pathway independently of the transmembrane protein Crumbs, and bypassing the negative feedback regulation that targets the same expanded enhancer. Thus the Salvador-Warts-Hippo pathway has a cell-autonomous function to prevent inappropriate differentiation due to transcription factor imbalance, and monitors the intrinsic developmental status of progenitor cells, distinct from any responses to cell-cell interactions. PMID:25579975

  3. Macrocyclization and labeling of helix-loop-helix peptide with intramolecular bis-thioether linkage.

    PubMed

    Nishihara, Toshio; Kitada, Hidekazu; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Fujii, Ikuo

    2016-11-01

    Conformationally constrained peptides have been developed as an inhibitor for protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and we have de novo designed cyclized helix-loop-helix (cHLH) peptide with a disulfide bond consisting of 40 amino acids to generate molecular-targeting peptides. However, synthesis of long peptides has sometimes resulted in low yield according to the respective amino acid sequences. Here we developed a method for efficient synthesis and labeling for cHLH peptides. First, we synthesized two peptide fragments and connected them by the copper-mediated alkyne and azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Cyclization was performed by bis-thioether linkage using 1,3-dibromomethyl-5-propargyloxybenzene, and subsequently, the cHLH peptide was labeled with an azide-labeled probe. Finally, we designed and synthesized a peptide inhibitor for the p53-HDM2 interaction using a structure-guided design and successfully labeled it with a fluorescent probe or a functional peptide, respectively, by click chemistry. This macrocyclization and labeling method for cHLH peptide would facilitate the discovery of de novo bioactive ligands and therapeutic leads. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 415-421, 2016. PMID:26917088

  4. Helix-loop-helix transcription factors mediate activation and repression of the p75LNGFR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Chiaramello, A; Neuman, K; Palm, K; Metsis, M; Neuman, T

    1995-01-01

    Sequence analysis of rat and human low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor p75LNGFR gene promoter regions revealed a single E-box cis-acting element, located upstream of the major transcription start sites. Deletion analysis of the E-box sequence demonstrated that it significantly contributes to p75LNGFR promoter activity. This E box has a dual function; it mediates either activation or repression of the p75LNGFR promoter activity, depending on the interacting transcription factors. We showed that the two isoforms of the class A basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor ME1 (ME1a and ME1b), the murine homolog of the human HEB transcription factor, specifically repress p75LNGFR promoter activity. This repression can be released by coexpression of the HLH Id2 transcriptional regulator. In vitro analyses demonstrated that ME1a forms a stable complex with the p75LNGFR E box and likely competes with activating E-box-binding proteins. By using ME1a-overexpressing PC12 cells, we showed that the endogenous p75LNGFR gene is a target of ME1a repression. Together, these data demonstrate that the p75LNGFR E box and the interacting bHLH transcription factors are involved in the regulation of p75LNGFR gene expression. These results also show that class A bHLH transcription factors can repress and Id-like negative regulators can stimulate gene expression. PMID:7565756

  5. Hydroxyproline Ring Pucker Causes Frustration of Helix Parameters in the Collagen Triple Helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying Chow, W.; Bihan, Dominique; Forman, Chris J.; Slatter, David A.; Reid, David G.; Wales, David J.; Farndale, Richard W.; Duer, Melinda J.

    2015-07-01

    Collagens, the most abundant proteins in mammals, are defined by their triple-helical structures and distinctive Gly-Xaa-Yaa repeating sequence, where Xaa is often proline and Yaa, hydroxyproline (Hyp/O). It is known that hydroxyproline in the Yaa position stabilises the triple helix, and that lack of proline hydroxylation in vivo leads to dysfunctional collagen extracellular matrix assembly, due to a range of factors such as a change in hydration properties. In addition, we note that in model peptides, when Yaa is unmodified proline, the Xaa proline has a strong propensity to adopt an endo ring conformation, whilst when Yaa is hydroxyproline, the Xaa proline adopts a range of endo and exo conformations. Here we use a combination of solid-state NMR spectroscopy and potential energy landscape modelling of synthetic triple-helical collagen peptides to understand this effect. We show that hydroxylation of the Yaa proline causes the Xaa proline ring conformation to become metastable, which in turn confers flexibility on the triple helix.

  6. The basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, Mist1, induces maturation of mouse fetal hepatoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Chikada, Hiromi; Ito, Keiichi; Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic stem/progenitor cells, hepatoblasts, have a high proliferative ability and can differentiate into mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. Therefore, these cells are considered to be useful for regenerative medicine and drug screening for liver diseases. However, it is problem that in vitro maturation of hepatoblasts is insufficient in the present culture system. In this study, a novel regulator to induce hepatic differentiation was identified and the molecular function of this factor was examined in embryonic day 13 hepatoblast culture with maturation factor, oncostatin M and extracellular matrices. Overexpression of the basic helix-loop-helix type transcription factor, Mist1, induced expression of mature hepatocytic markers such as carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase1 and several cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in this culture system. In contrast, Mist1 suppressed expression of cholangiocytic markers such as Sox9, Sox17, Ck19, and Grhl2. CYP3A metabolic activity was significantly induced by Mist1 in this hepatoblast culture. In addition, Mist1 induced liver-enriched transcription factors, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α and Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α, which are known to be involved in liver functions. These results suggest that Mist1 partially induces mature hepatocytic expression and function accompanied by the down-regulation of cholangiocytic markers. PMID:26456005

  7. Basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor gene family phylogenetics and nomenclature.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Michael K; Rawls, Alan; Wilson-Rawls, Jeanne; Roalson, Eric H

    2010-07-01

    A phylogenetic analysis of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) gene superfamily was performed using seven different species (human, mouse, rat, worm, fly, yeast, and plant Arabidopsis) and involving over 600 bHLH genes (Stevens et al., 2008). All bHLH genes were identified in the genomes of the various species, including expressed sequence tags, and the entire coding sequence was used in the analysis. Nearly 15% of the gene family has been updated or added since the original publication. A super-tree involving six clades and all structural relationships was established and is now presented for four of the species. The wealth of functional data available for members of the bHLH gene superfamily provides us with the opportunity to use this exhaustive phylogenetic tree to predict potential functions of uncharacterized members of the family. This phylogenetic and genomic analysis of the bHLH gene family has revealed unique elements of the evolution and functional relationships of the different genes in the bHLH gene family. PMID:20219281

  8. Origin and Diversification of Basic-Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Nuno; Dolan, Liam

    2010-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are a class of transcription factors found throughout eukaryotic organisms. Classification of the complete sets of bHLH proteins in the sequenced genomes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa (rice) has defined the diversity of these proteins among flowering plants. However, the evolutionary relationships of different plant bHLH groups and the diversity of bHLH proteins in more ancestral groups of plants are currently unknown. In this study, we use whole-genome sequences from nine species of land plants and algae to define the relationships between these proteins in plants. We show that few (less than 5) bHLH proteins are encoded in the genomes of chlorophytes and red algae. In contrast, many bHLH proteins (100–170) are encoded in the genomes of land plants (embryophytes). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that plant bHLH proteins are monophyletic and constitute 26 subfamilies. Twenty of these subfamilies existed in the common ancestors of extant mosses and vascular plants, whereas six further subfamilies evolved among the vascular plants. In addition to the conserved bHLH domains, most subfamilies are characterized by the presence of highly conserved short amino acid motifs. We conclude that much of the diversity of plant bHLH proteins was established in early land plants, over 440 million years ago. PMID:19942615

  9. Heat conductivity of DNA double helix

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Alexander V.; Mazo, Mikhail A.; Kikot, Irina P.; Manevitch, Leonid I.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of isolated single molecule DNA fragments is of importance for nanotechnology, but has not yet been measured experimentally. Theoretical estimates based on simplified (1D) models predict anomalously high thermal conductivity. To investigate thermal properties of single molecule DNA we have developed a 3D coarse-grained (CG) model that retains the realism of the full all-atom description, but is significantly more efficient. Within the proposed model each nucleotide is represented by 6 particles or grains; the grains interact via effective potentials inferred from classical molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories based on a well-established all-atom potential function. Comparisons of 10 ns long MD trajectories between the CG and the corresponding all-atom model show similar root-mean-square deviations from the canonical B-form DNA, and similar structural fluctuations. At the same time, the CG model is 10 to 100 times faster depending on the length of the DNA fragment in the simulation. Analysis of dispersion curves derived from the CG model yields longitudinal sound velocity and torsional stiffness in close agreement with existing experiments. The computational efficiency of the CG model makes it possible to calculate thermal conductivity of a single DNA molecule not yet available experimentally. For a uniform (polyG-polyC) DNA, the estimated conductivity coefficient is 0.3 W/mK which is half the value of thermal conductivity for water. This result is in stark contrast with estimates of thermal conductivity for simplified, effectively 1D chains (”beads on a spring”) that predict anomalous (infinite) thermal conductivity. Thus, full 3D character of DNA double-helix retained in the proposed model appears to be essential for describing its thermal properties at a single molecule level. PMID:26207085

  10. Nanoparticle biofabrication using English ivy (Hedera helix)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background English ivy (Hedera helix) is well known for its adhesive properties and climbing ability. Essential to its ability to adhere to vertical surfaces is the secretion of a nanocomposite adhesive containing spherical nanoparticles, 60–85 nm in diameter, produced exclusively by root hairs present on adventitious roots. These organic nanoparticles have shown promise in biomedical and cosmetic applications, and represent a safer alternative to metal oxide nanoparticles currently available. Results It was discovered that the maximum adventitious root production was achieved by a 4 h application of 1 mg/ml indole-3 butyric acid (IBA) to juvenile English ivy shoot segments cultured in custom vessels. After incubation of the shoots under continuous light at 83 μmol/m2 s at 20°C for 2 weeks, the adventitious roots were harvested from the culture system and it was possible to isolate 90 mg of dry weight nanoparticles per 12 g of roots. The nanoparticle morphology was characterized by atomic force microscopy, and found to be similar to previous studies. Conclusions An enhanced system for the production of English ivy adventitious roots and their nanoparticles by modifying GA7 Magenta boxes and identifying the optimal concentration of IBA for adventitious root growth was developed. This system is the first such platform for growing and harvesting organic nanoparticles from plants, and represents an important step in the development of plant-based nanomanufacturing. It is a significant improvement on the exploitation of plant systems for the formation of metallic nanoparticles, and represents a pathway for the generation of bulk ivy nanoparticles for translation into biomedical applications. PMID:23095780

  11. THE TRIFID NEBULA: STELLAR SIBLING RIVALRY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Trifid Nebula reveals a stellar nursery being torn apart by radiation from a nearby, massive star. The picture also provides a peek at embryonic stars forming within an ill-fated cloud of dust and gas, which is destined to be eaten away by the glare from the massive neighbor. This stellar activity is a beautiful example of how the life cycles of stars like our Sun is intimately connected with their more powerful siblings. The Hubble image shows a small part of a dense cloud of dust and gas, a stellar nursery full of embryonic stars. This cloud is about 8 light-years away from the nebula's central star, which is beyond the top of this picture. Located about 9,000 light-years from Earth, the Trifid resides in the constellation Sagittarius. A stellar jet [the thin, wispy object pointing to the upper left] protrudes from the head of a dense cloud and extends three-quarters of a light-year into the nebula. The jet's source is a very young stellar object that lies buried within the cloud. Jets such as this are the exhaust gases of star formation. Radiation from the massive star at the center of the nebula is making the gas in the jet glow, just as it causes the rest of the nebula to glow. The jet in the Trifid is a 'ticker tape,' telling the history of one particular young stellar object that is continuing to grow as its gravity draws in gas from its surroundings. But this particular ticker tape will not run for much longer. Within the next 10,000 years the glare from the central, massive star will continue to erode the nebula, overrunning the forming star, and bringing its growth to an abrupt and possibly premature end. Another nearby star may have already faced this fate. The Hubble picture shows a 'stalk' [the finger-like object] pointing from the head of the dense cloud directly toward the star that powers the Trifid. This stalk is a prominent example of the evaporating gaseous globules, or 'EGGs,' that were seen

  12. A possible family of B-like triple helix structures: comparison with the Arnott A-like triple helix.

    PubMed

    Ouali, M; Letellier, R; Adnet, F; Liquier, J; Sun, J S; Lavery, R; Taillandier, E

    1993-03-01

    Recent experimental studies of the structure of triple helices show that their conformation in solution differs from the A-like structure derived from diffraction data on triple helix fibers by Arnott and co-workers. Here we show by means of molecular modeling that a family of triple helix structures may exist with similar conformational energies, but with a variety of sugar puckers. The characteristics of these putative triple helices are analyzed for three different base sequences: (T.AxT)n, (C.GxC+)n, and alternating (C.GxC+/T.AxT)n. In the case of (C.GxC+)n triple helix, infrared and Raman spectra have been obtained and clearly reveal the existence of both N- and S-type sugars in solution. The molecular mechanics calculations allow us to propose a stereochemically reasonable model for this triple helix, in good agreement with the vibrational spectroscopy results. PMID:8448168

  13. De novo design of transmembrane helix-helix interactions and measurement of stability in a biological membrane.

    PubMed

    Nash, Anthony; Notman, Rebecca; Dixon, Ann M

    2015-05-01

    Membrane proteins regulate a large number of cellular functions, and have great potential as tools for manipulation of biological systems. Developing these tools requires a robust and quantitative understanding of membrane protein folding and interactions within the bilayer. With this in mind, we have designed a series of proteins to probe the net thermodynamic contribution of well-known sequence motifs to transmembrane helix-helix association in a biological membrane. The proteins were designed from first principles (de novo) using current knowledge about membrane insertion and stabilizing interaction motifs. A simple poly-Leu "scaffold" was decorated with individual helix interaction motifs (G-XXX-G, polar residues, heptad repeat) to create transmembrane helix-helix interactions of increasing strength. The GALLEX assay, an in vivo assay for measurement of transmembrane helix self-association, was combined with computational methods to characterize the relative strength and mode of interaction for each sequence. In addition, the apparent free energy contribution (ΔΔGapp) of each motif to transmembrane helix self-association was measured in a biological membrane, results that are the first of their kind for these de novo designed sequences, and suggest that the free energy barrier to overcoming weak association is quite small (<1.4 kcal mol(-1)) in a natural membrane. By quantifying and rationalizing the contribution of key motifs to transmembrane helix association, our work offers a route to direct the design of novel sequences for use in biotechnology or synthetic biology (e.g. molecular switches) and to predict the effects of sequence modification in known transmembrane domains (for control of cellular processes). PMID:25732028

  14. Tunable Control of Polyproline Helix (PPII) Structure via Aromatic Electronic Effects: An Electronic Switch of Polyproline Helix

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic rings exhibit defined interactions via the unique aromatic π face. Aromatic amino acids interact favorably with proline residues via both the hydrophobic effect and aromatic–proline interactions, C−H/π interactions between the aromatic π face and proline ring C–H bonds. The canonical aromatic amino acids Trp, Tyr, and Phe strongly disfavor a polyproline helix (PPII) when they are present in proline-rich sequences because of the large populations of cis amide bonds induced by favorable aromatic–proline interactions (aromatic–cis-proline and proline–cis-proline–aromatic interactions). We demonstrate the ability to tune polyproline helix conformation and cis–trans isomerism in proline-rich sequences using aromatic electronic effects. Electron-rich aromatic residues strongly disfavor polyproline helix and exhibit large populations of cis amide bonds, while electron-poor aromatic residues exhibit small populations of cis amide bonds and favor polyproline helix. 4-Aminophenylalanine is a pH-dependent electronic switch of polyproline helix, with cis amide bonds favored as the electron-donating amine, but trans amide bonds and polyproline helix preferred as the electron-withdrawing ammonium. Peptides with block proline–aromatic PPXPPXPPXPP sequences exhibited electronically switchable pH-dependent structures. Electron-poor aromatic amino acids provide special capabilities to integrate aromatic residues into polyproline helices and to serve as the basis of aromatic electronic switches to change structure. PMID:25075447

  15. Studies of bipolar nebulae. VI - Optical spectrophotometric mapping of GL 2688 /the Cygnus EGG Nebula/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.; Kuhi, L. V.

    1980-01-01

    Optical scanner spectra are presented for ten positions in the lobes of GL 2688. Color gradients exist across the nebulae, probably due to systematic variations in the sizes of typical scattering grains. Molecular emissions C2, C3, and SiC2 are found, similar to the spectra of comets. Resonance fluorescence seems to be indicated.

  16. Enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehler, R.; Ciprini, S.

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary LAT analysis indicates enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula. The daily-averaged gamma-ray emission (E > 100 MeV) from the direction of the Crab Nebula has surpassed 4.0 x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 five times in the last 12 days.

  17. The Very Fast Evolution of Bi-Lobed Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesicki, K.; Zijlstra, A. A.; Morisset, C.

    2015-12-01

    We study the kinematical ages of six Galactic bulge planetary nebulae selected purely on their bi-lobed morphology. The ages are derived from pseudo-3D photoionization and kinematical models, using HST images and UVES spectra and assuming axial symmetry. The bi-lobed nebulae show similar kinematical ages (˜1500 yrs), despite of their different sizes, expansion velocities and stellar temperatures.

  18. The Variable Central Star of Planetary Nebula NGC2346

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohoutek, L.

    1983-06-01

    NGC 2346, known already to Sir William Herschel, has been classified as a planetary nebula by R. Minkowski (1946) on the basis of its appearance on direct photographs. Morphologically it POssesses a distinct axial symmetry and belongs to the class of bipolar nebulae

  19. Three-dimensional evolution of early solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    1991-01-01

    The progress is reported toward the goal of a complete theory of solar nebula formation, with an emphasis on three spatial dimension models of solar nebular formation and evolution. The following subject areas are covered: (1) initial conditions for protostellar collapse; (2) single versus binary star formation; (3) angular momentum transport mechanisms; (4) three dimensional solar nebula models; and (5) implications for planetary formation.

  20. Elucidation of the aggregation pathways of helix-turn-helix peptides: Stabilization at the turn region is critical for fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thanh D.; Chamas, Ali; Zheng, Xueyun; Barnes, Aaron; Chang, Dayna; Veldstra, Tjitske; Takhar, Harmeet; Dressler, Nicolette; Trapp, Benjamin; Miller, Kylie; McMahon, Audrene; Meredith, Stephen C.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Cantrell, Kristi Lazar; Bowers, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins to fiber-like aggregates often involves a transformation of native monomers to β-sheet-rich oligomers. This general observation underestimates the importance of α-helical segments in the aggregation cascade. Here, using a combination of experimental techniques and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the aggregation of a 43-residue, apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide and its E21Q and D26N mutants. Our study indicates a strong propensity of helical segments not to adopt cross-β fibrils. The helix-turn-helix monomeric conformation of the peptides is preserved in the mature fibrils. Furthermore, we reveal opposite effects of mutations on and near the turn region in the self-assembly of these peptides. We show that the E21-R24 salt bridge is a major contributor to helix-turn-helix folding, subsequently leading to abundant fibril formation. On the other hand, the K19-D26 interaction is not required to fold the native helix-turn-helix. However, removal of the charged D26 residue decreases the stability of helix-turn-helix monomer, and consequently reduces aggregation. Finally, we provide a more refined assembly model for the helix-turn-helix peptides from apolipoprotein A-I based on the parallel stacking of helix-turn-helix dimers. PMID:26070092

  1. Binary stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, R.; Petr-Gotzens, M. G.; McCaughrean, M. J.; Bouvier, J.; Duchêne, G.; Quirrenbach, A.; Zinnecker, H.

    2006-11-01

    We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5-15 arcmin (0.65-2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13 arcsec-1.12 arcsec (60-500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 M⊙ is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from θ^1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.

  2. Binary Stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, Rainer; Petr-Gotzens, Monika G.; McCaughrean, Mark J.; Bouvier, Jerome; Duchêne, Gaspard; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Zinnecker, Hans

    2007-08-01

    We report on a high-spatial-resolution survey for binary stars in the periphery of the Orion Nebula Cluster, at 5 - 15 arcmin (0.65 - 2 pc) from the cluster center. We observed 228 stars with adaptive optics systems, in order to find companions at separations of 0.13 - 1.12 arcsec (60 - 500 AU), and detected 13 new binaries. Combined with the results of Petr (1998), we have a sample of 275 objects, about half of which have masses from the literature and high probabilities to be cluster members. We used an improved method to derive the completeness limits of the observations, which takes into account the elongated point spread function of stars at relatively large distances from the adaptive optics guide star. The multiplicity of stars with masses >2 Msun is found to be significantly larger than that of low-mass stars. The companion star frequency of low-mass stars is comparable to that of main-sequence M-dwarfs, less than half that of solar-type main-sequence stars, and 3.5 to 5 times lower than in the Taurus-Auriga and Scorpius-Centaurus star-forming regions. We find the binary frequency of low-mass stars in the periphery of the cluster to be the same or only slightly higher than for stars in the cluster core (<3 arcmin from θ1C Ori). This is in contrast to the prediction of the theory that the low binary frequency in the cluster is caused by the disruption of binaries due to dynamical interactions. There are two ways out of this dilemma: Either the initial binary frequency in the Orion Nebula Cluster was lower than in Taurus-Auriga, or the Orion Nebula Cluster was originally much denser and dynamically more active.

  3. Planetesimal Formation in the Outer Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Supulver, K. D.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical investigation of the orbital trajectories of individual particles in the turbulent outer solar nebula has been performed. The (spherical) particle consists of an unchanging mm-sized 'dust' core surrounded by an H2O ice mantle; the density of both core and mantle is 0.5 g/cm(exp 3). The simulations include the effects of H2O condensation from the gas phase, H2O sublimation from the particle surface, and collisional growth via particle collisions with a background distribution of small H2O grains. The model nebula is an azimuthally symmetric minimum-mass nebula of solar composition with a vertical (and radial) temperature gradient. Particle evolution follows a pattern. A particle starting out in a cool region grows via condensation and collisional accretion until it is large enough (decimeter- to meter-sized) to decouple somewhat from the turbulence. (This growth occurs on a timescale of several thousand years at 10 AU; at 30 AU, the timescale is approx. 104 years.) The particle then moves rapidly inward toward the sun due to secular gas drag forces, sublimates much of its icy mantle, and slows its inward migration as it gets caught up in the turbulence again (due to its now-smaller size) at the 'sublimation boundary,' where the ambient gas temperature is approx. 150 K. Such a process could, on a short timescale (i.e., a timescale much shorter than the nebular gas lifetime of approx. 106 yr), generate a population of decimeter- to meter-sized bodies which would then collisionally accrete to form planetesimals.

  4. CRL 618: A Nascent Planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tafoya, D.; Loinard, L.; Fonfría, J. P.; Vlemmings, W. H. T.; Martí-Vidal, I.; Pech, G.

    2014-04-01

    CRL 618 is an object that exhibits characteristics of both AGB and post-AGB star. It also displays a spectacular array of bipolar lobes with a dense equatorial region, which makes it an excellent object to study the development of asymmetries in evolved stars. In the recent decades, an elliptical compact HII region located in the center of the nebula has been seen to be increasing in size and flux. This seems to be due to the ionization of the circumstellar envelope by the central star, and it would be indicating the beginning of the planetary nebula phase for CRL 618. We analyzed interferometric radio continuum data at ~5 and 22 GHz from observations carried out at seven epochs with the VLA. We traced the increase of the flux of the ionized region over a period of ~26 years. We measured the dimensions of the HII region directly from the brightness distribution images to determine the increase of its size over time. For one of the epochs we analyzed observations at six frequencies from which we estimated the electron density distribution. We carried out model calculations of the spectral energy distribution at two different epochs to corroborate our observational results. We found that the radio continuum flux and the size of the ionized region have been increasing monotonically in the last three decades. The size of the major axis of the HII region shows a dependance with frequency, which has been interpreted as a result of a gradient of the electron density in this direction. The growth of the HII region is due to the expansion of an ionized wind whose mass-loss rate increased continuously for a period of ~100 years until a few decades ago, when the mass-loss rate experienced a sudden decline. Our results indicate that the beginning of the ionization of the circumstellar envelope began around 1971, which marks the start of the planetary nebula phase of CRL 618.

  5. Regulatory module network of basic/helix-loop-helix transcription factors in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Liu, Zijing J; Pan, Yuchun C; Liu, Qi; Fu, Xing; Cooper, Nigel GF; Li, Yixue; Qiu, Mengsheng; Shi, Tieliu

    2007-01-01

    Background The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are important components of the transcriptional regulatory network, controlling a variety of biological processes, especially the development of the central nervous system. Until now, reports describing the regulatory network of the bHLH transcription factor (TF) family have been scarce. In order to understand the regulatory mechanisms of bHLH TFs in mouse brain, we inferred their regulatory network from genome-wide gene expression profiles with the module networks method. Results A regulatory network comprising 15 important bHLH TFs and 153 target genes was constructed. The network was divided into 28 modules based on expression profiles. A regulatory-motif search shows the complexity and diversity of the network. In addition, 26 cooperative bHLH TF pairs were also detected in the network. This cooperation suggests possible physical interactions or genetic regulation between TFs. Interestingly, some TFs in the network regulate more than one module. A novel cross-repression between Neurod6 and Hey2 was identified, which may control various functions in different brain regions. The presence of TF binding sites (TFBSs) in the promoter regions of their target genes validates more than 70% of TF-target gene pairs of the network. Literature mining provides additional support for five modules. More importantly, the regulatory relationships among selected key components are all validated in mutant mice. Conclusion Our network is reliable and very informative for understanding the role of bHLH TFs in mouse brain development and function. It provides a framework for future experimental analyses. PMID:18021424

  6. Suppression of Chondrogenesis by Id Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins in Murine Embryonic Orofacial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Rezzoug, Francine; Webb, Cynthia L.; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of differentiation (Id) proteins are helix-loop-helix (HLH) transcription factors lacking a DNA binding domain. Id proteins modulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation in embryonic/fetal tissue. Perturbation of any of these processes in cells of the developing orofacial region results in orofacial anomalies. Chondrogenesis, a process integral to normal orofacial ontogenesis, is known to be modulated, in part, by Id proteins. In the present study, the mRNA and protein expression patterns of Id1, Id2, Id3 and Id4 were examined in developing murine orofacial tissue in vivo, as well as in murine embryonic maxillary mesenchymal cells in vitro. The functional role of Ids during chondrogenesis was also explored in vitro. Results reveal that cells derived from developing murine orofacial tissue: (1) express Id1, Id2, Id3 and Id4 mRNAs and proteins on each of gestational days 12-14, (2) express all four Id proteins in a developmentally regulated manner, (3) undergo chondrogenesis and express genes encoding various chondrogenic marker proteins (e.g. Runx2, Type X collagen, Sox9) when cultured under micromass conditions, and (4) can have their chondrogenic potential regulated via alteration of Id protein function through overexpression of a basic HLH factor. In summary, results from the current report reveal for the first time, the expression of all four Id proteins in cells derived from developing murine orofacial tissue, and demonstrate a functional role for the Ids in regulating the ability of these cells to undergo chondrogenesis. PMID:19349107

  7. Phylogenetic analyses of vector mosquito basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, D B; Wang, Y; Liu, A K; Wang, X H; Dang, C W; Yao, Q; Chen, K P

    2013-10-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play critical roles in the regulation of a wide range of developmental processes in higher organisms and have been identified in more than 20 organisms. Mosquitoes are important vectors of certain human diseases. In this study, Aedes aegypti, Anopheles gambiae str. PEST and Culex quinquefasciatus genomes were found to encode 55, 55 and 57 bHLH genes, respectively. Further phylogenetic analyses and OrthoDB and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes orthology database searches led us to define orthology for all the identified mosquito bHLHs successfully. This provides useful information with which to update annotations to 40 Ae. aegypti, 55 An. gambiae and 38 C. quinquefasciatus bHLH genes in VectorBase. The mosquito lineage has more bHLH genes in the Atonal, neurogenin (Ngn) and Hes-related with YRPW motif (Hey) families than do other insect species, suggesting that mosquitoes have evolved to be more sensitive to vibration, light and chemicals. Mosquito bHLH genes generally have higher evolutionary rates than other insect species. However, no pervasive positive selection occurred in the evolution of insect bHLH genes. Only episodic positive selection was found to affect evolution of bHLH genes in 11 families. Besides, coding regions of several Ae. aegypti bHLH motifs have unusually long introns in which multiple copies of transposable elements have been identified. These data provide a solid basis for further studies on structures and functions of bHLH proteins in the regulation of mosquito development and for prevention and control of mosquito-mediated human diseases. PMID:23906262

  8. Regulation of Arabidopsis Brassinosteroid Signaling by Atypical Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Proteins[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhu, Yongyou; Fujioka, Shozo; Asami, Tadao; Li, Jiayang; Li, Jianming

    2009-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are highly conserved transcription factors critical for cell proliferation and differentiation. Recent studies have implicated bHLH proteins in many plant signaling processes, including brassinosteroid (BR) signaling. Here, we report identification of two families of atypical bHLH proteins capable of modulating BR signaling. We found that activation-tagged bri1 suppressor 1-Dominant (atbs1-D), previously identified as a dominant suppressor of a weak BR receptor mutant bri1-301, was caused by overexpression of a 93–amino acid atypical bHLH protein lacking amino acids critical for DNA binding. Interestingly, atbs1-D only suppresses weak BR mutants, while overexpression of a truncated ATBS1 lacking the basic motif also rescues bri1-301, suggesting that ATBS1 likely stimulates BR signaling by sequestering negative BR signaling components. A yeast two-hybrid screen using ATBS1 as bait discovered four ATBS1-Interacting Factors (AIFs) that are members of another atypical bHLH protein subfamily. AIF1 exhibits an overlapping expression pattern with ATBS1 and its homologs and interacts with ATBS1 in vitro and in vivo. AIF1 overexpression nullifies the suppressive effect of atbs1-D on bri1-301 and results in dwarf transgenic plants resembling BR mutants. By contrast, silencing of AIF1 partially suppressed the bri1-301 phenotype. Our results suggested that plants use these atypical bHLH proteins to regulate BR signaling. PMID:20023194

  9. Large-scale processes in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, A. P.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical models of the structure of a minimum mass solar nebula should be able to provide the physical context to help evaluate the efficacy of any mechanism proposed for the formation of chondrules or Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAI's). These models generally attempt to use the equations of radiative hydrodynamics to calculate the large-scale structure of the solar nebula throughout the planet-forming region. In addition, it has been suggested that chondrules and CAI's (=Ch&CAI's) may have been formed as a direct result of large-scale nebula processing such as passage of material through high-temperature regions associated with the global structure of the nebula. In this report we assess the status of global models of solar nebula structure and of various related mechanisms that have been suggested for Ch and CAI formation.

  10. Solar nebula chemistry - Implications for volatiles in the solar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Current theoretical models of solar nebula chemistry which take into account the interplay between chemistry and dynamics are presented for the abundant reactive volatile elements including hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. Results of these models indicate that, in the solar nebula, the dominant carbon and nitrogen gases were CO and NO, whereas, in giant planet subnebulae, the dominant carbon and nitrogen gases were CH4 and NH3; in the solar nebula, the Fe metal grains catalyzed the formation of organic compounds from CO and H2 via the Fischer-Tropsch-type reaction. It was also found that, in solar nebula, bulk FeS formation was kinetically favorable, while FeO incorporation into silicates and bulk Fe3O4 formation were kinetically inhibited. Furthermore, clathrate formation was kinetically inhibited in the solar nebula, while it was kinetically favorable in giant planet subnebulae.

  11. MCNeil's Nebula in Orion: The Outburst History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, C.; Vivas, A. K.; Hernández, J.; Calvet, N.; Hartmann, L.; Megeath, T.; Berlind, P.; Calkins, M.; Hoyer, S.

    2004-05-01

    We present a sequence of I-band images obtained at the Venezuela 1 m Schmidt telescope during the outburst of the nebula recently discovered by J. W. McNeil in the Orion L1630 molecular cloud. We derive photometry spanning the preoutburst state and the brightening itself, which is a unique record including 14 epochs and spanning a timescale of ~5 years. We constrain the beginning of the outburst at some time between 2003 October 28 and November 15. The light curve of the object at the vertex of the nebula, the likely exciting source of the outburst, reveals that it has brightened ~5 mag in about 4 months. The timescale for the nebula to develop is consistent with the light-travel time, indicating that we are observing light from the central source scattered by the ambient cloud into the line of sight. We also show recent FLWO optical spectroscopy of the exciting source and of the nearby HH 22. The spectrum of the source is highly reddened; in contrast, the spectrum of HH 22 shows a shock spectrum superposed on a continuum, most likely the result of reflected light from the exciting source reaching the HH object through a much less reddened path. The blue portion of this spectrum is consistent with an early B spectral type, similar to the early outburst spectrum of the FU Orionis variable star V1057 Cygni; we estimate a luminosity of L~219 Lsolar. The eruptive behavior of McNeil's Nebula, its spectroscopic characteristics and luminosity, suggest that we may be witnessing an FU Ori event on its way to maximum. By further monitoring this object, we will be able decide whether or not it qualifies as a member of this rare class of objects. Based on observations obtained at the Llano del Hato National Astronomical Observatory of Venezuela, operated by CIDA for the Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología, and at the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory (FLWO) of the Smithsonian Institution.

  12. The Gum Nebula and Related Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Proceedings of a symposium concerning the Gum Nebula (GN) and related topics are reported. Papers presented include: Colin Gum and the discovery of the GN; identification of the GN as the fossil Stromgren sphere of Vela X Supernova; size and shape of GN; formation of giant H-2 regions following supernova explosions; radio astronomy Explorer 1 observations of GN; cosmic ray effects in the GN; low intensity H beta emission from the interstellar medium; and how to recognize and analyze GN. Astronomical charts and diagrams are included.

  13. Planetary nebulae and the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    In addition to available published data on planetary nebulae (PN), some 40 objects largely concentrated towards the galactic center and anticenter regions were included. All were observed with the Lick 3(sup m) telescope and image tube scanner. Abundances of C, N, O, Ne, Cl, and Ar were determined by a procedure in which theoretical models were used to obtain ionization correction factors (ICF). Of the 106 PN, 66 are N-rich and 40 are N-poor. There appear to be no significant differences between the average compositions in the solar neighborhood and the average taken over the entire observable portion of the galaxy.

  14. NGC 2242 - A newly discovered planetary nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, H.; Okamura, S.; Noguchi, T.; He, X. T.; Liu, J. Y.; Huang, Y. W.; Feng, X.-C.

    1987-05-01

    Photometric and spectroscopic analyses are made for the object NGC 2242, which was detected in a survey of emission-line galaxies by Liu et al. (1986). Luminosity and color distributions and a small heliocentric velocity (-30 km s-1) are all inconsistent with previous classifications as a galaxy. NGC 2242 is probably a planetary nebula located at ≡2 kpc from the sun and at ≡500 pc above the galactic plane. Characteristics and physical parameters of NGC 2242 are discussed in some detail.

  15. Investigation of the cometary nebula Parsamyan 21

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosyan, V.M.

    1985-05-01

    The results are given of an isodensitometric and spectrophotometric investigation of the cometary nebula P 21 and its associated nucleus. The shape of the isodensities of the nucleus differs from those for normal stars, and in this the nucleus recalls R Mon. A spectral investigation of the nucleus of P 21 made on the basis of observations during 1981-1982 shows that it is a star of the class F2-F5V with an envelope expanding at about 120 km/sec.

  16. The Boomerang Nebula - the coolest place in the Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-02-01

    Boomerang Nebula hi-res Size hi-res: 196 kb Credits: European Space Agency, NASA The Boomerang Nebula - the coolest place in the Universe? The Boomerang Nebula is a young planetary nebula and the coldest object found in the Universe so far. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is yet another example of how Hubble's sharp eye reveals surprising details in celestial objects. This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a young planetary nebula known (rather curiously) as the Boomerang Nebula. It is in the constellation of Centaurus, 5000 light-years from Earth. Planetary nebulae form around a bright, central star when it expels gas in the last stages of its life. The Boomerang Nebula is one of the Universe's peculiar places. In 1995, using the 15-metre Swedish ESO Submillimetre Telescope in Chile, astronomers revealed that it is the coldest place in the Universe found so far. With a temperature of -272°C, it is only 1 degree warmer than absolute zero (the lowest limit for all temperatures). Even the -270°C background glow from the Big Bang is warmer than this nebula. It is the only object found so far that has a temperature lower than the background radiation. Keith Taylor and Mike Scarrott called it the Boomerang Nebula in 1980 after observing it with a large ground-based telescope in Australia. Unable to see the detail that only Hubble can reveal, the astronomers saw merely a slight asymmetry in the nebula's lobes suggesting a curved shape like a boomerang. The high-resolution Hubble images indicate that 'the Bow tie Nebula' would perhaps have been a better name. The Hubble telescope took this image in 1998. It shows faint arcs and ghostly filaments embedded within the diffuse gas of the nebula's smooth 'bow tie' lobes. The diffuse bow-tie shape of this nebula makes it quite different from other observed planetary nebulae, which normally have lobes that look more like 'bubbles' blown in the gas. However, the Boomerang Nebula is so young that it may not

  17. The Other Double Helix--The Fascinating Chemistry of Starch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, Robert D.; Tarbet, Bryon J.

