Science.gov

Sample records for 2006-2007 balloon flight

  1. Initial Results from the ANITA 2006-2007 Balloon Flight

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /UC, Irvine

    2011-11-16

    We report initial results of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos. ANITA flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses that might be due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. In our initial high-threshold robust analysis, no neutrino candidates are seen, with no physics background. In a non-signal horizontal-polarization channel, we do detect 6 events consistent with radio impulses from extensive air showers, which helps to validate the effectiveness of our method. Upper limits derived from our analysis now begin to eliminate the highest cosmogenic neutrino models.

  2. The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna ultra-high energy neutrino detector: Design, performance, and sensitivity for 2006-2007 balloon flight

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; DuVernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C. L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Learned, J. G.

    2009-05-23

    In this article, we present a comprehensive report on the experimental details of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload, including the design philosophy and realization, physics simulations, performance of the instrument during its first Antarctic flight completed in January of 2007, and expectations for the limiting neutrino detection sensitivity.

  3. The In-flight Spectroscopic Performance of the Swift XRT CCD Camera During 2006-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godet, O.; Beardmore, A.P.; Abbey, A.F.; Osborne, J.P.; Page, K.L.; Evans, P.; Starling, R.; Wells, A.A.; Angelini, L.; Burrows, D.N.; Kennea, J.; Campana, S.; Chincarini, G.; Citterio, O.; Cusumano, G.; LaParola, V.; Mangano, V.; Mineo, T.; Giommi, P.; Perri, M.; Capalbi, M.; Tamburelli, F.

    2007-01-01

    The Swift X-ray Telescope focal plane camera is a front-illuminated MOS CCD, providing a spectral response kernel of 135 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV as measured before launch. We describe the CCD calibration program based on celestial and on-board calibration sources, relevant in-flight experiences, and developments in the CCD response model. We illustrate how the revised response model describes the calibration sources well. Comparison of observed spectra with models folded through the instrument response produces negative residuals around and below the Oxygen edge. We discuss several possible causes for such residuals. Traps created by proton damage on the CCD increase the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) over time. We describe the evolution of the CTI since the launch and its effect on the CCD spectral resolution and the gain.

  4. Mars Balloon Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffery L.; Pauken, Michael T.; Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.; Walsh, Gerald J.; Kulczycki, Eric A.; Fairbrother, Debora; Shreves, Chris; Lachenmeier, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a set of four Earth atmosphere flight test experiments on prototype helium superpressure balloons designed for Mars. Three of the experiments explored the problem of aerial deployment and inflation, using the cold, low density environment of the Earth's stratosphere at an altitude of 30-32 km as a proxy for the Martian atmosphere. Auxiliary carrier balloons were used in three of these test flights to lift the Mars balloon prototype and its supporting system from the ground to the stratosphere where the experiment was conducted. In each case, deployment and helium inflation was initiated after starting a parachute descent of the payload at 5 Pa dynamic pressure, thereby mimicking the conditions expected at Mars after atmospheric entry and high speed parachute deceleration. Upward and downward looking video cameras provided real time images from the flights, with additional data provided by onboard temperature, pressure and GPS sensors. One test of a 660 cc pumpkin balloon was highly successful, achieving deployment, inflation and separation of the balloon from the flight train at the end of inflation; however, some damage was incurred on the balloon during this process. Two flight tests of 12 m diameter spherical Mylar balloons were not successful, although some lessons were learned based on the failure analyses. The final flight experiment consisted of a ground-launched 12 m diameter spherical Mylar balloon that ascended to the designed 30.3 km altitude and successfully floated for 9.5 hours through full noontime daylight and into darkness, after which the telemetry system ran out of electrical power and tracking was lost. The altitude excursions for this last flight were +/-75 m peak to peak, indicating that the balloon was essentially leak free and functioning correctly. This provides substantial confidence that this balloon design will fly for days or weeks at Mars if it can be deployed and inflated without damage.

  5. Power supplies for long duration balloon flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichfield, Ernest W.

    Long duration balloon flights require more electrical power than can be carried in primary batteries. This paper provides design information for selecting rechargeable batteries and charging systems. Solar panels for recharging batteries are discussed, with particular emphasis on cells mounting suitable for balloon flights and panel orientation for maximum power collection. Since efficient utilization of power is so important, modern DC to DC power conversion techniques are presented. On short flights of 1 day or less, system designers have not been greatly concerned with battery weight. But, with the advent of long duration balloon flights using superpressure balloons, anchor balloon systems, and RACOON balloon techniques, power supplies and their weight become of prime importance. The criteria for evaluating power systems for long duration balloon flights is performance per unit weight. Instrumented balloon systems have flown 44 days. For these very long duration flights, batteries recharged from solar cells are the only solution. For intermediate flight duration, say less than 10 days, the system designer should seriously consider using primary cells. The National Center for Atmospheric Research is sponsored by the National Science Foundation. Any opinions, findings and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  6. Absorption spectrometer balloon flight and iodine investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    A high altitude balloon flight experiment to determine the technical feasibility of employing absorption spectroscopy to measure SO2 and NO2 gases in the earth's atmosphere from above the atmospheric ozone layer is discussed. In addition to the balloon experiment the contract includes a ground-based survey of natural I emissions from geological sources and studies of the feasibility of mapping I2 from spacecraft. This report is divided into three major sections as follows: (1) the planning engineering and execution of the balloon experiment, (2) data reduction and analysis of the balloon data, and (3) the results of the I2 phase of the contract.

  7. Test flights of the NASA ultra long duration balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, H.

    The NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon development project is attempting to extend the potential flight durations for large scientific balloon payloads. The culmination of each of the development steps has been the fabrication and test flight of progressively larger balloons. This new super-pressure balloon is a pumpkin balloon design. This paper concentrates on the super-pressure balloon development test flights that have been, and are currently being planned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program Office at Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. Two Ultra Long Duration balloon test flights took place from Australia in early 2001. The results from these flights, as well as the challenges presented, will be discussed. With these lessons learned and incorporating both material and design improvements, a test flight of a full-scale 610,500m3 balloon with a 2,800 kg suspended load will be completed in Spring of 2002 from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. This balloon, the largest single celled super- pressure balloon ever flown, has been sized to satisfy the requirements for the planned ULDB CREAM mission in late 2003. A description of the balloon design, including the modifications made as a result of the lessons learned from the two Australia flights, will be presented. The results, highlighting balloon performance, from the Spring 2002 test flight will be presented. This will include information related to the balloon preparation, flight operations, and flight performance. A review of the radiative environmental influences on the balloon related to this flight will be presented. A second test flight of a full-scale Ultra Long Duration Balloon is scheduled for December of 2002. This flight is expected to be one orbit or approximately 15 days. The plans for this Southern Hemisphere, Australia launched, global flight will also be presented.

  8. Test flights of the NASA ultra-long duration balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, H. M.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ultra-Long Duration Balloon development project is attempting to extend the potential flight durations for large scientific balloon payloads. The culmination of each of the development steps has been the fabrication and test flight of progressively larger balloons. This new super-pressure balloon is a pumpkin balloon design. This paper concentrates on the super-pressure balloon development test flights that have been, and are currently being planned by the NASA Balloon Program Office at Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility. Descriptions of two test flights from early 2001 are presented along with lessons learned. Results are also presented of a July 2002 test flight of a full-scale 610,500 m 3 balloon with a 2800 kg suspended load that incorporated the lessons learned.

  9. Measurements of Load Train Motion on a Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruner, Timothy D.; Olney, David J.; Russo, Angela M.

    2005-01-01

    Attitude measurements using gyros and magnetometers placed on a stratospheric balloon during a non-pointed test flight were used to observe the natural azimuth and elevation motions of a balloon/load train/gondola at an altitude of 36 km over a total flight time of 400 minutes. Time traces of the entire flight are presented. This flight, conducted under nominal atmospheric conditions, had significant motion about the azimuth. Some discussion on balloon disturbances is also included.

  10. EUSO-Balloon: The first flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, Valentina; Osteria, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    EUSO-Balloon is a pathfinder mission for JEM-EUSO, the near-UV telescope proposed to be installed on board the International Space Station (ISS). The main objective of this pathfinder mission is to perform a full scale end-to-end test of all the key technologies of JEM-EUSO detectors and to measure the UV background. The JEM-EUSO instrument consists of UV telescope designed to focus the signal of the UV tracks generated by Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays propagating in Earth's atmosphere, onto a finely pixelized UV camera. The EUSO-Balloon instrument, smaller than the one designed for the ISS, was launched on August 2014 from Timmins (Ontario, Canada). The flight lasted about five hours and the instrument reached a float altitude of about 40 km. From this altitude the telescope registered, at a rate of 400 000 frames/s, the nightglow background on forests, lakes and clouds, as well as city lights and artificial air showers tracks generated by means of a laser installed on an helicopter flying inside its field of view. In this contribution we will describe the instrument and its performance during the first flight.

  11. Sounding rocket and balloon flight safety philosophy and methodologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beyma, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    NASA's sounding rocket and balloon goal is to successfully and safely perform scientific research. This is reflected in the design, planning, and conduct of sounding rocket and balloon operations. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the sounding rocket and balloon scientific community with flight safety philosophy and methodologies, and how range safety affects their programs. This paper presents the flight safety philosophy for protecting the public against the risk created by the conduct of sounding rocket and balloon operations. The flight safety criteria used to implement this philosophy are defined and the methodologies used to calculate mission risk are described.

  12. NASA balloon design and flight - Philosophy and criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. S., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA philosophy and criteria for the design and flight of scientific balloons are set forth and discussed. The thickness of balloon films is standardized at 20.3 microns to isolate potential film problems, and design equations are given for specific balloon parameters. Expressions are given for: flight-stress index, total required thickness, cap length, load-tape rating, and venting-duct area. The balloon design criteria were used in the design of scientific balloons under NASA auspices since 1986, and the resulting designs are shown to be 95 percent effective. These results represent a significant increase in the effectiveness of the balloons and therefore indicate that the design criteria are valuable. The criteria are applicable to four balloon volume classes in combination with seven payload ranges.

  13. Flight Qualification of the NASA's Super Pressure Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, Henry; Said, Magdi; Fairbrother, Debora

    Designs of new balloons to support space science require a number of actual flights under various flight conditions to qualify them to as standard balloon flight offerings to the science community. Development of the new Super Pressure Balloon for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Balloon Program Office has entailed employing new design, analysis, and production techniques to advance the state of the art. Some of these advances have been evolutionary steps and some have been revolutionary steps requiring a maturing understanding of the materials, designs, and manufacturing approaches. The NASA Super Pressure Balloon development end goal is to produce a flight vehicle that is qualified to carry a ton of science instrumentation, at an altitude greater than 33 km while maintaining a near constant pressure altitude for extended periods of up to 100 days, and at any latitude on the globe. The NASA’s Balloon Program Office has pursued this development in a carefully executed incremental approach by gradually increasing payload carrying capability and increasing balloon volume to reach these end goal. A very successful test flight of a ~200,700 m3 balloon was launch in late 2008 from Antarctica. This balloon flew for over 54 days at a constant altitude and circled the Antarctic continent almost three times. A larger balloon was flown from Antarctica in early 2011. This ~422,400 m3 flew at a constant altitude for 22 days making one circuit around Antarctica. Although the performance was nominal, the flight was terminated via command to recover high valued assets from the payload. The balloon designed to reach the program goals is a ~532,200 m3 pumpkin shaped Super Pressure Balloon. A test flight of this balloon was launched from the Swedish Space Corporation’s Esrange Balloon Launch Facilities near Kiruna, Sweden on 14 August, 2012. This flight was another success for this development program. Valuable information was gained from this short test

  14. Medium energy gamma ray astronomy with transpacific balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zych, A. D.; Jennings, M. C.; White, R. S.; Dayton, B.

    1981-01-01

    Transpacific balloon flights with the University of California, Riverside (UCR) double scatter telescope are discussed. With flight durations from 5 days up to perhaps 15 days the long observation times necessary for medium energy (1-30 MeV) gamma ray astronomy can be obtained. These flights would be made under the auspices of the Joint U.S.-Japan Balloon Flight Program at NASA. It is proposed that flights can provide at least 30 hours of observation time per flight for many discrete source candidates and 120 hours for detecting low intensity cosmic gamma ray bursts.

  15. New Design Concept and Flight Test of Superpressure Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izutsu, Naoki; Yajima, Nobuyuki; Ohta, Shigeo; Honda, Hideyuki; Kurokawa, Haruhisa; Matsushima, Kiyoho

    A new ballon design method named ‘three-dimensional gore design’ was developed. It is based on a pumpkin shape balloon with bulges of small radii between adjacent load tapes without the help of film extensibility. This type of balloon can be manufactured with gores having a size larger than that of the conventional gore. The sides of each gore are fixed to the adjacent short load tapes with controlled shortening rates. The gore length is chosen so as not to create any meridional tension. Hence, the superpressure limit of these balloons is simply given as film strength divided by bulge radius. As the limit does not depend on the balloon size, a large balloon with a high superpressure limit can be easily constructed without strong films. A test flight as well as indoor inflation and burst experiment showed that this new design method can realize a larger and lighter superpressure balloon capable of suspending a heavy payload in the stratosphere.

  16. Results of the 1970 balloon flight solar cell standardization program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    For the eighth consective year, high-altitude calibration of solar cells was accomplished with the aid of free-flight balloons. Flights were conducted to an altitude of 36,576 m which is above 99.5% of earth's atmosphere where all water vapor levels and significant ozone bands are absent. Solar cells calibrated in this manner are significant used as intensity references in solar simulators and in terrestrial sunlight. Discussed is the method employed for high altitude balloon flight solar cell calibration. Also presented are data collected on 52 standard solar cells on two flights conducted in 1970. Solar cells flown repeatedly on successive flights have shown correlation of better than + or - 1.0%.

  17. ARL Supplementary Statistics, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Les, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents statistics on how Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries spend money on electronic resources. This report indicates that 108 ARL libraries purchased 25,006,758 electronic books. In 2006-2007, there was an ARL median of 243,725 acquisitions of electronic books (this includes one institution that purchased…

  18. USV test flight by stratospheric balloon: Preliminary mission analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardillo, A.; Musso, I.; Ibba, R.; Cosentino, O.

    The Unmanned Space Vehicle test flights will use a 7 m 1300 kg aircraft. The first three launches will take place at the Italian Space Agency ASI base in Trapani Milo, Sicily, through a stratospheric balloon that will drop the aircraft at a predefined height. After free fall acceleration to transonic velocities, the parachute deployment will allow a safe splash down in the central Mediterranean Sea. The goal of this article is to show the preliminary analysis results for the first USV flight. We carried out a statistical study for the year 2000 2003, evaluating the typical summer and winter launch windows of the Trapani Milo base. First, in the center Mediterranean, we define safe recovery areas. They cannot be reached during the balloon ascending phase so, after a sufficiently long floating part able to catch the open sea, the balloon will go down to the release height (24 km). The simulation foresees a 400,000 m3 balloon and 3 valves for the altitude transfer. A safe splash down must occur far enough from the nearest coast: the minimum distance is considered around 25 km. The vehicle should be released at a distance, from the nearest coast, greater than this minimum amount plus the USV model maximum horizontal translation, during its own trajectory from balloon separation to splash down. In this way we define safe release areas for some possible translations. Winter stratospheric winds are less stable. The winter average flight duration is 7 h and it is probably too long for the diurnal recovery requirement and its scheduled procedures. Comparing past stratospheric balloons flights and trajectories computed using measured meteorological data (analysis), with their predictions made using forecast models and soundings, we obtain the standard deviation of the trajectory forecast uncertainty at the balloon aircraft separation. Two cases are taken into account: predictions made 24 and 6 h before the launch. Assuming a Gaussian latitudinal uncertainty distribution for

  19. JACEE long duration balloon flights. [Japanese-American Cooperative Emulsion Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnett, T.; Iwai, J.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J.; Fountain, W.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J.; Hayashi, T.; Holynski, R.; Jones, W. V.

    1989-01-01

    JACEE balloon-borne emulsion chamber detectors are used to observe the spectra and interactions of cosmic ray protons and nuclei in the energy range 1 to 100A TeV. Experiments with long duration mid-latitude balloon flights and characteristics of the detector system that make it ideal for planned Antarctic balloon flights are discussed.

  20. Preliminary feasibility study of sea-anchored stratospheric balloon for long duration flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Daisuke

    Long duration flights are required for many scientific observations on stratospheric balloons. The flight duration of a super-pressure balloon is limited mainly by the flight distance due to limitations of the telemetry link, recovery possibility and national borders. A stratospheric super-pressure balloon which is anchored to the sea would have following ca-pabilities. 1) Long duration flight 2) Easy telemetry link to ground station 3) Wide launch window 4) Rapid gondola recovery 5) Fixed-point observation 6) Safety flight operation On the other hand, free-flying super-pressure balloons would be required to develop a flight trajectory control system for the long duration flight. Conventional quasi-static launch of a tethered bal-loon is difficult to ascent into the stratosphere through the jet stream. Because the dynamic pressure of the jet stream is significantly high for the balloon structure. The sea-anchored stratospheric balloon system consists of a long tether, a tether reel and a drag sail at the tether end. The flight sequence of the balloon is as follows. 1) Balloon launch with the reeled-in tether 2) Level flight at a designed altitude on the sea 3) Reel-out the tether with the drag sail 4) Sink the drag sail into the sea 5) Anchor the balloon by the drag sail 6) Observation 7) Cut the tether and terminate the flight The sea-anchored balloon does not require additional ground systems. The flight operation is same as normal balloon flights except for the reel-out and the cut of the tether. The sea-anchored balloon would have an appropriate altitude for its feasibility. The lower balloon altitude in the stratosphere results in significant increase of the dynamic pressure due to the jet stream, while the stress on the tether increases with increasing the balloon altitude by its own weight. In this study, the feasibility of the sea-anchored ballon is investigated in particular on the tether strength, balloon altitude and the system mass based on the present

  1. REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Joseph H.; Parashar, Manu; Lewis, Nancy Jo

    2008-08-15

    The Real Time System Operations (RTSO) 2006-2007 project focused on two parallel technical tasks: (1) Real-Time Applications of Phasors for Monitoring, Alarming and Control; and (2) Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (RTVSA) Prototype Tool. The overall goal of the phasor applications project was to accelerate adoption and foster greater use of new, more accurate, time-synchronized phasor measurements by conducting research and prototyping applications on California ISO's phasor platform - Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) -- that provide previously unavailable information on the dynamic stability of the grid. Feasibility assessment studies were conducted on potential application of this technology for small-signal stability monitoring, validating/improving existing stability nomograms, conducting frequency response analysis, and obtaining real-time sensitivity information on key metrics to assess grid stress. Based on study findings, prototype applications for real-time visualization and alarming, small-signal stability monitoring, measurement based sensitivity analysis and frequency response assessment were developed, factory- and field-tested at the California ISO and at BPA. The goal of the RTVSA project was to provide California ISO with a prototype voltage security assessment tool that runs in real time within California ISO?s new reliability and congestion management system. CERTS conducted a technical assessment of appropriate algorithms, developed a prototype incorporating state-of-art algorithms (such as the continuation power flow, direct method, boundary orbiting method, and hyperplanes) into a framework most suitable for an operations environment. Based on study findings, a functional specification was prepared, which the California ISO has since used to procure a production-quality tool that is now a part of a suite of advanced computational tools that is used by California ISO for reliability and congestion management.

  2. The NASA Balloon Program: Implementing a New Flight Program for the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, David L.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program continues to support the scientific community providing enhanced capabilities across a spectrum of balloon related disciplines. Long Duration Ballooning (LDB) continues to be a prominent element of the program with a mission model of a two flight campaign in each the Northern and Southern Hemispheres per year. A new LDB endurance record was achieved in Antarctica with the LDB/CREAM mission. Both polar and mid-latitude LDB capabilities continue to be on-going operational elements of the flight program. The Swedish Space Corporation/Esrange and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) inaugurated a joint European/U.S. capability for LDB balloon flights from Sweden to Canada in June 2005. This will complement the NASA/U.S. National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs achievement of more than a decade of successful long-duration flights around Antarctica. Most of Antarctic flights have flown one time around the South Pole in 8-20 days using conventional (zero differential pressure) balloons. One flight went twice around in 31 days and another went three times around in 42 days using conventional balloons. Balloon technology efforts have continued to broaden in scope and new plans for activities to provide advancements have been initiated. A new balloon volume record was established with the successful flight of a 1,700,000 m3 volume zero-pressure balloon. The capability to fly a 700 kg payload (200 kg science instrument) to 160,000 ft has also been demonstrated. A new super-pressure (constant volume) balloon is currently under development for future flights of 60 - 100 day at any latitude. The Ultra-Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) project for the development of a 100-day duration balloon capability has been progressing with additional ground and flight tests having been conducted. The Program has also continued to introduce new technology and improvements into flight

  3. Flight demonstration of a superpressure balloon by three-dimensional gore design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izutsu, N.; Yajima, N.; Ohta, S.; Honda, H.; Kurokawa, H.; Matsushima, K.

    On May 15, 1999, a balloon with a volume of 3,100 cubic meters was successfully launched from Sanriku Balloon Center of Japan. It became a superpressure balloon at 19.2km in altitude with 20% pressure difference to the ambient atmosphere. This is the first superpressure balloon capable of suspending a heavy payload. It was designed by the new 'three-dimensional gore design' method and was based on a pumpkin shape balloon with bulges of small radii between adjacent load tapes without the help of film extensibility. The balloon climbed up to 21.6km in altitude by dropping the ballast and held out against a 64% pressure difference over the ambient atmosphere. This flight test proved the capability of large stratospheric superpressure balloons by this new design method.

  4. Feasibility study of a sea-anchored stratospheric balloon for long-duration flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akita, Daisuke

    2012-08-01

    Sea-anchored balloons are stratospheric super-pressure balloons that are anchored to the sea. The sea-anchored balloon is a simple system that has the capability for long-duration flights, fixed-point observations, flexible launch windows, easy telemetry links to ground stations, and quick recoveries. Such balloons are not required to fly through the jet stream while tethered to the ground or sea, because the tether is deployed from a reel on the balloon after reaching a floating altitude. In this study, the feasibility of the sea-anchored balloon is investigated, with particular emphasis on the tether strength, balloon altitude, and system mass, based on the present technological level of the tether's specific strength. Although the wind distribution with altitude is a dominant factor for feasibility, a sea-anchored balloon with an altitude of about 25 km would be feasible if the velocity of the jet stream is sufficiently low. The sea-anchored balloon can be simply flight-tested, since additional ground facilities and special flight operations are not necessary.

  5. Implementation of a Novel Flight Tracking and Recovery Package for High Altitude Ballooning Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatima, Aqsa; Nekkanti, Sanjay; Mohan Suri, Ram; Shankar, Divya; Prasad Nagendra, Narayan

    High altitude ballooning is typically used for scientific missions including stratospheric observations, aerological observations, and near space environment technology demonstration. The usage of stratospheric balloons is a cost effective method to pursue several scientific and technological avenues against using satellites in the void of space. Based on the Indian Institute of Astrophysics (IIA) ballooning program for studying Comet ISON using high altitude ballooning, a cost effective flight tracking and recovery package for ballooning missions has been developed using open source hardware. The flight tracking and recovery package is based on using Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS) and has a redundant Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) based Global Positioning System (GPS) tracker. The APRS based tracker uses AX.25 protocol for transmission of the GPS coordinates (latitude, longitude, altitude, time) alongside the heading and health parameters of the board (voltage, temperature). APRS uses amateur radio frequencies where data is transmitted in packet messaging format, modulated by radio signals. The receiver uses Very High Frequency (VHF) transceiver to demodulate the APRS signals. The data received will be decoded using MixW (open source software). A bridge will be established between the decoding software and the APRS software. The flight path will be predicted before the launch and the real time position co-ordinates will be used to obtain the real time flight path that will be uploaded online using the bridge connection. We also use open source APRS software to decode and Google Earth to display the real time flight path. Several ballooning campaigns do not employ payload data transmission in real time, which makes the flight tracking and package recovery vital for data collection and recovery of flight instruments. The flight tracking and recovery package implemented in our missions allow independent development of the payload package

  6. Attenuation of Parachute Opening Shock Loads on Scientific Balloon Flight Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Erich

    ABSTRACT Attenuation of Parachute Opening Shock Loads on Scientific Balloon Flight Systems The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) has successfully flight tested a rip-stitch energy modulator for parachute decelerator systems flown on scientific balloons. The modulator was developed and fabricated by Pioneer Aerospace Corporation. The modulator reduces the post-line stretch rebound of the parachute system at flight termination thereby reducing the opening shock loads imparted on the balloon flight system. CSBF has conducted a total of four balloon flights with the modulator and flight test instrumentation, i.e., accelerometers and high definition video confirmed the modulator performance was excellent on all four flights. The violent translations of critical CSBF electronic packages located in the parachute decelerator systems were virtually eliminated. The complex and fragile science instruments were also spared the sharp pulse loading of canopy opening shock which is highly desired by the scientific community. This paper will describe the development and implementation of the rip-stitch energy modulator for scientific ballooning.

  7. Induced Radioactivity Measured in a Germanium Detector After a Long Duration Balloon Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, R.; Evans, L. G.; Floyed, S. R.; Drake, D. M.; Feldman, W. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Rester, A. C.

    1997-01-01

    A 13-day long duration balloon flight carrying a germanium detector was flown from Williams Field, Antartica in December 1992. After recovery of the payload the activity induced in the detector was measured.

  8. Potential of balloon payloads for in flight validation of direct and nulling interferometry concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demangeon, Olivier; Ollivier, Marc; Le Duigou, Jean-Michel; Cassaing, Frédéric; Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Mourard, Denis; Kern, Pierre; Lam Trong, Tien; Evrard, Jean; Absil, Olivier; Defrere, Denis; Lopez, Bruno

    2010-07-01

    While the question of low cost / low science precursors is raised to validate the concepts of direct and nulling interferometry space missions, balloon payloads offer a real opportunity thanks to their relatively low cost and reduced development plan. Taking into account the flight capabilities of various balloon types, we propose in this paper, several concepts of payloads associated to their flight plan. We also discuss the pros and cons of each concepts in terms of technological and science demonstration power.

  9. The balloon flights in the Tropics of the HIBISCUS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, A.; Pommereau, J. P.; Cocquerez, P.; Held, G.

    2005-08-01

    HIBISCUS is a project for studying the dynamics, microphysics and chemistry of the Tropical Tropopause Layer based on balloon measurements. Thirteen heavy sondes and 18 short duration balloons of different types have been used for local process studies. Eight superpressure (BP) and 3 Infra Red Montgolfier (MIR) long duration balloons have been flown for extending the investigations at global scale around the world. Overall the campaign has been very successful operationally as well as scientifically. The paper provides a description of the balloons, the instruments and the strategy used for meeting at best the goals of the project.

  10. Private and Commercial Pilot: Free Balloon: Flight Test Guide (Part 61 Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The flight test guide has been prepared to assist the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the private pilot or commercial pilot certificate with a lighter-than-air category and free balloon class rating. It contains information and guidance concerning the pilot operations, procedures, and maneuvers relevant to the flight test: layout and…

  11. Design considerations &practical results with long duration systems for manned flight: cryogenic helium and superpressure balloons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, J.

    The paper will describe two manned flights made in polyethylene zero pressure balloons with liquid helium carried to provide all in-flight buoyancy adjustment. These balloons were of 1,600 and 8,000 cubic meter volumes. Two flights have been made, both lasting 24 hours. The first flight cruised and flew through the sunset at 18,000 feet / 5,500 meters. The second flight using a pressurized cabin included flying through the night at about 32,000 feet / 10,000 meters. These flights highlight a wide range of theoretical and practical design concerns. For a craft carrying a crew, structural integrity and manageability &control in flight are naturally important. These flights demonstrated the complete feasibility of this system which will be described in detail. In addition the author constructed a 1,600 cubic meter pumpkin balloon used for a two day fight across Australia with a crew of two. Considerable problems were discovered during construction with distortion of the balloon. Although this work was done some time ago, the results have not been published in detail. The reason for publications at this time is that the work is very relevant to the problems recently encountered with the ULDB pumpkin design. The author, who is a physicist as well as a member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, was the principal desig ner as well as pilot of these craft. Ends...

  12. The CNES Balloon collaboration on the NAL / NASDA HSFD II flight test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venel, S.; Vargas, A.; Faucon, P.; Yanagihara, M.

    The 1st of July 2003, 4 h TU, the CNES Balloon Department launched from Esrange, the SSC base near Kiruna, Sweden, the NAL/NASDA High Speed Flight Demonstration PhaseII (HSFD II) vehicle. After the ascent and a short ceiling at 23 km, the vehicle was released from the balloon and accelerated into free fall up to 0,8 Mach for its flight test. The HSFD Phase II was planned as part of the NAL/NASDA joint research for the H-II Orbiting Plane Experiment (HOPE-X) unmanned re-entry vehicle project. The purpose was to clarify the transonic aerodynamic characteristics of the HOPE-X configuration and to verify its guidance and control systems for the transonic speed region. This flight test was conducted in collaboration with the CNES Balloon Department, which was responsible for the balloon system, the launch operations, and the flight service including the site, the TM/TC system, the flight survey, the safety and the helicopter recovery after touch down. CNES has an extensive experience in engineering experiments with balloons. The HSFD flight mission was nevertheless a very unusual one, and CNES had to lead specific developments. In particular, the CNES/HSFD interface required to develop a dedicated housekeeping gondola in order to power supply the vehicle during the ground tests and the flight under the balloon. The HSFD vehicle and the CNES gondola are integrated in the flight train through a dedicated mechanical interface piece together with a dedicated release system. The launch procedures had also to be adapted.

  13. Balloons for Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, Vincent E.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the nature and use of scientific balloons. Topics addressed include: (1) types of balloons; (2) lifting gases; (3) polyethylene balloons; (4) duration of balloon flight; and (5) use of balloons in scientific research. (JN)

  14. ARL Academic Law Library Statistics 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This document presents results of the 2006-2007 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Law Library Statistics Questionnaire. Of 113 ARL university libraries, 74 responded to the survey. Results for each library are presented in the following data tables: (1) collections (2-parts), including volumes in library, volumes added, monographs purchased,…

  15. Dilemmas of Dissent: International Students' Protest, Melbourne 2006/2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    International students in Australia are not usually identified with protest. However, a cohort of such students at one university campus was prepared to undertake robust public protest over alleged academic mistreatment in 2006/2007, eschewing conventional internal mechanisms for the resolution of such problems. Subsequent developments revealed…

  16. ARL Academic Health Sciences Library Statistics 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This document presents data that describe collections, expenditures, personnel, and services in 65 medical libraries at Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member institutions throughout North America. In 2006-2007, the reporting health sciences libraries held a median of 244,188 volumes, spent a total of $244,188,020, and employed 2,395 FTE…

  17. Long Duration Balloon flights development. (Italian Space Agency)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterzen, S.; Masi, S.; Dragoy, P.; Ibba, R.; Spoto, D.

    Stratospheric balloons are rapidly becoming the vehicle of choice for near space investigations and earth observations by a variety of science disciplines. With the ever increasing research into climatic change, earth observations, near space research and commercial component testing, instruments suspended from stratospheric balloons offer the science team a unique, stable and reusable platform that can circle the Earth in the polar region or equatorial zone for thirty days or more. The Italian Space Agency (ASI) in collaboration with Andoya Rocket Range (Andenes, Norway) has opened access in the far northern latitudes above 78º N from Longyearbyen, Svalbard. In 2006 the first Italian UltraLite Long Duration Balloon was launched from Baia Terra Nova, Mario Zuchelli station in Antarctica and now ASI is setting up for the their first equatorial stratospheric launch from their satellite receiving station and rocket launch site in Malindi, Kenya. For the equatorial missions we have analysed the statistical properties of trajectories considering the biennial oscillation and the seasonal effects of the stratospheric winds. Maintaining these launch sites offer the science community 3 point world coverage for heavy lift balloons as well as the rapidly deployed Ultra-light payloads and TM systems ASI developed to use for test platforms, micro experiments, as well as a comprehensive student pilot program. This paper discusses the development of the launch facilities and international LDB development.

  18. Results of the 1997 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Weiss, R. S.

    1997-01-01

    The 1997 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of three flights, the first flight on June 11, 1997, the second flight on August 2, 1997, and the third flight on August 24, 1997. One flight, flown on August 14, 1997, was terminated early because of a telemetry transmitter failure, and its payload was reflown on the August 24 flight. All objectives of the flight program were met. Ninety-eight modules were carried to an altitude of approximately 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on 32 of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on 66 modules. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10(exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to the participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  19. Precooled turbojet engine flight experiment using balloon-based operation vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, K.; Sawai, S.; Kobayashi, H.; Tsuboi, N.; Taguchi, H.; Kojima, T.; Okai, K.; Sato, T.; Miyaji, Koji

    2006-07-01

    Development of the Balloon-based Operation Vehicle (BOV) is currently in progress for the first flight scheduled in 2006. In a series of BOV experiments, a vehicle in a wing-body configuration is lifted by a high-altitude balloon and dropped, after which the microgravity experiments will be performed onboard the vehicle under favor of the quasi-free-fall environments. Although the BOV is originally designed for the microgravity experiments, various types of experiments can also be performed in a hypersonic flight at lower altitudes. One candidate currently under review is a flight experiment of a precooled turbojet engine in reduced dimension. In this article, an overview of the BOV experiment is introduced, and the current development status of the BOV and a flight model of the precooled turbojet engine is presented. The aerodynamic load and the aerodynamic characteristics of the BOV are obtained by computational fluid-dynamic analyses and wind-tunnel experiments.

  20. Results of the 1994 NASA/JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Weiss, R. S.

    1994-01-01

    The 1994 solar cell calibration balloon flight was completed on August 6, 1994. All objectives of the flight program were met. Thirty-seven modules were carried to an altitude of 119,000 ft (36.6 km). Data telemetered from the modules was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU. The calibrated cells have been returned to the 6 participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  1. Results of the 1993 NASA/JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, B.E.; Weiss, R.S.

    1993-10-01

    The 1993 solar cell calibration balloon flight was completed on July 29, 1993. All objectives of the flight program were met. Forty modules were carried to an altitude of 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Data telemetered from the modules was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU. The calibrated cells have been returned to 8 participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  2. Results of the 1991 NASA/JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, B.E.; Weiss, R.S.

    1991-10-01

    The 1991 solar cell calibration balloon flight was completed on August 1, 1991. All objectives of the flight program were met. Thirty-nine modules were carried to an altitude of 119,000 ft. (36.3 km). Data telemetered from the modules were corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU. The calibrated cells have been returned to the participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  3. Results of the 1994 NASA/JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, B.E.; Weiss, R.S.

    1994-10-01

    The 1994 solar cell calibration balloon flight was completed on August 6, 1994. All objectives of the flight program were met. Thirty-seven modules were carried to an altitude of 119,000 ft (36.6 km). Data telemetered from the modules was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU. The calibrated cells have been returned to the 6 participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  4. Results of the 1992 NASA/JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Weiss, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    The 1992 solar cell calibration balloon flight was completed on August 1, 1992. All objectives of the flight program were met. Forty-one modules were carried to an altitude of 119,000 ft (36.3 km). Data telemetered from the modules was corrected to 28 C and 1 AU. The calibrated cells have been returned to 39 participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  5. Results of the 1987 NASA/JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Weiss, R. S.

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 solar cell calibration balloon flight was successfully completed on August 23, 1987, meeting all objectives of the program. Forty-eight modules were carried to an altitude of 120,000 ft (36.0 km). The cells calibrated can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  6. Results of the 1989 NASA/JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, B.E.; Weiss, R.S.

    1989-11-01

    The 1989 solar cell calibration balloon flight was successfully completed on August 9, 1989, meeting all objectives of the program. Forty-two modules were carried to an altitude of 118,000 ft (36.0 km). The calibrated cells can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  7. Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Balloon Flight Engineering Model: Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Godfrey, G.; Williams, S. M.; Grove, J. E.; Mizuno, T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Kamae, T.; Ampe, J.; Briber, Stuart; Dann, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair-production high-energy (greater than 20 MeV) gamma-ray telescope being built by an international partnership of astrophysicists and particle physicists for a satellite launch in 2006, designed to study a wide variety of high-energy astrophysical phenomena. As part of the development effort, the collaboration has built a Balloon Flight Engineering Model (BFEM) for flight on a high-altitude scientific balloon. The BFEM is approximately the size of one of the 16 GLAST-LAT towers and contains all the components of the full instrument: plastic scintillator anticoincidence system (ACD), high-Z foil/Si strip pair-conversion tracker (TKR), CsI hodoscopic calorimeter (CAL), triggering and data acquisition electronics (DAQ), commanding system, power distribution, telemetry, real-time data display, and ground data processing system. The principal goal of the balloon flight was to demonstrate the performance of this instrument configuration under conditions similar to those expected in orbit. Results from a balloon flight from Palestine, Texas, on August 4, 2001, show that the BFEM successfully obtained gamma-ray data in this high-background environment.

  8. A high resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer (HIREGS) for long duration balloon flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelling, M.; Feffer, P. T.; Hurley, K.; Kane, S. R.; Lin, R. P.; McBride, S.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Youseffi, K.; Zimmer, G.

    1992-10-01

    The elements of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer, developed for observations of solar flares, are described. Emphasis is given to those aspects of the system that relate to its operation on a long duration balloon platform. The performance of the system observed in its first flight, launched from McMurdo Station, Antarctica on 10 January, 1992, is discussed. Background characteristics of the antarctic balloon environment are compared with those observed in conventional mid-latitude balloon flights and the general advantages of long duration ballooning are discussed.

  9. Influences of initial launch conditions on flight performance of high altitude balloon ascending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi; Liu, Dongxu

    2015-08-01

    Influences of initial launch conditions on flight performance are addressed for the high altitude balloon ascending process. A novel dynamic model was established to describe thermodynamic and kinetic characteristics of balloon which consists of atmospheric, thermal and dynamic submodels. Based on the model, ascending processes of a high altitude balloon under different initial launch conditions were simulated. The initial launch conditions were classified into three types: inflating quantity, launch time and launch position. The ascending velocity and the differential pressure were defined and used as evaluation parameters of flight performance. Results showed that the inflating quantity is the most effective factor for ascending process, and the upper and lower limits were also proposed separately from safety and performance perspectives. For both launch time and launch location conditions, different solar radiation is the main effect approach during ascending process. Specifically, the influence mechanism of launch time in one day and launch longitude are completely identical due to the Earth's rotation. Results also showed that the sunset process is the optimal selection for safety of balloon and efficient utilization of solar energy. Due to the Earth's revolution, the influence mechanism of launch date and launch latitude are identical and the effects are more seasonal and less effective. Launch time and location should be considered comprehensively in practical operation of ballooning.

  10. The GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichhorn, G.; Coldwell, R. L.; Dunnam, F. E.; Rester, A. C.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Advanced Detector (GRAD) consists of a n-type germanium detector inside an active bismuth-germanate Compton and charged particle shield with additional active plastic shielding across the aperture. It will be flown on a high-altitude balloon at 36 km altitude at a latitude of 78 deg S over Antarctica for observations of gamma radiation emitted by the radioactive decay of Co-56 in the supernova SN1987A, for assessment of the performance of bismuth-germanate scintillation material in the radiation environment of near space, for gathering information on the gamma-ray background over Antarctica, and for testing fault-tolerant software.

  11. Small balloon flights for investigating the impact of convective overshooting on the tropical lower stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommereau, Jean-Pierre; Riviere, Emmanuel; Khaykin, Sergey; Held, Gerhard

    Thunderstorm convective overshooting over tropical land can reach an altitude of 20-21 km (Pommereau et al, Cospar 2018, Id 15676). For better understanding the process and the impact on the lower stratosphere, a small balloon flight program combining frequent flights of plastic and large rubber balloons next to thunderstorms has been carried in S-E Brazil in the frame of a French TROPICO project. Given the goal flying as close as possible from thunderstorms and ATC and safety requirements at landing, a specific control procedure was developed based on C-band radar observations and use of light-weight Iridium telemetry/remote control whose data were made available in real time to ATC by Internet for following the flight. A total of 37 flights have been carried out within two 3 weeks campaigns (20 in March 2012 and 17 in February 2013) of 3-40 kg payloads, among which FLASH Lyman alpha stratospheric hygrometers, PicoSDLA water vapor, N2O and CH4 diode laser sensors and COBALD cloud and aerosols detectors, operated and recovered in safe conditions. Altogether those balloon data, complemented by a variety of ground-based measurements of cloud altitude, atmospheric optical thickness and 4 radiosondes/day, allow confirming the stronger convective intensity over land in the southern tropics. An promising approach for further investigating the possible differences with other continents, i.e. Central Africa and Northern Australia, would be to carry similar measurements from long duration circumnavigating Infra Montgolfier, when their flights will be newly authorized. Details on technical aspects, payloads and procedures applied for carrying safe balloon flights in agreement with Brazilian authorities will be presented.

  12. Results of the 1998 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Mueller, R. L.; Weiss, R. S.

    1998-01-01

    The 1998 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of one flight, which occurred on August 15, 1998. All objectives of the flight program were met. Thirty-one modules were carried to an altitude of = 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on 4 of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on 27 modules. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10(exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to the participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  13. Concept report: Experimental vector magnetograph (EXVM) operational configuration balloon flight assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The observational limitations of earth bound solar studies has prompted a great deal of interest in recent months in being able to gain new scientific perspectives through, what should prove to be, relatively low cost flight of the magnetograph system. The ground work done by TBE for the solar balloon missions (originally planned for SOUP and GRID) as well as the rather advanced state of assembly of the EXVM has allowed the quick formulation of a mission concept for the 30 cm system currently being assembled. The flight system operational configuration will be discussed as it is proposed for short duration flight (on the order of one day) over the continental United States. Balloon hardware design requirements used in formulation of the concept are those set by the National Science Balloon Facility (NSBF), the support agency under NASA contract for flight services. The concept assumes that the flight hardware assembly would come together from three development sources: the scientific investigator package, the integration contractor package, and the NSBF support system. The majority of these three separate packages can be independently developed; however, the computer control interfaces and telemetry links would require extensive preplanning and coordination. A special section of this study deals with definition of a dedicated telemetry link to be provided by the integration contractor for video image data for pointing system performance verification. In this study the approach has been to capitalize to the maximum extent possible on existing hardware and system design. This is the most prudent step that can be taken to reduce eventual program cost for long duration flights. By fielding the existing EXVM as quickly as possible, experience could be gained from several short duration flight tests before it became necessary to commit to major upgrades for long duration flights of this system or of the larger 60 cm version being considered for eventual development.

  14. Results of the 1995 JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Weiss, R. S.

    1995-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) solar cell calibration program was conceived to produce reference standards for the purpose of accurately setting solar simulator intensities. The concept was to fly solar cells on a high-altitude balloon, to measure their output at altitudes near 120,000 ft (36.6 km), to recover the cells, and to use them as reference standards. The procedure is simple. The reference cell is placed in the simulator beam, and the beam intensity is adjusted until the reference cell reads the same as it read on the balloon. As long as the reference cell has the same spectral response as the cells or panels to be measured, this is a very accurate method of setting the intensity. But as solar cell technology changes, the spectral response of the solar cells changes also, and reference standards using the new technology must be built and calibrated. Until the summer of 1985, there had always been a question as to how much the atmosphere above the balloon modified the solar spectrum. If the modification was significant, the reference cells might not have the required accuracy. Solar cells made in recent years have increasingly higher blue responses, and if the atmosphere has any effect at all, it would be expected to modify the calibration of these newer blue cells much more so than for cells made in the past. JPL has been flying calibration standards on high-altitude balloons since 1963 and continues to organize a calibration balloon flight at least once a year. The 1995 flight was the 48th flight in this series. The 1995 flight incorporated 46 solar cell modules from 7 different participants. The payload included Si, amorphous Si, GaAs, GaAs/Ge, dual junction cells, top and bottom sections of dual junction cells, and a triple junction cell. A new data acquisition system was built for the balloon flights and flown for the first time on the 1995 flight. This system allows the measurement of current-voltage (I-V) curves for 20 modules in addition to

  15. Results of the 1996 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Weiss, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The 1996 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign was completed with the first flight on June 30, 1996 and a second flight on August 8, 1996. All objectives of the flight program were met. Sixty-four modules were carried to an altitude of 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full 1-5 curves were measured on 22 of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on 42 modules. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10(exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to the participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  16. Results of the 1990 NASA/JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, Bruce E.; Weiss, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    The 1990 solar cell calibration balloon flight consisted of two flights, one on July 20, 1990 and the other on September 6, 1990. A malfunction occurred during the first flight, which resulted in a complete loss of data and a free fall of the payload from 120,000 ft. After the tracker was rebuilt, and several solar cell modules were replaced, the payload was reflown. The September flight was successful and met all the objectives of the program. Forty-six modules were carried to an altitude of 118,000 ft (36.0 km). Data telemetered from the modules was corrected to 28 C and to 1 a.u. The calibrated cells have been returned to the participants and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  17. Results of the 1999 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Mueller, R. L.; Weiss, R. S.

    2000-01-01

    The 1999 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of two flights, which occurred on June 14, 1999, and July 6, 1999. All objectives of the flight program were met. Fifty-seven modules were carried to an altitude of approximately equal to 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on five of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on forty-three modules (forty-five cells), with some modules repeated on the second flight. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10 (exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to their owners and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  18. Results of the 2000 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Mueller, R. L.; Weiss, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    The 2000 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of two flights, which occurred on June 27, 2000, and July 5, 2000. All objectives of the flight program were met. Sixty-two modules were carried to an altitude of approximately 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on sixteen of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on thirty-seven modules (forty-six cells), with some modules repeated on the second flight. Nine modules were flown for temperature measurement only. This data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496x10(exp 8) km). The calibrated cells have been returned to their owners and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  19. Results of the 1973 NASA/JPL balloon flight solar cell calibration program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasui, R. K.; Greenwood, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    High altitude balloon flights carried 37 standard solar cells for calibration above 99.5 percent of the earth's atmosphere. The cells were assembled into standard modules with appropriate resistors to load each cell at short circuit current. Each standardized module was mounted at the apex of the balloon on a sun tracker which automatically maintained normal incidence to the sun within 1.0 deg. The balloons were launched to reach a float altitude of approximately 36.6 km two hours before solar noon and remain at float altitude for two hours beyond solar noon. Telemetered calibration data on each standard solar cell was collected and recorded on magnetic tape. At the end of each float period the solar cell payload was separated from the balloon by radio command and descended via parachute to a ground recovery crew. Standard solar cells calibrated and recovered in this manner are used as primary intensity reference standards in solar simulators and in terrestrial sunlight for evaluating the performance of other solar cells and solar arrays with similar spectral response characteristics.

  20. Long-Duration Altitude-Controlled Balloons for Venus: A Feasibility Study Informed by Balloon Flights in Remote Environments on Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, P. B.; Nott, J.; Cutts, J. A.; Hall, J. L.; Beauchamp, P. M.; Limaye, S. S.; Baines, K. H.; Hole, L. R.