    2000-08-01

    Current textbooks deal only briefly with the chemistry of starch. A short review with 21 references is presented, describing the structure of starch and indicating the double helix structure of A-type and B-type starch. The structure of the starch granule is examined, pointing out the existence of growth rings of alternating crystalline and noncrystalline starch, with growing amylopectin molecules extending from the hilum (point of origin) to the surface of the starch granule. The swelling of starch granules in water, above the gelatinization temperature of about 60 °C, is discussed. The process of gelatinization involves unraveling of the starch helix and a manyfold increase in volume of the starch granule as water is imbibed and bound to the unraveled starch polymer by hydrogen bonding. Baking bread or pastries causes unraveling of the starch helix, and the process by which these products become stale corresponds primarily to the re-forming of the starch helix. The importance of this phenomenon in food science is discussed. The absorption of nonpolar linear molecules such as I2, or linear nonpolar portions of molecules such as n-butanol or fats and phospholipids, by the C-type helix of starch is examined. The way in which starch is structurally modified to retard staling is discussed in relation to food technology.

  18. Helix/Coil Nucleation: A Local Response to Global Demands

    PubMed Central

    Vorov, Oleg K.; Livesay, Dennis R.; Jacobs, Donald J.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A complete description of protein structure and function must include a proper treatment of mechanisms that lead to cooperativity. The helix/coil transition serves as a simple example of a cooperative folding process, commonly described by a nucleation-propagation mechanism. The prevalent view is that coil structure must first form a short segment of helix in a localized region despite paying a free energy cost (nucleation). Afterward, helical structure propagates outward from the nucleation site. Both processes entail enthalpy-entropy compensation that derives from the loss in conformational entropy on helix formation with concomitant gain in favorable interactions. Nucleation-propagation models inherently assume that cooperativity arises from a sequential series of local events. An alternative distance constraint model asserts there is a direct link between available degrees of freedom and cooperativity through the nonadditivity in conformational entropy. That is, helix nucleation is a concerted manifestation of rigidity propagating through atomic structure. The link between network rigidity and nonadditivity of conformational entropy is shown in this study by solving the distance constraint model using a simple global constraint counting approximation. Cooperativity arises from competition between excess and deficiency in available degrees of freedom in the coil and helix states respectively. PMID:19948130

  19. Stabilization of magnetic helix in exchange-coupled thin films.

    PubMed

    Dzemiantsova, L V; Meier, G; Röhlsberger, R

    2015-01-01

    Based on micromagnetic simulations, we report on a novel magnetic helix in a soft magnetic film that is sandwiched between and exchange-coupled to two hard magnetic layers with different anisotropies. We show that such a confined helix stays stable without the presence of an external magnetic field. The magnetic stability is determined by the energy minimization and is a result of an internal magnetic field created by the exchange interaction. We show that this internal field stores a magnetic energy density of a few kJ/m(3). We also find that it dramatically modifies ferromagnetic resonances, such that the helix can be used as a ferromagnetic resonance filter and a fast acting attenuator. PMID:26537574

  20. Stabilization of magnetic helix in exchange-coupled thin films

    PubMed Central

    Dzemiantsova, L. V.; Meier, G.; Röhlsberger, R.

    2015-01-01

    Based on micromagnetic simulations, we report on a novel magnetic helix in a soft magnetic film that is sandwiched between and exchange-coupled to two hard magnetic layers with different anisotropies. We show that such a confined helix stays stable without the presence of an external magnetic field. The magnetic stability is determined by the energy minimization and is a result of an internal magnetic field created by the exchange interaction. We show that this internal field stores a magnetic energy density of a few kJ/m3. We also find that it dramatically modifies ferromagnetic resonances, such that the helix can be used as a ferromagnetic resonance filter and a fast acting attenuator. PMID:26537574

  1. Conformation dependent electronic transport in a DNA double-helix

    SciTech Connect

    Kundu, Sourav Karmakar, S. N.

    2015-10-15

    We present a tight-binding study of conformation dependent electronic transport properties of DNA double-helix including its helical symmetry. We have studied the changes in the localization properties of DNA as we alter the number of stacked bases within every pitch of the double-helix keeping fixed the total number of nitrogen bases within the DNA molecule. We take three DNA sequences, two of them are periodic and one is random and observe that in all the cases localization length increases as we increase the radius of DNA double-helix i.e., number of nucleobases within a pitch. We have also investigated the effect of backbone energetic on the I-V response of the system and found that in presence of helical symmetry, depending on the interplay of conformal variation and disorder, DNA can be found in either metallic, semiconducting and insulating phases, as observed experimentally.

  2. A Hyperspectral View of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P.; Grandmont, F.; Binette, L.

    2010-05-01

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the Hβ, [O III] λ4959, λ5007, Hα, [N II] λ6548, λ6584, and [S II] λ6717, λ6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Mégantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Čadež et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/Hα, [S II]/Hα, and [S II] λ6717 /[S II] λ6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  3. Abundances in the Planetary Nebula IC 5217

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Woo-Baik; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution optical wavelength spectroscopic data were secured in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10,050A, for the planetary nebula IC 5217 with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory. These optical spectra have been analyzed along with the near-UV and UV archive data. Diagnostic analyses indicate a nebular physical condition with electron temperature of about 10,700 K (from the [O III] lines) and the density of N(sub epsilon) = 5000/cm. Ionic concentrations have been derived with the representative diagnostics, and with the aid of a photoionization model construction, we derived the elemental abundances. Contrary to the previous studies found in the literature, He and C appear to be depleted compared to the average planetary nebula and to the Sun (and S marginally so), while the remaining elements appear to be close to the average value. IC 5217 may have evolved from an O-rich progenitor and the central star temperature of IC 5217 is likely to be 92,000 K.

  4. A HYPERSPECTRAL VIEW OF THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Charlebois, M.; Drissen, L.; Bernier, A.-P.; Grandmont, F.; Binette, L. E-mail: ldrissen@phy.ulaval.c

    2010-05-15

    We have obtained spatially resolved spectra of the Crab nebula in the spectral ranges 450-520 nm and 650-680 nm, encompassing the H{beta}, [O III] {lambda}4959, {lambda}5007, H{alpha}, [N II] {lambda}6548, {lambda}6584, and [S II] {lambda}6717, {lambda}6731 emission lines, with the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer SpIOMM at the Observatoire du Mont-Megantic's 1.6 m telescope. We first compare our data with published observations obtained either from a Fabry-Perot interferometer or from a long-slit spectrograph. Using a spectral deconvolution technique similar to the one developed by Cadez et al., we identify and resolve multiple emission lines separated by large Doppler shifts and contained within the rapidly expanding filamentary structure of the Crab. This allows us to measure important line ratios, such as [N II]/H{alpha}, [S II]/H{alpha}, and [S II] {lambda}6717 /[S II] {lambda}6731 of individual filaments, providing a new insight on the SE-NW asymmetry in the Crab. From our analysis of the spatial distribution of the electronic density and of the respective shocked versus photoionized gas components, we deduce that the skin-less NW region must have evolved faster than the rest of the nebula. Assuming a very simple expansion model for the ejecta material, our data provide us with a complete tridimensional view of the Crab.

  5. IUE Tomography of the Rosette Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Buren, Dave

    We propose to obtain SWP and LWR spectra of a dozen 8th magnitude O and B stars associated with the Rosette Nebula in Monoceros for the purpose of determining the structure and kinematics of this HII region / stellar wind bubble. The ability to sense along numerous lines of sight will allow us to determine the detailed physical conditions which exist in the nebula, both inside the bubble and in the HII region exterior to it. This picture can then be compared in detail to the theory of stellar wind bubbles, HII region dynamics, photodissociation fronts and shock destruction of grains. The hot gas in the bubble has been detected in the soft x-rays by the Einstein satellite, so we anticipate a structure similar to that found by Castor, McCray and Weaver for adiabatic (non-radiative) stellar wind bubbles. Such adiabatic bubbles are ideal laboratories for the study of thermal conduction on astrophysical scales. While we will probably not be able to detect the conductive interface between the hot bubble interior and the swept up shell, we will be able to determine many properties of the bubble. These properties in turn will point to the Rosette's suitability as a cosmic laboratory for studying conductive interfaces with the Space Telescope. The energetics and mass balance of HII regions and stellar wind bubbles is important for a number of problems: the physical conditions in and near star forming regions; the structure and evolution of "superbubbles"; and galactic "ecology".

  6. Chemical fractionation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grossman, L.

    1977-01-01

    The sequence of condensation of minerals from a cooling gas of solar composition has been calculated from thermodynamic data over the pressure range 0.001-0.00001 atm, assuming that complete chemical equilibrium is maintained. The results suggest that the Ca-Al-rich inclusions Allende and other carbonaceous chondrites are aggregates of the highest temperature condensates. Complete condensation of these elements is followed, 100 deg later, by the onset of the crystallization of nickel-iron, forsterite and enstatite. Transport of Ca-Al-rich refractory condensates from one part of the nebula to another before the condensation of these lower-temperature phases may have been responsible for the refractory element fractionations between the different classes of chondrites and possibly for the inferred refractory element enrichment of the Moon. The temperature gap between the condensation temperatures of nickel-iron and forsterite increases with increasing total pressure. Because pressure and temperature probably increased with decreasing heliocentric distance in the solar nebula, Mercury may have accreted from a condensate assemblage having a higher metal/silicate ratio than Venus or Earth which may, in turn, have formed from less oxidized material than Mars.

  7. Si isotope homogeneity of the solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Pringle, Emily A.; Savage, Paul S.; Moynier, Frédéric; Jackson, Matthew G.; Barrat, Jean-Alix E-mail: savage@levee.wustl.edu E-mail: moynier@ipgp.fr E-mail: Jean-Alix.Barrat@univ-brest.fr

    2013-12-20

    The presence or absence of variations in the mass-independent abundances of Si isotopes in bulk meteorites provides important clues concerning the evolution of the early solar system. No Si isotopic anomalies have been found within the level of analytical precision of 15 ppm in {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si across a wide range of inner solar system materials, including terrestrial basalts, chondrites, and achondrites. A possible exception is the angrites, which may exhibit small excesses of {sup 29}Si. However, the general absence of anomalies suggests that primitive meteorites and differentiated planetesimals formed in a reservoir that was isotopically homogenous with respect to Si. Furthermore, the lack of resolvable anomalies in the calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion measured here suggests that any nucleosynthetic anomalies in Si isotopes were erased through mixing in the solar nebula prior to the formation of refractory solids. The homogeneity exhibited by Si isotopes may have implications for the distribution of Mg isotopes in the solar nebula. Based on supernova nucleosynthetic yield calculations, the expected magnitude of heavy-isotope overabundance is larger for Si than for Mg, suggesting that any potential Mg heterogeneity, if present, exists below the 15 ppm level.

  8. HUBBLE CAPTURES DYNAMICS OF CRAB NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A new sequence of Hubble Space Telescope images of the remnant of a tremendous stellar explosion is giving astronomers a remarkable look at the dynamic relationship between the tiny Crab Pulsar and the vast nebula that it powers. This picture shows a Hubble Space Telescope image of the inner parts of the Crab. The pulsar itself is visible as the left of the pair of stars near the center of the frame. Surrounding the pulsar is a complex of sharp knots and wisp-like features. This image is one of a sequence of Hubble images taken over the course of several months. This sequence shows that the inner part of the Crab Nebula is far more dynamic than previously understood. The Crab literally 'changes it stripes' every few days as these wisps stream away from the pulsar at half the speed of light. The Hubble Space Telescope photo was taken Nov. 5, 1995 by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 at a wavelength of around 550 nanometers, in the middle of the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Credit: Jeff Hester and Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), and NASA

  9. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  10. Optical line intensities in the Trifid nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Lynds, B.T.; Oneil, E.J. Jr.

    1985-07-01

    Observations of the Trifid nebula (M20) obtained in H-alpha; He I (587.6 nm); and the forbidden lines of N II (658.3 nm), S II (671.6 and 673 nm), O III (500.7 nm), and O II (272.6 and 372.9 nm) using either the CIT long-slit spectrograph or a direct-mode CCD with narrow-band interference filters on the 92-cm telescope at KPNO are reported. The data are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail and a model is proposed to explain the scattering measurements. Findings discussed include a single central O7 V star with Teff = about 37,500 K, a dusty plasma ionized by this star, mean nebular electron density 150/cu cm, a central hole of radius 0.2 times that of the ionized zone, dust extending beyond the ionized region, overall temperature 7000-8000 K, filament temperatures up to 9000 K, dust optical depth 1.5 at H-beta, dust albedo 0.5, emission-nebula radius 2.8 pc, and total mass about 1700 solar mass (comprising 340 solar mass ionized material, about 800 solar mass unionized cloud material, and about 600 solar mass in an outer dust sphere). 18 references.

  11. Forming Planets in the Hostile Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Can protoplanetary disks form and be maintained around low-mass stars in the harsh environment of a highly active, star-forming nebula? A recent study examines the Carina nebula to answer this question.Crowded ClustersStars are often born in clusters that contain both massive and low-mass stars. The most massive stars in these clusters emit far-ultraviolet and extreme-ultraviolet light that irradiates the region around them, turning the surrounding area into a hostile environment for potential planet formation.Planet formation from protoplanetary disks typically requires timescales of at least 12 million years. Could the harsh radiation from massive stars destroy the protoplanetary disks around low-mass stars by photoevaporation before planets even have a chance to form?Artists impression of a protoplanetary disk. Such disks can be photoevaporated by harsh ultraviolet light from nearby massive stars, causing the disk to be destroyed before planets have a chance to form within them. [ESO/L. Calada]Turning ALMA Toward CarinaA perfect case study for exploring hostile environments is the Carina nebula, located about 7500 lightyears away and home to nearly 100 O-type stars as well as tens of thousands of lower-mass young stars. The Carina population is ~14 Myr old: old enough to form planets within protoplanetary disks, but also old enough that photoevaporation could already have wreaked havoc on those disks.Due to the dense stellar populations in Carinas clusters, this is a difficult region to explore, but the Atacama Large Millimeter-submillimeter Array (ALMA) is up to the task. In a recent study, a team of scientists led by Adal Mesa-Delgado (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) made use of ALMAs high spatial resolution to image four regions spaced throughout Carina, searching for protoplanetary disks.Detections and Non-DetectionsTwo evaporating gas globules in the Carina nebula, 104-593 and 105-600, that each contain a protoplanetary disk. The top panels are

  12. Single- and double-helix chiral fiber sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Kopp, Victor I.; Churikov, Victor M.; Zhang, Guoyin; Singer, Jonathan; Draper, Christopher W.; Chao, Norman; Neugroschl, Daniel; Genack, Azriel Z.

    2007-10-15

    Copropagating core and cladding modes in optical fibers can be coupled by a grating with a period greatly exceeding the wavelength, since their propagation constants are similar. In contrast to conventional long-period gratings, in which the modulation is imposed by exposing a photosensitive core to ultraviolet light, we have created chiral long-period gratings with single- or double-helix symmetry by twisting optical fibers with nonconcentric or noncircular cores, respectively, as they pass through a short heat zone. The difference in symmetry between single- and double-helix gratings is manifested in their polarization properties. The use of these gratings as sensors of liquid level and temperature is demonstrated.

  13. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling in Twin-Helix.

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Erdelyi. B., J.A. Maloney

    2011-09-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated optics. Wedge-shaped absorbers immediately followed by short rf cavities are placed into the twin-helix channel. Parametric resonances are induced in both planes using helical quadrupole harmonics. We demonstrate resonant dynamics and cooling with stochastic effects off using GEANT4/G4beamline. We illustrate compensation of spherical aberrations and benchmark COSY Infinity, a powerful tool for aberration analysis and compensation.

  14. Artificial metalloenzymes derived from three-helix bundles

    PubMed Central

    Tebo, Alison G.; Pecoraro, Vincent L.

    2015-01-01

    Three-helix bundles and coiled-coil motifs are well-established de novo designed scaffolds that have been investigated for their metal-binding and catalytic properties. Satisfaction of the primary coordination sphere for a given metal is sufficient to introduce catalytic activity and a given structure may catalyze different reactions dependent on the identity of the incorporated metal. Here we describe recent contributions in the de novo design of metalloenzymes based on three-helix bundles and coiled-coil motifs, focusing on non-heme systems for hydrolytic and redox chemistry. PMID:25579452

  15. Converting One-Face α-Helix Mimetics into Amphiphilic α-Helix Mimetics as Potent Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Oh, Misook; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Huisun; Im, Wonpil; Lim, Hyun-Suk

    2016-01-11

    Many biologically active α-helical peptides adopt amphiphilic helical structures that contain hydrophobic residues on one side and hydrophilic residues on the other side. Therefore, α-helix mimetics capable of mimicking such amphiphilic helical peptides should possess higher binding affinity and specificity to target proteins. Here we describe an efficient method for generating amphiphilic α-helix mimetics. One-face α-helix mimetics having hydrophobic side chains on one side was readily converted into amphiphilic α-helix mimetics by introducing appropriate charged residues on the opposite side. We also demonstrate that such two-face amphiphilic α-helix mimetics indeed show remarkably improved binding affinity to a target protein, compared to one-face hydrophobic α-helix mimetics. We believe that generating a large combinatorial library of these amphiphilic α-helix mimetics can be valuable for rapid discovery of highly potent and specific modulators of protein-protein interactions. PMID:26651509

  16. Chemical evolution of the solar nebula: A new model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trivedi, B. M. P.

    1984-01-01

    The common notion of a hot solar nebula from which meteoritic minerals condensed is not supported by theories of star formation. A model is developed which can give the same sequence of condensation without recourse to hot solar nebula. In this model, the solar nebula was formed from the matter ejected by the Sun during its T Tauri phase and the chemical condensation took place in this outflowing matter. Isotopic anomalies and the unique minerals found in meteorites may be explained by this model.

  17. X-Ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula trailing the high-velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the "Guitar Nebula"). This X-ray flux gives evidence of gamma approximately 10(exp 7) eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the postshock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near-equipartition values.

  18. Infrared polarimetry of the NGC 6334 V bipolar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Okuda, Haruyuki; Shibai, Hiroshi; Nagata, Tetsuya Kyoto Univ. )

    1990-03-01

    Exceptionally high degrees (up to about 100 percent) of polarization were observed in the L-prime band (3.8 microns) toward the NGC 6334 V bipolar nebula. The observed symmetric polarization pattern indicates that the nebula is a reflection nebula consisting of two lobes illuminated by a central obscured star. The distribution of polarization requires that one of the lobes consist of a lemon-shaped cavity which scatters light mainly at its surface, whereas a conical cavity model is appropriate for the other lobe. This asymmetry of the lobes is probably due to a density gradient in the ambient cloud material in this region. 17 refs.

  19. The abundances of neon, sulfur, and argon in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. C.; Lacy, J. H.; Townes, C. H.; Aller, L. H.; Geballe, T. R.; Baas, F.

    1981-01-01

    New infrared observations of Ne II, Ar III, and S IV are used in optical observations of other ionization states of the considered elements to evaluate the abundances of neon, argon, and sulfur in 18 planetary nebulae. Attention is also given to one or more of the infrared lines in 18 other nebulae. It is pointed out that S IV was detected in approximately 90% of the observed objects, while Ar III was found in about 80%, and Ne II in roughly one-third. It is noted that optical observations typically include only a limited region of the nebula, while the infrared measurements frequently involve integration over the entire nebular image.

  20. Estimating the Binary Fraction of Central Stars of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douchin, Dimitri

    2015-01-01

    Planetary nebulae are the end-products of intermediate-mass stars evolution, following a phase of expansion of their atmospheres at the end of their lives. Observationally, it has been estimated that 80% of them have non-spherical shapes. Such a high fraction is puzzling and has occupied the planetary nebula community for more than 30 years. One scenario that would allow to justify the observed shapes is that a comparable fraction of the progenitors of central stars of planetary nebula (CSPN) are not single, but possess a companion. The shape of the nebulae would then be the result of an interaction with this companion. The high fraction of non-spherical planetary nebulae would thus imply a high fraction of binary central stars of planetary nebulae, making binarity a preferred channel for planetary nebula formation. After presenting the current state of knowledge regarding planetary nebula formation and shaping and reviewing the diverse efforts to find binaries in planetary nebulae, I present my work to detect a near-infrared excess that would be the signature of the presence of cool companions. The first part of the project consists in the analysis of data and photometry acquired and conducted by myself. The second part details an attempt to make use of archived datasets: the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 optical survey and the extended database assembled by Frew (2008). I also present results from a radial velocity analysis of VLT/UVES spectra for 14 objects aiming to the detection of spectroscopic companions. Finally I give details of the analysis of optical photometry data from our observations associated to the detection of companions around central stars of planetary nebulae using the photometric variability technique. The main result of this thesis is from the near-infrared excess studies which I combine with previously published data. I conclude that if the detected red and NIR flux excess is indicative of a stellar companion then the binary

  1. Regulation of T cell receptor beta gene rearrangements and allelic exclusion by the helix-loop-helix protein, E47.

    PubMed

    Agata, Yasutoshi; Tamaki, Nobuyuki; Sakamoto, Shuji; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Masuda, Kyoko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Murre, Cornelis

    2007-12-01

    Allelic exclusion of antigen-receptor genes is ensured primarily by monoallelic locus activation upon rearrangement and subsequently by feedback inhibition of continued rearrangement. Here, we demonstrated that the basic helix-loop-helix protein, E47, promoted T cell receptor beta (TCRbeta) gene rearrangement by directly binding to target gene segments to increase chromatin accessibility in a dosage-sensitive manner. Feedback signaling abrogated E47 binding, leading to a decline in accessibility. Conversely, enforced expression of E47 induced TCRbeta gene rearrangement by antagonizing feedback inhibition. Thus, the abundance of E47 is rate limiting in locus activation, and feedback signaling downregulates E47 activity to ensure allelic exclusion. PMID:18093539

  2. Planetary Nebulae with Supporting IR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    1999-01-01

    We present new HST/WFPC2 imagery for the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 6818. Observations were made in line filters F437N, F487N, F502N, and F656N plus continuum filter F547M. The primary goal was to develop a high spatial resolution (approx. 0.1 in.) map of the intrinsic line ratio [O III] 4363/5007 and thereby evaluate the electron temperature (T(sub e)) and the mean-square T(sub e) variation (t(sup 2) across the PN. In this process we developed an extinction map from the F487N (H(beta)) and F656N (H(alpha)) images by comparing the observed line ratios in each pixel to the theoretical ratio and computing a c(H(beta)) map which was used to correct the observed 4363/5007 ratios for reddening. We also adjust for the continuum contribution to the line filter data. We present color-coded pictures of the reddening (c(H(beta))) map, the [O III] T(sub e) map, as well as our determinations of t(sup 2). The T(sub e) map shows a decline from approx. 14000 K in the inner regions to approx. 11000 K at the outer edge. Such a radial T(sub e) gradient is expected for a high-excitation nebula with a prominent He(++) zone such as NGC 6818. A composite of images taken in 3 filters (F656N, red; F487N, blue; and F502N, [O III] 5007, green) shows a roughly spherical outer envelope as well as a brighter vase-shaped interior "bubble". There is a prominent orifice to the North and a smaller one to the South, along the major axis, possibly caused by a blow-out from a fast wind. This nebula has an appearance remarkably similar to that of the PN NGC 3918 previously imaged with HST by H. Bond. We note from the continuum images (F547M) two stars in the nebular field that are fainter than the prominent central star; these are roughly 2-4 sec. N and NE of the central star. Further study is needed to establish whether or not there may be a physical association of either star with the central star.

  3. The ionization structure of planetary nebulae. VII. New observations of the Ring Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barker, Timothy

    1987-01-01

    New optical spectrophotometric observations of emission-line intensities have been made in eight positions in the Ring Nebula corresponding to those observed previously with the Ultraviolet Explorer satellite; the total coverage is therefore 1400 to 7200 A. The intensities are in generally good agreement with those found previously in corresponding positions. The Oand Balmer continuum electron temperatures agree well on the average and, like the Nelectron temperatures, decrease with increasing distance from the central star. As found previously for the Ring Nebula and for other planetaries in this series, the lambda 4267 C 2 line intensity near the central star implies a Cabundance that is higher than that determined from the lambda 1906, 1909 C 3 lines. The discrepancy again decreases with increasing distance from the central star and vanishes from the outermost positions, again suggesting that the excitation mechanism from the lambda 4267 line is not understood. Standard equations used to correct for the existence of elements in other than the optically observable ionization stages give results that are consistent and in appropriate agreement with abundances calculated using UV lines. The rather high abundances of O, N, and C, and, to some extent N, indicate that some mixing of CNO processed material into the nebular shell may have occurred in the Ring Nebula.

  4. A single peptide loop in an alpha-Helix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pitch is not a height but a ratio of rise/run. In an alpha-helix, run can be as the radius (r) from the center of the circle, as a diameter (d) measured across/bisecting a circumference, or as a distance (c) along a circumference; rise in each case can corresponds to same height (h) increase. For ...

  5. Three-dimensional simulation of helix traveling wave tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, H.P.; Zaidman, E.G.; Mankofsky, A.; Kodis, M.A.; Vanderplaats, N.R.

    1995-12-31

    The authors present a three-dimensional nonlinear formulation and simulation of a helix traveling wave tube (TWT) using a sheath helix model. The simulation is capable of treating both DC and pulsed electron beams as well as single-frequency or multi-tone operation. The model relies upon a spectral decomposition of the electromagnetic fields in terms of the vacuum sheath helix polarizations. The field equations are integrated on a grid and advanced in time using a MacCormack predictor-corrector scheme, and the electron orbit equations are integrated using a fourth order Runge-Kutta algorithm. Charge is accumulated on the grid and the field is interpolated to the particle location by a linear map. Several numerical cases are considered. Simulation of the injection of a DC beam and a signal at a single frequency is compared with a linear field theory of the helix TWT interaction, and good agreement is found. Simulation of a prebunched beam is also discussed, and compared with an experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  6. Structural constraints regulating triple helix formation by A-tracts.

    PubMed

    Sen, A; Gräslund, A

    2000-12-15

    The study concerns the propensity of triple helix formation by different DNA oligonucleotides containing long A-tracts with and without flanking GxC base pairs in order to probe the role of length of the A-tract and the flanking sequences. From nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of imino proton spectra and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of samples composed of potential triplex forming strand sequences in correct stoichiometries, we have concluded that 8-mer A-tracts flanked by GxC base pairs exert significant steric hindrance to triple helix formation. When as much as 50 mM Mg2+ was added, no triple helix formation was observed in these samples. In contrast, open-ended 8-mer A-tracts formed triplex with the corresponding two T8 strands under relatively mild ionic conditions (100 mM Na+). Moreover, the shorter the length of the A-tract, the less is the hindrance to form a triple helix. PMID:11152277

  7. Talent Development as a University Mission: The Quadruple Helix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holm-Nielsen, Lauritz B.; Thorn, Kristian; Olesen, Jeppe Dorup; Huey, Tina

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors discuss the rationale behind making talent development at the PhD, post-doctoral and early career levels an equal fourth pillar of the university's mission, alongside the more traditional pillars of the triple helix. Using Denmark and Aarhus University as a case study, the paper describes how increased institutional…

  8. Probabilistic grammatical model for helix‐helix contact site classification

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hidden Markov Models power many state‐of‐the‐art tools in the field of protein bioinformatics. While excelling in their tasks, these methods of protein analysis do not convey directly information on medium‐ and long‐range residue‐residue interactions. This requires an expressive power of at least context‐free grammars. However, application of more powerful grammar formalisms to protein analysis has been surprisingly limited. Results In this work, we present a probabilistic grammatical framework for problem‐specific protein languages and apply it to classification of transmembrane helix‐helix pairs configurations. The core of the model consists of a probabilistic context‐free grammar, automatically inferred by a genetic algorithm from only a generic set of expert‐based rules and positive training samples. The model was applied to produce sequence based descriptors of four classes of transmembrane helix‐helix contact site configurations. The highest performance of the classifiers reached AUCROC of 0.70. The analysis of grammar parse trees revealed the ability of representing structural features of helix‐helix contact sites. Conclusions We demonstrated that our probabilistic context‐free framework for analysis of protein sequences outperforms the state of the art in the task of helix‐helix contact site classification. However, this is achieved without necessarily requiring modeling long range dependencies between interacting residues. A significant feature of our approach is that grammar rules and parse trees are human‐readable. Thus they could provide biologically meaningful information for molecular biologists. PMID:24350601

  9. A symmetric bipolar nebula around MWC 922.

    PubMed

    Tuthill, P G; Lloyd, J P

    2007-04-13

    We report regular and symmetric structure around dust-enshrouded Be star MWC 922 obtained with infrared imaging. Biconical lobes that appear nearly square in aspect, forming this "Red Square" nebula, are crossed by a series of rungs that terminate in bright knots or "vortices," and an equatorial dark band crossing the core delimits twin hyperbolic arcs. The intricate yet cleanly constructed forms that comprise the skeleton of the object argue for minimal perturbation from global turbulent or chaotic effects. We also report the presence of a linear comb structure, which may arise from optically projected shadows of a periodic feature in the inner regions, such as corrugations in the rim of a circumstellar disk. The sequence of nested polar rings draws comparison with the triple-ring system seen around the only naked-eye supernova in recent history: SN1987A. PMID:17431173

  10. Atlas of monochromatic images of planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Schmidt, E. O.; Vena Valdarenas, R. R.; Ahumada, J. A.; Volpe, M. G.; Mudrik, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present an atlas of more than one hundred original images of planetary nebulae (PNe). These images were taken in a narrow-band filter centred on the nebular emission of the [N ii] during several observing campaigns using two moderate-aperture telescopes, at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), and the Estación Astrofísica de Bosque Alegre (EABA), both in Argentina. The data provided by this atlas represent one of the most extensive image surveys of PNe in [N ii]. We compare the new images with those available in the literature, and briefly describe all cases in which our [N ii] images reveal new and interesting structures. The reduced images as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A103

  11. ISO Spectroscopy of Proto-Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrivnak, Bruce J.

    2000-01-01

    The goal of this program was to determine the chemical properties of the dust shells around protoplanetary nebulae (PPNs) through a study of their short-wavelength (6-45 micron) infrared spectra. PPNs are evolved stars in transition from the asymptotic giant branch to the planetary nebula stages. Spectral features in the 10 to 20 gm region indicate the chemical nature (oxygen- or carbon-rich), and the strengths of the features relate to the physical properties of the shells. A few bright carbon-rich PPNs have been observed to show PAH features and an unidentified 21 micron emission feature. We used the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) to observe a sample of IRAS sources that have the expected properties of PPNs and for which we have accurate positions. Some of these have optical counterparts (proposal SWSPPN01) and some do not (SWSPPN02). We had previously observed these from the ground with near-infrared photometry and, for those with visible counterparts, visible photometry and spectroscopy, which we have combined with these new ISO data in the interpretation of the spectra. We have completed a study of the unidentified emission feature at 21 micron in eight sources. We find the shape of the feature to be the same in all of the sources, with no evidence of any substructure. The ratio of the emission peak to continuum ranges from 0.13 to 1.30. We have completed a study of seven PPNs and two other carbon-rich objects for which we had obtained ISO 2-45 micron observations. The unidentified emission features at 21 and 30 micron were detected in six sources, including four new detections of the 30 micron feature. This previously unresolved 30 micron feature was resolved and found to consist of a broad feature peaking at 27.2 micron (the "30 micron" feature) and a narrower feature peaking at 25.5 micron (the "26 micron" feature). This new 26 micron feature is detected in eight sources and is particularly strong in IRAS Z02229+6208 and 16594-4656. The unidentified

  12. Temperature Scale of Central Stars Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruk, Jeffry

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain new insight into both the true temperatures of the central stars of planetary nebulae and their evolutionary histories. The temperature scale of the hottest central stars of planetary nebulae is poorly known. The temperature diagnostics available at visible wavelengths are not useful for these very hot stars, or suffer from as-yet unresolved systematic uncertainties. However, the combination of FUSE FUV spectra and HST NUV spectra allows precise temperature determinations by utilizing ionization balances of C III, C IV and O V, O VI lines. The sample comprises hot hydrogen-rich central stars covering the hottest phase of post-AGB evolution (T_eff greater than 70,000K). The spectra were analyzed with fully metal line blanketed NLTE model atmospheres in order to determine T_eff, surface gravity, and chemical composition. In addition to the temperature scale, the spectra help address the question of metal abundances at the surface of these stars. Depending on the particular star, the metal abundances are either dominated by ongoing diffusion processes or they originate from dredge-up phases during previous AGB evolution. The sample was selected so as to include objects that were expected to exhibit both processes, in order to assess their relative importance and to gain insight into the evolutionary history of the stars. The objects that show qualitatively a metal abundance pattern which points at dredge-up phases, can be used to quantitatively check against abundance predictions of stellar evolution theory. The other objects, where gravitational diffusion and radiative acceleration determine the photospheric metal abundances, will be used to check our NLTE models which for the first time include diffusion processes self-consistently.

  13. Solar nebula condensates and the composition of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    1989-01-01

    Interpretation of the volatile abundances in Halley's comet in terms of models for chemical and physical processes in the solar nebula are discussed. Key ratios of the oxidized and reduced species of nitrogen and carbon are identified which tell something of the chemical history of the environment in which cometary grains accreted to form the nucleus. Isotopic abundances are also applied to this problem. It will be shown that the abundances of methane and carbon monoxide are consistent both with models of solar nebula chemistry and chemical processing on grains in star-forming regions. Ultimately, limitations of the current data set on molecular abundances in comets and star-forming regions prevent a definitive choice between the two. Processes important to the composition of outer solar system bodies are: (1) gas phase chemistry in the solar nebula; (2) imperfect mixing in the solar nebula; (3) condensation; (4) clathration; (5) adsorption; and (6) processing of interstellar material.

  14. Io's volcanic enhancement seen in Jupiter's sodium nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present variations in D-line emissions of Jupiter's sodium nebula.The sodium atoms in the nebula are originated from volcanic gas on Io.The D-line brightness of the nebula is expected to be reflecting thevolcanism on Io. We have been making ground-based observations of thisnebula at the Haleakala High Altitude Observatory in Maui island in aconjunction with the Hisaki spacecraft. Until the end of 2014, thebrightness of the nebula had been stably dim and faint. However, thenebula showed a distinct enhancement from the end of January through theend of April, 2015. During this event, the brightness is the nebulajumped by three times. Detailed of this event will be shown in thepresentation.

  15. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Simonelli, D.P.; Pollack, J.B.; Mckay, C.P.; Reynolds, R.T.; Summers, A.L. )

    1989-11-01

    The compositional contrast between the giant-planet satellites and the significantly rockier Pluto/Charon system is indicative of different formation mechanisms; cosmic abundance calculations, in conjunction with an assumption of the Pluto/Charon system's direct formation from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that most of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in CO form, in keeping with both the inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium, and/or the Lewis and Prinn (1980) kinetic-inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Laboratory studies of carbonaceous chondrites and Comet Halley flyby studies suggest that condensed organic material, rather than elemental carbon, is the most likely candidate for the small percentage of the carbon-bearing solid in the outer solar nebula. 71 refs.

  16. Planetary nebulae in galaxies beyond the Local Group.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, H. C.; Ciardullo, R.; Jacoby, G. H.; Hui, X.

    Planetary nebulae can be used to estimate the distances to galaxies and to measure stellar dynamics in faint halos. The authors discuss surveys which have netted a total of 665 candidate planetary nebulae in NGC 5128 (Cen A), NGC 5102, NGC 3031 (M81), NGC 3115, three galaxies in the Leo Group (NGC 3379, NGC 3384, NGC 3377), NGC 5866, and finally, in NGC 4486 (M87). The highly consistent distances derived from the brightnesses of the jth nebula and the median nebula in different fields in the same galaxy and from different galaxies in the same group lend strong support to the suggestion that planetaries are an accurate standard candle in old stellar populations. Comparison of theoretical luminosity functions to be observed PNLFs shows that there is a very small dispersion in the central star masses.

  17. Bipolar nebulae and mass loss from red giant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, M.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of several bipolar nebulae are used to learn something of the nature of mass loss from the probable red-giant progenitors of these nebulae. Phenomena discussed are: (1) probable GL 2688's optical molecular emissions; (2) newly discovered very high velocity knots along the axis of OH 0739 - 14, which reveal evidence for mass ejections of + or 300 km/s from the M9 III star embedded in this nebula; (3) the bipolar structure of three extreme carbon stars, and the evidence for periodic mass ejection in IRC + 30219, also at high speed (about 80 km/s); and (4) the curious cool TiO-rich region above Parsamian 13, which may represent the very recent shedding of photospheric material from a cool, oxygen-rich giant. Several general key questions about bipolar nebulae that relate to the process of mass loss from their progenitor stars are raised.

  18. Infrared studies of dust grains in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Werner, Michael W.

    1989-01-01

    IR reflection nebulae, regions of dust which are illuminated by nearby embedded sources, were observed in several regions of ongoing star formation. Near IR observation and theoretical modelling of the scattered light form IR reflection nebulae can provide information about the dust grain properties in star forming regions. IR reflection nebulae were modelled as plane parallel slabs assuming isotropically scattering grains. For the grain scattering properties, graphite and silicate grains were used with a power law grain size distribution. Among the free parameters of the model are the stellar luminosity and effective temperature, the optical depth of the nebula, and the extinction by foreground material. The typical results from this model are presented and discussed.

  19. The near-infrared continuum emission of visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.

    1984-01-01

    In the past, reflection nebulae have provided an astrophysical laboratory well suited for the study of the reflection properties of interstellar dust grains at visual and ultraviolet wavelengths. The present investigation is concerned with observations which were begun with the objective to extend to near-infrared wavelengths the study of grains in reflection. Observations of three classical visual reflection nebulae were conducted in the wavelength range from 1.25 to 2.2 microns, taking into account NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. All three nebulae were found to have similar near-infrared colors, despite widely different colors of their illuminating stars. The brightness level shown by two of the nebulae at 2.2 microns was too high to be easily accounted for on the basis of reflected light. Attention is given to a wide variety of possible emission mechanisms.

  20. A New Color Image of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscoat, R. J.; Kormendy, K.

    1997-03-01

    A new color image of the Crab Nebula is presented. This is a $2782 \\times 1904$ pixel mosaic of CCD frames taken through \\B\\ (blue), \\V\\ (green), and \\R\\ (red) filters; it was carefully color balanced so that the Sun would appear white. The resolution of the final image is approximately 0\\farcs8 FWHM. The technique by which this image was constructed is described, and some aspects of the structure of the Crab Nebula revealed by the image are discussed. We also discuss the weaknesses of this technique for producing ``true-color'' images, and describe how our image would differ from what the human eye might see in a very large wide-field telescope. The structure of the inner part of the synchrotron nebula is compared with recent high-resolution images from the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope\\/} and from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. (SECTION: Interstellar Medium and Nebulae)

  1. Video Zoom into Veil Nebula - Duration: 28 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video opens with a backyard view of the nighttime sky centered on the constellation Cygnus, the Swan. We zoom into a vast donut-shaped feature called the Veil Nebula. It is the tattered expand...

  2. The Crab Nebula: A Flickering X-ray Candle

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Crab Nebula, created by a supernova seen nearly a thousand years ago, is one of the sky's most famous "star wrecks." For decades, most astronomers have regarded it as the steadiest beacon at X-...

  3. Pipe Nebula (B59, B65-7, B79)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A large dark nebula in the constellation Scorpius, resembling a tobacco pipe. E E Barnard assigned five separate catalog numbers to sections of the nebula. B78 is the `bowl', about 3½° by 2½°, with approximate position RA 17 h 33 m, dec. -26°, while B59 and B65-7 comprise the `stem', 5° by 1°, with approximate position RA 17 h 21 m, dec. -27°....

  4. Diffusive redistribution of water vapor in the solar nebula revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sears, William D.

    1993-01-01

    Stevenson and Lunine presented a model for enhancing the abundance of solid material in the region of the solar nebula at the water condensation point. This was used to provide a means to produce a much more rapid formation of Jupiter than the standard solar nebula models. However, they underestimated the drag induced sun-ward radial drift of the planetesimals of interest. Reanalysis reveals that these particles would spread over the inner solar system and might influence the formation of the asteroids.

  5. Ly(alpha) Photolysis in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for the third year of work on this project. Our proposal was to quantitatively investigate the importance of photochemistry in the solar nebula. In the generally accepted theory for the chemical evolution of the primitive solar nebula, Prinn and Fegley argued that photochemistry is unimportant, and that thermochemistry controls the relative abundances of molecular species throughout the planet-forming region. They provided useful estimates of the chemical energy available to the solar nebula from a variety of sources, and established that even the small photolysis rate due to starlight is more important than the photolysis rate from direct sunlight (although small, the UV flux from starlight could have processed a non-negligible fraction of the solar nebula. The reason for this is that the opacity of the disk was so large that direct sunlight could only penetrate to 0.1 AU or so, despite the expectation that the protosun, if comparable to a T-Tauri star, would be emitting up to 104 more H I Ly(alpha) photons than the current sun. We developed a Monte Carlo resonance fine radiative transfer code, capable of accurately calculating the radiation field of H I Ly(alpha), He I 584 A, and He II 304 A emissions throughout the nebula and the nearby interstellar medium in which it is embedded. We applied the code to two appropriate models of the primitive solar nebula. Our model provided the photolysis rates of various species over the entire surface layer of the nebula, and from this we evaluated the importance of UV photochemistry due to backscattered solar UV resonance line emissions on different parts of the nebula. The results discussed below were presented.

  6. Dust to planetesimals - Settling and coagulation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of solid particles in a low-mass solar nebula during settling to the central plane and the formation of planetesimals is discussed. The gravitational instability in a dust layer and collisional accretion are examined as possible mechanisms of planetesimal formation. The shear between the gas and a dust layer is considered along with the differences in the planetesimal formation mechanisms between the inner and outer nebula. A numerical model for computing simultaneous coagulation and settling is described.

  7. Giant Hα Nebula Surrounding the Starburst Merger NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Michitoshi; Yagi, Masafumi; Ohyama, Youichi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Tanaka, Hisashi; Okamura, Sadanori

    2016-03-01

    We revealed the detailed structure of a vastly extended Hα-emitting nebula (“Hα nebula”) surrounding the starburst/merging galaxy NGC 6240 by deep narrow-band imaging observations with the Subaru Suprime-Cam. The extent of the nebula is ˜90 kpc in diameter and the total Hα luminosity amounts to LHα ≈ 1.6 × 1042 erg s-1. The volume filling factor and the mass of the warm ionized gas are ˜10-4-10-5 and ˜5 × 108 M⊙, respectively. The nebula has a complicated structure, which includes numerous filaments, loops, bubbles, and knots. We found that there is a tight spatial correlation between the Hα nebula and the extended soft-X-ray-emitting gas, both in large and small scales. The overall morphology of the nebula is dominated by filamentary structures radially extending from the center of the galaxy. A large-scale bipolar bubble extends along the minor axis of the main stellar disk. The morphology strongly suggests that the nebula was formed by intense outflows—superwinds—driven by starbursts. We also found three bright knots embedded in a looped filament of ionized gas that show head-tail morphologies in both emission-line and continuum, suggesting close interactions between the outflows and star-forming regions. Based on the morphology and surface brightness distribution of the Hα nebula, we propose the scenario that three major episodes of starburst/superwind activities, which were initiated ˜102 Myr ago, formed the extended ionized gas nebula of NGC 6240. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  8. Ly(alpha) Photolysis in the Primitive Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gladstone, G. Randall

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for the third year of work on this project. Our proposal was to quantitatively investigate the importance of photochemistry in the solar nebula. In the generally accepted theory for the chemical evolution of the primitive solar nebula, Prinn and Fegley argued that photochemistry is unimportant, and that thermochemistry controls the relative abundances of molecular species throughout the planet-forming region. They provided useful estimates of the chemical energy available to the solar nebula from a variety of sources, and established that even the small photolysis rate due to starlight is more important than the photolysis rate from direct sunlight (although small, the UV flux from starlight could have processed a non-negligible fraction of the solar nebula. The reason for this is that the opacity of the disk was so large that direct sunlight could only penetrate to 0.1 AU or so, despite the expectation that the protosun, if comparable to a T-Tauri star, would be emitting up to 10(exp 4) more H I Ly(alpha) photons than the current sun. We developed a Monte Carlo resonance fine radiative transfer code, capable of accurately calculating the radiation field of H I Ly(alpha), He I 584 A, and He II 304 A emissions throughout the nebula and the nearby interstellar medium in which it is embedded. We applied the code to two appropriate models of the primitive solar nebula. Our model provided the photolysis rates of various species over the entire surface layer of the nebula, and from this we evaluated the importance of UV photochemistry due to backscattered solar UV resonance line emissions on different parts of the nebula. The results discussed below were presented.

  9. OVERVIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), WITH ANTENNA TOWERS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), WITH ANTENNA TOWERS, HELIX HOUSE NO. 1 (S-3) AND TRANSMITTER BLDG. (S-2) AT REAR, LOOKING WEST SOUTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  10. On planetary nebulae as sources of carbon dust: Infrared emission from planetary nebulae of the galactic halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Lester, Daniel F.

    1990-01-01

    Planetary nebulae of the galactic disk are generally seen to emit a thermal continuum due to dust grains heated by stellar and nebular photons. This continuum typically peaks between 25 and 60 micron m, so that the total power emitted by the dust is sampled well by the broad-band measurements made by IRAS. Researchers examine here the characteristics of the infrared emission from the four planetary nebulae which are believed on the basis of their low overall metallicities to belong to the halo population. These nebulae are of particular interest because they are the most metal-poor ionized nebulae known in our Galaxy, and offer the opportunity to probe possible dependences of the dust properties on nebular composition. Researchers present fluxes extracted from co-addition of the IRAS data, as well as ground-based near infrared measurements. Each of the four halo objects, including the planetary nebula in the globular cluster M15, is detected in at least one infrared band. Researchers compare the estimated infrared excesses of these nebulae (IRE, the ratio of measured infrared power to the power available in the form of resonantly-trapped Lyman alpha photons) to those of disk planetary nebulae with similar densities but more normal abundances. Three of the halo planetaries have IRE values similar to those of the disk nebulae, despite the fact that their Fe- and Si-peak gas phase abundances are factors of 10 to 100 lower. However, these halo nebulae have normal or elevated C/H ratios, due to nuclear processing and mixing in their red giant progenitors. Unlike the other halo planetaries, DDDM1 is deficient in carbon as well as in the other light metals. This nebula has a substantially lower IRE than the other halo planetaries, and may be truly dust efficient. Researchers suggest that the deficiency is due to a lack of the raw material for producing carbon-based grains, and that the main bulk constituent of the dust in these planetary nebulae is carbon.

  11. The Orion Nebula: Still Full of Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This ethereal-looking image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This nebula is much more than just a pretty face, offering astronomers a close-up view of a massive star-forming region to help advance our understanding of stellar birth and evolution. The data used for this image were selected by Igor Chekalin (Russia), who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Igor's composition of the Orion Nebula was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, although another of Igor's images was the eventual overall winner. The Orion Nebula, also known as Messier 42, is one of the most easily recognisable and best-studied celestial objects. It is a huge complex of gas and dust where massive stars are forming and is the closest such region to the Earth. The glowing gas is so bright that it can be seen with the unaided eye and is a fascinating sight through a telescope. Despite its familiarity and closeness there is still much to learn about this stellar nursery. It was only in 2007, for instance, that the nebula was shown to be closer to us than previously thought: 1350 light-years, rather than about 1500 light-years. Astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile to observe the stars within Messier 42. They found that the faint red dwarfs in the star cluster associated with the glowing gas radiate much more light than had previously been thought, giving us further insights into this famous object and the stars that it hosts. The data collected for this science project, with no original intention to make a colour image, have now been reused to create the richly detailed picture of Messier 42 shown here. The image is a composite of several exposures taken through a total of five different filters. Light that passed through a red filter as well as light from a filter that

  12. The Orion Nebula: Still Full of Surprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    This ethereal-looking image of the Orion Nebula was captured using the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla Observatory, Chile. This nebula is much more than just a pretty face, offering astronomers a close-up view of a massive star-forming region to help advance our understanding of stellar birth and evolution. The data used for this image were selected by Igor Chekalin (Russia), who participated in ESO's Hidden Treasures 2010 astrophotography competition. Igor's composition of the Orion Nebula was the seventh highest ranked entry in the competition, although another of Igor's images was the eventual overall winner. The Orion Nebula, also known as Messier 42, is one of the most easily recognisable and best-studied celestial objects. It is a huge complex of gas and dust where massive stars are forming and is the closest such region to the Earth. The glowing gas is so bright that it can be seen with the unaided eye and is a fascinating sight through a telescope. Despite its familiarity and closeness there is still much to learn about this stellar nursery. It was only in 2007, for instance, that the nebula was shown to be closer to us than previously thought: 1350 light-years, rather than about 1500 light-years. Astronomers have used the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile to observe the stars within Messier 42. They found that the faint red dwarfs in the star cluster associated with the glowing gas radiate much more light than had previously been thought, giving us further insights into this famous object and the stars that it hosts. The data collected for this science project, with no original intention to make a colour image, have now been reused to create the richly detailed picture of Messier 42 shown here. The image is a composite of several exposures taken through a total of five different filters. Light that passed through a red filter as well as light from a filter that

  13. Mixing and Transport in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2003-01-01

    Boss & Vanhala (2000, 2001) prepared reviews of triggered collapse and injection models, using Prudence Foster's finite differences code at very high spatial resolution (440 x 1440 cells) to demonstrate the convergence of the R-T fingers in triggered injection models. A two dimensional hydrodynamical calculation with unprecedentedly high spatial resolution (960 x 2880 zones, or almost 3 million grid points) demonstrated that it suitable shock front can both trigger the collapse of an otherwise stable presolar cloud, and inject shock front particles into the collapsing cloud through the formation of what become Rayleigh-Taylor fingers of compressed fluid layers falling into the gravitational potential well of the growing protostar. These calculations suggest that heterogeneity derived from these R-T fingers will persist down to the scale of their injection onto the surface of the solar nebula. Haghighipour developed a numerical code capable of calculating the orbital evolution of dust grains of varied sizes in a gaseous nebula, subject to Epstein and Stokes drag as well as the self-gravity of the disk. In collaboration with the PI and George W. Wetherill, Haghighipour has been involved in development of a new idea on the possibility of rapid formation of ice giant planets via the disk instability mechanism. Haghighipour studied the stability of a five-body system consisting of the Sun and four protoplanets by numerically integrating their equations of motions. Using Levison and Duncan s SWIFT integrator, Haghighipour showed that, depending on the orbital parameters of the bodies, such a system can be stable for 0.1-10 Myr. Time periods of 1 Myr or more are long enough to be consistent with the time scale proposed for the formation of giant planets by the disk instability mechanism and the photoevaporation of the gaseous envelopes of the outermost protoplanets by a nearby OB star, resulting in the formation of ice giant planets. The PI has used his three dimensional

  14. The carbon budget in the outer solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, D P; Pollack, J B; McKay, C P; Reynolds, R T; Summers, A L

    1989-01-01

    Detailed models of the internal structures of Pluto and Charon, assuming rock and water ice as the only constituents, indicate that the mean silicate mass fraction of this two-body system is on the order of 0.7; thus the Pluto/Charon system is significantly "rockier" than the satellites of the giant planets (silicate mass fraction approximately 0.55). This compositional contrast reflects different formation mechanisms: it is likely that Pluto and Charon formed directly from the solar nebula, while the circumplanetary nebulae that produced the giant planet satellites were derived from envelopes that surrounded the forming giant planets (envelopes in which icy planetesimals dissolved more readily than rocky planetesimals). Simple cosmic abundance calculations, and the assumption that the Pluto/Charon system formed directly from solar nebula condensates, strongly suggest that the majority of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of carbon monoxide; these results are consistent with (1) inheritance from the dense molecular clouds in the interstellar medium (where CH4/CO < 10(-2) in the gas phase) and/or (2) of the Lewis and Prinn kinetic inhibition model of solar nebula chemistry. Theoretical predictions of the C/H enhancements in the atmospheres of the giant planets, when compared to the actual observed enhancements, suggest that 10%, or slightly more, of the carbon in the outer solar nebula was in the form of condensed materials (although the amount of condensed C may have dropped slightly with increasing heliocentric distance). Strict compositional limits computed for the Pluto/Charon system using the densities of CH4 and CO ices indicate that these pure ices are at best minor components in the interiors of these bodies, and imply that CH4 and CO ices were not the dominant C-bearing solids in the outer nebula. Clathrate-hydrates could not have appropriated enough CH4 or CO to be the major form of condensed carbon, although such clathrates may be

  15. The Chemical Diversity of Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet L.; Geballe, T. R.; Sterling, N. C.

    2014-01-01

    The metallicity of the progenitor star of a planetary nebula (PN) can be inferred from measurements of elements whose abundances are unaffected by nucleosynthesis during the star’s evolution. In practice, nearly all of the observable elements that qualify, such as O, Ne, S, and Ar, are α species (built up by α-capture reactions). On the other hand, the total elemental abundances of the Fe-group nuclei are not directly measurable in ionized nebulae due to the highly refractory character of Fe and most other Fe-group elements. Although emission lines of several Fe ions are seen in many PNe, they generally indicate mildly to severely subsolar gas-phase abundances that are interpreted as the consequence of depletion into dust. The identification of a near-infrared emission line of Zn, the least refractory (by far) Fe-group element, by Dinerstein & Geballe (2001, ApJ, 562, 515) provided the first practical tracer of Fe/H in PNe. In this poster, we recap results to date from observations of Zn in 21 PNe from a range of Milky Way populations including the thin and thick disk and three Local Group dwarf galaxies. Combined with the results of Smith, Zijlstra, & Dinerstein (2013, MNRAS, submitted) for several objects in the Galactic Bulge, we find that PNe echo the abundance patterns of their parent populations: PNe with spatio-kinematic properties of Fe-poor stellar populations (e.g. the thick disk and bulge) tend to have subsolar zinc (<[Zn/H]> ≈ -0.6 dex) accompanied by elevated [O/Zn]. This conforms to the composition profile of the corresponding stars, if [Zn/H] and [O/Zn] can be taken as proxies for [Fe/H] and [α/Fe] respectively. Deducing the Fe/H metallicity of a PN from an α element alone is inadvisable, as a low-[Fe/H], high-[α/Fe] pattern is indistinguishable from one of solar [Fe/H] and [α/Fe]. To estimate [Fe/H] in a PN for which Zn measurements are unavailable or not feasible, the best approach is to measure an α species and scale by [α/Fe] typical

  16. Signatures of Chemical Evolution in Protostellar Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha

    2011-01-01

    A decade ago observers began to take serious notice of the presence of crystalline silicate grains in the dust flowing away from some comets. While crystallinity had been seen in such objects previously, starting with the recognitions by Campins and Ryan (1990) that the 10 micron feature of Comet Halley resembled that of the mineral forsterite, most such observations were either ignored or dismissed as no path to explain such crystalline grains was available in the literature. When it was first suggested that an outward flow must be present to carry annealed silicate grains from the innermost regions of the Solar Nebula out to the regions where comets could form (Nuth, 1999; 2001) this suggestion was also dismissed because no such transport mechanism was known at the time. Since then not only have new models of nebular dynamics demonstrated the reality of long distance outward transport (Ciesla, 2007; 2008; 2009) but examination of older models (Boss, 2004) showed that such transport had been present but had gone unrecognized for many years. The most unassailable evidence for outward nebular transport came with the return of the Stardust samples from Comet Wild2, a Kuiper-belt comet that contained micron-scale grains of high temperature minerals resembling the Calcium-Aluminum Inclusions found in primitive meteorites (Zolensky et aI., 2006) that formed at T > 1400K. Now that outward transport in protostellar nebulae has been firmly established, a re-examination of its consequences for nebular gas is in order that takes into account both the factors that regulate both the outward flow as well as those that likely control the chemical composition of the gas. Laboratory studies of surface catalyzed reactions suggest that a trend toward more highly reduced carbon and nitrogen compounds in the gas phase should be correlated with a general increase in the crystallinity of the dust (Nuth et aI., 2000), but is such a trend actually observable? Unlike the Fischer-Tropsch or

  17. A 20 GHz, 75 watt helix TWT for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heney, J. F.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    1982-01-01

    A space-qualified, helix-type traveling wave tube is being developed for satellite communication systems in the frequency band of 17.7 to 21.2 GHz. The design approach stresses very high efficiency operation, but with very low distortion. The tube provides multi-mode operation, permitting CW saturated power output levels of 75 watts, 40 watt and 7.5 watts. Operation is also anticipated at 5 dB below these saturation levels to achieve the required low distortion levels. Advanced construction features include a 5 stage depressed collector, a diamond supported helix slow-wave circuit, and a type M dispenser cathode. High reliability and long life (10 years) are objectives of the tube design. The status of the development and recent experimental results are presented.

  18. Crowding effect on helix-coil transition: Beyond entropic stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Koutsioubas, A.; Lairez, D.; Combet, S.; Longeville, S.; Zalczer, G.

    2012-06-07

    We report circular dichroism measurements on the helix-coil transition of poly(L-glutamic acid) in solution with polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a crowding agent. The PEG solutions have been characterized by small angle neutron scattering and are well described by the picture of a network of mesh size {xi}, usual for semi-dilute chains in good solvent. We show that the increase of PEG concentration stabilizes the helices and increases the transition temperature. But more unexpectedly, we also notice that the increase of concentration of crowding agent reduces the mean helix extent at the transition, or in other words reduces its cooperativity. This result cannot be taken into account for by an entropic stabilization mechanism. Comparing the mean length of helices at the transition and the mesh size of the PEG network, our results strongly suggest two regimes: helices shorter or longer than the mesh size.

  19. Structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes: a graphene helix.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Kap; Lee, Sohyung; Kim, Jin-Gyu; Min, Bong-Ki; Kim, Yong-Il; Lee, Kyung-Il; An, Kay Hyeok; John, Phillip

    2014-08-27

    Evidence is presented in this paper that certain single-wall carbon nanotubes are not seamless tubes, but rather adopt a graphene helix resulting from the spiral growth of a nano-graphene ribbon. The residual traces of the helices are confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The analysis also shows that the tubular graphene material may exhibit a unique armchair structure and the chirality is not a necessary condition for the growth of carbon nanotubes. The description of the structure of the helical carbon nanomaterials is generalized using the plane indices of hexagonal space groups instead of using chiral vectors. It is also proposed that the growth model, via a graphene helix, results in a ubiquitous structure of single-wall carbon nanotubes. PMID:24838196

  20. Highly twisted double-helix carbon nanotube yarns.

    PubMed

    Shang, Yuanyuan; Li, Yibin; He, Xiaodong; Du, Shanyi; Zhang, Luhui; Shi, Enzheng; Wu, Shiting; Li, Zhen; Li, Peixu; Wei, Jinquan; Wang, Kunlin; Zhu, Hongwei; Wu, Dehai; Cao, Anyuan

    2013-02-26

    The strength and flexibility of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) allow them to be constructed into a variety of innovated architectures with fascinating properties. Here, we show that CNTs can be made into a highly twisted yarn-derived double-helix structure by a conventional twist-spinning process. The double-helix is a stable and hierarchical configuration consisting of two single-helical yarn segments, with controlled pitch and unique mechanical properties. While one of the yarn components breaks early under tension due to the highly twisted state, the second yarn produces much larger tensile strain and significantly prolongs the process until ultimate fracture. In addition, these elastic and conductive double-helix yarns show simultaneous and reversible resistance change in response to a wide range of input sources (mechanical, photo, and thermal) such as applied strains or stresses, light illumination, and environmental temperature. Our results indicate that it is possible to create higher-level, more complex architectures from CNT yarns and fabricate multifunctional nanomaterials with potential applications in many areas. PMID:23289799

  1. A 20 GHz, 75 watt, helix TWT for space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heney, J. F.; Tamashiro, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    A space-qualified, helix-type traveling wave tube is being developed for satellite communication systems in the frequency band of 17.7 to 21.2 GHz. The design approach stresses very high efficiency operation, but with very low distortion. The tube provides multi-mode operation, permitting CW saturated power output levels of 75, 40, and 7.5 W. Operation is also anticipated at 5 dB below these saturation levels to achieve the required low distortion levels. Advanced construction features include a five-stage depressed collector, a diamond supported helix slow-wave circuit, and a type M dispenser cathode. High reliability and long life (10 yr) are objectives of the tube design. Preliminary test results on early developmental models of this tube are very encouraging. An output power of 75 to 90 W has been achieved over the full bandwidth with about 40 dB of saturated gain. More importantly, the basic electronic efficiency of the interaction process has been increased from about 7.5-11 percent by the use of the diamond helix support compared to earlier tubes using BeO support rods. This effort is supported by NASA Lewis Research Center and is aimed toward application in the NASA Advanced Communications Satellite Technology Program.

  2. Field analysis of helix traveling wave tube interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderplaats, N.R.; Kodis, M.A.; Freund, H.P.

    1994-12-31

    Recent results are presented for the linear field analysis of the coupled beam-wave system for the traveling wave tube (TWT) and numerical techniques for TWT design. The basic model includes an electron beam of constant current density located inside the helix. The helix is loaded externally by lossy dielectric material, a conducting shell and vanes for dispersion modification. The model is further divided into axial regions which may include severs, lossy materials, or circuit velocity steps, with the helix geometry varied arbitrarily in each region. The backward-wave root of the coupled dispersion equation is discarded and the sum of the fields for the three forward waves is followed to the circuit output. The dispersion equations are expressed in terms of equating admittance functions at radial boundaries. The numerical procedures to solve the dispersion equations will be described. Results obtained using the field analysis will be compared with those from the conventional coupled-mode Pierce theory for the same geometry. The issue of weak (Brillouin) vs. strong focusing will be discussed and recent refinements to the field theory will be described.

  3. The Nineteenth-Century Spiral Nebula Whodunit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    2010-06-01

    The discovery of the first spiral nebula was a milestone in the history of astronomy, but the initial observations of it are shrouded in mystery. The discovery came within months of the commissioning of the Third Earl of Rosse’s very large 72-inch optical telescope at Birr Castle in the center of Ireland. Unfortunately, no observing records have survived, and while there is no doubt that the observations took place in the spring of 1845, there is some uncertainty as to whom was actually present when the discovery was made. The construction of the Earl’s telescope (the Leviathan) was a magnificent achievement, since it was entirely of his design, built with his own funds, and constructed by his own workers who were literally taken “from the plough” on his estate. The summer of 1845 saw the first appearance of the Irish Potato Famine of 1845-1848, which would seriously curtail astronomical activity when Lord Rosse’s 72-inch telescope was in prime condition.

  4. The inner knot of the Crab nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver

    2016-02-01

    We model the inner knot of the Crab nebula as a synchrotron emission coming from the non-spherical MHD termination shock of relativistic pulsar wind. The post-shock flow is mildly relativistic; as a result the Doppler beaming has a strong impact on the shock appearance. The model can reproduce the knot location, size, elongation, brightness distribution, luminosity and polarization provided the effective magnetization of the section of the pulsar wind producing the knot is low, σ ≤ 1. In the striped wind model, this implies that the striped zone is rather wide, with the magnetic inclination angle of the Crab pulsar ≥45°; this agrees with the previous model-dependent estimate based on the gamma-ray emission of the pulsar. We conclude that the tiny knot is indeed a bright spot on the surface of a quasi-stationary magnetic relativistic shock and that this shock is a site of efficient particle acceleration. On the other hand, the deduced low magnetization of the knot plasma implies that this is an unlikely site for the Crab's gamma-ray flares, if they are related to the fast relativistic magnetic reconnection events.

  5. Planetary nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Di Criscienzo, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell'Agli, F.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the planetary nebulae (PNe) population of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based on evolutionary models of stars with metallicities in the range 10-3 ≤ Z ≤ 4 × 10-3 and mass 0.9 M⊙ < M < 8 M⊙, evolved through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. The models used account for dust formation in the circumstellar envelope. To characterize the PNe sample of the SMC, we compare the observed abundances of the various species with the final chemical composition of the AGB models: this study allows us to identify the progenitors of the PNe observed, in terms of mass and chemical composition. According to our interpretation, most of the PNe descend from low-mass (M < 2 M⊙) stars, which become carbon rich, after experiencing repeated third dredge-up episodes, during the AGB phase. A fraction of the PNe showing the signature of advanced CNO processing are interpreted as the progeny of massive AGB stars, with mass above ˜6 M⊙, undergoing strong hot bottom burning. The differences with the chemical composition of the PNe population of the Large Magellanic Cloud is explained on the basis of the diverse star formation history and age-metallicity relation of the two galaxies. The implications of this study for some still highly debated points regarding the AGB evolution are also commented.

  6. Abundances in Eight M31 Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, Kerry G.; Kwitter, Karen B.; Corradi, Romano; Galera-Rosillo, R.; Balick, Bruce; Henry, Richard B. C.

    2014-06-01

    As part of a continuing project using planetary nebulae (PNe) to study the chemical evolution and formation history of M31 (see accompanying poster by Balick et al.), we obtained spectra of eight PNe in the fall of 2013 with the OSIRIS spectrograph on the GTC. All of these PNe are located outside M31’s inner disk and bulge. Spectral coverage extended from 3700-7800Å with a resolution of ~6 Å. Especially important in abundance determinations is the detection of the weak, temperature-sensitive auroral line of [O III], at 4363Å, which is often contaminated by Hg I 4358Å from streetlights; the remoteness of the GTC eliminated this difficulty. We reduced and measured the spectra using IRAF, and derived nebular diagnostics and abundances with ELSA, our in-house five-level-atom program. Here we report the chemical abundances determined from these spectra. The bottom line is that the oxygen abundances in these PNe are all within a factor of 2-3 of the solar value, (as are all the other M31 PNe our team has previously measured) despite the significant range of galactocentric distance. Future work will use these abundances to constrain models of the central star to estimate progenitor masses and ages. In particular we will use the results to investigate the hypothesis that these PNe might represent a population related to the encounter between M31 and M33 ~3 Gy ago. We gratefully acknowledge support from Williams College.

  7. Spectroscopy of planetary nebulae in M 33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrini, L.; Perinotto, M.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Mampaso, A.

    2003-03-01

    Spectroscopic observations of 48 emission-line objects of M 33 have been obtained with the multi-object, wide field, fibre spectrograph AF2/WYFFOS at the 4.2 m WHT telescope (La Palma, Spain). Line intensities and logarithmic extinction, cbeta , are presented for 42 objects. Their location in the Sabbadin & D'Odorico diagnostic diagram (Hα /[S II] vs. Hα /[N II]) suggests that >70% of the candidates are Planetary Nebulae (PNe). Chemical abundances and nebular physical parameters have been derived for the three of the six PNe where the 4363 Å, [O II]i emission line was measurable. These are disc PNe, located within a galactocentric distance of 4.1 kpc, and, to date, they are the farthest PNe with a direct chemical abundance determination. No discrepancy in the helium, Oxygen and Argon abundances has been found in comparison with corresponding abundances of PNe in our Galaxy. Only a lower limit to the sulphur abundance has been obtained since we could not detect any [S III] line. N/H appears to be lower than the Galactic value; some possible explanations for this under-abundance are discussed. Based on observations obtained at the 4.2 m WHT telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Isaac Newton Group in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias.

  8. Black Widow Nebula Hiding in the Dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    In this Spitzer image, the two opposing bubbles are being formed in opposite directions by the powerful outflows from massive groups of forming stars. The baby stars can be seen as specks of yellow where the two bubbles overlap.

    When individual stars form from molecular clouds of gas and dust they produce intense radiation and very strong particle winds. Both the radiation and the stellar winds blow the dust outward from the star creating a cavity or, bubble.

    In the case of the Black Widow Nebula, astronomers suspect that a large cloud of gas and dust condensed to create multiple clusters of massive star formation. The combined winds from these groups of large stars probably blew out bubbles into the direction of least resistance, forming a double bubble.

    The infrared image was captured by the Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE) Legacy project. The Spitzer picture is a four-channel false-color composite, showing emission from wavelengths of 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8.0 microns (red).

  9. Eagle Nebula Flaunts its Infrared Feathers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Figure 3

    This set of images from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Eagle nebula in different hues of infrared light. Each view tells a different tale. The left picture shows lots of stars and dusty structures with clarity. Dusty molecules found on Earth called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons produce most of the red; gas is green and stars are blue.

    The middle view is packed with drama, because it tells astronomers that a star in this region violently erupted, or went supernova, heating surrounding dust (orange). This view also reveals that the hot dust is shell shaped, another indication that a star exploded.

    The final picture highlights the contrast between the hot, supernova-heated dust (green) and the cooler dust making up the region's dusty star-forming clouds and towers (red, blue and purple).

    The left image is a composite of infrared light with the following wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue); 4.5 microns (green); 5.8 microns (orange); and 8 microns (red). The right image includes longer infrared wavelengths, and is a composite of light of 4.5 to 8.0 microns (blue); 24 microns (green); and 70 microns (red). The middle image is made up solely of 24-micron light.

  10. ELEMENT DISTRIBUTIONS IN THE CRAB NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Satterfield, Timothy J.; Katz, Andrea M.; Sibley, Adam R.; MacAlpine, Gordon M.; Uomoto, Alan

    2012-07-15

    Images of the Crab Nebula have been obtained through custom interference filters that transmit emission from the expanding supernova remnant in He II {lambda}4686, H{beta}, He I {lambda}5876, [O I] {lambda}{lambda}6300, 6364, [N II] {lambda}{lambda}6548, 6583, [S II] {lambda}{lambda}6716, 6731, [S III] {lambda}9069, and [C I] {lambda}{lambda}9823, 9850. We present both raw and flux-calibrated emission-line images. Arrays of 19,440 photoionization models, with extensive input abundance ranges, were matched pixel by pixel to the calibrated data in order to derive corresponding element abundance or mass-fraction distributions for helium, carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and sulfur. These maps show distinctive structure, and they illustrate regions of gas in which various stages of nucleosynthesis have apparently occurred, including the CNO cycle, helium burning, carbon burning, and oxygen burning. It is hoped that the calibrated observations and chemical abundance distribution maps will be useful for developing a better understanding of the precursor star evolution and the supernova explosive process.

  11. Edwin Hubble. Mariner of the nebulae.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christianson, G. E.

    This biography of Edwin Hubble has been acclaimed by professionals and laymen alike. It is both the biography of an extraordinary human being and the story of the greatest quest in the history of astronomy since the Copernican revolution. Born in 1889 and reared in the village of Marshfield, Missouri, Edwin Powell Hubble became one of the towering figures in 20th century science. Hubble worked with the great 100 inch Hooker telescope at California's Mount Wilson Observatory and made a series of discoveries that revolutionized humanity's vision of the cosmos. In 1923 he was able to confirm the existence of other nebulae beyond our own Milky Way. By the end of the decade, he had proven that the universe is expanding, thus laying the very cornerstone of the "Big Bang" theory of creation. It was Hubble who developed the elegant scheme by which the galaxies are classified as ellipticals and spirals, and it was Hubble who first provided reliable evidence that the universe is homogeneous, the same in all directions as far as the telescope can see.

  12. FU Orionis Outbursts and the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Robbins; Young, Rich (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Protostellar systems are variable on many timescales. The FU Orionis outburst is one of the most drastic forms of variability known to occur in low mass stellar systems. During a typical outburst lasting several decades, system luminosities may be a hundred times what is normal of the quiescent state. FU Orionis outburst events are believed to have significant impacts on the thermal structure of the protosolar nebula. Their existence has been utilized to explain features in the meteoritic record from thermally induced homogenization to chondrule formation. Recent numerical models have shown the viability of the hypothesis that the radiation observed during outburst is emitted by a luminous circumstellar disk transporting mass at a thousand times the quiescent rate. We will begin by describing what is known about the FU Orionis outburst phenomenon from recent observations and theory. We will discuss evidence that suggests that outburst radiation is emitted by a circumstellar disk rather than by the star and will briefly describe the thermal instability as a mechanism for outburst. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Radio Observations of Elongated Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Stephen C.-Y.

    2015-08-01

    The majority of pulsars' rotational energy is carried away by relativistic winds, which are energetic particles accelerated in the magnetosphere. The confinement of the winds by the ambient medium result in synchrotron bubbles with broad-band emission, which are commonly referred to as pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). Due to long synchrotron cooling time, a radio PWN reflects the integrated history of the system, complementing information obtained from the X-ray and higher energy bands. In addition, radio polarization measurements can offer a powerful probe of the PWN magnetic field structure. Altogether these can reveal the physical conditions and evolutionary history of a system.I report on preliminary results from high-resolution radio observations of PWNe associated with G327.1-1.1, PSRs J1015-5719, B1509-58, and J1549-4848 taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA). Their magnetic field structure and multiwavelength comparison with other observations are discussed.This work is supported by a ECS grant of the Hong Kong Government under HKU 709713P. The Australia Telescope is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia for operation as a National Facility managed by CSIRO.

  14. Planetary nebulae in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventura, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Di Criscienzo, M.; García-Hernández, D. A.; Dell'Agli, F.

    2016-08-01

    We analyse the planetary nebulae (PNe) population of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), based on evolutionary models of stars with metallicities in the range $10^{-3} \\leq Z \\leq 4\\times 10^{-3}$ and mass $0.9 M\\odot < M < 8M\\odot$, evolved through the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase. The models used account for dust formation in the circumstellar envelope. To characterise the PNe sample of the SMC, we compare the observed abundances of the various species with the final chemical composition of the AGB models: this study allows us to identify the progenitors of the PNe observed, in terms of mass and chemical composition. According to our interpretation, most of the PNe descend from low-mass ($M < 2 M\\odot$) stars, which become carbon rich, after experiencing repeated third dredge-up episodes, during the AGB phase. A fraction of the PNe showing the signature of advanced CNO processing are interpreted as the progeny of massive AGB stars, with mass above $\\sim 6 M\\odot$, undergoing strong hot bottom burning. The differences with the chemical composition of the PNe population of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is explained on the basis of the diverse star formation history and age-metallicity relation of the two galaxies. The implications of the present study for some still highly debated points regarding the AGB evolution are also commented.

  15. Planetary nebula progenitors that swallow binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I propose that some irregular messy planetary nebulae (PNe) owe their morphologies to triple-stellar evolution where tight binary systems evolve inside and/or on the outskirts of the envelope of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. In some cases, the tight binary system can survive, in others, it is destroyed. The tight binary system might break up with one star leaving the system. In an alternative evolution, one of the stars of the broken-up tight binary system falls towards the AGB envelope with low specific angular momentum, and drowns in the envelope. In a different type of destruction process, the drag inside the AGB envelope causes the tight binary system to merge. This releases gravitational energy within the AGB envelope, leading to a very asymmetrical envelope ejection, with an irregular and messy PN as a descendant. The evolution of the triple-stellar system can be in a full common envelope evolution or in a grazing envelope evolution. Both before and after destruction (if destruction takes place), the system might launch pairs of opposite jets. One pronounced signature of triple-stellar evolution might be a large departure from axisymmetrical morphology of the descendant PN. I estimate that about one in eight non-spherical PNe is shaped by one of these triple-stellar evolutionary routes.