    2013-12-01

    In situ exploration of the upper atmosphere of Venus, approximately 65-77 km altitude, could answer many important questions (Limaye 2013, Crisp 2013). This region contains a time-variable UV absorber of unknown composition that controls many aspects of the heat balance on Venus. Understanding the composition and dynamics of this unknown absorber is an important science goal; in situ optical and chemical measurements are needed. However, conventional approaches do not provide access to this altitude range, repeated traverses, and a mission lifetime of several months needed to effectively carry out the science. This paper examines concepts for altitude-controlled balloons not previously flown on planetary missions that could potentially provide the desired measurements. The concepts take advantage of the fact that at 60 km altitude, for example, the atmospheric density on Venus is about 40% of the sea-level density on earth and the temperature is a moderate 230 K. The solar flux is approximately double that on earth, creating some thermal challenges, but making photovoltaic power highly effective. Using a steady-state thermodynamic model and flight data from Earth, we evaluate the suitability of two types of altitude-controlled balloons for a potential mission on Venus. Such balloons could repeatedly measure profiles, avoid diurnal temperature extremes, and navigate using wind shear. The first balloon design uses air ballast (AB) whereby ambient air can be compressed into or released from a constant-volume balloon, causing it to descend or ascend accordingly. The second design uses lift-gas compression (LGC) to change the volume of a zero-pressure balloon, thereby changing its effective density and altitude. For an altitude range of 60-75 km on Venus, we find that the superpressure volume for a LGC balloon is about 5% of that needed for an AB balloon while the maximum pressurization is the same for both systems. The compressor work per km descent of the LGC balloon

  1. Results of the 2001 JPL Balloon Flight Solar Cell Calibration Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Mueller, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    The 2001 solar cell calibration balloon flight campaign consisted of two flights, which occurred on June 26, 2001, and July 4, 2001. Fifty-nine modules were carried to an altitude of approximately 120,000 ft (36.6 km). Full I-V curves were measured on nineteen of these modules, and output at a fixed load was measured on thirty-two modules (forty-six cells), with some modules repeated on the second flight. Nine modules were flown for temperature measurement only. The data from the fixed load cells on the first flight was not usable. The temperature dependence of the first-flight data was erratic and we were unable to find a way to extract accurate calibration values. The I-V data from the first flight was good, however, and all data from the second flight was also good. The data was corrected to 28 C and to 1 AU (1.496 x 10(exp 8)km). The calibrated cells have been returned to their owners and can now be used as reference standards in simulator testing of cells and arrays.

  2. Balloon launched decelerator test program: Post-flight test report, BLDT vehicle AV-3, Viking 1975 project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, D.; Hicks, F.; Schlemmer, J.; Michel, F.; Moog, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    The pertinent events concerned with the launch, float, and flight of balloon launched decelerator test vehicle AV-3 are discussed. The performance of the decelerator system is analyzed. Data on the flight trajectory and decelerator test points at the time of decelerator deployment are provided. A description of the time history of vehicle events and anaomalies encounters during the mission is included.

  3. Balloon launched decelerator test program: Post-flight test report, BLDT vehicle AV-2, Viking 1975 project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, D.; Hicks, F.; Schlemmer, J.; Michel, F.; Moog, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    The pertinent events concerned with the launch, float, and flight of balloon launched decelerator test vehicle AV-2 are discussed. The performance of the decelerator system is analyzed. Data on the flight trajectory and decelerator test points at the time of decelerator deployment are provided. A description of the time history of vehicle events and anomalies encounters during the mission is included.

  4. The 2006-2007 Observing Campaign On VX Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.; Samolyk, G.; Dvorak, S.; Poklar, R.; Butterworth, N.; Gerner, H. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present the results of the 2006-2007 observing campaign on the double-mode delta Scuti star VX Hydrae. Nearly 8800 V-band CCD observations were obtained during the two observing seasons. Although the data were taken with small telescopes (0.3-m or less, using consumer-grade CCD cameras), the data quality is very high, enabling the detection of variability at the millimagnitude level at some frequencies. Analysis of the data yields only two primary pulsation frequencies: f(0) = 4.4765 c/d, and f(1) = 5.7899 c/d. The two modes have comparable amplitude, although the amplitude of f(1) appears to have increased slightly from 2006 to 2007 by 0.01 mag. Only two pulsation modes are detected, but at least 18 additional linear combination frequencies are also clearly detected, some having amplitudes as low as 1 mmag, resulting in an incredibly rich Fourier spectrum. We discuss the evidence for amplitude variation in VX Hydrae, along with prospects for future study of this and other similar delta Scuti stars by AAVSO observers.

  5. GRAINE 2011 balloon-borne experiment: flight data analysis and detector performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokujo, Hiroki

    2012-07-01

    Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion (GRAINE) is the balloon-born experiment project to observe gamma-ray sources precisely in the 10MeV-100GeV region. A new generation detector "emulsion gamma-ray telescope" has one order higher angular resolution compared with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. As the first step in GRAINE, a technical flight was performed by employing a small-scale prototype (125 cm ^{2} aperture). On June 8, 2011, the balloon was launched from Taiki Aerospace Research Field and realized the level flight at the altitude of 34.8 km for 1.5 hours. Tracks recorded in emulsion chambers were read by the fully automated scanning system and gamma-ray events in field of view in 2.2 sr were reconstructed. Event time stamps were done by "multi-stage shifter" mechanism, which gives sub-second time resolution to tracks using their position displacements caused by shifting multiple chambers during the flight. As an initial result, we succeeded in pointing gamma-ray directions on celestial coordinates, and demonstrated feasibility of each component of the detector for future experiments with larger apertures.

  6. Crew Recovery and Contingency Planning for a Manned Stratospheric Balloon Flight - the StratEx Program.

    PubMed

    Menon, Anil S; Jourdan, David; Nusbaum, Derek M; Garbino, Alejandro; Buckland, Daniel M; Norton, Sean; Clark, Johnathan B; Antonsen, Erik L

    2016-10-01

    The StratEx program used a self-contained space suit and balloon system to loft pilot Alan Eustace to a record-breaking altitude and skydive from 135,897 feet (41,422 m). After releasing from the balloon and a stabilized freefall, the pilot safely landed using a parachute system based on a modified tandem parachute rig. A custom spacesuit provided life support using a similar system to NASA's (National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Washington, DC USA) Extravehicular Mobility Unit. It also provided tracking, communications, and connection to the parachute system. A recovery support team, including at least two medical personnel and two spacesuit technicians, was charged with reaching the pilot within five minutes of touchdown to extract him from the suit and provide treatment for any injuries. The team had to track the flight at all times, be prepared to respond in case of premature release, and to operate in any terrain. Crew recovery operations were planned and tailored to anticipate outcomes during this novel event in a systematic fashion, through scenario and risk analysis, in order to minimize the probability and impact of injury. This analysis, detailed here, helped the team configure recovery assets, refine navigation and tracking systems, develop procedures, and conduct training. An extensive period of testing and practice culminated in three manned flights leading to a successful mission and setting the record for exit altitude, distance of fall with stabilizing device, and vertical speed with a stabilizing device. During this mission, recovery teams reached the landing spot within one minute, extracted the pilot, and confirmed that he was not injured. This strategy is presented as an approach to prehospital planning and care for improved safety during crew recovery in novel, extreme events. Menon AS , Jourdan D , Nusbaum DM , Garbino A , Buckland DM , Norton S , Clark JB , Antonsen EL . Crew recovery and contingency planning for a manned

  7. Balloon-Borne, High Altitude Gravimetry: The Flight of DUCKY II (October 1985)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-28

    largely unpredictable environment, where little, if any gound truth"adta are available. The motions-of the balloon must be very accurately accounted for in...System Description 13 2.3.1.3 Method for Frequency Counting 16 2.3.2 Motion-Sensing Instrument Package 16 2.3.2.1 Instruments 17 2.3.2.2 System Description...Gravimetry The Flight of DUCKY II (October 1985) 1. INTRODUCTION Gravity field values at high altitudes, between altitudes for aerial surveys and

  8. Radiation measurement platform for balloon flights based on the TriTel silicon detector telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabori, Balazs; Hirn, Attila; Pazmandi, Tamas; Apathy, Istvan; Szanto, Peter; Deme, Sandor

    Several measurements have been performed on the cosmic radiation field from the surface of the Earth up to the maximum altitudes of research airplanes. However the cosmic radiation field is not well known between 15 km and 30 km. Our experiment idea based on to study the radiation environment in the stratosphere. The main technical goals of our experiment were to test at first time the TriTel 3D silicon detector telescope system for future ISS missons and to develop a balloon technology platform for advanced cosmic radiation and dosimetric measurements. The main scientific goals were to give an assessment of the cosmic radiation field at the altitude of the BEXUS balloons, to use the TriTel system to determine dosimetric and radiation quantities during the ballon flight and to intercompare the TriTel and Pille results to provide a correction factor definition method for the Pille ISS measurements. To fulfil the scientific and technological objectives several different dosimeter systems were included in the experiment: an advanced version of the TriTel silicon detector telescope, Geiger-Müller counters, Pille passive thermoluminescent dosimeters and Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. The experiment was built by students from Hungarian universities and flew on board the BEXUS stratospheric balloon in Northern Sweden (from ESRANGE Space Center). The float altitude was approximately 28.6 km and the total flight time was about 4 hours. The active instruments measured in real time and the ground team received the collected data continuously during the mission. The main technical goals were received since the operation of the TriTel experienced no failures and the experiment worked as it expected. This paper presents the scientific goals and results. From the TriTel measurements the deposited energy spectra, the Linear Energy Transfer spectra, the average quality factor of the cosmic radiation as well as the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were determined for the

  9. Investigation of solar active regions at high resolution by balloon flights of the solar optical universal polarimeter, definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.; Topka, Kenneth P.

    1992-01-01

    The definition phase of a scientific study of active regions on the sun by balloon flight of a former Spacelab instrument, the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) is described. SOUP is an optical telescope with image stabilization, tunable filter and various cameras. After the flight phase of the program was cancelled due to budgetary problems, scientific and engineering studies relevant to future balloon experiments of this type were completed. High resolution observations of the sun were obtained using SOUP components at the Swedish Solar Observatory in the Canary Islands. These were analyzed and published in studies of solar magnetic fields and active regions. In addition, testing of low-voltage piezoelectric transducers was performed, which showed they were appropriate for use in image stabilization on a balloon.

  10. Adapted ECC ozonesonde for long-duration flights aboard boundary-layer pressurised balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheusi, François; Durand, Pierre; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Attié, Jean-Luc; Commun, Philippe; Barret, Brice; Basdevant, Claude; Clenet, Antoine; Derrien, Solène; Doerenbecher, Alexis; El Amraoui, Laaziz; Fontaine, Alain; Hache, Emeric; Jambert, Corinne; Jaumouillé, Elodie; Meyerfeld, Yves; Roblou, Laurent; Tocquer, Flore

    2016-12-01

    Since the 1970s, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurised balloons (BLPBs) with the capability to transport lightweight scientific payloads at isopycnic level and offer a quasi-Lagrangian sampling of the lower atmosphere over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks).

    Electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes are widely used under small sounding balloons. However, their autonomy is limited to a few hours owing to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation. An adaptation of the ECC sonde has been developed specifically for long-duration BLPB flights. Compared to conventional ECC sondes, the main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences (with possible remote control during the flight). To increase the ozonesonde autonomy, the strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (2-3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min). The rest of the time, the sonde pump is turned off. Results of preliminary ground-based tests are first presented. In particular, the sonde was able to provide correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV-absorption ozone analyser every 15 min for 4 days. Then we illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched over the western Mediterranean during three summer field campaigns of the ChArMEx project (http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr): TRAQA in 2012, and ADRIMED and SAFMED in 2013. BLPB drifting altitudes were in the range 0.25-3.2 km. The longest flight lasted more than 32 h and covered more than 1000 km. Satisfactory data were obtained when compared to independent ozone measurements close in space and time. The quasi-Lagrangian measurements allowed a first look at ozone diurnal evolution in the marine boundary layer as well as in the lower free troposphere. During some flight segments, there was indication of photochemical ozone production in the marine boundary layer or even

  11. The First Science Flight of the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher; Milliard, Bruno; Schiminovich, David; Tuttle, Sarah; Matuszewski, Matt; Rahman, Shahin; Evrard, Jean; Frank, Stephan; Deharveng, Jean-Michel; Peroux, Celine

    We have completed the second flight of the path-finding experiment, the Faint Intergalactic medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL), designed to discover and map faint emis-sion from the Intergalactic Medium (IGM). The second flight was fully successful, proving a fully functional fine pointing gondola with arcsec level capability, a 1 meter diameter (fixed) parabola primary telescope with planar sidereostat for pointing, a complete closed loop guide camera and control software, and a fiber fed UV integral field spectrograph feeding a spare GALEX Near UV detector. Three scientific targets were observed, and analysis of the data shows that the instrument performed as expected. The flux measurements obtained will be compared to models for IGM emission. We discuss future modifications to the payload that will achieve a 10-to 30-fold increase in sensitivity over science flight 1. We also discuss other instrument configurations that can utilize the 1-meter UV telescope and arcsecond pointing platform, and their corresponding science objectives. FIREBALL is a collaboration of NASA, Caltech, Columbia University, CNES, and Laboratorie Astrophysique Marseille, and is sup-ported by NASA, CNES, and CNRS.

  12. THE BALLOON-BORNE LARGE APERTURE SUBMILLIMETER TELESCOPE (BLAST) 2006: CALIBRATION AND FLIGHT PERFORMANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Truch, Matthew D. P.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Klein, Jeff; Ade, Peter A. R.; Griffin, Matthew; Hargrave, Peter C.; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Pascale, Enzo; Bock, James J.; Chapin, Edward L.; Halpern, Mark; Marsden, Gaelen; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Hughes, David H.; Martin, Peter G.; Netterfield, C. Barth; Olmi, Luca; Patanchon, Guillaume

    2009-12-20

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) operated successfully during a 250 hr flight over Antarctica in 2006 December (BLAST06). As part of the calibration and pointing procedures, the red hypergiant star VY CMa was observed and used as the primary calibrator. Details of the overall BLAST06 calibration procedure are discussed. The 1sigma uncertainty on the absolute calibration is accurate to 9.5%, 8.7%, and 9.2% at the 250, 350, and 500 mum bands, respectively. The errors are highly correlated between bands resulting in much lower errors for the derived shape of the 250-500 mum continuum. The overall pointing error is < 5'' rms for the 36'', 42'', and 60'' beams. The performance of optics and pointing systems is discussed.

  13. Nocturnal atmospheric uv background measurements in the 300-400 nm band with baby 2001: a balloon borne experiment to flight on board of a transmediterranean balloon.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarrusso, S.; Agnetta, G.; Biondo, B.; Catalano, O.; Cusumano, G.; Gugliotta, G.; La Rosa, G.; Maccarone, M.C.; Mangano, A.; Russo, F.; Sacco, B.

    In the framework of the EUSO project (an experiment approved by ESA to be accommodate on board of the ISS) we present a new balloon borne experimental apparatus, named BABY 2001 that is devoted to systematic and exhaustive observations of the UV nocturnal atmospheric background. The BABY 2001 experiment is foreseen to flight on the 3rd 4th week of July 2001 from the Milo-Trapani base on board of a transmediterranean balloon, looking downward from about 40 km of altitude the dark nocturnal atmosphere over the sea. The apparatus used for the BABY 2001 experiment was designed and built at the IFCAI-CNR in Palermo. The instrument is composed by 8 filtered and collimated fast photomultipliers, two of them detecting the UV light in the 300-400 nm wavelengths band and the others in the three narrow bands centered at the emission lines of the atmospheric Nitrogen molecules.

  14. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  15. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  16. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  17. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  18. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  19. Modified ECC ozone sonde for long-duration flights aboard isopicnic drifting balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheusi, Francois; Durand, Pierre; Verdier, Nicolas; Dulac, François; Attié, Jean-Luc; Commun, Philippe; Barret, Brice; Basdevant, Claude; Clénet, Antoine; Fontaine, Alain; Jambert, Corinne; Meyerfeld, Yves; Roblou, Laurent; Tocquer, Flore

    2015-04-01

    Since few years, the French space agency CNES has developed boundary-layer pressurized balloons (BLPB) with the capability to transport scientific payloads at isopicnic level over very long distances and durations (up to several weeks in absence of navigation limits). However, the autonomy of conventional electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozone sondes, that are widely used for tropospheric and stratospheric soundings, is limited to few hours due to power consumption and electrolyte evaporation (owing to air bubbling in the cathode solution). In collaboration with the French research community, CNES has developed a new ozone payload suited for long duration flights aboard BLPB. The mechanical elements (Teflon pump and motor) and the electrochemical cell of conventional ECC sondes have been kept but the electronic implementation is entirely new. The main feature is the possibility of programming periodic measurement sequences -- with possible remote control during the flight. To increase the ozone sonde autonomy, a strategy has been adopted of short measurement sequences (typically 2-3 min) regularly spaced in time (e.g. every 15 min, which is usually sufficient for air quality studies). The rest of the time, the sonde is at rest (pump motor off). The response time of an ECC sonde to an ozone concentration step is below one minute. Consequently, the measurement sequence is typically composed of a one-minute spin-up period after the pump has been turned on, followed by a one- to two-minute acquisition period. All time intervals can be adjusted before and during the flight. Results of a preliminary ground-based test in spring 2012 are first presented. The sonde provided correct ozone concentrations against a reference UV analyzer every 15 minutes during 4 days. Then we illustrate results from 16 BLBP flights launched in the low troposphere over the Mediterranean during summer field campaings in 2012 and 2013 (TRAQA and ChArMEx programmes). BLPB drifting

  20. Ground-based evaluation of dosimeters for NASA high-altitude balloon flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straume, T.; Mertens, C. J.; Lusby, T. C.; Gersey, B.; Tobiska, W. K.; Norman, R. B.; Gronoff, G. P.; Hands, A.

    2016-11-01

    Results are presented from evaluations of radiation dosimeters prior to a NASA high-altitude balloon flight, the RaD-X mission. Four radiation dosimeters were on board RaD-X: a Far West Hawk (version 3), a Teledyne dosimeter (UDOS001), a Liulin dosimeter (MDU 6SA1), and a RaySure dosimeter (version 3b). The Hawk is a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and the others are solid-state Si sensors. The Hawk served as the "flight standard" and was calibrated for this mission. The Si-based dosimeters were tested to make sure they functioned properly prior to flight but were not calibrated for the radiation environment in the stratosphere. The dosimeters were exposed to 60Co gamma rays and 252Cf fission radiation (which includes both neutrons and gamma rays) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The measurement results were compared with results from standard "benchmark" measurements of the same sources and source-to-detector distances performed contemporaneously by LLNL calibration facility personnel. For 60Co gamma rays, the dosimeter-to-benchmark ratios were 0.84 ± 0.06, 1.07 ± 0.32, 1.31 ± 0.07, and 0.82 ± 0.24 for the TEPC, Teledyne, Liulin, and RaySure, respectively. For 252Cf radiation, the dosimeter-to-benchmark ratios were 0.94 ± 0.15, 0.55 ± 0.18, 0.58 ± 0.08, and 0.33 ± 0.12 for the TEPC, Teledyne, Liulin, and RaySure. Some examples of how the results were used to help interpret the flight data are also presented.

  1. Altitude-Controlled Balloons for Long-Duration Flights on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, P. B.; Nott, J.; Cutts, J. A.; Hall, J. L.; Beauchamp, P. M.; Limaye, S. S.; Baynes, K. H.; Bennett, B.; Hole, L. R.

    2014-06-01

    Balloons provide a relatively simple and well-proven platform for accessing the upper atmosphere of Venus. We analyze several types of altitude-controlled balloons and assess their suitability for an extended mission on Venus.

  2. Scientific ballooning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Fumiyoshi

    Activities in scientific ballooning in Japan during 1998-1999 are reported. The total number of scientific balloons flown in Japan in 1998 and 1999 was sixteen, eight flights in each year. The scientific objectives were observations of high energy cosmic electrons, air samplings at various altitudes, monitoring of atmospheric ozone density, Galactic infrared observations, and test flights of new type balloons. Balloon expeditions were conducted in Antarctica by the National Institute of Polar Research, in Russia, in Canada and in India in collaboration with foreign countries' institutes to investigate cosmic rays, Galactic infrared radiation, and Earth's atmosphere. There were three flights in Antarctica, four flights in Russia, three flights in Canada and two flights in India. Four test balloons were flown for balloon technology, which included pumpkin-type super-pressure balloon and a balloon made with ultra-thin polyethylene film of 3.4 μm thickness.

  3. Solar Observations at THz Frequencies on Board of a Trans-Antartic Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Pierre; Abrantes, André; Bortolucci, Emilio; Caspi, Amir; Fernandes, Luis Olavo T.; Kropotov, Grigory; Kudaka, Amauri; Laurent, Glenn Thomas; Machado, Nelson; Marcon, Rogério; Marun, Adolfo; Nicolaev, Valery; Hidalgo Ramirez, Ray Fernando; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Shih, Albert; Silva, Claudemir; Timofeevsky, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    Sub-THz and 30 THz solar burst observations revealed a new spectral component, with fluxes increasing towards THz frequencies, simultaneously with the well known component peaking at microwaves, bringing challenging constraints for interpretation. The THz flare spectra can be completed with measurements made from space. A new system of two photometers was built to observe the Sun at 3 and 7 THz named SOLAR-T. An innovative optical setup allows observations of the full solar disk and detect small burst with sub-second time resolution. The photometers use two Golay cell detectors at the foci of 7.6 cm Cassegrain telescopes. The incoming radiation undergoes low-pass filters made of rough surface primary mirrors and membranes, 3 and 7 THz band-pass filters, and choppers. The system has been integrated to redundant data acquisition system and Iridium short-burst data services telemetry for monitoring during the flight. SOLAR-T has been flown coupled to U.C. Berkeley solar hard X-ray and gamma-ray imaging spectro-polarimeter GRIPS experiment launched on a NASA CSBF stratospheric balloon from U.S. McMurdo base on January 19, 2016, on a trans-Antarctic flight. The mission ended on January 30. The SOLAR-T on-board computers were recovered from the payload that landed in the Argentina Mountain Range, nearly 2100 km from McMurdo. The SOLAR-T performance was successfully attained, with full space qualification instrumentation. Preliminary results provide the solar disk THz brightness temperatures and indicate a 7 THz burst enhancement time coincident to a sub-THz burst observed by SST during the 28 January GOES C9.6 class soft X-ray burst, the largest occurred during the flight.

  4. High Energy Electrons and Gamma Rays from the ATIC-2 Balloon Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbert, J. B.; ATIC Collaboration

    2004-08-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment is primarily designed to measure the spectra of nuclear cosmic rays (protons to nickel). It is composed of a segmented BGO calorimeter (18 radiation lengths deep) following a carbon target (0.75 nuclear interaction lengths) interleaved with scintillator tracking layers. A Silicon matrix detector at the entrance identifies the incident particle charge. Utilizing simulations such as Fluka and Geant we have investigated the ability of this design to differentiate electron (gamma) initiated showers from hadronic showers. The differences in shower development between the two populations are sufficient to differentiate them for measurements of electron spectra into the TeV region, as confirmed by accelerator tests at CERN and by the ATIC-1 test flight in 2000-01. ATIC had a successful science flight in 2002-03 from McMurdo, Antarctica returning about 19 days of flight data. This exposure is sufficient to record electrons into the TeV region and measure gamma rays at 100's of GeV. The majority of gamma rays are of atmospheric origin and provide a test for this technique. The preliminary electron spectrum from the ATIC-2 flight is presented and compared to previous high energy measurements, principally from emulsion chambers. Possible astrophysical interpretations of the results are discussed. The ATIC Collaboration: J.H. Adams,2 H.S. Ahn,3 G.L. Bashindzhagyan,4 K.E. Batkov,4 J. Chang,6,7 M. Christl,2 A.R. Fazely,5, O. Ganel,3 R.M. Gunasingha,5 T.G. Guzik,1 J. Isbert,1 K.C. Kim,3 E.N. Kouznetsov,4 M.I. Panasyuk,4 A.D. Panov,4 W.K.H. Schmidt,6 E.S. Seo,3 N.V. Sokolskaya,4 J.Z. Wang,3 J.P. Wefel,1 J. Wu,3 V.I. Zatsepin,4 (1) Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA (2) Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL, USA (3) University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA (4) Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia (5) Southern University, Baton Rouge, LA, USA (6

  5. Testing of Radio Communication Subsystems for the NUTS CubeSat on a Meteorological Balloon Flight from Andoya in 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommer, M.; Birkeland, R.; Gjersvik, A.; Stein, T. A.; Vestnes, F.; Skagmo, J. P.; Kvamtro, K. M.; Eckholdt, F.; Alstad, T.; Grande, J.; Mathisen, S. V.

    2015-09-01

    In April 2014, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) Test Satellite (NUTS) team carried out a balloon campaign at Andøya, Norway. The purpose was to test the on-board UHF and VHF radio prototypes. In accordance with the project mission goals, this campaign marked the test of the engineering model's communication subsystems. One of the mission requirements was that these systems should be as close to the final flight-model as possible. Parts of the system were built and assembled in advance at NTNU, and the final system integration was carried out at Andøya. A standard PTU probe with a GPS module transmitting the balloon's location in the UHF band was used to track the flight. The probe was mounted below the NUTS payload box. The payload radios was tracked using Yagi antennas based on the received GPS coordinates from the PTU probe. A two-way communication link was established and maintained between the balloon and the ground station. This paper will present the results from the mission as well as lessons learned related to the preparation and execution of balloon campaigns.

  6. Balloon flight background measurement with actively-shielded planar and imaging CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Narita, Tomohiko; Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Perrin, Marshall; Murray, Ruth; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2002-01-01

    We present results from the flight of two prototype CZT detectors on a scientific balloon payload in September 2000. The first detector, referred to as CZT1, consisted of a 10 mm x 10 mm x 2 mm CZT crystal with a single gold planar electrode readout. This detector was shielded by a combination of a passive collimator in the front, giving a 40 degree field of view and surrounded by plastic scintillator, and a thick BGO crystal in the rear. The second detector, CZT2, comprised two 10 mm x 10 mm x 5 mm CZT crystals, one made of eV Products high pressure Bridgman material and the other of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman material, each fashioned with a 4 x 4 array of gold pixels on a 2.5 mm pitch. The pixellated detectors were flip-chip-mounted side by side and read out by a 32-channel ASIC. This detector was also shielded by a passive/plastic collimator in the front, but used only additional passive/plastic shielding in the rear. Both experiments were flown from Ft. Sumner, NM on September 19, 2000 on a 24 hour balloon flight. Both instruments performed well. CZT1 recorded a non-vetoed background level at 100 keV of approximately 1 x 10-3 cm-2s-1keV-1. Raising the BGO threshold from 50 keV to approximately 1 MeV produced only an 18% increase in this level. CZT2 recorded a background at 100 keV of approximately 4 times 10-3 cts cm-2s-1keV-1 in the eV Products detector and approximately 6 x 10-3 cts cm-2s-1keV-1 in the IMARAD detector, a difference possibly due to our internal background subtracting procedure. Both CZT1 and CZT2 spectra were in basic agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, though both recorded systematically higher count rates at high energy than predicted. No lines were observed, indicating that neutron capture reactions, at least those producing decay lines at a few 100 keV, are not significant components of the CZT background. Comparison of the CZT1 and CZT2 spectra indicates that passive/plastic shielding may provide adequately low background levels for

  7. Stratochip, a dual balloon high-altitude platform: controlled altitude flight experiments and potential applications in geosciences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlet, Christian; Vanbrabant, Yves

    2014-05-01

    A high-altitude dual balloons system, the 'Stratochip', was designed at the Geological Survey of Belgium to serve as a development platform to carry measurement and earth observation equipments, in altitudes comprised between 1000 and 25000m. These working altitudes far exceed the range of current motor powered unmanned aerial vehicules, with a higher weight carrying capacity (up to 10-15kg). This platform is built around a two helium balloons configuration, than can be released one by one at a target altitude or location, allowing a partially controlled drift of the platform. Using a 'nowcasting' meteorological model, updated by flight telemetry, the predicted path can be refined live to follow and retrieve the equipment in a predicted landing area. All subsystems (balloon cut-off devices, flight controller, telemetry system) have been developed in-house. Three independent communication channels, designed to work at extremely low temperature (up to -60° C) ensure a continuous tracking until landing. A calibrated parachute is used to control the safe descent of the equipment. Several flight tests have been performed in Belgium to control the meteorological model accuracy for wind predictions (model based on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data). Those tests demonstrated the capability of the platform to maintain its altitude in a predicted path, allowing using the platform for new types of atmospheric studies and affordable high-altitude remote-sensing applications (i.e. sub-meter resolution stereo imagery).

  8. Thin film strain transducer. [in-flight measurement of stress or strain in walls of high altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Previous attempts to develop an appropriate sensor for measuring the stress or strain of high altitude balloons during flight are reviewed as well as the various conditions that must be met by such a device. The design, development and calibration of a transducer which promises to satisfy the necessary design constraints are described. The thin film strain transducer has a low effective modulus so as not to interfere with the strain that would naturally occur in the balloon. In addition, the transducer has a high sensitivity to longitudinal strain (7.216 mV/V/unit strain) which is constant for all temperature from room temperature to -80 C and all strains from 5 percent compression to 10 percent tensile strain. At the same time, the sensor is relatively insensitive (0.27 percent) to transverse forces. The device has a standard 350 ohm impedance which is compatible with available bridge balance, amplification and telemetry instrumentation now available for balloon flight. Recommendations are included for improved coatings to provide passive thermal control as well as model, tethered and full scale flight testing.

  9. Preliminary results of a balloon flight of the solar disk sextant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maier, E.; Twigg, L.; Sofia, S.

    1992-01-01

    Preliminary results of a balloon flight on October 11, 1991, of the solar disk sextant (SDS) experiment are reported. The SDS is an instrument which measures the solar diameter at different orientations with respect to the solar polar axis. Fitting straight lines through two fixed-angle data sets with time as the independent variable yields slopes of (7.1 +/ - 1.5) x 10 exp -3 and (6.7 +/- 1.6) x 10 exp -3/mas s, consistent with the value of 6.47 x 10 exp -3/mas s expected from the earth's approach to the sun due to the orbital motion toward perihelion. Upon the instrument's rotation on its axis a sinusoidal component of the diameter measurement was observed in each rotation cycle, with a variable amplitude of about 150 mas. The present result is epsilon of (5.6 +/- 6.3) x 10 exp -6, about 30 deg offset from the polar-equator position. The absolute diameter obtained by means of the FFT definition is found to be 1919.269 +/- 0.240 arcsec or 1919.131 +/- 0.240 arcsec, depending on the orientation mode of the measurement.

  10. Two lighter than air systems in opposing flight regimes: An unmanned short haul, heavy load transport balloon and a manned, light payload airship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohl, R. A.

    1975-01-01

    Lighter Than Air vehicles are generally defined or categorized by the shape of the balloon, payload capacity and operational flight regime. Two balloon systems that are classed as being in opposite categories are described. One is a cable guided, helium filled, short haul, heavy load transport Lighter Than Air system with a natural shaped envelope. The other is a manned, aerodynamic shaped airship which utilizes hot air as the buoyancy medium and is in the light payload class. While the airship is in the design/fabrication phase with flight tests scheduled for the latter part of 1974, the transport balloon system has been operational for some eight years.

  11. Venus Altitude Cycling Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Jong, M. L.

    2015-04-01

    A novel balloon concept is demonstrated that uses mechanical compression as altitude control mechanism to sustain long duration balloon probe flight in the cloud level region of Venus’ atmosphere between 45 and 58 km altitude.

  12. Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 2006/2007 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayne, Tracy J.; Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Now in its 2006-2007 edition, this perennial bestseller is the resource students count on for the most current information on applying to doctoral programs in clinical or counseling psychology. The Insider's Guide presents up-to-date facts on 300 accredited programs in the United States and Canada. Each program's profile includes admissions…

  13. Achieving Transparency in the Public Reporting of 2006-2007 Assessment Results. Technical Report 53

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albus, Debra; Thurlow, Martha; Bremer, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The 2006-2007 school year was the eighth annual reporting period since disaggregating the performance of students with disabilities on state and district-wide assessments was required by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). It is the fifth reporting period since the enactment of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), and the…

  14. Annual Report: Discipline, Crime, and Violence, School Year 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The "Code of Virginia" requires school divisions statewide to submit data to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) on incidents of discipline, crime, and violence (DCV). School divisions began reporting such data in 1991. This annual report focuses primarily on DCV data submitted for school year 2006-2007, with selected comparisons…

  15. Beating the Odds: Assessment Results from the 2006-2007 School Year. Individual District Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This report includes quantitative information by individual urban school district for the 2006-2007 school year. Data includes: (1) Total Students; (2) Free/Reduced Price Lunch Eligible Students; (3) Students with Individual Educational Plans; (4) English Language Learners; (5) American Indian/Alaskan Native Students; (6) Asian/Pacific Islander…

  16. International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication presents changes and modifications for 2006-2007 to the "International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs." It is written to guide fair directors, teachers, scientists, parents, and adult volunteers as they pursue their work of encouraging students to explore and investigate their…

  17. Measuring What Students Entering School Know and Can Do: PIPS Australia 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildy, Helen; Styles, Irene

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports analysis of 2006-2007 on-entry assessment data from the Performance Indicators in Primary Schools Baseline Assessment (PIPS-BLA) of random samples of students in England, Scotland, New Zealand and Australia. The analysis aimed, first, to investigate the validity and reliability of that instrument across countries and sexes, and,…

  18. Sicily 2002 Balloon Flight Campaign: A Test of the HASI Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettanini, C.

    A mock up of the probe descending in the Titan atmosphere for the Huygens Cassini Mission has been successfully launched with stratospheric balloon from Italian Space Agency Base "Luigi Broglio" in Sicily and recovered on May 30 th 2002. The probe has been lifted at 32 km altitude and then released to perform a 45 minutes descent decelerated by parachute, to simulate Huygens mission at Titan. Preliminary aerodynamics study of the probe has focused on the achievement of a descent velocity profile and a spin rate profile, satisfying the Huygens mission to Titan requirements. The descent velocity and spin rate have been calculated by solving a system of ODE describing the translational and rotational motion of the probe trough the earth atmosphere during parachute aided descent Results of these calculations have driven the choice of an appropriate angle of attack of the blades in the bottom of the probe and ballast weight during flight. The probe is hosting spares of HASI instruments, housekeeping sensors and other dedicated sensors, Beagle II UV Sensors and Huygens Tilt Sensor, for a total of 77 acquired sensor channels, sampled during ascent, drift and descent phase. Main goals are to verify sensor performance and perform a realistic functional test in dynamical and environmental conditions similar to those during the descent in Titan atmosphere and furthermore to investigate impact at ground to check the impact detection sequence of HASI accelerometer and HASI in the surface phase. An integrated data acquisition and instrument control system has been developed, based on PC architecture and soft -real-time application. Sensors channels have been sampled at the nominal HASI data rates, with a max rate of 1 kHz. Software has been developed for data acquisition, onboard storage and telemetry transmission satisfying all requests for real-time monitoring, diagnostic and redundancy.

  19. Long duration flights of stratospheric balloons in the frame of the Taranis project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Catoire, Valery; Huret, Nathalie

    The satellite instrument TARANIS will be dedicated to the study of the Transient Luminous Events (TLE) above storms, and of the energy transfers between the Earth atmosphere and space. Such phenomena can affect the atmospheric chemistry. Stratospheric balloon instruments can be used for the detection of stratospheric ozone and nitrogen chemistry perturbations induced by these high energy phenomena. Obviously, it is difficult to know in advance when such phenomena can occur and then to be ready for opportune launching of a stratospheric balloon. Then, we propose to use long duration balloons that can reside in the lower and middle stratosphere for more than one week. Open stratospheric balloons could be used for such purpose. Some tests have shown that these balloons could stay several days in the middle stratosphere (around an altitude of 30 km) and can carry heavy gondolas, typically up to 200 kg. Such balloon can flown over large storms and cloud expanses without any risk. In the frame of the TARANIS project, we propose to use such balloons with gondolas carrying different kinds of instruments. Ozone and NO2 measurements can be conducted using remote sensing techniques, using Moon and Sun as light source (SALOMON-type instrument). The integrated path length of the measurements is between tens and few hundreds of km. Following the motion of the balloon (carried by winds) and the motion of the Moon and Sun, a part of the stratosphere above the balloon float motion can be sampled. On the other hand, the estimation of the position of the NO2 enhancements cannot be accurately determined. The second technique involves in situ measurements (SPIRIT-type instrument). In this case, the location of the enhancements can be accurately determined, as well as the absolute values of the species concentrations. On the other hand, the probability of detection is smaller than with remote sensing techniques. Finally, instruments dedicated to the detection of atmospheric "terrestrial

  20. The solar diameter and oblateness measured by the solar disk sextant on the 1992 September 30 balloon flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sofia, S.; Heaps, W.; Twigg, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a balloon flight of the Solar Disk Sextant (SDS) on 1992 September 30. This was the first flight in which the SDS used a wedge assembly fabricated by molecular contact in order to eliminate the wedge angle variations observed in previous flights. The instrument performed as designed. The main results obtained are values of the solar diameter for a number of discrete heliocentric latitudes, and the solar oblateness. The accuracy of the diameter values is better than 0.2 sec whereas the precision is approximately 1-2 mas. The equatorial solar diameter, at 1 AU, was 1919.06 sec +/- 0.12 sec, and the oblateness epsilon = 8.63 +/- 0.88 x 10(exp -6).

  1. Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL)-2: Flight Test of Next Generation UV Detector and Spectrograph (Lead Institution)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Christopher

    We have developed and successfully flown a path-finding experiment, for which this is the lead proposal, the Faint Intergalactic-medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL), designed to discover and map faint emission from the Intergalactic Medium (IGM). Our successful science flight in June 2009, proved every aspect of the complex instrument performance, and provided the strongest measurements and constraints on IGM emission available from any instrument. We are preparing a significantly upgraded experiment, FIREBALL-2, for launch in Fall 2015 at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. We have made progress in spectrograph, detector, and payload design and development. CNES is providing the spectrograph, gondola, and gondola flight support team. Because of a CNES balloon mishap and funding constraints, support for a FIREBALL launch was delayed from Fall 2013 to Fall 2015. We propose 18 months of bridge funding to support the FIREBALL team that includes two female graduate students and one female Post Doctoral scholar (separately supported by NSF and Caltech Millikan Fellowships). FIREBALL directly supports NASA Science Plan Objectives to "Understand the many phenom-ena and processes associated with galaxy, stellar, and planetary system formation and evolution from the earliest epochs to today." FIREBALL directly addresses four Core Science Questions from the Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey (New Worlds New Horizons). FIREBALL provides flight and science testing of new UV technologies directly called out by NWNH as high priority for the next decade as a precursor to a 4-m class UV/optical future mission.

  2. Faint Intergalactic Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL)-2: Flight Test of Next Generation UV Detector and Spectrograph (Co-I Proposal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiminovich, David

    Columbia University is a Co-I institution in a collaborative research program with Caltech, the Lead Institution (PI: Christopher Martin). We have developed and successfully flown a path-finding experiment, the Faint Intergalactic-medium Redshifted Emission Balloon (FIREBALL), designed to discover and map faint emission from the Intergalactic Medium (IGM). Our successful science flight in June 2009, proved every aspect of the complex instrument performance, and provided the strongest measurements and constraints on IGM emission available from any instrument. We are preparing a significantly upgraded experiment, FIREBALL-2, for launch in Fall 2015 at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico. We have made progress in spectrograph, detector, and payload design and development. CNES is providing the spectrograph, gondola, and gondola flight support team. Because of a CNES balloon mishap and funding constraints, support for a FIREBALL launch was delayed from Fall 2013 to Fall 2015. We propose 18 months of bridge funding to support the FIREBALL team that includes one woman Ph.D. student at Columbia University. FIREBALL directly supports NASA Science Plan Objectives to "Understand the many phenomena and processes associated with galaxy, stellar, and planetary system formation and evolution from the earliest epochs to today." FIREBALL directly addresses four Core Science Questions from the Astrophysics 2010 Decadal Survey (New Worlds New Horizons). FIREBALL provides flight and science testing of new UV technologies directly called out by NWNH as high priority for the next decade as a precursor to a 4-m class UV/optical future mission.

  3. 77 FR 42764 - Distribution of the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Digital Audio Recording Technology Royalty Funds...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Copyright Royalty Board Distribution of the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Digital Audio Recording Technology... the digital audio recording technology royalty fees in the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Musical Works... royalties on digital audio recording devices and media that are distributed in the United States. 17...

  4. Feasibility study of a long duration balloon flight with NASA/GSFC and Soviet Space Agency Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, William E.; Knoll, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    A feasibility study of conducting a joint NASA/GSFC and Soviet Space Agency long duration balloon flight at the Antarctic in Jan. 1993 is reported. The objective of the mission is the verification and calibration of gamma ray and neutron remote sensing instruments which can be used to obtain geochemical maps of the surface of planetary bodies. The gamma ray instruments in question are the GRAD and the Soviet Phobos prototype. The neutron detectors are supplied by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Soviet Phobos prototype. These are to be carried aboard a gondola that supplies the data and supplies the power for the period of up to two weeks.

  5. "SP.ACE" 2013-2015: ASGARD Balloon and BIFROST Parabolic Flights: Latest Developments in Hands-On Space Education Projects for Secondary School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Schrijver, E.; Chameleva, H.; Degroote, C.; D'Haese, Z.; Paice, C.; Plas, H.; Van den Bossche, A.; Vander Donckt, L.; Vander Vost, J.

    2015-09-01

    Flight opportunities on high-altitude ASGARD balloons offered to secondary schools worldwide since 20 1 1 have led to an ever more rapidly increasing number of project proposals. The introduction of beginners' and ‘advanced classes of experiments is hoped to draw in even larger numbers of interested school teams. Furthermore, and in cooperation with ESERO (European Space Education Resources Office), workshops and documentation are being prepared to introduce teachers and students alike to the world of microcontrollers and sensors. A student parabolic flight programme called BIFROST (Brussels' Initiative to provide Flight Research Opportunities to STudents) was initiated to meet the rising demand for hands-on space education projects and the desire to cover the widest possible range of scientific and/or technical domains, which essentially calls for a variety of flight platforms: cansats, balloons and parabolic flight.

  6. Construction and testing of a pixellated CZT detector and shield for a hard x-ray astronomy balloon flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Narita, Tomohiko; Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.

    2000-12-01

    We report on the construction and laboratory testing of pixellated CZT detectors mounted in a flip-chip, tiled fashion and read out by an ASIC, as required for proposed hard X-ray astronomy missions. Two 10 mm X 10 mm X 5 mm detectors were fabricated, one out of standard eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT and one out of IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT. Each was fashioned with a 4 X 4 array of gold pixels on 2.5 mm pitch with a surrounding guard ring. The detectors were mounted side by side on a carrier card, such that the pixel pitch was preserved, and read out by a 32-channel VA-TA ASIC from IDE AS Corp. controlled by a PC/104 single-board computer. A passive shield/collimator surrounded by plastic scintillator encloses the detectors on five sides and provides an approximately 40 degree field of view. Thus this experiment tests key techniques required for future hard X-ray survey instruments. The experiment was taken to Ft. Sumner, NM in May 2000 in preparation for a scientific balloon flight aboard the joint Harvard-MSFC EXITE2/HERO payload. Although we did not receive a flight opportunity, and are currently scheduled to fly in September 2000, we present our calibration data in the flight configuration together with data analysis techniques and simulations of the expected flight background spectrum.

  7. Unmanned powered balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korn, A. O.

    1975-01-01

    In the late 1960's several governmental agencies sponsored efforts to develop unmanned, powered balloon systems for scientific experimentation and military operations. Some of the programs resulted in hardware and limited flight tests; others, to date, have not progressed beyond the paper study stage. Balloon system designs, materials, propulsion units and capabilities are briefly described, and critical problem areas are pointed out which require further study in order to achieve operational powered balloon systems capable of long duration flight at high altitudes.

  8. Balloon film strain measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, James L.

    In order to understand the state of stress in scientific balloons, a need exists for the measurement of film deformation in flight. The results of a flight test program are reported where material strain was measured for the first time during the inflation, launch, ascent and float of a typical natural shape, zero pressure scientific balloon.

  9. Balloon for Long-Duration, High-Altitude Flight at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffrey; Kerzhanovich, Viktor; Yavrouian, Andre; Fairbrother, Debora; Said, Magdi; Sandy, Chuck; Fredrickson, Thad

    2007-01-01

    A document describes a 5.5-m-diameter, helium-filled balloon designed for carrying a scientific payload having a mass of 44 kg for at least six days at an altitude of about 55 km in the atmosphere of Venus. The requirement for floating at nearly constant altitude dictates the choice of a mass-efficient spherical super-pressure balloon that tracks a constant atmospheric density. Therefore, the balloon is of a conventional spherical super-pressure type, except that it is made of materials chosen to minimize solar radiant heating and withstand the corrosive sulfuric acid aerosol of the Venusian atmosphere. The shell consists of 16 gores of a multilayer composite material. The outer layer, made of polytetrafluoroethylene, protects against sulfuric acid aerosol. Next is an aluminum layer that reflects sunlight to minimize heating, followed by an aluminized polyethylene terephthalate layer that resists permeation by helium, followed by an aromatic polyester fabric that imparts strength to withstand deployment forces and steady super-pressure. A polyurethane coat on the inner surface of the fabric facilitates sealing at gore-to-gore seams. End fittings and seals, and a tether connecting the end fittings to a gondola, are all made of sulfuric-acid-resistant materials.

  10. A mercuric iodide detector system for X-ray astronomy. II - Results from flight tests of a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J. V.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1983-01-01

    To establish the expected sensitivity of a new hard X-ray telescope design, described by Ricker et al., an experiment was conducted to measure the background counting rate at balloon altitudes (40 km) of mercuric iodide, a room temperature solid state X-ray detector. The prototype detector consisted of two thin mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors surrounded by a large bismuth germanate scintillator operated in anticoincidence. The bismuth germanate shield vetoed most of the background counting rate induced by atmospheric gamma-rays, neutrons and cosmic rays. A balloon-borne gondola containing a prototype detector assembly was designed, constructed and flown twice in the spring of 1982 from Palestine, TX. The second flight of this instrument established a differential background counting rate of 4.2 + or - 0.7 x 10 to the -5th counts/s sq cm keV over the energy range of 40-80 keV. This measurement was within 50 percent of the predicted value. The measured rate is about 5 times lower than previously achieved in shielded NaI/CsI or Ge systems operating in the same energy range.

  11. A mercuric detector system for X-ray astronomy. 2. Results from flight tests of a balloon borne instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.; Vanderspek, R. K.; Ricker, G. R.

    1982-01-01

    To establish the expected sensitivity of a new hard X-ray telescope design, an experiment was conducted to measure the background counting rate at balloon altitudes (40 km) of mercuric iodide, a room temperature solid state X-ray detector. The prototype detector consisted of two thin mercuric iodide (HgI2) detectors surrounded by a large bismuth germanate (Bi4Ge3O12) scintillator operated in anticoincidence. The bismuth germanate shield vetoed most of the background counting rate induced by atmospheric gamma-rays, neutrons and cosmic rays. A balloon-borne gondola containing a prototype detector assembly was designed, constructed and flown twice in the spring of 1982 from Palestine, Texas. The second flight of this instrument established a differential background counting rate of 4.2 O.7 x 10-5 counts/sec cm keV over the energy range of 40 to 80 keV. This measurement was within 50% of the predicted value. The measured rate is approx 5 times lower than previously achieved in shielded NaI/CsI or Ge systems operating in the same energy range. The prediction was based on a Monte Carlo simulation of the detector assembly in the radiation environment at float altitude.

  12. Investigation of solar active regions at high resolution by balloon flights of the solar optical universal polarimeter, extended definition phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.

    1993-01-01

    Technical studies of the feasibility of balloon flights of the former Spacelab instrument, the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter, with a modern charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, to study the structure and evolution of solar active regions at high resolution, are reviewed. In particular, different CCD cameras were used at ground-based solar observatories with the SOUP filter, to evaluate their performance and collect high resolution images. High resolution movies of the photosphere and chromosphere were successfully obtained using four different CCD cameras. Some of this data was collected in coordinated observations with the Yohkoh satellite during May-July, 1992, and they are being analyzed scientifically along with simultaneous X-ray observations.

  13. B-SSIPP: A Miniature Solar Observatory for Rocket or Balloon Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeForest, Craig; Laurent, Glenn Thomas; Diller, Jed; Brownsberger, Judy

    2016-05-01

    The Southwest Solar Instrument Pointing Package (SSIPP) is a miniature solar observatory for flight application. Conceived as a way to lower barriers to entry to spaceflight, SSIPP conditions a broadband solar beam for use by an IR, visible, or UV instrument on an optical table -- just as do ground-based observatories. The beam is conditioned by a closed-loop tip/tilt pointing system that can lock onto the Sun over a 20° cone of angles, and maintain arcsecond-class pointing from a dynamic flight platform. SSIPP was originally conceived as an instrument platform for the XCOR Lynx suborbital sportsrocket. It has been adapted for ballloon flight, incorporating a novel coarse pointing system that measures torsional pendulation in-flight to construct a stable pointing law on-the-fly. First flight is projected for June 2016 (shortly after SPD). We present status, major design elements, and future plans for the platform.

  14. Initial Results from the Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) Balloon Flight Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) high-altitude balloon mission was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico USA on 25 September, 2015. Over 15 hours of science data were obtained from four dosimeters at altitudes above about 25 km. The four dosimeters flown on the RaD-X science payload are a Hawk version 3.0 Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) manufactured by Far West Technologies, a Liulin dosimeter-spectrometer produced by the Solar Research and Technology Institute, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, a total ionizing dose detector manufactured by Teledyne Microelectronic Technologies, and the RaySure detector provided by the University of Surrey.

  15. Thin film strain transducer. [suitable for in-flight measurement of scientific balloon strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A strain transducer system and process for making same is disclosed wherein a beryllium-copper ring having four strain gages disposed thereon is electrically connected in Wheatstone bridge fashion to output instrumentation. Tabs are bonded to a balloon or like surface with strain on the surface causing bending of the ring and providing an electrical signal through the gages proportional to the surface strain. A figure is provided which illustrates a pattern of a one-half ring segment as placed on a sheet of beryllium-copper for chem-mill etch formation, prior to bending and welding of a pair of the segments to form a ring structure.

  16. NASA Balloon Technology Developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbrother, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program has been, and will continue to be, committed to improving the capabilities of balloons to support science missions. Fundamental to vehicle improvement is a program of technology development that will enable improved flight performance throughout the next decade. The program s technology thrust areas include: materials, vehicle design & development, structural analysis, operations & support systems, performance modeling and planetary balloons. Building on the foundations of the 18-year research and development program, a technology roadmap has been generated which identifies specific areas of interest to NASA and the vision of future developments. The major components of the roadmap are: vehicle systems, balloon-craft systems, operational and safety support systems, and planetary vehicles. Current technology activities include nanocomposite balloon films, a new balloon designed to lift 3600 kgs to 36 km, a balloon rotation rate study and Mars pumpkin balloon investigations. The technology roadmap, as well as specific projects and recent advancements, will be presented.

  17. Ground-Water Conditions and Studies in Georgia, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Michael F.; Painter, Jaime A.; Leeth, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collects ground-water data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, better define ground-water resources, and address problems related to water supply, water use, and water quality. Water levels were monitored continuously, in Georgia, in a network of 184 wells during 2006 and 182 wells during 2007. Because of missing data or the short period of record (less than 3 years) for several of these wells, a total of 166 wells from the network are discussed in this report. These wells include 18 in the surficial aquifer system, 21 in the Brunswick aquifer system and equivalent sediments, 67 in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 15 in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 10 in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 in the Gordon aquifer, 11 in the Clayton aquifer, 12 in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 9 in crystalline-rock aquifers. Data from the network indicate that water levels generally declined from 2005 levels, with water levels in 99 wells below normal, 52 wells in the normal range, 12 wells above normal, and 3 wells with insufficient data for comparison of 5-year trends and period of record statistics. In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic synoptic water-level measurements were collected and used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for the Upper Floridan aquifer in Camden, Charlton, and Ware Counties, Georgia, and adjacent counties in Florida during September 2006 and 2007, in the Brunswick area during July 2006 and August 2007, and in the City of Albany-Dougherty County area during October 2006 and October 2007. In general, the configuration of the potentiometric surfaces showed little change during 2006-2007 in each of the areas. Ground-water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer is monitored in the Albany, Savannah, and Brunswick areas and in Camden County; and water quality in the Lower Floridan aquifer is monitored in the Savannah and Brunswick areas and in Camden County. In

  18. LUPUS I observations from the 2010 flight of the Balloon-borne large aperture submillimeter telescope for polarimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Tristan G.; Chapman, Nicholas L.; Novak, Giles; Ade, Peter A. R.; Hargrave, Peter C.; Nutter, David; Angilè, Francesco E.; Devlin, Mark J.; Klein, Jeffrey; Benton, Steven J.; Fissel, Laura M.; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Chapin, Edward L.; Fukui, Yasuo; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Mroczkowski, Tony K.; Olmi, Luca; and others

    2014-04-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry (BLASTPol) was created by adding polarimetric capability to the BLAST experiment that was flown in 2003, 2005, and 2006. BLASTPol inherited BLAST's 1.8 m primary and its Herschel/SPIRE heritage focal plane that allows simultaneous observation at 250, 350, and 500 μm. We flew BLASTPol in 2010 and again in 2012. Both were long duration Antarctic flights. Here we present polarimetry of the nearby filamentary dark cloud Lupus I obtained during the 2010 flight. Despite limitations imposed by the effects of a damaged optical component, we were able to clearly detect submillimeter polarization on degree scales. We compare the resulting BLASTPol magnetic field map with a similar map made via optical polarimetry. (The optical data were published in 1998 by J. Rizzo and collaborators.) The two maps partially overlap and are reasonably consistent with one another. We compare these magnetic field maps to the orientations of filaments in Lupus I, and we find that the dominant filament in the cloud is approximately perpendicular to the large-scale field, while secondary filaments appear to run parallel to the magnetic fields in their vicinities. This is similar to what is observed in Serpens South via near-IR polarimetry, and consistent with what is seen in MHD simulations by F. Nakamura and Z. Li.

  19. Planetary atmospheres minor species sensor balloon flight test to near space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peale, Robert E.; Fredricksen, Christopher J.; Muraviev, Andrei V.; Maukonen, Douglas; Quddusi, Hajrah M.; Calhoun, Seth; Colwell, Joshua E.; Lachenmeier, Timothy A.; Dewey, Russell G.; Stern, Alan; Padilla, Sebastian; Bode, Rolfe

    2015-05-01

    The Planetary Atmospheres Minor Species Sensor (PAMSS) is an intracavity laser absorption spectrometer that uses a mid-infrared quantum cascade laser in an open external cavity for sensing ultra-trace gases with parts-per-billion sensitivity. PAMSS was flown on a balloon by Near Space Corporation from Madras OR to 30 km on 17 July 2014. Based on lessons learned, it was modified and was flown a second time to 32 km by World View Enterprises from Pinal AirPark AZ on 8 March 2015. Successes included continuous operation and survival of software, electronics, optics, and optical alignment during extreme conditions and a rough landing. Operation of PAMSS in the relevant environment of near space has significantly elevated its Technical Readiness Level for trace-gas sensing with potential for planetary and atmospheric science in harsh environments.

  20. Measurements of atmospheric electrical parameters and ELF electromagnetic emissions during a meteorological balloon flight.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benda, Robert; Dujany, Matthieu; Berthomieu, Roland; Boissier, Mathilde; Bruneel, Pierre; Fischer, Lucie; Focillon, William; Gullo, Robin; Hubert, Valentin; Lafforgue, Gaétan; Loe-Mie, Marichka; Messager, Adrien; Roy, Felix; Auvray, Gérard; Bertrand, Fabrice; Coulomb, Romain; Deprez, Gregoire; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of electric field and atmospheric conductivity were performed onboard a small payload flown under a meteorological balloon during a fair weather period. This experiment is part of a project to study thunderstorms and TLE organized in the frame of the engineering cursus at Ecole Polytechnique. The payload is equipped with 4 electrodes to measure the 3 components of the DC and AC electric fields up to 3.2 kHz. Dedicated sequences of operation, when one electrode is operated in the relaxation mode, have been used to determine the positive and negative electrical conductivities. Altitude profiles of the DC vertical electric field and conductivities in agreement with expected fair weather parameters were obtained from ~ 3.5 to ~ 13 km before the failure of a battery. At an altitude of ~ 9 km slight disturbances in the electric field suggest the traversal of thin clouds with disturbed electrical characteristics. Schumann resonances were observed up to the fifth harmonics at levels that are typical of a quiet period over Europe with most thunderstorms located over remote longitudinal sectors. EM waves due the power lines at 50Hz are detected during the whole measuring period and their altitude and horizontal variations will be presented as a function of the position of the balloon over the ground power network. A surprising and interesting observation was made of a Russian transmitter at 82 Hz located in Murmansk region and used for sub-marine communications. We shall present an initial analysis of the amplitude and polarization of the corresponding signal.

  1. Upcoming long-duration balloon flight of the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Albert Y.; Saint Hilaire, Pascal; Duncan, Nicole A.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Bain, Hazel; Maruca, Bennett A.; Boggs, Steven E.; Zoglauer, Andreas C.; Smith, David; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Amman, Mark S.

    2015-04-01

    We present the status of preparations for the upcoming Antarctic long-duration balloon flight of the balloon-borne Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares (GRIPS) instrument in December 2015. GRIPS will provide a near-optimal combination of high-resolution imaging, spectroscopy, and polarimetry of solar-flare gamma-ray/hard X-ray emissions from ~20 keV to >~10 MeV. GRIPS will address questions raised by recent solar flare observations regarding particle acceleration and energy release, such as: What causes the spatial separation between energetic electrons producing hard X-rays and energetic ions producing gamma-ray lines? How anisotropic are the relativistic electrons, and why can they dominate in the corona? How do the compositions of accelerated and ambient material vary with space and time, and why? The spectrometer/polarimeter consists of sixteen 3D position-sensitive germanium detectors (3D-GeDs), where each energy deposition is individually recorded with an energy resolution of a few keV FWHM and a spatial resolution of <0.1 mm3. Imaging is accomplished by a single multi-pitch rotating modulator (MPRM), a 2.5-cm thick tungsten-alloy slit/slat grid with pitches that range quasi-continuously from 1 to 13 mm. The MPRM is situated 8 meters from the spectrometer to provide excellent image quality and unparalleled angular resolution at gamma-ray energies (12.5 arcsec FWHM), sufficient to separate 2.2 MeV footpoint sources for almost all flares. Polarimetry is accomplished by analyzing the anisotropy of reconstructed Compton scattering in the 3D-GeDs (i.e., as an active scatterer), with an estimated minimum detectable polarization of a few percent at 150-650 keV in an X-class flare.

  2. NASA balloon technology developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbrother, D. A.

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Balloon Program has been, and will continue to be, committed to improving the capabilities of balloons to support science missions. Fundamental to vehicle improvement is a program of technology development that will enable improved flight performance throughout the next decade. The program's technology thrust areas include: materials, vehicle design & development, structural analysis, operations & support systems, performance modeling and planetary balloons. Building on the foundations of the 18-year research and development program, a technology roadmap has been generated which identifies specific areas of interest to NASA and the vision of future developments. The major components of the roadmap are: vehicle systems, ballooncraft systems, operational and safety support systems, and planetary vehicles. Current technology activities include nanocomposite balloon films, a new balloon designed to lift 3600 kgs to 36 km, a balloon rotation rate study and Mars pumpkin balloon investigations. The technology roadmap, as well as specific projects and recent advancements, will be presented.

  3. Performance of bismuth germanate active shielding on a balloon flight over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C.; Coldwell, R. L.; Trombka, J. I.; Starr, R.; Eichhorn, G.

    1990-01-01

    The GRAD (Gamma-Ray Advanced Detector) gamma-ray spectrometer was flown on a balloon at an altitude of 36.6 km over Antarctica on January 8-10, 1988, where it was used to make observations of SN 1987A. The performance of the bismuth germanate (BGO) active shielding in the near-space environment over Antarctica is examined. The promised effectiveness of this shielding in the suppression of unwanted background has been demonstrated. The BGO-shielded GRAD spectrometer detected gamma-ray lines with fluxes of 0.002/sq cm sec from SN 1987A in a radiation background approximately a factor of 4 more intense than that over Alice Springs, Australia. This level of sensitivity indicates that BGO is at least as effective as CsI when used as active shielding. Isomerism is common, both in the bismuth and germanium regions of the nuclear chart, but is found to be less of a problem for background suppression in the latter region than in the former.

  4. Composite Materials With Uncured Epoxy Matrix Exposed in Stratosphere During NASA Stratospheric Balloon Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kondyurin, Alexey; Kondyurina, Irina; Bilek, Marcela; de Groh, Kim K.

    2013-01-01

    A cassette of uncured composite materials with epoxy resin matrixes was exposed in the stratosphere (40 km altitude) over three days. Temperature variations of -76 to 32.5C and pressure up to 2.1 torr were recorded during flight. An analysis of the chemical structure of the composites showed, that the polymer matrix exposed in the stratosphere becomes crosslinked, while the ground control materials react by way of polymerization reaction of epoxy groups. The space irradiations are considered to be responsible for crosslinking of the uncured polymers exposed in the stratosphere. The composites were cured on Earth after landing. Analysis of the cured composites showed that the polymer matrix remains active under stratospheric conditions. The results can be used for predicting curing processes of polymer composites in a free space environment during an orbital space flight.

  5. Results from the First Flight of the High Energy Imaging Device (HEIDI) Balloon Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Dennis, B. R.; Gaither, C. C., III; Hartman, C. N.; Orwig, L. E.; Lang, F. L.; Starr, R.; Schmahl, E. J.; Greene, M. E.; Tan, H.; Hurford, G. J.; Johnson, W. N.

    1993-12-01

    Imaging solar flares in hard X rays and gamma rays is the current scientific frontier for solar flare physics. The objectives of the HEIDI Project are to develop the Fourier-transform imaging technique using rotating modulation collimators (RMCs) and to obtain hard X-ray and gamma-ray images of solar flares and non-solar, cosmic X-ray sources such as the Crab Nebula. As currently configured, the HEIDI payload has two RMCs with 25-arcsecond and 11-arcsecond angular resolution, respectively; sensitivity to photon energies as high as 700 keV; and time resolution for individual photon events of 100 microseconds. It flew for the first time on June 22, 1993, and was pointed at the Crab Nebula and at the Sun throughout the six-hour flight. The HEIDI effort is envisioned as part of a long-term growth plan in which HEIDI will serve not only as a vehicle for testing grids and associated alignment techniques being developed for the High Energy Solar Physics (HESP) mission, but also as a hard X-ray and gamma-ray imager, ready to fly during the next solar maximum should HESP not come to fruition. Results from the first flight and a description of plans for the future of HEIDI will be presented.

  6. The Second Flight of the Sunrise Balloon-borne Solar Observatory: Overview of Instrument Updates, the Flight, the Data, and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solanki, S. K.; Riethmüller, T. L.; Barthol, P.; Danilovic, S.; Deutsch, W.; Doerr, H.-P.; Feller, A.; Gandorfer, A.; Germerott, D.; Gizon, L.; Grauf, B.; Heerlein, K.; Hirzberger, J.; Kolleck, M.; Lagg, A.; Meller, R.; Tomasch, G.; van Noort, M.; Blanco Rodríguez, J.; Gasent Blesa, J. L.; Balaguer Jiménez, M.; Del Toro Iniesta, J. C.; López Jiménez, A. C.; Orozco Suarez, D.; Berkefeld, T.; Halbgewachs, C.; Schmidt, W.; Álvarez-Herrero, A.; Sabau-Graziati, L.; Pérez Grande, I.; Martínez Pillet, V.; Card, G.; Centeno, R.; Knölker, M.; Lecinski, A.

    2017-03-01

    The Sunrise balloon-borne solar observatory, consisting of a 1 m aperture telescope that provides a stabilized image to a UV filter imager and an imaging vector polarimeter, carried out its second science flight in 2013 June. It provided observations of parts of active regions at high spatial resolution, including the first high-resolution images in the Mg ii k line. The obtained data are of very high quality, with the best UV images reaching the diffraction limit of the telescope at 3000 Å after Multi-Frame Blind Deconvolution reconstruction accounting for phase-diversity information. Here a brief update is given of the instruments and the data reduction techniques, which includes an inversion of the polarimetric data. Mainly those aspects that evolved compared with the first flight are described. A tabular overview of the observations is given. In addition, an example time series of a part of the emerging active region NOAA AR 11768 observed relatively close to disk center is described and discussed in some detail. The observations cover the pores in the trailing polarity of the active region, as well as the polarity inversion line where flux emergence was ongoing and a small flare-like brightening occurred in the course of the time series. The pores are found to contain magnetic field strengths ranging up to 2500 G, and while large pores are clearly darker and cooler than the quiet Sun in all layers of the photosphere, the temperature and brightness of small pores approach or even exceed those of the quiet Sun in the upper photosphere.

  7. Telescope Systems for Balloon-Borne Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, C. (Editor); Witteborn, F. C. (Editor); Shipley, A. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference on the use of balloons for scientific research are presented. The subjects discussed include the following: (1) astronomical observations with balloon-borne telescopes, (2) orientable, stabilized balloon-borne gondola for around-the-world flights, (3) ultraviolet stellar spectrophotometry from a balloon platform, (4) infrared telescope for balloon-borne infrared astronomy, and (5) stabilization, pointing, and command control of balloon-borne telescopes.

  8. 38th Annual Survey Report on State-Sponsored Student Financial Aid, 2006-2007 Academic Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Each year, the National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs (NASSGAP) completes a survey regarding state-funded expenditures for postsecondary student financial aid. This report, the 38th annual survey, represents data from academic year 2006-07. Data highlights of this survey include: (1) In the 2006-2007 academic year, the states…

  9. Florida Community College System Long-Range Program Plan (LRPP) for Fiscal Years 2002-2003 through 2006-2007.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Board of Community Colleges, Tallahassee.

    This document discusses the Florida Community College System's Long Range Program Plan (LRPP) for the fiscal years 2002-2003 through 2006-2007. The document begins by addressing the mission statement of the college, which strives for "high student achievement, seamless articulation and increased access, workforce skills and economic…

  10. Isolation and characterization of medically important aerobic actinomycetes in soil of iran (2006 - 2007).

    PubMed

    Aghamirian, Mohammad Reza; Ghiasian, Seyed Amir

    2009-01-01

    The aerobic actinomycetes are a large group of soil-inhabiting bacteria that occur worldwide. Some of them are the main cause of two important diseases, nocardiosis and actinomycetoma. To identify the prevalence and geographic distribution of aerobic actinomycetes in soil of Qazvin province, a study was carried out during 2006-2007. In this study, the incidence and diversity of medically important aerobic actinomycetes was determined in 300 soil samples of different parts of Qazvin. The suspensions of superficial soil samples were prepared by adding of normal saline, streptomycin and chloramphenicol and the supernatants were cultured on brain-heart infusion agar and Sabouraud's dextrose agar contain cycloheximide. The isolated microorganisms were examined by Gram and acid-fast stains and were identified biochemically and morphologically. Of 96 aerobic actinomycetes isolates identified, Actinomadura madurae and Streptomyces somaliensis were the most frequently isolated species each representing 19.8% of isolates, followed by Nocardia asteroides (15.6%), N. otitidiscaviarum (9.4%), N. brasiliensis (7.3%), A. peletieri, S. griseus, and Nocardia spp. (each 5.2%), and N. transvalensis, Nocardiopsis dassonvillei, Actinomadura spp. and Streptomyces spp. (each 3.1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on epidemiological investigation of medically important aerobic actinomycetes in soil samples from Iran. In recent years, mycetoma and nocardiosis have been increasingly reported in Iran. The results showed that medically important actinomycetes occur in the environment of Iran and soil could be potential source of actinomycotic infections.

  11. Unintentional injuries among youth with developmental disabilities in the United States, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Ruth A; Taneja, Gitanjali S; Schroeder, Thomas J; Trumble, Ann C; Moyer, Patricia M; Louis, Germaine M Buck

    2013-01-01

    We examined unintentional injury among youth with and without developmental disabilities. Our nationally representative sample included 6369 injured youth, aged 0-17 years, who were seen in one of the 63 US hospital emergency rooms that participated in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System - All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) in 2006-2007. Parents or guardians of injured youth were interviewed by telephone after the hospital visit to ascertain disability status. Denominator data were obtained from the National Health Interview Survey. Leading causes of injury were comparable for youth with and without disability. Injury rates (per 100 youth per year) were also comparable [10.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8, 13.0 and 10.5; 95% CI 8.2, 12.9, for youth with and without disability, respectively]. When examined by specific disability, the rate ratio for youth with learning disabilities versus youth without learning disability was 1.57 (95% CI 1.04, 2.10), which may represent a subgroup for targeted interventions.

  12. Accuracy of analyzed temperatures, winds and trajectories in the Southern Hemisphere tropical and midlatitude stratosphere as compared to long-duration balloon flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, B. M.; Christensen, T.; Hertzog, A.; Deme, A.; Vial, F.; Pommereau, J.-P.

    2006-12-01

    Eight super-pressure balloons floating at constant level between 50 and 80 hPa and three Infra-Red Montgolfier balloons of variable altitude (15 hPa daytime, 40-80 hPa night time) have been launched at 22° S from Brazil in February-May 2004 in the frame of the HIBISCUS project. The flights lasted for 7 to 79 days residing mainly in the tropics, but some of them passed the tropical barrier and went to southern midlatitudes. Compared to the balloon measurements just above the tropical tropopause the ECMWF operational temperatures show a systematic cold bias of 0.9 K and the easterly zonal winds are too strong by 0.7 m/s. This bias in the zonal wind adds to the ECMWF trajectory errors, but they still are relatively small with e.g. about an error of 700 km after 5 days. The NCEP/NCAR reanalysis trajectory errors are substantially larger (1300 km after 5 days). In the southern midlatitudes the cold bias is the same, but the zonal wind bias is almost zero. The trajectories are generally more accurate than in the tropics, but for one balloon a lot of the calculated trajectories end up on the wrong side of the tropical barrier and this leads to large trajectory errors.

  13. SAM 2 balloon test (stratospheric aerosol measurement)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepin, T. J.

    1976-01-01

    As a parallel effort to the LACATE balloon experiment a small optical system was constructed to enable a balloon test of a diode filter system similar to the type planned for the Nimbus-G SAM II experiment. The system was called the SAM II Balloon Test. Results of the balloon flight are summarized.

  14. Breakthrough in Mars balloon technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Cutts, J. A.; Cooper, H. W.; Hall, J. L.; McDonald, B. A.; Pauken, M. T.; White, C. V.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Castano, A.; Cathey, H. M.; Fairbrother, D. A.; Smith, I. S.; Shreves, C. M.; Lachenmeier, T.; Rainwater, E.; Smith, M.

    2004-01-01

    Two prototypes of Mars superpressure balloons were flight tested for aerial deployment and inflation in the Earth's stratosphere in June, 2002. One was an 11.3 m diameter by 6.8 m high pumpkin balloon constructed from polyethylene film and Zylon (PBO) tendons, the second was a 10 m diameter spherical balloon constructed from 12 μm thick Mylar film. Aerial deployment and inflation occurred under parachute descent at 34 km altitude, mimicing the dynamic pressure environment expected during an actual Mars balloon mission. Two on-board video cameras were used on each flight to provide real-time upward and downward views of the flight train. Atmospheric pressure and temperature were also recorded. Both prototypes successfully deployed from their storage container during parachute descent at approximately 40 m/s. The pumpkin balloon also successfully inflated with a 440 g charge of helium gas injected over a 1.5-min period. Since the helium inflation system was deliberately retained after inflation in this test, the pumpkin balloon continued to fall to the ocean where it was recovered for post-flight analysis. The less robust spherical balloon achieved only a partial (~70%) inflation before a structural failure occurred in the balloon film resulting in the loss of the vehicle. This structural failure was diagnosed to result from the vigorous oscillatory motion of the partially inflated balloon, possibly compounded by contact between the balloon film and an instrumentation box above it on the flight train. These two flights together represent significant progress in the development of Mars superpressure balloon technology and pave the way for future flight tests that will include post-deployment flight of the prototype balloons at a stable altitude.

  15. Effects of new penicillin susceptibility breakpoints for Streptococcus pneumoniae--United States, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    2008-12-19

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a common cause of pneumonia and meningitis in the United States. Antimicrobial resistance, which can result in pneumococcal infection treatment failure, is identified by measuring the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antimicrobial that will inhibit pneumococcal growth. Breakpoints are MICs that define infections as susceptible (treatable), intermediate (possibly treatable with higher doses), and resistant (not treatable) to certain antimicrobials. In January 2008, after a reevaluation that included more recent clinical studies, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) published new S. pneumoniae breakpoints for penicillin (the preferred antimicrobial for susceptible S. pneumoniae infections). To assess the potential effects of the new breakpoints on susceptibility categorization, CDC applied them to MICs of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) isolates collected by the Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) system at sites in 10 states during 2006-2007. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that the percentage of IPD nonmeningitis S. pneumoniae isolates categorized as susceptible, intermediate, and resistant to penicillin changed from 74.7%, 15.0%, and 10.3% under the former breakpoints to 93.2%, 5.6%, and 1.2%, respectively, under the new breakpoints. Microbiology laboratories should be aware of the new breakpoints to interpret pneumococcal susceptibility accurately, and clinicians should be aware of the breakpoints to prescribe antimicrobials appropriately for pneumococcal infections. State and local health departments also should be aware of the new breakpoints because they might result in a decrease in the number of reported cases of penicillin-resistant pneumococcus.

  16. Low-cost balloon missions to Mars and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerzhanovich, V.; Cutts, J.; Hall, J.

    2003-01-01

    The first successful flight demonstration of aerial deployment of Mars balloon prototypes in June 2002 and, earlier, of Venus balloon prototype deemed to be a turning point in the risk assessment of balloon missions.

  17. [Recommendations of the Vaccine Advisory Committee of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics: influenza vaccination campaign 2006-2007].

    PubMed

    Pineda Solas, A; Bernaola Iturbe, E; Martinón-Torres, F; Baca Cots, M; de Juan Martín, F; Gómez Campderá, J A; Díaz Domingo, J; Garcés Sánchez, M; Giménez Sánchez, F; Picazo, J

    2006-09-01

    The recommendations of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics on influenza vaccination in the pediatric age group for the 2006-2007 season are presented. Influenza has special characteristics in children due to the high morbidity it carries. Moreover, children constitute the most frequent source of transmission. The risk factors supporting influenza vaccination in children and the need for immunization in persons living with high-risk children are discussed. The advisability of extending vaccination in health workers, and specifically to pediatricians and medical personnel in contact with sick children is stressed. The composition of the vaccine for the 2006-2007 seasons, the schedules and dosages in children depending on age, and the contraindications to vaccination are specified. Finally, the premises required to recommend universal vaccination in young children in Spain as a strategy to reduce morbidity due to this epidemic in children and adults are discussed.

  18. Firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas - United States, 2006-2007 and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-08-02

    Firearm homicides and suicides are a continuing public health concern in the United States. During 2009-2010, a total of 22,571 firearm homicides and 38,126 firearm suicides occurred among U.S. residents. This includes 3,397 firearm homicides and 1,548 firearm suicides among persons aged 10-19 years; the firearm homicide rate for this age group was slightly above the all-ages rate. This report updates an earlier report that provided statistics on firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas for 2006-2007, with special emphasis on persons aged 10-19 years in recognition of the importance of early prevention efforts. Firearm homicide and suicide rates were calculated for the 50 most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) for 2009-2010 using mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Comparison statistics were recalculated for 2006-2007 to reflect revisions to MSA delineations and population estimates subsequent to the earlier report. Although the firearm homicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained above the national rate during 2009-2010, more than 75% of these MSAs showed a decreased rate from 2006-2007, largely accounting for a national decrease. The firearm homicide rate for persons aged 10-19 years exceeded the all-ages rate in many of these MSAs during 2009-2010, similar to the earlier reporting period. Conversely, although the firearm suicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained below the national rate during 2009-2010, nearly 75% of these MSAs showed an increased rate from 2006-2007, paralleling the national trend. Firearm suicide rates among persons aged 10-19 years were low compared with all-ages rates during both periods. These patterns can inform the development and monitoring of strategies directed at reducing firearm-related violence.

  19. Taking the Hot Air Out of Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinks, Virgil L.; Brinks, Robyn L.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how a teacher can give their students the challenge of designing and building model balloons or blimps. The project helps students learn the basics of balloon flight and what it really means to be "lighter than air." (PR)

  20. Optimum Designs for Superpressure Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Rainwater, E.

    Natural shape balloons have been employed for minimum stress envelope design in zero pressure scientific balloons since the 1940's. Superpressure balloons, on the other hand, have traditionally been spheres with tangential load attachment points. Application of natural shape design principles to superpressure balloons is relatively new. The resulting natural shape superpressure balloon shape generally fits Euler's Elastica. There are numerous examples of superpressure cylinder balloons which take on the elastica shape when pressurized. Techniques tried for reducing circumferential stresses in the NASA ULDB natural shape superpressure balloons have revealed new challenges both for design and manufacture. This paper will present a thorough background in the development of the current design concept as well as a review of the current challenges associated with manufacturing these envelopes. Approaches for achieving an optimum design will be presented along with ground and flight test data.

  1. Recent developments in scientific ballooning and launching of stratopause balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buduru, Suneel Kumar

    2012-07-01

    The Balloon Facility, Hyderabad has been launching stratospheric zero pressure balloons for scientific, engineering experiments and sounding balloons for getting winds at balloon float altitudes. Sounding balloons of volume 4,000 cubic meters made with thin film of 5.8 microns can reach up to 43 kilometers with a maximum payload of 1 kilogram. To keep pace with growing demand from user scientists in terms of higher payload capability and higher float altitude, developmental work in the area of very thin film continued, resulting in the development of very thin film of 3.8 microns thickness. Using this very thin film, four balloons of volume 60,000 cubic meters each, capable of carrying 10 kilograms payload to stratopause (approximately 47 kilometers) were fabricated for the first time for trial and evaluation. These balloons are precursors to our ultimate aim of developing still thinner film of 2.7 microns, to be used in balloons for reaching mesosphere with 10 kilogram payload. Raw material selection, manufacturing process, test and evaluation of the film in laboratory, new launching techniques for handling the very thin film balloons are described. A summary of the successful balloon flights carried out in last two years for scientific experiments and launching results of very thin film balloon is presented.

  2. Development overview of the revised NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, H. M.

    2008-11-01

    The desire for longer duration stratospheric flights at constant float altitudes for heavy payloads has been the focus of the development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) effort. Recent efforts have focused on ground testing and analysis to understand the previously observed issue of balloon deployment. A revised approach to the pumpkin balloon design has been tested through ground testing of model balloons and through two test flights. The design approach does not require foreshortening, and will significantly reduce the balloon handling during manufacture reducing the chances of inducing damage to the envelope. Successful ground testing of model balloons lead to the fabrication and test flight of a ˜176,000 m3 (˜6.2 MCF Million Cubic Foot) balloon. Pre-flight analytical predictions predicted that the proposed flight balloon design to be stable and should fully deploy. This paper provides an overview of this first test flight of the revised Ultra Long Duration Balloon design which was a short domestic test flight from Ft. Sumner, NM, USA. This balloon fully deployed, but developed a leak under pressurization. After an extensive investigation to the cause of the leak, a second test flight balloon was fabricated. This ˜176,000 m3 (˜6.2 MCF) balloon was flown from Kiruna, Sweden in June of 2006. Flight results for both test flights, including flight performance are presented.

  3. Universal stratospheric balloon gradiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsvetkov, Yury; Filippov, Sergey; Brekhov, Oleg; Nikolaev, Nikolay

    The study of the interior structure of the Earth and laws of its evolution is one of the most difficult problems of natural science. Among the geophysical fields the anomaly magnetic field is one of the most informational in questions of the Earth’s crust structure. Many important parameters of an environment are expedient for measuring at lower altitudes, than satellite ones. So, one of the alternatives is stratospheric balloon survey. The balloon flight altitudes cover the range from 20 to 50 km. At such altitudes there are steady zone air flows due to which the balloon flight trajectories can be of any direction, including round-the-world (round-the-pole). For investigation of Earth's magnetic field one of the examples of such sounding system have been designed, developed and maintained at IZMIRAN and MAI during already about 25 years. This system consists of three instrumental containers uniformly placed along a vertical 6 km line. Up today this set has been used only for geomagnetic purposes. So we describe this system on example of the measuring of the geomagnetic field gradient. System allows measuring a module and vertical gradient of the geomagnetic field along the whole flight trajectory and so one’s name is - stratospheric balloon magnetic gradiometer (SMBG). The GPS-receivers, located in each instrumental container, fix the flight coordinates to within several tens meters. Process of SBMG deployment, feature of the exit of rope from the magazine at the moment of balloon launching has been studied. Used magazine is cellular type. The hodograph of the measuring base of SBMG and the technique of correction of the deviations of the measuring base from the vertical line (introduction of the amendments for the deviation) during the flight have been investigated. It is shown that estimation of the normal level of values of the vertical gradient of the geomagnetic field is determined by the accuracy of determining the length of the measuring base SBMG

  4. A 100,000 pulse height analyzer for use in High Energy Cosmic Ray Experiments (HECRE) on high altitude balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cancro, C. A.; Garrahan, N. M.; Mcgowan, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    A description is given of a wide dynamic range pulse height analyzer system developed for use on High Energy Cosmic Ray Experiment (HECRE) Balloon Flights. A wide dynamic range of 100,000 is obtained by extending the range of a basic 1024 channel analyzer through the use of multiple ranges and range selection. The system described here contains four 100,000 pulse height analyzers. Each 100,000 pulse height analyzer consists of a group of cordwood welded modules mounted and interconnected on a printed circuit card. Four of these card assemblies, the required clock drive circuitry (discrete components mounted and interconnected on a separate card) and three input-output connectors are interconnected and mounted on the system board.

  5. NASA Super Pressure Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbrother, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    NASA is in the process of qualifying the mid-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB) to provide constant density altitude flight for science investigations at polar and mid-latitudes. The status of the development of the 18.8 million cubic foot SPB capable of carrying one-tonne of science to 110,000 feet, will be given. In addition, the operating considerations such as launch sites, flight safety considerations, and recovery will be discussed.

  6. Scientific ballooning: Past, present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, W. Vernon

    2013-02-01

    Balloons have been used for scientific research since they were invented in France more than 200 years ago. Cosmic rays were discovered 100 years ago with an experiment flown on a manned balloon. A major change in balloon design occurred in 1950 with the introduction of the socalled natural shape balloon with integral load tapes. This basic design has been used with more or less continuously improved materials for scientific balloon flights for the past half century, including long-duration balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica for the past two decades. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing a super-pressure balloon that would enable extended duration missions above 99.5% of the Earth's atmosphere at any latitude. Ultra-long-duration balloon (ULDB) flights enabled by constant-volume balloons should result in an even greater sea change in scientific ballooning than the inauguration of long-duration balloon (LDB) flights in Antarctica during the 1990-91 austral summer.

  7. Cleft formation in pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, Frank E.; Brakke, Kenneth A.; Schur, Willi W.

    NASA’s development of a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, centers on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. Under certain circumstances, it has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired state instead. Success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and developing of means for the quantitative assessment of design measures that prevent the occurrence of undesired equilibrium. In this paper, we will use the concept of stability to classify cyclically symmetric equilibrium states at full inflation and pressurization. Our mathematical model for a strained equilibrium balloon, when applied to a shape that mimics the Phase IV-A balloon of Flight 517, predicts instability at float. Launched in Spring 2003, this pumpkin balloon failed to deploy properly. Observations on pumpkin shape type super-pressure balloons that date back to the 1980s suggest that within a narrowly defined design class of pumpkin shape super-pressure balloons where individual designs are fully described by the number of gores ng and by a single measure of the bulging gore shape, the designs tend to become more vulnerable with the growing number of gores and with the diminishing size of the bulge radius rB Weight efficiency considerations favor a small bulge radius, while robust deployment into the desired cyclically symmetrical configuration becomes more likely with an increased bulge radius. In an effort to quantify this dependency, we will explore the stability of a family of balloon shapes parametrized by (ng, rB) which includes a design that is very similar, but not identical, to the balloon of Flight 517. In addition, we carry out a number of simulations that demonstrate other aspects related to multiple equilibria of pumpkin balloons.

  8. Violence-related firearm deaths among residents of metropolitan areas and cities---United States, 2006--2007.

    PubMed

    2011-05-13

    Violence-related firearm deaths remain an important public health concern in the United States. During 2006--2007, a total of 25,423 firearm homicides and 34,235 firearm suicides occurred among U.S. residents. These national totals include 4,166 firearm homicides and 1,446 firearm suicides among youths aged 10--19 years; the rate of firearm homicides among youths slightly exceeded the rate among persons of all ages. This report presents statistics on firearm homicides and firearm suicides for major metropolitan areas and cities, with an emphasis on youths aged 10--19 years in recognition of the importance of early prevention efforts. It integrates analyses conducted by CDC in response to requests for detailed information, arising from a heightened focus on urban violence by the media, the public, and policymakers over the past year. Firearm homicides and suicides and annual rates were tabulated for the 50 largest U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) and their central cities for 2006--2007, using data from the National Vital Statistics System and the U.S. Census Bureau. Firearm homicide rates in approximately two thirds of the MSAs exceeded the national rate, and 86% of cities had rates higher than those of their MSAs. The youth firearm homicide rate exceeded the all-ages rate in 80% of the MSAs and in 88% of the cities. Firearm suicide rates in just over half of the MSAs were below the national rate, and 55% of cities had rates below those of their MSAs. Youth firearm suicide rates in the MSAs and cities were collectively low compared with all-ages rates. Such variations in firearm homicide and firearm suicide rates, with respect to both urbanization and age, should be considered in the continuing development of prevention programs directed at reducing firearm violence.

  9. Measurements of Cosmic-Ray Proton and Helium Spectra from the BESS-Polar Long-duration Balloon Flights over Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Itazaki, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kumazawa, T.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Matsumoto, K.; Mitchell, J. W.; Myers, Z.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shikaze, Y.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Takasugi, Y.; Takeuchi, K.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.; Yamagami, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, T.; Yoshimura, K.

    2016-05-01

    The BESS-Polar Collaboration measured the energy spectra of cosmic-ray protons and helium during two long-duration balloon flights over Antarctica in 2004 December and 2007 December at substantially different levels of solar modulation. Proton and helium spectra probe the origin and propagation history of cosmic rays in the galaxy, and are essential to calculations of the expected spectra of cosmic-ray antiprotons, positrons, and electrons from interactions of primary cosmic-ray nuclei with the interstellar gas, and to calculations of atmospheric muons and neutrinos. We report absolute spectra at the top of the atmosphere for cosmic-ray protons in the kinetic energy range 0.2-160 GeV and helium nuclei in the range 0.15-80 GeV/nucleon. The corresponding magnetic-rigidity ranges are 0.6-160 GV for protons and 1.1-160 GV for helium. These spectra are compared to measurements from previous BESS flights and from ATIC-2, PAMELA, and AMS-02. We also report the ratio of the proton and helium fluxes from 1.1 to 160 GV and compare this to the ratios from PAMELA and AMS-02.

  10. Scientific ballooning in India: recent developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, M. N.; Damle, S. V.

    The National Scientific Balloon Facility (NBF) of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) has been conducting regular balloon flights for various experiments in the areas of Space Astronomy and Atmospheric Sciences. A continuous improvement in all aspects of Scientific Ballooning through a sustained R and D programme ensures uptodate services and a better handle on the design specifications for the balloon. Recent developments in balloon grade films, continuous improvements in design specifications, balloon manufacturing methods, flight operational procedures and improved balloon flight capabilities have resulted in a greatly improved flight performance in the last five years. A launch capability upgradation programme in terms of new launch spool and new launch vehicle has been initiated to be able to safely launch balloons with gross lifts upto 3500 kg, balloon volumes upto 450,000 m^3 and payloads upto 1400 kg. A series of steps have been initiated to improve long duration flight capabilities. In this paper, we present details on some of these aspects of Scientific Ballooning in India.

  11. John F. Kennedy Space Center's Technology Development and Application 2006-2007 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Topics covered include: Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors; Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling; Using Indium Tin Oxide To Mitigate Dust on Viewing Ports; High-Performance Polyimide Powder Coatings; Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications; Aerocoat 7 Replacement Coatings; Photocatalytic Coatings for Exploration and Spaceport Design; New Materials for the Repair of Polyimide Electrical Wire Insulation; Commodity-Free Calibration; Novel Ice Mitigation Methods; Crack Offset Measurement With the Projected Laser Target Device; New Materials for Structural Composites and Protective Coatings; Fire Chemistry Testing of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI); Using Aerogel-Based Insulation Material To Prevent Foam Loss on the Liquid-Hydrogen Intertank; Particle Ejection and Levitation Technology (PELT); Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust; Numerical Analysis of Rocket Exhaust Cratering; RESOLVE Projects: Lunar Water Resource Demonstration and Regolith Volatile Characterization; Tribocharging Lunar Soil for Electrostatic Beneficiation; Numerically Modeling the Erosion of Lunar Soil by Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Trajectory Model of Lunar Dust Particles; Using Lunar Module Shadows To Scale the Effects of Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Predicting the Acoustic Environment Induced by the Launch of the Ares I Vehicle; Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite; Hail Size Distribution Mapping; Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor Array System; Autonomous Flight Safety System - Phase III; The Photogrammetry Cube; Bird Vision System; Automating Range Surveillance Through Radio Interferometry and Field Strength Mapping Techniques; Next-Generation Telemetry Workstation; GPS Metric Tracking Unit; and Space-Based Range.

  12. Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X): High-Altitude Balloon Flight Mission for Improving the NAIRAS Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Alston, Erica J.; Straume, Tore; Gersey, Brad; Lusby, Terry C.; Norman, Ryan B.; Gronoff, Guillaume P.; Tobiska, W. Kent; Wilkins, Rick

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) high-altitude balloon mission was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico USA on 25 September, 2015. Over 15 hours of science data were obtained from four dosimeters at altitudes above about 25 km. One of the main goals of the RaD-X mission is to improve aviation radiation model characterization of cosmic ray primaries by taking dosimetric measurements above the Pfotzer maximum before the production of secondary particles occurs. The second goal of the RaD-X mission is to facilitate the pathway toward real-time, data assimilative predictions of atmospheric cosmic radiation exposure by identifying and characterizing low-cost radiation measurement solutions.

  13. Atmospheric Background Measurement in the 300-400 nm Band with a Balloon Borne Experiment During a Nocturnal Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rosa, Giovanni; Agnetta, Gaetano; Biondo, Benedetto; Catalano, Osvaldo; Celi, Filippo; Di Raffaele, Renato; Giarrusso, Salvatore; Mangano, Angelo; Russo, Francesco; Linsley, John; Lo Bue, Angelo

    2001-03-01

    The balloon borne experiment, named BABY (BAckground BYpass) belongs to a wider program, AIRWATCH-OWL, intended for the observation of high energy Cosmic Rays from space, detecting the faint UV fluorescence light emitted by the atmospheric Nitrogen as final result of a complex hadronic cascade. In this framework, one of the fundamental information concern the knowledge of the background level. This is one of the main parameters that contribute to the sensitivity of any kind of instrument. The apparatus used for the BABY experiment was designed and completely built at the IFCAI-CNR in Palermo. The instrument is composed by two filtered and collimated photomultipliers (PMT) that detect the UV light in the 300-400 nm wavelength. We report a brief description of the design of the detector and the results coming from a preliminary analysis of the data taken during a nocturnal over-sea observation.

  14. Flight performance of an advanced CZT imaging detector in a balloon-borne wide-field hard X-ray telescope—ProtoEXIST1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Allen, B.; Grindlay, J.; Barthelemy, S.; Baker, R.; Garson, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Apple, J.; Cleveland, W. H.

    2011-10-01

    We successfully carried out the first high-altitude balloon flight of a wide-field hard X-ray coded-aperture telescope ProtoEXIST1, which was launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility at Ft. Sumner, New Mexico on October 9, 2009. ProtoEXIST1 is the first implementation of an advanced CdZnTe (CZT) imaging detector in our ongoing program to establish the technology required for next generation wide-field hard X-ray telescopes such as the High Energy Telescope (HET) in the Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST). The CZT detector plane in ProtoEXIST1 consists of an 8×8 array of closely tiled 2 cm×2 cm×0.5 cm thick pixellated CZT crystals, each with 8×8 pixels, mounted on a set of readout electronics boards and covering a 256 cm2 active area with 2.5 mm pixels. A tungsten mask, mounted at 90 cm above the detector provides shadowgrams of X-ray sources in the 30-600 keV band for imaging, allowing a fully coded field of view of 9°×9° (and 19°×19° for 50% coding fraction) with an angular resolution of 20‧. In order to reduce the background radiation, the detector is surrounded by semi-graded (Pb/Sn/Cu) passive shields on the four sides all the way to the mask. On the back side, a 26 cm×26 cm×2 cm CsI(Na) active shield provides signals to tag charged particle induced events as well as ≳100keV background photons from below. The flight duration was only about 7.5 h due to strong winds (60 knots) at float altitude (38-39 km). Throughout the flight, the CZT detector performed excellently. The telescope observed Cyg X-1, a bright black hole binary system, for ˜1h at the end of the flight. Despite a few problems with the pointing and aspect systems that caused the telescope to track about 6.4° off the target, the analysis of the Cyg X-1 data revealed an X-ray source at 7.2σ in the 30-100 keV energy band at the expected location from the optical images taken by the onboard daytime star camera. The success of this first flight is very

  15. Balloon gondola diagnostics package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantor, K. M.

    1986-10-01

    In order to define a new gondola structural specification and to quantify the balloon termination environment, NASA developed a balloon gondola diagnostics package (GDP). This addition to the balloon flight train is comprised of a large array of electronic sensors employed to define the forces and accelerations imposed on a gondola during the termination event. These sensors include the following: a load cell, a three-axis accelerometer, two three-axis rate gyros, two magnetometers, and a two axis inclinometer. A transceiver couple allows the data to be telemetered across any in-line rotator to the gondola-mounted memory system. The GDP is commanded 'ON' just prior to parachute deployment in order to record the entire event.

  16. Balloons Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeskova, Z.; Featonby, D.; Fekova, V.

    2012-01-01

    Whilst everyone is familiar with the process of blowing up a balloon, few of us have gone further to quantify the actual pressures involved at different stages in the inflation process. This paper seeks to describe experiments to fill some of those gaps and examine some of the apparently anomalous behaviour of connected balloons. (Contains 12…

  17. Florida's Enhancing Education through Technology (Florida EETT). Leveraging Laptops: Effective Models for Enhancing Student Achievement. 2006-2007 Evaluation Report: Classroom Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowther, Deborah L.; Strahl, J. Daniel; Ross, Steven M.; Huang, Ying

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the 2006-2007 evaluation that was focused toward investigating one primary question: What changes in tool-based, student-centered teaching happen as a result of the infusion of technology and professional development? The research methodology involved the use of trained external researchers from Florida EETT schools…

  18. Measurements of the UV Nocturnal Atmospheric Background in the 300-400 nm Wavelength Band with the Experiment BaBy during a Transmediterranean Balloon Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giarrusso, S.; Gugliotta, G.; Agnetta, G.; Assis, P.; Biondo, B.; Catalano, O.; Celi, F.; Cusumano, G.; D'Ali Staiti, G.; Raffaele, R.Di.; Espirito-Santo, M.C.; Gabriele, M.; Rosa, G.La; Maccarone, M.C.; Mangano, A.; Mineo, T.; Pimenta, M.; Russo, F.; Sacco, B.; Santangelo, A.; Scarsi, P.; Tome, B.