  16. A nebula around Nova BT Monocerotis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, T. R.; Oke, J. B.; Wade, R. A.

    1983-01-01

    H-alpha observations of Nova BT Mon obtained on December 15, 1981 using an 800x800-pixel CCD detector on the double spectrograph of the 5-m Hale telescope at Palomar Observatory are reported. The reciprocal dispersion at H-alpha was 6.04 A/pixel and the angular scale along the 1.0-arcsec-wide east-west slit was 0.58 arcsec/pixel; resolution of the combined, processed image is about 12 A. A ring-shaped nebular emission with a center displaced slightly from the stellar image and an expansion distance to BT Mon of about 1800 pc was detected. The velocity diameter is found to be about 1500 km/sec along the ridge line and 2100 km/sec along the 10-unit contour. The mass of the visible nebula is estimated as 0.00003 solar mass, similar to the BT Mon ejection mass determined by Schaefer and Patterson (1983).

  17. Absolute spectrophotometry of northern compact planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, S. A.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Perinotto, M.

    2005-06-01

    We present medium-dispersion spectra and narrowband images of six northern compact planetary nebulae (PNe): BoBn 1, DdDm 1, IC 5117, M 1-5, M 1-71, and NGC 6833. From broad-slit spectra, total absolute fluxes and equivalent widths were measured for all observable emission lines. High signal-to-noise emission line fluxes of Hα, Hβ, [Oiii], [Nii], and HeI may serve as emission line flux standards for northern hemisphere observers. From narrow-slit spectra, we derive systemic radial velocities. For four PNe, available emission line fluxes were measured with sufficient signal-to-noise to probe the physical properties of their electron densities, temperatures, and chemical abundances. BoBn 1 and DdDm 1, both type IV PNe, have an Hβ flux over three sigma away from previous measurements. We report the first abundance measurements of M 1-71. NGC 6833 measured radial velocity and galactic coordinates suggest that it is associated with the outer arm or possibly the galactic halo, and its low abundance ([O/H]=1.3× 10-4) may be indicative of low metallicity within that region.

  18. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    SciTech Connect

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database in which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  19. An affinity-structure database of helix-turn-helix: DNA complexes with a universal coordinate system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    AlQuraishi, Mohammed; Tang, Shengdong; Xia, Xide

    2015-11-19

    Molecular interactions between proteins and DNA molecules underlie many cellular processes, including transcriptional regulation, chromosome replication, and nucleosome positioning. Computational analyses of protein-DNA interactions rely on experimental data characterizing known protein-DNA interactions structurally and biochemically. While many databases exist that contain either structural or biochemical data, few integrate these two data sources in a unified fashion. Such integration is becoming increasingly critical with the rapid growth of structural and biochemical data, and the emergence of algorithms that rely on the synthesis of multiple data types to derive computational models of molecular interactions. We have developed an integrated affinity-structure database inmore » which the experimental and quantitative DNA binding affinities of helix-turn-helix proteins are mapped onto the crystal structures of the corresponding protein-DNA complexes. This database provides access to: (i) protein-DNA structures, (ii) quantitative summaries of protein-DNA binding affinities using position weight matrices, and (iii) raw experimental data of protein-DNA binding instances. Critically, this database establishes a correspondence between experimental structural data and quantitative binding affinity data at the single basepair level. Furthermore, we present a novel alignment algorithm that structurally aligns the protein-DNA complexes in the database and creates a unified residue-level coordinate system for comparing the physico-chemical environments at the interface between complexes. Using this unified coordinate system, we compute the statistics of atomic interactions at the protein-DNA interface of helix-turn-helix proteins. We provide an interactive website for visualization, querying, and analyzing this database, and a downloadable version to facilitate programmatic analysis. Lastly, this database will facilitate the analysis of protein-DNA interactions and the

  20. The Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, T.; Ladjal, D.; HerPlaNS Team

    2012-12-01

    The Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS, PI: T. Ueta) is one of the largest Herschel Open Time 1 program in which we explore the far-infrared aspects of 11 planetary nebulae (PNs) with the Herschel Space Observatory, exploiting its unprecedented capabilities in broadband photometry mapping, spectral mapping, and integral-field spectroscopy. We perform (1) deep PACS/SPIRE broadband mapping to account for the coldest dust component of the nebulae and determine the spatial distribution of the dusty haloes in the target PNs, (2) exhaustive PACS/SPIRE line mapping in far-IR atomic and molecular lines in two representative PNs to diagnose the energetics of the nebulae as a function of location in the nebulae, and (3) PACS/SPIRE spectral-energy-distribution spectroscopy at several positions in the target PNs to understand variations in the physical conditions as a function of location in the nebulae, to build a more complete picture of the interplay between the dust and gas components as a function of location in the nebulae. The HerPlaNS survey is distinguished from the existing guaranteed-time Key Program (KPGT), "Mass Loss of Evolved StarS" (MESS, PI: M. Groenewegen, including 10 PNs) by the extra dimension added by spectral mapping and integral-field spatio-spectroscopy that permit simultaneous probing of the gas and dust component in the target PNs. Through these investigations, we will consider the energetics of the entire gas-dust system as a function of location in the nebulae, which is a novel approach that has rarely been taken previously. HerPlaNS is conducted in collaboration with the Chandra Planetary Survey (ChanPlaNS, PI: J.H. Kastner) to furnish substantial PN data resources that would allow us—a community of PN astronomers—to tackle a multitude of unanswered issues in PN physics, from the shaping mechanisms of the nebulae to the energetics of the multi-phased gas-dust system surrounding the central white dwarf. These PN surveys, combined with

  1. Weak magnetic fields in central stars of planetary nebulae?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, M.; Hubrig, S.; Todt, H.; Schöller, M.; Hamann, W.-R.; Sandin, C.; Schönberner, D.

    2014-10-01

    Context. It is not yet clear whether magnetic fields play an essential role in shaping planetary nebulae (PNe), or whether stellar rotation alone and/or a close binary companion, stellar or substellar, can account for the variety of the observed nebular morphologies. Aims: In a quest for empirical evidence verifying or disproving the role of magnetic fields in shaping planetary nebulae, we follow up on previous attempts to measure the magnetic field in a representative sample of PN central stars. Methods: We obtained low-resolution polarimetric spectra with FORS 2 installed on the Antu telescope of the VLT for a sample of 12 bright central stars of PNe with different morphologies, including two round nebulae, seven elliptical nebulae, and three bipolar nebulae. Two targets are Wolf-Rayet type central stars. Results: For the majority of the observed central stars, we do not find any significant evidence for the existence of surface magnetic fields. However, our measurements may indicate the presence of weak mean longitudinal magnetic fields of the order of 100 Gauss in the central star of the young elliptical planetary nebula IC 418 as well as in the Wolf-Rayet type central star of the bipolar nebula Hen 2-113 and the weak emission line central star of the elliptical nebula Hen 2-131. A clear detection of a 250 G mean longitudinal field is achieved for the A-type companion of the central star of NGC 1514. Some of the central stars show a moderate night-to-night spectrum variability, which may be the signature of a variable stellar wind and/or rotational modulation due to magnetic features. Conclusions: Since our analysis indicates only weak fields, if any, in a few targets of our sample, we conclude that strong magnetic fields of the order of kG are not widespread among PNe central stars. Nevertheless, simple estimates based on a theoretical model of magnetized wind bubbles suggest that even weak magnetic fields below the current detection limit of the order of 100

  2. Recent Progresses in Studying Helix-Helix Interactions in Proteins by Incorporating the Wenxiang Diagram into the NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guo-Ping; Chen, Dong; Liao, Siming; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2016-01-01

    All residues in an alpha helix can be characterized and dispositioned on a 2D the wenxiang diagram, which possesses the following features: (1) the relative locations of the amino acids in the α-helix can be clearly displayed regardless how long it is; (2) direction of an alphahelix can be indicated; and (3) more information regarding each of the constituent amino acid residues in an alpha helix. Owing to its intuitionism and easy visibility, wenxiang diagrams have had an immense influence on our understanding of protein structure, protein-protein interactions, and the effect of helical structural stability on protein conformational transitions. In this review, we summarize two recent applications of wenxiang diagrams incorporating NMR spectroscopy in the researches of the coiled-coil protein interactions related to the regulation of contraction or relaxation states of vascular smooth muscle cells, and the effects of α-helical stability on the protein misfolding in prion disease, in hopes that the gained valuable information through these studies can stimulate more and more widely applications of wenxiang diagrams in structural biology. PMID:26286215

  3. Evaluation of a high-precision gear measuring machine for helix measurement using helix and wedge artifacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yohan

    2016-08-01

    High-precision gears are required for advanced motion and power transmission. The reliability of the measured value becomes important as the gear accuracy increases, and the establishment of a traceability system is needed. Therefore, a high-precision gear measuring machine (GMM) with a smaller uncertainty is expected to improve the gear calibration uncertainty. For this purpose, we developed a prototype of a high-precision GMM that adopts a direct drive mechanism and other features. Then, the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified using gear artifacts. Recently, some new measurement methods using simple shapes such as spheres and planes have been proposed as standards. We have verified the tooth profile measurement using a sphere artifact and reported the results that the developed GMM had a high capability in tooth profile measurement. Therefore, we attempted to devise a new evaluation method for helix measurement using a wedge artifact (WA) whose plane was treated as the tooth flank, and the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified. The results will provide a part of information to fully assess measurement uncertainty as our future work. This paper describes the evaluation results of the developed GMM for helix measurement using both a helix artifact and the WA, and discusses the effectiveness of the WA as a new artifact to evaluate the GMMs.

  4. Lipid solvation effects contribute to the affinity of Gly-xxx-Gly motif-mediated helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Melnyk, Roman A; Deber, Charles M

    2006-07-18

    Interactions between transmembrane helices are mediated by the concave Gly-xxx-Gly motif surface. Whether Gly residues per se are sufficient for selection of this motif has not been established. Here, we used the in vivo TOXCAT assay to measure the relative affinities of all 18 combinations of Gly, Ala, and Ser "small-xxx-small" mutations in glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 major coat protein (MCP) homodimers. Affinity values were compared with the accessibility to a methylene-sized probe of the total surface area of each helix monomer as a measure of solvation by membrane components. A strong inverse correlation was found between nonpolar-group lipid accessibility and dimer affinity (R = 0.75 for GpA, p = 0.013, and R = 0.81 for MCP, p = 0.004), suggesting that lipid as a poor membrane protein solvent, conceptually analogous to water in soluble protein folding, can contribute to dimer stability and help to define helix-helix interfaces. PMID:16834324

  5. Molecular chemistry and the missing mass problem in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, R. K.; Gruenwald, R.; Aleman, I.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Detections of molecular lines, mainly from H2 and CO, reveal molecular material in planetary nebulae. Observations of a variety of molecules suggest that the molecular composition in these objects differs from that found in interstellar clouds or in circumstellar envelopes. The success of the models, which are mostly devoted to explain molecular densities in specific planetary nebulae, is still partial however. Aims: The present study aims at identifying the influence of stellar and nebular properties on the molecular composition of planetary nebulae by means of chemical models. A comparison of theoretical results with those derived from the observations may provide clues to the conditions that favor the presence of a particular molecule. Methods: A self-consistent photoionization numerical code was adapted to simulate cold molecular regions beyond the ionized zone. The code was used to obtain a grid of models and the resulting column densities are compared with those inferred from observations. Results: Our models show that the inclusion of an incident flux of X-rays is required to explain the molecular composition derived for planetary nebulae. We also obtain a more accurate relation for the N(CO)/N(H2) ratio in these objects. Molecular masses obtained by previous works in the literature were then recalculated, showing that these masses can be underestimated by up to three orders of magnitude. We conclude that the problem of the missing mass in planetary nebulae can be solved by a more accurate calculation of the molecular mass.

  6. The discovery of a highly polarized bipolar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolstencroft, Ramon D.; Scarrott, S. M.; Menzies, J.

    1989-01-01

    During a search for the optical counterparts of IRAS sources whose flux peaks at 25 microns, a small faint bipolar nebula was discovered in Monoceros at the position of IRAS 07131-0147. The CCD images display the object's considerable structure. The central star seems relatively free of closeby nebulosity: the two lobes have a bow-tie structure with those parts nearest to the star consisting of series of small knots. The outer parts of the lobes seem to be made up of filaments streaming away from knots. On the basis of its optical spectrum, the central star was classified as a M5-6 giant. In the IRAS color classification scheme of Van der Veen and Habing (1988), the central star is VIb which indicates that there are distinct hot and cold components of circumstellar dust and that the mass loss process may have temporarily abated. Therefore, it is proposed that the object is in the post main sequence stage of evolution and is a protoplanetary nebulae. Young protoplanetary nebulae have totally obscured central stars illuminating reflective lobes whereas older ones such as M2-9 have lobes seen in emission from gas ionized by the central hot star which is clearly visible. Since the central object of IRAS07131-0147 is a relatively unobscured late type star and the lobes are seen only by reflection, it is suggested that this nebula is a protoplanetary nebula in an evolutionary stage intermediate between that of CRL2688 and M2-9.

  7. Recent Progress in Studies of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slane, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The synchrotron-emitting nebulae formed by energetic winds from young pulsars provide information on a wide range phenomena that contribute to their structure. High resolution X-ray observations reveal jets and toroidal structures in many systems, along with knot-like structures whose emission is observed to be time-variable. Large-scale filaments seen in optical and radio images mark instability regions where the expanding nebulae interact with the surrounding ejecta, and spectral studies reveal the presence of these ejecta in the form of thermal X-ray emission. Infrared studies probe the frequency region where evolutionary and magnetic field effects conspire to change the broadband synchrotron spectrum dramatically, and studies of the innermost regions of the nebulae provide constraints on the spectra of particles entering the nebula. At the highest energies, TeV gamma-ray observations provide a probe of the spectral region that, for low magnetic fields, corresponds to particles with energies just below the X-ray-emitting regime. Here I summarize the structure of pulsar wind nebulae and review several new observations that have helped drive a recent resurgence in theoretical modeling of these systems.

  8. Morphology of the Red Rectangle Proto-planetary Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koning, N.; Kwok, Sun; Steffen, W.

    2011-10-01

    The morphology of the Red Rectangle (RR) exhibits several singular attributes. Most prominent are a series of linear features perpendicular to the symmetry axis which appear as "ladder rungs" across the nebula. At the edge of each "rung" gas seemingly flows from bright knots in a parabolic shape toward the center of the nebula. We present a new model of the RR which explains these features as a projection effect of the more common concentric arcs seen in other proto-planetary nebulae (e.g., Egg Nebula). Using the three-dimensional morpho-kinematic modeling software SHAPE, we have created a model of the RR that consists of spherical shells evacuated by a bi-conical outflow. When the symmetry axis is oriented perpendicular to the line of sight, the spherical shells become linear, thereby reproducing the "rungs" seen in the RR. When oriented at different inclinations, the linear features become spherical as observed in the Egg Nebula. The model also accurately reproduces the bright knots and the parabolic outflows from these knots that have proven difficult to explain in the past. Using this model, we are able to place a lower limit on the speed of the outflow of ~158 km s-1.

  9. MORPHOLOGY OF THE RED RECTANGLE PROTO-PLANETARY NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Koning, N.; Kwok, Sun; Steffen, W. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2011-10-10

    The morphology of the Red Rectangle (RR) exhibits several singular attributes. Most prominent are a series of linear features perpendicular to the symmetry axis which appear as 'ladder rungs' across the nebula. At the edge of each 'rung' gas seemingly flows from bright knots in a parabolic shape toward the center of the nebula. We present a new model of the RR which explains these features as a projection effect of the more common concentric arcs seen in other proto-planetary nebulae (e.g., Egg Nebula). Using the three-dimensional morpho-kinematic modeling software SHAPE, we have created a model of the RR that consists of spherical shells evacuated by a bi-conical outflow. When the symmetry axis is oriented perpendicular to the line of sight, the spherical shells become linear, thereby reproducing the 'rungs' seen in the RR. When oriented at different inclinations, the linear features become spherical as observed in the Egg Nebula. The model also accurately reproduces the bright knots and the parabolic outflows from these knots that have proven difficult to explain in the past. Using this model, we are able to place a lower limit on the speed of the outflow of {approx}158 km s{sup -1}.

  10. Chandra Confirmation of a Pulsar Wind Nebula in DA 495

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Safi-Harb, S.; Landecker, T.L.; Kothes, R.; Camilo, F.

    2008-01-01

    As part of a multiwavelength study of the unusual radio supernova remnant DA 495, we present observations made with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Imaging and spectroscopic analysis confirms the previously detected X-ray source at the heart of the annular radio nebula, establishing the radiative properties of two key emission components: a soft unresolved source with a blackbody temperature of 1 MK consistent with a neutron star, surrounded by a nontherma1 nebula 40" in diameter exhibiting a power-law spectrum with photon index Gamma = 1.63, typical of a pulsar wind nebula. Morphologically, the nebula appears to be slightly extended along a direction, in projection on the sky, previously demonstrated to be of significance in radio and ASCA observations; we argue that this represents the orientation of the pulsar spin axis. At smaller scales, a narrow X-ray feature is seen extending out 5" from the point source, but energetic arguments suggest that it is not the resolved termination shock of the pulsar wind against the ambient medium. Finally, we argue based on synchrotron lifetimes in the nebular magnetic field that DA 495 represents the first example of a pulsar wind nebula in which electromagnetic flux makes up a significant part, together with particle flux, of the neutron star's wind.

  11. SOFIA Observations of the Planetary Nebula NGC7027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuck, Timothy; Werner, M. W.; Sahai, R.; Hartley, M.; Herter, T. L.; Horner, J.; Keller, L. D.; Livingston, J.; Morris, M.

    2013-01-01

    NGC7027 is one of the brightest and best-studied planetary nebulae. The nebula is 2900 light years from earth, and approximately 0.08 parsec in physical size making it one of the youngest known planetary nebula with an estimated age of just 600 years. NGC7027’s central 16th magnitude star is pumping out the energy of 6000 suns, and at 185,000 Kelvin the star is one of the hottest known. NGC7027 was imaged using the FORCAST instrument on SOFIA at 6.4, 6.6, 11.1, 19.7, 24.2, 33.6, and 37.1 microns. The HBPW of the measurements is 4-to-6 pixels 3 to 4.5 arc sec] across the bands. Analysis indicates a bright well-resolved nebula with an overall angular size of ~10 X 13 arc sec. The morphology is similar to what is seen in ground-based infrared and radio continuum images. The size varies little with wavelength. The SED derived from the SOFIA observations varies moderately but systematically across the nebula, with the longer wavelengths becoming relatively brighter at the edges. Analysis of the images has been carried out under the NASA-IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program with portions of the work being carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, operated by the California Institute of Technology under a contract with NASA.

  12. Ionization nebulae surrounding supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Chiang, E.; Kallman, T.; Malina, R.

    1994-01-01

    In this work we carry out a theoretical investigation of a new type of astrophysical gaseous nebula, viz., ionized regions surrounding supersoft X-ray sources. Supersoft X-ray sources, many of which have characteristic luminosities of approximately 10(exp 37)-(10(exp 38) ergs/s and effective temperatures of approximately 4 x 10(exp 5) K, were first discovered with the Einstein Observatory. These sources have now been shown to constitute a distinct class of X-ray source and are being found in substantial numbers with ROSAT. We predict that these sources should be surrounded by regions of ionized hydrogen and helium with properties that are distinct from other astrophysical gaseous nebulae. We present caluations of the ionization and temperature structure of these ionization nebulae, as well as the expected optical line fluxes. The ionization profiles for both hydrogen and helium exhibit substantially more gradual transitions from the ionized to the unionized state than is the case for conventional H II regions. The calculated optical line intensitites are presented as absolute fluxes from sources in the Large Magellanic Cloud and as fractions of the central source luminosity. We find, in particular, that (O III) lambda 5008 and He II lambda 4686 are especially prominent in these ionization nebulae as compared to other astrophysical nebulae. We propose that searches for supersoft X-rays via their characteristic optical lines may reveal sources in regions where the soft X-rays are nearly completely absorbed by the interstellar medium.

  13. The spatial distribution of infrared radiation from visible reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luan, Ling; Werner, Michael W.; Dwek, Eli; Sellgren, Kris

    1989-01-01

    The emission at IRAS 12 and 25 micron bands of reflection nebulae is far in excess of that expected from the longer wavelength equilibrium thermal emission. The excess emission in the IRAS 12 micron band is a general phenomenon, seen in various components of interstellar medium such as IR cirrus clouds, H II regions, atomic and molecular clouds, and also normal spiral galaxies. This excess emission has been attributed to UV excited fluorescence in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules or to the effect of temperature fluctuations in very small grains. Results are presented of studies of IRAS data on reflection nebulae selected from the van den Bergh reflection nebulae sample. Detailed scans of flux ratio and color temperature across the nebulae were obtained in order to study the spatial distribution of IR emission. A model was used to predict the spatial distribution of IR emission from dust grains illuminated by a B type star. The model was also used to explore the excitation of the IRAS 12 micron band emission as a function of stellar temperature. The model predictions are in good agreement with the analysis of reflection nebulae, illuminated by stars with stellar temperature ranging from 21,000 down to 3,000 K.

  14. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during...

  15. Autoinhibition of ETV6 DNA Binding Is Established by the Stability of Its Inhibitory Helix.

    PubMed

    De, Soumya; Okon, Mark; Graves, Barbara J; McIntosh, Lawrence P

    2016-04-24

    The ETS transcriptional repressor ETV6 (or TEL) is autoinhibited by an α-helix that sterically blocks its DNA-binding ETS domain. The inhibitory helix is marginally stable and unfolds when ETV6 binds to either specific or non-specific DNA. Using NMR spectroscopy, we show that folding of the inhibitory helix requires a buried charge-dipole interaction with helix H1 of the ETS domain. This interaction also contributes directly to autoinhibition by precluding a highly conserved dipole-enhanced hydrogen bond between the phosphodiester backbone of bound DNA and the N terminus of helix H1. To probe further the thermodynamic basis of autoinhibition, ETV6 variants were generated with amino acid substitutions introduced along the solvent exposed surface of the inhibitory helix. These changes were designed to increase the intrinsic helical propensity of the inhibitory helix without perturbing its packing interactions with the ETS domain. NMR-monitored amide hydrogen exchange measurements confirmed that the stability of the folded inhibitory helix increases progressively with added helix-promoting substitutions. This also results in progressively reinforced autoinhibition and decreased DNA-binding affinity. Surprisingly, locking the inhibitory helix onto the ETS domain by a disulfide bridge severely impairs, but does not abolish DNA binding. Weak interactions still occur via an interface displaced from the canonical ETS domain DNA-binding surface. Collectively, these studies establish a direct thermodynamic linkage between inhibitory helix stability and ETV6 autoinhibition, and demonstrate that helix unfolding does not strictly precede DNA binding. Modulating inhibitory helix stability provides a potential route for the in vivo regulation of ETV6 activity. PMID:26920109

  16. Narrow band coronographic imaging of the bipolar nebula around the LBV R127

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clampin, Mark; Nota, Antonella; Golimowski, David A.; Leitherer, Claus

    1992-01-01

    New high resolution narrow band coronographic images of the R127 nebula have been recently obtained. The nebula displays a bipolar morphology and is similar in appearance to the nebula around AG Carinae. The observations improve the values for the linear dimensions (1.9 x 2.2 pc) and yield an estimated nebular mass of 3.1 solar mass.

  17. Planetary Nebulae in the Magellanic Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, M. A.

    The relative closeness, the low reddening, and accurately known distance to the Magellanic Clouds give the ideal set of circumstances to pursue quantitative examinations of individual stellar at metallicities lower than solar. Our understanding of the population of PN in the Magellanic Clouds has been much enhanced recently by imaging and spectroscopic studies using the HST. With the HST, details of the internal nebular structure are resolved as well as ground-based telescopes resolve galactic PN. In the UV, the low line of sight reddening ensures that high signal to noise nebular and central star spectra can be obtained; sufficient to examine the P-Cygni profiles of the mass-losing central stars in some cases. In conjuction with ground-based spectrophotometry, absolute flux, expansion velocity and density information, this data set permits fully self consistent diameters, ages, masses, and abundances to be derived for the nebulae, and the central stars can be accurately placed on the H-R Diagram. Thus, we can examine the details of the evolution, and of the mass- and age-dependent dredge-up processes in a way which is just not possible in the case of Galactic PN. A brief summary of the highlights of the results: * The younger, low excitation, compact planetary nebulae appear to have a central reservoir of dense atomic and molecular gas. This gas lies close to the central star and is undergoing ionisation and being accelerated into outflow, consistent with the "two-wind" model of PN evolution and shaping. * The PN previously classified as nitrogen-rich objects (Peimbert Type I), show the bipolar "butterfly" symmetry that is also a characteristic of their Galactic counterparts. These have been shown to have the most massive precursor stars, as had been long suspected for the Galactic Type I PN. * The PN divide into two evolutionary groups according to kinematic age / size relationships, which may be identified with stars which leave the AGB as He- or as H- burners

  18. GAS KINEMATICS IN Ly{alpha} NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yujin; Jahnke, Knud; Zabludoff, Ann; Eisenstein, Daniel; Dave, Romeel; Shectman, Stephen A.; Kelson, Daniel D.

    2011-07-10

    Exploring the origin of Ly{alpha} nebulae ('blobs') at high redshift requires measurements of their gas kinematics that are impossible with only the resonant, optically thick Ly{alpha} line. To define gas motions relative to the systemic velocity of the blob, the Ly{alpha} line must be compared with an optically thin line like H{alpha} {lambda}6563, which is not much altered by radiative transfer effects and is more concentrated about the galaxies embedded in the nebula's core. We obtain optical and near-IR (NIR) spectra of the two brightest Ly{alpha} blobs (CDFS-LAB01 and CDFS-LAB02) from the Yang et al. sample using the Magellan/Magellan Echellette Spectrograph optical and Very Large Telescope/SINFONI NIR spectrographs. Both the Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} lines confirm that these blobs lie at the survey redshift, z {approx} 2.3. Within each blob, we detect several H{alpha} sources, which roughly correspond to galaxies seen in Hubble Space Telescope rest-frame UV images. The H{alpha} detections show that these galaxies have large internal velocity dispersions ({sigma}{sub v} = 130-190 km s{sup -1}) and that, in the one system (LAB01), where we can reliably extract profiles for two H{alpha} sources, their velocity difference is {Delta}v {approx} 440 km s{sup -1}. The presence of multiple galaxies within the blobs, and those galaxies' large velocity dispersions and large relative motion, is consistent with our previous finding that Ly{alpha} blobs inhabit massive dark matter halos that will evolve into those typical of present-day rich clusters and that the embedded galaxies may eventually become brightest cluster galaxies. To determine whether the gas near the embedded galaxies is predominantly infalling or outflowing, we compare the Ly{alpha} and H{alpha} line centers, finding that Ly{alpha} is not offset ({Delta}v{sub Ly{alpha}} = +0 km s{sup -1}) in LAB01 and redshifted by only +230 km s{sup -1} in LAB02. These offsets are small compared to those of Lyman break

  19. Production of Gamma-Rays in the Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bednarek, W.; Bartosik, M.

    2004-10-01

    We construct the time dependent hadronic-leptonic radiation model for the high energy processes inside the pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). This model is based on the hypothesis that heavy nuclei are effi- ciently accelerated in the vicinity of young pulsars. Different energy loss processes of nuclei and accel- erated by them leptons are considered in order to obtain the equilibrium spectra of these particles in- side the nebula at an arbitrary time after the pulsar formation. We calculate the multiwavelength spec- tra from specific PWNe expected from different lep- tonic and hadronic processes. From normalization of the calculated synchrotron spectrum to the observed spectrum at low energies, the expected TeV gamma- ray fluxes from a few PWNe are predicted and its possible detectability by the future TeV telescopes is discussed. Key words: Pulsars: nebulae - radiation mecha- nisms: gamma-rays.

  20. IUE observations of the 'Butterfly' Nebula M2-9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feibelman, W. A.

    1984-01-01

    IUE observations of the peculiar 'Butterfy' nebula M2-9 indicate that it is not a normal planetary nebula. The ultraviolet spectrum is characterized by few emission lines and a weak continuum. Mg II 2800 A is the strongest emission line present and may be indicative of a binary nucleus. Lines of N v, Q I, N III, N IV, Si III, and C III are seen, but C IV and O III are conspicuous by their absence. T(e) = 10,250 + or - 400 K was determined for the core. Nitrogen in the core is found to be overabundant by about a factor of 5 over the solar value. M2-9 may be an object in the early stages of becoming a planetary nebula.

  1. A search for planetary nebulae on the 'POSS'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dengel, J.; Hartl, H.; Weinberger, R.

    1980-05-01

    Results of a search for new planetary nebulae on a quarter of the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey (POSS) E plates are reported. A total of 218 prints evenly scattered over all accessible galactic longitudes and latitudes was examined, in addition to the entire region between longitudes 33 and 213 deg and latitudes + or - 2 deg. Five objects satisfying the criteria of emission nebulosity characteristic of planetary nebulae and/or a central blue star were detected, as well as another three dozen very faint, roundish unlisted objects. The coordinates, dimensions, central star magnitudes, surfaces brightnesses, nebular magnitudes, volumes and estimated distances of the five probable planetary nebulae are presented, and it is noted that all but one of them are of considerably low surface brightness.

  2. On the formation of ansae in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam

    1990-01-01

    Formation mechanisms for the two optical bright knots in planetary nebulae, 'ansae', are investigated. Adiabatic two-dimensional numerical simulations of the interacting winds flow at early stages of the planetary nebulae evolution are performed. It is found that no real focusing of the shocked fast wind material toward the symmetry axis occurs, and thus the interaction of winds by itself will not form the ansae. A model is proposed, in which jets from the central star form the ansae. These jets are presumably being formed during the few hundred years in the period between the end of the slow wind and the beginning of the fast wind. It is shown that a companion to the progenitor red giant can lead to the degree of asymmetry observed in elliptical planetary nebulae.

  3. Evolution of the Crab Nebula in a Low Energy Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Haifeng; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2015-06-01

    The nature of the supernova leading to the Crab Nebula has long been controversial because of the low energy that is present in the observed nebula. One possibility is that there is significant energy in extended fast material around the Crab but searches for such material have not led to detections. An electron capture supernova model can plausibly account for the low energy and the observed abundances in the Crab. Here, we examine the evolution of the Crab pulsar wind nebula inside a freely expanding supernova and find that the observed properties are most consistent with a low energy event. Both the velocity and radius of the shell material, and the amount of gas swept up by the pulsar wind point to a low explosion energy (∼1050 erg). We do not favor a model in which circumstellar interaction powers the supernova luminosity near maximum light because the required mass would limit the freely expanding ejecta.

  4. Facilitating NASA Earth Science Data Processing Using Nebula Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Pham, L.; Kempler, S.; Theobald, M.; Esfandiari, A.; Campino, J.; Vollmer, B.; Lynnes, C.

    2011-12-01

    Cloud Computing technology has been used to offer high-performance and low-cost computing and storage resources for both scientific problems and business services. Several cloud computing services have been implemented in the commercial arena, e.g. Amazon's EC2 & S3, Microsoft's Azure, and Google App Engine. There are also some research and application programs being launched in academia and governments to utilize Cloud Computing. NASA launched the Nebula Cloud Computing platform in 2008, which is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) to deliver on-demand distributed virtual computers. Nebula users can receive required computing resources as a fully outsourced service. NASA Goddard Earth Science Data and Information Service Center (GES DISC) migrated several GES DISC's applications to the Nebula as a proof of concept, including: a) The Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Processor for Measurements (S4PM) for processing scientific data; b) the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) data process workflow for processing AIRS raw data; and c) the GES-DISC Interactive Online Visualization ANd aNalysis Infrastructure (GIOVANNI) for online access to, analysis, and visualization of Earth science data. This work aims to evaluate the practicability and adaptability of the Nebula. The initial work focused on the AIRS data process workflow to evaluate the Nebula. The AIRS data process workflow consists of a series of algorithms being used to process raw AIRS level 0 data and output AIRS level 2 geophysical retrievals. Migrating the entire workflow to the Nebula platform is challenging, but practicable. After installing several supporting libraries and the processing code itself, the workflow is able to process AIRS data in a similar fashion to its current (non-cloud) configuration. We compared the performance of processing 2 days of AIRS level 0 data through level 2 using a Nebula virtual computer and a local Linux computer. The result shows that Nebula has significantly

  5. Electrical discharge heating of chondrules in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, Stanley G.; Keil, Klaus; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1995-01-01

    We present a rudimentary theoretical assessment of electrical discharge heating as a candidate mechanism for the formation of chondrules in the solar nebula. The discharge model combines estimates of the properties of the nebula, a mechanism for terrestrial thunderstorm electrification, and some fundamental electrical properties of gases. Large uncertainties in the model inputs limit these calculations to order-or-magnitude accuracy. Despite the uncertainty, it is possible to estimate an upper limit to the efficiency of nebular discharges at melting millimeter-sized stony objects. We find that electrical arcs analogous to terrestrial lightning could have occurred in the nebula, but that under most conditions these discharges probably could not have melted chondrules. Despite our difficulties, we believe the topic worthy of further investigation and suggest some experiments which could improve our understanding of nebular discharges.

  6. MULTIPOLAR PLANETARY NEBULAE: NOT AS GEOMETRICALLY DIVERSIFIED AS THOUGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, S.-N.; Imai, H.; Chibueze, J.; Kwok, Sun; Tafoya, D. E-mail: sunkwok@hku.hk

    2012-12-01

    Planetary nebulae (PNe) have diverse morphological shapes, including point-symmetric and multipolar structures. Many PNe also have complicated internal structures such as tori, lobes, knots, and ansae. A complete accounting of all the morphological structures through physical models is difficult. A first step toward such an understanding is to derive the true three-dimensional structure of the nebulae. In this paper, we show that a multipolar nebula with three pairs of lobes can explain many such features, if orientation and sensitivity effects are taken into account. Using only six parameters-the inclination and position angles of each pair-we are able to simulate the observed images of 20 PNe with complex structures. We suggest that multipolar structure is an intrinsic structure of PNe and the statistics of multipolar PNe have been severely underestimated in the past.

  7. The surprising Crab pulsar and its nebula: a review.

    PubMed

    Bühler, R; Blandford, R

    2014-06-01

    The Crab nebula and its pulsar (referred to together as 'the Crab') have historically played a central role in astrophysics. True to this legacy, several unique discoveries have been made recently. The Crab was found to emit gamma-ray pulsations up to energies of 400 GeV, beyond what was previously expected from pulsars. Strong gamma-ray flares, of durations of a few days, were discovered from within the nebula, while the source was previously expected to be stable in flux on these time scales. Here we review these intriguing and suggestive developments. In this context we give an overview of the observational properties of the Crab and our current understanding of pulsars and their nebulae. PMID:24913306

  8. THE PHASES OF WATER ICE IN THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesla, Fred J.

    2014-03-20

    Understanding the phases of water ice that were present in the solar nebula has implications for understanding cometary and planetary compositions as well as the internal evolution of these bodies. Here we show that amorphous ice formed more readily than previously recognized, with formation at temperatures <70 K being possible under protoplanetary disk conditions. We further argue that photodesorption and freeze-out of water molecules near the surface layers of the solar nebula would have provided the conditions needed for amorphous ice to form. This processing would be a natural consequence of ice dynamics and would allow for the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles in water ice in the outer solar nebula.

  9. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion molecular cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y.; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New obervations of Orion Molecular Cloud-2 have been made from 1-100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near infrared sources, IRS1 and IRS4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS1 and IRS4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS1 can be characterized by L less than or equal to 500 Solar luminosities and T approx. 1000 K. The near infrared (1-5) micron albedo of the grains in the IRS1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  10. Infrared reflection nebulae in Orion Molecular Cloud 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne; Werner, M. W.; Capps, R.; Lester, D.

    1986-01-01

    New observations of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 have been made from 1 to 100 microns using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility and the Kuiper Airborne Observatory. An extensive program of polarimetry, photometry, and spectrophotometry has shown that the extended emission regions associated with two of the previously known near-infrared sources, IRS 1 and IRS 4, are infrared reflection nebulae, and that the compact sources IRS 1 and IRS 4 are the main luminosity sources in the cloud. The constraints from the far-infrared observations and an analysis of the scattered light from the IRS 1 nebula show that OMC-2/IRS 1 can be characterized by L of 500 solar luminosities or less and T of roughly 1000 K. The near-infrared albedo of the grains in the IRS 1 nebula is greater than 0.08.

  11. [Fe iii] lines in the planetary nebula NGC 2392

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Fang, Xuan; Chau, Wayne; Hsia, Chin-Hao; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Kwok, Sun

    2012-08-01

    The Eskimo Nebula (NGC 2392) is a young double-shell planetary nebula (PN). Its intrinsic structure and the responsible shaping mechanism are still not fully understood. We present new optical spectroscopy of NGC 2392 at two different locations to obtain the spectra of the inner and outer shells. Several [Fe iii] lines are clearly detected. We find that these [Fe iii] lines mostly originate from the inner shell. Therefore, we suggest that NGC 2392 might have an intrinsic structure similar to the Ant Nebula Mz 3, which exhibits a number of [Fe iii] lines from the central dense regions. In this scenario, the inner and outer shells correspond to the central emission core and the outer lobes of Mz 3, respectively.