    2003-07-01

    We present new results of U V no cturnal atmospheric background measured with the balloon borne experiment BaBy that performed a trans-Mediterranean flight on July 11 2002. The experiment looked downwards from about 40 km of altitude the dark no cturnal atmosphere over the sea in a moonless night. It is composed of 8 filtered and collimated fast PMTs detecting the U V light in the 300-400 nm wavelength band and in the 3 narrow bands centered at the emission lines of the atmospheric Nitrogen molecules. Both single photon counting and charge integration methods are used in pairs of PMTs with the same filter. The background measured over the sea is about 300 photons m-2 sr-1 ns-1 in the 300-400 nm wavelength band. Introduction The Backround Bypass, BaBy, experiment is a scientific support activity to the evaluation of the sensitivity of EUSO [3], devoted to the observation of the Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays from space by detecting U V fluorescence light. One of the fundamental information in EUSO design is the U V no cturnal atmospheric background level whose main sources are: light pollution from cities, planes and ships, naturally occurring bioluminescence, lightning flashes, reflected moonlight and starlight, auroral flashes, low energy cosmic ray air showers and atmospheric chemical reactions. Since 1998, no cturnal atmospheric U V background measurements, in the wavelength interval (300-400 nm) relevant for EUSO, have been performed by

  19. The CNES Balloon Program : an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debouzy, G.; Cazaux, C.

    The CNES (French Space Agency) Balloon Program continues to support the scientific community providing enhanced measurements capabilities across different kind of balloons: zero pressure balloon (80 % of activities), Infra-Red Montgolfiere (MIR) and superpressure balloon. For ENVISAT satellite validation, CNES has set up with ESA an important international balloon program with six dedicated campaigns, in 2002 - 2004 period, from mid-latitude; northern and tropical balloon launch facilities. In the framework of an European program, CNES participates to HIBISCUS project by organizing balloon campaigns (2003 & 2004) in tropical region with the launches of zero-pressure balloon, MIR and superpressure balloon from the same facility. In cooperation with US, CNES is preparing the VORCORE project which consists to study the atmospheric circulation of Antarctica polar vortex, using superpressure balloons launched from the Mac-Murdo station. This paper will present the CNES balloon activities in the 2002-2004 period, mainly focused on atmospheric chemistry, will give an overview of balloon technology development, and will present also the JAXA / CNES cooperation for the HSFD shuttle drop from stratospheric balloons with a first flight realized in 2003.

  20. Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight in Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.

    2011-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p(raised bar)'s) collected by the BESS-Polar II instrument during a long-duration flight over Antarctica in the solar minimum period of December 2007 through January 2008. The p(raised bar) spectrum measured by BESS-Polar II shows good consistency with secondary p(raised bar) calculations. Cosmologically primary p(raised bar)'s have been searched for by comparing the observed and calculated p(raised bar) spectra. The BESSPolar II result shows no evidence of primary p(raised bar)'s originating from the evaporation of PBH.

  1. Measurement of the Cosmic-Ray Antiproton Spectrum at Solar Minimum with a Long-Duration Balloon Flight over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abe, K.; Fuke, H.; Haino, S.; Hams, T.; Hasegawa, M.; Horikoshi, A.; Kim, K. C.; Kusumoto, A.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Matsukawa, Y.; Mitchell, J. W.; Nishimura, J.; Nozaki, M.; Orito, R.; Ormes, J. F.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, M.; Seo, E. S.; Shinoda, R.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, K.; Thakur, N.

    2012-01-01

    The energy spectrum of cosmic-ray antiprotons (p-bar's) from 0.17 to 3.5 GeV has been measured using 7886 p-bar's detected by BESS-Polar II during a long-duration flight over Antarctica near solar minimum in December 2007 and January 2008. This shows good consistency with secondary p-bar calculations. Cosmologically primary p-bar's have been investigated by comparing measured and calculated p-bar spectra. BESS-Polar II data.show no evidence of primary p-bar's from the evaporation of primordial black holes.

  2. Population structure of the dengue viruses, Aragua, Venezuela, 2006-2007. Insights into dengue evolution under hyperendemic transmission.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Roche, Rosmari; Villegas, Elci; Cook, Shelley; Poh Kim, Pauline A W; Hinojosa, Yoandri; Rosario, Delfina; Villalobos, Iris; Bendezu, Herminia; Hibberd, Martin L; Guzman, Maria G

    2012-03-01

    During the past three decades there has been a notable increase in dengue disease severity in Venezuela. Nevertheless, the population structure of the viruses being transmitted in this country is not well understood. Here, we present a molecular epidemiological study on dengue viruses (DENV) circulating in Aragua State, Venezuela during 2006-2007. Twenty-one DENV full-length genomes representing all of the four serotypes were amplified and sequenced directly from the serum samples. Notably, only DENV-2 was associated with severe disease. Phylogenetic trees constructed using Bayesian methods indicated that only one genotype was circulating for each serotype. However, extensive viral genetic diversity was found in DENV isolated from the same area during the same period, indicating significant in situ evolution since the introduction of these genotypes. Collectively, the results suggest that the non-structural (NS) proteins may play an important role in DENV evolution, particularly NS1, NS2A and NS4B proteins. The phylogenetic data provide evidence to suggest that multiple introductions of DENV have occurred from the Latin American region into Venezuela and vice versa. The implications of the significant viral genetic diversity generated during hyperendemic transmission, particularly in NS protein are discussed and considered in the context of future development and use of human monoclonal antibodies as antivirals and tetravalent vaccines.

  3. Marital and job satisfaction among non-resident physicians at a Hispanic academic medical center, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Acevedo, Luis F; Céspedes-Gómez, Wayca R

    2009-01-01

    Marital satisfaction has been previously associated with job satisfaction although few studies have addressed this issue among Hispanic physicians. Marital and job satisfaction were assessed in a sample of 92 legally married non-residents physicians working at a Hispanic Academic Medical Center during the 2006-2007 academic year. Marital satisfaction was assessed using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and job satisfaction was measured using a 18-item scale. Response rate was 34.8%. Most (70.7%) of the subjects were males. Forty- five percent (45.0%) belonged to the surgical specialties group. The mean scale value for marital satisfaction was found to be in the average range. Almost all (88.7%) the participants reported being "satisfied "to "very satisfied" with their job. Ninety percent (90.0%) of the surgical specialists and 86.9% of the non-surgical specialists reported being satisfied with their job. The percentage of participants that reported to be "very satisfied" with their job, was higher among the group of surgical specialists (23.3%) than among the non-surgical specialists (13.0%) There was no significant relationship between marital satisfaction and job satisfaction. Also, no statistically significant difference was observed in the level of marital satisfaction and job satisfaction when surgical and non-surgical physicians were compared. The findings on marital satisfaction obtained in this sample were similar to those observed in a previous study of resident physicians at the same academic medical center.

  4. Vega balloon meteorological measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Hildebrand, C. E.; Preston, R. A.

    1990-01-01

    The Vega balloons obtained in situ measurements of pressure, temperature, vertical winds, cloud density, ambient illumination, and the frequency of lightning during their flights in the Venus middle cloud layer. The Vega measurements were used to develop a comprehensive description of the meteorology of the Venus middle cloud layer. The Vega measurements provide the following picture: large horizontal temperature gradients near the equator, vigorous convection, and weather conditions that can change dramatically on time scales as short as one hour.

  5. LOAC: a small aerosol optical counter/sizer for ground-based and balloon measurements of the size distribution and nature of atmospheric particles - Part 2: First results from balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Berthet, Gwenaël; Lurton, Thibaut; Vignelles, Damien; Jégou, Fabrice; Tonnelier, Thierry; Jeannot, Matthieu; Couté, Benoit; Akiki, Rony; Verdier, Nicolas; Mallet, Marc; Gensdarmes, François; Charpentier, Patrick; Mesmin, Samuel; Duverger, Vincent; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Elias, Thierry; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Zieger, Paul; Salter, Matthew; Roberts, Tjarda; Giacomoni, Jérôme; Gobbi, Matthieu; Hamonou, Eric; Olafsson, Haraldur; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Mazel, Christophe; Décamps, Thierry; Piringer, Martin; Surcin, Jérémy; Daugeron, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In the companion (Part I) paper, we have described and evaluated a new versatile optical particle counter/sizer named LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter), based on scattering measurements at angles of 12 and 60°. That allows for some typology identification of particles (droplets, carbonaceous, salts, and mineral dust) in addition to size-segregated counting in a large diameter range from 0.2 µm up to possibly more than 100 µm depending on sampling conditions (Renard et al., 2016). Its capabilities overpass those of preceding optical particle counters (OPCs) allowing the characterization of all kind of aerosols from submicronic-sized absorbing carbonaceous particles in polluted air to very coarse particles (> 10-20 µm in diameter) in desert dust plumes or fog and clouds. LOAC's light and compact design allows measurements under all kinds of balloons, on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and at ground level. We illustrate here the first LOAC airborne results obtained from a UAV and a variety of scientific balloons. The UAV was deployed in a peri-urban environment near Bordeaux in France. Balloon operations include (i) tethered balloons deployed in urban environments in Vienna (Austria) and Paris (France), (ii) pressurized balloons drifting in the lower troposphere over the western Mediterranean (during the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment - ChArMEx campaigns), (iii) meteorological sounding balloons launched in the western Mediterranean region (ChArMEx) and from Aire-sur-l'Adour in south-western France (VOLTAIRE-LOAC campaign). More focus is put on measurements performed in the Mediterranean during (ChArMEx) and especially during African dust transport events to illustrate the original capability of balloon-borne LOAC to monitor in situ coarse mineral dust particles. In particular, LOAC has detected unexpected large particles in desert sand plumes.

  6. LOAC: a small aerosol optical counter/sizer for ground-based and balloon measurements of the size distribution and nature of atmospheric particles - Part 2: First results from balloon and unmanned aerial vehicle flights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, J.-B.; Dulac, F.; Berthet, G.; Lurton, T.; Vignelles, D.; Jégou, F.; Tonnelier, T.; Thaury, C.; Jeannot, M.; Couté, B.; Akiki, R.; Verdier, N.; Mallet, M.; Gensdarmes, F.; Charpentier, P.; Mesmin, S.; Duverger, V.; Dupont, J. C.; Elias, T.; Crenn, V.; Sciare, J.; Giacomoni, J.; Gobbi, M.; Hamonou, E.; Olafsson, H.; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Mazel, C.; Décamps, T.; Piringer, M.; Surcin, J.; Daugeron, D.

    2015-09-01

    In the companion paper (Renard et al., 2015), we have described and evaluated a new versatile optical particle counter/sizer named LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) based on scattering measurements at angles of 12 and 60° that allows some topology identification of particles (droplets, carbonaceous, salts, and mineral dust) in addition to size segregated counting in a large diameter range from 0.2 up to possibly more than 100 μm depending on sampling conditions. Its capabilities overpass those of preceding optical particle counters (OPCs) allowing the characterization of all kind of aerosols from submicronic-sized absorbing carbonaceous particles in polluted air to very coarse particles (> 10-20 μm in diameter) in desert dust plumes or fog and clouds. LOAC's light and compact design allows measurements under all kinds of balloons, on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and at ground level. We illustrate here the first LOAC airborne results obtained from an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and a variety of scientific balloons. The UAV was deployed in a peri-urban environment near Bordeaux in France. Balloon operations include (i) tethered balloons deployed in urban environments in Vienna (Austria) and Paris (France), (ii) pressurized balloons drifting in the lower troposphere over the western Mediterranean (during the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment - ChArMEx campaigns), (iii) meteorological sounding balloons launched in the western Mediterranean region (ChArMEx) and from Aire-sur-l'Adour in south-western France (VOLTAIRE-LOAC campaign). More focus is put on measurements performed in the Mediterranean during (ChArMEx) and especially during African dust transport events to illustrate the original capability of balloon-borne LOAC to monitor in situ coarse mineral dust particles. In particular, LOAC has detected unexpected large particles in desert sand plumes.

  7. Scientific Balloons for Venus Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutts, James; Yavrouian, Andre; Nott, Julian; Baines, Kevin; Limaye, Sanjay; Wilson, Colin; Kerzhanovich, Viktor; Voss, Paul; Hall, Jeffery

    Almost 30 years ago, two balloons were successfully deployed into the atmosphere of Venus as an element of the VeGa - Venus Halley mission conducted by the Soviet Union. As interest in further Venus exploration grows among the established planetary exploration agencies - in Europe, Japan, Russia and the United States, use of balloons is emerging as an essential part of that investigative program. Venus balloons have been proposed in NASA’s Discovery program and ESA’s cosmic vision program and are a key element in NASA’s strategic plan for Venus exploration. At JPL, the focus for the last decade has been on the development of a 7m diameter superpressure pressure(twice that of VeGa) capable of carrying a 100 kg payload (14 times that of VeGA balloons), operating for more than 30 days (15 times the 2 day flight duration of the VeGa balloons) and transmitting up to 20 Mbit of data (300 times that of VeGa balloons). This new generation of balloons must tolerate day night transitions on Venus as well as extended exposure to the sulfuric acid environment. These constant altitude balloons operating at an altitude of about 55 km on Venus where temperatures are benign can also deploy sondes to sound the atmosphere beneath the probe and deliver deep sondes equipped to survive and operate down to the surface. The technology for these balloons is now maturing rapidly and we are now looking forward to the prospects for altitude control balloons that can cycle repeatedly through the Venus cloud region. One concept, which has been used for tropospheric profiling in Antarctica, is the pumped-helium balloon, with heritage to the anchor balloon, and would be best adapted for flight above the 55 km level. Phase change balloons, which use the atmosphere as a heat engine, can be used to investigate the lower cloud region down to 30 km. Progress in components for high temperature operation may also enable investigation of the deep atmosphere of Venus with metal-based balloons.

  8. Ballooning Interest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mebane, Robert C.; Rector, Bronwyn

    1991-01-01

    Presents activities that utilize balloons to encourage students to explore questions related to scientific concepts. Concepts explored include light, heat, charged ions, polarization, and the sense of smell. (MDH)

  9. The performance of different cumulus parameterization schemes in simulating the 2006/2007 southern peninsular Malaysia heavy rainfall episodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardie, Wan Ahmad; Sow, Khai Shen; Tangang, Fredolin T.; Hussin, Abdul Ghapor; Mahmud, Mastura; Juneng, Liew

    2012-04-01

    The performance of four different cumulus parameterization schemes (CPS) in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for simulating three heavy rainfall episodes over the southern peninsular Malaysia during the winter monsoon of 2006/2007 were examined. The modelled rainfall was compared with the 3-hourly satellite observation and objectively scored using a verification technique called the acuity-fidelity. The technique is based on minimization of a cost function that is calculated from four parameters taking into account errors in distance, time, intensity, and missed events. All simulations were made for 72 hours for the three episodes starting at 1200 UTC 17 December 2006, 1200 UTC 24 December 2006 and 1200 UTC 11 January 2007, respectively. The four different CPSs used are the new Kain-Fritsch scheme (KF2), the Betts-Miller-Janjic scheme (BMJ), the Grell-Devenyi ensemble scheme (GD) and the older Kain-Fritsch scheme (KF1). While the BMJ scheme shows some success in the second and third episodes, it shows high location errors in the first episode, leading to high acuity errors. The GD, KF2 and KF1 schemes performed poorly, although both the BMJ and GD schemes simulated the observed drastic increase of rainfall at 2100 UTC 18 December 2006 during the first episode. Overall, the KF1 and KF2 schemes produced positive biases in terms of coverage, while the GD scheme showed persistent location bias, producing a scattered line of precipitation over the eastern coastline of peninsular Malaysia. Although the BMJ scheme has better results, its poor performance for the first episode suggests that suitability of CPS may be case dependent.

  10. Four different sublineages of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N1 introduced in Hungary in 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Szeleczky, Zsófia; Dán, Adám; Ursu, Krisztina; Ivanics, Eva; Kiss, István; Erdélyi, Károly; Belák, Sándor; Muller, Claude P; Brown, Ian H; Bálint, Adám

    2009-10-20

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses were introduced to Hungary during 2006-2007 in three separate waves. This study aimed at determining the full-length genomic coding regions of the index strains from these epizootics in order to: (i) understand the phylogenetic relationship to other European H5N1 isolates, (ii) elucidate the possible connection between the different outbreaks and (iii) determine the putative origin and way of introduction of the different virus variants. Molecular analysis of the HA gene of Hungarian HPAI isolates obtained from wild birds during the first introduction revealed two groups designated Hungarian1 (HUN1) and Hungarian2 (HUN2) within sublineage 2.2B and clade 2.2.1, respectively. Sequencing the whole coding region of the two index viruses A/mute swan/Hungary/3472/2006 and A/mute swan/4571/Hungary/2006 suggests the role of wild birds in the introduction of HUN1 and HUN2 viruses: the most similar isolates to HUN1 and HUN2 group were found in wild avian species in Croatia and Slovakia, respectively. The second introduction of HPAI H5N1 led to the largest epizootic in domestic waterfowl in Europe. The index strain of the epizootic A/goose/Hungary/14756/2006 clustered to sublineage 2.2.A1 forming the Hungarian3 (HUN3) group. A common ancestry of HUN3 isolates with Bavarian strains is suggested as the most likely scenario of origin. Hungarian4 (HUN4) viruses isolated from the third introduction clustered with isolate A/turkey/United Kingdom/750/2007 forming a sublineage 2.2.A2. The origin and way of introduction of HUN4 viruses is still obscure, thus further genetic, phylogenetic, ecological and epidemiological data are required in order to elucidate it.

  11. Scientific Ballooning Activities and Recent Developments in Technology and Instrumentation of the TIFR Balloon Facility, Hyderabad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buduru, Suneel Kumar

    2016-07-01

    The Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR-BF) is a unique center of expertise working throughout the year to design, fabricate and launch scientific balloons mainly for space astronomy, atmospheric science and engineering experiments. Recently TIFR-BF extended its support to new user scientists for conducting balloon launches for biological and middle atmospheric sciences. For the first time two balloon launches conducted for sending live lab rats to upper stratosphere and provided launch support for different balloon campaigns such as Tropical Tropopause Dynamics (TTD) to study water vapour content in upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric regions over Hyderabad and the other balloon campaign to study the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (BATAL) during the Indian summer monsoon season. BATAL is the first campaign to conduct balloon launches during active (South-West) monsoon season using zero pressure balloons of different volumes. TIFR-BF also provided zero pressure and sounding balloon support to various research institutes and organizations in India and for several international space projects. In this paper, we present details on our increased capability of balloon fabrication for carrying heavier payloads, development of high strength balloon load tapes and recent developments of flight control and safety systems. A summary of the various flights conducted in two years will be presented along with the future ballooning plans.

  12. High Altitude Ozone Research Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauthen, Timothy A.; Daniel, Leslie A.; Herrick, Sally C.; Rock, Stacey G.; Varias, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to create a mission model of the high altitude ozone research balloon (HAORB) several options for flight preparation, altitude control, flight termination, and payload recovery were considered. After the optimal launch date and location for two separate HAORB flights were calculated, a method for reducing the heat transfer from solar and infrared radiation was designed and analytically tested. This provided the most important advantage of the HAORB over conventional balloons, i.e., its improved flight duration. Comparisons of different parachute configurations were made, and a design best suited for the HAORB's needs was determined to provide for payload recovery after flight termination. In an effort to avoid possible payload damage, a landing system was also developed.

  13. Microbial and Nutrient Concentration and Load Data During Stormwater Runoff at a Swine Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes water-quality and hydrologic data collected during 2006-2007 to characterize bacteria and nutrient loads associated with overland runoff and subsurface tile drainage in spray fields at a swine concentrated animal feeding operation. Four monitoring locations were established at the Lizzie Research Site in the North Carolina Coastal Plain Physiographic Province for collecting discharge and water-quality data during stormwater-runoff events. Water stage was measured continuously at each monitoring location. A stage-discharge relation was developed for each site and was used to compute instantaneous discharge values for collected samples. Water-quality samples were collected for five storm events during 2006-2007 for analysis of nutrients and fecal indicator bacteria. Instantaneous loads of nitrite plus nitrate, total coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci were computed for selected times during the five storm events.

  14. Scientific balloons: historical remarks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, P.

    The paper is an overview of the Human attempt to fly, from the myth of Daedalus and his son Icarus to the first "aerostatic" experiment by Joseph-Michel and Jaques-Etienne Montgolfier. Then, via a jump of about 200 years, we arrive to the era of the modern stratospheric ballooning that, from the beginning of the last century, have provided a unique flight opportunity for aerospace experiments. In particular, the Italian scientific community has employed stratospheric balloons since the '50s for cosmic rays and high energy astrophysical experiments with initial launches performed from Cagliari Helmas Airport (Sardinia). More recently an almost ideal location was found in the area of Trapani-Milo (Sicily, Italy), were an old abandoned airport was refurbished to be used as a new launch site that became operative at the beginning of the '70s. Finally, we suggest a short reminiscence of the first transatlantic experiment carried out on August 1975 in collaboration between SAS-CNR (Italy) and NSBF-NASA (USA). The reason why the Long Duration Balloon has been recently re-oriented in a different direction is analysed and future perspectives discussed. Finally, the spirit of the balloon launch performed by the Groups lead by Edoardo Amaldi, Livio Scarsi and other Italian pioneers, with payloads looking like "refrigerators" weighting a few tens of kg is intact and the wide participation to the present Workshop is the clear demonstration.

  15. Global electrodynamics from superpressure balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Hu, H.

    1995-08-01

    Electric field and conductivity measurements in the stratosphere between November 1992 and March 1993 have been made using superpressure balloons in the southern hemisphere. Over 400 payload-days of data have been made during a record setting experiment called ELBBO (Extended Life Balloon Borne Observatories). This experiment resulted in 4 flights aloft simultaneously for over 2 months including one flight which lasted over 4 months. Electrodynamical coupling between the atmosphere and ionosphere is studied using the measured electric fields, and a simple empirical model of the stratospheric conductivity. Altitude profiles of conductivity have been obtained from several superpressure balloon flights using the large end-of-flight altitude swings on the last few days of each flight (as the balloon begins to loose superpressure). Coupling between the fields and atmospheric inertial waves has been observed. Effects and dynamics of the global circuit suggest that standard models are missing significant phenomena. Large scale ionospheric convection activity has been studied from the polar cap to the middle latitudes. Cusp latitude fields have been continuously measured for many days in a row.

  16. Global electrodynamics from superpressure balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Hu, H.

    1995-01-01

    Electric field and conductivity measurements in the stratosphere between November 1992 and March 1993 have been made using superpressure balloons in the southern hemisphere. Over 400 payload-days of data have been made during a record setting experiment called ELBBO (Extended Life Balloon Borne Observatories). This experiment resulted in 4 flights aloft simultaneously for over 2 months including one flight which lasted over 4 months. Electrodynamical coupling between the atmosphere and ionosphere is studied using the measured electric fields, and a simple empirical model of the stratospheric conductivity. Altitude profiles of conductivity have been obtained from several superpressure balloon flights using the large end-of-flight altitude swings on the last few days of each flight (as the balloon begins to loose superpressure). Coupling between the fields and atmospheric inertial waves has been observed. Effects and dynamics of the global circuit suggest that standard models are missing significant phenomena. Large scale ionospheric convection activity has been studied from the polar cap to the middle latitudes. Cusp latitude fields have been continuously measured for many days in a row.

  17. Molecular epidemiology and genetic characterization of equine arteritis virus isolates associated with the 2006-2007 multi-state disease occurrence in the USA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianqiang; Timoney, Peter J; Shuck, Kathleen M; Seoul, Gong; Go, Yun Young; Lu, Zhengchun; Powell, David G; Meade, Barry J; Balasuriya, Udeni B R

    2010-09-01

    In 2006-2007, equine viral arteritis (EVA) was confirmed for the first time in Quarter Horses in multiple states in the USA. The entire genome of an equine arteritis virus (EAV) isolate from the index premises in New Mexico was 12 731 nt in length and possessed a previously unrecorded unique 15 nt insertion in the nsp2-coding region in ORF1a and a 12 nt insertion in ORF3. Sequence analysis of additional isolates made during this disease occurrence revealed that all isolates from New Mexico, Utah, Kansas, Oklahoma and Idaho had 98.6-100.0 % (nsp2) and 97.8-100 % (ORF3) nucleotide identity and contained the unique insertions in nsp2 and ORF3, indicating that the EVA outbreaks in these states probably originated from the same strain of EAV. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis of several EAV isolates made following an EVA outbreak on another Quarter Horse farm in New Mexico in 2005 provided evidence that this outbreak may well have been the source of virus for the 2006-2007 occurrence of the disease. A virus isolate from an aborted fetus in Utah was shown to have a distinct neutralization phenotype compared with other isolates associated with the 2006-2007 EVA occurrence. Full-length genomic sequence analysis of 18 sequential isolates of EAV made from eight carrier stallions established that the virus evolved genetically during persistent infection, and the rate of genetic change varied between individual animals and the period of virus shedding.

  18. Girl child marriage and its effect on fertility in Pakistan: findings from Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Muazzam, Sana; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Raj, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Child marriage (before 18 years) is prevalent in Pakistan, which disproportionately affects young girls in rural, low income and low education households. Our study aims to determine the association between early marriage and high fertility and poor fertility health indicators among young women in Pakistan beyond those attributed to social vulnerabilities. Nationally representative data from Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey, 2006-2007, a cross-sectional observational survey, were limited to ever-married women aged 20-24 years (n = 1,560; 15% of 10,023) to identify differences in poor fertility outcomes [high fertility (three or more childbirths); rapid repeat childbirth (<24 months between births); unwanted pregnancy (any ever); pregnancy termination (any stillbirth, miscarriage or abortion ever)] by early (<18) versus adult (≥18) age at marriage. Associations between child marriage and fertility outcomes were assessed by calculating adjusted odds ratios (AORs) using logistic regression models after controlling for demographics, social equity indicators (education, wealth index, rural residence), contraception use, marriage duration and culture-specific factors (husband's desire for more children, son preference). Overall, 50% of ever-married women aged 20-24 years in Pakistan were married before the age of 18 years. Girl child marriage was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with low social equity indicators (poverty, rural residence, and no formal education). Adjusted logistic regression models showed that girl child marriage was significantly associated with high fertility (AOR 6.62; 95% CI 3.53-12.43), rapid repeat childbirth (AOR 2.88; 95% CI 1.83-4.54), unwanted pregnancy (AOR 2.90; 95% CI 1.75-4.79), and pregnancy termination (AOR 1.75; 95% CI 1.10-2.78). Girl child marriage affects half of all ever-married women aged 20-24 years in Pakistan, and increases their risk for high fertility and poor fertility health indicators, highlighting the need of

  19. Urinary arsenic levels in the French adult population: the French National Nutrition and Health Study, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Saoudi, Abdessattar; Zeghnoun, Abdelkrim; Bidondo, Marie-Laure; Garnier, Robert; Cirimele, Vincent; Persoons, Renaud; Fréry, Nadine

    2012-09-01

    The French Nutrition and Health Survey (ENNS) was conducted to describe dietary intakes, nutritional status, physical activity, and levels of various biomarkers for environmental chemicals (heavy metals and pesticides) in the French population (adults aged 18-74 years and children aged 3-17 years living in continental France in 2006-2007). The aim of this paper was to describe the distributions of total arsenic and the sum of iAs+MMA+DMA in the general adult population, and to present their main risk factors. In the arsenic study, 1500 and 1515 adults (requested to avoid seafood intake in the previous 3 days preceding urine collection) were included respectively for the analysis of the sum of inorganic arsenic (iAs) and its two metabolites, monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), and for the total arsenic. Results were presented as geometric means and selected percentiles of urinary arsenic concentrations (μg/L) and creatinine-adjusted urinary arsenic (μg/g of creatinine) for total arsenic, and the sum of inorganic arsenic and metabolites (iAs+MMA+DMA). The geometric mean concentration of the sum of iAs+MMA+DMA in the adult population living in France was 3.34 μg/g of creatinine [3.23-3.45] (3.75 μg/L [3.61-3.90]) with a 95th percentile of 8.9 μg/g of creatinine (10.68 μg/L). The geometric mean concentration of total arsenic was 11.96 μg/g of creatinine [11.41-12.53] (13.42 μg/L [12.77-14.09]) with a 95th percentile of 61.29 μg/g of creatinine (72.75 μg/L). Urinary concentrations of total arsenic and iAS+MMA+DMA were influenced by sociodemographic and economic factors, and by risk factors such as consumption of seafood products and of wine. In our study, covariate-adjusted geometric means demonstrated several slight differences, due to consumption of fish, shellfish/crustaceans or wine. This study provides the first reference value for arsenic in a representative sample of the French population not particularly exposed to high levels

  20. 14 CFR 61.115 - Balloon rating: Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Balloon rating: Limitations. 61.115 Section...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.115 Balloon rating: Limitations. (a) If a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with a balloon...

  1. 14 CFR 61.115 - Balloon rating: Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Balloon rating: Limitations. 61.115 Section...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.115 Balloon rating: Limitations. (a) If a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with a balloon...

  2. 14 CFR 61.115 - Balloon rating: Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Balloon rating: Limitations. 61.115 Section...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.115 Balloon rating: Limitations. (a) If a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with a balloon...

  3. 14 CFR 61.115 - Balloon rating: Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Balloon rating: Limitations. 61.115 Section...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.115 Balloon rating: Limitations. (a) If a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with a balloon...

  4. 14 CFR 61.115 - Balloon rating: Limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Balloon rating: Limitations. 61.115 Section...) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: PILOTS, FLIGHT INSTRUCTORS, AND GROUND INSTRUCTORS Private Pilots § 61.115 Balloon rating: Limitations. (a) If a person who applies for a private pilot certificate with a balloon...

  5. Analysis and prediction of stratospheric balloons trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardillo, A.; Memmo, A.; Musso, I.; Ibba, R.; Spoto, D.

    The first step to manage a balloon flight from a trajectory point of view is the definition of launch location and period. Analysis data are used to realize a statistical study of the trajectories that can be obtained. The goal is define the conditions able to maximize the probability to respect mission objectives and constrains. Ones started with operations the balloon control centre has to manage the flight respecting safety and science. To predict stratospheric balloon trajectories we must utilize data from different forecast models and real-time measurements of wind and other meteorological entities. These sources of information have to be merged along the simulation of the balloon flight. Great attention has be paid for long duration flight from Pole and Equator, where QBO plays an important role.

  6. Development of scientific ballooning in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, Jun

    On the occasion of the 50th Anniversary Celebration of COSPAR of this year of 2008, it is worthwhile to summarize the results of the Scientific ballooning in early days in connection with the recent developments in various countries. Nishina Laboratories, Riken, had started the observations of cosmic rays with rubber balloons as early as 1942. However it was interrupted soon by the war II. After the war, new research group started in collaboration with several universities with nuclear emulsions put on the rubber balloons in 1950, and then soon after the group manufactured by themselves and launched the first plastic balloon in 1953. Based on additional technologies during a few years developed by these group, the Institute of Nuclear Study, INS, the University of Tokyo, organized the large campaign of 14 emulsion chambers and a pellicle stack with 8 plastic balloons in 1956. It is to be noted that the project was one of the largest in the world standard in those days. By the experience of this campaign, the importance of the balloon technologies was more recognized, and INS organized the group to study the balloon technologies, and had established some developments. The systematic study of scientific ballooning has started, when the scientific ballooning laboratory was founded in 1965, in the new Institute of ISAS, the University of Tokyo. The permanent balloon base of "Sanriku Balloon Center" was founded in 1971. This group has expended all efforts for the scientific ballooning, launching 10-20 balloons in each year with new inventions such as the studies of; Technologies to manufacture the reliable plastic balloons, New Balloon materials, New instrumentations for scientific ballooning, Systems of long duration flights including Antarctica flights, International collaboratiom, etc. Up to now almost 600 plastic balloons were launched during past 50 years. Then the scientific balloonings have played important and indispensable roles for the development of space

  7. Cosmic Balloons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El Abed, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    A team of French high-school students sent a weather balloon into the upper atmosphere to recreate Viktor Hess's historical experiment that demonstrated the existence of ionizing radiation from the sky--later called cosmic radiation. This discovery earned him the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1936.

  8. Balloon Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warwick, James F.

    1976-01-01

    For the adventurous teacher and student there is an alternative to the often messy mixing, pouring, casting, cutting, scoring and sanding of plaster of Paris for casting or sculptural projects. Balloon sculpture, devised, designed and shown here by a sculptor/teacher, is an eye appealing sculptural form and holds a strong interest for students.…

  9. The balloon and the airship technological heritage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, N. J.

    1981-01-01

    The balloon and the airship are discussed with emphasis on the identification of commonalities and distinctions. The aerostat technology behind the shape and structure of the vehicles is reviewed, including a discussion of structural weight, internal pressure, buckling, and the development of a stable tethered balloon system. Proper materials for the envelope are considered, taking elongation and stress into account, and flight operation and future developments are reviewed. Airships and tethered balloons which are designed to carry high operating pressure with low gas loss characteristics are found to share similar problems in low speed flight operations, while possessing interchangeable technologies.

  10. A balloon-borne integrating nephelometer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S.; Apple, M.L. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-09-01

    A balloon-borne integrating nephelometer has been successfully developed and flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report details instrument design, calibration and data conversion procedure. Free and tethered balloon transport and telemetry systems are described. Data taken during March 1989 South-Central New Mexico free flight ascents are presented as vertical profiles of atmospheric particle scattering coefficient, temperature and balloon heading. Data taken during December 1989 Albuquerque, New Mexico tethered flights are also presented as vertical profiles. Data analysis shows superior instrument performance. 5 refs., 22 figs.

  11. Balloon flight and atmospheric electricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera, Emilio

    1924-01-01

    The air is known to be charged with electricity (chiefly positive) with reference to the earth, so that its potential increases with the altitude and the difference in potential between two points in the same vertical line, divided by the distance between them, gives a value called the "potential gradient," which may vary greatly with the altitude, the nature of the ground and the atmospheric conditions.

  12. Gondola development for CNES stratospheric balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, A.; Audoubert, J.; Cau, M.; Evrard, J.; Verdier, N.

    The CNES has been supporting scientific ballooning since its establishment in 1962. The two main parts of the balloon system or aerostat are the balloon itself and the flight train, comprising the house-keeping gondola, for the control of balloon flight (localization and operational telemetry & telecommand - TM/TC), and the scientific gondola with its dedicated telecommunication system. For zero pressure balloon, the development of new TM/TC system for the housekeeping and science data transmission are going on from 1999. The main concepts are : - for balloon house-keeping and low rate scientific telemetry, the ELITE system, which is based on single I2C bus standardizing communication between the different components of the system : trajectography, balloon control, power supply, scientific TM/TC, .... In this concept, Radio Frequency links are developed between the house keeping gondola and the components of the aerostat (balloon valve, ballast machine, balloon gas temperature measurements, ...). The main objectives are to simplify the flight train preparation in term of gondola testing before flight, and also by reducing the number of long electrical cables integrated in the balloon and the flight train; - for high rate scientific telemetry, the use of functional interconnection Internet Protocol (IP) in interface with the Radio Frequency link. The main idea is to use off-the-shelf IP hardware products (routers, industrial PC, ...) and IP software (Telnet, FTP, Web-HTTP, ...) to reduce the development costs; - for safety increase, the adding, in the flight train, of a totally independent house keeping gondola based on the satellite Inmarsat M and Iridium telecommunication systems, which permits to get real time communications between the on-board data mobile and the ground station, reduced to a PC computer with modem connected to the phone network. These GEO and LEO telecommunication systems give also the capability to operate balloon flights over longer distance

  13. Stratospheric Balloon Gradient Geomagnetic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, Sergey; Tsvetkov, Yury

    The study of the interior structure of the Earth and laws of its evolution is one of the most difficult problems of natural science. Among the geophysical fields the anomaly magnetic field is one of the most informational in questions of the Earth's crust structure. Many important parameters of an environment are expedient for measuring at lower altitudes, than satellite ones. So, one of the alternatives is stratospheric balloon survey. The balloon flight altitudes cover the range from 20 to 50 km. At such altitudes there are steady zone air flows due to which the balloon flight trajectories can be of any direction, including round-the-world (round-the-pole). One of the examples of such sounding system have been designed, developed and maintained at IZMIRAN during already about 20 years. This system consists of three instrumental con-tainers uniformly placed along a vertical 6 km line. System allows measuring a module and vertical gradient of the geomagnetic field along the whole flight trajectory and so one's name is -stratospheric balloon magnetic gradiometer (SMBG). The GPS-receivers, located in each instrumental container, fix the flight coordinates to within several tens meters. Data trans-mission is carried out by Globalstar satellite link. The obtained data are used in solving the problems of deep sounding of the Earth's crust magnetic structure -an extraction of magnetic anomalies, determination of a depth of bedding of magnetoactive rocks and others. The developed launching technology, deployment in flight, assembly, data processing, transfer and landing the containers with the equipment can be used for other similar problems of monitoring and sounding an environment. Useful flight weights of each instrumental container may be reaching 50 kg. More than ten testing flights (1986-2009) at stratospheric altitudes (20-30 km) have proven the reliability of this system.

  14. The Brazilian scientific balloon program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Joao

    The Brazilian scientific balloon program is based almost entirely at the National Institute for Space Research -INPE, which has a facility for research and development of scientific balloon systems such as telemetry, command, power supply, separation and flight train devices, ballast control systems, ATC transponders, shock absorbers and especially different launching tech-niques. The Balloon Launching Center of INPE operates since the early 70s, when the first launches were performed in cooperation with French groups for astronomical gamma-ray obser-vations. Since then, the center was involved in a large numbers of international collaborations with France, Japan, United Kingdom, USA, Italy, Germany and Tasmania. INPEs high-energy astrophysics group developed several X and Gamma-ray experiments that were launched in balloons since the early 80s. The most complex of these payloads is the MASCO experiment, launched in 2004. It consists in a 2-ton experiment with a large gamma-ray imaging coded-mask telescope and an attitude control system developed at INPE. Currently, the high-energy group is developing a prototype balloon experiment for the MIRAX satellite, named protoMIRAX. Others scientists at INPE have also used balloons for cosmic rays, geophysics and atmospheric electricity experiments.

  15. Final report : results of the 2006-2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The 2006-2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Barnes, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The overall goal of the investigation was to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The investigation objectives were to (1) determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, (2) delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and (3) design and implement an expanded monitoring network at Barnes (Argonne 2006a).

  16. Simulating clefts in pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, Frank; Brakke, Kenneth

    2010-02-01

    The geometry of a large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, such as a sphere, leads to very high film stresses. These stresses can be significantly reduced by using a tendon re-enforced lobed pumpkin-like shape. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin shape, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design, the constant bulge radius (CBR) design, CBA/CBR hybrids, and NASA’s recent constant stress (CS) design. Utilizing a hybrid CBA/CBR pumpkin design, Flight 555-NT in June 2006 formed an S-cleft and was unable to fully deploy. In order to better understand the S-cleft phenomenon, a series of inflation tests involving four 27-m diameter 200-gore pumpkin balloons were conducted in 2007. One of the test vehicles was a 1/3-scale mockup of the Flight 555-NT balloon. Using an inflation procedure intended to mimic ascent, the 1/3-scale mockup developed an S-cleft feature strikingly similar to the one observed in Flight 555-NT. Our analysis of the 1/3-scale mockup found it to be unstable. We compute asymmetric equilibrium configurations of this balloon, including shapes with an S-cleft feature.

  17. Balloons and Science Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balloon Council, Washington, DC.

    This document provides background information on balloons including: (1) the history of balloons; (2) balloon manufacturing; (3) biodegradability; (4) the fate of latex balloons; and (5) the effect of balloons on the rainforest and sea mammals. Also included as part of this instructional kit are four fun experiments that allow students to…

  18. NASA super-pressure balloons - designing to meet the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cathey, Henry M., Jr.

    2001-08-01

    The NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon project presents a new challenge in balloon design by extending flight duration for large heavy payloads. The pumpkin balloon design is innovative and presents many new challenges. This paper encapsulates the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon Vehicle developments, presents them to the Science Community, and shows points of interaction with the users. The capabilities and limitations are presented to allow potential users to make informed choices in the development of balloon class payloads. Brief summaries of test flights and the cause and effect relationship between suspended load and float altitude are presented. A focus on innovation and the future using the Ultra Long Duration Balloon super-pressure balloon technology is also presented.

  19. Balloon Kyphoplasty

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To review the evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of balloon kyphoplasty for the treatment of vertebral compression fractures (VCFs). Clinical Need Vertebral compression fractures are one of the most common types of osteoporotic fractures. They can lead to chronic pain and spinal deformity. They are caused when the vertebral body (the thick block of bone at the front of each vertebra) is too weak to support the loads of activities of daily living. Spinal deformity due to a collapsed vertebral body can substantially affect the quality of life of elderly people, who are especially at risk for osteoporotic fractures due to decreasing bone mass with age. A population-based study across 12 European centres recently found that VCFs have a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Complications associated with VCFs are pulmonary dysfunction, eating disorders, loss of independence, and mental status change due to pain and the use of medications. Osteoporotic VCFs also are associated with a higher rate of death. VCFs affect an estimated 25% of women over age 50 years and 40% of women over age 80 years. Only about 30% of these fractures are diagnosed in clinical practice. A Canadian multicentre osteoporosis study reported on the prevalence of vertebral deformity in Canada in people over 50 years of age. To define the limit of normality, they plotted a normal distribution, including mean and standard deviations (SDs) derived from a reference population without any deformity. They reported a prevalence rate of 23.5% in women and a rate of 21.5% in men, using 3 SDs from the mean as the limit of normality. When they used 4 SDs, the prevalence was 9.3% and 7.3%, respectively. They also found the prevalence of vertebral deformity increased with age. For people older than 80 years of age, the prevalence for women and men was 45% and 36%, respectively, using 3 SDs as the limit of normality. About 85% of VCFs are due to primary

  20. Recent and Future Stratospheric Balloon Activities at Esrange Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemi, Stig

    Esrange Space Center located in northern Sweden has during 45 years been a leading launch site for both sounding rockets and stratospheric balloons. We have a unique combination of maintaining both stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets launch operations. Most balloon flights are normally handled inside Scandinavia but since 2005 PersonNamesemi-circular flights are performed with recovery in northern Canada. The Swedish Government and Swedish National Space Board are now finaliz-ing an agreement with Russia for peaceful uPersonNamese of space, which will permit circumpolar balloon flights. Within this agreement we will soon be able to of-fer the science community long duration balloon flights with durations for PersonNameseveral weeks. The balloon operations at Esrange Space Center are yearly expanding. Both NASA and CNES have long term plans for balloon flights from northern Sweden. We have also received a request from JAXA for future balloon missions. To handle balloon campaigns with large numbers of payloads or build up for two different campaigns a new big assembly hall will be ready for use at the beginning of 2011. January 24 we made an historical balloon flight in a very cold stratosphere with a Zodiac metricconverterProductID402?000 m3402ü ınbsp;000 m3402 000 m3 balloon carrying a 750kg gondola with the German Mipas-B/Telis instrument. The balloon reached 34kms alti-tude after a carefully piloted ascent in temperature levels down to -89 degrees Centigrade. The scientists received unique data during the 13 hours and 30 minutes long sailing at different altitudes during slow descent. The payload was recovered in very good condition 80 kms from the border between country-regionFinland and Russia.

  1. The Design, Development and Test of Balloonborne and Groundbased Lidar Systems. Volume 2. Flight Test of Atmospheric Balloon Lidar Experiment, ABLE 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    Balloon Lidar E-xperiment) is part of Air Force Phillips Laboratory’s continuing interest in developing techniques for making remote measurements of...shaft is rotated until the two pointing mirrors are reflecting away from the payload. Using an autocollimator, the reticula pattern reflected from the...laser pointing mirror is made coincident with the reticula pattern reflected from the receiver pointing mirror by adjusting the mounting of the former

  2. 75 FR 33838 - National Environmental Policy Act; Scientific Balloon Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility, Wallops Island, VA 23337. Comments also may be submitted... Program Manager, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility; telephone 757-824-2319; or... SPACE ADMINISTRATION National Environmental Policy Act; Scientific Balloon Program AGENCY:...

  3. Power Systems Design for Long Duration Ballooning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stilwell, Bryan; Chuzel, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility has been designing and building high-altitude balloon power systems for over 26 years. With that experience, we have found certain types of PV panels, batteries, and charge controllers that are reliable in stratospheric environments. The ultimate goal is to ensure that power systems will provide power reliably throughout the duration of an LDB flight. The purpose of this presentation is to provide some general guidelines and best practices for power system design.

  4. Evolution of scientific ballooning and its impact on astrophysics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William Vernon

    2014-05-01

    As we celebrate the centennial year of the discovery of cosmic rays on a manned balloon, it seems appropriate to reflect on the evolution of ballooning and its scientific impact. Balloons have been used for scientific research since they were invented in France more than 200 years ago. Ballooning was revolutionized in 1950 with the introduction of the so-called natural shape balloon with integral load tapes. This basic design has been used with more or less continuously improved materials for scientific balloon flights for more than a half century, including long-duration balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica for the past two decades. The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is currently developing the next generation super-pressure balloon that would enable extended duration missions above 99.5% of the Earth's atmosphere at any latitude. The Astro2010 Decadal Survey report supports super-pressure balloon development and the giant step forward it offers with ultra-long-duration balloon (ULDB) flights at constant altitudes for about 100 days.

  5. Stability of the pumpkin balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, Frank

    A large axisymmetric balloon with positive differential pressure, e.g., a sphere, leads to high film stresses. These can be significantly reduced by using a lobed pumpkin-like shape re-enforced with tendons. A number of schemes have been proposed to achieve a cyclically symmetric pumpkin-shape at full inflation, including the constant bulge angle (CBA) design and the constant bulge radius (CBR) design. The authors and others have carried out stability studies of CBA and CBR designs and found instabilities under various conditions. While stability seems to be a good indicator of deployment problems for large balloons under normal ascent conditions, one cannot conclude that a stable design will deploy reliably. Nevertheless, stability analysis allows one to quantify certain deployment characteristics. Ongoing research by NASA's Balloon Program Office utilizes a new design approach developed by Rodger Farley, NASA/GSFC, that takes into account film and tendon strain. We refer to such a balloon as a constant stress (CS) pumpkin design. In June 2006, the Flight 555-NT balloon (based on a hybrid CBR/CBA design) developed an S-cleft and did not deploy. In order to understand the S-cleft phenomena and study a number of aspects related to the CS-design, a series of inflation tests were conducted at TCOM, Elizabeth City, NC in 2007. The test vehicles were 27 meter diameter pumpkins distinguished by their respective equatorial bulge angles (BA). For example, BA98 indicates an equatorial bulge angle of 98° . BA90, BA55, and BA00 are similarly defined. BA98 was essentially a one-third scale version of of the Flight 555 balloon (i.e., 12 micron film instead of 38.1 micron, mini-tendons, etc.). BA90 and BA55 were Farley CS-designs. BA00 was derived from the BA55 design so that a flat chord spanned adjacent tendons. In this paper, we will carry out stability studies of BA98, BA90, BA55, and BA00. We discuss the deployment problem of pumpkin balloons in light of 2007 inflation

  6. Pathologic studies on suspect animal and human cases of Rift Valley fever from an outbreak in Eastern Africa, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Wun-Ju; Paddock, Chris D; Lederman, Edith; Rao, Carol Y; Gould, L Hannah; Mohamed, Mohamed; Mosha, Fausta; Mghamba, Janeth; Bloland, Peter; Njenga, M Kariuki; Mutonga, David; Samuel, Amwayi A; Guarner, Jeannette; Breiman, Robert F; Zaki, Sherif R

    2010-08-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an important viral zoonotic disease in Africa with periodic outbreaks associated with severe disease, death, and economic hardship. During the 2006-2007 outbreaks in Eastern Africa, postmortem and necropsy tissue samples from 14 animals and 20 humans clinically suspected of RVF were studied with histopathologic evaluation and immunohistochemical (IHC) assays. Six animal and 11 human samples had IHC evidence of Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) antigens. We found that extensive hepatocellular necrosis without prominent inflammatory cell infiltrates is the most distinctive histopathologic change in liver tissues infected with RVFV. Pathologic studies on postmortem tissue samples can help establish the diagnosis of RVF, differentiating from endemic diseases with clinical manifestations similar to RVF, such as malaria, leptospirosis, or yellow fever.

  7. Relationship of climate, geography, and geology to the incidence of Rift Valley fever in Kenya during the 2006-2007 outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Allen; Kinkade, Carl; Nguku, Patrick M; Anyangu, Amwayi; Mutonga, David; Omolo, Jared; Njenga, M Kariuki; Feikin, Daniel R; Schnabel, David; Ombok, Maurice; Breiman, Robert F

    2012-02-01

    We estimated Rift Valley fever (RVF) incidence as a function of geological, geographical, and climatological factors during the 2006-2007 RVF epidemic in Kenya. Location information was obtained for 214 of 340 (63%) confirmed and probable RVF cases that occurred during an outbreak from November 1, 2006 to February 28, 2007. Locations with subtypes of solonetz, calcisols, solonchaks, and planosols soil types were highly associated with RVF occurrence during the outbreak period. Increased rainfall and higher greenness measures before the outbreak were associated with increased risk. RVF was more likely to occur on plains, in densely bushed areas, at lower elevations, and in the Somalia acacia ecological zone. Cases occurred in three spatial temporal clusters that differed by the date of associated rainfall, soil type, and land usage.

  8. A survey of gundog lameness and injuries in Great Britain in the shooting seasons 2005/2006 and 2006/2007.

    PubMed

    Houlton, J E F

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to record the types of injuries and causes of lameness exhibited by dogs involved in game shooting. The study investigated gundogs that worked in the seasons 2005/2006 and 2006/2007. Information was acquired by owner questionnaires. The dogs were classified as working in the beating line, as peg dogs or as picking up dogs. A further group comprised Setters and Pointers that worked the grouse moors. A secondary objective was to assess the incidence of injuries that were treated by owners without seeking the assistance of their veterinarian, and to identify those that may have been underestimated. Depending on whether a dog was injured or went lame, and, if so, the nature of the injury, was correlated with the number of days worked, where it worked, its breed and the type of work it did. A mildly positive association between the Spaniel breed group and injuries was seen in 2005/2006 but not in 2006/2007. However, the relationship between the type of work and injuries was very significant for both seasons with dogs working in the beating line being at greatest risk and Setters and Pointers having the least number of injuries. The dogs in the beating line were also at a significantly greater risk of injury in both years when the type of injury was investigated. Fifty-three percent of all injuries were deemed to be sufficiently minor, that veterinary attention was not sought. However, those dogs with proximal thoracic limb lameness may have been under-investigated. There was a highly significant association between tail injuries and undocked Springer and Cocker Spaniels.

  9. Antenatal iron-folic acid supplementation reduces risk of low birthweight in Pakistan: secondary analysis of Demographic and Health Survey 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Bin Nisar, Yasir; Dibley, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the impact of antenatal iron-folic acid (IFA) supplementation on perceived birth size and birthweight in Pakistan over a 5-year period from 2002 to 2006. The data source was the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (PDHS) 2006-2007. Information from 5692 most recent live-born infants within 5 years prior to the survey was examined. The primary outcomes were maternal perception of birth size and birthweight, and the main exposure was any use of antenatal IFA supplements. Birthweight was reported for only 10% of the live births in the PDHS 2006-2007. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was adjusted for the cluster sampling design and for 13 potential confounders. The risk of having smaller than average birth size newborn was significantly reduced by 18% (adjusted odds ratio 0.82, 95% confidence interval 0.71, 0.96) for mothers who used any IFA supplements compared with those who did not. A similar (18%), but non-significant reduction in the risk of low birthweight, was found with the maternal use of IFA supplements. The risk of having smaller than average birth size babies was significantly reduced by 19% in those women who started IFA in the first trimester of pregnancy. About 11% of babies with smaller than average birth size were attributed to non-use of antenatal IFA supplements. Antenatal IFA supplementation significantly reduces the risk of a newborn of smaller than average birth size in Pakistan. Universal coverage of supplementation would improve birth size.

  10. Energy from solar balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Grena, Roberto

    2010-04-15

    Solar balloons are hot air balloons in which the air is heated directly by the sun, by means of a black absorber. The lift force of a tethered solar balloon can be used to produce energy by activating a generator during the ascending motion of the balloon. The hot air is then discharged when the balloon reaches a predefined maximum height. A preliminary study is presented, along with an efficiency estimation and some considerations on possible realistic configurations. (author)

  11. Nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman Des Jardins, Angela; Berk Knighton, W.; Larimer, Randal; Mayer-Gawlik, Shane; Fowler, Jennifer; Harmon, Christina; Koehler, Christopher; Guzik, Gregory; Flaten, James; Nolby, Caitlin; Granger, Douglas; Stewart, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the Nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project is to make the most of the 2017 rare eclipse event in four main areas: public engagement, workforce development, partnership development, and science. The Project is focused on two efforts, both student-led: online live video of the eclipse from the edge of space and the study of the atmospheric response to the eclipse. These efforts, however, involving more than 60 teams across the US, are challenging in many ways. Therefore, the Project is leveraging the NASA Space Grant and NOAA atmospheric science communities to make it a success. The first and primary topic of this poster is the NASA Space Grant supported online live video effort. College and high school students on 48 teams from 31 states will conduct high altitude balloon flights from 15-20 locations across the 8/21/2017 total eclipse path, sending live video and images from near space to a national website. Video and images of a total solar eclipse from near space are fascinating and rare. It’s never been done live and certainly not in a network of coverage across a continent. In addition to the live video to the web, these teams are engaged in several other science experiments as secondary payloads. We also briefly highlight the eclipse atmospheric science effort, where about a dozen teams will launch over one hundred radiosondes from across the 2017 path, recording an unprecedented atmospheric data sample. Collected data will include temperature, density, wind, humidity, and ozone measurements.

  12. Evolution of Information Management at the GSFC Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC): 2006-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce; Alcott, Gary; Berrick, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth science missions have driven their associated data and data management systems from providing simple point-to-point archiving and retrieval to performing user-responsive distributed multisensor information extraction. To fully maximize the use of remote-sensor-generated Earth science data, NASA recognized the need for data systems that provide data access and manipulation capabilities responsive to research brought forth by advancing scientific analysis and the need to maximize the use and usability of the data. The decision by NASA to purposely evolve the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) and other information management facilities was timely and appropriate. The GES DISC evolution was focused on replacing the EOSDIS Core System (ECS) by reusing the In-house developed disk-based Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Product Archive (S4PA) data management system and migrating data to the disk archives. Transition was completed in December 2007

  13. The EUSO-Balloon pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    EUSO-Balloon is a pathfinder for JEM-EUSO, the Extreme Universe Space Observatory which is to be hosted on-board the International Space Station. As JEM-EUSO is designed to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR)-induced Extensive Air Showers (EAS) by detecting their ultraviolet light tracks "from above", EUSO-Balloon is a nadir-pointing UV telescope too. With its Fresnel Optics and Photo-Detector Module, the instrument monitors a 50 km2 ground surface area in a wavelength band of 290-430 nm, collecting series of images at a rate of 400,000 frames/sec. The objectives of the balloon demonstrator are threefold: a) perform a full end-to-end test of a JEM-EUSO prototype consisting of all the main subsystems of the space experiment, b) measure the effective terrestrial UV background, with a spatial and temporal resolution relevant for JEM-EUSO. c) detect tracks of ultraviolet light from near space for the first time. The latter is a milestone in the development of UHECR science, paving the way for any future space-based UHECR observatory. On August 25, 2014, EUSO-Balloon was launched from Timmins Stratospheric Balloon Base (Ontario, Canada) by the balloon division of the French Space Agency CNES. From a float altitude of 38 km, the instrument operated during the entire astronomical night, observing UV-light from a variety of ground-covers and from hundreds of simulated EASs, produced by flashers and a laser during a two-hour helicopter under-flight.

  14. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... certain flight tests. (a) No person may operate a civil aircraft (except a manned free balloon) that is... used for a flight test for an airline transport pilot certificate or a class or type rating on...

  15. Recent and future Stratospheric Balloon Activities at Esrange Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemi, Stig

    2012-07-01

    PlaceNameEsrange PlaceNameSpace PlaceTypeCenter located in northern country-regionplaceSweden has during 45 years been a leading launch site for both sounding rockets and stratospheric balloons. We have an unique combination of maintaining both stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets launch operations. Most balloon flights are normally handled inside Scandinavia but since 2005 PersonNamesemi-circular flights are performed with recovery in northern country-regionplaceCanada. The Swedish and Russian Governments have signed an agreement for peaceful exploration of space on 19 March 2010, which will permit circumpolar balloon flights. Within this agreement we are able to offer the science community long duration balloon flights in the Northern Hemisphere with durations for PersonNameseveral weeks. The balloon operations at placePlaceNameEsrange PlaceNameSpace PlaceTypeCenter are yearly expanding. Both NASA and CNES have long term plans for balloon flights from northern country-regionplaceSweden. We have also received requests from placePlaceNameJapanese PlaceTypeUniversities and JAXA for future balloon missions. To handle balloon campaigns with large numbers of payloads or build up for two different campaigns a new big assembly hall was ready for use in April 2011. Circumpolar balloon flights from PlaceNameplaceEsrange PlaceNameSpace PlaceTypeCenter are possible due to the specific conditions during the Arctic summer with continuous daylight and nearly constant solar heating keeping the balloon at a constant altitude with a minimum of ballast. In total 10 payloads have been flying for 4 to 5 days from Esrange westwards with landing in northern Canada since 2005. The SUNRISE balloon borne solar telescope is one example which made in June metricconverterProductID2009 a2009 a more than 4 days semi-circular balloon flight from Esrange. The CitySunrise project is a collaborative project between the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Katlenburg-Lindau and

  16. The French Balloon Program 2013 - 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubourg, Vincent; Vargas, André; Raizonville, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    With over 50 years' experience in the field, the French Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) goes on supporting - as designer and operator - a significant scientific ballooning program. In particular so because balloons still give a unique and valuable access to near space science. From 2008 to 2013, an important renovation effort was achieved, beginning by Zero Pressure Balloons (ZPB) systems, to comply with more stringent Safety constraints and to the growing reliability and performance requirements from scientific missions. The paper will give an overview of the CNES new capabilities and services for operational balloon activities, and their availability status. The scientific launch campaigns of the past two years will be presented. A focus will be made on the results of the Stratoscience 2015 flight campaign from Timmins, Ontario, using the NOSYCA command and control system for ZPB, qualified in flight in 2013. In particular, the PILOT telescope successfully flew during the 2015 campaign, key figures about the flight and mission will be given. An outlook of the new stratospheric long duration flight systems currently in process of developement at CNES will be given, as well as the presentation of the Stratéole 2 project, dedicated to the survey of the low stratosphere and upper troposphere in equatorial regions, with a fleet of small suprer pressure balloons (SPB). As far as tropospheric balloons are concerned, the Aeroclipper initiative will be presented, aiming at qualifying a quasi-tethered balloon, pushed by the winds close to the sea surface, for the study of cyclones. The scientific launch campaigns and the main payloads in the study for the near future will also be presented.

  17. Long duration IR montgolfier and super-pressure balloon flights at the tropics for invetigating the impact of deep convection on transport, chemistry and microphysics in the UTLS region: The Hibiscus Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnier, A.; Pommereau, J.; Letrenne, G.

    The HIBISCUS project is to study the uplift of tropospheric air, lightning, water- vapour injection and radiative impact on the lower stratosphere associated to deep convection at the tropics. The main field campaign planned in Brazil during the Austral summer of 2003-04 is to combined measurements around the world by remote sensing from Infra-Red Montgolfier (MIR) and in-situ from constant level super-pressure balloons (BP). Remote sensing includes profiling of O3, NO 2, H2O and atmospheric extinction in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere by UV-Vis spectrometry and aerosol and sub-visible cirrus by a micro-lidar. In-situ measurements are those of water vapour, ozone and clouds at constant level at the tropopause level around 17 km. In preparation to HIBISCUS, several preliminary MIR and BP test flights have been conducted in the tropics and in the Arctic which allow to better understand the anticipated performances of the approach. The goal of the presentation is to describe the results already achieved during those test flights and the undergoing developments for fulfilling the scientific goals of HIBISCUS.

  18. A High Resolution Liquid Xenon Imaging Telescope for 0.3-10 MeV Gamma Ray Astrophysics: Construction and Initial Balloon Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aprile, Elena

    1993-01-01

    The results achieved with a 3.5 liter liquid xenon time projection chamber (LXe-TPC) prototype during the first year include: the efficiency of detecting the primary scintillation light for event triggering has been measured to be higher than 85%; the charge response has been measured to be stable to within 0.1% for a period of time of about 30 hours; the electron lifetime has been measured to be in excess of 1.3 ms; the energy resolution has been measured to be consistent with previous results obtained with small volume chambers; X-Y gamma ray imaging has been demonstrated with a nondestructive orthogonal wires readout; Monte Carlo simulation results on detection efficiency, expected background count rate at balloon altitude, background reduction algorithms, telescope response to point-like and diffuse sources, and polarization sensitivity calculations; and work on a 10 liter LXe-TPC prototype and gas purification/recovery system.

  19. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberspeaker, Philip J.; Smith, Ira S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 50 to 60 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions support investigations sponsored by NASA's Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program provides the science community with payload development support, environmental testing, launch vehicles, and launch operations from fixed and mobile launch ranges. Sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface. New technology efforts include GPS payload event triggering, tailored trajectories, new vehicle configuration development to expand current capabilities, and the feasibility assessment of an ultra high altitude sounding rocket vehicle. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. The Long Duration Balloon (LDB) is capable of providing flight durations in excess of two weeks and has had many successful flights since its development. The NASA Balloon Program is currently engaged in the development of the Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB), which will be capable of providing flight times up to 100-days. Additional development efforts are focusing on ultra high altitude balloons, station keeping techniques and planetary balloon technologies.

  20. Recent developments in the scientific ballooning in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchanda, R.; Sreenivasan, S.; Subbarao, J.; Kumar, P.

    RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE SCIENTIFIC BALLOONING IN INDIA R. K. Manchanda1, S. Sreenivasan2, J. V. Subbarao2, P. R. Kumar2 1. Tata Institute of Fundamental Research Colaba, Mumbai-400 005, India. 2. TIFR Balloon Facility, PO Box 5, ECIL Post Office, Hyderabad-500 762, India ravi@tifr.res.in/FAX: +91-22-2152110 National Balloon facility operated by TIFR in Hyderabad, India is the only one of its kind in the world, which combines both, the in-house balloon production and a complete flight support for scientific ballooning. In the past few years we executed a major programme of upgradation of different components of balloon production, telemetry and telecommand hardware and various support facilities. This paper focuses on our increased capability of balloon production of large sizes up to 780,000 m3 using Antrix film, development of high strength balloon load tapes with the breaking strength of 182 kg, and the recent introduction of S-band telemetry and a commandable timer cut-off unit in the flight hardware. A summary of the various flights conducted in recent years and the results of the test flight conducted to qualify new sub systems will be presented.

  1. Balloon Ascent: 3-D Simulation Tool for the Ascent and Float of High-Altitude Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Rodger E.

    2005-01-01

    The BalloonAscent balloon flight simulation code represents a from-scratch development using Visual Basic 5 as the software platform. The simulation code is a transient analysis of balloon flight, predicting the skin and gas temperatures along with the 3-D position and velocity in a time and spatially varying environment. There are manual and automated controls for gas valving and the dropping of ballast. Also, there are many handy calculators, such as appropriate free lift, and steady-state thermal solutions with temperature gradients. The strength of this simulation model over others in the past is that the infrared environment is deterministic rather than guessed at. The ground temperature is specified along with the emissivity, which creates a ground level IR environment that is then partially absorbed as it travels upward through the atmosphere to the altitude of the balloon.

  2. Development Overview of the Revised NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cathey, H. M.; Gregory, D; Young, L.; Pierce, D.

    2006-01-01

    The development of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) has made significant strides in addressing the deployment issues experienced in the scaling up of the balloon structure. This paper concentrates on the super-pressure balloon developments that have been, and are currently being planned by the NASA Balloon Program Office at Goddard Space Flight Center s Wallops Flight Facility. The goal of the NASA ULDB development project is to attempt to extend the potential flight durations for large scientific balloon payloads. A summary of the February 2005 test flight from Ft. Sumner, New Mexico will be presented. This test flight spurred a number of investigations and advancements for this project. The development path has pursued some new approaches in the design, analysis, and testing of the balloons. New issues have been ideEti6ed throu& both analysis md testing. These have been addressed in the design stage before the next balloon construction was begun. This paper will give an overview of the recent history for this effort and the development approach pursued for ULDB. A description of the balloon design, including the modifications made as a result of the lessons learned, will be presented. Areas to be presented include the design approach, deployment issues that have been encountered and the proposed solutions, ground testing, photogrammetry, and an analysis overview. Test flight planning and considerations will be presented including test flight safety. An extended duration test flight of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s Ultra Long Duration Balloon is planned for the May/June 2006 time frame. This flight is expected to fly from Sweden to either Canada or Alaska. Preliminary results of this flight will be presented as available. Future plans for both ground testing and additional test flights will also be presented. Goals of the future test flights, which are staged in increments of

  3. Deployment Instabilities of Lobed-Pumpkin Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashino, Kyoichi

    A lobed-pumpkin balloon, currently being developed in ISAS/JAXA as well as in NASA, is a promising vehicle for long duration scientific observations in the stratosphere. Recent ground and flight experiments, however, have revealed that the balloon has deployment instabilities under certain conditions. In order to overcome the instability problems, a next generation SPB called 'tawara' type balloon has been proposed, in which an additional cylindrical part is appended to the standard lobed-pumpkin balloon. The present study investigates the deployment stability of tawara type SPB in comparison to that of standard lobed-pumpkin SPB through eigenvalue analysis on the basis of finite element methods. Our numerical results show that tawara type SPB enjoys excellent deployment performance over the standard lobed-pumpkin SPBs.

  4. Morphological characterization of selected balloon films and its effects on balloon performances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Said, Magdi A.

    1994-01-01

    Morphological characterization of several polyethylene balloon films have been studied using various techniques. The objective is to determine, if any, differentiating structural or morphological features that can be related to the performance of these balloon film materials. The results of the study indicate that the films are composed of either linear low denstiy polyethylene (LLDPE) or low density polyethylene (LDPE). A selective examination of these data imply that films limited degree of branching and larger crystallites size (same % crystallinity) showed good mechanical properties that appear to correlate with their high level of success in balloon flights.

  5. Reduced Disparities in Birth Rates Among Teens Aged 15-19 Years - United States, 2006-2007 and 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lisa; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Cox, Shanna; Kroelinger, Charlan; Besera, Ghenet; Brittain, Anna; Fuller, Taleria R; Koumans, Emilia; Barfield, Wanda

    2016-04-29

    Teen childbearing can have negative health, economic, and social consequences for mothers and their children (1) and costs the United States approximately $9.4 billion annually (2). During 1991-2014, the birth rate among teens aged 15-19 years in the United States declined 61%, from 61.8 to 24.2 births per 1,000, the lowest rate ever recorded (3). Nonetheless, in 2014, the teen birth rate remained approximately twice as high for Hispanic and non-Hispanic black (black) teens compared with non-Hispanic white (white) teens (3), and geographic and socioeconomic disparities remain (3,4), irrespective of race/ethnicity. Social determinants associated with teen childbearing (e.g., low parental educational attainment and limited opportunities for education and employment) are more common in communities with higher proportions of racial and ethnic minorities (4), contributing to the challenge of further reducing disparities in teen births. To examine trends in births for teens aged 15-19 years by race/ethnicity and geography, CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) data at the national (2006-2014), state (2006-2007 and 2013-2014), and county (2013-2014) levels. To describe socioeconomic indicators previously associated with teen births, CDC analyzed data from the American Community Survey (ACS) (2010-2014). Nationally, from 2006 to 2014, the teen birth rate declined 41% overall with the largest decline occurring among Hispanics (51%), followed by blacks (44%), and whites (35%). The birth rate ratio for Hispanic teens and black teens compared with white teens declined from 2.9 to 2.2 and from 2.3 to 2.0, respectively. From 2006-2007 to 2013-2014, significant declines in teen birth rates and birth rate ratios were noted nationally and in many states. At the county level, teen birth rates for 2013-2014 ranged from 3.1 to 119.0 per 1,000 females aged 15-19 years; ACS data indicated unemployment was higher, and education attainment and family income were lower in

  6. Sinuplasty (Balloon Catheter Dilation)

    MedlinePlus

    ... development of the balloon dilating catheter and its adaptation to sinus surgery. In the 1980s, the field ... used in endoscopic sinus surgery. It is the adaptation or application of minimally-invasive balloon technology to ...

  7. Overview of the Scientific Balloon Activity in Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, Mattias; Kemi, Stig; Lockowandt, Christian; Andersson, Kent

    SSC, formerly known as Swedish Space Corporation, is a Swedish state-owned company working in several different space related fields, including scientific stratospheric balloon launches. Esrange Space Centre (Esrange in short) located in the north of Sweden is the launch facility of SSC, where both sounding rocket launches and stratospheric balloon launches are conducted. At Esrange there are also facilities for satellite communication, including one of the largest civilian satellite data reception stations in the world. Stratospheric balloons have been launched from Esrange since 1974, when the first flights were performed together with the French space agency CNES. These balloon flights have normally flown eastward either only over Sweden or into Finland. Some flights have also had permission to fly into Russia, as far as the Ural Mountains. Normal flight times are from 4 to 12 hours. These eastward flights are conducted during the winter months (September to May). Long duration flights have been flown from ESC since 2005, when NASA flew the BLAST payload from Sweden to north Canada. The prevailing westerly wind pattern is very advantageous for trans-Atlantic flights during summer (late May to late July). The long flight times are very beneficial for astronomical payloads, such as telescopes that need long observation times. In 2013 two such payloads were flown, the first called SUNRISE was a German/US solar telescope, and the other called PoGOLite with a Swedish gamma-ray telescope. In 14 days PoGOLite, which had permission to fly over Russia, made an almost complete circumpolar flight. Typical scientific balloon payload fields include atmospheric research, including research on ozone depletion, astronomical and cosmological research, and research in technical fields such as aerodynamics. University students from all over Europe are involved in flights from Esrange under a Swedish/German programme called BEXUS. Two stratospheric balloons are flown with student

  8. Japan-Indo collaboration on balloon observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Fumiyoshi

    Japan-Indo collaboration on balloon observations of cosmic X-ray sources was started in 1969 by the late S. Hayakawa of Nagoya Univ. and B. V. Sreekantan of TIFR. Cosmic background X-ray and soft gamma-ray spectra, simultaneous X-ray and optical flux variation, and size of X-ray emitting region of Crab Nebula were observed successfully by balloon flights at Hyderabad in 1969-1975. H. Shibai of Nagoya Univ. and T. N. Rengarajan of TIFR have organized collaboration on far infrared sky survey at wavlength of 150 micron emitted from CII. By employing improved detectors, CII distribution of Orion Nebula has been obtained in good accuracy by more than ten balloon flights in 1999-2008.

  9. Probability of Elevated Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  10. Description of two measles outbreaks in the Lazio Region, Italy (2006-2007). Importance of pockets of low vaccine coverage in sustaining the infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Despite the launch of the national plan for measles elimination, in Italy, immunization coverage remains suboptimal and outbreaks continue to occur. Two measles outbreaks, occurred in Lazio region during 2006-2007, were investigated to identify sources of infection, transmission routes, and assess operational implications for elimination of the disease. Methods Data were obtained from several sources, the routine infectious diseases surveillance system, field epidemiological investigations, and molecular genotyping of virus by the national reference laboratory. Results Overall 449 cases were reported, sustained by two different stereotypes overlapping for few months. Serotype D4 was likely imported from Romania by a Roma/Sinti family and subsequently spread to the rest of the population. Serotype B3 was responsible for the second outbreak which started in a secondary school. Pockets of low vaccine coverage individuals (Roma/Sinti communities, high school students) facilitated the reintroduction of serotypes not endemic in Italy and facilitated the measles infection to spread. Conclusions Communities with low vaccine coverage represent a more serious public health threat than do sporadic susceptible individuals. The successful elimination of measles will require additional efforts to immunize low vaccine coverage population groups, including hard-to-reach individuals, adolescents, and young adults. An enhanced surveillance systems, which includes viral genotyping to document chains of transmission, is an essential tool for evaluating strategy to control and eliminate measles PMID:20219143

  11. Probability of Elevated Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  12. An overview of instrumentation capabilities for Scientific ballooning in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarajan, Anand; Reddy Vizapur, Anmi; Rao Tanneeru, Venkateswara; Bangaru, Kapardhi; Trivedi, Dharmesh; Rodi, Ashish; Ojha, Devendra; Koli, Santosh

    2016-07-01

    The Balloon Facility of Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR-BF) in India, launches scientific balloons for research in the field of astronomy, astrobiology and atmospheric sciences. TIFR-BF not only has the capability to design, fabricate and launch zero-pressure balloons, but also provide operational and engineering support for launching them. The Control Instrumentation Group (CIG) at the balloon facility handles all electronics related to telemetry, telecommand, tracking, real-time data display, data storage, air-safety and payload recovery. In the recent past, it has designed and developed customized electronics and payload orientation mechanism to meet specific experimental objectives. Small, inexpensive and rugged industrial grade radio data modems were successfully deployed in balloon flights for low bit rate data and image telemetry. This paper will provide an overview and in-flight performance of some of the recent developments in instrumentation and electronics systems. Our plans for future upgradations will also be discussed.

  13. Recruiting Trends, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collegiate Employment Research Institute (NJ3), 2007

    2007-01-01

    College students who plan on entering the labor market can expect to see more job opportunities in the spring of 2007, according to information supplied by 864 companies and organizations to this year's Recruiting Trends Report. After two years of double digit growth, the expansion will slow to a modest 4% to 6%. Two opposing factors appear to be…

  14. Stratospheric balloons trajectories predictions and optimizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musso, I.; Cardillo, A.; Memmo, A.

    Trajectory predictions are becoming an important part of the stratospheric balloons activities due to the increased safety and scientific requirements Often high-populated areas must be avoided while the balloon could be asked to reach regions interesting for scientific measurements The balloon trajectory s reconstruction is essentially a time propagation of local wind vectors along the expected altitudes As consequence the predictor is composed of two interconnected subsystems one for the definition of vertical position and one for the wind predictions and horizontal propagation at every time step Forecast data permits up to 6 days of wind vector predictions Below 10mb altitude mesoscale models reduce the wind prediction uncertainty Directly measured information comes from radiosoundings few hours before flight or during it GPS onboard the balloon telemetry is a second direct wind data source The software has to mesh these different flows of information giving to the measured values a weight inversely proportional to the time and space distance from wind measurements In this way sounding data if properly used are able to reduce the path s dispersion A thermodynamic model reconstructs the balloon vertical positions Heat exchanges between internal gas and external environment are very sensitive to air temperature infrared radiance and albedo Again forecast data have to be properly meshed with radiosoundings and satellite images to obtain the best values of these border conditions They will apply the thermodynamic balloon model We

  15. The experience and opportunities carrying out balloon experiments in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifrin, David; Faucon, Pierre

    2001-08-01

    Beginning with EASOE campaign (1999/1992) that involved participation of Russian specialists in the Arctic region, including the territory of Russia, six international balloon campaigns have been implemented: EASOE (1999/1992), SESAME (1994/1995), ILAS (1997), THESEO (1999), THESEO/2000, ARCHEOPS (2000/2001). All campaigns were launched from Esrange, the facility of the Swedish Space Corporation in Kiruna (68N, 21E) in winter. During these campaigns 19 open-envelope balloon flights as well as 10 long duration flights (of IK-montgolfiers MIR and superpressure balloons) have been conducted on the Russian territory. The given paper features the ten-year experience in implementing balloon campaigns in Russia as well as opportunities for conducting flight in Russia.

  16. Changes in mean intake of fatty acids and intake of saturated and trans fats from potatoes: NHANES 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Storey, Maureen L; Anderson, Patricia A

    2015-05-01

    Studies have shown that higher than usual intakes of trans fatty acids (TFAs) have adverse effects on blood lipids. Because of this, in 2006 the US FDA mandated labeling of TFAs on food packages. The food and restaurant industries, including the potato industry, reformulated their foods to reduce or eliminate partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and TFAs. Before mandatory labeling, grain-based desserts, yeast breads, and French-fried potatoes (FFPs) were the top sources of TFAs in the food supply; by 2007, potato food manufacturers and quick-service restaurants had reduced or eliminated TFAs without increasing saturated fatty acids (SFAs). FFPs are no longer a source of TFAs in the food supply. This study examined energy and fatty acid intake among children aged 6-11 y, adolescents aged 12-18 y, and adults aged ≥19 y across 3 time periods by using data from the NHANES 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010. On average, intakes of total energy, total fat, SFAs, and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) decreased significantly between 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 among children and adolescents; however, the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) did not change. Among adults, intakes of total fat, SFAs, and MUFAs decreased; however, total energy and PUFA intake did not change. On the day of the 2009-2010 survey, ∼13% of children and 10% of adolescents reported consuming fried FFPs, whereas <7% of adults reported consumption of fried FFPs. Intakes of SFAs and TFAs from fried FFPs decreased significantly between 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 among children, adolescents, and adults. This study confirms that intake of TFAs from FFPs is trivial.

  17. Dietary patterns in the French adult population: a study from the second French national cross-sectional dietary survey (INCA2) (2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Gazan, R; Béchaux, C; Crépet, A; Sirot, V; Drouillet-Pinard, P; Dubuisson, C; Havard, S

    2016-07-01

    Identification and characterisation of dietary patterns are needed to define public health policies to promote better food behaviours. The aim of this study was to identify the major dietary patterns in the French adult population and to determine their main demographic, socio-economic, nutritional and environmental characteristics. Dietary patterns were defined from food consumption data collected in the second French national cross-sectional dietary survey (2006-2007). Non-negative-matrix factorisation method, followed by a cluster analysis, was implemented to derive the dietary patterns. Logistic regressions were then used to determine their main demographic and socio-economic characteristics. Finally, nutritional profiles and contaminant exposure levels of dietary patterns were compared using ANOVA. Seven dietary patterns, with specific food consumption behaviours, were identified: 'Small eater', 'Health conscious', 'Mediterranean', 'Sweet and processed', 'Traditional', 'Snacker' and 'Basic consumer'. For instance, the Health-conscious pattern was characterised by a high consumption of low-fat and light products. Individuals belonging to this pattern were likely to be older and to have a better nutritional profile than the overall population, but were more exposed to many contaminants. Conversely, individuals of Snacker pattern were likely to be younger, consumed more highly processed foods, had a nutrient-poor profile but were exposed to a limited number of food contaminants. The study identified main dietary patterns in the French adult population with distinct food behaviours and specific demographic, socio-economic, nutritional and environmental features. Paradoxically, for better dietary patterns, potential health risks cannot be ruled out. Therefore, this study demonstrated the need to conduct a risk-benefit analysis to define efficient public health policies regarding diet.

  18. Genetic Analysis of Norovirus GII.4 Variant Strains Detected in Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis in Yokohama, Japan, from the 2006-2007 to the 2013-2014 Seasons.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, Makoto; Usuku, Shuzo

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis, both in sporadic cases and outbreaks. Since the 1990s, the emergence of several GII.4 variants has been reported worldwide. To investigate the epidemic status of NoV, 6,724 stool samples collected from outbreaks in Yokohama, Japan, from the 2006-2007 to 2013-2014 seasons were assessed for NoVs. We genotyped one specimen from each GII outbreak and conducted a sequence analysis of the VP1 gene for several GII.4 strains. Of the 947 NoV outbreaks during our study, GII was detected in 835, and GII.4 was the predominant genotype of GII. Five different GII.4 variants, Yerseke 2006a, Den Haag 2006b (2006b), Apeldoorn 2007, New Orleans 2009, and Sydney 2012, were detected. During this study period, the most prevalent variant of GII.4 was 2006b, and in each individual season, either 2006b or Sydney 2012 was the predominant variant. Out of the 16 detected 2006b strains, 12 had some amino acid substitutions in their blockade epitope, and these substitutions were concentrated in three residues. Two of the 2006b strains detected in the 2012-2013 season had a S368E substitution, which is consistent with the amino acid residues at same site of NSW0514 (Sydney 2012 prototype). Among the 16 detected strains of Sydney 2012, a phylogenetic analysis showed that all five strains detected in Yokohama during the 2011-2012 season clustered away from the other Sydney 2012 strains that were detected in the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 seasons. These five strains and other Sydney 2012 strains in Yokohama had a few amino acid differences in the blockade epitopes compared with NSW0514. The amino acid substitutions observed in this study provide informative data about the evolution of a novel GII.4 variant.

  19. Groundwater Quality, Age, and Probability of Contamination, Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    The Eagle River watershed is located near the destination resort town of Vail, Colorado. The area has a fastgrowing permanent population, and the resort industry is rapidly expanding. A large percentage of the land undergoing development to support that growth overlies the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA), which likely has a high predisposition to groundwater contamination. As development continues, local organizations need tools to evaluate potential land-development effects on ground- and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. To help develop these tools, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority, conducted a study in 2006-2007 of the groundwater quality, age, and probability of contamination in the ERWVFA, north-central Colorado. Ground- and surface-water quality samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water, tritium, dissolved gases, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) determined with very low-level laboratory methods. The major-ion data indicate that groundwaters in the ERWVFA can be classified into two major groups: groundwater that was recharged by infiltration of surface water, and groundwater that had less immediate recharge from surface water and had elevated sulfate concentrations. Sulfate concentrations exceeded the USEPA National Secondary Drinking Water Regulations (250 milligrams per liter) in many wells near Eagle, Gypsum, and Dotsero. The predominant source of sulfate to groundwater in the Eagle River watershed is the Eagle Valley Evaporite, which is a gypsum deposit of Pennsylvanian age located predominantly in the western one-half of Eagle County.

  20. Advances in Scientific Balloon Thermal Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohaboj, T.; Cathey, H. M., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Balloon Program office has long acknowledged that the accurate modeling of balloon performance and flight prediction is dependant on how well the balloon is thermally modeled. This ongoing effort is focused on developing accurate balloon thermal models that can be used to quickly predict balloon temperatures and balloon performance. The ability to model parametric changes is also a driver for this effort. This paper will present the most recent advances made in this area. This research effort continues to utilize the "Thrmal Desktop" addition to AUTO CAD for the modeling. Recent advances have been made by using this analytical tool. A number of analyses have been completed to test the applicability of this tool to the problem with very positive results. Progressively detailed models have been developed to explore the capabilities of the tool as well as to provide guidance in model formulation. A number of parametric studies have been completed. These studies have varied the shape of the structure, material properties, environmental inputs, and model geometry. These studies have concentrated on spherical "proxy models" for the initial development stages and then to transition to the natural shaped zero pressure and super pressure balloons. An assessment of required model resolution has also been determined. Model solutions have been cross checked with known solutions via hand calculations. The comparison of these cases will also be presented. One goal is to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed full models. This papa presents the step by step advances made as part of this effort, capabilities, limitations, and the lessons learned. Also presented are the plans for further thermal modeling work.

  1. TMBM: Tethered Micro-Balloons on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, M. H.; Greeley, R.; Cutts, J. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Murbach, M.

    2000-01-01

    The use of balloons/aerobots on Mars has been under consideration for many years. Concepts include deployment during entry into the atmosphere from a carrier spacecraft, deployment from a lander, use of super-pressurized systems for long duration flights, 'hot-air' systems, etc. Principal advantages include the ability to obtain high-resolution data of the surface because balloons provide a low-altitude platform which moves relatively slowly. Work conducted within the last few years has removed many of the technical difficulties encountered in deployment and operation of balloons/aerobots on Mars. The concept proposed here (a tethered balloon released from a lander) uses a relatively simple approach which would enable aspects of Martian balloons to be tested while providing useful and potentially unique science results. Tethered Micro-Balloons on Mars (TMBM) would be carried to Mars on board a future lander as a stand-alone experiment having a total mass of one to two kilograms. It would consist of a helium balloon of up to 50 cubic meters that is inflated after landing and initially tethered to the lander. Its primary instrumentation would be a camera that would be carried to an altitude of up to tens of meters above the surface. Imaging data would be transmitted to the lander for inclusion in the mission data stream. The tether would be released in stages allowing different resolutions and coverage. In addition during this staged release a lander camera system may observe the motion of the balloon at various heights above he lander. Under some scenarios upon completion of the primary phase of TMBM operations, the tether would be cut, allowing TMBM to drift away from the landing site, during which images would be taken along the ground.

  2. NASA test flights with increased flight stress indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, I. S., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the objectives, results, and conclusions stemming from a series of six test flights conducted for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) by the National Scientific Balloon Facility (NSBF). Results from the test flights indicate that: (1) the current two U.S. balloon films are capable of being flown at significantly increased flight stress index values; (2) payload weights less than the design minimum payload can be reliably flown without fear of structural failure due to increased circumferential stress; and (3) large and rapid decreases in payload weight can be tolerated by current balloons without structural failure.

  3. Small Research Balloons in a Physics Course for Education Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruhweiler, F. C.; Verner, E.; Long, T.; Montanaro, E.

    2013-12-01

    At The Catholic Univ. of America, we teach an experimental physics course entitled Physics 240: The Sun-Earth Connection, which is designed for the undergraduate education major. The emphasis is on providing hands-on experience and giving the students an exciting experience in physics. As part of this course, in the Spring 2013 semester, we instituted a project to plan, build, launch, and retrieve a small (~1.3 kg) research balloon payload. The payload flown was a small GPS unit that sent its position to an Internet site, a small wide-angle high-resolution video camera, and an analog refrigerator thermometer placed in the field of view of the camera. All data were stored on the camera sim-card. Students faced the problems of flying a small research balloon in the congested, densely populated Northeast Corridor of the US. They used computer simulators available on the Web to predict the balloon path and flight duration given velocities for the Jet Stream and ground winds, as well as payload mass and amount of helium in the balloon. The first flight was extremely successful. The balloon was launched 140 km NW of Washington DC near Hagerstown, MD and touched down 10 miles (16 km) NW of York, PA, within 1.6 km of what was predicted. The balloon reached 73,000 ft (22,000 m) and the thermometer indicated temperatures as low as -70 degrees Fahrenheit (-57 C) during the flight. Further balloon flights are planned in conjunction with this course. Additional exercises and experiments will be developed centered around these flights. Besides learning that science can be exciting, students also learn that science is not always easily predictable, and that these balloon flights give an understanding of many of problems that go into real scientific space missions. This project is supported in part by an educational supplement to NASA grant NNX10AC56G

  4. Pumpkins and onions and balloon design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winker, J. A.

    The reach for a capability to make long flights (months) with heavy payloads (tonnes) has long been pursued. The closest we have come is with polar flights devoid of a significant diurnal cycle. Superpressure technology, with its ability to survive diurnal cycles, is an obvious choice, but materials limitations have been an obstacle to realizing these ambitious goals. Now comes an assortment of new synthetic materials, coupled with a special variety of superpressure balloon which, in combination, is poised to yield a solution for our enhanced duration/payload quest. In this paper we are looking not at materials, but only at a balloon concept. This concept is a "natural shape" oblate spheroid balloon whose shape is chosen to exploit properties of component materials, particularly newly available ones. The current variation of this concept is called a "pumpkin" balloon. The most visible work on this shape is that done by France's CNES, Japan's ISAS, and in the USA by NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. But the basic design idea is not new; it extends back at least a half century. This paper traces the origins of the shape, its evolution through various iterations, and it speculates on some of the recent thinking regarding construction details.

  5. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  6. Catalytic Generation of Lift Gases for Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert; Berggren, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A lift-gas cracker (LGC) is an apparatus that generates a low-molecular-weight gas (mostly hydrogen with smaller amounts of carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide) at low gauge pressure by methanol reforming. LGCs are undergoing development for use as sources of buoyant gases for filling zero-gauge-pressure meteorological and scientific balloons in remote locations where heavy, high-pressure helium cylinders are not readily available. LGCs could also be used aboard large, zero-gauge-pressure, stratospheric research balloons to extend the duration of flight.

  7. Controlled weather balloon ascents and descents for atmospheric research and climate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, A.; Philipona, R.; Romanens, G.; Hurst, D. F.; Hall, E. G.; Jordan, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    In situ upper-air measurements are often made with instruments attached to weather balloons launched at the surface and lifted into the stratosphere. Present day balloon-borne sensors allow near-continuous measurements from the Earth's surface to about 35 km (3-5 hPa), where the balloons burst and their instrument payloads descend with parachutes. It has been demonstrated that ascending weather balloons can perturb the air measured by very sensitive humidity and temperature sensors trailing behind them, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The use of controlled balloon descent for such measurements has therefore been investigated and is described here. We distinguish between the one balloon technique that uses a simple automatic valve system to release helium from the balloon at a pre-set ambient pressure, and the double balloon technique that uses a carrier balloon to lift the payload and a parachute balloon to control the descent of instruments after the carrier balloon is released at pre-set altitude. The automatic valve technique has been used for several decades for water vapor soundings with frost point hygrometers, whereas the double balloon technique has recently been re-established and deployed to measure radiation and temperature profiles through the atmosphere. Double balloon soundings also strongly reduce pendulum motion of the payload, stabilizing radiation instruments during ascent. We present the flight characteristics of these two ballooning techniques and compare the quality of temperature and humidity measurements made during ascent and descent.

  8. Controlled weather balloon ascents and descents for atmospheric research and climate monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Romanens, Gonzague; Hurst, Dale F.; Hall, Emrys G.; Jordan, Allen F.

    2016-03-01

    In situ upper-air measurements are often made with instruments attached to weather balloons launched at the surface and lifted into the stratosphere. Present-day balloon-borne sensors allow near-continuous measurements from the Earth's surface to about 35 km (3-5 hPa), where the balloons burst and their instrument payloads descend with parachutes. It has been demonstrated that ascending weather balloons can perturb the air measured by very sensitive humidity and temperature sensors trailing behind them, particularly in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The use of controlled balloon descent for such measurements has therefore been investigated and is described here. We distinguish between the single balloon technique that uses a simple automatic valve system to release helium from the balloon at a preset ambient pressure, and the double balloon technique that uses a carrier balloon to lift the payload and a parachute balloon to control the descent of instruments after the carrier balloon is released at preset altitude. The automatic valve technique has been used for several decades for water vapor soundings with frost point hygrometers, whereas the double balloon technique has recently been re-established and deployed to measure radiation and temperature profiles through the atmosphere. Double balloon soundings also strongly reduce pendulum motion of the payload, stabilizing radiation instruments during ascent. We present the flight characteristics of these two ballooning techniques and compare the quality of temperature and humidity measurements made during ascent and descent.

  9. Percutaneous balloon pericardiotomy: a double-balloon technique.

    PubMed

    Iaffaldano, R A; Jones, P; Lewis, B E; Eleftheriades, E G; Johnson, S A; McKiernan, T L

    1995-09-01

    We describe a double-balloon technique for performing a percutaneous balloon pericardiotomy. This technique was employed when the large, single dilation balloon customarily used for this procedure failed to fully inflate across the parietal pericardium. Two smaller balloons were advanced through the same skin tract and simultaneously inflated, thus producing an adequate pericardial window. This double-balloon technique allowed for the more secure anchoring of the balloons across the pericardium and for the delivery of greater dilation pressures.

  10. Advances in balloon endoscopes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Akihiro; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2014-06-01

    In September 2003, a double-balloon endoscope (DBE) composed of balloons attached to a scope and an overtube was released in Japan prior to becoming available in other parts of the world. The DBE was developed by Dr. Yamamoto (1), and 5 different types of scopes with different uses have already been marketed. In April 2007, a single-balloon small intestinal endoscope was released with a balloon attached only to the overtube as a subsequent model. This article presents a detailed account of the development of these scopes up to the present time.

  11. GHOST balloons around Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stearns, Charles R.

    1988-01-01

    The GHOST balloon position as a function of time data shows that the atmospheric circulation around the Antarctic Continent at the 100 mb and 200 mb levels is complex. The GHOST balloons supposedly follow the horizontal trajectory of the air at the balloon level. The position of GHOST balloon 98Q for a three month period in 1968 is shown. The balloon moved to within 2 deg of the South Pole on 1 October 1968 and then by 9 December 1968 was 35 deg from the South Pole and close to its position on 1 September 1968. The balloon generally moved from west to east but on two occasions moved in the opposite direction for a few days. The latitude of GHOST balloons 98Q and 149Z which was at 200 mb is given. Both balloons tended to get closer to the South Pole in September and October. Other GHOST balloons at the same pressure and time period may not indicate similar behavior.

  12. Kestrel balloon launch system

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, M.J.

    1991-10-01

    Kestrel is a high-altitude, Helium-gas-filled-balloon system used to launch scientific payloads in winds up to 20 knots, from small platforms or ships, anywhere over land or water, with a minimal crew and be able to hold in standby conditions. Its major components consist of two balloons (a tow balloon and a main balloon), the main deployment system, helium measurement system, a parachute recovery unit, and the scientific payload package. The main scope of the launch system was to eliminate the problems of being dependent of launching on long airfield runways, low wind conditions, and long launch preparation time. These objectives were clearly met with Kestrel 3.

  13. Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serotype Tennessee Strain CDC07-0191, Implicated in the 2006-2007 Multistate Food-Borne Outbreak Linked to Peanut Butter in the United States.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiangyu; Salazar, Joelle K; Frezet, Stephanie; Maccannell, Duncan; Ribot, Efrain M; Fields, Patricia I; Fricke, W Florian; Zhang, Wei

    2013-05-23

    Salmonella enterica serotype Tennessee strain CDC07-0191 was isolated from the 2006-2007 multistate food-borne outbreak linked to peanut butter in the United States. Here we report a high-quality draft assembly of the genome sequence of this strain, derived from a patient. This is the first reported high-quality draft genome sequence for S. enterica serotype Tennessee, which will enable in-depth studies of its transmission and virulence.