  12. Detection of submillimeter polarization in the Orion nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, R. H.; Dragovan, M.; Novak, G.

    1984-01-01

    Linear polarization has been observed in the submillimeter radiation (270 microns) from two regions of Orion: one centered in the Kleinmann-Low nebula and one centered 1.5 arcmin south of the nebula. The observations were performed in September of 1983 and January of 1984 with the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The polarizations measured for the two regions were both 1.7 percent, plus or minus 0.4 and 0.5 percent, respectively. The angle of the outflow from both sources was 27 degrees, plus or minus seven degrees. An upper limit for polarization in the submillimeter radiation from the nebula W3(OH) was established at 1.6 percent. The observational data are compared with results from several other recent polarimetric observations of Orion, and some of their implications are discussed.

  13. 3D Model of the Eta Carinae Little Homunculus Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Wolfgang; Teodoro, Mairan; Madura, Thomas; Groh, Jose H.; Gull, Theodore R.; Corcoran, Michael F.; Damineli, Augusto; Hamaguchi, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    We extend our morpho-kinematic 3D modeling of the Homunculus nebula (Steffen et al., 2014) to the interior nested Little Homunculus. The model is based on spectroscopic observations from HST/STIS. We find that the structure of the interior Little Homunculus is rather flat in the polar regions and interacts with the main Homunculus nebula only on one side, towards the periastron direction of the binary orbit. Furthermore, the two lobes of the LH are misaligned, also towards the periastron direction. As an explanation for the misalignment we propose that, in both cases, shortly after the eruptions that created the bipolar nebulae from the primary star, the off-center wind of the secondary has pushed the ejecta towards the periastron directions, since the secondary is most of the time near the apastron. Future hydrodynamic simulations are warranted to confirm this scenario.

  14. Implications of HESS Observations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jager, Ocker C.; Djannati-Ataï, Arache

    Even before the discovery of pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) like the Crab Nebula were identified as belonging to a class of cosmic radio sources with rela-tivistic electrons moving in magnetized plasmas to give the continuum radiation as observed. Visionaries like [36] already predicted that we should be able to measure the magnetic field strength in PWN using the combination of synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) radiation. Following this, [43] were the first to provide us with a sophisticated one dimensional (1D) magneto hydrodynamical models (MHD) model of the Crab Nebula, which predicted a magnetic field strength distribution, consistent with broadband multi-wavelength (radio through very high energy gamma-ray) constraints [12,25, 39].

  15. Gamma-rays from pulsar wind nebulae in starburst galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannheim, Karl; Elsässer, Dominik; Tibolla, Omar

    2012-07-01

    Recently, gamma-ray emission at TeV energies has been detected from the starburst galaxies NGC253 (Acero et al., 2009) [1] and M82 (Acciari et al., 2009) [2]. It has been claimed that pion production due to cosmic rays accelerated in supernova remnants interacting with the interstellar gas is responsible for the observed gamma rays. Here, we show that the gamma-ray pulsar wind nebulae left behind by the supernovae contribute to the TeV luminosity in a major way. A single pulsar wind nebula produces about ten times the total luminosity of the Sun at energies above 1 TeV during a lifetime of 105 years. A large number of 3 × 104 pulsar wind nebulae expected in a typical starburst galaxy at a distance of 4 Mpc can readily produce the observed TeV gamma rays.

  16. Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae VI: the conference summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, O.

    2014-04-01

    The Asymmetric Planetary Nebulae conference series, now in its sixth edition, aims to resolve the shaping mechanism of PN. Eighty percent of PN have non spherical shapes and during this conference the last nails in the coffin of single stars models for non spherical PN have been put. Binary theories abound but observational tests are lagging. The highlight of APN6 has been the arrival of ALMA which allowed us to measure magnetic fields on AGB stars systematically. AGB star halos, with their spiral patterns are now connected to PPN and PN halos. New models give us hope that binary parameters may be decoded from these images. In the post-AGB and pre-PN evolutionary phase the naked post-AGB stars present us with an increasingly curious puzzle as complexity is added to the phenomenologies of objects in transition between the AGB and the central star regimes. Binary central stars continue to be detected, including the first detection of longer period binaries, however a binary fraction is still at large. Hydro models of binary interactions still fail to give us results, if we make an exception for the wider types of binary interactions. More promise is shown by analytical considerations and models driven by simpler, 1D simulations such as those carried out with the code MESA. Large community efforts have given us more homogeneous datasets which will yield results for years to come. Examples are the ChanPlaN and HerPlaNe collaborations that have been working with the Chandra and Herschel space telescopes, respectively. Finally, the new kid in town is the intermediate-luminosity optical transient, a new class of events that may have contributed to forming several peculiar PN and pre-PN.

  17. Planetary Nebula Kinematics in M101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin

    2011-02-01

    Look at a spiral; what do you see? Stars zooming `round in the galaxy! Their motions indicate total mass, but how much is DM, stars, and gas? Study motions in and out; first find monochromatic stars- that's my kind. Find us, get our velocities, then: determine disk mass! I'm a PN! Rotation curves indicate the total mass of spirals, but halo mass profiles cannot be decoupled from the visible disk mass using rotation curves alone. To break this disk-halo degeneracy, we have been using planetary nebulae (PNe) to measure the z-component of the stellar velocity dispersion in the disks of face-on spirals. These measurements of σ_z, coupled with straightforward assumptions, have yielded disk surface mass estimates over several scale lengths (h_R) in 6 spirals. We find that in the inner regions of galaxies (R < 3.5 h_R), the values of σ_z are consistent with those expected from a constant mass-to-light ratio (M/L), constant scale-height disk and this trend continues into the outer regions of M74 and IC 342. However, in M83 and M94, σ_z flattens and becomes constant with radius. We have interpreted this as evidence for satellite accretion with disk flaring, but an increasing disk M/L may also contribute to the behavior. To investigate this phenomenon more thoroughly, we are proposing to extend the survey of an additional galaxy, M101, to R > 8 h_R. Last year we imaged M101 with the wide-field Mosaic camera on the KPNO 4-m telescope. This proposal is to perform follow-up spectroscopy on ~240 PNe in M101 with WIYN/Hydra.

  18. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy for proud nebulae in keratoconus.

    PubMed Central

    Moodaley, L; Liu, C; Woodward, E G; O'Brart, D; Muir, M K; Buckley, R

    1994-01-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy was performed as an outpatients with proud nebulae as treatment patients with proud nebulae as treatment for their contact lens intolerance. The mean period of contact lens wear before the development of intolerance was 13.4 years (range 2 to 27 years). Following the development of intolerance, three patients abandoned contact lens wear in the affected eye while the remainder experienced a reduction in comfortable wearing time (mean = 3.75 hours; range: 0-14 hours). All patients had good potential Snellen visual acuity with a contact lens of 6/9 (nine eyes) and 6/12 (one eye). The proud nebulae were directly ablated with a 193 nm ArF excimer laser using a 1 mm diameter beam. Between 100-150 pulses were sufficient to ablate the raised area. Patients experienced no pain during the procedure and reported minimal discomfort postoperatively. In all cases flattening of the proud nebulae was achieved. Seven patients were able to resume regular contact lens wear (mean wearing time = 10.17 hours; range 8 to 16 hours). In three patients, resumption of contact lens wear was unsuccessful because of cone steepness. All patients achieved postoperative Snellen visual acuity of 6/12 or better with a contact lens. Four patients experienced a loss of one line in Snellen acuity. The mean follow up period was 8.3 months (range 2 to 17 months). Excimer laser superficial keratectomy is a useful technique for the treatment of contact lens intolerance caused by proud nebulae in patients with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty is thus avoided. Images PMID:8060928

  19. The blue supergiant MN18 and its bipolar circumstellar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvaramadze, V. V.; Kniazev, A. Y.; Bestenlehner, J. M.; Bodensteiner, J.; Langer, N.; Greiner, J.; Grebel, E. K.; Berdnikov, L. N.; Beletsky, Y.

    2015-11-01

    We report the results of spectrophotometric observations of the massive star MN18 revealed via discovery of a bipolar nebula around it with the Spitzer Space Telescope. Using the optical spectrum obtained with the Southern African Large Telescope, we classify this star as B1 Ia. The evolved status of MN18 is supported by the detection of nitrogen overabundance in the nebula, which implies that it is composed of processed material ejected by the star. We analysed the spectrum of MN18 by using the code CMFGEN, obtaining a stellar effective temperature of ≈21 kK. The star is highly reddened, E(B - V) ≈ 2 mag. Adopting an absolute visual magnitude of MV = -6.8 ± 0.5 (typical of B1 supergiants), MN18 has a luminosity of log L/L⊙ ≈ 5.42 ± 0.30, a mass-loss rate of ≈(2.8-4.5) × 10- 7 M⊙ yr- 1, and resides at a distance of ≈5.6^{+1.5} _{-1.2} kpc. We discuss the origin of the nebula around MN18 and compare it with similar nebulae produced by other blue supergiants in the Galaxy (Sher 25, HD 168625, [SBW2007] 1) and the Large Magellanic Cloud (Sk-69°202). The nitrogen abundances in these nebulae imply that blue supergiants can produce them from the main-sequence stage up to the pre-supernova stage. We also present a K-band spectrum of the candidate luminous blue variable MN56 (encircled by a ring-like nebula) and report the discovery of an OB star at ≈17 arcsec from MN18. The possible membership of MN18 and the OB star of the star cluster Lynga 3 is discussed.

  20. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy for proud nebulae in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Moodaley, L; Liu, C; Woodward, E G; O'Brart, D; Muir, M K; Buckley, R

    1994-06-01

    Contact lens intolerance in keratoconus may be due to the formation of a proud nebula at or near the apex of the cone. Excimer laser superficial keratectomy was performed as an outpatients with proud nebulae as treatment patients with proud nebulae as treatment for their contact lens intolerance. The mean period of contact lens wear before the development of intolerance was 13.4 years (range 2 to 27 years). Following the development of intolerance, three patients abandoned contact lens wear in the affected eye while the remainder experienced a reduction in comfortable wearing time (mean = 3.75 hours; range: 0-14 hours). All patients had good potential Snellen visual acuity with a contact lens of 6/9 (nine eyes) and 6/12 (one eye). The proud nebulae were directly ablated with a 193 nm ArF excimer laser using a 1 mm diameter beam. Between 100-150 pulses were sufficient to ablate the raised area. Patients experienced no pain during the procedure and reported minimal discomfort postoperatively. In all cases flattening of the proud nebulae was achieved. Seven patients were able to resume regular contact lens wear (mean wearing time = 10.17 hours; range 8 to 16 hours). In three patients, resumption of contact lens wear was unsuccessful because of cone steepness. All patients achieved postoperative Snellen visual acuity of 6/12 or better with a contact lens. Four patients experienced a loss of one line in Snellen acuity. The mean follow up period was 8.3 months (range 2 to 17 months). Excimer laser superficial keratectomy is a useful technique for the treatment of contact lens intolerance caused by proud nebulae in patients with keratoconus. Penetrating keratoplasty is thus avoided. PMID:8060928

  1. Stability of Small Grains in HII Regions and Reflection Nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, M. W.; Gauthier, T. N., III; Cawlfield, T.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed IRAS data to assess the relative amounts of small and large grains in HII regions and reflection nebulae. Our most important finding is that no evidence for small grain destruction is seen in reflection nebulae, even for [high] values of the radiation energy density at which significant grain destruction apparently occurs in HII regions. This suggests that it is not only the total radiant energy density but also the energy per photon which determines the stability of small grains in astrophysical environments.

  2. Planetary nebulae in 2014: A review of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zijlstra, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Planetary nebulae had a double anniversary in 2014, 250 years since their discovery and 150 years since the correct spectroscopic identification. This paper gives an overview of planetary nebula research published in 2014. Topics include surveys, central stars, abundances, morphologies, magnetic fields, stellar population and galactic dynamics. An important continuing controversy is the discrepancy between recombination-line and forbidden-line abundances. A new controversy is the relation between symbiotic stars and [WC] stars. PN of the year is undoubtedly CRL 618, with papers on its binary symbiotic/[WC] nucleus, rapid stellar evolution, expanding jets and magnetic fields.

  3. Facilitating NASA Earth Science Data Processing Using Nebula Cloud Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, Long; Chen, Aijun; Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Theobald, Michael; Asghar, Esfandiari; Campino, Jane; Vollmer, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Cloud Computing has been implemented in several commercial arenas. The NASA Nebula Cloud Computing platform is an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) built in 2008 at NASA Ames Research Center and 2010 at GSFC. Nebula is an open source Cloud platform intended to: a) Make NASA realize significant cost savings through efficient resource utilization, reduced energy consumption, and reduced labor costs. b) Provide an easier way for NASA scientists and researchers to efficiently explore and share large and complex data sets. c) Allow customers to provision, manage, and decommission computing capabilities on an as-needed bases

  4. Catalysis by dust grains in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, M. E.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.

    1996-10-01

    In order to determine whether grain-catalyzed reactions played an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula, the authors applied their time-dependent model of methane formation via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis to pressures from 10-5 to 1 bar and temperatures from 450 to 650K. Results indicate that under certain nebular conditions, conversion of CO to methane could be extremely efficient in the presence of iron-nickel dust grains over timescales very short compared to the lifetime of the solar nebula.

  5. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennessy, Gregory S.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Cheng, Kwang P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gull, Theodore P.; Hintzen, Paul; Isensee, Joan E.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Roberts, Morton S.

    1992-01-01

    We obtained ultraviolet images of the Crab Nebula with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission in 1990 December. The UV continuum morphology of the Crab is generally similar to that in the optical region, but the wispy structures are less conspicuous in the UV and X-ray. UV line emission from the thermal filaments is not strong. UV spectral index maps with a resolution of 10 arcsecs show a significant gradient across the nebula, with the outer parts being redder, as expected from synchrotron losses. The location of the bluest synchrotron continuum does not coincide with the pulsar.

  6. Interpretation of the [ClIII] Lines in Gaseous Nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J; Walker, M F; Krueger, T K

    1970-05-01

    The intensity ratio of the green lambdalambda5517 and 5537 lines of [ClIII] serves as an indicatrix of the electron density in many gaseous nebulae whose spectra can be observed with an image converter. Quantitative interpretation of the line ratio requires accurate values of the collisional strengths and transition probabilities. With improved values of these parameters we have revised electron densities for a number of nebulae; the results seem to be in good accord with those derived from other criteria. PMID:16591829

  7. Interacting winds and the shaping of planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soker, Noam; Livio, Mario

    1989-01-01

    Using two-dimensional hydrodynamics, the problem of shaping of planetary nebulae by the interacting winds model is studied. The shock structure is obtained and it is shown that interacting winds are capable of producing morphologies similar to the ones observed in planetary nebulae, provided that a density contrast exists between the equatorial and polar directions. This confirms recent suggestions by Balick. Mechanisms that can produce the required density contrast are discussed and it is shown that binary central stars provide the most natural mechanism, especially via common envelope evolution. It is not yet entirely clear whether stellar rotation is sufficient to generate the required contrast in the case of single central stars.

  8. A radio nebula associated with Circinus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, R. F.; Komesaroff, M. M.; Jauncey, D. L.; Caswell, J. L.; Milne, D. K.; Kesteven, M. J.; Wellington, K. J.; Preston, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the variable source Circinus X-1 is reported that reveals that this eccentric double-star system is embedded in a nebula of steady radio emission extending over several parsecs, orders of magnitude larger than the binary stellar system responsible for the fluctuating component of emission. This is in marked constrast to most X-ray binaries, where an envelope of radio emission in conspicuously absent. There are difficulties in explaining the emission, but analogies with SS433 and the Crab nebula suggest possible models.

  9. Two new evolved neighbouring planetary nebulae in Aquila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Pfleiderer, J.

    1997-08-01

    In the course of a search for faint new non-stellar objects in the Northern Galactic Plane, two neighbouring planetary nebula (PNe) candidates have been detected on film copies of the POSS II. Whereas the morphology of the smaller of the two objects (v = 15 arcsec) is typical for PNe, the nature of the larger one (34 x 18 arcsec^2) defied an even provisional classification, on its photographic appearance alone. Optical spectra, however, allowed both sources, which are separated by 20 arcmin only, to be classified as highly obscured PNe. Both nebulae obviously are rather old, i.e. they are evolved representatives of their kind.

  10. Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope observations of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennessy, Gregory S.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Cheng, Kwang P.; Bohlin, Ralph C.; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gull, Theodore R.; Hintzen, Paul; Isensee, Joan E.; Landsman, Wayne B.; Roberts, Morton S.; Smith, Andrew M.; Smith, Eric P.; Stecher, Theodore P.

    1992-08-01

    We obtained ultraviolet images of the Crab Nebula with the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope during the Astro-1 Space Shuttle mission in 1990 December. The UV continuum morphology of the Crab is generally similar to that in the optical region, but the wispy structures are less conspicuous in the UV and X-ray. UV line emission from the thermal filaments is not strong. UV spectral index maps with a resolution of 10 arcsecs show a significant gradient across the nebula, with the outer parts being redder, as expected from synchrotron losses. The location of the bluest synchrotron continuum does not coincide with the pulsar.

  11. Detection of X-ray polarization of the Crab Nebula.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, R.; Weisskopf, M. C.; Berthelsdorf, R.; Linke, R.; Wolff, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Two different types of X-ray polarimeters were used in a sounding rocket to search for X-ray polarization of the Crab Nebula. Polarization was detected at a statistical confidence level of 99.7%. If the X-ray polarization is assumed to be independent of energy, the results of this and a previous experiment lead to a polarization of 15.4 (plus or minus 5.2) percent at a position angle of 156 (plus or minus 10) deg. This result confirms the synchrotron model for X-ray emission from the Crab Nebula.

  12. Diffuse X-ray emission from the Dumbbell Nebula?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, You-Hua; Kwitter, Karen B.; Kaler, James B.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter pointed observations of the Dumbbell Nebula and find that the previously reported 'extended' X-ray emission is an instrumental electronic ghost image at the softest energy band. At slightly higher energy bands, the image of the Dumbbell is not very different from that of the white dwarf HZ43. We conclude that the X-ray emission of the Dumbbell Nebula comes from its central star. A blackbody model is fitted to the spectrum and the best-fit temperature of not greater than 136,000 +/- 10,000 K is in excellent agreement with the Zanstra temperatures.

  13. Designing Covalently Linked Heterodimeric Four-Helix Bundles.

    PubMed

    Chino, M; Leone, L; Maglio, O; Lombardi, A

    2016-01-01

    De novo design has proven a powerful methodology for understanding protein folding and function, and for mimicking or even bettering the properties of natural proteins. Extensive progress has been made in the design of helical bundles, simple structural motifs that can be nowadays designed with a high degree of precision. Among helical bundles, the four-helix bundle is widespread in nature, and is involved in numerous and fundamental processes. Representative examples are the carboxylate bridged diiron proteins, which perform a variety of different functions, ranging from reversible dioxygen binding to catalysis of dioxygen-dependent reactions, including epoxidation, desaturation, monohydroxylation, and radical formation. The "Due Ferri" (two-irons; DF) family of proteins is the result of a de novo design approach, aimed to reproduce in minimal four-helix bundle models the properties of the more complex natural diiron proteins, and to address how the amino acid sequence modulates their functions. The results so far obtained point out that asymmetric metal environments are essential to reprogram functions, and to achieve the specificity and selectivity of the natural enzymes. Here, we describe a design method that allows constructing asymmetric four-helix bundles through the covalent heterodimerization of two different α-helical harpins. In particular, starting from the homodimeric DF3 structure, we developed a protocol for covalently linking the two α2 monomers by using the Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition. The protocol was then generalized, in order to include the construction of several linkers, in different protein positions. Our method is fast, low cost, and in principle can be applied to any couple of peptides/proteins we desire to link. PMID:27586346

  14. Unwinding of double-stranded DNA helix by dehydration.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C H; Mizusawa, H; Kakefuda, T

    1981-01-01

    Conformation changes of the double-stranded DNA helix in response to dehydration were investigated by monitoring, by agarose gel electrophoresis, the linking number of covalently closed circular DNA generated by ligation of linear DNA in the presence of different organic solvents or different temperatures. It was found that: (i) The DNA helix unwinds upon addition of certain organic solvents or elevation of temperature. (ii) The conformational change observed under the experimental conditions is a continuous process in response to the organic solvent concentration. (iii) The delta H of unwinding one linking of the DNA helix is constant at approximately 12.2 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol (1 kcal = 4.184 kJ); the corresponding delta S and d(delta S)/dn are 2nkR and 2kR, in which n is the relative equivalent linking number (referred to the state of delta S = 0 for unwinding) of the DNA, R is the gas constant, and k is equal to 1117/number of base pairs. The delta H, delta S, and d(delta S)/dn for unwinding i linkings are i X 12.2 kcal/mol, 2inkR, and 2ikR, respectively. (iv) d(delta S)/dn, like k, is inversely proportional to the number of base pairs in DNA. (v) Double-stranded DNAs of different chain lengths have average delta S = 35 cal/mol.K for unwinding one linking under the experimental conditions; this corresponds to 127 +/- 14 base pairs per "relative linking." Images PMID:7019913

  15. Fluctuations in the DNA double helix: A critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank-Kamenetskii, Maxim D.; Prakash, Shikha

    2014-06-01

    A critical overview of the extensive literature on fluctuations in the DNA double helix is presented. Both theory and experiment are comprehensively reviewed and analyzed. Fluctuations, which open up the DNA double helix making bases accessible for hydrogen exchange and chemical modification, are the main focus of the review. Theoretical descriptions of the DNA fluctuations are discussed with special emphasis on most popular among them: the nonlinear-dynamic Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois (PBD) model and the empirical two-state (or helix-coil) model. The experimental data on the issue are comprehensibly overviewed in the historical retrospective with main emphasis on the hydrogen exchange data and formaldehyde kinetics. The theoretical descriptions are critically evaluated from the viewpoint of their applicability to describe DNA in water environment and from the viewpoint of agreement of their predictions with the reliable experimental data. The presented analysis makes it possible to conclude that, while the two-state model is most adequate from theoretical viewpoint and its predictions, based on an empirical parametrization, agree with experimental data very well, the PBD model is inapplicable to DNA in water from theoretical viewpoint on one hand and it makes predictions totally incompatible with reliable experimental data on the other. In particular, it is argued that any oscillation movements of nucleotides, assumed by the PBD model, are severely damped in water, that no "bubbles", which the PBD model predicts, exist in reality in linear DNA well below the melting range and the lifetime of an open state in DNA is actually 5 orders of magnitude longer than the value predicted by the PBD model.

  16. Mechanically Induced Helix-Coil Transition in Biopolymer Networks

    PubMed Central

    Courty, Sebastien; Gornall, Joanne L.; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2006-01-01

    The quasi-equilibrium evolution of the helical fraction occurring in a biopolymer network (gelatin gel) under an applied stress has been investigated by observing modulation in its optical activity. Its variation with the imposed chain extension is distinctly nonmonotonic and corresponds to the transition of initially coiled strands to induced left-handed helices. The experimental results are in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions of helices induced on chain extension. This new effect of mechanically stimulated helix-coil transition has been studied further as a function of the elastic properties of the polymer network: crosslink density and network aging. PMID:16239334

  17. Scattering of linearly polarized microwave radiation from a dielectric helix.

    PubMed

    Haracz, R D; Cohen, L D; Cohen, A; Wang, R T

    1987-11-01

    A method for calculating the electric field scattered from a helical dielectric target is compared to an equivalent experiment. The wavelength of the incident light is 3.18 cm, and the right-handed helix has a radius of 1.83 cm and wire radius of 0.24 cm, a pitch of 0.553 cm, and seven turns. The index of refraction of, the target is 1.626-i 0.012. A brief description of the Shifrin theory generalized to this application is given along with a discussion of the experiment, and the experimental intensities are compared to the first-order theory. PMID:20523417

  18. Triple helix structures: sequence dependence, flexibility and mismatch effects.

    PubMed

    Sun, J S; Mergny, J L; Lavery, R; Montenay-Garestier, T; Hélène, C

    1991-12-01

    By means of molecular modelling, electrostatic interactions are shown to play an important role in the sequence-dependent structure of triple helices formed by a homopyrimidine oligonucleotide bound to a homopurine. homopyrimidine sequence on DNA. This is caused by the presence of positive charges due to the protonation of cytosines in the Hoogsteen-bonded strand, required in order to form C.GxC+ triplets. Energetic and conformational characteristics of triple helices with different sequences are analyzed and discussed. The effects of duplex mismatches on the triple helix stability are investigated via thermal dissociation using UV absorption. PMID:1815635

  19. Repair and recombination induced by triple helix DNA.

    PubMed

    Chin, Joanna Y; Schleifman, Erica B; Glazer, Peter M

    2007-01-01

    Triple-helix DNA structures can form endogenously at mirror repeat polypurine/polypyrimidine sequences or by introduction of triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). Recent evidence suggests that triple helices are sources of genetic instability, and are subject to increased rates of mutagenesis and recruitment of repair factors. Indeed, observations using TFOs suggest that triple helices provoke a variety of biological processes which can be harnessed to modulate gene expression and induce heritable changes in targeted genes. This review surveys the biological applications of TFOs, with particular attention to their recombinogenic and mutagenic potential, and summarizes available evidence for the mechanism of triplex and triplex-associated repair. PMID:17485375

  20. Wave patterns in α-helix proteins with interspine coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimshe Fewu, J. C.; Tabi, C. B.; Edongue, H.; Ekobena Fouda, H. P.; Kofané, T. C.

    2013-02-01

    Modulational instability is a direct way by which localized structures emerge in nonlinear systems. We investigate analytically, through the linear stability of plane wave solutions, the existence of localized structures in α-helix proteins with three spines. Through numerical simulations, trains of pulses are found and confirm our analytical predictions. The presence of higher-order interactions between adjacent spines tends to suppress the formed localized structures for erratic ones to emerge. These erratic structures are highly localized and rather reinforce the idea that the energy to be used in metabolic processes is rather confined to specific regions for its efficiency.

  1. Broadband circular polarizers constructed using helix-like chiral metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Ruonan; Wang, Shao-Wei; Liu, Xingxing; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, one kind of helix-like chiral metamaterial which can be realized by multiple conventional lithography or electron beam lithographic techniques is proposed to have a broadband bianisotropic optical response analogous to helical metamaterials. On the basis of twisted metamaterials, via tailoring the relative orientation within the lattice, the anisotropy of arcs is converted into magneto-electric coupling of closely spaced arc pairs, which leads to a broad bianisotropic optical response. By connecting the adjacent upper and lower arcs, the coupling of metasurface pairs is transformed into the coupling of the three-dimensional inclusions, and provides a much broader and higher bianisotropic optical response. For only a four-layer helix-like metamaterial, the maximum extinction ratio can reach 19.7. The operation band is in the wavelength range of 4.69 μm to 8.98 μm with an average extinction ratio of 6.9. And the transmittance for selective polarization is above 0.8 in the entire operation band. Such a structure is a promising candidate for integratable and scalable broadband circular polarizers, especially it has great potential to act as a broadband circular micropolarizer in the field of the full-Stokes division of focal plane polarimeters.In this paper, one kind of helix-like chiral metamaterial which can be realized by multiple conventional lithography or electron beam lithographic techniques is proposed to have a broadband bianisotropic optical response analogous to helical metamaterials. On the basis of twisted metamaterials, via tailoring the relative orientation within the lattice, the anisotropy of arcs is converted into magneto-electric coupling of closely spaced arc pairs, which leads to a broad bianisotropic optical response. By connecting the adjacent upper and lower arcs, the coupling of metasurface pairs is transformed into the coupling of the three-dimensional inclusions, and provides a much broader and higher bianisotropic optical

  2. Folding Dynamics of an α Helix and a β Hairpin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofrichter, James

    1998-03-01

    What processes limit the rate at which proteins fold? In an effort to address this question we have begun to study the dynamics of the formation of loops, α helices and the minimal β structural element, a β hairpin, which must occur on the pathway from random coils to folded proteins. Because these processes occur on time scales of 10-5-10-9 seconds and experimental access to these time scales has been limited, the kinetics of these processes have not been extensively studied. The expectation is that a more complete understanding of the dynamics of these microprocesses will provide constraints on possible mechanisms for the overall folding of more complex structures. We have explored the kinetics of the helix-coil transition of a synthetic, 21-residue peptide: Ac-WAAAH^+(AAARA)_3A-NH2 and of the folding of a 16 residue β hairpin from protein G B1 using the nanosecond temperature jump technique. Both processes were studied by monitoring tryptophan fluorescence. In the helical peptide, the quantum yield of tryptophan decreases as a result of the interaction between tryptophan in position 1 with the protonated histidine in position 5. In the native conformation of the hairpin, it increases because it forms part of a hydrophobic cluster which stabilizes the native conformation (in a peptide in which a dansylated lysine is incorporated at the C-terminus the fluorescence is quenched). At 300 K, the relaxation time for the helix-coil transition is ~ 250 ns and that for the hairpin-coil transition is ~ 2.2 μs, about 10 times slower. The apparent activation energies are 6.8 kcal/mol for the helix and 10 kcal/mol for the hairpin. We have developed simple kinetic models for these processes which incorporate the sequence- and position-dependent properties known from equilibrium studies and the single-sequence approximation. These models provide a remarkably consistent picture of the dynamics, permitting us to extract information on both the microscopic rates for the c

  3. Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions in amino-acid homopolymers studied by multicanonical algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.; Okamoto, Yuko

    1996-03-01

    Thermodynamics of helix-coil transitions in amino-acid homopolymers are studied by the multicanonical algorithms. Homopolymers of length 10 are considered for three characteristic amino acids, alanine (helix former), valine (helix indifferent), and glycine (helix breaker). For alanine other lengths (15 and 20) are also considered in order to examine the length dependence. From one multicanonical production run with completely random initial conformations, we have obtained various thermodynamic quantities (average helix length, specific heat, etc.) as functions of temperature. The results, though preliminary, suggest that the helix-coil transition for poly-alanine is second-order, while the nature of phase transition is not clear for poly-valine and poly-glycine.

  4. Three-dimensional simulation of helix traveling-wave tube cold-test characteristics using MAFIA

    SciTech Connect

    Kory, C.L.

    1996-08-01

    The cold-test parameters including dispersion, impedance, and attenuation have been calculated for a helix traveling-wave tube (TWT) slow-wave circuit using MAFIA, the three-dimensional (3-D) electromagnetic finite-integration computer code. The helix model includes tape thickness, rectangular dielectric supports, and material properties consistent with the actual circuit. Measured cold-test data and computer-derived results for the helix circuit are presented with excellent agreement.

  5. Ultraviolet spectra of planetary nebulae. VII - The abundance of carbon in the very low excitation nebula He 2-131

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, S.; Seaton, M. J.

    1982-07-01

    Features observed in infrared spectra suggest that certain very low excitation (VLE) nebulae have low C/O abundance ratios (Cohen & Barlow 1980; Aitken & Roche 1982). Fluxes in the multiplets [O II] sun2470 and [O II] λ2326 have been measured for the VLE nebula He 2-131 = HD 138403 using lUE high-dispersion spectra. An analysis similar to that of Harrington et al. (1980) for IC 418 gives C/O = 0.3 for He 2-131, compared with C/O = 1.3 for IC 418 and 0.6 for the Sun.

  6. Investigating potential planetary nebula/cluster pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moni Bidin, C.; Majaess, D.; Bonatto, C.; Mauro, F.; Turner, D.; Geisler, D.; Chené, A.-N.; Gormaz-Matamala, A. C.; Borissova, J.; Kurtev, R. G.; Minniti, D.; Carraro, G.; Gieren, W.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Fundamental parameters characterizing the end-state of intermediate-mass stars may be constrained by discovering planetary nebulae (PNe) in open clusters (OCs). Cluster membership may be exploited to establish the distance, luminosity, age, and physical size for PNe, and the intrinsic luminosity and mass of its central star. Aims: Four potential PN-OC associations were investigated to assess the cluster membership for the PNe. Methods: Radial velocities were measured from intermediate-resolution optical spectra, complemented with previous estimates in the literature. When the radial velocity study supported the PN/OC association, we analyzed whether other parameters (e.g., age, distance, reddening, central star brightness) were consistent with this conclusion. Results: Our measurements imply that the PNe VBe 3 and HeFa 1 are not members of the OCs NGC 5999 and NGC 6067, respectively, and that they very likely belong to the background bulge population. Conversely, consistent radial velocities indicate that NGC 2452/NGC 2453 could be associated, but our results are not conclusive so additional observations are warranted. Finally, we demonstrate that all the available information point to He 2-86 being a young, highly internally obscured PN member of NGC 4463. New near-infrared photometry acquired via the Vista Variables in the Via Lactea ESO public survey was used in tandem with existing UBV photometry to measure the distance, reddening, and age of NGC 4463, finding d = 1.55 ± 0.10 kpc, E(B - V) = 0.41 ± 0.02, and τ = 65 ± 10 Myr, respectively. The same values should be adopted for the PN if the proposed cluster membership is confirmed. Based on observations gathered with ESO-VISTA telescope (program ID 172.B-2002).Based on observations gathered at Las Campanas observatory (program ID CN2012A-080).The spectra as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  7. Abundant Solar Nebula Solids in Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Nguyen, A. N.; Clemett, S.

    2016-01-01

    Comets have been proposed to consist of unprocessed interstellar materials together with a variable amount of thermally annealed interstellar grains. Recent studies of cometary solids in the laboratory have shown that comets instead consist of a wide range of materials from across the protoplanetary disk, in addition to a minor complement of interstellar materials. These advances were made possible by the return of direct samples of comet 81P/Wild 2 coma dust by the NASA Stardust mission and recent advances in microscale analytical techniques. Isotopic studies of 'cometary' chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP-IDPs) and comet 81P/Wild 2 Stardust samples show that preserved interstellar materials are more abundant in comets than in any class of meteorite. Identified interstellar materials include sub-micron-sized presolar silicates, oxides, and SiC dust grains and some fraction of the organic material that binds the samples together. Presolar grain abundances reach 1 weight percentage in the most stardust-rich CP-IDPs, 50 times greater than in meteorites. Yet, order of magnitude variations in presolar grain abundances among CP-IDPs suggest cometary solids experienced significant variations in the degree of processing in the solar nebula. Comets contain a surprisingly high abundance of nebular solids formed or altered at high temperatures. Comet 81P/Wild 2 samples include 10-40 micron-sized, refractory Ca- Al-rich inclusion (CAI)-, chondrule-, and ameboid olivine aggregate (AOA)-like materials. The O isotopic compositions of these refractory materials are remarkably similar to their meteoritic counterparts, ranging from 5 percent enrichments in (sup 16) O to near-terrestrial values. Comet 81P/Wild 2 and CP-IDPs also contain abundant Mg-Fe crystalline and amorphous silicates whose O isotopic compositions are also consistent with Solar System origins. Unlike meteorites, that are dominated by locally-produced materials, comets appear to be composed of

  8. Infrared Study of Fullerene Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Hernández, D. A.; Villaver, E.; García-Lario, P.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Cataldo, F.