  14. Stratospheric Balloon Platforms for Near Space Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewey, R. G.

    2012-12-01

    For over five decades, high altitude aerospace balloon platforms have provided a unique vantage point for space and geophysical research by exposing scientific instrument packages and experiments to space-like conditions above 99% of Earth's atmosphere. Reaching altitudes in excess of 30 km for durations ranging from hours to weeks, high altitude balloons offer longer flight durations than both traditional sounding rockets and emerging suborbital reusable launch vehicles. For instruments and experiments requiring access to high altitudes, engineered balloon systems provide a timely, responsive, flexible, and cost-effective vehicle for reaching near space conditions. Moreover, high altitude balloon platforms serve as an early means of testing and validating hardware bound for suborbital or orbital space without imposing space vehicle qualifications and certification requirements on hardware in development. From float altitudes above 30 km visible obscuration of the sky is greatly reduced and telescopes and other sensors function in an orbit-like environment, but in 1g. Down-facing sensors can take long-exposure atmospheric measurements and images of Earth's surface from oblique and nadir perspectives. Payload support subsystems such as telemetry equipment and command, control, and communication (C3) interfaces can also be tested and operationally verified in this space-analog environment. For scientific payloads requiring over-flight of specific areas of interests, such as an active volcano or forest region, advanced mission planning software allows flight trajectories to be accurately modeled. Using both line-of-sight and satellite-based communication systems, payloads can be tracked and controlled throughout the entire mission duration. Under NASA's Flight Opportunities Program, NSC can provide a range of high altitude flight options to support space and geophysical research: High Altitude Shuttle System (HASS) - A balloon-borne semi-autonomous glider carries

  15. Experimental characterization and numerical modelling of polymeric film damage, constituting the stratospheric super pressurized balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaabane, Makram; Chaabane, Makram; Dalverny, Olivier; Deramecourt, Arnaud; Mistou, Sébastien

    The super-pressure balloons developed by CNES are a great challenge in scientific ballooning. Whatever the balloon type considered (spherical, pumpkin...), it is necessary to have good knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the envelope regarding to the flight level and the lifespan of the balloon. It appears during the working stages of the super pressure balloons that these last can exploded prematurely in the course of the first hours of flight. For this reason CNES and LGP are carrying out research programs about experimentations and modelling in order to predict a good stability of the balloons flight and guarantee a life time in adequacy with the technical requirement. This study deals with multilayered polymeric film damage which induce balloons failure. These experimental and numerical study aims, are a better understanding and predicting of the damage mechanisms bringing the premature explosion of balloons. The following damages phenomena have different origins. The firsts are simple and triple wrinkles owed during the process and the stocking stages of the balloons. The second damage phenomenon is associated to the creep of the polymeric film during the flight of the balloon. The first experimental results we present in this paper, concern the mechanical characterization of three different damage phenomena. The severe damage induced by the wrinkles of the film involves a significant loss of mechanical properties. In a second part the theoretical study, concerns the choice and the development of a non linear viscoelastic coupled damage behavior model in a finite element code.

  16. Development of a super-pressure balloon with a diamond-shaped net --- result of a ground inflation test of a 2,000 cubic-meter balloon ---

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Nakashino, Kyoichi; Akita, Daisuke; Matsushima, Kiyoho; Shimadu, Shigeyuki; Goto, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Matsuo, Takuma

    2016-07-01

    A light super-pressure balloon has been developed using a method to cover a balloon with a diamond-shaped net of high-tensile fibers. The goal is to fly a payload of 900 kg to the altitude of 37 km with a 300,000 m^{3} balloon. Beginning from a demonstration test of the net-balloon with a 10 m^{3} balloon in 2010, we have been polished the net-balloon through ground inflation tests and flight tests, including a flight test of a 3,000 m ^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 15,000 m^{3} zero-pressure balloon in 2012, and a flight test of a 10 m^{3} balloon in the tandem balloon configuration with a 2 kg rubber balloon in 2013, as reported in the last COSPAR. In 2014, we developed a 5,000 m^{3} balloon and performed a ground inflation test to find that the balloon burst from a lip panel for termination with a differential pressure of 425 Pa. It was due to a stress concentration at the edge of a thick tape attached along the termination mechanism. In 2015, we modified the balloon by adding tapes on the lip panel to avoid the stress concentration, and also shorten the net length to leave some margin of the film and performed a ground inflation test again to find the balloon showed asymmetrical deployment and burst from the edge of the net with a differential pressure of 348 Pa. We consider it is due to the margin of the film along the circumferential direction, and proposed a gore shape which circumference length is kept as determined by the pumpkin shape of the balloon but setting meridian length longer than that. We developed a 10 m^{3} balloon with the gore design to find that the balloon deployed symmetrically and showed the burst pressure of 10,000 Pa. In 2016, we are going to develop a 2,000 m^{3} balloon with the gore design and perform its ground inflation test. In this paper, we are going to report its result with the sequence of the development.

  17. National Report on the NASA Sounding Rocket and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberspeaker, Philip; Fairbrother, Debora

    2013-01-01

    The U. S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a total of 30 to 40 missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community and other users. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program supports the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payloads, and providing both the rocket vehicle and launch operations services. Activities since 2011 have included two flights from Andoya Rocket Range, more than eight flights from White Sands Missile Range, approximately sixteen flights from Wallops Flight Facility, two flights from Poker Flat Research Range, and four flights from Kwajalein Atoll. Other activities included the final developmental flight of the Terrier-Improved Malemute launch vehicle, a test flight of the Talos-Terrier-Oriole launch vehicle, and a host of smaller activities to improve program support capabilities. Several operational missions have utilized the new Terrier-Malemute vehicle. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program is currently engaged in the development of a new sustainer motor known as the Peregrine. The Peregrine development effort will involve one static firing and three flight tests with a target completion data of August 2014. The NASA Balloon Program supported numerous scientific and developmental missions since its last report. The program conducted flights from the U.S., Sweden, Australia, and Antarctica utilizing standard and experimental vehicles. Of particular note are the successful test flights of the Wallops Arc Second Pointer (WASP), the successful demonstration of a medium-size Super Pressure Balloon (SPB), and most recently, three simultaneous missions aloft over Antarctica. NASA continues its successful incremental design qualification program and will support a science mission aboard WASP in late 2013 and a science mission aboard the SPB in early 2015. NASA has also embarked on an intra-agency collaboration to launch a rocket from a balloon to

  18. Modelling Hot Air Balloons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brimicombe, M. W.

    1991-01-01

    A macroscopic way of modeling hot air balloons using a Newtonian approach is presented. Misleading examples using a car tire and the concept of hot air rising are discussed. Pressure gradient changes in the atmosphere are used to explain how hot air balloons work. (KR)

  19. The Great Balloon Controversy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Valerie

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the harmful effects of balloon launches and the dumping of plastic debris into oceans. Cites several examples of plastic materials being discovered inside the bodies of sick and/or dead marine animals. Offers alternative activities to releasing balloons into the atmosphere. (RT)

  20. Clefting in pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baginski, F.; Schur, W.

    NASA's effort to develop a large payload, high altitude, long duration balloon, the Ultra Long Duration Balloon, focuses on a pumpkin shape super-pressure design. It has been observed that a pumpkin balloon may be unable to pressurize into the desired cyclically symmetric equilibrium configuration, settling into a distorted, undesired stable state instead. Hoop stress considerations in the pumpkin design leads to choosing the lowest possible bulge radius, while robust deployment is favored by a large bulge radius. Some qualitative understanding of design aspects on undesired equilibria in pumpkin balloons has been obtained via small-scale balloon testing. Poorly deploying balloons have clefts, but most gores away from the cleft deploy uniformly. In this paper, we present models for pumpkin balloons with clefts. Long term success of the pumpkin balloon for NASA requires a thorough understanding of the phenomenon of multiple stable equilibria and means for quantitative assessment of measures that prevent their occurrence. This paper attempts to determine numerical thresholds of design parameters that distinguish between properly deploying designs and improperly deploying designs by analytically investigating designs in the vicinity of criticality. Design elements which may trigger the onset undesired equilibria and remedial measures that ensure deployment are discussed.

  1. Thermal performance modeling of NASA s scientific balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, H.; Cathey, H.

    The flight performance of a scientific balloon is highly dependant on the interaction between the balloon and its environment. The balloon is a thermal vehicle. Modeling a scientific balloon's thermal performance has proven to be a difficult analytical task. Most previous thermal models have attempted these analyses by using either a bulk thermal model approach, or by simplified representations of the balloon. These approaches to date have provided reasonable, but not very accurate results. Improvements have been made in recent years using thermal analysis tools developed for the thermal modeling of spacecraft and other sophisticated heat transfer problems. These tools, which now allow for accurate modeling of highly transmissive materials, have been applied to the thermal analysis of NASA's scientific balloons. A research effort has been started that utilizes the "Thermal Desktop" addition to AUTO CAD. This paper will discuss the development of thermal models for both conventional and Ultra Long Duration super-pressure balloons. This research effort has focused on incremental analysis stages of development to assess the accuracy of the tool and the required model resolution to produce usable data. The first stage balloon thermal analyses started with simple spherical balloon models with a limited number of nodes, and expanded the number of nodes to determine required model resolution. These models were then modified to include additional details such as load tapes. The second stage analyses looked at natural shaped Zero Pressure balloons. Load tapes were then added to these shapes, again with the goal of determining the required modeling accuracy by varying the number of gores. The third stage, following the same steps as the Zero Pressure balloon efforts, was directed at modeling super-pressure pumpkin shaped balloons. The results were then used to develop analysis guidelines and an approach for modeling balloons for both simple first order estimates and detailed

  2. Balloon experiments in the earth's stratosphere within the ``Mars-96'' project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremnev, R. S.; Pichkhadze, K. M.; Zashchirinskii, A. M.; Pavlov, V. A.; Trifonov, I. V.; Linkin, V. M.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Nazarov, D. N.; Kotov, B. B.; Kotelnikov, K. A.; Polukhina, N. G.; Lepazg, G.-P.; Avrar, J.; Ortis, J.; Makartsev, O. V.; Sazonov, L. B.

    1996-03-01

    For experimental testing of a Mars balloon probe in the upper layers of the Earth's atmosphere a specified parachute system was developed, fabricated and tested in 3 high-altitude balloon flights. The balloon volumes were 130000 and 180000 m^3 with the payloads of 500 - 900 kg; the maximum flight altitude reached 32 km. The experiments showed that one-canopy parachute system with the area of 1200 m^2 has certain advantages as compared to the four-canopy system and can be used both in Mars balloon tests in the Earth's stratosphere and as a parachute system of the descent apparatus for investigation of Mars.

  3. New concepts for interplanetary balloons and blimps, particularly for Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, J.

    This paper proposes novel approaches for balloons for planets Titan BALLUTE A balloon or blimp arriving at a planet or moon with an atmosphere might inflate falling under a parachute or after landing Neither is ideal In both cases the envelope must include qualities needed for inflation as well as those for flight A ballute BALLoon parachUTE could be used thus a ballute is like a hot air balloon with a large mouth Initially it fills by ram pressure descending through an atmosphere As proposed it would then be heated by solid propellant It would stop descending and float level with hot air lift It is now a perfect location for inflation without wind or movement through the atmosphere and away from the uncertainties of the surface A ballute could be used over several bodies in the solar system BALLOONS FOR LOW TEMPERATURES Flight in very low temperatures is also discussed Conditions are so different that it is useful to examine basic factors These apply for any planet with low temperature and weather calm enough for balloons or blimps First for terrestrial hot air balloons thermal radiation is usually the dominant way heat is lost But radiation rises with the 4th power of absolute temperature At Titan radiation will be one or two orders of magnitude smaller Also the dense atmosphere allows small balloons small temperature differences So convection is small It appears a hot air balloon can easily be heated by a radioactive source likely carried to make electricity Pinholes are not important in such a balloon

  4. Evolution of the NASA long-duration balloon program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. Vernon

    1994-01-01

    The development of long-duration ballooning techniques to support flights of 1-2 ton payloads for periods up to 2 weeks, possibly even longer, offers a near-space scientific mission capability with an order of magnitude improvement over traditional balloon flights. This revolution in scientific research ballooning began with the solution of the manufacturing difficulties that plagued the program in the first half of the 1980's, and it has culminated in the early 1990's with three successive circumnavigations of the Antarctic continent in 9 to 14 day flights. A complementary capablity in the Northern hemisphere, which would approximately double the number of flights that could be supported each year, is needed to accommodate the trend for conventional payloads to be modified, or developed, for long-duration flights. Plans are already underway to employ the order-of-magnitude increased flight time for support of multi-flight research programs that will produce results comparable to some space missions. An overview of the current status and near-term plans for ballooning will be presented, along with a discussion of some major science initiatives that have been enabled.

  5. A unified thermal and vertical trajectory model for the prediction of high altitude balloon performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, L. A.; Horn, W. J.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model for the prediction of the trajectory and thermal behavior of zero-pressure high altitude balloon was developed. In accord with flight data, the model permits radiative emission and absorption of the lifting gas and daytime gas temperatures above that of the balloon film. It also includes ballasting, venting, and valving. Predictions obtained with the model are compared with flight data from several flights and newly discovered features are discussed.

  6. Information processing for the infrared balloon telescope Goldener Drache

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haser, L.

    1983-02-01

    The information processing system of the ground station and balloon carrying an infrared telescope is described. The ground-balloon link is achieved by telemetry and the control by a computer. The operation scheme contains programs for planning, observations, decision aids during the flight, remote control, telemetry interpretation, and data registration. The real time data are presented partly via computer and partly via direct signal coding. All data can be stored on magnetic tape.

  7. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... certain flight tests. (a) No person may operate a civil aircraft (except a manned free balloon) that is... transport pilot certificate or a class or type rating on that certificate, or for a part 121...

  8. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... certain flight tests. (a) No person may operate a civil aircraft (except a manned free balloon) that is... transport pilot certificate or a class or type rating on that certificate, or for a part 121...

  9. 14 CFR 91.109 - Flight instruction; Simulated instrument flight and certain flight tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... certain flight tests. (a) No person may operate a civil aircraft (except a manned free balloon) that is... transport pilot certificate or a class or type rating on that certificate, or for a part 121...

  10. A Survey of Titan Balloon Concepts and Technology Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Jeffery L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the options for, and technology status of, balloon vehicles to explore Saturn's moon Titan. A significant amount of Titan balloon concept thinking and technology development has been performed in recent years, particularly following the spectacular results from the descent and landing of the Huygens probe and remote sensing observations by the Cassini spacecraft. There is widespread recognition that a balloon vehicle on the next Titan mission could provide an outstanding and unmatched capability for in situ exploration on a global scale. The rich variety of revealed science targets has combined with a highly favorable Titan flight environment to yield a wide diversity of proposed balloon concepts. The paper presents a conceptual framework for thinking about balloon vehicle design choices and uses it to analyze various Titan options. The result is a list of recommended Titan balloon vehicle concepts that could perform a variety of science missions, along with their projected performance metrics. Recent technology developments for these balloon concepts are discussed to provide context for an assessment of outstanding risk areas and technological maturity. The paper concludes with suggestions for technology investments needed to achieve flight readiness.

  11. Balloon observations of spatial coherence in the Global Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Polar Patrol Balloon Team

    The first campaign of the Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) experiment (1st-PPB) was carried out at Syowa Station in Antarctica during 1990-1991 and 1992-1993. Based on the results of the 1st-PPB experiment, the next campaign (2nd-PPB) was carried out in the austral summer of 2002-2003. This paper will present the global circuit results from the 2nd-PPB experiment. In that experiment, three balloons were launched for the purpose of upper atmosphere physics observation (3 balloons). Payloads of these 3 flights were identical with each other, and were launched as close together in time as allowed by weather conditions to constitute a cluster of balloons during their flights. Such a "Balloon Cluster" is suitable to observe temporal evolution and spatial distribution of phenomena in the ionospheric regions and boundaries that the balloons traversed during their circumpolar trajectory. More than 20 days of simultaneous fair weather 3-axis electric field and stratospheric conductivity data were obtained at geomagnetic latitudes ranging from sub-auroral to the polar cap. Balloon separation varied from ˜ 60 to ˜ 500 km. This paper will present the global circuit observations with emphasis on the times of apparent spatial variation in the vertical fair weather field.

  12. An Overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flowers, Bobby J.; Needleman, Harvey C.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Sounding Rockets and Balloon Programs conduct a combined total of approximately fifty to sixty missions per year in support of the NASA scientific community. These missions are provided in support of investigations sponsored by NASA'S Offices of Space Science, Life and Microgravity Sciences & Applications, and Earth Science. The Goddard Space Flight Center has management and implementation responsibility for these programs. The NASA Sounding Rockets Program has continued to su,pport the science community by integrating their experiments into the sounding rocket payload and providing the rocket vehicle and launch operations necessary to provide the altitude/time required obtain the science objectives. The sounding rockets continue to provide a cost-effective way to make in situ observations from 50 to 1500 km in the near-earth environment and to uniquely cover the altitude regime between 50 km and 130 km above the Earth's surface, which is physically inaccessible to either balloons or satellites. A new architecture for providing this support has been introduced this year with the establishment of the NASA Sounding Rockets Contract. The Program has continued to introduce improvements into their operations and ground and flight systems. An overview of the NASA Sounding Rockets Program with special emphasis on the new support contract will be presented. The NASA Balloon Program continues to make advancements and developments in its capabilities for support of the scientific ballooning community. Long duration balloon (LDB) is a prominent aspect of the program with two campaigns scheduled for this calendar year. Two flights are scheduled in the Northern Hemisphere from Fairbanks, Alaska, in June and two flights are scheduled from McMurdo, Antarctica, in the Southern Hemisphere in December. The comprehensive balloon research and development (R&D) effort has continued with advances being made across the

  13. Overview of the development of the pathfinder ultra long duration balloon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M.; Stuchlik, D.; Corbin, B.

    The Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Pathfinder Project is developing a small pumpkin balloon system and new payload support systems to demonstrate a global 100 day duration capability that is scalable to a full scale flight. The proposed 56,600 m3 pumpkin balloon will be capable of supporting a small tracking payload on the order of 20-40 kg, to an altitude of 24 to 33 km. The Pathfinder Test Balloons will provide valuable data in the development of performance models for future ULDB flights. Attempts will be made to design and fabricate the balloons as close as possible to the full scale ULDB in order to maintain conformity and accuracy of the two balloons' performance models. The balloon system will be designed to handle a small global command and telemetry payload also under development. The payload will include a photo-voltaic power system, command and data handling unit, GPS receiver, and IRIDIUM transceiver for global communications. The flight data will include, at a minimum, position (latitude, longitude, and altitude), and time as well as other balloon performance parameters. Although the system will be designed for global launch capability, initial flights will be launched from the proposed full-scale ULDB mission launch locations. The overall project objectives as well as the trade studies for determining the balloon design parameters, performance, system power requirements, data transmission rates, termination options and overall system configuration will be discussed.

  14. A Balloon-Gondola Dedicated for Waterlanding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, J.; Roudil, G.; Catalano, C.; Von Ballmoos, P.

    2015-09-01

    As balloon flights over populated areas are increasingly considered a safety risk, new launch sites are chosen to ensure that sparsely inhabited regions are overflown. Particular vigilance is requested for the selection of the zones where flight termination and landing take place. While open sea would ideally fulfil the safety requirements for flight track and termination, traditional balloon experiments are lost or severely damaged on water landings. EUSO-Balloon, a pathfinder mission for Cosmic-Ray physics, has deliberately been designed as a water-landing gondola as the instrument eventually will observe Energetic Air Showers above open water. In order to maximize the chances for a dry recovery of all the sensitive equipment after a water-landing, the gondola features a number of special devices: inside a watertight capsule using a Fresnel lens as a porthole, the electronics is mounted on a ‘dry-shelf' with limber holes (drain holes). Also, the entire capsule is held above the waterline by a collar of floaters. To minimize damage to the payload and warrant the integrity of the leak-tight capsule at splashdown, efficient deceleration is achieved by using the instruments optical baffle (nadir-pointing) as a cylinder; the pressure of the air-cushion in the enclosed volume being passively controlled by calibrated evacuation-holes. Upon its maiden flight of August 25, 2014 from Timmins, Ontario, EUSO-Balloon not only accomplished its science goals, but it also accidentally landed in a small lake, validating the water-landing capacity it was designed for.

  15. Scientific ballooning in the 20 th century; a historical perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, J.

    Hess discovered the cosmic rays in 1912. Using a manned balloon, he found the altitude variation of the radiation. After this discovery, many balloon experiments were performed to explore the most mysterious radiation coming from outside of the earth during the 1920's to the 1930's. At the end of the 1940's, balloon systems were revolutionized by the use of new plastic films and telemetry systems. At almost the same time, highly sensitive nuclear emulsions were developed. Balloon exposures of emulsions brought us new discoveries of the heavy primaries in cosmic rays. Extensive studies with nuclear emulsions discovered high-energy phenomena and new particles between the end of 1940's to the 1960's. At the same time, in various countries, experiments with more sophisticated electronic devices were begun together with ingenious work on balloon technology. Inventions were made in the areas of designing, manufacturing, materials, telemetry systems for balloons and long duration flight systems etc. Several permanent launching stations were established in various countries in the 1960's Here, I review the development of essential technologies in scientific ballooning, and their value in contributing to the growth of space physics. As the future prospect, I stress the point that scientific ballooning is indispensable and a most cost-effective way to explore space astrophysics and Earth science, in addition to the preparation of satellite and the space station experiments.

  16. Balloon Catheter Prevents Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higginson, Gregory A.; Bouffard, Marc R.; Hoehicke, Beth S.; King, Bradley D.; Peterson, Sandra L.

    1994-01-01

    Balloon catheter similar to that used in such medical procedures as angioplasty and heart surgery protects small orifices against contamination and blockage by chips generated in machining operations. Includes small, inflatable balloon at end of thin, flexible tube. Contains additional features adapting it to anticontamination service: balloon larger to fit wider channel it must block; made of polyurethane (rather than latex), which does not fragment if bursts; material made thicker to resist abrasion better; and kink-resistant axial wire helps catheter negotiate tight bends.

  17. Ballooning Interest in Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hy

    1992-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students construct model hot air balloons to introduce the concepts of convection current, the principles of Charles' gas law, and three-dimensional geometric shapes. Provides construction and launching instructions. (MDH)

  18. The Descending Helium Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helseth, Lars Egil

    2014-01-01

    I describe a simple and fascinating experiment wherein helium leaks out of a rubber balloon, thereby causing it to descend. An estimate of the volumetric leakage rate is made by measuring its rate of descent.

  19. NASA Now: Balloon Research

    NASA Video Gallery

    In this NASA Now program, Debbie Fairbrother discusses two types of high-altitude balloons that NASA is using to test scientific instruments and spacecraft. She also talks about the Ideal Gas Law a...

  20. High Energy Antimatter Telescope (HEAT) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J. J.

    1995-01-01

    This grant supported our work on the High Energy Antimatter Telescope(HEAT) balloon experiment. The HEAT payload is designed to perform a series of experiments focusing on the cosmic ray positron, electron, and antiprotons. Thus far two flights of the HEAT -e+/- configuration have taken place. During the period of this grant major accomplishments included the following: (1) Publication of the first results of the 1994 HEAT-e+/- flight in Physical Review Letters; (2) Successful reflight of the HEAT-e+/- payload from Lynn Lake in August 1995; (3) Repair and refurbishment of the elements of the HEAT payload damaged during the landing following the 1995 flight; and (4) Upgrade of the ground support equipment for future flights of the HEAT payload.

  1. Balloon measurements of the far-infrared background radiation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlner, D.; Weiss, R.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a balloon-borne radiometer designed to make direct measurements of the background radiation in the spectral range from 1 to 20 cm, and evaluation of the results of two balloon flights performed with the aid of this radiometer. Measurements in five different passbands in the spectral region below 20 per cm were made with a liquid-helium-cooled radiometer in two flights at approximately 40-km altitude. The results obtained are found to be consistent with a 2.7 K thermal radiation background. In addition, an atmospheric radiation of certain magnitude is found to dominate the region above 11 per cm.

  2. New Deflation Systems for Zero Pressure Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huens, Thomas

    Balloon flights in populated countries like France are seriously constrained in terms of safety. Flight window opportunities have been reduced in order to comply a minimal damage probability (material and human damages). Although we could use different launch sites, the enormous and useful data base collected by Scientists during 40 years in France encourages to keep the sites of Aire sur l'Adour and Gap operational. Developments were initiated in order to cope with these problems and improve the landing precision. More precisely for the last four years, the CNES balloon engineers have focused on developing a new deflation system and a new parachute system for zero pressure balloons (ZPB), in order to reduce the size of the impact uncertainty zone. We have observed that the envelope deflation phase has an important impact on the envelope drag coefficient. Residual helium inside the envelope can maintain a residual lift reducing the expected descent rate and generating a dispersion in the descent trajectory from flight to flight that increase the size of the potential landing zone. As for consequence, the deflation system installed on the new envelope shall allow a quick and efficient evacuation of the helium. The final shape of the envelope in descent with a drag coefficient is about constant, is quickly reached and the portion of residual helium is negligible. The way to improve the deflation system's efficiency -with a negligible impact on the envelope relia-bility -is a true challenge. It requires a significant amount of ground validation before the first flight test. Due to the difficulty of simulating the stratospheric environment in a volume large enough to test a ZPB, the ground validation is based on a group of tests, defined to be as close as possible to the real conditions. To reach this goal, we use (a)low speed little size tear tests in universal testing machine, at cold and ambient temperature; (b)high speed medium size tear tests, at ambient

  3. Development of a super-pressure balloon with a diamond-shaped net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Iijima, Issei; Matsuzaka, Yukihiko; Tanaka, Shigeki; Matsushima, Kiyoho; Kajiwara, Koji; Shimadu, Shigeyuki

    2012-07-01

    The essential mechanism for the lobed-pumpkin shaped super-pressure balloon to withstand against the high pressure is that the local curvature of the balloon film is kept small. Recently, it was found that the small local curvature can also be obtained, if the balloon is covered by a diamond-shaped net with vertically elongated shape. In addition, this method has following merits; 1. the weight of the balloon can be reduced by using a weak but light film and a fine mesh net, 2. the deployment problem known for the lobed-pumpkin shaped balloon can be solved due to its lack of additional films, 3. the capacity of resist pressure is not spoiled severely due to the manufacturing error of the net, since the local distortion of the mesh size does not affect the global balloon shape. First, a 3-m balloon using a polyethylene film and a net using Kevlar ropes was made for the confirmation of this method. The inflation test showed the expected high burst pressure. Then, a 6-m and a 12-m balloons using a polyethylene film and a net using the Vectran were developed and checked their stable deployment through the ground inflation tests. The flight test of a 3,000 m^3 balloon will be performed in this spring. In this paper, the method to cover a balloon with a diamond-shaped net will be explained and the results of ground and the flight tests will be reported.

  4. The issue of development and validation of a planetary balloon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, André

    When we talk of planetary balloon system, everyone think about the free flight of the balloon in the atmosphere of the planet, following the winds and currently being achieving its scientific mission. But before the scientific mission flight, a subsystem, in the descent module, is manda-tory for the set up of the balloon in flight conditions from a folded configuration used during the interplanetary transfer. To develop such a system, the first step is to find or produce material that will enable the manufacture of a balloon capable of withstanding the environment of the planet, and which fulfills the requirements of the scientific mission in terms of flight profile, payload mass and flight duration. The second step consists in the development and validation of the subsystem, in the descent module, which permits the deployment of the aerostat and the inflation of the balloon, during the entry in the atmosphere of the planet, after main parachute stabilization and, of course, before landing on the surface of the planet. An important issue is relative to the strategy for the validations of deployment inflation phase, testing on the Earth, whose characteristics, as atmosphere (pressure temperature profile, composition, heat-ing fluxes) and gravity, are usually quite unlike that the planet. For the system validation, it is necessary to develop models (thermodynamic for flight phase and mechanics kinematic for deployment inflation phase). After the definition of similarity criteria between the planet and the Earth, these models will permit to transpose the test results on Earth to predict and to validate the behavior of the balloon system on the planet. The purpose of this paper is to pro-vide a brief overview of the issues relative to the development and the validation of a planetary balloon system. We have to deal with a lot of technical challenges as long duration folding of the balloon in its container, aerostat deployment and balloon inflation, and separations

  5. Long duration flights management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosa-Sesma, Sergio; Letrenne, Gérard; Spel, Martin; Charbonnier, Jean-Marc

    Long duration flights (LDF) require a special management to take the best decisions in terms of ballast consumption and instant of separation. As a contrast to short duration flights, where meteorological conditions are relatively well known, for LDF we need to include the meteorological model accuracy in trajectory simulations. Dispersions on the fields of model (wind, temperature and IR fluxes) could make the mission incompatible with safety rules, authorized zones and others flight requirements. Last CNES developments for LDF act on three main axes: 1. Although ECMWF-NCEP forecast allows generating simulations from a 4D point (altitude, latitude, longitude and UT time), result is not statistical, it is determinist. To take into account model dispersion a meteorological NCEP data base was analyzed. A comparison between Analysis (AN) and Forecast (FC) for the same time frame had been done. Result obtained from this work allows implementing wind and temperature dispersions on balloon flight simulator. 2. For IR fluxes, NCEP does not provide ascending IR fluxes in AN mode but only in FC mode. To obtain the IR fluxes for each time frame, satellite images are used. A comparison between FC and satellites measurements had been done. Results obtained from this work allow implementing flux dispersions on balloon flight simulator. 3. An improved cartography containing a vast data base had been included in balloon flight simulator. Mixing these three points with balloon flight dynamics we have obtained two new tools for observing balloon evolution and risk, one of them is called ASTERISK (Statistic Tool for Evaluation of Risk) for calculations and the other one is called OBERISK (Observing Balloon Evolution and Risk) for visualization. Depending on the balloon type (super pressure, zero pressure or MIR) relevant information for the flight manager is different. The goal is to take the best decision according to the global situation to obtain the largest flight duration with

  6. A balloon-borne survey of the mm/sub-mm sky: OLIMPO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, S.; Calvo, M.; Conversi, L.; de Bernardis, P.; de Petris, M.; de Troia, G.; Iacoangeli, A.; Lamagna, L.; Marini Bettolo, C.; Melchiorri, A.; Melchiorri, F.; Nati, L.; Nati, F.; Piacentini, F.; Polenta, G.; Valiante, E.; Ade, P.; Hargrave, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Orlando, A.; Pisano, G.; Savini, G.; Tucker, C.; Boscaleri, A.; Peterzen, S.; Colafrancesco, S.; Rephaeli, Y.; Romeo, G.; Salvaterra, L.; Delbart, A.; Juin, J. B.; Magneville, C.; Pansart, J. P.; Yvon, D.

    2005-08-01

    The main objective of the OLIMPO project, a large stratospheric telescope, is the measurement of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in many clusters of galaxies during a long-duration balloon flight. We describe the OLIMPO experiment, and outline the scientific rationale of balloon-borne measurements of the effect.

  7. Evolution of NASA Scientific Ballooning and Particle Astrophysics Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William Vernon

    2017-01-01

    Particle astrophysics research has a history in ballooning that spans over 100 years, ever since Victor Hess discovered cosmic rays on a manned balloon in 1912. The NASA Particle Astrophysics Program currently covers the origin, acceleration and transport of Galactic cosmic rays, plus the Nature of Dark Matter and Ultrahigh Energy Neutrinos. Progress in each of these topics has come from sophisticated instrumentation flown on Long Duration Balloon (LDB) flights around Antarctica for more than two decades. Super Pressure Balloons (SPB) and International Space Station (ISS) platforms are emerging opportunities that promise major steps forward for these and other objectives. NASA has continued development and qualification flights leading to SPB flights capable of supporting 1000 kg science instruments to 33 km for upwards of hundred day missions, with plans for increasing the altitude to 38 km. This goal is even more important now, in view of the Astro2010 Decadal Study recommendation that NASA should support Ultra-Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flight development for studies of particle astrophysics, cosmology and indirect detection of dark matter. The mid-latitude test flight of an 18.8 MCF SPB launched from Wanaka, NZ in 2015 achieved 32 days of nearly constant altitude exposure, and an identical SPB launched from Wanaka in 2016 with a science payload flew for 46 days. Scientific ballooning as a vital infrastructure component for cosmic ray and general astrophysics investigations, including training for young scientists, graduate and undergraduate students, leading up to the 2020 Decadal Study and beyond, will be presented and discussed.

  8. Report on the Brazilian Scientific Balloon Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Joao

    2016-07-01

    We report on the recent scientific ballooning activities in Brazil, and present the plans for the next few years. Recent technological developments, especially on telecommunications and gondola attitude control systems will be reported. We also present the recent progress achieved in the development of the protoMIRAX balloon experiment. protoMIRAX is a balloon-borne hard X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in a hard X-ray coded-aperture imager to operate in the 20-200 keV energy range. The detector plane is a square array of 196 10mm x 10mm x 2mm CdZnTe (CZT) planar detectors. A collimator defines a fully-coded field-of-view of 20 x 20 degrees, with 7 x 7 degrees of full sensitivity and an angular resolution of 1.7 degrees. We describe the final stages of development and testing of the front-end electronics, with charge preamplifiers, LNAs, shapers and Wilkinson-type ADCs customized for these detectors. We also show detailed Monte Carlo simulations of the flight background and the expected flight images of bright sources performed with the use of GEANT4.

  9. Aerobot measurements successfully obtained during Solo Spirit Balloon Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avidson, Raymond E.; Bowman, Judd D.; Guinness, Edward A.; Johnson, Sarah S.; Slavney, S. H.; Stein, Thomas C.; Bachelder, Aaron D.; Cameron, Jonathan M.; Cutts, James A.; Ivlev, Robert V.; Kahn, Ralph A.

    Robotic balloons, also known as aerobots, have become candidates for collecting atmospheric data and detailed surface observations of Venus, Mars, and Titan. A mission to Venus over a decade ago used two of them. Their inclusion last year in attempts by a balloonist to circumnavigate the Earth aptly demonstrated their utility for remote sensing and in situ observations of planetary atmospheres.To simulate aspects of an aerobot mission, a small payload to measure local atmospheric conditions and balloon position and velocity was included on Solo Spirit “Round the World” flights during January and August of last year. These missions, flown in Roziere balloons, were attempts by Steve Fossett to become the first person to circumnavigate the globe in a balloon without stopping. Neither attempt was successful, but the aerobot came through with flying colors.

  10. LISA: a java API for performing simulations of trajectories for all types of balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conessa, Huguette

    2016-07-01

    LISA (LIbrarie de Simulation pour les Aerostats) is a java API for performing simulations of trajectories for all types of balloons (Zero Pressure Balloons, Pressurized Balloons, Infrared Montgolfier), and for all phases of flight (ascent, ceiling, descent). This library has for goals to establish a reliable repository of Balloons flight physics models, to capitalize developments and control models used in different tools. It is already used for flight physics study software in CNES, to understand and reproduce the behavior of balloons, observed during real flights. It will be used operationally for the ground segment of the STRATEOLE2 mission. It was developed with quality rules of "critical software." It is based on fundamental generic concepts, linking the simulation state variables to interchangeable calculation models. Each LISA model defines how to calculate a consistent set of state variables combining validity checks. To perform a simulation for a type of balloon and a phase of flight, it is necessary to select or create a macro-model that is to say, a consistent set of models to choose from among those offered by LISA, defining the behavior of the environment and the balloon. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the main concepts of LISA, and the new perspectives offered by this library.

  11. Development of a balloon volume sensor for pulsating balloon catheters.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Timothy D C; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2004-01-01

    Helium pulsed balloons are integral components of several cardiovascular devices, including intraaortic balloon pumps (IABP) and a novel intravenous respiratory support catheter. Effective use of these devices clinically requires full inflation and deflation of the balloon, and improper operating conditions that lead to balloon under-inflation can potentially reduce respiratory or cardiac support provided to the patient. The goal of the present study was to extend basic spirographic techniques to develop a system to dynamically measure balloon volumes suitable for use in rapidly pulsating balloon catheters. The dynamic balloon volume sensor system (DBVSS) developed here used hot wire anemometry to measure helium flow in the drive line from console to catheter and integrated the flow to determine the volume delivered in each balloon pulsation. An important component of the DBVSS was an algorithm to automatically detect and adjust flow signals and measured balloon volumes in the presence of gas composition changes that arise from helium leaks occurring in these systems. The DBVSS was capable of measuring balloon volumes within 5-10% of actual balloon volumes over a broad range of operating conditions relevant to IABP and the respiratory support catheter. This includes variations in helium concentration from 70-100%, pulsation frequencies from 120-480 beats per minute, and simulated clinical conditions of reduced balloon filling caused by constricted vessels, increased driveline, or catheter resistance.

  12. Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wefel, John P.; Guzik, T. Gregory

    2001-01-01

    During grant NAG5-5064, Louisiana State University (LSU) led the ATIC team in the development, construction, testing, accelerator validation, pre-deployment integration and flight operations of the Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) Balloon Experiment. This involved interfacing among the ATIC collaborators (UMD, NRL/MSFC, SU, MSU, WI, SNU) to develop a new balloon payload based upon a fully active calorimeter, a carbon target, a scintillator strip hodoscope and a pixilated silicon solid state detector for a detailed investigation of the very high energy cosmic rays to energies beyond 10(exp 14) eV/nucleus. It is in this very high energy region that theory predicts changes in composition and energy spectra related to the Supernova Remnant Acceleration model for cosmic rays below the "knee" in the all-particle spectrum. This report provides a documentation list, details the anticipated ATIC science return, describes the particle detection principles on which the experiment is based, summarizes the simulation results for the system, describes the validation work at the CERN SPS accelerator and details the balloon flight configuration. The ATIC experiment had a very successful LDB flight from McMurdo, Antarctica in 12/00 - 1/01. The instrument performed well for the entire 15 days. Preliminary data analysis shows acceptable charge resolution and an all-particle power law energy deposition distribution not inconsistent with previous measurements. Detailed analysis is underway and will result in new data on the cosmic ray charge and energy spectra in the GeV - TeV energy range. ATIC is currently being refurbished in anticipation of another LDB flight in the 2002-03 period.

  13. Gradient magnetometer system balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korepanov, Valery; Tsvetkov, Yury

    2005-08-01

    Earth's magnetic field study still remains one of the leading edges of experimental geophysics. Thus study is executed on the Earth surface, including ocean bottom, and on satellite heights using component, mostly flux-gate magnetometers. But balloon experiments with component magnetometers are very seldom, first of all because of great complexity of data interpretation. This niche still waits for new experimental ideology, which will allow to get the measurements results with high accuracy, especially in gradient mode. The great importance of precise balloon-borne component magnetic field gradient study is obvious. Its technical realization is based both on the available at the marked high-precision non-magnetic tiltmeters and on recent achievements of flux-gate magnetometry. The scientific goals of balloon-borne magnetic gradiometric experiment are discussed and its practical realization is proposed.

  14. Stability of lobed balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagitz, M.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    This paper presents a computational study of the stability of simple lobed balloon structures. The particular structure that is investigated is a stack of pumpkin-shaped envelopes with a common axis of symmetry, and hence forming a kind of lobed cylinder. The number of the pumpkin envelopes is one of the variables that is investigated; a number of shape imperfections are also considered. This lobed cylinder is an axi-symmetric, idealised version of the lobed pumpkin balloons that have occasionally deployed into anomalous, clefted configurations. By studying in detail the behaviour of lobed cylinder we are able to draw some preliminary conclusions about general features of the behaviour of lobed pumpkin balloons.

  15. BARREL Team Launching 20 Balloons

    NASA Video Gallery

    A movie made by the NASA-Funded Balloon Array for Radiation belt Relativistic Electron Losses, or BARREL, team on their work launching 20 balloons in Antarctica during the Dec. 2013/Jan. 2014 campa...

  16. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Mann, I. R.; Mazzino, L.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Team

    2011-12-01

    The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon (UA-HAB) program is a one and half year program sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) that offers hands on experience for undergraduate and graduate students in the design, build, test and flight of an experimental payload on a high altitude balloon platform. Utilising low cost weather balloon platforms, and through utilisation of the CSA David Florida Laboratory for thermal-vacuum tests , in advance of the final flight of the payload on a NASA high altitude balloon platform. Collectively the program provided unique opportunities for students to experience mission phases which parallel those of a space satellite mission. The program has facilitated several weather balloon missions, which additionally provide educational opportunities for university students and staff, as well as outreach opportunities among junior and senior high school students. Weather balloon missions provide a cheap and quick alternative to suborbital missions; they can be used to test components for more expensive missions, as well as to host student based projects from different disciplines such as Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS), Physics, and Engineering. In addition to extensive skills development, the program aims to promote recruitment of graduate and undergraduate students into careers in space science and engineering. Results from the UA-HAB program and the flight of the UA-HAB shielded Gieger counter payload for cosmic ray and space radiation studies will be presented. Lessons learned from developing and maintaining a weather balloon program will also be discussed. This project is undertaken in partnership with the High Altitude Student Platform, organized by Louisiana State University and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSpace), and sponsored by NASA, with the financial support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  17. Daytime Aspect Camera for Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Kurt L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swift, Wesley R.

    2002-01-01

    We have designed, built, and flight-tested a new star camera for daytime guiding of pointed balloon-borne experiments at altitudes around 40 km. The camera and lens are commercially available, off-the-shelf components, but require a custom-built baffle to reduce stray light, especially near the sunlit limb of the balloon. This new camera, which operates in the 600- to 1000-nm region of the spectrum, successfully provides daytime aspect information of approx. 10 arcsec resolution for two distinct star fields near the galactic plane. The detected scattered-light backgrounds show good agreement with the Air Force MODTRAN models used to design the camera, but the daytime stellar magnitude limit was lower than expected due to longitudinal chromatic aberration in the lens. Replacing the commercial lens with a custom-built lens should allow the system to track stars in any arbitrary area of the sky during the daytime.

  18. A Daytime Aspect Camera for Balloon Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, Kurt L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Alexander, Cheryl D.; Apple, Jeff A.; Ghosh, Kajal K.; Swift, Wesley R.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have designed, built, and flight-tested a new star camera for daytime guiding of pointed balloon-borne experiments at altitudes around 40km. The camera and lens are commercially available, off-the-shelf components, but require a custom-built baffle to reduce stray light, especially near the sunlit limb of the balloon. This new camera, which operates in the 600-1000 nm region of the spectrum, successfully provided daytime aspect information of approximately 10 arcsecond resolution for two distinct star fields near the galactic plane. The detected scattered-light backgrounds show good agreement with the Air Force MODTRAN models, but the daytime stellar magnitude limit was lower than expected due to dispersion of red light by the lens. Replacing the commercial lens with a custom-built lens should allow the system to track stars in any arbitrary area of the sky during the daytime.

  19. Sonic Thermometer for High-Altitude Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bognar, John

    2012-01-01

    The sonic thermometer is a specialized application of well-known sonic anemometer technology. Adaptations have been made to the circuit, including the addition of supporting sensors, which enable its use in the high-altitude environment and in non-air gas mixtures. There is a need to measure gas temperatures inside and outside of superpressure balloons that are flown at high altitudes. These measurements will allow the performance of the balloon to be modeled more accurately, leading to better flight performance. Small thermistors (solid-state temperature sensors) have been used for this general purpose, and for temperature measurements on radiosondes. A disadvantage to thermistors and other physical (as distinct from sonic) temperature sensors is that they are subject to solar heating errors when they are exposed to the Sun, and this leads to issues with their use in a very high-altitude environment

  20. Microgravity experiment system utilizing a balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, M.; Ohta, S.; Yamagami, T.; Koma, Y.; Akiyama, H.; Hirosawa, H.; Nishimura, J.

    A system for microgravity experiments by using a stratospheric balloon has been planned and developed in ISAS since 1978. A rocket-shaped chamber mounting the experiment apparatus is released from the balloon around 30 km altitude. The microgravity duration is from the release to opening of parachute, controlled by an on-board sequential timer. Test flights were performed in 1980 and in 1981. In September 1983 the first scientific experiment, observing behaviors and brain activities of fishes in the microgravity circumstance, have been successfully carried out. The chamber is specially equipped with movie cameras and subtransmitters, and its release altitude is about 32 km. The microgravity observed inside the chamber is less than 2.9 × 10-3 G during 10 sec. Engineering aspects of the system used in the 1983 experiment are presented.

  1. Balloons of the Civil War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-03

    summer. The indirect path involved transporting the Army of the Potomac south, via the water network , to some point nearer Richmond, and thence...using the telegraph. and signal stations near his balloons to communicate with headquarters. Logistic support for the balloons flowed via the water ... network to Aquia Creek Station Landing and then overland to the balloon camps. Two of four balloons available were sent back to Washington for repairs

  2. Balloon borne Infrared Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Philip M.

    2015-08-01

    We report on modeling of a balloon borne mission to survey the 1-5 micron region with sensitivity close to the zodiacal light limits in portions of this band. Such a survey is compelling for numerous science programs and is complimentary to the upcoming Euclid, WFIRST and other orbital missions. Balloons borne missions offer much lower cost access and rapid technological implementation but with much less exposure time and increased backgrounds. For some science missions the complimentary nature of these is extremely useful. .

  3. Near Space Lab-Rat Experimentation using Stratospheric Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buduru, Suneel Kumar; Reddy Vizapur, Anmi; Rao Tanneeru, Venkateswara; Trivedi, Dharmesh; Devarajan, Anand; Pandit Manikrao Kulkarni, MR..; Ojha, Devendra; Korra, Sakram; Neerudu, Nagendra; Seng, Lim; Godi, Stalin Peter

    2016-07-01

    First ever balloon borne lab-rat experiment up to near space stratospheric altitude levels carried out at TIFR Balloon Facility, Hydeabad using zero pressure balloons for the purpose of validating the life support system. A series of two balloon experiments conducted under joint collaboration with IN.Genius, Singapore in the year 2015. In these experiments, three lab-rats sent to stratosphere in a pressurized capsule designed to reach an altitude of 30 km by keeping constant pressure, temperature and maintained at a precise rate of oxygen supply inside the capsule. The first experiment conducted on 1 ^{st} February, 2015 with a total suspended weight of 225 kg. During the balloon ascent stage at 18 km altitude, sensors inside the capsule reported drastic drop in internal pressure while oxygen and temperatures maintained at correct levels resulted in premature fligt termination at 20.1 km. All the three lab-rats recovered without life due to the collapse of their lungs caused by the depressurization inside the capsule. The second experiment conducted on 14th March, 2015 using a newly developed capsule with rectification of depressurization fault by using improved sealing gaskets and hermitically sealed connectors for sending lab-rats again to stratosphere comprising a total suspended load of 122.3 kg. The balloon flight was terminated after reaching 29.5 km in 110 minutes and succesfully recovered all the three lab-rats alive. This paper focuses on lessons learnt of the development of the life support system as an integral pressurized vessel, flight control instrumentation, flight simulation tests using thermo-vaccum chamber with pre-flight operations.

  4. Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System (Vps)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marz, Bryan E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the launch and post-launch activities of Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System, V(ps). It is a comprehensive overview covering launch activities, post-launch activities, experimental results, and future flight recommendations.

  5. Balloon test project: Cosmic Ray Antimatter Calorimeter (CRAC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, J. C.; Dhenain, G.; Goret, P.; Jorand, J.; Masse, P.; Mestreau, P.; Petrou, N.; Robin, A.

    1984-01-01

    Cosmic ray observations from balloon flights are discussed. The cosmic ray antimatter calorimeter (CRAC) experiment attempts to measure the flux of antimatter in the 200-600 Mev/m energy range and the isotopes of light elements between 600 and 1,000 Mev/m.

  6. Development of a super-pressure balloon with a diamond-shaped net

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Iijima, I.; Matsuzaka, Y.; Matsushima, K.; Tanaka, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Shimadu, S.

    2014-10-01

    The essential reason of the lobed-pumpkin shaped super-pressure balloon to withstand against the high pressure is that the local curvature of the balloon film is kept small. Recently, it has been found that the small local curvature can also be obtained if the balloon is covered by a diamond-shaped net with a vertically elongated shape. The development of the super-pressure balloon using this method was started from a 3-m balloon with a polyethylene film covered by a net using Kevlar ropes. The ground inflation test showed the expected high burst pressure. Then, a 6-m and a 12-m balloon using a polyethylene film and a net using the Vectran were developed and stable deployment was checked through the ground inflation tests. The flight test of a 3000 m3 balloon was performed in 2013 and shown to resist a pressure of at least 400 Pa. In the future, after testing a new design to relax a possible stress concentration around the polar area, test flights of scaled balloons will be performed gradually enlarging their size. The goal is to launch a 300,000 m3 super-pressure balloon.

  7. Balloon angioplasty - short segment

    MedlinePlus

    Angioplasty is a procedure to open narrowed or blocked arteries caused by deposits of plaque. If the blockage is not major, the problem may be corrected by inflating the balloon several times to compact the plaque against the arterial wall, widening the passage for the blood ...