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) where fullerenes have been detected in their Spitzer Space Telescope spectra. This large sample of objects offers a unique opportunity to test conditions of fullerene formation and survival under different metallicity environments because we are analyzing five sources in our own Galaxy, four in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and seven in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Among the 16 PNe studied, we present the first detection of C60 (and possibly also C70) fullerenes in the PN M 1-60 as well as of the unusual ~6.6, 9.8, and 20 μm features (attributed to possible planar C24) in the PN K 3-54. Although selection effects in the original samples of PNe observed with Spitzer may play a potentially significant role in the statistics, we find that the detection rate of fullerenes in C-rich PNe increases with decreasing metallicity (~5% in the Galaxy, ~20% in the LMC, and ~44% in the SMC) and we interpret this as a possible consequence of the limited dust processing occurring in Magellanic Cloud (MC) PNe. CLOUDY photoionization modeling matches the observed IR fluxes with central stars that display a rather narrow range in effective temperature (~30,000-45,000 K), suggesting a common evolutionary status of the objects and similar fullerene formation conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest that fullerene PNe likely evolve from low-mass progenitors and are usually of low excitation. We do not find a metallicity dependence on the estimated fullerene abundances. The observed C60 intensity ratios in the Galactic sources confirm our previous finding in the MCs that the fullerene emission is not excited by the UV radiation from the central star. CLOUDY models also show that line- and wind-blanketed model atmospheres can explain many of the observed [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios using photoionization, suggesting that possibly the UV radiation from the central star, and not shocks, is triggering the decomposition of the

  9. INFRARED STUDY OF FULLERENE PLANETARY NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Manchado, A.; Garcia-Lario, P.; Stanghellini, L.; Shaw, R. A.; Cataldo, F. E-mail: amt@iac.es E-mail: Pedro.Garcia-Lario@sciops.esa.int E-mail: letizia@noao.edu

    2012-12-01

    We present a study of 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) where fullerenes have been detected in their Spitzer Space Telescope spectra. This large sample of objects offers a unique opportunity to test conditions of fullerene formation and survival under different metallicity environments because we are analyzing five sources in our own Galaxy, four in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and seven in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Among the 16 PNe studied, we present the first detection of C{sub 60} (and possibly also C{sub 70}) fullerenes in the PN M 1-60 as well as of the unusual {approx}6.6, 9.8, and 20 {mu}m features (attributed to possible planar C{sub 24}) in the PN K 3-54. Although selection effects in the original samples of PNe observed with Spitzer may play a potentially significant role in the statistics, we find that the detection rate of fullerenes in C-rich PNe increases with decreasing metallicity ({approx}5% in the Galaxy, {approx}20% in the LMC, and {approx}44% in the SMC) and we interpret this as a possible consequence of the limited dust processing occurring in Magellanic Cloud (MC) PNe. CLOUDY photoionization modeling matches the observed IR fluxes with central stars that display a rather narrow range in effective temperature ({approx}30,000-45,000 K), suggesting a common evolutionary status of the objects and similar fullerene formation conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest that fullerene PNe likely evolve from low-mass progenitors and are usually of low excitation. We do not find a metallicity dependence on the estimated fullerene abundances. The observed C{sub 60} intensity ratios in the Galactic sources confirm our previous finding in the MCs that the fullerene emission is not excited by the UV radiation from the central star. CLOUDY models also show that line- and wind-blanketed model atmospheres can explain many of the observed [Ne III]/[Ne II] ratios using photoionization, suggesting that possibly the UV radiation from the central star, and

  10. Broadband circular polarizers constructed using helix-like chiral metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Ji, Ruonan; Wang, Shao-Wei; Liu, Xingxing; Chen, Xiaoshuang; Lu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, one kind of helix-like chiral metamaterial which can be realized by multiple conventional lithography or electron beam lithographic techniques is proposed to have a broadband bianisotropic optical response analogous to helical metamaterials. On the basis of twisted metamaterials, via tailoring the relative orientation within the lattice, the anisotropy of arcs is converted into magneto-electric coupling of closely spaced arc pairs, which leads to a broad bianisotropic optical response. By connecting the adjacent upper and lower arcs, the coupling of metasurface pairs is transformed into the coupling of the three-dimensional inclusions, and provides a much broader and higher bianisotropic optical response. For only a four-layer helix-like metamaterial, the maximum extinction ratio can reach 19.7. The operation band is in the wavelength range of 4.69 μm to 8.98 μm with an average extinction ratio of 6.9. And the transmittance for selective polarization is above 0.8 in the entire operation band. Such a structure is a promising candidate for integratable and scalable broadband circular polarizers, especially it has great potential to act as a broadband circular micropolarizer in the field of the full-Stokes division of focal plane polarimeters. PMID:27352818

  11. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  12. ADP-ribosyltransferase from Helix pomatia. Purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, H J; Klocker, H; Schneider, R; Auer, B; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Schweiger, M

    1987-12-15

    ADP-ribosyltransferases from several higher eukaryotes have been purified and characterized, but little is known about ADP-ribosyltransferases in lower eukaryotes. We have purified an ADP-ribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.30) from Helix pomatia. The enzyme has an apparent Km of 26.7 microM. Optimal conditions for the enzyme reaction are 17.5 degrees C and pH 8. The time course is linear during the first 10 min of the reaction. The enzyme is capable of poly-ADP-ribosylation. The most highly purified preparation shows one major band at an Mr of 75,000 on electrophoresis in an SDS/polyacrylamide gel, with minor bands at Mr 115,000 and 155,000. Re-activation of SDS/polyacrylamide gels in situ shows the 75,000-Mr band to be enzymically active and additional active bands with Mr values of 115,000, 90,000 and 87,000 respectively. The 115,000-Mr and 75,000-Mr bands cross-react with a polyclonal affinity-purified antiserum against human ADP-ribosyltransferase. Like enzymes from higher eukaryotes, the activity from Helix pomatia is inhibited by thymidine, theophylline, theobromine nicotinamide, 3-methoxybenzamide and 3-aminobenzamide, and is dependent on histone and DNA. PMID:3124818

  13. A MODEL OF THE SPECTRAL EVOLUTION OF PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Shuta J.; Takahara, Fumio

    2010-06-01

    We study the spectral evolution of pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) taking into account the energy injected when they are young. We model the evolution of the magnetic field inside a uniformly expanding PWN. Considering time-dependent injection from the pulsar and coolings by radiative and adiabatic losses, we solve the evolution of the particle distribution function. The model is calibrated by fitting the calculated spectrum to the observations of the Crab Nebula at an age of a thousand years. The spectral evolution of the Crab Nebula in our model shows that the flux ratio of TeV {gamma}-rays to X-rays increases with time, which implies that old PWNe are faint in X-rays, but not in TeV {gamma}-rays. The increase of this ratio is because the magnetic field decreases with time and is not because the X-ray emitting particles are cooled more rapidly than the TeV {gamma}-ray emitting particles. Our spectral evolution model matches the observed rate of the radio flux decrease of the Crab Nebula. This result implies that our magnetic field evolution model is close to the reality. Finally, from the viewpoint of the spectral evolution, only a small fraction of the injected energy from the Crab Pulsar needs to go to the magnetic field, which is consistent with previous studies.

  14. Hubble Hatches Image of Rotten Egg Nebula Shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Some 5,000 light years (2,900 trillion miles) from Earth, in the constellation Puppis, is the 1.4 light years (more than 8 trillion miles) long Calabash Nebula, referred to as the Rotten Egg Nebula because of its sulfur content which would produce an awful odor if one could smell in space. This image of the nebula captured by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) depicts violent gas collisions that produced supersonic shock fronts in a dying star. Stars, like our sun, will eventually die and expel most of their material outward into shells of gas and dust These shells eventually form some of the most beautiful objects in the universe, called planetary nebulae. The yellow in the image depicts the material ejected from the central star zooming away at speeds up to one and a half million kilometers per hour (one million miles per hour). Due to the high speeds of the gas, shock-fronts are formed on impact and heat the surrounding gas. Although computer calculations have predicted the existence and structure of such shocks for some time, previous observations have not been able to prove the theory.

  15. Forming Chondrites in a Solar Nebula with Magnetically Induced Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Turner, Neal J.; Masiero, Joseph; Wakita, Shigeru; Matsumoto, Yuji; Oshino, Shoichi

    2016-03-01

    Chondritic meteorites provide valuable opportunities to investigate the origins of the solar system. We explore impact jetting as a mechanism of chondrule formation and subsequent pebble accretion as a mechanism of accreting chondrules onto parent bodies of chondrites, and investigate how these two processes can account for the currently available meteoritic data. We find that when the solar nebula is ≤5 times more massive than the minimum-mass solar nebula at a ≃ 2-3 au and parent bodies of chondrites are ≤1024 g (≤500 km in radius) in the solar nebula, impact jetting and subsequent pebble accretion can reproduce a number of properties of the meteoritic data. The properties include the present asteroid belt mass, the formation timescale of chondrules, and the magnetic field strength of the nebula derived from chondrules in Semarkona. Since this scenario requires a first generation of planetesimals that trigger impact jetting and serve as parent bodies to accrete chondrules, the upper limit of parent bodies’ masses leads to the following implications: primordial asteroids that were originally ≥1024 g in mass were unlikely to contain chondrules, while less massive primordial asteroids likely had a chondrule-rich surface layer. The scenario developed from impact jetting and pebble accretion can therefore provide new insights into the origins of the solar system.

  16. Probing Early-Type Galaxy Halos Using Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrifield, Michael; Arnaboldi, Magda; Coccato, Lodovico; Gerhard, Ortwin; Napolitano, Nicola; Pulsoni, Claudia; Planetary Nebula Spectrograph Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Planetary nebulae offer an invaluable probe of the stellar kinematics at very large radii in early-type galaxies, reaching regimes where we can learn about both the dark matter halo of the system and the formation history of the stellar component. We present results from the largest kinematic survey to-date of extragalactic planetary nebulae in the outer halos early-type galaxies, obtained using the custom Planetary Nebula Spectrograph instrument. The survey currently comprises validated homogeneous catalogs for 33 early-type galaxies, with data typically extending to beyond 5 effective radii.This survey confirms that planetary nebulae trace the bulk stellar population very closely, allowing these data to be combined with more conventional absorption-line spectral studies at smaller radii. Analysis shows that: (1) there is a kinematic dichotomy amongst the galaxies between those that display rapidly-falling velocity disperson profiles and those where the dispersion remains roughly constant with radius - a distinction that reflects both orbital and mass profile differences; (2) rotation in outer regions correlates strongly with rotation in inner regions - they are fairly monolithic systems; (3) the velocity field usually contains symmetries that indicate triaxiality; (4) some systems have outer velocity fields that imply these regions are not in any sort of equilibrium.

  17. Optical Spectrum of the Compact Planetary Nebula IC 5117

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyung, Siek; Aller, Lawrence H.; Feibelman, Walter A.; Lee, Seong-Jae; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High resolution spectroscopic data of the very compact planetary nebula IC 5117 are obtained in the optical wavelengths, 3700A - 10050A, with the Hamilton Echelle Spectrograph at Lick Observatory, and which have been analyzed along with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) UV archive data. Although a diagnostic diagram shows significant density and temperature fluctuations, our analysis indicates that the nebular gas may be represented by a homogeneous shell of extremely high density gas, N(sub epsilon) approx. 90 000 /cu cm. The average electron temperatures, e.g. indicated by the [OIII] diagnostics, are around 12 000 K. We construct a photoionization model to represent most of the observed line intensities, and the physical condition of this compact nebulosity. Based on the semi-empirical ionization correction approach, and model indications, we derived the elemental abundances: He, C, N, O, Ne, and Ar appear to be normal or marginally depleted compared to the average planetary nebula, while the remaining elements, S, Cl, and K appear to be enhanced. IC 5117 is perhaps a very young compact planetary nebula, slightly more evolved than the other well-known compact planetary nebula IC 4997. The central stellar temperature is likely to be around 120 000 K, evolved from a C-rich AGB progenitor.

  18. Millimeter-wave Molecular Line Observations of the Tornado Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-01

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, 13CO, and HCO+ with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V LSR = -14 km s-1 and +5 km s-1. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado "head" in the -14 km s-1 cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s-1 cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the -14 km s-1 cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s-1 cloud collided into the -14 km s-1 cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  19. The spectrum of planetary nebula K 1-27

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henize, K. G.; Fairall, A. P.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of K 1-27 shows He II 4686 stronger than either H-beta or forbidden O III 4959. K 1-27 therefore appears to belong to the small group of old, very hot planetary nebulae which also includes NGC 246, NGC 4361, and Abell 36.

  20. Hard X-ray structure of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Makishima, K.; Ogawara, Y.; Matsuoka, M.; Oda, M.; Miyamoto, S.; Pelling, R. M.; Peterson, L. E.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1981-01-01

    Two-dimensional maps of the Crab Nebula have been synthesized in 22-64 keV range through the modulation collimator experiment. The effective angular resolution is about 15-arcmin. The result indicates that the Crab morphology is strictly controlled by the pulsar.

  1. Modelling the gamma-ray flares of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The detection of major gamma-ray flaring episodes above 100 MeV from the Crab Nebula is challenging theoretical models of particle acceleration. We will review the recent AGILE and Fermi-LAT data showing both short (hour/day) timescale flares and more prolonged enhanced emission lasting weeks. Gamma-ray emission peaking near 500 MeV is apparently violating standard constraints derived from relativistic cyclotron-limited acceleration and synchrotron cooling. The Crab "flaring phenomenon" shows evidence of "super-acceleration" characterized by: (1) an apparent violation of standard synchrotron cooling and of the MHD approximation, and (2) a radiation-reaction-limited spectrum of accelerated particles producing a quasi mono-energetic distribution. We will discuss several scenarios for super-acceleration including collisionless magnetic field reconnection in specific sites of the Crab Nebula. We will present recent theoretical modelling of the South-East jet in the Nebula, and will address the issue of instabilities and particle acceleration in the jet and in the inner Nebula. Understanding the Crab "flaring phenomenon" will have an important impact for a variety of high-energy astrophysical sources including relativistic jets in Galactic and extragalactic sources.

  2. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.; Skinner, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, approximately 7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/ PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approximately 3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab Nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  3. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.; Skinner, G. K.

    2013-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, approximately 7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approximately 3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  4. The [NeIV] Lines in High Excitation Gaseous Nebulae.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H

    1970-04-01

    The "forbidden" lines of three times ionized neon are among the most precious indicators of electron temperature and excitation. They are also predicted to be among the strongest lines observed in the far ultraviolet spectra of high excitation nebulae. PMID:16591822

  5. Hard X-ray Variations in the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, M. L.; Case, G. L.; Baumgarter, W. H.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Greiner, J.; Jahoda, K.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Kouveliotou, C.; Krimm, H. A.; Kuulkers, E.; Lund, N.; Meegan, C. A.; Natalucci, L.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J. C.

    2012-01-01

    In the first two years of science operations of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), August 2008 to August 2010, a approx.7% (70 mcrab) decline was discovered in the overall Crab Nebula flux in the 15 - 50 keV band, measured with the Earth occultation technique. This decline was independently confirmed with four other instruments: the RXTE/PCA, Swift/BAT, INTEGRAL/IBIS, and INTEGRAL/SPI. The pulsed flux measured with RXTE/PCA from 1999-2010 was consistent with the pulsar spin-down, indicating that the observed changes were nebular. From 2001 to 2010, the Crab nebula flux measured with RXTE/PCA was particularly variable, changing by up to approx.3.5% per year in the 15-50 keV band. These variations were confirmed with INTEGRAL/SPI starting in 2003, Swift/BAT starting in 2005, and Fermi GBM starting in 2008. Before 2001 and since 2010, the Crab nebula flux has appeared more stable, varying by less than 2% per year. I will present updated light curves in multiple energy bands for the Crab nebula, including recent data from Fermi GBM, Swift/BAT, and MAXI, and a 16-year long light curve from RXTE/PCA.

  6. Preferrential Concentration of Particles in Protoplanetary Nebula Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartlep, Thomas; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2015-01-01

    Preferential concentration in turbulence is a process that causes inertial particles to cluster in regions of high strain (in-between high vorticity regions), with specifics depending on their stopping time or Stokes number. This process is thought to be of importance in various problems including cloud droplet formation and aerosol transport in the atmosphere, sprays, and also in the formation of asteroids and comets in protoplanetary nebulae. In protoplanetary nebulae, the initial accretion of primitive bodies from freely-floating particles remains a problematic subject. Traditional growth-by-sticking models encounter a formidable "meter-size barrier" [1] in turbulent nebulae. One scenario that can lead directly from independent nebula particulates to large objects, avoiding the problematic m-km size range, involves formation of dense clumps of aerodynamically selected, typically mm-size particles in protoplanetary turbulence. There is evidence that at least the ordinary chondrite parent bodies were initially composed entirely of a homogeneous mix of such particles generally known as "chondrules" [2]. Thus, while it is arcane, turbulent preferential concentration acting directly on chondrule size particles are worthy of deeper study. Here, we present the statistical determination of particle multiplier distributions from numerical simulations of particle-laden isotopic turbulence, and a cascade model for modeling turbulent concentration at lengthscales and Reynolds numbers not accessible by numerical simulations. We find that the multiplier distributions are scale dependent at the very largest scales but have scale-invariant properties under a particular variable normalization at smaller scales.

  7. Crab Nebula Variations in Hard X-rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The Crab Nebula was surprisingly variable from 2001-2010, with less variability before 2001 and since mid-2010. We presented evidence for spectral softening from RXTE, Swift/BAT, and Fermi GBM during the mid-2008-2010 flux decline. We see no clear connections between the hard X-ray variations and the GeV flares

  8. High-energy flux evolution of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Mattana, F.; Falanga, M.; Goetz, D.

    2008-12-24

    The very high energy {gamma}-ray spectra of Pulsar Wind Nebulae are interpreted as due to inverse Compton scattering of ultrarelativistic electrons on the ambient photons, whereas their X-ray spectra are due to synchrotron emission. We investigate the relation between the {gamma}- and X-ray emission and the pulsars' spin-down luminosity and characteristic age. We find that the {gamma}-to X-ray flux ratio of the nebulae is inversely proportional to the spin-down luminosity ({proportional_to}E{sup -1.9}) and to the characteristic age ({proportional_to}{tau}{sub c}{sup 2.2}) of the parent pulsar. We interpret these results as due to the evolution of the electron energy distribution and the nebular dynamics, supporting the idea of so-called relic pulsar wind nebulae. These empirical relations provide a new tool to classify unidentified diffuse {gamma}-ray sources and to estimate the spin-down luminosity and characteristic age for four rotation powered pulsars with no detected pulsation from the X- and {gamma}--ray properties of the associated pulsar wind nebulae.

  9. Why convective heat transport in the solar nebula was inefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The radial distributions of the effective temperatures of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence (T Tauri) stars are relatively well-constrained by ground-based and spacecraft infrared photometry and radio continuum observations. If the mechanisms by which energy is transported vertically in the disks are understood, these data can be used to constrain models of the thermal structure and evolution of solar nebula. Several studies of the evolution of the solar nebula have included the calculation of the vertical transport of heat by convection. Such calculations rely on a mixing length theory of transport and some assumption regarding the vertical distribution of internal dissipation. In all cases, the results of these calculations indicate that transport by radiation dominates that by convection, even when the nebula is convectively unstable. A simple argument that demonstrates the generality (and limits) of this result, regardless of the details of mixing length theory or the precise distribution of internal heating is presented. It is based on the idea that the radiative gradient in an optically thick nebula generally does not greatly exceed the adiabatic gradient.

  10. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Werner, M. W.

    1990-01-01

    A model has been developed for reflection nebulae around luminous IR sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The shape of the IR spectrum is shown to be the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of the model results with IR observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse ISM, or consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains. By adding water-ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, the 3.08 micron ice-band feature observed in the spectra of several IR reflection nebulae has been modeled. It is shown that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains.

  11. A HOT GAP AROUND JUPITER'S ORBIT IN THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, N. J.; Choukroun, M.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Bryden, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Sun was an order of magnitude more luminous during the first few hundred thousand years of its existence, due in part to the gravitational energy released by material accreting from the solar nebula. If Jupiter was already near its present mass, the planet's tides opened an optically thin gap in the nebula. Using Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations, we show that sunlight absorbed by the nebula and re-radiated into the gap raised temperatures well above the sublimation threshold for water ice, with potentially drastic consequences for the icy bodies in Jupiter's feeding zone. Bodies up to a meter in size were vaporized within a single orbit if the planet was near its present location during this early epoch. Dust particles lost their ice mantles, and planetesimals were partially to fully devolatilized, depending on their size. Scenarios in which Jupiter formed promptly, such as those involving a gravitational instability of the massive early nebula, must cope with the high temperatures. Enriching Jupiter in the noble gases through delivery trapped in clathrate hydrates will be more difficult, but might be achieved by either forming the planet much farther from the star or capturing planetesimals at later epochs. The hot gap resulting from an early origin for Jupiter also would affect the surface compositions of any primordial Trojan asteroids.

  12. The Crab Nebula: The gift that keeps on giving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hester, J. Jeff

    2001-05-01

    In many ways the Crab Nebula is the object that started off the study of supernova remnants, yet hundreds of years after its discovery it is still poorly understood in many respects. Recently, a number of observational and theoretical results have shed new light on longstanding questions and misconceptions about the Crab. We are taught in graduate school that the Crab is a freely expanding ejecta-dominated remnant, with the slight added complication that it contains a pulsar and synchrotron nebula. This conception of the Crab is incorrect. Instead, when we think of the Crab we should think first of the powerful and dynamic axisymmetric wind from an energetic pulsar as it powers a high pressure synchrotron nebula. That synchrotron nebula is sweeping up and concentrating thermal ejecta into dense, complex Rayleigh-Taylor filaments as it pushes its way out through a large, freely expanding remnant. This larger remnant is all but unseen, but probably carries the bulk of the mass and kinetic energy from the explosion. Every aspect of the visible Crab-from its overall size and shape, to the complex structure of its filaments, to the highly dynamical structure at its heart-is a direct result of the action of the wind from the Crab pulsar. .

  13. Creation and Distribution of CAIs in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Davis, S. S.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    CaAl rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found at 1 - 10% mass fraction in primitive chondrites appear to be several million years older than the dominant (chondrule) components in the same parent bodies. A prevalent concern is that it is difficult to retain CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We assess a hot inner (turbulent) nebula context for CAI formation, using analytical models of nebula evolution and particle diffusion. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for times of 1 - 3 x 10(exp 6) years. To match the CAI abundances quantitatively, we advocate an enhancement of the inner hot nebula in silicate-forming material, due to rapid inward migration of very primitive, silicate and carbon rich, meter-sized objects. 'Combustion' of the carbon into CO would make the CAI formation environment more reduced than solar, as certain observations imply. Abundant CO might also play a role in mass-independent chemical fractionation of oxygen isotopes as seen in CAIs and associated primitive, high-temperature condensates.

  14. Particle simulation of supersonic convection in the protostellar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riegger, J. M.

    1995-02-01

    For the simulation of compressible convection and a possible description of inner processes in meteorites a new algorithm for particle-in-cell methods in particle simulation is developed, which allows a direct description of the inner pressure by use of individual particle temperatures and therefore a description of gas dynamics without the approximations of perturbation theory. The simulation of nonadiabatic processes in superadiabatic stratified atmospheres leads to the self-organization of convection cells and to supersonic convection and instationary shock front systems for high Rayleigh numbers Ra > 5 × 10 5 as they are received by other numerical methods. The transport of material through shock fronts yields much faster temperature and pressure changes than ordinary convective transport in the subsonic range. Tracing the values of state along the pathlines shows that fast entropy increases occur either within shock fronts or due to local dissipation in turbulences. Transport through shock front systems results in multiple rapid temperature changes per cycle. Investigations on the local convective structure of the protostellar nebula with a simple radiative transfer and standard opacities and accretion rates indicate supersonic convection and multiple shock front systems in the outer layers of the solar nebula due to radiative cooling. Supersonic convection provides a very effective mechanism of dissipation for the protostellar nebula and makes a contribution to the discussion on the turbulent structure of the protostellar nebula and to the formation of chrondrules.

  15. Solution to the Sigma Problem of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porth, Oliver; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Keppens, Rony

    2014-03-01

    Pulsar wind nebulae (PWN) provide a unique test-bed for the study of highly relativistic processes right at our astronomical doorstep. In this contribution we will show results from the first 3D RMHD simulations of PWN. Of key interest to our study is the long standing "sigma-problem" that challenges MHD models of Pulsars and their nebulae now for 3 decades. Earlier 2D MHD models were very successful in reproducing the morphology of the inner Crab nebula showing a jet, torus, concentric wisps and a variable knot. However, these models are limited to a purely toroidal field geometry which leads to an exaggerated compression of the termination shock and polar jet — in contrast to the observations. In three dimensions, the toroidal field structure is susceptible to current driven instabilities; hence kink instability and magnetic dissipation govern the dynamics of the nebula flow. This leads to a resolution of the sigma-problem once also the pulsar's obliqueness (striped wind) is taken into account. In addition, we present polarized synchrotron maps constructed from the 3D simulations, showing the wealth of morphological features reproduced in 2D is preserved in the 3D case.

  16. The Extended Region Around the Planetary Nebula NGC 3242

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This ultraviolet image from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows NGC 3242, a planetary nebula frequently referred to as 'Jupiter's Ghost.'

    The unfortunate name of 'planetary nebula' for this class of celestial object is a historical legacy credited to William Herschel during the 18th century a time when telescopes where small and objects like these, at least the central region, looked very similar to gas-giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter. In fact, NGC 3242 has no relation to Jupiter or any other planet.

    Telescopes and their detectors have dramatically improved over the past few centuries. Our understanding of what planetary nebulae truly are has improved accordingly.

    When stars with a mass similar to our sun approach the end of their lives by exhausting supplies of hydrogen and helium fuel in their cores, they swell up into cool red-giant stars. In a last gasp before death, they expel the layers of gas in their outer atmosphere. This exposes the core of the dying star, a dense hot ball of carbon and oxygen called a white dwarf. The white dwarf is so hot that it shines very brightly in the ultraviolet. The ultraviolet light from the white dwarf, in turn, ionizes the gaseous material expelled by the star causing it to glow. A planetary nebula is really the death of a low-mass star.

    Although low-mass stars like our sun live for billions of years, planetary nebulae only last for about ten thousand years. As the central white dwarf quickly cools and the ultraviolet light dwindles, the surrounding gas also cools and fades.

    In this image of NGC 3242 from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer, the extended region around the planetary nebula is shown in dramatic detail. The small circular white and blue area at the center of the image is the well-known portion of the famous planetary nebula. The precise origin and composition of the extended wispy white features is not known for certain. It is most likely material ejected during the star's red

  17. Studies of dust grain properties in infrared reflection nebulae.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Y J; Tielens, A G; Werner, M W

    1990-01-20

    We have developed a model for reflection nebulae around luminous infrared sources embedded in dense dust clouds. The aim of this study is to determine the sizes of the scattering grains. In our analysis, we have adopted an MRN-like power-law size distribution (Mathis, Rumpl, and Nordsieck) of graphite and silicate grains, but other current dust models would give results which were substantially the same. In the optically thin limit, the intensity of the scattered light is proportional to the dust column density, while in the optically thick limit, it reflects the grain albedo. The results show that the shape of the infrared spectrum is the result of a combination of the scattering properties of the dust, the spectrum of the illuminating source, and foreground extinction, while geometry plays a minor role. Comparison of our model results with infrared observations of the reflection nebula surrounding OMC-2/IRS 1 shows that either a grain size distribution like that found in the diffuse interstellar medium, or one consisting of larger grains, can explain the observed shape of the spectrum. However, the absolute intensity level of the scattered light, as well as the observed polarization, requires large grains (approximately 5000 angstroms). By adding water ice mantles to the silicate and graphite cores, we have modeled the 3.08 micrometers ice band feature, which has been observed in the spectra of several infrared reflection nebulae. We show that this ice band arises naturally in optically thick reflection nebulae containing ice-coated grains. We show that the shape of the ice band is diagnostic of the presence of large grains, as previously suggested by Knacke and McCorkle. Comparison with observations of the BN/KL reflection nebula in the OMC-1 cloud shows that large ice grains (approximately 5000 angstroms) contribute substantially to the scattered light. PMID:11538693

  18. Formation of Primitive Bodies in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a simple model of global transport of solids in the protoplanetary nebula, including radial drift of large particles and diffusion of small ones. The model has been applied to the formation and redistribution of the Ca-A1 rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found in primitive chondrites. These objects form at much higher temperatures, and appear to be 1-3 million years older than, the dominant (chondrule) components found in the same parent bodies. A widespread concern has been the retention of CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can overwhelm inward drift, and prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for tines on the order of several Myr. An element of this model is rapid inward radial drift of boulder-sized primitive (carbon-rich) silicate material, more like Halley-dust than CI chondrites in the early days of the nebula. Thls process can enrich the abundance of silicate and carbon material in the inner nebula, and may provide possible explanations for both chemical and isotopic properties of CAIs. The predicted enhancement of CO relative to water might be of relevance to recent IR astronomical observations of CO in the inner disks of several actively accreting T Tauri stars. This process has applications to the transport and redistribution of volatiles in general. Depending on the rubble particle size distribution, rapid radial drift of boulder-sized solids can bring more material inwards across a condensation front, to evaporate, than can subsequently be removed by nebula advection or diffusion, until a strong local enhancement is produced which allows diffusive loss to balance the drifting source. Application of this process to enhancement of the abundance of water near the "ice line" will be discussed. Supported by the Origins of Solar Systems program.

  19. Super-Acceleration in the Flaring Crab Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, Marco

    2013-10-01

    The Crab Nebula continues to surprise us. The Crab system (energized by a very powerful pulsar at the center of the Supernova Remnant SN1054) is known to be a very efficient particle "accelerator" which can reach PeV energies. Today, new surprising data concerning the gamma-ray flares produced by the Crab Nebula challenge models of particle acceleration. The total energy flux from the Crab has been considered for many decades substantially stable at X-ray and gamma-ray energies. However, this paradigm was shattered by the AGILE discovery and Fermi confirmation in September 2010 of transient gamma-ray emission from the Crab. Indeed, we can state that four major flaring gamma-ray episodes have been detected by AGILE and Fermi during the period mid-2007/2012. During these events, transient particle acceleration occurs in a regime which apparently violates the MHD conditions and synchrotron cooling constraints. This fact justifies calling "super-acceleration" the mechanism which produces the "flaring Crab phenomenon". Radiation between 50 MeV and a few GeV is emitted with a quite hard spectrum within a short timescale (hours-days), with no obvious relation with simultaneous optical and X-ray emissions in the inner Nebula. "Super-acceleration" implies overcoming synchrotron cooling by strong (and "parallel") electric fields most likely produced by magnetic field reconnection within the pulsar wind outflow. This acceleration appears to be very efficient and, remarkably, limited by radiation reaction. It is not clear at the moment where in the Nebula this phenomenon occurs. An intense observational program is now focused on the Crab Nebula to resolve its most challenging mystery.

  20. A novel basic helix-loop-helix protein is expressed in muscle attachment sites of the Drosophila epidermis.

    PubMed Central

    Armand, P; Knapp, A C; Hirsch, A J; Wieschaus, E F; Cole, M D

    1994-01-01

    We have found that a novel basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein is expressed almost exclusively in the epidermal attachments sites for the somatic muscles of Drosophila melanogaster. A Drosophila cDNA library was screened with radioactively labeled E12 protein, which can dimerize with many HLH proteins. One clone that emerged from this screen encoded a previously unknown protein of 360 amino acids, named delilah, that contains both basic and HLH domains, similar to a group of cellular transcription factors implicated in cell type determination. Delilah protein formed heterodimers with E12 that bind to the muscle creatine kinase promoter. In situ hybridization with the delilah cDNA localized the expression of the gene to a subset of cells in the epidermis which form a distinct pattern involving both the segmental boundaries and intrasegmental clusters. This pattern was coincident with the known sites of attachment of the somatic muscles to tendon cells in the epidermis. delilah expression persists in snail mutant embryos which lack mesoderm, indicating that expression of the gene was not induced by attachment of the underlying muscles. The similarity of this gene to other bHLH genes suggests that it plays an important role in the differentiation of epidermal cells into muscle attachment sites. Images PMID:8196652

  1. Genome-wide features of neuroendocrine regulation in Drosophila by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor DIMMED

    PubMed Central

    Hadžić, Tarik; Park, Dongkook; Abruzzi, Katharine C.; Yang, Lin; Trigg, Jennifer S.; Rohs, Remo; Rosbash, Michael; Taghert, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) cells use large dense core vesicles (LDCVs) to traffic, process, store and secrete neuropeptide hormones through the regulated secretory pathway. The dimmed (DIMM) basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor of Drosophila controls the level of regulated secretory activity in NE cells. To pursue its mechanisms, we have performed two independent genome-wide analyses of DIMM's activities: (i) in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to define genomic sites of DIMM occupancy and (ii) deep sequencing of purified DIMM neurons to characterize their transcriptional profile. By this combined approach, we showed that DIMM binds to conserved E-boxes in enhancers of 212 genes whose expression is enriched in DIMM-expressing NE cells. DIMM binds preferentially to certain E-boxes within first introns of specific gene isoforms. Statistical machine learning revealed that flanking regions of putative DIMM binding sites contribute to its DNA binding specificity. DIMM's transcriptional repertoire features at least 20 LDCV constituents. In addition, DIMM notably targets the pro-secretory transcription factor, creb-A, but significantly, DIMM does not target any neuropeptide genes. DIMM therefore prescribes the scale of secretory activity in NE neurons, by a systematic control of both proximal and distal points in the regulated secretory pathway. PMID:25634895

  2. Selective utilization of basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper proteins at the immunoglobulin heavy-chain enhancer.

    PubMed

    Carter, R S; Ordentlich, P; Kadesch, T

    1997-01-01

    The microE3 E box within the immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IgH) enhancer binds several proteins of the basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHzip) class, including TFE3, USF1, and Max. Both TFE3 and USF have been described as transcriptional activators, and so we investigated their possible roles in activating the IgH enhancer in vivo. Although TFE3 activated various enhancer-based reporters, both USF1 and Max effectively inhibited transcription. Inhibition by USF correlated with the lack of a strong activation domain and was the result of the protein neutralizing the microE3 site. The effects of dominant-negative derivatives of TFE3 and USF1 confirmed that TFE3, or a TFE3-like protein, is the primary cellular bHLHzip protein that activates the IgH enhancer. In addition to providing a physiological role for TFE3, our results call into question the traditional view of USF1 as an obligate transcriptional activator. PMID:8972181

  3. GLABRA2 Directly Suppresses Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Genes with Diverse Functions in Root Hair Development

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qing; Ohashi, Yohei; Kato, Mariko; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia; Aoyama, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana GLABRA2 (GL2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in the cell differentiation of various epidermal tissues. During root hair pattern formation, GL2 suppresses root hair development in non-hair cells, acting as a node between the gene regulatory networks for cell fate determination and cell differentiation. Despite the importance of GL2 function, its molecular basis remains obscure because the GL2 target genes leading to the network for cell differentiation are unknown. We identified five basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor genes—ROOT HAIR DEFECTIVE6 (RHD6), RHD6-LIKE1 (RSL1), RSL2, LjRHL1-LIKE1 (LRL1), and LRL2—as GL2 direct targets using transcriptional and post-translational induction systems. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed GL2 binding to upstream regions of these genes in planta. Reporter gene analyses showed that these genes are expressed in various stages of root hair development and are suppressed by GL2 in non-hair cells. GL2 promoter-driven green fluorescent protein fusions of LRL1 and LRL2, but not those of the other bHLH proteins, conferred root hair development on non-hair cells. These results indicate that GL2 directly suppresses bHLH genes with diverse functions in root hair development. PMID:26486447

  4. Structure of bacteriophage [phi]29 head fibers has a supercoiled triple repeating helix-turn-helix motif

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Ye; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2011-12-22

    The tailed bacteriophage {phi}29 capsid is decorated with 55 fibers attached to quasi-3-fold symmetry positions. Each fiber is a homotrimer of gene product 8.5 (gp8.5) and consists of two major structural parts, a pseudohexagonal base and a protruding fibrous portion that is about 110 {angstrom} in length. The crystal structure of the C-terminal fibrous portion (residues 112-280) has been determined to a resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}. The structure is about 150 {angstrom} long and shows three distinct structural domains designated as head, neck, and stem. The stem region is a unique three-stranded helix-turn-helix supercoil that has not previously been described. When fitted into a cryoelectron microscope reconstruction of the virus, the head structure corresponded to a disconnected density at the distal end of the fiber and the neck structure was located in weak density connecting it to the fiber. Thin section studies of Bacillus subtilis cells infected with fibered or fiberless {phi}29 suggest that the fibers might enhance the attachment of the virions onto the host cell wall.

  5. Conservation of lotus and Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix proteins reveals new players in root hair development.

    PubMed

    Karas, Bogumil; Amyot, Lisa; Johansen, Christopher; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Szczyglowski, Krzysztof

    2009-11-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins constitute a large family of transcriptional regulators in plants. Although they have been shown to play important roles in a wide variety of developmental processes, relatively few have been functionally characterized. Here, we describe the map-based cloning of the Lotus japonicus ROOTHAIRLESS1 (LjRHL1) locus. Deleterious mutations in this locus prevent root hair development, which also aborts root hair-dependent colonization of the host root by nitrogen-fixing bacteria. We show that the LjRHL1 gene encodes a presumed bHLH transcription factor that functions in a nonredundant manner to control root hair development in L. japonicus. Homology search and cross-species complementation experiments defined three members of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) bHLH protein family, At2g24260, At4g30980, and At5g58010, as functionally equivalent to LjRHL1. Curiously, At2g24260 and At4g30980 mRNA species accumulate independently from the known positive regulators of root hair cell fate, while all three genes act in a partially redundant manner to regulate root hair development in Arabidopsis. PMID:19675148

  6. A novel initiator regulates expression of the nontissue-specific helix-loop-helix gene ME1.

    PubMed Central

    Shain, D H; Neuman, T; Zuber, M X

    1995-01-01

    The mouse ME1 gene (HEB, REB and GE1, homologues in human, rat and chick, respectively) is a member of the nontissue-specific helix-loop-helix (HLH) gene family that includes E2A, E2-2 and Drosophila daughterless. We have examined the factors that control ME1 gene expression. ME1 is a single copy gene that spans > or = 150 kb of DNA and contains > 10 exons. Transcription was directed by an unusual initiator element that contained a 13 bp poly d(A) tract flanked by palindromic and inverted repeat sequences. Both RNase protection and primer extension analyses mapped the ME1 transcriptional start site to the center of the 13 bp poly d(A) tract. The ME1 initiator and its proximal sequences were required for promoter activity, supported basal levels of transcription, and contributed to cell type-specific gene expression. Other cis-elements utilized by the TATA-less ME1 promoter included a cluster of Sp1 response elements, E-boxes and a strong repressor. Collectively, our results suggest that the ME1 initiator and other cis-elements in the proximal promoter play an important role in regulating ME1 gene expression. Images PMID:7784173

  7. Observation of helix associations for insertion of a retinal molecule and distortions of helix structures in bacteriorhodopsin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urano, Ryo; Okamoto, Yuko

    2015-12-01

    We applied a newly proposed prediction method for membrane protein structures to bacteriorhodopsin that has distorted transmembrane helices in the native structure. This method uses an implicit membrane model, which restricts sampling space during folding in a membrane region, and includes helix bending. Replica-exchange simulations were performed with seven transmembrane helices only without a retinal molecule. Obtained structures were classified into clusters of similar structures, which correspond to local-minimum free energy states. The two lowest free energy states corresponded to a native-like structure with the correct empty space for retinal and a structure with this empty space filled with a helix. Previous experiments of bacteriorhodopsin suggested that association of transmembrane helices enables them to make a room for insertion of a retinal. Our results are consistent with these results. Moreover, distortions of helices in the native-like structures were successfully reproduced. In the distortions, whereas the locations of kinks for all helices were similar to those of Protein Data Bank's data, the amount of bends was more similar for helices away from the retinal than for those close to the retinal in the native structure. This suggests a hypothesis that the amino-acid sequence specifies the location of kinks in transmembrane helices and that the amount of distortions depends on the interactions with the surrounding molecules such as neighboring helices, lipids, and retinal.

  8. DNA recognition for virus assembly through multiple sequence-independent interactions with a helix-turn-helix motif

    PubMed Central

    Greive, Sandra J.; Fung, Herman K.H.; Chechik, Maria; Jenkins, Huw T.; Weitzel, Stephen E.; Aguiar, Pedro M.; Brentnall, Andrew S.; Glousieau, Matthieu; Gladyshev, Grigory V.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Antson, Alfred A.

    2016-01-01

    The helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif features frequently in protein DNA-binding assemblies. Viral pac site-targeting small terminase proteins possess an unusual architecture in which the HTH motifs are displayed in a ring, distinct from the classical HTH dimer. Here we investigate how such a circular array of HTH motifs enables specific recognition of the viral genome for initiation of DNA packaging during virus assembly. We found, by surface plasmon resonance and analytical ultracentrifugation, that individual HTH motifs of the Bacillus phage SF6 small terminase bind the packaging regions of SF6 and related SPP1 genome weakly, with little local sequence specificity. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation studies with an arbitrary single-site substrate suggest that the HTH motif contacts DNA similarly to how certain HTH proteins contact DNA non-specifically. Our observations support a model where specificity is generated through conformational selection of an intrinsically bent DNA segment by a ring of HTHs which bind weakly but cooperatively. Such a system would enable viral gene regulation and control of the viral life cycle, with a minimal genome, conferring a major evolutionary advantage for SPP1-like viruses. PMID:26673721

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of Basic/Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factor Family in Rice and Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoxing; Duan, Xuepeng; Jiang, Haixiong; Sun, Yujin; Tang, Yuanping; Yuan, Zheng; Guo, Jingkang; Liang, Wanqi; Chen, Liang; Yin, Jingyuan; Ma, Hong; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Dabing

    2006-01-01

    The basic/helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors and their homologs form a large family in plant and animal genomes. They are known to play important roles in the specification of tissue types in animals. On the other hand, few plant bHLH proteins have been studied functionally. Recent completion of whole genome sequences of model plants Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and rice (Oryza sativa) allows genome-wide analysis and comparison of the bHLH family in flowering plants. We have identified 167 bHLH genes in the rice genome, and their phylogenetic analysis indicates that they form well-supported clades, which are defined as subfamilies. In addition, sequence analysis of potential DNA-binding activity, the sequence motifs outside the bHLH domain, and the conservation of intron/exon structural patterns further support the evolutionary relationships among these proteins. The genome distribution of rice bHLH genes strongly supports the hypothesis that genome-wide and tandem duplication contributed to the expansion of the bHLH gene family, consistent with the birth-and-death theory of gene family evolution. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that rice bHLH proteins can potentially participate in a variety of combinatorial interactions, endowing them with the capacity to regulate a multitude of transcriptional programs. In addition, similar expression patterns suggest functional conservation between some rice bHLH genes and their close Arabidopsis homologs. PMID:16896230

  10. The basic helix loop helix transcription factor Twist1 is a novel regulator of ATF4 in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Danciu, Theodora E; Li, Yan; Koh, Amy; Xiao, Guozhi; McCauley, Laurie K; Franceschi, Renny T

    2012-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an essential regulator of endochondral bone formation and an important anabolic agent for the reversal of bone loss. PTH mediates its functions in part by regulating binding of the bone-related activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) to the osteoblast-specific gene, osteocalcin. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factors Twist1 and Twist2 also regulate osteocalcin transcription in part through the interaction of the C-terminal "box" domain in these factors and Runx2. In this study, we discovered a novel function of PTH: its ability to dramatically decrease Twist1 transcription. Since ATF4 is a major regulator of the PTH response in osteoblasts, we assessed the mutual regulation between these factors and determined that Twist proteins and ATF4 physically interact in a manner that affects ATF4 DNA binding function. We mapped the interaction domain of Twist proteins to the C-terminal "box" domain and of ATF4, to the N-terminus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Twist1 overexpression in osteoblasts attenuates ATF4 binding to the osteocalcin promoter in response to PTH. This study thus identifies Twist proteins as novel inhibitory binding partners of ATF4 and explores the functional significance of this interaction. PMID:21866569

  11. The basic helix loop helix transcription factor Twist1 is a novel regulator of ATF4 in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Danciu, Theodora E.; Li, Yan; Koh, Amy; Xiao, Guozhi; McCauley, Laurie K.; Franceschi, Renny T.

    2011-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is an essential regulator of endochondral bone formation and an important anabolic agent for the reversal of bone loss. PTH mediates its functions in part by regulating binding of the bone-related activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4) to the osteoblast-specific gene, osteocalcin. The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factors Twist1 and Twist2 also regulate osteocalcin transcription in part through the interaction of the C-terminal “box” domain in these factors and Runx2. In this study, we discovered a novel function of PTH: its ability to dramatically decrease Twist1 transcription. Since ATF4 is a major regulator of the PTH response in osteoblasts, we assessed the mutual regulation between these factors and determined that Twist proteins and ATF4 physically interact in a manner that affects ATF4 DNA binding function. We mapped the interaction domain of Twist proteins to the C-terminal “box” domain and of ATF4, to the N-terminus. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Twist1 overexpression in osteoblasts attenuates ATF4 binding to the osteocalcin promoter in response to PTH. This study thus identifies Twist proteins as novel inhibitory binding partners of ATF4 and explores the functional significance of this interaction. PMID:21866569

  12. DNA recognition for virus assembly through multiple sequence-independent interactions with a helix-turn-helix motif.

    PubMed

    Greive, Sandra J; Fung, Herman K H; Chechik, Maria; Jenkins, Huw T; Weitzel, Stephen E; Aguiar, Pedro M; Brentnall, Andrew S; Glousieau, Matthieu; Gladyshev, Grigory V; Potts, Jennifer R; Antson, Alfred A

    2016-01-29

    The helix-turn-helix (HTH) motif features frequently in protein DNA-binding assemblies. Viral pac site-targeting small terminase proteins possess an unusual architecture in which the HTH motifs are displayed in a ring, distinct from the classical HTH dimer. Here we investigate how such a circular array of HTH motifs enables specific recognition of the viral genome for initiation of DNA packaging during virus assembly. We found, by surface plasmon resonance and analytical ultracentrifugation, that individual HTH motifs of the Bacillus phage SF6 small terminase bind the packaging regions of SF6 and related SPP1 genome weakly, with little local sequence specificity. Nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift perturbation studies with an arbitrary single-site substrate suggest that the HTH motif contacts DNA similarly to how certain HTH proteins contact DNA non-specifically. Our observations support a model where specificity is generated through conformational selection of an intrinsically bent DNA segment by a ring of HTHs which bind weakly but cooperatively. Such a system would enable viral gene regulation and control of the viral life cycle, with a minimal genome, conferring a major evolutionary advantage for SPP1-like viruses. PMID:26673721

  13. Phylogeny, Functional Annotation, and Protein Interaction Network Analyses of the Xenopus tropicalis Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    The previous survey identified 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins, but it was proved to be incomplete, and the functional information and regulatory networks of frog bHLH transcription factors were not fully known. Therefore, we conducted an updated genome-wide survey in the Xenopus tropicalis genome project databases and identified 105 bHLH sequences. Among the retrieved 105 sequences, phylogenetic analyses revealed that 103 bHLH proteins belonged to 43 families or subfamilies with 46, 26, 11, 3, 15, and 4 members in the corresponding supergroups. Next, gene ontology (GO) enrichment analyses showed 65 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and KEGG pathways counted in frequency. To explore the functional pathways, regulatory gene networks, and/or related gene groups coding for Xenopus tropicalis bHLH proteins, the identified bHLH genes were put into the databases KOBAS and STRING to get the signaling information of pathways and protein interaction networks according to available public databases and known protein interactions. From the genome annotation and pathway analysis using KOBAS, we identified 16 pathways in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. From the STRING interaction analysis, 68 hub proteins were identified, and many hub proteins created a tight network or a functional module within the protein families. PMID:24312906

  14. Recapitulating the α-helix: nonpeptidic, low-molecular-weight ligands for the modulation of helix-mediated protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Lanning, Maryanna; Fletcher, Steven

    2013-12-01

    Protein-protein interactions play critical roles in a wide variety of biological processes, and their dysregulations contribute to the pathogenesis of several diseases, including cancer. Chemical entities that can abrogate aberrant protein-protein interactions may provide novel therapeutic agents. A large number of protein-protein interactions are mediated by protein secondary structure, the most commonly encountered form of which is the α-helix. Accordingly, over the last decade, there has been a flood of nonpeptidic small molecules that recapitulate the projection and chemical nature of key side chains of the canonical α-helix as a strategy to disrupt helix-mediated protein-protein interactions. In this review, we discuss recent advances (post 2006) in the design of synthetic α-helix mimetics, which include single-faced and two-faced/amphipathic structures, for the modulation of protein-protein interactions. PMID:24261892

  15. Doppler velocimetry of a current driven spin helix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Luyi

    2012-02-01

    We present direct observation of the translational motion of spin helices in GaAs quantum wells under the influence of applied electric fields. Previously, the lifetime of such helices was observed by time-resolving the amplitude of light diffracted from the periodic spin polarization [1]. This technique cannot be applied to tracking the motion of current-driven spin helices because diffraction amplitude is insensitive to translation of the center of mass of a periodic structure. In this talk, we describe a new experimental technique, Doppler spin velocimetry, capable of resolving displacements of spin polarization at the level of 1 nm on a picosecond time scale [2]. This is accomplished through the use of heterodyne detection to measure the optical phase of the diffracted light. We discuss experiments in which this technique is used to measure the motion of spin helices as a function of temperature, in-plane electric field, and photoinduced spin polarization amplitude. Several striking observations will be reported -- for example, the spin helix velocity changes sign as a function of wavevector and is zero at the wavevector that yields the largest spin lifetime. Another important observation is that the velocity of spin polarization packets becomes equal to the drift velocity of the high-mobility electron gas in the limit of small spin helix amplitude. Finally, we show that spin helices continue propagate at the same speed as the Fermi sea even when the electron drift velocity exceeds the Fermi velocity of 10^7 cm-s-1. In collaboration with J. D. Koralek and J. Orenstein, UC Berkeley and LBNL, D. R. Tibbetts, J. L. Reno, and M. P. Lilly, SNL. Supported by DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231 and DE-AC04-94AL85000. [4pt] [1] J. D. Koralek et al., ``Emergency of the persistent spin helix in semiconductor quantum wells,'' Nature 458, 610-613 (2009). [0pt] [2] L. Yang et al, ``Doppler velocimetry of spin propagation in a two-dimensional electron gas,'' to appear

  16. The Chandra planetary nebula survey (CHANPLANS). II. X-ray emission from compact planetary nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, M.; Kastner, J. H.; Montez, R. Jr.; Balick, B.; Frew, D. J.; De Marco, O.; Parker, Q. A.; Jones, D.; Miszalski, B.; Sahai, R.; Blackman, E.; Frank, A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Guerrero, M. A.; Zijlstra, A.; Bujarrabal, V.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Nordhaus, J.; and others

    2014-10-20

    We present results from the most recent set of observations obtained as part of the Chandra X-ray observatory Planetary Nebula Survey (CHANPLANS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood (i.e., within ∼1.5 kpc of the Sun). The survey is designed to place constraints on the frequency of appearance and range of X-ray spectral characteristics of X-ray-emitting PN central stars and the evolutionary timescales of wind-shock-heated bubbles within PNe. CHANPLANS began with a combined Cycle 12 and archive Chandra survey of 35 PNe. CHANPLANS continued via a Chandra Cycle 14 Large Program which targeted all (24) remaining known compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.4 pc), young PNe that lie within ∼1.5 kpc. Results from these Cycle 14 observations include first-time X-ray detections of hot bubbles within NGC 1501, 3918, 6153, and 6369, and point sources in HbDs 1, NGC 6337, and Sp 1. The addition of the Cycle 14 results brings the overall CHANPLANS diffuse X-ray detection rate to ∼27% and the point source detection rate to ∼36%. It has become clearer that diffuse X-ray emission is associated with young (≲ 5 × 10{sup 3} yr), and likewise compact (R {sub neb} ≲ 0.15 pc), PNe with closed structures and high central electron densities (n{sub e} ≳ 1000 cm{sup –3}), and is rarely associated with PNe that show H{sub 2} emission and/or pronounced butterfly structures. Hb 5 is one such exception of a PN with a butterfly structure that hosts diffuse X-ray emission. Additionally, two of the five new diffuse X-ray detections (NGC 1501 and NGC 6369) host [WR]-type central stars, supporting the hypothesis that PNe with central stars of [WR]-type are likely to display diffuse X-ray emission.

  17. The role of glycine (residue 89) in the central helix of EF-hand protein troponin-C exposed following amino-terminal alpha-helix deletion.

    PubMed

    Ding, X L; Akella, A B; Su, H; Gulati, J

    1994-11-01

    Because an N-terminal alpha-helical (N-helix) arm and a KGK-triplet (residues 88KGK90) in the central helix of troponin-C (TnC) are missing in calmodulin, several recent studies have attempted to elucidate the structure-function correlations of these units. Presently, with a family of genetically manipulated derivatives especially developed for this study and tested on permeabilized isolated single skeletal muscle fiber segments, we explored the specificities of the amino acid residues within the N-helix and the KGK-triplet in TnC. Noticeably, the amino acid compositions vary between the N-helices of the cardiac and skeletal TnC isoforms. On the other hand, the KGK-triplet is located similarly in both TnC isoforms. We previously indicated that deletion of the N-helix (mutant delta Nt) diminishes the tension obtained on activation with maximal calcium, but the contractile function is revived by the superimposed deletion of the 88KGK90-triplet (mutant delta Nt delta KGK; see Gulati J, Babu A, Su H, Zhang YF, 1993, J Biol Chem 268:11685-11690). Using this functional test, we find that replacement of Gly-89 with a Leu or an Ala could also overcome the contractile defect associated with N-helix deletion. On the other hand, replacement of the skeletal TnC N-helix with cardiac type N-helix was unable to restore contractile function. The findings indicate a destabilizing influence of Gly-89 residue in skeletal TnC and suggest that the N-terminal arm in normal TnC serves to moderate this effect. Moreover, specificity of the N-helix between cardiac and skeletal TnCs raises the possibility that resultant structural disparities are also important for the functional distinctions of the TnC isoforms. PMID:7703855

  18. Enhancer of splitD, a dominant mutation of Drosophila, and its use in the study of functional domains of a helix-loop-helix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tietze, K; Oellers, N; Knust, E

    1992-01-01

    Helix-loop-helix proteins play important roles in developmental processes, such as myogenesis, neurogenesis, and sex determination. The gene Enhancer of split [E(spl)] of Drosophila, a member of a gene complex that is involved in early neurogenesis, encodes a protein with a basic domain and a helix-loop-helix motif. We took advantage of a dominant mutation of this gene, E(spl)D, to define in vivo structural features of this protein for proper function. The mutation renders the otherwise recessive eye phenotype of spl dominant. By germ-line transformation of different in vitro mutagenized versions of the E(spl) gene, we could demonstrate that the basic domain of this helix-loop-helix protein is functional and necessary for expression of the dominant phenotype. These results are supported by in vitro DNA-binding assays, which showed that the basic domain is in fact necessary for DNA binding, despite the presence of a proline residue. Furthermore, we could show that the dominant enhancement of spl is caused by truncation of the E(SPL)D protein in combination with deletion of a putative regulatory element. Images PMID:1631102

  19. Proposal of a new hydrogen-bonding form to maintain curdlan triple helix.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Kentaro; Uezu, Kazuya; Sakurai, Kazuo; Shinkai, Seiji

    2004-06-01

    Curdlan and other beta-1,3-D-glucans form right-handed triple helices, and it has been believed that the intermolecular H-bond is present at the center of the helix to maintain the structure. In this H-bond model, three secondary OH groups form an inequilateral hexagonal shape perpendicular to the helix axis. This hexagonal form seems to be characteristic for beta-1,3-D-glucans and is widely accepted. We carried out MOPAC and ab initio calculations for the curdlan helix, and we propose a new intermolecular H-bonding model. In our model, the H-bonds are formed between the O2-atoms on different x-y planes along the curdlan helix, hence the H-bonds are not perpendicular to the helix axis. The new H-bonds are connected along the helix, traversing three curdlan chains to make a left-handed helix. Therefore, the H-bonding array leads to a reverse helix of the main chain. According to our MOPAC calculation, this model is more stable than the previous one. We believe that the continuous H-bonding array is stabilized by cooperative phenomena in the polymeric system. PMID:17191891

  20. Triple Helix Systems: An Analytical Framework for Innovation Policy and Practice in the Knowledge Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranga, Marina; Etzkowitz, Henry

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the concept of Triple Helix systems as an analytical construct that synthesizes the key features of university--industry--government (Triple Helix) interactions into an "innovation system" format, defined according to systems theory as a set of components, relationships and functions. Among the components of Triple…

  1. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), LOOKING WEST (without scale stick). - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  2. VIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), WITH ANTENNA TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), WITH ANTENNA TOWER CABLE SUPPORT IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  3. VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF EAST ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87), LOOKING WEST (with scale stick). - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  4. VIEW OF SOUTH ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S87) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF SOUTH ELEVATION OF HELIX HOUSE NO. 2 (S-87) SHOWING MAIN ENTRY DOOR, LOOKING NORTH NORTHWEST. - Naval Computer & Telecommunications Area Master Station, Eastern Pacific, Radio Transmitter Facility Lualualei, Helix House No. 2, Base of Radio Antenna Structure No. 427, Makaha, Honolulu County, HI

  5. RFID Tag Helix Antenna Sensors for Wireless Drug Dosage Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiyu; Zhao, Peisen; Chen, Pai-Yen; Ren, Yong; Liu, Xuewu; Ferrari, Mauro; Hu, Ye; Akinwande, Deji

    2014-01-01

    Miniaturized helix antennas are integrated with drug reservoirs to function as RFID wireless tag sensors for real-time drug dosage monitoring. The general design procedure of this type of biomedical antenna sensors is proposed based on electromagnetic theory and finite element simulation. A cost effective fabrication process is utilized to encapsulate the antenna sensor within a biocompatible package layer using PDMS material, and at the same time form a drug storage or drug delivery unit inside the sensor. The in vitro experiment on two prototypes of antenna sensor-drug reservoir assembly have shown the ability to monitor the drug dosage by tracking antenna resonant frequency shift from 2.4-2.5-GHz ISM band with realized sensitivity of 1.27 [Formula: see text] for transdermal drug delivery monitoring and 2.76-[Formula: see text] sensitivity for implanted drug delivery monitoring. PMID:27170865

  6. Helix versus sheet formation in a small peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Hansmann, Ulrich H.

    2003-10-01

    Segments with the amino acid sequence EKAYLRT (glutamine-lysine-alanine-tyrosine-leucine-arginine-threonine) appear in naturally occurring proteins both in α-helices and β-sheets. For this reason, we have used this peptide to study how secondary structure formation in proteins depends on the local environment. Our data rely on multicanonical Monte Carlo simulations where the interactions among all atoms are taken into account. Results in gas phase are compared with that in an implicit solvent. We find that both the solvated molecule and EKAYLRT in gas phase form an α-helix when not interacting with other molecules. However, in the vicinity of a β-strand, the peptide forms a β-strand. Because of this change in secondary structure our peptide may provide a simple model for the α→β transition that is supposedly related to the outbreak of prion diseases and similar illnesses.

  7. Spontaneous and stable uniform lying helix liquid-crystal alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Outram, B. I.; Elston, S. J.

    2013-01-01

    The flexoelectro-optic effect in the uniform lying helix (ULH) geometry could provide many advantages over existing liquid-crystal technologies, however reliably forming the ULH has been problematic. Here, we achieve spontaneous, stable, and repeatable ULH alignment for materials with both positive and negative dielectric anisotropy in devices ranging from 1 to 7 μm in thickness without the need for any field application or flow-induced alignment, using a combination of weak homeotropic alignment conditions and unidirectional grooved surface profiles. The technique requires slow cooling from the isotropic phase and through the blue phase. Devices made using the technique display sub-millisecond and linear electro-optical responses.

  8. Microscopical approach to the helix-coil transition in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, V. F.; Mamasakhlisov, E. Sh.; Hayryan, Shura; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2000-06-01

    A model Hamiltonian for double-strand polynucleotides is suggested to describe the phenomenon of helix-coil transition. The Hamiltonian is constructed using solely the microscopical, pure physical quantities, characterizing the molecular chain, namely the energy of hydrogen-bond formation and the number of conformations of repeated unit. Realistic constraints are imposed on the conformations of chain in the case of loop formation. The advantage of the suggested approach is that the parameters of the model can be obtained from independent calculations or experiments. It is shown that with the approximation of neglecting the effect of large loops, the model of DNA is reduced to the generalized microscopical model of polypeptide chain.

  9. Emergence of the persistent spin helix in semiconductor quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Koralek, J D; Weber, C P; Orenstein, J; Bernevig, B A; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; Mack, S; Awschalom, D D

    2009-04-01

    According to Noether's theorem, for every symmetry in nature there is a corresponding conservation law. For example, invariance with respect to spatial translation corresponds to conservation of momentum. In another well-known example, invariance with respect to rotation of the electron's spin, or SU(2) symmetry, leads to conservation of spin polarization. For electrons in a solid, this symmetry is ordinarily broken by spin-orbit coupling, allowing spin angular momentum to flow to orbital angular momentum. However, it has recently been predicted that SU(2) can be achieved in a two-dimensional electron gas, despite the presence of spin-orbit coupling. The corresponding conserved quantities include the amplitude and phase of a helical spin density wave termed the 'persistent spin helix'. SU(2) is realized, in principle, when the strengths of two dominant spin-orbit interactions, the Rashba (strength parameterized by alpha) and linear Dresselhaus (beta(1)) interactions, are equal. This symmetry is predicted to be robust against all forms of spin-independent scattering, including electron-electron interactions, but is broken by the cubic Dresselhaus term (beta(3)) and spin-dependent scattering. When these terms are negligible, the distance over which spin information can propagate is predicted to diverge as alpha approaches beta(1). Here we report experimental observation of the emergence of the persistent spin helix in GaAs quantum wells by independently tuning alpha and beta(1). Using transient spin-grating spectroscopy, we find a spin-lifetime enhancement of two orders of magnitude near the symmetry point. Excellent quantitative agreement with theory across a wide range of sample parameters allows us to obtain an absolute measure of all relevant spin-orbit terms, identifying beta(3) as the main SU(2)-violating term in our samples. The tunable suppression of spin relaxation demonstrated in this work is well suited for application to spintronics. PMID:19340077

  10. Alpha-Helix folding in the presence of structural constraints.

    PubMed

    Ihalainen, Janne A; Paoli, Beatrice; Muff, Stefanie; Backus, Ellen H G; Bredenbeck, Jens; Woolley, G Andrew; Caflisch, Amedeo; Hamm, Peter

    2008-07-15

    We have investigated the site-specific folding kinetics of a photoswitchable cross-linked alpha-helical peptide by using single (13)C = (18)O isotope labeling together with time-resolved IR spectroscopy. We observe that the folding times differ from site to site by a factor of eight at low temperatures (6 degrees C), whereas at high temperatures (45 degrees C), the spread is considerably smaller. The trivial sum of the site signals coincides with the overall folding signal of the unlabeled peptide, and different sites fold in a noncooperative manner. Moreover, one of the sites exhibits a decrease of hydrogen bonding upon folding, implying that the unfolded state at low temperature is not unstructured. Molecular dynamics simulations at low temperature reveal a stretched-exponential behavior which originates from parallel folding routes that start from a kinetically partitioned unfolded ensemble. Different metastable structures (i.e., traps) in the unfolded ensemble have a different ratio of loop and helical content. Control simulations of the peptide at high temperature, as well as without the cross-linker at low temperature, show faster and simpler (i.e., single-exponential) folding kinetics. The experimental and simulation results together provide strong evidence that the rate-limiting step in formation of a structurally constrained alpha-helix is the escape from heterogeneous traps rather than the nucleation rate. This conclusion has important implications for an alpha-helical segment within a protein, rather than an isolated alpha-helix, because the cross-linker is a structural constraint similar to those present during the folding of a globular protein. PMID:18621686

  11. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-03-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a `fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures.

  12. Dispersion relations for a plasma-filled helix-loaded-waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Makowski, M.A.; Hooper, E.B.; Stallard, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    The propagation of waves on bounded, magnetized plasma columns arises in connection with a variety of applications. To this end dispersion relations axe developed for a variety of multi-region circularly symmetric configurations. These include, a sheath helix in free space, a plasma column in free space, a plasma filled conducting tube, a plasma filled sheath-helix in free space, a sheath helix within a conducting cylinder, a plasma filled sheath-helix within a conducting cylinder, and a plasma column within a sheath-helix contained within a conducting cylinder. The latter configuration is of the most interest for whistler wave excitation for plasma thruster applications, since it includes the effect of a vacuum region separating the plasma column from the helical excitation structure.

  13. Connecting two proteins using a fusion alpha helix stabilized by a chemical cross linker

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Woo Hyeon; Lee, Haerim; Song, Dong Hyun; Eom, Jae-Hoon; Kim, Sun Chang; Lee, Hee-Seung; Lee, Hayyoung; Lee, Jie-Oh

    2016-01-01

    Building a sophisticated protein nano-assembly requires a method for linking protein components in a predictable and stable structure. Most of the cross linkers available have flexible spacers. Because of this, the linked hybrids have significant structural flexibility and the relative structure between their two components is largely unpredictable. Here we describe a method of connecting two proteins via a ‘fusion α helix' formed by joining two pre-existing helices into a single extended helix. Because simple ligation of two helices does not guarantee the formation of a continuous helix, we used EY-CBS, a synthetic cross linker that has been shown to react selectively with cysteines in α-helices, to stabilize the connecting helix. Formation and stabilization of the fusion helix was confirmed by determining the crystal structures of the fusion proteins with and without bound EY-CBS. Our method should be widely applicable for linking protein building blocks to generate predictable structures. PMID:26980593

  14. Evolution of planetary nebulae. III. Position-velocity images of butterfly-type nebulae

    SciTech Connect

    Icke, V.; Preston, H.L.; Balick, B.

    1989-02-01

    Observations of the motions of the shells of the planetary nebulae NGC 2346, NGC 2371-2, NGC 2440, NGC 6058, NGC 6210, IC 1747, IC 5217, J-320, and M2-9 are presented. These are all 'butterfly' type PNs, and show evidence for bipolar shocks. The observations are interpreted in terms of a fast spherical wind, driven by the central star into a quasi-toroidal envelope deposited earlier by the star, during its slow-wind phase on the asymptotic giant branch. It is shown that this model, which is a straightforward extension of a mechanism previously invoked to account for elliptical PNs, reproduces the essential kinematic features of butterfly PNs. It is inferred that the envelopes of butterflies must have a considerable equator-to-pole density gradient, and it is suggested that the origin of this asphericity must be sought in an as yet unknown mechanism during the AGB, Mira, or OH/IR phases of late stellar evolution. 28 references.

  15. The planetary nebula system and dynamics of NGC 5128. I - Planetary nebulae as standard candles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hui, Xiaohui; Ford, Holland C.; Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.

    1993-01-01

    We present the result of a planetary nebula (PN) survey of the nearby giant elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 performed with CCD cameras at the prime focus of the CTIO 4 m telescope. By comparing CCD images centered on the characteristic emission line forbidden O III 5007 A and on the adjacent continuum, we identify a total of 785 PNs in areas extending 20 kpc along the photometric major axis and covering the whole galaxy to 10 kpc. From these data, we form a complete sample of 224 PNs extending to a dereddened limiting magnitude of m5007 = 24.8, which extends 1.5 mag down the PN luminosity function (PNLF). Adopting a foreground extinction of E(B-V) = 0.1, we derive a distance to the galaxy of 3.5 +/- 0.2 Mpc, in excellent agreement with the surface brightness fluctuation method. No population effect on the bright cutoff of PNLF is observed in the isophotal radius range of 2-16 kpc, but the luminosity specific PN density seems to increase with radius inside of 7 kpc, in agreement with the alpha(2.5)-color relation observed for other galaxies.

  16. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. II. PLANETARY NEBULA SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-09-20

    As the second step in our investigation of the mass-to-light ratio of spiral disks, we present the results of a spectroscopic survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in five nearby, low-inclination galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). Using 50 setups of the WIYN/Hydra and Blanco/Hydra spectrographs, and 25 observations with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope's Medium Resolution Spectrograph, we determine the radial velocities of 99, 102, 162, 127, and 48 PNe, respectively, to a precision better than 15 km s{sup -1}. Although the main purpose of this data set is to facilitate dynamical mass measurements throughout the inner and outer disks of large spiral galaxies, our spectroscopy has other uses as well. Here, we co-add these spectra to show that, to first order, the [O III] and Balmer line ratios of PNe vary little over the top {approx}1.5 mag of the PN luminosity function. The only obvious spectral change occurs with [N II], which increases in strength as one proceeds down the luminosity function. We also show that typical [O III]-bright planetaries have E(B - V) {approx} 0.2 of circumstellar extinction, and that this value is virtually independent of [O III] luminosity. We discuss the implications this has for understanding the population of PN progenitors.

  17. PLANETARY NEBULAE IN FACE-ON SPIRAL GALAXIES. III. PLANETARY NEBULA KINEMATICS AND DISK MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Kimberly A.; Ciardullo, Robin E-mail: rbc@astro.psu.ed

    2009-11-10

    Much of our understanding of dark matter halos comes from the assumption that the mass-to-light ratio (Y) of spiral disks is constant. The best way to test this hypothesis is to measure the disk surface mass density directly via the kinematics of old disk stars. To this end, we have used planetary nebulae (PNe) as test particles and have measured the vertical velocity dispersion (sigma{sub z}) throughout the disks of five nearby, low-inclination spiral galaxies: IC 342, M74 (NGC 628), M83 (NGC 5236), M94 (NGC 4736), and M101 (NGC 5457). By using H I to map galactic rotation and the epicyclic approximation to extract sigma{sub z} from the line-of-sight dispersion, we find that, with the lone exception of M101, our disks do have a constant Y out to approx3 optical scale lengths (h{sub R} ). However, once outside this radius, sigma{sub z} stops declining and becomes flat with radius. Possible explanations for this behavior include an increase in the disk mass-to-light ratio, an increase in the importance of the thick disk, and heating of the thin disk by halo substructure. We also find that the disks of early type spirals have higher values of Y and are closer to maximal than the disks of later-type spirals, and that the unseen inner halos of these systems are better fit by pseudo-isothermal laws than by NFW models.

  18. ChanPlaNS: The Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastner, Joel; Montez, Rodolfo; Freeman, Marcus; ChanPlaNS Team

    2015-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for the morphological diversity among planetary nebulae (PNe) have been the subject of intense interest and hot debate among PN researchers over the past two decades. The PN shaping problem is multifaceted, with connections to (and implications for) a wide variety of astrophysical systems. Two areas of particular importance are (1) binary star astrophysics and (2) wind interactions and their implications for nebular shaping. X-ray observations play a pivotal role in the study of both of these fundamental aspects of PNe, by revealing (1) point-like X-ray sources at PN central stars that may be indicative of binary companions, and (2) diffuse X-ray emission generated by energetic, PN-shaping shocks. To assess the frequency of appearance and characteristics of these respective PN X-ray sources, we have undertaken the Chandra Planetary Nebula Survey (ChanPlaNS), the first comprehensive X-ray survey of planetary nebulae (PNe) in the solar neighborhood. ChanPlaNS began with a combined Cycle 12 Large Program and archival survey of 35 PNe, with emphasis on high-excitation nebulae, and continued via a Cycle 14 Large Program targeting an additional 24 known compact (R_neb <~ 0.4 pc) PNe. For the latter category of relatively young nebulae, we estimate that the ChanPlaNS survey is ~90% complete within ~1.5 kpc from the Sun. For the ~60 nebulae within this distance observed by Chandra, the point source detection rate is ~36%, and the diffuse X-ray source detection rate is ~27%. However, the point-like and diffuse X-ray detection rates, respectively, are significantly higher for PNe known to harbor binary central stars (~60%) and for the compact (young) PN subsample (~50%). These results demonstrate the potential for insight into PN shaping processes provided by ChanPlaNS. In companion presentations at this meeting (Montez et al.; Freeman et al.), we present highlights of the astrophysics gleaned to date from these Chandra detections (and

  19. Kinematic study of planetary nebulae in NGC 6822

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Durán, S. N.; Peña, M.; Hernández-Martínez, L.; García-Rojas, J.; Ruiz, M. T.

    2014-08-01

    Context. The kinematics of planetary nebulae in external galaxies and in our own is a clue for understanding the behavior of the low- and intermediate-mass stars and their relation with other components of the galaxies. Aims: By measuring precise radial velocities of planetary nebulae (which belong to the intermediate-age population), H ii regions and A-type supergiant stars (which are members of the young population) in NGC 6822, we aim to determine whether both types of population share the kinematics of the disk of H i found in this galaxy. Methods: Spectroscopic data for six planetary nebulae were obtained with the high spectral-resolution spectrograph Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle (MIKE) on the Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Data for another three PNe and one H ii region were obtained from the SPM Catalog of Extragalactic Planetary Nebulae, which employed the Manchester Echelle Spectrometer attached to the 2.1m telescope at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, México. An additional PN and one H ii region were observed with this same telescope-spectrograph in 2013. Thus, in total we have high-quality data for 10 of the 26 PNe detected in this galaxy. In the wavelength calibrated spectra, the heliocentric radial velocities were measured with a precision better than 5-6 km s-1. Data for two additional H ii regions and two A-type supergiant stars were collected from the literature. The heliocentric radial velocities of the different objects were compared to the velocities of the H i disk at the same position. Results: From the analysis of radial velocities we found that H ii regions and A-type supergiants do share the kinematics of the H i disk at the same position, as expected for these young objects. In contrast, most planetary nebula velocities differ significantly (more than 12 km s-1) from that of the H i at the same position. The kinematics of planetary nebulae is different from the young population kinematics and is more similar to

  20. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the β-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-01

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the β6.3-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed β4.4-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed β4.4-helix, right-handed and left-handed β6.3-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite β-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed β6.3-helix and β4.4-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these β-helix structures. The results suggested that β6.3-helix is more stable than β4.4-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the β6.3-helix conformation.

  1. Folding simulations of gramicidin A into the beta-helix conformations: Simulated annealing molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Mori, Takaharu; Okamoto, Yuko

    2009-10-28

    Gramicidin A is a linear hydrophobic 15-residue peptide which consists of alternating D- and L-amino acids and forms a unique tertiary structure, called the beta(6.3)-helix, to act as a cation-selective ion channel in the natural conditions. In order to investigate the intrinsic ability of the gramicidin A monomer to form secondary structures, we performed the folding simulation of gramicidin A using a simulated annealing molecular dynamics (MD) method in vacuum mimicking the low-dielectric, homogeneous membrane environment. The initial conformation was a fully extended one. From the 200 different MD runs, we obtained a right-handed beta(4.4)-helix as the lowest-potential-energy structure, and left-handed beta(4.4)-helix, right-handed and left-handed beta(6.3)-helix as local-minimum energy states. These results are in accord with those of the experiments of gramicidin A in homogeneous organic solvent. Our simulations showed a slight right-hand sense in the lower-energy conformations and a quite beta-sheet-forming tendency throughout almost the entire sequence. In order to examine the stability of the obtained right-handed beta(6.3)-helix and beta(4.4)-helix structures in more realistic membrane environment, we have also performed all-atom MD simulations in explicit water, ion, and lipid molecules, starting from these beta-helix structures. The results suggested that beta(6.3)-helix is more stable than beta(4.4)-helix in the inhomogeneous, explicit membrane environment, where the pore water and the hydrogen bonds between Trp side-chains and lipid-head groups have a role to further stabilize the beta(6.3)-helix conformation. PMID:19894978

  2. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C). The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6 ~ 7 kDa fragments. Thus

  3. A genome-wide identification of basic helix-loop-helix motifs in Pediculus humanus corporis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-Hua; Wang, Yong; Zhang, De-Bao; Liu, A-Ke; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins comprise a large superfamily of transcription factors, which are involved in the regulation of various developmental processes. bHLH family members are widely distributed in various eukaryotes including yeast, fruit fly, zebrafish, mouse, and human. In this study, we identified 55 bHLH motifs encoded in genome sequence of the human body louse, Pediculus humanus corporis (Phthiraptera: Pediculidae). Phylogenetic analyses of the identified P. humanus corporis bHLH (PhcbHLH) motifs revealed that there are 23, 11, 9, 1, 10, and 1 member(s) in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. Examination to GenBank annotations of the 55 PhcbHLH members indicated that 29 PhcbHLH proteins were annotated in consistence with our analytical result, 8 were annotated different with our analytical result, 12 were merely annotated as hypothetical protein, and the rest 6 were not deposited in GenBank. A comparison on insect bHLH gene composition revealed that human body louse possibly has more hairy and E(spl) genes than other insect species. Because hairy and E(spl) genes have been found to negatively regulate the differentiation of insect preneural cells, it is suggested that the existence of additional hairy and E(spl) genes in human body louse is probably the consequence of its long period adaptation to the relatively dark and stable environment. These data provide good references for further studies on regulatory functions of bHLH proteins in the growth and development of human body louse. PMID:25434030

  4. De novo design of protein-protein interactions through modification of inter-molecular helix-helix interface residues.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Sota; Akanuma, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Manami; Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2016-05-01

    For de novo design of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), information on the shape and chemical complementarity of their interfaces is generally required. Recent advances in computational PPI design have allowed for de novo design of protein complexes, and several successful examples have been reported. In addition, a simple and easy-to-use approach has also been reported that arranges leucines on a solvent-accessible region of an α-helix and places charged residues around the leucine patch to induce interactions between the two helical peptides. For this study, we adopted this approach to de novo design a new PPI between the helical bundle proteins sulerythrin and LARFH. A non-polar patch was created on an α-helix of LARFH around which arginine residues were introduced to retain its solubility. The strongest interaction found was for the LARFH variant cysLARFH-IV-3L3R and the sulerythrin mutant 6L6D (KD=0.16 μM). This artificial protein complex is maintained by hydrophobic and ionic interactions formed by the inter-molecular helical bundle structure. Therefore, by the simple and easy-to-use approach to create de novo interfaces on the α-helices, we successfully generated an artificial PPI. We also created a second LARFH variant with the non-polar patch surrounded by positively charged residues at each end. Upon mixing this LARFH variant with 6L6D, mesh-like fibrous nanostructures were observed by atomic force microscopy. Our method may, therefore, also be applicable to the de novo design of protein nanostructures. PMID:26867971

  5. The "Príncipes de Asturias" nebula: a new quadrupolar planetary nebula from the IPHAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mampaso, A.; Corradi, R. L. M.; Viironen, K.; Leisy, P.; Greimel, R.; Drew, J. E.; Barlow, M. J.; Frew, D. J.; Irwin, J.; Morris, R. A. H.; Parker, Q. A.; Phillipps, S.; Rodríguez-Flores, E. R.; Zijlstra, A. A.