  8. Particle Astrophysics Using Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, E. S.

    Cosmic rays, energetic particles coming from outer space, bring us information about the physical processes that accelerate particles to relativistic energies, about the effects of those particles in driving dynamical processes in our Galaxy, and about the distribution of matter and fields in interstellar space. Cosmic rays were discovered in the early twentieth century using a balloon-borne electroscope. Balloons are currently being used for answering fundamental questions about the cosmos: (1) Is the Universe symmetric, and if so where is the antimatter? (2) What is the dark matter? (3) How do cosmic rays get their enormous energies? (4) Can the entire energy spectrum of cosmic rays result from a single acceleration mechanism? (5) Are supernovae really the sources of cosmic rays? (6) What is the history of cosmic rays in the Galaxy? (7) What is the origin of the "knee" in the cosmic ray energy spectrum? etc. The status of results from past balloon-borne measurements and expected results from ongoing and planned future balloon-borne particle astrophysics experiments will be reviewed.

  9. THERMTRAJ: A FORTRAN program to compute the trajectory and gas film temperatures of zero pressure balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, W. J.; Carlson, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program called THERMTRAJ is presented which can be used to compute the trajectory of high altitude scientific zero pressure balloons from launch through all subsequent phases of the balloon flight. In addition, balloon gas and film temperatures can be computed at every point of the flight. The program has the ability to account for ballasting, changes in cloud cover, variable atmospheric temperature profiles, and both unconditional valving and scheduled valving of the balloon gas. The program was verified for an extensive range of balloon sizes (from 0.5 to 41.47 million cubic feet). Instructions on program usage, listing of the program source deck, input data and printed and plotted output for a verification case are included.

  10. Recent Controlled Meteorological Balloon experiments in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, L. R.; Voss, P. B.; Vihma, T. P.

    2013-12-01

    Controlled Meteorological (CMET) balloons are unique in that their altitude can be changed at any time during flight. They are remotely controlled via the Iridium network and use GPS for positioning. Over the past seven years, they have been operated at altitudes from sea-level to six kilometers and have flown for periods as long as five days. Campaigns have been carried out from the Amazon via Mexico City to polar regions. CMET balloons can perform repeated soundings in order to probe evolving thermal and chemical structure, measure wind shear, and track atmospheric layers. Typical ascent/descent rate is 1 m/s and the data sampling rate is 10 sec. The standard CMET balloon consists of zero-pressure balloon (~300-500 liters at sea level) which itself contains a much smaller (~100 liter) super-pressure balloon. Transferring helium between the super-pressure balloon and the zero-pressure balloon regulates the volume (and density) of the system, leading to controlled ascent and descent. Due to the rarity of meteorological observations from the Antarctic, especially from inland and over the sea, CMET balloons have potential to provide strongly needed data for evaluation of numerical weather prediction and climate models. Here, we present data from a CMET campaign carried out at the Finnish Aboa station in Antarctica (73° 03' S, 13° 25' W) in January 2013. The campaign was unique in that three CMET balloons were shipped to the station and launched by the local team. After the launch, they were controlled by scientists located in MA, USA and Norway. One balloon, Bravo, cruised for more than 100 hours over the coastal slopes of Queen Maud Land and nearby sea ice with a total trajectory length of over 3000 km (Fig. 1). It also passed nearby the UK Halley station. The altitude was generally kept at about 3000-3500 masl, but 8 controlled soundings down to 400-500 masl were carried out. The balloon data were compared with the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF

  11. Flow Past a Descending Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baginski, Frank

    2001-01-01

    In this report, we present our findings related to aerodynamic loading of partially inflated balloon shapes. This report will consider aerodynamic loading of partially inflated inextensible natural shape balloons and some relevant problems in potential flow. For the axisymmetric modeling, we modified our Balloon Design Shape Program (BDSP) to handle axisymmetric inextensible ascent shapes with aerodynamic loading. For a few simple examples of two dimensional potential flows, we used the Matlab PDE Toolbox. In addition, we propose a model for aerodynamic loading of strained energy minimizing balloon shapes with lobes. Numerical solutions are presented for partially inflated strained balloon shapes with lobes and no aerodynamic loading.

  12. Recent Progress in Materials Selection and Characterizations for Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Said, Magdi A.

    2000-01-01

    The development and characterization of materials suitable for ultra long duration balloon flights has recently been the focus of the materials R&D efforts for the NASA balloon program. Although basic materials selection criteria is similar to those used for conventional balloon missions, additional considerations related to balloon design, fabrication, durability, environmental effects, and cost must also be considered. Among these, the highest impact on material selection is, related to the design shape of the balloon. Work done by independent researchers indicate that for pumpkin type balloons, the load-carrying member is the tendon rather than the structural envelope. This in turn lowers the strength requirements on the envelope material to a large extent. Several materials and material combinations were explored for both design systems. This paper will present the progress made to date in the selection and characterization of these materials and the technical challenges remaining to be overcome,

  13. Assessment of explanted PTCA balloons.

    PubMed

    Behrend, D; Zinner, G; Sternberg, K; Schroeder, M; Schmitz, K P; Haubold, A

    2000-10-01

    The data presented here are part of a on-going study to define the surface characteristics and properties of explanted PTCA catheters in a further effort to address some of the ramifications of the re-use issue. PTCA balloon catheter were examined after angioplasty in one hundred and sixty-eight patients (n = 168). This series included six balloon types from three manufacturers. The fresh fixed and dehydrated balloons were examined at first with light microscopy and then in a scanning electron microscope. X-ray semiquantitative microanalysis and FT-IR-ATR analysis were also performed on the balloons. Because most blood proteins are water soluble, we examined unfixed balloons with a protein silver staining kit for detection of adhered proteins described by Heukeshoven. A further method for protein detection is the Lowry-analysis. With this method water insoluble proteins can be observed. Our study has shown convincingly that all deployed angioplasty catheters were coated with adherent protein layers. Plaque particles were found embedded in the surfaces of most of the balloons examined. Fissuring and micro tearing of balloon surfaces was noted. FT-IR-ATR analyses of the blood contacted balloon surfaces did not show any peaks indicative of proteins on the balloon surface. The silver staining method also did not show any evidence of protein adsorption on the balloons. On the other hand, the Lowry-analysis yielded clear evidence that water insoluble proteins were adherent to the balloon surfaces. The average measured protein concentration was 17 microg/ml.

  14. Venus Balloons using Water Vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izutsu, N.; Yajima, N.; Honda, H.; Imamura, T.

    We propose an inflatable balloon using water vapor for the lifting gas, which is liquid in the transportation stage before entry into the high temperature atmosphere. The envelope of the balloon has an outer layer for gas barrier (a high-temperature resistant film) and an inner layer for liquid water keeping. In the descent stage using a parachute, water widely held just inside the balloon envelope can be quickly vaporized by a lot of heat flux from the surrounding high-temperature atmosphere owing to the large surface area of the balloon. As neither gas containers nor heat exchangers are necessary, we can construct a simple, lightweight and small size Venus balloon probe system. Tentative floating altitude is 35 km below the thick clouds in the Venusian atmosphere. Selection of balloon shape and material for balloon envelope are discussed in consideration of the Venusian environment such as high-temperature, high-pressure, and sulfuric acid. Balloon deployment and inflation sequence is numerically simulated. In case of the total floating mass of 10 kg at the altitude of 35 km, the volume and mass of the balloon is 1.5 cubic meters, and 3.5 kg, respectively. The shape of the balloon is chosen to be cylindrical with a small diameter. The mass of li fting gas can be determined as 4.3 kg and the remaining 2.2 kg becomes the payload mass. The mass of the total balloon system is also just 10 kg excluding the entry capsule.

  15. Overview Of The Scientific Balloon Activity in Sweden 2014-2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, Mattias; Lockowandt, Christian; Andersson, Kent

    2016-07-01

    SSC, formerly known as Swedish Space Corporation, is a Swedish state-owned company working in several different space related fields, including scientific stratospheric balloon launches. Esrange Space Centre (Esrange in short) located in the north of Sweden is the launch facility of SSC, where both sounding rocket launches and stratospheric balloon launches are conducted. At Esrange there are also facilities for satellite communication, including one of the largest civilian satellite data reception stations in the world. Stratospheric balloons have been launched from Esrange since 1974, when the first flights were performed together with the French space agency CNES. These balloon flights have normally flown eastward either only over Sweden or into Finland. Some flights have also had permission to fly into Russia, as far as the Ural Mountains. Normal flight times are from 4 to 12 hours. These eastward flights are conducted during the winter months (September to May). Long duration flights have been flown from Esrange since 2005, when NASA flew the BLAST payload from Sweden to north Canada. The prevailing westerly wind pattern is very advantageous for trans-Atlantic flights during summer (late May to late July). The long flight times of 4-5 days are very beneficial for astronomical payloads, such as telescopes that need long observation times. Circumpolar flights of more than two weeks are possible if Russian overflight permission exists. Typical scientific balloon payload fields include atmospheric research, including research on ozone depletion, astronomical and cosmological research, and research in technical fields such as aerodynamics. Since last COSPAR a number of interesting balloon flights have been performed from Esrange. In late 2014 parachute tests for the ExoMars programme was performed by drop-test from balloons. This was followed up on in the summer of 2015 with full end-to-end dynamic stability tests of Earth re-entry capsule shapes. Several balloon

  16. Development of a tiny tandem balloon system for atmospheric observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Yoshitaka; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Fujiwara, Masatomo

    2016-07-01

    A tandem balloon system with a combination of a zero-pressure balloon on top and a super-pressure balloon on the bottom has a unique trajectory characteristic, with different flight altitudes between day and night and thus with ascending and descending motions at dawn and dusk, respectively. This characteristic provides a unique opportunity to explore the atmosphere, e.g., the upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric region with cross-tropopause measurements twice a day. We started development of a tiny tandem balloon system using a 10 m^{3} super-pressure balloon and a 100 m^{3} zero-pressure balloon, with a capability of carrying 3 kg of payload. One of the scientific targets is to measure water vapor, cloud particles, and temperature around the tropical tropopause which is the entry point of the stratospheric and mesospheric meridional circulation. For the data transfer, the iridium satellite communication module, SBD9603 is used. In this paper, the current status of the development will be reported.

  17. Scientific study in solar and plasma physics relative to rocket and balloon projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    The goals of this research are to provide scientific and technical capabilities in the areas of solar and plasma physics contained in research programs and instrumentation development relative to current rocket and balloon projects; to develop flight instrumentation design, flight hardware, and flight program objectives and participate in peer reviews as appropriate; and to participate in solar-terrestrial physics modeling studies and analysis of flight data and provide theoretical investigations as required by these studies.

  18. Dilatation balloons: polymer selection, balloon design and assembly.

    PubMed

    Crittenden, J F

    1987-01-01

    The current status of coronary dilating instruments is presented from the designer's perspective. Catheter shaft design is considered by important features, common catheter materials and types of catheter construction. Among the seven companies manufacturing balloon dilating instruments, only three types of catheter and four materials are offered. Balloon design is presented by important features and by materials selected. Performance comparisons are made between the three materials used to fabricate dilating balloons: PVC, PE and PET.

  19. Space Weather Ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Tony; Johnson, Sam; Koske-Phillips, Amelia; White, Michael; Yarborough, Amelia; Lamb, Aaron; Herbst, Anna; Molina, Ferris; Gilpin, Justin; Grah, Olivia; Perez, Ginger; Reid, Carson; Harvey, Joey; Schultz, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    We have developed a "Space Weather Buoy" for measuring upper atmospheric radiation from cosmic rays and solar storms. The Buoy, which is carried to the stratosphere by helium balloons, is relatively inexpensive and uses off-the-shelf technology accessible to small colleges and high schools. Using this device, we have measured two Forbush Decreases and a small surge in atmospheric radiation during the St. Patrick's Day geomagnetic storm of March 2015.

  20. Experimental investigation of undesired stable equilibria in pumpkin shape super-pressure balloon designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schur, W.

    The scientific community's desire for large capacity, constant altitude, long duration stratospheric platforms is not likely going to be met by un-reinforced spherical super-pressure balloons. More likely, the pneumatic envelope for the large-scale super-pressure balloon of the future will be a tendon reinforced structure in which the tendons perform the primary pressure load confining function and the skin serves as a gas barrier and transfers the local pressure load to the tendons. NASA's Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB), which is currently under development, is of that type. By separating the load carrying function of the tendons and the skin a number of advantages are gained. Perhaps most important is the fact that the required skin strength remains to first order independent of the balloon size. Only the size and number of tendons are dictated by the balloon size. By designing the balloon to be at least quasi statically determinate, the stress distributions are more certain, and stress raisers due to fabrication imperfections are more easily controlled and it becomes unnecessary to account for load path uncertainties by providing everywhere excessive strength and structural weight. Furthermore, it becomes possible to use for the envelope skin a visco-elastic film (polyethylene) that has proven performance in the stratospheric environment. The silhouette shape of this balloon type has prompted early researchers to name this design a "pumpkin" shape balloon. Later investigators accepted this terminology. The pumpkin shape balloon concept was adopted by NASA for its ULDB design at the end of 1998 when advantages of that design over a spherical shape design were convincingly demonstrated. Two stratospheric test flights of large-scale super-pressure balloons demonstrated the functioning of this balloon type. In the second successful flight the switch was made from an excessively strong and heavy skin, a holdover from the earlier concept of a spherical design, to

  1. SoRa first flight. Summer 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirrotta, S.; Flamini, E.

    The SoRa (Sounding Radar) experiment was successfully launched from Longyearbyen (Svalbard, Norway) during the summer 2009 campaign managed by the Italian/Norwegian "Nobile Amundsen / Stratospheric Balloon Centre" (NA/SBC). SoRa is part of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) programs for Long Duration Balloon Flights. Carried by the biggest balloon (800.000 m3) ever launched in polar regions, SoRa main experiment and its three piggyback payloads (DUSTER, ISA and SIDERALE) performed a nominal flight of almost 4 days over the North Sea and Greenland, until the separation, landing and recovery in Baffin Island (Canada). Despite the final destructive event that compromise the scientific main goal of SoRa, the 2009 ASI balloon campaign can be considered an important milestone, because of the obtained scientific and technical results but also for the lesson learned by the science, engineering and managerial teams looking at the future ASI scientific balloon-born activities.

  2. Optimum designs for superpressure balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. S.; Rainwater, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    The elastica shape is now well known to be the best basic shape for superpressure balloon design. This shape, also known as the pumpkin, or natural shape for balloons, has been well understood since the early 1900s when it was applied to the determination of the shape of descending parachutes. The elastica shape was also investigated in the 1950s when high strength films were used to produce superpressure cylinder balloons. The need for uniform stress distribution in shells of early superpressure balloons led to a long period of the development of spherical superpressure balloons. Not until the late 1970s was the elastica shape revisited for the purpose of the producing superpressure balloons. This paper will review various development efforts in the field of superpressure design and will elaborate on the current state-of-the-art with suggestions for future developments.

  3. Microcontroller uses in Long-Duration Ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joseph

    This paper discusses how microcontrollers are being utilized to fulfill the demands of long duration ballooning (LDB) and the advantages of doing so. The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) offers the service of launching high altitude balloons (120k ft) which provide an over the horizon telemetry system and platform for scientific research payloads to collect data. CSBF has utilized microcontrollers to address multiple tasks and functions which were previously performed by more complex systems. A microcontroller system has been recently developed and programmed in house to replace our previous backup navigation system which is used on all LDB flights. A similar microcontroller system was developed to be independently launched in Antarctica before the actual scientific payload. This system's function is to transmit its GPS position and a small housekeeping packet so that we can confirm the upper level float winds are as predicted from satellite derived models. Microcontrollers have also been used to create test equipment to functionally check out the flight hardware used in our telemetry systems. One test system which was developed can be used to quickly determine if our communication link we are providing for the science payloads is functioning properly. Another system was developed to provide us with the ability to easily determine the status of one of our over the horizon communication links through a closed loop system. This test system has given us the capability to provide more field support to science groups than we were able to in years past. The trend of utilizing microcontrollers has taken place for a number of reasons. By using microcontrollers to fill these needs, it has given us the ability to quickly design and implement systems which meet flight critical needs, as well as perform many of the everyday tasks in LDB. This route has also allowed us to reduce the amount of time required for personnel to perform a number of the tasks required

  4. The Micro-Instrumentation Package: A Solution to Lightweight Ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juneau, Jill

    This paper discusses the design and testing of an over the horizon (OTH) light weight telemetry and termination system that can be used for small ballooning payloads. Currently, the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF) provides telemetry for the science payload by integrating one of two types of support packages. The type of support package integrated depends on whether the flight will stay in range of line of sight (LOS) or will exceed LOS requiring the use of over the horizon (OTH) telemetry. The weights of these systems range from 100 pounds to 350 pounds depending upon the use of redundant systems, equipment for high data rates, and batteries and/or solar panels for power requirements. These weight values are not as significant for larger payloads but can be crippling for smaller payloads. In addition, these support package systems are fairly expensive, placing a high importance on recovery. A lightweight and inexpensive telemetry system could be beneficial for various reasons. First, it would allow scientists to fly lightweight payloads on large balloons reaching even higher altitudes. Second, scientists could fly lightweight payloads on less expensive balloons such as meteorological balloons. Depending on the payload, these flights could be fairly inexpensive and even disposable. Third, a compact telemetry system on any balloon will free up more room for the science portion of the payload. In response, a compact telemetry/termination system called the Micro-Instrumentation Package (MIP) was developed. The MIP provides uplink and downlink communications, an interface to the science, housekeeping information including global positioning system (GPS) position, and relays. Instead of a power-hungry microprocessor, the MIP's central consists of a microcontroller. Microcontrollers are lower power, easily programmed, and can be purchased for less than ten dollars. For uplink and downlink telemetry, the MIP uses an LOS serial transceiver and an Iridium unit

  5. Report on the Brazilian Scientific Balloon Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, Joao

    We report on the recent scientific ballooning activities in Brazil, including important international collaborations, and present the plans for the next few years. We also present the recent progress achieved in the development and calibration of the protoMIRAX balloon experiment, especially about the detector system. protoMIRAX is a balloon-borne X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in a hard X-ray (30-200 keV) coded-aperture imager which employs a square array of 196 10mm x 10mm x 2mm CdZnTe (CZT) planar detector. A collimator defines a fully-coded field-of-view of 20(°) x 20(°) , with 4(°) x 4(°) of full sensitivity. The angular resolution will be of 1.7(°) , defined by the use of a 1mm-thick lead coded-mask with an extended (˜4x4) 13x13 MURA pattern will 20mm-side cells, placed at a distance of 650 mm from the detector plane. We describe the design and development of the front-end electronics, with charge preamplifiers and shaping amplifiers customized for these detectors. We present spectral results obtained in the laboratory as well as initial calibration results of the acquisition system designed to get positions and energies in the detector plane. We show simulations of the flight background and the expected flight images of bright sources.

  6. A Constitutive Equation for Stratospheric Balloon Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rand, J. L.; Sterling, W. J.

    2004-01-01

    The selection of a suitable material for use as a reliable stratospheric balloon gas barrier and structural component is based on a variety of properties. Due to a more desirable combination of properties, the low density polyethylene that has been used for the last half century has been replaced during the last decade by linear low density polyethylene (LLDPE). This paper describes the effort to characterize the time dependent properties of a 38 micron coextrusion of LLDPE. The nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive equation presented may be used to accurately describe the creep and/or relaxation of this film when subjected to a biaxial state of stress, such as might be required for an extended balloon flight. Recent laboratory data have been used to mod@ an existing model of LLDPE to account for differences caused by the coextrusion process. The new model will facilitate structural design optimization and reliability assessment, and may be further utilized as a predictive tool to benefit in-flight operations. Current structural analysis tech&ques based on linear elastic properties have predicted stresses in excess of those which would actually exist.

  7. Balloon Operation for Stratospheric Air Sampling at Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, H.; Yajima, N.; Yamagami, T.; Aoki, S.; Hashida, G.; Machida, T.; Morimoto, S.

    On January 3rd, 1998, a cryogenic air sampling experiment was carried out at Syowa Station (69S, 40E), which is the first successful trial in the world for collection of large amount of stratospheric air over the Antarctic. The samples are analyzed for CO2, CH4, CFCs, and C and O isotope ratios in CO2 in the laboratories. As the meteorological conditions for launching and payload recovery are both critical, feasibility on wind conditions over Syowa Station was studied in detail. The balloon launching operations had to be performed without a specialist. Facilities for balloon launching, tracking, and other support systems were newly designed for ready-to- and easy-to-use. Realtime remote support from Japan for the balloon launching and flight control operations was applied using a computer network linked by INMARSAT

  8. Iridium: Global OTH data communications for high altitude scientific ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denney, A.

    While the scientific community is no stranger to embracing commercially available technologies, the growth and availability of truly affordable cutting edge technologies is opening the door to an entirely new means of global communications. For many years high altitude ballooning has provided science an alternative to costly satellite based experimental platforms. As with any project, evolution becomes an integral part of development. Specifically in the NSBF ballooning program, where flight durations have evolved from the earlier days of hours to several weeks and plans are underway to provide missions up to 100 days. Addressing increased flight durations, the harsh operational environment, along with cumbersome and outdated systems used on existing systems, such as the balloon vehicles Support Instrumentation Package (SIP) and ground-based systems, a new Over-The-Horizon (OTH) communications medium is sought. Current OTH equipment planning to be phased-out include: HF commanding systems, ARGOS PTT telemetry downlinks and INMARSAT data terminals. Other aspects up for review in addition to the SIP to utilize this communications medium include pathfinder balloon platforms - thereby, adding commanding abilities and increased data rates, plus providing a package for ultra-small experiments to ride aloft. Existing communication systems employed by the National Scientific Balloon Facility ballooning program have been limited not only by increased cost, slow data rates and "special government use only" services such as TDRSS (Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System), but have had to make special provisions to geographical flight location. Development of the Support Instrumentation Packages whether LDB (Long Duration Balloon), ULDB (Ultra Long Duration Balloon) or conventional ballooning have been plagued by non-standard systems configurations requiring additional support equipment for different regions and missions along with a myriad of backup for redundancy. Several

  9. Extrusion process optimization for toughness in balloon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantor, K. M.; Harrison, I. R.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental optimization process for blown film extrusion is described and examined in terms of the effects of the technique on the toughness of balloon films. The optimization technique by Cantor (1990) is employed which involves the identification of key process variables including screw speed, nip speed, bubble diameter, and frost-line height for analysis to optimize the merit function. The procedure is employed in the extrusion of a low-density polyethylene polymer, and the resulting optimized materials are toughness- and puncture-tested. Balloon toughness is optimized in the analytical relationship, and the process parameters are modified to attain optimal toughness. The film produced is shown to have an average toughness of 24.5 MPa which is a good value for this key property of balloon materials for high-altitude flights.

  10. Analysis of Data from the Balloon Borne Gamma RAy Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasti, Sambid K.; Bloser, Peter F.; Legere, Jason S.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.

    2016-04-01

    The Gamma Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE), a balloon borne polarimeter for 50~300 keV gamma rays, successfully flew in 2011 and 2014. The main goal of these balloon flights was to measure the gamma ray polarization of the Crab Nebula. Analysis of data from the first two balloon flights of GRAPE has been challenging due to significant changes in the background level during each flight. We have developed a technique based on the Principle Component Analysis (PCA) to estimate the background for the Crab observation. We found that the background depended mostly on the atmospheric depth, pointing zenith angle and instrument temperatures. Incorporating Anti-coincidence shield data (which served as a surrogate for the background) was also found to improve the analysis. Here, we present the calibration data and describe the analysis done on the GRAPE 2014 flight data.

  11. Superpressure Balloon Design Using Nonlinear Viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, James; Rand, James; Wakefield, David

    Stratospheric balloon platforms are used extensively by scientists for a variety of purposes. The typical balloon used today is the zero pressure natural shape fabricated from a thin film of linear low density polyethylene. This material has been found to possess a variety of desirable characteristics suitable to this environment. This film will remain ductile at very low temperatures which will permit it to develop large strains if necessary to satisfy equilibrium considerations. However, in order to achieve long duration flight without significant changes in altitude, the balloon should be pressurized to the extent necessary to maintain constant volume during typical variations in temperature. In the past, pressurized balloons were fabricated from other materials in order to achieve significant increases in strength. Thin films of polyester or polyimide have been used to make relatively small spheres capable of long duration flight. Unfortunately, these materials do not have the ductility of polyethylene at low temperature and are somewhat more fragile and subject to damage. In recent years various organizations have attempted to use the characteristic shape of a pumpkin to limit the stresses in a balloon envelope to that which can be accommodated by laminated fabric materials. While developing the design, analysis and construction techniques for this type of system, the use of polyethylene has been successfully demonstrated to provide a reliable envelope. This shape is achieved by using high strength members in the meridional direction to carry the very high loads generated by the pressure. These so called "tendons" have very low elongation and serve to limit the deformation of the film in that direction. However, earlier designs attempted to limit the stresses in the circumferential direction by using a lobe angle to control the stress. Unfortunately this has led to a number of stability problems with this type of balloon. In order to control the stability of

  12. A Low Cost Weather Balloon Borne Solar Cell Calibration Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David B.; Wolford, David S.

    2012-01-01

    Calibration of standard sets of solar cell sub-cells is an important step to laboratory verification of on-orbit performance of new solar cell technologies. This paper, looks at the potential capabilities of a lightweight weather balloon payload for solar cell calibration. A 1500 gr latex weather balloon can lift a 2.7 kg payload to over 100,000 ft altitude, above 99% of the atmosphere. Data taken between atmospheric pressures of about 30 to 15 mbar may be extrapolated via the Langley Plot method to 0 mbar, i.e. AMO. This extrapolation, in principle, can have better than 0.1 % error. The launch costs of such a payload arc significantly less than the much larger, higher altitude balloons, or the manned flight facility. The low cost enables a risk tolerant approach to payload development. Demonstration of 1% standard deviation flight-to-flight variation is the goal of this project. This paper describes the initial concept of solar cell calibration payload, and reports initial test flight results. .

  13. Aerodynamics of a Party Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Rod

    2007-01-01

    It is well-known that a party balloon can be made to fly erratically across a room, but it can also be used for quantitative measurements of other aspects of aerodynamics. Since a balloon is light and has a large surface area, even relatively weak aerodynamic forces can be readily demonstrated or measured in the classroom. Accurate measurements…

  14. A Methane Balloon Inflation Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czerwinski, Curtis J.; Cordes, Tanya J.; Franek, Joe

    2005-01-01

    The various equipments, procedure and hazards in constructing the device for inflating a methane balloon using a standard methane outlet in a laboratory are described. This device is fast, safe, inexpensive, and easy to use as compared to a hydrogen gas cylinder for inflating balloons.

  15. Aerial Deployment and Inflation System for Mars Helium Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lachenmeler, Tim; Fairbrother, Debora; Shreves, Chris; Hall, Jeffery, L.; Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.; Pauken, Michael T.; Walsh, Gerald J.; White, Christopher V.

    2009-01-01

    A method is examined for safely deploying and inflating helium balloons for missions at Mars. The key for making it possible to deploy balloons that are light enough to be buoyant in the thin, Martian atmosphere is to mitigate the transient forces on the balloon that might tear it. A fully inflated Mars balloon has a diameter of 10 m, so it must be folded up for the trip to Mars, unfolded upon arrival, and then inflated with helium gas in the atmosphere. Safe entry into the Martian atmosphere requires the use of an aeroshell vehicle, which protects against severe heating and pressure loads associated with the hypersonic entry flight. Drag decelerates the aeroshell to supersonic speeds, then two parachutes deploy to slow the vehicle down to the needed safe speed of 25 to 35 m/s for balloon deployment. The parachute system descent dynamic pressure must be approximately 5 Pa or lower at an altitude of 4 km or more above the surface.

  16. Progress of the super-pressure balloon developments in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, Hideyuki; Izutsu, Naoki; Akita, Daisuke; Iijima, Issei; Kato, Yoichi; Kawada, Jiro; Matsushima, Kiyoho; Matsuzaka, Yukihiko; Mizuta, Eiichi; Namiki, Michiyoshi; Nonaka, Naoki; Ohta, Shigeo; Saito, Yoshitaka; Sato, Takatoshi; Seo, Motoharu; Takada, Atsushi; Tamura, Keisuke; Toriumi, Michi-Hiko; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Yamagami, Takamasa; Yoshida, Tetsuya

    Zero-pressure balloon (ZPB) used for the scientific observation in the stratosphere has an un-avoidable limitation of flight duration. The ZPB cannot fly for a long day and nights, because it cannot keep its floating altitude during nighttime without dropping ballasts. On the other hand, super-pressure balloon (SPB) can keep its volume, and thus it can keep its altitude for a long duration. Therefore, the SPB is expected to provide a very useful way of a long flight to the science communities. The basic principle of the SPB had been well known for several tens of years. However, it was not easy to develop a large, light-weight, and pressure-tight SPB, which can lift a heavy (heavier than a few hundred kg) payload to an altitude of around 35 km. In these ten years, we have developed the SPB based on a unique lobed-pumpkin design. We have carried out a number of ground tests and flight tests to improve the every component of the SPB developments. Recently, we have begun an additional development of an advanced shape of SPB, named `tawara', which is a lobed-pumpkin with a lobed-cylinder. We have performed tests of the tawara-SPB to verify its advantages over the conventional pumpkin SPB. The tawara-SPB can make it easier to enlarge the SPB volume with keeping a single basic design and saving the balloon weight. The tawara-SPB may improve the balloon deployment stability, and can be utilized as a powered balloon. At the conference, we will report a summary of our tests over the past few years as well as of the prospects in the near future.

  17. Balloon-Borne, High-Energy Astrophysics: Experiences from the 1960s to the 1980s

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2008-01-01

    Observational high-energy astrophysics in the hard-x-ray and gamma-ray regions owes its development and initial successes to the balloon-borne development of detector systems, as well as pioneering observations, primarily in the timeframe from the 1960s to the 1990s. I will describe some of the first observations made by the Rice University balloon group in the 1960s, including the impetus for these observations. The appearance of SN 1987a led to several balloon-flight campaigns, sponsored by NASA, from Alice Springs, Australia in 1987 and 1988. During the 1980s, prototypes of instruments for the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory were flown on many balloon flights, which greatly enhanced the success of that mission.

  18. Dengue virus 2 American-Asian genotype identified during the 2006/2007 outbreak in Piauí, Brazil reveals a Caribbean route of introduction and dissemination of dengue virus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barcelos Figueiredo, Leandra; Sakamoto, Tetsu; Leomil Coelho, Luiz Felipe; de Oliveira Rocha, Eliseu Soares; Gomes Cota, Marcela Menezes; Ferreira, Gustavo Portela; de Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most widespread arthropod-borne virus, and the number and severity of outbreaks has increased worldwide in recent decades. Dengue is caused by DENV-1, DENV- 2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 which are genetically distant. The species has been subdivided into genotypes based on phylogenetic studies. DENV-2, which was isolated from dengue fever patients during an outbreak in Piaui, Brazil in 2006/2007 was analyzed by sequencing the envelope (E) gene. The results indicated a high similarity among the isolated viruses, as well as to other DENV-2 from Brazil, Central America and South America. A phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis based on DENV-2E gene sequences revealed that these viruses are grouped together with viruses of the American-Asian genotype in two distinct lineages. Our results demonstrate the co-circulation of two American-Asian genotype lineages in northeast Brazil. Moreover, we reveal that DENV-2 lineage 2 was detected in Piauí before it disseminated to other Brazilian states and South American countries, indicating the existence of a new dissemination route that has not been previously described.

  19. Probability of Unmixed Young Groundwater (defined using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities) in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of unmixed young groundwater (defined using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities) in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps were developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  20. The upcoming balloon campaign of the Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, J.-L.; Boggs, S. E.; Chang, H.-K.; Tomsick, J. A.; Zoglauer, A.; Amman, M.; Chang, Y.-H.; Chou, Y.; Jean, P.; Kierans, C.; Lin, C.-H.; Lowell, A.; Shang, J.-R.; Tseng, C.-H.; von Ballmoos, P.; Yang, C.-Y.

    2015-06-01

    The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI), formerly known as the Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT), is a balloon-borne soft gamma-ray telescope (0.2-5 MeV) designed to study astrophysical sources of nuclear-line emission and gamma-ray polarization. The heart of COSI is a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors (GeDs), providing excellent spectral resolution ( 0.2 - 1 %) and the capability to track individual photon interactions with full 3D position resolution to 1.6 mm3. COSI is built upon considerable heritage from the previous NCT balloon instrument, which has flown successfully on two conventional balloon flights to date. The Crab Nebula was detected at a significance of 6σ in the second flight, which is the first reported detection of an astrophysical source by a compact Compton telescope. COSI has been upgraded from the previous NCT instrument to be an Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) payload, utilizing a new detector configuration optimized for polarization sensitivity and employing a mechanical cryocooler to remove consumables (LN2) for ULDB flights. The instrument is being integrated for a ULDB flight in December 2014 from Antarctica on a superpressure balloon. Here we will present the redesign of the instrument and our current progress in preparing for the flight.

  1. Test of Re-Entry Systems at Estrange Using Sounding Rockets and Stratospheric Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockowandt, C.; Abrahamsson, M.; Florin, G.

    2015-09-01

    Stratospheric balloons and sounding rockets can provide an ideal in-flight platform for performing re-entry and other high speed tests off different types of vehicles and techniques. They are also ideal platforms for testing different types of recovery systems such as airbrakes and parachutes. This paper expands on some examples of platforms and missions for drop tests from balloons as well as sounding rockets launched from Esrange Space Center, a facility run by Swedish Space Corporation SSC in northern Sweden.

  2. Balloon launched decelerator test program: Post-test test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, D.; Schlemmer, J.; Hicks, F.; Michel, F.; Moog, R. D.

    1972-01-01

    Balloon Launched Decelerator Test (BLDT) flights were conducted during the summer of 1972 over the White Sands Missile Range. The purpose of these tests was to qualify the Viking disk-gap band parachute system behind a full-scale simulator of the Viking Entry Vehicle over the maximum range of entry conditions anticipated in the Viking '75 soft landing on Mars. Test concerns centered on the ability of a minimum weight parachute system to operate without structural damage in the turbulent wake of the blunt-body entry vehicle (140 deg, 11.5 diameter cone). This is the first known instance of parachute operation at supersonic speeds in the wake of such a large blunt body. The flight tests utilized the largest successful balloon-payload weight combination known to get to high altitude (120kft) where rocket engines were employed to boost the test vehicle to supersonic speeds and dynamic pressures simulating the range of conditions on Mars.

  3. Learning Clicks, 2006-2007. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Now progressing into its fourth year, Learning Clicks is an interactive, dynamic, and informative program to help students in Grades 9-12 learn about the importance, long-term benefits, and opportunities of post-secondary education. This program also serves as a portal to provide students with the necessary information to assist in planning and…

  4. Annual Change Report 2006/2007

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-11-16

    As part of continuing compliance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide information on any change in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system since the most recent compliance application. This requirement is identified in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 194.4(b)(4), which states: "No later than six months after the administrator issues a certification, and at least annually thereafter, the Department shall report to the Administrator, in writing, any changes in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system that were not required to be reported by paragraph (b)(3) of this section and that differ from information contained in the most recent compliance application." In meeting the requirement, the DOE provides an annual report each November of all applicable changes under the above requirement. This annual report informs the EPA of changes to information in the most recent compliance recertification (the 2004 Compliance Recertification). Significant planned changes must be reported to the EPA prior to implementation by the DOE. In addition, Title 40 CFR, Section 194.4(b)(3) requires that significant unplanned changes be reported to the EPA within 24 hours or ten days, depending on the severity of the activity or condition. To date, there have been no significant unplanned changes to the certification basis. Planned changes have been submitted on an individual basis. All other changes are reported annually. Changes in activities or conditions are reviewed to determine if 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(3) reporting is necessary. As indicated above, no significant unplanned changes were identified for the time period covered by this report. The enclosed tables list those items identified for reporting under 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(4). The majority of the items described in this report are inspections, reports, and modifications to written plans and procedures for WIPP operations.

  5. ESO Fellowship Programme 2006/2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    ESO awards several postdoctoral fellow-ships each year. The goal of these fel-lowships is to offer young scientists op-portunities and facilities to enhance their research programmes at one of the world's foremost observatories.

  6. Balloon Study of the Global Circuit: Spatial Coherence and Correlation with Lightning Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzworth, R. H.; Bering, E. A.; Kokorowski, M.; Reddell, B.; Kadokura, A.; Yamagishi, H.; Sato, N.; Ejiri, M.; Hirosawa, H.; Yamagami, T.; Torii, S.; Tohyama, F.; Nakagawa, M.; Okada, T.

    2004-12-01

    The second campaign of the Polar Patrol Balloon (PPB) experiment (2nd-PPB) was carried out at Syowa Station in Antarctica during 2002-2003. This paper will present the global circuit results from the 2nd-PPB experiment. In that experiment, three balloons were launched for the purpose of upper atmosphere physics observation (3 balloons). Payloads of these 3 flights were identical with each other, and were launched as close together in time as allowed by weather conditions to constitute a cluster of balloons during their flights. Such a ``Balloon Cluster'' is suitable to observe temporal evolution and spatial distribution of phenomena in the ionospheric regions and boundaries that the balloons traversed during their circumpolar trajectory. More than 20 days of simultaneous fair weather 3-axis electric field and stratospheric conductivity data were obtained at geomagnetic latitudes ranging from sub-auroral to the polar cap. Balloon separation varied from ˜60 to ˜500 km. This paper will present the global circuit observations with emphasis on the times of apparent spatial variation in the vertical fair weather field. This paper will also present stratospheric conductivity observations with emphasis on the temporal and spatial variations that were observed. Finally, the inferred current density will be compared with data from the WWLL (TOGA) lightning monitor experiment.

  7. Overview of the development of the pathfinder ultra-long duration balloon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Magdi A.; Stuchlik, David; Corbin, Brian; Smolinski, Michael; Abresch, Brian; Shreves, Christopher; Stancil, Robert; Cathey, Henry M.; Cannon, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The ultra-long duration balloon (ULDB) Pathfinder Project is developing a small pumpkin balloon system and a new communication package based on the iridium satellites technology to demonstrate a global, 100-day duration capability that is scalable to the full-scale ULDB. A set of trade studies has been conducted to determine the volume, mass and cost of the balloon system to support up to 90 kg payload mass to an altitude of 35 km. The Pathfinder test balloons will provide valuable data in the development of performance models for future ULDB flights. The iridium based communication package will include a power subsystem, a command and data-handling unit, a GPS receiver, and an iridium L-Band Transceiver (LBT) for global communications. The flight data will include, at a minimum: latitude, longitude, altitude, horizontal and vertical speeds, heading, time, and other balloon performance parameters (i.e., system voltages, temperatures, etc.). Although the system will be designed for global launch capability, initial flights will be launched from the proposed full-scale ULDB mission launch locations. This paper will present and discuss the initial series of trade studies conducted for the development of the pathfinder balloon and the design concept of the iridium based communication package.

  8. The Extreme Universe Space Observatory Super Pressure Balloon Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiencke, Lawrence; Olinto, Angela; Adams, Jim; JEM-EUSO Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Extreme Universe Space Observatory on a super pressure balloon (EUSO-SPB) mission will make the first fluorescence observations of high energy cosmic ray extensive air showers by looking down on the atmosphere from near space. A long duration flight of at least 50 nights launched from Wanaka NZ is planned for 2017. We describe completed instrument, and the planned mission. We acknowledge the support of NASA through grants NNX13AH53G and NNX13AH55G.

  9. Flight. Science Series Grades 4, 5, 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frensch, Helen

    The activities in this book are designed to reinforce the elementary concepts of flight. General background information, suggested activities, questions for discussion, and answers are provided. Twenty-eight reproducible worksheets are contained in this guide. Topics include: hot air balloons, the physics of flight, air resistance, airplane…

  10. Interventional balloon-enteroscopy.

    PubMed

    Albert, Jörg G

    2012-01-01

    Balloon assisted enteroscopy (BE) expands greatly the therapeutic options in interventional endoscopy; bleeding sites, strictures, polyps, and other small bowel lesions are increasingly been treated by use of BE in the last 10 years. Treatment options for small bowel bleeding include Argon plasma coagulation (APC), injection therapy, and application of TTS metal clips, and thereby bleeding is stopped in most cases. Dilating symptomatic strictures, resecting polyps as seen in Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS), and removing foreign bodies, BE carries most endoscopic treatment techniques to the small bowel. Another new indication field for BE are interventions at the biliary system in patients with surgically modified anatomy such as Roux-Y anastomosis. This review offers a full overview on indications of BE and refers to the practical use of the method for all endoscopic interventions.

  11. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Angelini, P.

    1987-01-01

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty.

  12. Stability of Lobed Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Danny (Technical Monitor); Pagitz, M.; Pellegrino, Xu S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the stability of simple lobed balloon structures. Two approaches are presented, one based on a wrinkled material model and one based on a variable Poisson s ratio model that eliminates compressive stresses iteratively. The first approach is used to investigate the stability of both a single isotensoid and a stack of four isotensoids, for perturbations of in.nitesimally small amplitude. It is found that both structures are stable for global deformation modes, but unstable for local modes at su.ciently large pressure. Both structures are stable if an isotropic model is assumed. The second approach is used to investigate the stability of the isotensoid stack for large shape perturbations, taking into account contact between di.erent surfaces. For this structure a distorted, stable configuration is found. It is also found that the volume enclosed by this con.guration is smaller than that enclosed by the undistorted structure.

  13. Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories balloon operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danaher, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    The establishment and functions of the AFCRL balloon operations facility are discussed. The types of research work conducted by the facility are defined. The facilities which support the balloon programs are described. The free balloon and tethered balloon capabilities are analyzed.

  14. Lightweight Liquid Helium Dewar for High-Altitude Balloon Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, Alan; James, Bryan; Fixsen, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical observations at millimeter wavelengths require large (2-to-5- meter diameter) telescopes carried to altitudes above 35 km by scientific research balloons. The scientific performance is greatly enhanced if the telescope is cooled to temperatures below 10 K with no emissive windows between the telescope and the sky. Standard liquid helium bucket dewars can contain a suitable telescope for telescope diameter less than two meters. However, the mass of a dewar large enough to hold a 3-to-5-meter diameter telescope would exceed the balloon lift capacity. The solution is to separate the functions of cryogen storage and in-flight thermal isolation, utilizing the unique physical conditions at balloon altitudes. Conventional dewars are launched cold: the vacuum walls necessary for thermal isolation must also withstand the pressure gradient at sea level and are correspondingly thick and heavy. The pressure at 40 km is less than 0.3% of sea level: a dewar designed for use only at 40 km can use ultra thin walls to achieve significant reductions in mass. This innovation concerns new construction and operational techniques to produce a lightweight liquid helium bucket dewar. The dewar is intended for use on high-altitude balloon payloads. The mass is low enough to allow a large (3-to-5-meter) diameter dewar to fly at altitudes above 35 km on conventional scientific research balloons without exceeding the lift capability of the balloon. The lightweight dewar has thin (250- micron) stainless steel walls. The walls are too thin to support the pressure gradient at sea level: the dewar launches warm with the vacuum space vented continuously during ascent to eliminate any pressure gradient across the walls. A commercial 500-liter storage dewar maintains a reservoir of liquid helium within a minimal (hence low mass) volume. Once a 40-km altitude is reached, the valve venting the vacuum space of the bucket dewar is closed to seal the vacuum space. A vacuum pump then

  15. Astronomy from the Upper Stratosphere: Key Discoveries and New Opportunities from High Altitude Scientific Balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissel, Laura M.

    2017-01-01

    Stratospheric balloons offer a near-space astronomy platform for a small fraction of the cost of an equivalent satellite. These balloons can lift scientific payloads of up to 6,000 lbs as high as 40 km above the Earth’s surface (above >99.5% of the atmosphere). In this presentation I will discuss the contribution that scientific balloon experiments have made to astronomy, from the early days when astronomers had to accompany their telescopes to the stratosphere, to the present era where automated payloads are in some cases able to achieve a pointing precision of better than an arcsecond. In particular, I will discuss the important contributions that balloon telescopes have made to our current understanding of the Universe through detailed measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background. I will also show how recent observations from sub-millimeter balloon telescopes such as BLAST and BLASTPol have been used to study both star formation and magnetic fields of nearby giant molecular clouds in unprecedented detail, and also to constrain models of interstellar dust composition. With improving ballooning technology, such as NASA’s new Super-Pressure Balloon program, we will soon have the capability for science flights of several months (rather than weeks) duration, thus beginning an exciting new era in balloon astronomy.

  16. Structure variations of pumpkin balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, N.; Izutsu, N.; Honda, H.

    A robed pumpkin balloon by 3-D gore design concept is recognized as a basic form for a super -pressure balloon. This paper deals with an extension of this design concept for other large pressurized membrane structures, such as a stratospheric airship and a balloon of which volume is controllable. The structural modifications are performed by means of additional ropes or poles. When the original pumpkin shape is modified for those systems, superior characteristics of 3-D gore design, those are large bulges with a small local radius and unidirectional film tension, should be maintained. Improved design methods which are adequate for the above subjects will be discussed in detail.

  17. A new generation of CNES boundary layer pressurized balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, André; Verdier, Nicolas; Ragazzo, Patrick; Douchin, Francoise; Dupouy, Gilles

    2012-07-01

    Since 1973, CNES develops and operates, for the benefit of scientific laboratories, pressurized spherical balloon (2.5m of diameter) to make ins-situ measurements within the planetary boundary layer (1000 to 2000 m altitude). The instrumentation consists of an atmospheric meteorological package (pressure, temperature and humidity), associated with onboard GPS receiver for wind measurements (speed and direction). Depending on scientific requirements, other sensors can be added on-board (flux-meter, particle counter, ozone sensor,...). Also, the safety issues have been improved : redundant GPS receiver, valve to avoid the balloon burst and an automatic flight termination to not flight above a prohibited geographic area. This paper will present the new generation of this aerostat, using the Iridium satellite link for telemetry and remote command allowing a significant increase of the telemetry rate, and permitting a real time management of the flight termination. The results of the technologic balloon campaign for this aerostat validation, planned in March 2012, will be also presented.

  18. The Rocket Balloon (Rocketball): Applications to Science, Technology, and Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Originally envisioned to study upper atmospheric phenomena, the Rocket Balloon system (or Rocketball for short) has utility in a range of applications, including sprite detection and in-situ measurements, near-space measurements and calibration correlation with orbital assets, hurricane observation and characterization, technology testing and validation, ground observation, and education. A salient feature includes the need to reach space and near-space within a critical time-frame and in adverse local meteorological conditions. It can also provide for the execution of technology validation and operational demonstrations at a fraction of the cost of a space flight. In particular, planetary entry probe proof-of-concepts can be examined. A typical Rocketball operational scenario consists of a sounding rocket launch and subsequent deployment of a balloon above a desired location. An obvious advantage of this combination is the additional mission 'hang-time' rendered by the balloon once the sounding rocket flight is completed. The system leverages current and emergent technologies at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and other organizations.