    2006-10-01

    Context: .The Isaac Newton Telescope Photometric Hα Survey (IPHAS) is currently mapping the Northern Galactic plane reaching to r'=20 mag with typically 1primeprime resolution. Hundreds of Planetary Nebulae (PNe), both point-like and resolved, are expected to be discovered. We report on the discovery of the first new PN from this survey: it is an unusual object located at a large galactocentric distance and has a very low oxygen abundance. Aims: .Detecting and studying new PNe will lead to improved estimates of the population size, binary fraction and lifetimes, and yield new insights into the chemistry of the interstellar medium at large galactocentric distances. Methods: .Compact nebulae are searched for in the IPHAS photometric catalogue, selecting those candidates with a strong Hα excess in the r'-Hα vs. r'-i' colour-colour diagram. Searches for extended nebulae are by visual inspection of the mosaics of continuum-subtracted Hα images at a spatial sampling of 5×5 arcsec^2. Follow-up spectroscopy enables confirmation of the PNe, and their physico-chemical study. Results: .The first planetary nebula discovered via IPHAS imagery shows an intricate morphology: there is an inner ring surrounding the central star, bright inner lobes with an enhanced waist, and very faint lobular extensions reaching up to more than 100''. We classify it as a quadrupolar PN, a rather unusual class of planetary showing two pairs of misaligned lobes. From long-slit spectroscopy we derive T_e[ Nii] =12 800±1000 K, Ne = 390±40 cm-3, and chemical abundances typical of Peimbert's type I nebulae (He/H =0.13, N/O =1.8) with an oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H)=8.17±0.15. A kinematic distance of 7.0+4.5-3.0 kpc is derived, implying an unusually large size of >4 pc for the nebula. The photometry of the central star indicates the presence of a relatively cool companion. This, and the evidence for a dense circumstellar disk and quadrupolar morphology, all of which are rare among PNe, support

  6. Radial Migration of Phyllosilicates in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciesla, F. J.; Lauretta, D. S.; Hood, L. L.

    2004-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the high temperatures of the inner solar nebula (within approx. 3 AU) would not have allowed water to be incorporated into solids. However, the presence of water on the surface of Earth, as well as evidence for it on the surface of an early Mars imply that water was incorporated into solid bodies in this region. How this water was delivered to the solid bodies has yet to be identified. In this abstract we explore the possibility that hydrous minerals, such as phyllosilicates, formed somewhere in the asteroid belt region of the solar nebula or beyond, and then migrated inward where they would be accreted into larger bodies.

  7. UNRAVELING THE GEOMETRY OF THE CRAB NEBULA's 'INNER RING'

    SciTech Connect

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2012-02-10

    Chandra images of the Crab Nebula resolve the detailed structure of its 'inner ring', possibly a termination shock where pulsar-accelerated relativistic particles begin to emit X radiation. Analysis of these images finds that the center of the ellipse-presumably a circular ring in projection-lies about 0.''9 (10 light days at 2 kpc) from the pulsar's image, at a position angle of about 300 Degree-Sign (east of north). This analysis also measures properties of the ellipse: the position angle of the semi-major axis is about 210 Degree-Sign (east of north); the aspect ratio is 0.49. In a simple-albeit, not unique-de-projection of the observed geometry, a circular ring is centered on the axis of symmetry of the pulsar wind nebula. This ring is not equatorial but rather lies near +4.{sup 0}5 latitude in pulsar-centered coordinates. Alternative geometries are briefly discussed.

  8. The Jovian nebula - A post-Voyager perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trauger, J. T.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager 1 carried a diverse collection of magnetospheric probes through the inner Jovian magnetosphere in March 1979. The ensuing data analysis and theoretical investigation provided a comprehensive description of the Jovian nebula, a luminous torus populated with newly released heavy ions drawn from Io's surface. Recent refinements in earth-based imaging instrumentation are used to extend the Voyager in situ picture in temporal and spatial coverage. An analysis of S III and S II forbidden-line optical emissions observed during the Jovian apparitions of 1981 through 1983 reveals three distinct torus components. Regularities have been identified in the ion partitioning and ion densities in the hot outer and inner tori, sharply defined radial structure is found in the plasma near Io, and the relative permanence of the cool inner torus is inferred. An extended cloud of neutral material is required as a source of fresh ions in the nebula.

  9. Magellanic cloud planetary nebula with suspected strong forbidden iron lines

    PubMed Central

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1983-01-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair λ4724, 4726, [Ca V] λ5309, [Fe V] λ4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially “normal” helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries. PMID:16593294

  10. Outflows, Jets and Shocks in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODell, C. R.; Bally, John

    2000-01-01

    The rich young cluster of stars associated with the Orion Nebula provides a unique laboratory for the study of plasma phenomena. We see five types of flows and shocks. Photoablation outflow from the proplyds nearest theta (exp 1) Ori C form nearly stationary shocks with the high velocity wind from that star. Microjets, with scales of less than 10 (exp 4) AU, are seen around some 20 low mass stars. Isolated jets, with high velocities and scales of about, 104 AU, are less numerous but common. One also sees the shocks formed when these jets impinge on the ionized nebular gas and the neutral gas in the foreground lid. The final type of object is the stationary shock formed by the interaction from the stellar wind that arises during disk formation with the ambient, gas flowing away from the main body of the nebula.

  11. Ionized magnesium in the planetary nebula NGC 7027

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, N. J., II; Natta, A.; Russell, R. W.; Wyant, J.; Beckwith, S.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of NGC 7027 are presented for six ionic lines: Mg(+3) (4.48 microns), Mg(+4) (5.61 microns), H(0) (4.05 and 7.46 microns), Ne(+5) (7.64 microns), and Ar(+5) (4.53 microns). The magnesium lines are consistent with the measurements of Russell, Soifer, and Willner (1977), and the hydrogen lines are consistent with the line strengths predicted from the radio flux. Upper limits were obtained for the neon and argon lines. The abundance of magnesium in the central part of the nebula is highly uncertain because the fine-structure collision strengths are poorly known. The strong gradient of magnesium abundance from the inner to the outer portions of the nebula derived by Pequignot and Stasinska (1980) could be an artifact of this uncertainty. A brief analysis of the effective stellar temperature derived from the magnesium line ratios is given.

  12. Deuterium fractionation of water in the Solar nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albertsson, Tobias; Semenov, Dmitry; Henning, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Water evaporates in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks and is frozen onto grains in the outer regions. Therefore its presence in vast quantities on Earth is puzzling. Subsequent delivery through bombardment by primitive bodies formed in the outer icy regions is the favored mechanism. By studying water D/H ratios one hopes to understand whether the water was mainly delivered by comets or asteroids. Using an extended deuterium chemistry network coupled to a 2D chemo-dynamical disk model, we investigate the evolution of the D/H ratio of water in the young Solar nebula. We find that both the laminar and mixing Solar nebula models show the Earth's ocean water D/H ratio at 2-3 AU. In addition, the 2D-mixing model explains better the water D/H values observed in the Oort- and Jupiter-family comets.

  13. Al-Sufi's Investigation of Stars, Star Clusters and Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafez, Ihsan; Stephenson, F. R.; Orchiston, W.

    2011-01-01

    The distinguished Arabic astronomer, Al-Sufi (AD 903-986) is justly famous for his Book of the Fixed Stars, an outstanding Medieval treatise on astronomy that was assembled in 964. Developed from Ptolemy's Algamest, but based upon al-Sufi's own stellar observations, the Book of the Fixed Stars has been copied down through the ages, and currently 35 copies are known to exist in various archival repositories around the world. Among other things, this major work contains 55 astronomical tables, plus star charts for 48 constellations. For the first time a long-overdue English translation of this important early work is in active preparation. In this paper we provide biographical material about Al-Sufi and the contents of his Book of the Fixed Stars, before examining his novel stellar magnitude system, and his listing of star clusters and nebulae (including the first-ever mention of the Great Nebula in Andromeda).

  14. Detection of submillimeter polarization in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, R. H.; Dragovan, M.; Novak, G.

    1984-01-01

    Linear polarization of the submillimeter (270 micron) continuum radiation from two regions of Orion was observed: one centered on the Kleinmann-Low Nebula and one centered on the 400 micron peak 1.5' south of the nebula. The polarizations measured for these regions are P = (1.7 +/-0.4)% at phi = 23 deg +/-7 deg and P=(1.7 +/- 0.5)% at phi = 27 deg +/- 7 deg respectively. A 2(sigma) upper limit, P or = 1.6%, was found for the nebular W3(OH). The position angle at KL is orthogonal to that measured at 11 microns by Dyck and Beichman and at 11 and 20 microns by Knacke and Capps. The far-IR values for KL reported by Gull et. al. (approx 2%) and by Cudlip et al. (1 to 2% level) are consistent with the submillimeter results.

  15. Catalysis by Dust Grains in the Solar Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kress, Monika E.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    1996-01-01

    In order to determine whether grain-catalyzed reactions played an important role in the chemistry of the solar nebula, we have applied our time-dependent model of methane formation via Fischer-Tropsch catalysis to pressures from 10(exp -5) to 1 bar and temperatures from 450 to 650 K. Under these physical conditions, the reaction 3H2 + CO yields CH4 + H2O is readily catalyzed by an iron or nickel surface, whereas the same reaction is kinetically inhibited in the gas phase. Our model results indicate that under certain nebular conditions, conversion of CO to methane could be extremely efficient in the presence of iron-nickel dust grains over timescales very short compared to the lifetime of the solar nebula.

  16. Million-degree plasma pervading the extended Orion Nebula.

    PubMed

    Güdel, Manuel; Briggs, Kevin R; Montmerle, Thierry; Audard, Marc; Rebull, Luisa; Skinner, Stephen L

    2008-01-18

    Most stars form as members of large associations within dense, very cold (10 to 100 kelvin) molecular clouds. The nearby giant molecular cloud in Orion hosts several thousand stars of ages less than a few million years, many of which are located in or around the famous Orion Nebula, a prominent gas structure illuminated and ionized by a small group of massive stars (the Trapezium). We present x-ray observations obtained with the X-ray Multi-Mirror satellite XMM-Newton, revealing that a hot plasma with a temperature of 1.7 to 2.1 million kelvin pervades the southwest extension of the nebula. The plasma flows into the adjacent interstellar medium. This x-ray outflow phenomenon must be widespread throughout our Galaxy. PMID:18048651

  17. Unraveling the Geometry of the Crab Nebula's "Inner Ring"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Tennant, Allyn F.

    2012-02-01

    Chandra images of the Crab Nebula resolve the detailed structure of its "inner ring," possibly a termination shock where pulsar-accelerated relativistic particles begin to emit X radiation. Analysis of these images finds that the center of the ellipse—presumably a circular ring in projection—lies about 0farcs9 (10 light days at 2 kpc) from the pulsar's image, at a position angle of about 300° (east of north). This analysis also measures properties of the ellipse: the position angle of the semi-major axis is about 210° (east of north); the aspect ratio is 0.49. In a simple—albeit, not unique—de-projection of the observed geometry, a circular ring is centered on the axis of symmetry of the pulsar wind nebula. This ring is not equatorial but rather lies near +4fdg5 latitude in pulsar-centered coordinates. Alternative geometries are briefly discussed.

  18. PAH and H2 emission in the Ring Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, N. L. J.; Pilleri, P.; Berné, O.; Cernicharo, J.; Joblin, C.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the Spitzer IRS (Infra Red Spectrograph) detection of mid-infrared polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features and H2 associated with dense knots in the ring of the “oxygen-rich” (C/O∼⃒0.6-0.8) planetary nebula (PN) NGC6720 (Ring Nebula). We explored a further three oxygen-rich extended PNe with similar dataset available. These turned out to be non-detection of PAHs, although two of these do contain H2 emission knots. The presence of PAHs is discussed in the context of a bottom-up formation mechanism, in which first small hydrocarbons, and later PAHs, are formed in warm dense knots inside the ionised regions of PNe.

  19. X-RAY EVOLUTION OF PULSAR WIND NEBULAE

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Aya; Anada, Takayasu; Dotani, Tadayasu; Ebisawa, Ken; Yamazaki, Ryo; Vink, Jacco

    2010-08-20

    During the search for counterparts of very high energy gamma-ray sources, we serendipitously discovered large, extended, low surface brightness emission from pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) around pulsars with the ages up to {approx}100 kyr, a discovery made possible by the low and stable background of the Suzaku X-ray satellite. A systematic study of a sample of eight of these PWNe, together with Chandra data sets, has revealed that the nebulae keep expanding up to {approx}100 kyr, although the timescale of the synchrotron X-ray emission is only {approx}60 yr for typical magnetic fields of 100 {mu}G. Our result suggests that the accelerated electrons up to {approx}80 TeV can escape from the PWNe without losing most energies. Moreover, in order to explain the observed correlation between the X-ray size and the pulsar spin-down age, the magnetic field strength in the PWNe must decrease with time.

  20. Magellanic cloud planetary nebula with suspected strong forbidden iron lines.

    PubMed

    Aller, L H; Czyzak, S J

    1983-03-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair lambda4724, 4726, [Ca V] lambda5309, [Fe V] lambda4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially "normal" helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries. PMID:16593294

  1. High dispersion observations of selected regions in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeshaar, G. O.; Harvel, C. A.; Mallama, A. D.; Perry, P. M.; Thompson, R. W.; Turnrose, B.

    High resolution spectral observations were made of several regions of the Orion Nebula near theta (2) Ori A using the IUE. The positions were selected using a moderate spatial resolution map from a previous low dispersion IUE survery of this section of the nebula. With the SWP and LWR cameras, 28 pectra were obtained of the bright bar, three Taylor-Munch cloudlets, and several surrounding locations. Emission lines of He, C, N, O, Mg, and Si allow a characterization of these cloudlets and of the gas in and around the bar. Small aperture observations provide radial velocity information for the ultraviolet emission of these features. These data show ionization variations from region to region and are suggestive of stellar wind interactions between the cloudlets and theta(2) Ori A.

  2. Spectrophotometry of Bowen resonance fluorescence lines in three planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, C. R.; Miller, Christopher O.

    1992-01-01

    The results are presented of a uniquely complete, carefully reduced set of observations of the O III Bowen fluorescence lines in the planetary nebulae NGC 6210, NGC 7027, and NGC 7662. A detailed comparison with the predictions of radiative excitation verify that some secondary lines are enhanced by selective population by the charge exchange mechanism involving O IV. Charge exchange is most important in NGC 6210, which is of significantly lower ionization than the other nebulae. In addition to the principal Bowen lines arising from Ly-alpha pumping of the O III O1 line, lines arising from pumping of the O3 line are also observed. Comparison of lines produced by O1 and O3 with the theoretical predictions of Neufeld indicate poor agreement; comparison with the theoretical predictions of Harrington show agreement with NGC 7027 and NGC 7662.

  3. Supernova remnants, planetary nebulae and the distance to NGC 4214

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Calzetti, Daniela; Maíz Apellániz, Jesús; Blair, William P.; Long, Knox S.; Mutchler, Max; Whitmore, Bradley C.; Bond, Howard E.; MacKenty, John; Balick, Bruce; Carollo, Marcella; Disney, Michael; Frogel, Jay A.; O'Connell, Robert; Hall, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A.; Kimble, Randy A.; McCarthy, Patrick; Paresce, Francesco; Saha, Abhijit; Walker, Alistair R.; Silk, Joe; Sirianni, Marco; Trauger, John; Windhorst, Rogier; Young, Erick

    2010-11-01

    We present narrow band, continuum subtracted H α, [S ii], H β, [O iii] and [O ii] data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope in the nearby dwarf starburst galaxy NGC 4214. From these images, we identify seventeen new planetary nebula candidates, and seven supernova remnant candidates. We use the observed emission line luminosity function of the planetary nebulae to establish a new velocity-independent distance to NGC 4214. We conclude that the PNLF technique gives a reddening independent distance to NGC 4214 of 3.19±0.36 Mpc, and that our current best-estimate of the distance to this galaxy ids 2.98±0.13 Mpc.

  4. Extended near infrared emission from visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.; Werner, M. W.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    Extended near infrared (2 to 5 microns) emission was observed from three visual reflection nebulae, NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. The emission from each nebula consists of a smooth continuum, which can be described by a greybody with a color temperature of 1000 K, and emission features at 3.3 and 3.4 microns. The continuum emission cannot be explained by free-free emission, reflected light, or field stars, or by thermal emission from grains, with commonly accepted ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, which are in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field. A possible explanation is thermal emission from grains with extremely low ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, or from grains with a temperature determined by mechanisms other than equilibrium radiative heating. Another possibility is continuum fluorescence.

  5. Extended near-infrared emission from visual reflection nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellgren, K.; Werner, M. W.; Dinerstein, H. L.

    1983-01-01

    Extended near infrared (2 to 5 microns) emission was observed from three visual reflection nebulae, NGC 7023, 2023, and 2068. The emission from each nebula consists of a smooth continuum, which can be described by a greybody with a color temperature of 1000 K, and emission features at 3.3 and 3.4 microns. The continuum emission cannot be explained by free-free emission, reflected light, or field stars, or by thermal emission from grains, with commonly accepted ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, which are in equilibrium with the stellar radiation field. A possible explanation is thermal emission from grains with extremely low ratios of infrared to ultraviolet emissivities, or from grains with a temperature determined by mechanisms other than equilibrium radiative heating. Another possibility is continuum fluorescence. Previously announced in STAR N83-25629

  6. Detection of submillimeter polarization in the Orion Nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, R.H.; Dragovan, M.; Novak, G.

    1984-10-01

    Linear polarization of the submillimeter (270 micron) continuum radiation from two regions of Orion was observed: one centered on the Kleinmann-Low Nebula and one centered on the 400 micron peak 1.5' south of the nebula. The polarizations measured for these regions are P (1.7 +/-0.4)% at phi 23 deg +/-7 deg and P (1.7 +/- 0.5)% at phi 27 deg +/- 7 deg respectively. A 2(sigma) upper limit, P or 1.6%, was found for the nebular W3(OH). The position angle at KL is orthogonal to that measured at 11 microns by Dyck and Beichman and at 11 and 20 microns by Knacke and Capps. The far-IR values for KL reported by Gull et. al. (approx 2%) and by Cudlip et al. (1 to 2% level) are consistent with the submillimeter results.

  7. The violent interstellar medium associated with the Carina Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, C.; Paul, J. A.; Pettini, M.

    1982-06-01

    The physical conditions and chemical composition of the interstellar medium in line to HD 93205, an O3V star in the Great Carina Nebula, were studied, using UV spectra. The two main high velocity components show different relative abundance patterns. The red shifted component shows no depletion. For the blue shifted component, the relative abundance pattern seems difficult to explain in terms of elements locked into grains. Its composition is attributed to mixing with freshly synthetized material ejected by a recent supernova explosion. One low velocity component is identified with the normal interstellar gas in the disk of the Galaxy. In this component, column densities of interstellar CIV and SiIV, free from contamination by circumstellar material, were measured. The other low velocity component is identified with the approaching part of the expanding ionized nebula around the Carina OB associations. It consists of a dense HII region in which the two conspicuous OI fine structure lines originate.

  8. Probing Shocks of the Young Planetary Nebula NGC 7027

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montez, Rodolfo

    2013-09-01

    The rapid evolution of the planetary nebula NGC 7027 provides a rare glimpse at the evolution of the shocks. We propose a detailed spatial and spectroscopic study of the shock conditions in NGC 7027 that will enhance and bridge our understanding of the shocks seen in other planetary nebula. Comparison between the Cycle 1 observation and a new Cycle 15 observation will (i) confirm the presence of the two components in the extended X-ray emission, (ii) measure the changes (spatial and spectral) in the components, and, (iii) provide a valuable trove of tests and inputs for shock conditions and hydrodynamical simulations. We rely on the unprecedented spatial resolution and soft-sensitivity of Chandra.

  9. BY POPULAR DEMAND: HUBBLE OBSERVES THE HORSEHEAD NEBULA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Rising from a sea of dust and gas like a giant seahorse, the Horsehead nebula is one of the most photographed objects in the sky. NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took a close-up look at this heavenly icon, revealing the cloud's intricate structure. This detailed view of the horse's head is being released to celebrate the orbiting observatory's eleventh anniversary. Produced by the Hubble Heritage Project, this picture is a testament to the Horsehead's popularity. Internet voters selected this object for the orbiting telescope to view. The Horsehead, also known as Barnard 33, is a cold, dark cloud of gas and dust, silhouetted against the bright nebula, IC 434. The bright area at the top left edge is a young star still embedded in its nursery of gas and dust. But radiation from this hot star is eroding the stellar nursery. The top of the nebula also is being sculpted by radiation from a massive star located out of Hubble's field of view. Only by chance does the nebula roughly resemble the head of a horse. Its unusual shape was first discovered on a photographic plate in the late 1800s. Located in the constellation Orion, the Horsehead is a cousin of the famous pillars of dust and gas known as the Eagle nebula. Both tower-like nebulas are cocoons of young stars. The Horsehead nebula lies just south of the bright star Zeta Orionis, which is easily visible to the unaided eye as the left-hand star in the line of three that form Orion's Belt. Amateur astronomers often use the Horsehead as a test of their observing skills; it is known as one of the more difficult objects to see visually in an amateur-sized telescope. The magnificent extent of the Horsehead is best appreciated in a new wide-field image of the nebula being released today by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, taken by Travis Rector with the National Science Foundation's 0.9 meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ. This popular celestial target was the clear winner among more

  10. Forbidden O III electron temperature in planetary nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, F. P.; Aggarwal, K. M.

    1989-06-01

    The electron-temperature-sensitive emission-line ratio I(2s2 2p2 1D - 2s2 2p2 1S)/I(2s2 2p2 3P1,2 - 2s2 2p2 1D) = I(4363 A)/I(4959 + 5007 A) has been determined based upon relative level populations for O III obtained using impact excitation rates calculated with the R-matrix code. Results are presented for a temperature range which is applicable to planetary nebulae. Electron temperatures derived from the observed R values of several planetary nebulae agree well with those determined from electron-temperature-sensitive line ratios is such other species as (semiforbidden C III)/C II, forbidden N II, and forbidden Ar II.

  11. Magellanic Cloud Planetary Nebula with Suspected Strong Forbidden Iron Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, L. H.; Czyzak, S. J.

    1983-03-01

    The relatively high-excitation nebula (Westerlund-Smith object 25) in the large Magellanic cloud shows prominent forbidden lines of [Ar IV], the close [Ne IV] pair λ 4724, 4726, [Ca V] λ 5309, [Fe V] λ 4227, and probably [Fe VI] and [Fe VII], as well. A conventional interpretation of observations secured with a vidicon detector at the Cerro Tololo 4-m telescopes indicates an essentially ``normal'' helium abundance but depletions of N, O, Ne, and other elements with respect to our own galaxy. When a comparison is made with diffuse nebulae or H II regions in the large Magellanic cloud, we find helium to be more abundant, oxygen to be depleted, and nitrogen, neon, and argon to be comparable. The abundance of sulfur is uncertain. Iron in the gaseous phase is certainly more plentiful than in conventional planetaries.

  12. Surface mapping of selected regions in the Orion Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, P. M.; Turnrose, B. E.; Harvel, C. A.; Thompson, R. W.; Mallama, A. D.

    1981-01-01

    Low dispersion, large aperture, ultraviolet spectra of selected regions in the Orion Nebula were obtained with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) scientific instrument. Spectra obtained at 35 contiguous locations defining a mosaic within the nebula were used to generate monochromatic images of high spatial resolution at the wavelengths of the ultraviolet emission lines. Image processing techniques were utilized to generate and analyze these ultraviolet surface maps. The imagery at the three wavelengths studied shows definite differences in the spatial distribution of emission from the CII CIII and OII ions. Ways of using the imagery to determine ionization structure and C/O abundance ratios throughout the regions observed are developed, in addition to means of analyzing the extensive continuum measurements in terms of dust scattering characteristics.

  13. Preliminary report on IUE spectra of the Crab Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, K.; Gull, T. R.; Maran, S. P.; Stecher, T. P.; Kafatos, M.; Trimble, V. L.

    1981-01-01

    The Crab Nebula is marginally observable with the IUE. Observations of the optically brightest filamentary regions, made with IUE in August 1979, show the C IV lambda 1549, He II lambda 1640, and C III lambda 1909 emission lines. The intensities of these lines were compared with the visual wavelength data. It appears that carbon is not overabundant in the Crab; carbon/oxygen is approximately normal and oxygen is slightly scarcer than normal as a fraction of the total mass.

  14. The first published chart of the Andromeda Nebula, 1667

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gingerich, Owen

    2014-06-01

    The Parisian astronomer Ismaél Bullialdus (1605-1694) is known for his planetary tables (Astronomia philolaica, 1645) based on a geometrical approximation to the Keplerian ellipse, and for his long correspondence with the Danzig astronomer Johannes Hevelius and with Christiaan Huygens. Bullialdus became interested in the nascent study of variable stars, and in 1667 published a small pamphlet with two contributions, one on Mira Ceti and the other on the nebula in Andromeda. He found a manuscript portraying the nebula with the date 1428, and because Tycho Brahe never mentioned a nebula in Andromeda, Bullialdus conjectured that this object was a variable that had disappeared in the intervening era. “We conclude this since this conglomeration was observed neither by Hipparchus nor anyone else in antiquity, nor in the previous age by Tycho, nor in the age of our forefathers like Bayer.” His publication included a handsome engraving of the image of Andromeda and the position of the nebula, its first printed chart. I recently acquired a copy of this rare pamphlet, Ad astronomos monita duo, and realized that the image matched a manuscript now in the Gotha Research Library, a 15th-century Latin version based on the work of the tenth-century Islamic astronomer, al-Sufi. The manuscript does not carry the name of al-Sufi, and hence Bullialdus had no real clue about its origin or its date of composition. Paul Kunitzsch (The Arabs and the Stars, 1989, Article XI, “The Astronomer Abu ’l-Husayn al-Sufi”) has identified a group of eight “Latin al-Sufi” manuscripts from this period, scattered in European libraries, but only the one now in Gotha is an exact match to Bullialdus’ engraving. The al-Sufi manuscript was given to the Gotha Library in 1798 by Duke Ernst II of Saxonia-Gotha-Altenburg, who must have acquired it from France sometime in the 18th century.

  15. Planetary nebulae and their mimics: The MASH-MEN Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissay, Rozenn; Parker, Quentin A.; Frew, David J.; Bojicic, Ivan

    2012-08-01

    The total number of true, likely and possible planetary nebulae (PN) now known in the Milky Way is about 3000, approximately twice the number known a decade ago. The new discoveries are a legacy of the recent availability of wide-field, narrowband imaging surveys, primarily in the light of Hα. The two most important are the AAO/UKST SuperCOSMOS Hα survey SHS and the Isaac Newton photometric Hα survey IPHAS, which are responsible for most of the new discoveries. A serious problem with previous PN catalogs is that several different kinds of astrophysical objects are able to mimic PN in some of their observed properties leading to significant contamination. These objects include H~II regions and Strömgren zones around young O/B stars, reflection nebulae, Wolf-Rayet ejecta, supernova remnants, Herbig-Haro objects, young stellar objects, B[e] stars, symbiotic stars and outflows, late-type stars, cataclysmic variables, low redshift emission-line galaxies, and even image/detector flaws. PN catalogs such as the Macquarie/AAO/Strasbourg Hα Planetary Nebula catalog (MASH) have been carefully vetted to remove these mimics using the wealth of new wide-field multi-wavelength data and our 100% follow-up spectroscopy to produce a compilation of new PN discoveries of high purity. During this process significant numbers of PN mimics have been identified. The aim of this project is to compile these MASH rejects into a catalog of Miscellaneous Emission Nebulae (MEN) and to highlight the most unusual and interesting examples. A new global analysis of these MEN objects is underway before publishing the MEN catalog online categorizing objects by type together with their spectra and multi-wavelength images.

  16. THE LINE POLARIZATION WITHIN A GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULA

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Smith, Paul S.; Schmidt, Gary D.; Dey, Arjun

    2011-04-01

    Recent theoretical work has suggested that Ly{alpha} nebulae could be substantially polarized in the Ly{alpha} emission line, depending on the geometry, kinematics, and powering mechanism at work. Polarization observations can therefore provide a useful constraint on the source of ionization in these systems. In this Letter, we present the first Ly{alpha} polarization measurements for a giant Ly{alpha} nebula at z{approx} 2.656. We do not detect any significant linear polarization of the Ly{alpha} emission: P{sub Ly{alpha}} = 2.6% {+-} 2.8% (corrected for statistical bias) within a single large aperture. The current data also do not show evidence for the radial polarization gradient predicted by some theoretical models. These results rule out singly scattered Ly{alpha} (e.g., from the nearby active galactic nucleus, AGN) and may be inconsistent with some models of backscattering in a spherical outflow. However, the effects of seeing, diminished signal-to-noise ratio, and angle averaging within radial bins make it difficult to put strong constraints on the radial polarization profile. The current constraints may be consistent with higher density outflow models, spherically symmetric infall models, photoionization by star formation within the nebula or the nearby AGN, resonant scattering, or non-spherically symmetric cold accretion (i.e., along filaments). Higher signal-to-noise ratio data probing to higher spatial resolution will allow us to harness the full diagnostic power of polarization observations in distinguishing between theoretical models of giant Ly{alpha} nebulae.

  17. Interstellar Organics, the Solar Nebula, and Saturn's Satellite Phoebe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Cruikshank, Dale P.

    2014-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar medium inventory of organic material (Pendleton et al. 1994, Pe 2002) was likely incorporated into the molecular cloud in which the solar nebula condensed. This provided the feedstock for the fo planets, and the smaller icy bodies in the region outside Neptune's orbit (transneptunian objects, or TNOs). Saturn's satellites Phoeb open a window to the composition of one class of TNO as revealed by the near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIMS) on the Cass Phoebe (mean diameter 213 km) is a former TNO now orbiting Saturn. VIMS spectral maps of Phoebe's surface reveal a complex consisting of prominent aromatic (CH) and aliphatic hydrocarbon (CH2, CH3) absorption bands (3.2-3.6 µm). Phoebe is the source encircling Saturn, and from which particles (5-20 µm size) spiral inward toward Saturn. They encounter Iapetus and Hyperion wh blanket the native H2O ice of those two bodies. Quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon bands on Iapetus demonstrates that aroma abundant as aliphatic CH2+CH3, significantly exceeding the strength of the aromatic signature in interplanetary dust particles, com carbonaceous meteorites (Cruikshank et al. 2013). A similar excess of aromatics over aliphatics is seen in the qualitative analysis o itself (Dalle Ore et al. 2012). The Iapetus aliphatic hydrocarbons show CH2/CH3 4, which is larger than the value found in the di as Phoebe is a primitive body that formed in the outer regions of the solar nebula and has preserved some of the original nebula inv understanding the content and degree of processing of that nebular material. There are other Phoebe-like TNOs that are presently b in the organic spectral region, but JWST will open that possibility for a number of objects. We now need to explore and understand organic-bearing Solar System material to the solar nebula and the inventory of ISM materials incorporated therein.

  18. A Broadband Emission Model of Magnetar Wind Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuta J.

    2016-08-01

    Angular momentum loss by the plasma wind is considered as a universal feature of isolated neutron stars including magnetars. The wind nebulae that are powered by magnetars allow us to compare the wind properties and the spin evolution of magnetars with those of rotation-powered pulsars (RPPs). In this paper, we construct a broadband emission model of magnetar wind nebulae (MWNe). This model is similar to past studies of young pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) around RPPs, but is modified for the application to MWNe that have far less observational information than the young PWNe. We apply the model to the MWN around the youngest (˜1 kyr) magnetar, 1E 1547.0-5408, which has the largest spin-down power L spin among all the magnetars. However, the MWN is faint because of the low L spin of 1E 1547.0-5408 when compared to the young RPPs. Since most parameters are not well constrained by only an X-ray flux upper limit of the MWN, we adopt the model’s parameters from the young PWN Kes 75 around PSR J1846-0258, which is a peculiar RPP showing magnetar-like behaviors. The model predicts that γ-ray flux will be detected in a future TeV γ-ray observation by CTA (Cherenkov Telescope Array). The MWN spectrum does not allow us to test the hypothesis that 1E 1547.0-5408 had a period of milliseconds at its birth because the particles injected during the early phase of evolution suffered from severe adiabatic and synchrotron losses. Furthermore, both observational and theoretical studies of the wind nebulae around magnetars are required to constrain the wind and the spin-down properties of magnetars.

  19. Millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado nebula

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, D.; Oka, T.; Tanaka, K.; Matsumura, S.; Miura, K.; Takekawa, S.

    2014-08-10

    We report the results of millimeter-wave molecular line observations of the Tornado Nebula (G357.7-0.1), which is a bright radio source behind the Galactic center region. A 15' × 15' area was mapped in the J = 1-0 lines of CO, {sup 13}CO, and HCO{sup +} with the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope. The Very Large Array archival data of OH at 1720 MHz were also reanalyzed. We found two molecular clouds with separate velocities, V{sub LSR} = –14 km s{sup –1} and +5 km s{sup –1}. These clouds show rough spatial anti-correlation. Both clouds are associated with OH 1720 MHz emissions in the area overlapping with the Tornado Nebula. The spatial and velocity coincidence indicates violent interaction between the clouds and the Tornado Nebula. Modestly excited gas prefers the position of the Tornado 'head' in the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, also suggesting the interaction. Virial analysis shows that the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud is more tightly bound by self-gravity than the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud. We propose a formation scenario for the Tornado Nebula; the +5 km s{sup –1} cloud collided into the –14 km s{sup –1} cloud, generating a high-density layer behind the shock front, which activates a putative compact object by Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion to eject a pair of bipolar jets.

  20. The Hubble Heritage Image of the Crab Nebula Supernova Remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, W. P.; English, J.; Bond, H. E.; Christian, C. A.; Frattare, L.; Hamilton, F.; Levay, Z.; Noll, K. S.

    2000-05-01

    The Hubble Heritage Project has the aim of providing the public with pictorially striking images of celestial objects obtained with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Here we present a 5-color Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) image of the Crab Nebula, a ~950 year old supernova remnant located 6500 light-years distant in the constellation Taurus. The images were obtained in 1995 January and April, and the science investigation reporting results was published by Blair, W. P., et al. (1997, ApJS, 109, 473--480). Over 10 hours of exposure time through 5 separate optical continuum band and emission-line filters were used to study size scales and ionization structures of the filaments and newly synthesized dust within the expanding ejecta. The Heritage version of these data shows several important aspects of the Crab Nebula all in one spectacular image. The continuum image shows stars, including the enigmatic pulsar (the collapsed core of the original star) and the ghostly diffuse synchrotron nebula energized by the pulsar. The synchrotron nebula in turn heats and ionizes the surrounding clumpy filaments of gas and dust visible in the emission line images. These filaments are the supernova ejecta that were expelled during the explosion and are now expanding outward from the pulsar at high speed. The different colors in the picture show optical emission lines of hydrogen (orange), nitrogen (red), sulfur (pink) and oxygen (bluish-green). The subtle changes in color from one filament to the next arise because of varying temperatures and densities of the gas, and variable chemical abundances of the ``star stuff," or the doppler shifting of emission into or out of the various narrow filter bandpasses. Support for this work was provided by NASA through grant numbers GO-07632.01-96A and GO-5354.04-93A from the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.