  19. Planetary Balloon-Based Science Platform Evaluation and Program Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dankanich, John W.; Kremic, Tibor; Hibbitts, Karl; Young, Eliot F.; Landis, Rob

    2016-01-01

    This report describes a study evaluating the potential for a balloon-based optical telescope as a planetary science asset to achieve decadal class science. The study considered potential science achievable and science traceability relative to the most recent planetary science decadal survey, potential platform features, and demonstration flights in the evaluation process. Science Potential and Benefits: This study confirms the cost the-benefit value for planetary science purposes. Forty-four (44) important questions of the decadal survey are at least partially addressable through balloon based capabilities. Planetary science through balloon observations can provide significant science through observations in the 300 nm to 5 m range and at longer wavelengths as well. Additionally, balloon missions have demonstrated the ability to progress from concept to observation to publication much faster than a space mission increasing the speed of science return. Planetary science from a balloon-borne platform is a relatively low-cost approach to new science measurements. This is particularly relevant within a cost-constrained planetary science budget. Repeated flights further reduce the cost of the per unit science data. Such flights offer observing time at a very competitive cost. Another advantage for planetary scientists is that a dedicated asset could provide significant new viewing opportunities not possible from the ground and allow unprecedented access to observations that cannot be realized with the time allocation pressures faced by current observing assets. In addition, flight systems that have a relatively short life cycle and where hardware is generally recovered, are excellent opportunities to train early career scientists, engineers, and project managers. The fact that balloon-borne payloads, unlike space missions, are generally recovered offers an excellent tool to test and mature instruments and other space craft systems. Desired Gondola Features: Potential

  20. The Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) balloon project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter F.; Sharma, Tejaswita; Legere, Jason S.; Bancroft, Christopher M.; McConnell, Mark L.; Ryan, James M.; Wright, Alex M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe a project to develop new medium-energy gamma-ray instrumentation by constructing and flying a balloon-borne Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts. There is a need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from approximately 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. We believe that directly building on the legacy of COMPTEL, using relatively robust, low-cost, off-the-shelf technologies, is the most promising path for such a mission. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), Cerium Bromide (CeBr3), and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. We have conducted two balloon flights of prototype instruments to test these technologies. The first, in 2011, demonstrated that a Compton telescope consisting of an liquid organic scintillator scattering layer and a LaBr3 calorimeter effectively rejects background under balloon-flight conditions, using time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination. The second, in 2014, showed that a telescope using an organic stilbene crystal scattering element and a LaBr3 calorimeter with SiPM readouts can achieve similar ToF performance. We are now constructing a much larger balloon instrument, an Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope (ASCOT) with SiPM readout, with the goal of imaging the Crab Nebula at MeV energies in a one-day flight. We expect a 4σ detection up to 1 MeV in a single transit. We present calibration results of the first detector modules, and updated simulations of the balloon instrument sensitivity. If successful, this project will demonstrate that the energy, timing, and position resolution of this technology are sufficient to achieve an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity in the mediumenergy gamma-ray band, were it to be

  1. Balloon-borne remote sensing of stratospheric constituents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. H.; Kosters, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Data on species of interest in the photochemistry of the ozone layer obtained from balloon flights are presented. The flights made use of remote-sensing instruments that took measurements in the wavelength region from the ultraviolet to millimeter wavelengths. Most of the data were obtained with instruments whose readings were in the midinfrared wavelengths. Descriptions are given of the two techniques generally used in this type of research, namely solar absorption and atmospheric emission. The promise that these techniques hold for providing data on the photochemistry of the ozone layer is discussed.

  2. Status of the Balloon-Borne X-ray Polarimetry Mission X-Calibur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczynski, Henric; Kislat, Fabian; Stuchlik, David; Okajima, Takashi; de Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2016-04-01

    We report on the status of the balloon borne hard X-ray polairmetry mission X-Calibur. The missions combines a focussing hard X-ray mirror from the InFOCuS collaboration with a scattering polarimeter and the WASP (Wallops Arc Second Pointer) pointing system. The mission is scheduled for a conventonal ~1 day balloon flight in Fall 2016 and a long duration (~30 day) balloon flight from McMurdo (Ross Island) in 2018/2019. X-Calibur will allow us to measure ~5% polarization fractions for strong sources with a Crab-like enegry spectra and fluxes. The science targets of the first balloon flights will include the stellar mass black holes GRS 1915+105 and Cyg X-1, Her X-1, Sco X-1, and the Crab nebula and pulsar. The long duration balloon flight will target several X-ray binaries and the extragalactic mass accreting supermassive black hole Cen A. In this contribution we give an update on the status of the mission, and the expected science return.

  3. Recent progress in planetary balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerzhanovich, Viktor V.; Cutts, James A.

    2001-08-01

    In the last 15 years several balloon mission cencepts have been proposed for Mars and Venus, one of them - Russian-French Mars Aerostat - was extensively developed in 1988-1995 but was terminated before completion. It became clear that a number of critical technologies still needed to be developed prior to committing a costly space mission. In recent years significant progress has been made in two critical fields: aerial deployment and inflation of thin-film balloons for specific planetary applications, and in the development of envelope design for stratospheric applications. This paper describes requirements, proposed concepts, critical elements and trade-offs in planetary balloon missions as well as current results of some of JPL balloon programs.

  4. Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100160.htm Coronary artery balloon angioplasty - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... slide 9 out of 9 Overview The coronary arteries supply blood to the heart muscle. The right ...

  5. Balloon exoplanet nulling interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-08-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize an exosolar planet and the surrounding debris disk. The existing instrument consists of a three-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with thre fast steering mirrors and three delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer would be coupled to the imaging interferometer and in principle, allows deep starlight suppression. Atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet show that balloonborne payloads are a possible path towards the direct detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and debris disks. Furthermore, rapid development of lower cost balloon payloads provide a path towards advancement of NASA technology readiness levels for future space-based exoplanet missions. Discussed are the BENI mission and instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such a balloon-borne mission.

  6. Ballooning Modes and Sustorm Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. Z.; Zaharia, S.

    2002-12-01

    Based on the AMPTE/CCE observations [Cheng and Lui, GRL, 1998], a low frequency instability with period on the order of 1 min is observed about 2-3 minutes before the substorm onset and is identified as a kinetic ballooning instability. Kinetic effects such as ion gyroradii, magnetic drift, and trapped electrons can strongly enhance the beta threshold over that of ideal MHD ballooning mode theory prediction. However, the ballooning instability threshold based on the ideal MHD model in realistic magnetospheres is still unresolved. Here, we present the stability property of ideal MHD ballooning modes in numerical 3D magnetospheric equilibria with thin current sheet. The coupling effects between perpendicular and parallel (compressional) perturbed magnetic fields are included. The calculations make use of numerical 3D magnetospheric equilibria including thin current sheet by assuming pressure to be constant along a field line. We then, estimate the stability threshold including kinetic effects and compare with observations.

  7. High Altitude Infrasound Measurements using Balloon-Borne Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, D. C.; Johnson, C. S.; Gupta, R. A.; Anderson, J.; Lees, J. M.; Drob, D. P.; Phillips, D.

    2015-12-01

    For the last fifty years, almost all infrasound sensors have been located on the Earth's surface. A few experiments consisting of microphones on poles and tethered aerostats comprise the remainder. Such surface and near-surface arrays likely do not capture the full diversity of acoustic signals in the atmosphere. Here, we describe results from a balloon mounted infrasound array that reached altitudes of up to 38 km (the middle stratosphere). The balloon drifted at the ambient wind speed, resulting in a near total reduction in wind noise. Signals consistent with tropospheric turbulence were detected. A spectral peak in the ocean microbarom range (0.12 - 0.35 Hz) was present on balloon-mounted sensors but not on static infrasound stations near the flight path. A strong 18 Hz signal, possibly related to building ventilation systems, was observed in the stratosphere. A wide variety of other narrow band acoustic signals of uncertain provenance were present throughout the flight, but were absent in simultaneous recordings from nearby ground stations. Similar phenomena were present in spectrograms from the last balloon infrasound campaign in the 1960s. Our results suggest that the infrasonic wave field in the stratosphere is very different from that which is readily detectable on surface stations. This has implications for modeling acoustic energy transfer between the lower and upper atmosphere as well as the detection of novel acoustic signals that never reach the ground. Our work provides valuable constraints on a proposed mission to detect earthquakes on Venus using balloon-borne infrasound sensors.

  8. Cutting-Balloon-Associated Vascular Rupture After Failed Standard Balloon Angioplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraverty, S. Meier, M.A.J.; Aarts, J.C.N.M.; Ross, R.A.; Griffiths, G.D.

    2005-06-15

    The following case reports illustrate a possible complication of vascular rupture when cutting balloon dilatation is performed immediately after failed standard balloon angioplasty to the same diameter. Deferral of the cutting balloon dilatation should be considered in such circumstances.

  9. Balloon-Borne Infrasound Detection of Energetic Bolide Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Eliot F.; Ballard, Courtney; Klein, Viliam; Bowman, Daniel; Boslough, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Infrasound is usually defined as sound waves below 20 Hz, the nominal limit of human hearing. Infrasound waves propagate over vast distances through the Earth's atmosphere: the CTBTO (Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization) has 48 installed infrasound-sensing stations around the world to detect nuclear detonations and other disturbances. In February 2013, several CTBTO infrasound stations detected infrasound signals from a large bolide that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia. Some stations recorded signals that had circumnavigated the Earth, over a day after the original event. The goal of this project is to improve upon the sensitivity of the CTBTO network by putting microphones on small, long-duration super-pressure balloons, with the overarching goal of studying the small end of the NEO population by using the Earth's atmosphere as a witness plate.A balloon-borne infrasound sensor is expected to have two advantages over ground-based stations: a lack of wind noise and a concentration of infrasound energy in the "stratospheric duct" between roughly 5 - 50 km altitude. To test these advantages, we have built a small balloon payload with five calibrated microphones. We plan to fly this payload on a NASA high-altitude balloon from Ft Sumner, NM in August 2016. We have arranged for three large explosions to take place in Socorro, NM while the balloon is aloft to assess the sensitivity of balloon-borne vs. ground-based infrasound sensors. We will report on the results from this test flight and the prospects for detecting/characterizing small bolides in the stratosphere.

  10. Balloon and Lear Jet Testing of Scarlet Modules and Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eskenazi, Michael; Murphy, David M.; Anspaugh, Bruce E.; Mueller, Robert L.; Brinker, Dave; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents test results from SCARLET (Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology) experiments performed on several Lewis Research Center Lear jet flights and two JPL balloon flights. The tests were performed in support of the BMDO sponsored SCARLET II program, which is building a 2.6 kW SCARLET solar array to supply the primary power for the JPL New Millennium Deep Space 1 Mission. The experiments involve TECSTAR dual junction GaInP2/GaAs/Ge cells flown bare and under two different types of SCARLET lenses. The two types of lenses tested were a developmental design consisting of monolithic THV fluoroplastic and the current baseline flight design consisting of ceria-doped microsheet and silicone. Measured lens and total module efficiencies are presented and the flight data is compared to various solar simulator test results.

  11. Near Space Observations: Planetary Science from a Balloon-Borne Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E.; Hibbitts, C.; Cheng, A.; Dolloff, M.; Kremic, T.

    2015-10-01

    On 25-SEP-2014, the BOPPS balloon mission (Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science) launched from Ft Sumner, NM. During its 17-hour flight, BOPPS observed three comets in wavelengths from 0.8 to 4.6 μm with its infrared camera and demonstrated 66 mas image stability with its visible- UV cameras. The BOPPS payload was intended to develop and demonstrate two key capabilities of balloonborne telescopes: the ability to acquire IR wavelengths that are obscured from the ground or from SOFIA, and the ability to obtain diffraction-limited images at wavelengths shortward of 1 μm, where ground-based adaptive optics systems typically provide poor Strehl ratios. Now that the successful BOPPS mission is behind us, there is the potential to re-use the BOPPS instrumentation for additional long-duration balloon missions to address other planetary science investigations: a planetary observatory in the stratosphere, with the possibility of performing observations that are proposed and competed by the planetary community. NASA's Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility just flew a record-setting 32-day circumglobal super-pressure balloon mission at southern mid-latitudes. Unlike previous long-duration flights from Antarctica (zeropressure balloons flying in constant daylight), this recent flight launched from New Zealand and passed through day/night cycles, demonstrating the ability of balloons to carry science payloads weighing up to 3000 lb and provide hundreds of hours of dark time above 99.5 % of the atmosphere. We will provide an overview of the BOPPS payload and a review of the BOPPS flight. We will highlight the recommended changes that would allow BOPPS to become a general purpose infrared and visible/UV observatory.

  12. Technology development for a long duration, mid-cloud level Venus balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Jeffery; Yavrouian, Andre; Kerzhanovich, Viktor; Fredrickson, Thad; Sandy, Chuck; Pauken, Michael; Kulczycki, Eric; Walsh, Gerald; Said, Magdi; Day, Shari; Fairbrother, Debora

    This paper describe the results of ongoing technology development activities for a Venus spher-ical superpressure balloon capable of flying for long durations (30 days) in the middle cloud layer at an altitude of 55 km. Data is presented from a successful aerial deployment and infla-tion flight experiment on a 5.5 m diameter prototype balloon conducted at a 2.5 km altitude on Earth. Although the balloon in that test was not released for free flight, all other steps in the deployment and inflation process were successfully executed. Experimental and computa-tion results are also presented from an investigation of the stress concentration phenomenon at the junction of the metal end fitting and fabric end cap of the Venus balloon. Results are also presented from sulfuric acid exposure experiments on a number of plastic films that could serve as an improved outer protective layer over the Teflon FEP film previously used. It was discovered that although some films are not damaged by the acid, they are permeable and allow acid penetration over multi-day time scales. Aclar film was found to be both unaffected and impermeable to sulfuric acid and therefore was selected as the protective outer layer in a new balloon laminate material. Experimental results are presented for mechanical, optical and sulfuric acid resistance properties of this new laminate, and from testing of a 3.5 m diameter (half-scale) prototype balloon.

  13. Ground based instruments and basic structures supporting rocket & balloon campaigns at Esrange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widell, Ola

    2005-08-01

    Many campaigns at Esrange are involving validation of scientific instruments onboard satellites. The validation is often done by balloon borne flights within different stratospheric conditions. Several campaigns are also coordinated programs including rocket, balloon and ground-based instruments. For testing of unmanned vehicles and parachute systems we are taking advantage of the huge land recovery area near Esrange and the Vidsel test field 300km south of Esrange. Several flights within the NEAT concept have been performed. An optical observatory called KEOPS, located at Esrange, is the main site for ground based instruments. The observatory is mainly dedicated for optical instruments like photometers, cameras, FPIs and an IR interferometer. The major expansion of the launch pad for stratospheric balloons and the cooperation with NASA will result in long duration balloon flights from Esrange to Alaska carrying heavy astronomical payloads. First flight will start summer 2005 and with annual flights. The accommodation complex is also extended to a total of more than 100 rooms.

  14. Certification and safety aspects relating to the transport of passengers on high altitude balloons in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenmaker, Annelie

    2014-07-01

    High-altitude balloons typically fly between 25 and 50 km in altitude, which, while below the Karman line of 100 km, is yet far above the altitudes typically flown by aircraft. For example, the highest-flying commercial aircraft - the Concorde - had a maximum cruising altitude of only 18 km. zero2infinity, a Spanish company, is currently developing a pressurized pod named “bloon” which will be capable of lifting six people, including two pilot crew members and four paying passengers, to an altitude of 36 km through the use of high-altitude balloons. The boundary between Airspace and Outer Space has never been legally defined, mostly because of the lack of activities taking place between the altitude where airplanes fly and the lowest orbiting spacecraft. High-altitude balloons do fly at these in-between altitudes and the prospect of commercializing access to these parts of the stratosphere poses some questions in a new light. Given the relatively low altitude at which they fly, it may well be that these types of balloons would be considered to operate exclusively within air space. However, given the technology involved in crewed high altitude balloon flights, which is more similar to spacecraft engineering than to traditional hot-air or gas ballooning, it is necessary to evaluate the various legal regimes, codes, and regulations that would apply to such flights, especially regarding licenses and liabilities. For high altitude balloon flights commencing in Europe, the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) would very likely be the competent certification or licensing agency for these flights, although there would likely be input from various national aviation authorities as well. However, because the European Commission (EC) has not yet issued regulations regarding commercial spaceflight, particularly the use of high altitude balloons, new rules and regulations governing such flights may still need to be drafted and promulgated. With the development of

  15. Low Cost Balloon programme of Indian Centre for Space Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has launched 89 Missions to near space using single or multiple weather balloons or very light plastic balloons. Basic goal was to capitalize miniaturization of equipments in modern ages. Our typical payload of less than 4kg weight consists of GPS, video camera, cosmic ray detectors, Attitude measurement unit, sunsensor and most importantly a 50-100sqcm X-ray/Gamma-ray detector (usually a scintillator type). The main purpose of the latter is to study spectra of secondary cosmic ray spectra (till our ceiling altitude of 36-42km) over the years and their seasonal variation or variation with solar cycle. We also study solar X-ray spectra, especially of solar flares. We have detected a Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) and pulsars. Our observation of black hole candidates did not yield satisfactory result yet mainly because of poor collimation (~ 10 deg x 10 deg) by lead collimator which introduces strong background also. Our effort with multiple balloon flights enabled us to have long duration flights. We believe that our procedure is very futuristic and yet at an affordable cost.

  16. High Altitude Balloons as a Platform for Space Radiation Belt Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzino, L.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Johnson, W.; Mann, I. R.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons (UA-HAB)

    2011-12-01

    The goals of the University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons Program (UA-HAB) are to i) use low cost balloons to address space radiation science, and ii) to utilise the excitement of "space mission" involvement to promote and facilitate the recruitment of undergraduate and graduate students in physics, engineering, and atmospheric sciences to pursue careers in space science and engineering. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloons (UA-HAB) is a unique opportunity for University of Alberta students (undergraduate and graduate) to engage in the hands-on design, development, build, test and flight of a payload to operate on a high altitude balloon at around 30km altitude. The program development, including formal design and acceptance tests, reports and reviews, mirror those required in the development of an orbital satellite mission. This enables the students to gain a unique insight into how space missions are flown. UA-HAB is a one and half year program that offers a gateway into a high-altitude balloon mission through hands on experience, and builds skills for students who may be attracted to participate in future space missions in their careers. This early education will provide students with the experience necessary to better assess opportunities for pursuing a career in space science. Balloons offer a low-cost alternative to other suborbital platforms which can be used to address radiation belt science goals. In particular, the participants of this program have written grant proposal to secure funds for this project, have launched several 'weather balloon missions', and have designed, built, tested, and launched their particle detector called "Maple Leaf Particle Detector". This detector was focussed on monitoring cosmic rays and space radiation using shielded Geiger tubes, and was flown as one of the payloads from the institutions participating in the High Altitude Student Platform (HASP), organized by the Louisiana State University and the Louisiana

  17. Integrating BalloonSAT and Atmospheric Dynamic Concepts into the Secondary Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fong, B. N.; Kennon, J. T.; Roberts, E.

    2016-05-01

    Arkansas BalloonSAT is an educational outreach and scientific research program that is part of Arkansas State University in Jonesboro, AR. The following is a unit of instruction to incorporate BalloonSAT measurements into secondary science classes. Students interpret graphs and identify several atmospheric trends and properties of a typical balloon flight. Students engage critical thinking skills in developing and answering their own questions relevant to the BalloonSAT program. Prerequisite concepts students should know are how to interpret graphs and unit conversions. Students should have a basic understanding of gravity, units of temperature and distance, and error in measurements. The unit is designed for one week after end-of-course exams and before the end of school. The unit may take two to five 50-minute periods, depending on how many activities are completed.

  18. Hardware, integration & support for the ASI BIRBA balloon campaigns since year 2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, A.; Petracchi, L.; Neri, G.; Zolesi, V.

    In the history of the space exploration, the stratospheric balloons have been among the first platforms used to carry out scientific experiments. The Italian Space Agency (ASI) has a long experience of missions with sounding balloons, managing the launch base of Trapani-Milo and executing launches over the Mediterranean sea with flight duration of about 24 hours. From year 2000 Kayser Italia (KI) have been commissioned by ASI to develop incubators for biology and physical science to be used for balloon missions, and to provide mission support during the balloon campaigns. On this basis KI developed the BIRBA incubator, that was used in four mission campaigns from 2000 to 2002. A large set of BIRBA incubators are currently available at ASI for carrying out new mission campaigns.

  19. BLAST: A balloon-borne, large-aperture, submillimetre telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Donald Victor

    BLAST is a balloon-borne large-aperture, submillimetre telescope, which makes large area (1--200 square degree) surveys of Galactic and extragalactic targets. Since BLAST observes in the stratosphere, it is able to make broad-band observations between 200 mum and 550 mum which are difficult or impossible to perform from the ground. BLAST has been designed to probe star formation both in the local Galaxy and in the high redshift (z = 1--4) universe. Because BLAST is flown on an unmanned stratospheric balloon platform, it has been designed to be able to operate autonomously, without needing operator intervention to perform its scientific goals. This thesis includes an overview of the design of the BLAST platform, with emphasis on the command and control systems used to operate the telescope. BLAST has been flown on two long-duration balloon flights. The first of these, from Esrange, Sweden in June of 2005, acquired ˜70 hours of primarily Galactic data. During the second flight, from Willy Field, Antarctica in December of 2006, BLAST acquired ˜225 hours of both Galactic and extragalactic data. Operational performance of the platform during these two flights is reviewed, with the goal of providing insight on how future flights can be improved. Reduction of the data acquired by these large-format bolometer arrays is a challenging procedure, and techniques developed for BLAST data reduction are reviewed. The ultimate goal of this reduction is the generation of high quality astronomical maps which can be used for subsequent portions of data analysis. This thesis treats, in detail, the iterative, maximum likelihood map maker developed for BLAST. Results of simulations performed on the map maker to characterise its ability to reconstruct astronomical signals are presented. Finally, astronomical maps produced by this map maker using real data acquired by BLAST are presented, with a discussion on non-physical map pathologies resulting from the data reduction pipeline and

  20. Structure variations of pumpkin balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, N.; Izutsu, N.; Honda, H.

    2004-01-01

    A lobed pumpkin balloon by 3-D gore design concept is recognized as a basic form for a super-pressure balloon. This paper deals with extensions of this design concept for other large pressurized membrane structures, such as a stratospheric airship and a balloon of which volume is controllable. The structural modifications are performed by means of additional ropes, belts or a strut. When the original pumpkin shape is modified by these systems, the superior characteristics of the 3-D gore design, incorporating large bulges with a small local radius and unidirectional film tension, should be maintained. Improved design methods which are adequate for the above subjects will be discussed in detail. Application for ground structures are also mentioned.

  1. Balloon Exoplanet Nulling Interferometer (BENI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Ford, Holland; Petro, Larry; Herman, Jay; Rinehart, Stephen; Carpenter, Kenneth; Marzouk, Joe

    2009-01-01

    We evaluate the feasibility of using a balloon-borne nulling interferometer to detect and characterize exosolar planets and debris disks. The existing instrument consists of a 3-telescope Fizeau imaging interferometer with 3 fast steering mirrors and 3 delay lines operating at 800 Hz for closed-loop control of wavefront errors and fine pointing. A compact visible nulling interferometer is under development which when coupled to the imaging interferometer would in-principle allow deep suppression of starlight. We have conducted atmospheric simulations of the environment above 100,000 feet and believe balloons are a feasible path forward towards detection and characterization of a limited set of exoplanets and their debris disks. Herein we will discuss the BENI instrument, the balloon environment and the feasibility of such as mission.

  2. NASA Aeronautics Showcased at Balloon Fiesta

    NASA Video Gallery

    Visitors at the 2010 International Balloon Fiesta in Albuquerque, N.M., got visual stimulation from hundreds of colorful hot-air balloons soaring skyward, but also learned about NASA's aeronautics ...

  3. Yellow Balloon in a Briar Patch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Frank; Fitzmaurice, Robert W.

    1978-01-01

    As part of a meteorology unit, sixth grade science students launched helium balloons with attached return postcards. This article describes Weather Service monitoring of the balloons and postcard return results. (MA)

  4. Astrophysical Observations with the HEROES Balloon-borne Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Colleen; Gaskin, J.; Christe, S.; Shih, A. Y.; Swartz, D. A.; Tennant, A. F.; Ramsey, B.

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) payload flew on a balloon from Ft. Sumner, NM, September 21-22, 2013. HEROES is sensitive from about 20-75 keV and comprises 8 optics modules, each consisting of 13-14 nickel replicated optics shells and 8 Xenon-filled position-sensitive proportional counter detectors. HEROES is unique in that it is the first hard X-ray telescope that will observe the Sun and astrophysical targets in the same balloon flight. Our astrophysics targets include the Crab nebula and pulsar and the black hole binary GRS 1915+105. In this presentation, I will describe the HEROES mission, the data analysis pipeline and calibrations, and preliminary astrophysics results.

  5. Astrophysical Observations with the HEROES Balloon-borne Payload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, C.; Gaskin, J.; Christe, S.; Shih, A. Y.; Swartz, D. A.; Tennant, A. F.; Ramsey, B.

    2014-01-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) payload flew on a balloon from Ft. Sumner, NM, September 21-22, 2013. HEROES is sensitive from about 20-75 keV and comprises 8 optics modules, each consisting of 13-14 nickel replicated optics shells and 8 Xenon-filled positionsensitive proportional counter detectors. HEROES is unique in that it is the first hard X-ray telescope that will observe the Sun and astrophysical targets in the same balloon flight. Our astrophysics targets include the Crab nebula and pulsar and the black hole binary GRS 1915+105. In this presentation, I will describe the HEROES mission, the data analysis pipeline and calibrations, and preliminary astrophysics results.

  6. Simulating payload mass and balloon rotation for equipment validation using hardware apparatus and custom software interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denney, Andrew

    The Gondola Mass Simulator and Balloon Suspension and Rotation Simulator were developed to aid in replicating the dynamics that occur during flight conditions, allowing for improved Rotator (Solar Point System) subsystem testing and preflight certification. Development of the two simulators along with their relationship to the each other such as balloon, flight train and payload characteristics will be discussed and final project analysis described. The Gondola Mass Simulator (GMS) is intended as a compact mechanical interface to simulate science payload weight, inertia and suspension type based on gondola dimension, mass, mounting, etc., alleviating the need of testing with actual science hardware. The GMS is used to assist in Rotator certification after Rotator refurbishment and with new fabrication or can be provided to an end-user for mass simulation. The CSBF GMS features include fixed and variable inertia adjustments, independent of weight; realistic suspension mounting, four attachment points (cable and rigid); and the provision of using ballast as the variable weighted component of the apparatus, allows easier in-field transport and utilization. Among the elements of the Rotator to be exercised based on the science payloads flight configuration, rotational rates, PWM gain, feedback stability, static friction, automated pointing and orientation, along with overall Rotator functionality can be verified. Equations used to determine weight location simulating payload mass and movement arm inertia will be included. In its initial design stage the Balloon Suspension and Rotation Simulator (BSRS) is intended as an electro-mechanical interface to simulate balloon rotation and suspension elements that arise during flight. Historically, the angular moment, positional changes and oscillatory movements encountered during flight are very unpredictable and therefore difficult to analytically reproduce. These behavioral aspects of the balloon movement can have an affect

  7. Background measurements from a balloon-borne staring sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, R. E.; Cook, F. H.; Yap, B. K.

    1981-07-01

    Several hours of data were gathered on three successful data flights conducted as part of the balloon altitude mosaic measurements (BAMM) program which was designed to collect spectral, spatial, and temporal statistics on the infrared Earth/atmospheric backgrounds. Two of these flights collected data on a wide range of infrared backgrounds characteristics of the Southwestern United States. A third mission provided statistics of the Gulf Coast region as well as solar specular reflections off land, water, and clouds. Measurements were made with a two-color SWIR radiometer and with a Michelson interferometer spectrometer covering the 2.5 to 5.5 micron region from float altitudes of 70,000 to 100,000 ft. Both instruments were spatially co-aligned such that their 4x4 mosaic focal planes projected over-lapping footprints on the ground simultaneously. Data collected on these flights were reduced and relevant statistics were compiled. Samples of the data and results are presented.

  8. History and perspectives of scientific ballooning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Frank

    2001-08-01

    Prehistory: Robertson, Biot and Gay-Lussac; Glaisher and the first studies of the atmosphere; Flammarion. The rebirth of scientific ballooning: polyethylene and mylar vehicles at Minneapolis. Super-pressurized balloons. The CNES and the Nasa programs; meteorology, aeronomy and astronomy, The Eole program. The Venus and Mars balloons in the French-Soviet space program. The future.

  9. 21 CFR 874.4100 - Epistaxis balloon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4100 Epistaxis balloon. (a) Identification. An epistaxis balloon is a device consisting of an inflatable balloon intended to control...

  10. 21 CFR 874.4100 - Epistaxis balloon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4100 Epistaxis balloon. (a) Identification. An epistaxis balloon is a device consisting of an inflatable balloon intended to control...

  11. Multicolour far infrared photometry of galactic H2 regions. [data acquisition using high altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olthof, H.

    1974-01-01

    Results are presented of far infrared photometric measurements of H2 regions in the galactic plane between longitudes 350 and 40 degrees. The results are combined from balloon flights in 1972 and 1973 carried out in cooperation with CNES in the south of France.

  12. Liquid helium cryopump and reliable opening device for a balloon-borne mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ingels, J; Arijs, E; Nevejans, D; Forth, H J; Schäfer, G

    1978-06-01

    The design, technical characteristics, and test and flight results of a liquid helium cryopump and an opening device operating on board a balloon-borne mass spectrometer combining a cryopump and a quadrupole mass filter are reported. The gas inlet of this mass spectrometer is opened through a simple and reliable remote-controlled system, which is also described.

  13. The first frontier: High altitude ballooning as a platform for student research experiences in science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Shane L.; Armstrong, John C.; Hiscock, William A.

    2009-06-01

    High altitude balloon platforms are ideal for providing hands-on research experiences for students in physics, atmospheric science, engineering, and other aerospace-related disciplines. We describe a basic high altitude balloon platform that can be constructed and operated by undergraduate students. The existing HARBOR and BOREALIS programs are used to illustrate some possible science and engineering research projects that students can pursue as part of a high-altitude flight program.

  14. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  15. Zodiac: A Balloon Facility for Exoplanet Debris Disk Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, S.; Traub, W.

    2010-10-01

    Zodiac is a telescope-coronagraph system, operating at visible wavelengths, mounted on a balloon-borne gondola in the stratosphere. The science objective is to image debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks, usually found in the outer reaches of a planetary system, are significant for exoplanet science because (a) they tell us that planet formation did actually get started around a star, (b) they are a contributing source of potentially obscuring dust to the inner part of the disk where we will someday start searching for terrestrial planets, and (c) for a disk with an inner edge, this feature is a signpost for a shepherding planet and thus a sign that planet formation did indeed proceed to completion around that star. The telescope has a 1-m diameter, clear-aperture primary mirror, designed to operate in the cold stratospheric environment. The coronagraph is designed to suppress starlight, including its diffracted and scattered components, and allow a faint surrounding debris disk to be imaged. We will control the speckle background to be about 7 orders of magnitude fainter than the star, with detection sensitivity about one more order of magnitude fainter, in order to comfortably image the expected brightness of typical debris disks. Zodiac will be designed to make scientifically useful measurements on a conventional overnight balloon flight, but would also be fully compatible with future Ultra Long Duration Balloon flights. Zodiac has a technical objective of advancing the technology levels of future mission components from the lab to near-space flight status. These components include deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, coronagraph masks, lightweight mirrors, precision pointing, and speckle rejection by wavefront control.

  16. Zodiac: A Balloon Facility for Exoplanet Debris Disk Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Traub, W.; Bryden, G.

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac is a telescope-coronagraph system, operating at visible wavelengths, mounted on a balloon-borne gondola in the stratosphere. The science objective is to image debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks, usually found in the outer reaches of a planetary system, are significant for exoplanet science because (a) they tell us that planet formation did actually get started around a star, (b) they are a contributing source of potentially obscuring dust to the inner part of the disk where we will someday start searching for terrestrial planets, and (c) for a disk with an inner edge, this feature is a signpost for a shepherding planet and thus a sign that planet formation did indeed proceed to completion around that star. The telescope has a 1-m diameter, clear-aperture primary mirror, designed to operate in the cold stratospheric environment. The coronagraph is designed to suppress starlight, including its diffracted and scattered components, and allow a faint surrounding debris disk to be imaged. We will control the speckle background to be about 7 orders of magnitude fainter than the star, with detection sensitivity about one more order of magnitude fainter, in order to comfortably image the expected brightness of typical debris disks. Zodiac will be designed to make scientifically useful measurements on a conventional overnight balloon flight, but would also be fully compatible with future Ultra Long Duration Balloon flights. Zodiac has a technical objective of advancing the technology levels of future mission components from the lab to near-space flight status. These components include deformable mirrors, wavefront sensors, coronagraph masks, lightweight mirrors, precision pointing, and speckle rejection by wavefront control. The research described in this talk was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  17. Balloon program for hard-X-ray astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontera, F.; dal Fiume, D.; Morelli, E.; Spada, G.

    1984-12-01

    The aims and progress of the program of balloon-borne NaI(Tl)-scintillator-array hard-X-ray (20-200-keV) astronomical observations using the payload described by Frontera et al. (1982) are surveyed, and some sample results from the three flights undertaken since 1980 are presented. The observations of the Crab pulsar in October 1980 are characterized in detail, and a power-law spectrum K(E/100) to the -alpha photons/sq cm s keV is derived, with K = 0.000637 + or - 0.000031 and alpha = 2.27 + or - 0.14.

  18. Pointing system for the balloon-borne astronomical payloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmal, Kaipacheri; Sreejith, Aickara Gopinathan; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Ambily, Suresh; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-10-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a light-weight, fully autonomous 2-axis pointing and stabilization system designed for balloon-borne astronomical payloads. The system is developed using off-the-shelf components such as Arduino Uno controller, HMC 5883L magnetometer, MPU-9150 inertial measurement unit, and iWave GPS receiver unit. It is a compact and rugged system which can also be used to take images/video in a moving vehicle or in real photography. The system performance is evaluated from the ground, as well as in conditions simulated to imitate the actual flight by using a tethered launch.

  19. Non-linear analysis and the design of Pumpkin Balloons: stress, stability and viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rand, J. L.; Wakefield, D. S.

    Tensys have a long-established background in the shape generation and load analysis of architectural stressed membrane structures Founded upon their inTENS finite element analysis suite these activities have broadened to encompass lighter than air structures such as aerostats hybrid air-vehicles and stratospheric balloons Winzen Engineering couple many years of practical balloon design and fabrication experience with both academic and practical knowledge of the characterisation of the non-linear viscoelastic response of the polymeric films typically used for high-altitude scientific balloons Both companies have provided consulting services to the NASA Ultra Long Duration Balloon ULDB Program Early implementations of pumpkin balloons have shown problems of geometric instability characterised by improper deployment and these difficulties have been reproduced numerically using inTENS The solution lies in both the shapes of the membrane lobes and also the need to generate a biaxial stress field in order to mobilise in-plane shear stiffness Balloons undergo significant temperature and pressure variations in flight The different thermal characteristics between tendons and film can lead to significant meridional stress Fabrication tolerances can lead to significant local hoop stress concentrations particularly adjacent to the base and apex end fittings The non-linear viscoelastic response of the envelope film acts positively to help dissipate stress concentrations However creep over time may produce lobe geometry variations that may

  20. Integrating Balloon and Satellite Operation Data Centers for Technology Readiness Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattiello-Francisco, Fátima; Fernandes, Jose Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric balloon-borne experiments have been one of the most effective ways to validate innovative space technology, taking the advantage of reduced development cycles and low cost in launching and operation. In Brazil, the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) has balloon and satellite ground infrastructures since the 1970´s and the 1990´s, respectively. In the recent past, a strategic approach was adopted on the modernization of balloon ground operation facilities for supporting the protoMIRAX experiment, an X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The strategic target was to reuse the SATellite Control System (SATCS), a software framework developed to control and monitor INPÉs satellites, for balloon operation. This paper presents the results of that effort and the new ongoing project, a computer-based framework named I2Bso, which strategic target is to Integrate INPÉs Balloon and Satellite Operation data centers. The I2Bso major purpose is to support the continuous assessment of an innovative technology after different qualification flights either on board balloons or satellites in order to acquire growing evidence for the technology maturity.

  1. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope: BLAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truch, Matthew D. P.; Ade, P. A. R.; Bock, J. J.; Chapin, E. L.; Chung, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Dicker, S.; Griffin, M.; Gundersen, J. O.; Halpern, M.; Hargrave, P. C.; Hughes, D. H.; Klein, J.; MacTavish, C. J.; Marsden, G.; Martin, P. G.; Martin, T. G.; Mauskopf, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Olmi, L.; Pascale, E.; Patanchon, G.; Rex, M.; Scott, D.; Semisch, C.; Thomas, N. E.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, G. S.; Viero, M. P.; Wiebe, D. V.

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) is a suborbital surveying experiment designed to study the evolutionary history and processes of star formation in local galaxies (including the Milky Way) and galaxies at cosmological distances. The BLAST continuum camera, which consists of 270 detectors distributed between three arrays, observes simultaneously in broadband (30%) spectral windows at 250, 350, and 500 microns. The optical design is based on a 2 m diameter telescope, providing a diffraction-limited resolution of 30" at 250 microns. The gondola pointing system enables raster mapping of arbitrary geometry, with a repeatable positional accuracy of 30"; postflight pointing reconstruction to <5" rms is achieved. The onboard telescope control software permits autonomous execution of a preselected set of maps, with the option of manual override. On this poster, we describe the primary characteristics and measured in-flight performance of BLAST. BLAST performed a test flight in 2003 and has since made two scientifically productive long-duration balloon flights: a 100 hour flight from ESRANGE (Kiruna), Sweden to Victoria Island, northern Canada in 2005 June; and a 250 hour, circumpolar flight from McMurdo Station, Antarctica in 2006 December. The BLAST collaboration acknowledges the support of NASA through grants NAG5-12785, NAG5-13301, and NNGO-6GI11G, the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Canada's Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), the Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Ontario Innovation Trust, the Puerto Rico Space Grant Consortium, the Fondo Institucional para la Investigacion of the University of Puerto Rico, and the National Science Foundation Office of Polar Programs.

  2. Numerical and experimental simulation of the mechanical behavior of super-pressure balloon subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siguier, J.; Guigue, P.; Karama, M.; Mistou, S.; Dalverny, O.; Granier, S.

    Long duration super-pressure balloons are a great challenge in scientific ballooning. Whatever the balloon type considered (spherical, pumpkin,...), it is necessary to have good knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the envelope regarding the flight level and the life-span of the balloon. For this reason CNES, ONERA and ENIT are carrying out a research program of modelization and experimentation in order to predict the envelope shape of a balloon in different conditions of temperature and differential pressure. On the one hand, we define the mechanical laws of envelope materials, that is the elasticity, plasticity and viscosity properties of polymers, and find the parameters of the law with unidirectional tests. These laws are introduced in a finite element code which predict the stress and strain state of a complex envelope structure. On the other hand, we are developing an experimental set-up to measure the 3D strain of a balloon sub-system, that is including the envelope, assemblies and apex parts, with realistic flight conditions. This facility, called NIRVANA, is a 1m3 vacuum chamber with cooled screens equipped with a stereoscopic CCD measurement system. We can submit a 1,5m diameter sample to differential pressure, regulate the temperature from +20°C to -120°C and apply a load to tendons of up to 6 tons if required. This paper presents the first results of the modelizations and m asurements of ane envelope sample submitted to axisymetrical stress due to the differential pressure. This sample consists of a 50μm multi-layer polymer film with an assembly, used in 10m diameter STRATEOLE super-pressure balloons. The modelization gives results which largely agree with the experiment and enable us to continue with cold conditions and more complex structures.

  3. A new starting point-the renewal project of chinese balloon facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yidong, Gu

    To meet the increasing requirements of scientific investigation by using balloons, Chinese Balloon Facility is carrying out a project to get the additional equipment with high performance, improve the existing facilities since 1995. Besides, because of the development of civil aviation in recent years, to meet the requirement of the authority of air traffic control, the Chinese balloon launch station at Xiang He must be moved to a new place. It is just an opportune moment to make a future program for Chinese scientific ballooning. The investigations and choices to a new launch site is in progress. We call these an Renewal Project of Chinese balloon Facility. It will be accomplished in 1997. The items of new manufactured and improved equipment involve: A new launch vehicle with launch capacity of 2 tons payload for dynamic launch. A new down-link data telecommunication system with bit rate of 256 Kbps. Improvements of the telemetry & tracking and telecommand facilities. To enlarge the storage of the amount of the lift gas To increase the carrying capacity of the recovery parachute. The candidates of the new launch site are located at Gu Cheng (37 deg47' N, 116 deg08' E) and Zheng Ding (38 deg30'N, 114 deg57'E), Hebei Province of China. One of them will be used for testing flights from Jun.,1997. The comprehensive conditions to air traffic control, the flight duration and recovery operations are expected to be considerably improved. The continuous efforts to improve the balloon film and to develop larger balloons were made for years. It is also described in this paper.

  4. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) Superpressure Balloon Payload

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boggs, Steven E.

    2014-08-01

    The Compton Spectrometer and Image (COSI) is a ULDB-borne soft gamma-ray telescope (0.2-5 MeV) designed to probe the origins of Galactic positrons, uncover sites of nucleosynthesis in the Galaxy, and perform pioneering studies of gamma-ray polarization in a number of source classes. COSI uses a compact Compton telescope design, resulting from a decade of development under NASA’s ROSES program - a modern take on techniques successfully pioneered by COMPTEL on CGRO. COSI performs groundbreaking science by combining improvements in sensitivity, spectral resolution, and sky coverage. The COSI instrument and flight systems have been designed for flight on NASA’s 18 MCF superpressure balloon (SPB). We are now beginning a series science flights to fulfill the COSI science goals: a SPB in 2014 from Antarctica, followed by two 100-day ULDB flights from New Zealand.COSI is a wide-field survey telescope designed to perform imaging, spectroscopy, and polarization measurements. It employs a novel Compton telescope design utilizing a compact array of cross-strip germanium detectors (GeDs) to resolve individual gamma-ray interactions with high spectral and spatial resolution. The COSI array is housed in a common vacuum cryostat cooled by a mechanical cryocooler. An active CsI Shield encloses the cryostat on the sides and bottom. The FoV of the instrument covers 25% of the full sky at a given moment.The COSI instrument builds upon considerable heritage from the previous Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) balloon instrument that underwent a successful technology demonstration flight in June 2005 from Fort Sumner, NM, a successful “first light” science flight from Fort Sumner in May 2009, and a launch campaign from Alice Springs, Australia in June 2010, where it unfortunately suffered a launch mishap. COSI has been upgraded from the previous NCT instrument by conversion to a detector configuration optimized for polarization sensitivity and addition of a cryocooler to remove

  5. The Louisiana ACES Student-built BalloonSat Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, B.; Giammanco, J.; Guzik, T. G.; Johnson, K.; Wefel, J. P.

    The Aerospace Catalyst Experiences for Students (ACES) pilot project was funded at Louisiana State University by NASA's National Space Grant College and Fellowship program during the 2002-2003 academic year with the primary goal of giving students a true hands-on experience with project management, life-cycle, experiment construction, data collection, analysis and interpretation. In this project students design, build, fly and analyze the data returned from small payloads (typical dimensions 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm, typical weight ˜ 500 grams) carried up to ˜ 100,000 feet by a helium-filled latex sounding balloon. During the pilot project the 13 students that participated in the program, grouped in 4 teams, built payloads that included studies in atmospheric science, cosmic rays and remote sensing. These payloads were then launched from the NASA National Scientific Balloon Facility in Palestine, Texas on May 21, 2003. Most recently, the LaACES (Louisiana ACES) program has been selected for funding by NASA. During LaACES we will expand the pilot program to institutions across the state including developing student training materials, holding a workshop for institution representatives, awarding payload development grants to student teams, monitoring the progress of these teams and supporting the balloon flight of the completed payloads. Here we describe the ACES pilot, the outcomes, and plans for La ACES.

  6. A method for balloon trajectory control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, K. M.; Heun, M. K.; Nock, K. T.

    A balloon trajectory control system is discussed that is under development for use on NASA's Ultra Long Duration Balloon Project. The trajectory control system exploits the natural wind field variation with altitude to generate passive lateral control forces on a balloon using a tether-deployed aerodynamic surface below the balloon. A lifting device, such as a wing on end, is suspended on a tether well beneath the balloon to take advantage of this variation in wind velocity with altitude. The wing generates a horizontal lift force that can be directed over a wide range of angles. This force, transmitted to the balloon by a tether, alters the balloon's path providing a bias velocity of a few meters per second to the balloon drift rate. The trajectory control system enables the balloon to avoid hazards, reach targets, steer around avoidance countries and select convenient landing zones. No longer will balloons be totally at the mercy of the winds. Tests in April 1999 of a dynamically-scaled model of the trajectory control system were carried out by Global Aerospace Corporation in ground level winds up to 15 m/s. The size of the scale model was designed to simulate the behavior of the full scale trajectory control system operating at 20 km altitude. The model confirmed many aspects of trajectory control system performance and the results will be incorporated into future development.

  7. 14 CFR 31.23 - Flight load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flight load factor. 31.23 Section 31.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.23 Flight load factor. In determining limit...

  8. 14 CFR 31.23 - Flight load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flight load factor. 31.23 Section 31.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.23 Flight load factor. In determining limit...

  9. 14 CFR 31.23 - Flight load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flight load factor. 31.23 Section 31.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.23 Flight load factor. In determining limit...

  10. 14 CFR 31.23 - Flight load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flight load factor. 31.23 Section 31.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.23 Flight load factor. In determining limit...

  11. 14 CFR 31.23 - Flight load factor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight load factor. 31.23 Section 31.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: MANNED FREE BALLOONS Strength Requirements § 31.23 Flight load factor. In determining limit...

  12. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallice, A.; Wienhold, F. G.; Hoyle, C. R.; Immler, F.; Peter, T.

    2011-06-01

    A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ~30-35 km altitude) is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI) campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s-1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s-1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study) in the orographically unperturbed mid-latitude middle troposphere.

  13. Epidemiology of hot-air balloon crashes in the U.S., 1984-88.

    PubMed

    Frankenfield, D L; Baker, S P

    1994-01-01

    Hot-air ballooning crashes in the U.S. during 1984-88 were examined using National Transportation Safety Board reports. The 138 crashes occurred most frequently during recreational flights (51% of the total) and paid rides (28%). A total of 480 persons were involved; 6 were killed and 123 seriously injured. Pilot error contributed to 88% of the crashes, and equipment failure or malfunction to 11%. Of the six fatal crashes, five involved collision with power lines. Crashes occurring outside optimal flying times accounted for 15% of the total. Pilots with 10 h or less flight time accounted for fewer than expected crashes. All five student pilots flying solo sustained serious injuries. Suggested prevention efforts include better training in avoidance of power lines and proper handling of rapid descents; more stringent and frequent flight testing of pilots; and a longer training period before granting pilot certificates. Attention should be given to delethalizing balloon crashes and encouraging the use of protective equipment.

  14. Ppi results from the balloon drop experiment of the hasi pressure profile instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkinen, T.; Lehto, A.; Salminen, P.; Leppelmeier, G.; Harri, A. M.

    1998-10-01

    At December 1995 a balloon drop experiment was conducted at León, Spain, for the HASI (Huygens Atmospheric Structure Instrument) instrument of the Huygens probe. A part of HASI is the Pressure Profile Instrument (PPI) which will measure the atmospheric pressure profile of Titan during the descent at November 2004. The experiment platform was carried by a balloon to an altitude of 30 km and it made a subsequent parachute-assisted descent. The pressure instrument functioned basically as expected. The vertical flight trajectory and pressure profile was reconstructed by using the collected data of the pressure instrument and the simultaneous temperature measurements. The calculated flight trajectory was in agreement with independent measurements with Omega and GPS. Some turbulence was detected near the surface and other dynamic behaviour in the upper part of the trajectory. The experiment demonstrated the nominal performance of the PPI instrument and serves as a real-like test flight for the actual mission.

  15. High Energy Cosmic Ray Electron Spectra measured from the ATIC Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, J.; Schmidt, W. K. H.; Adams, J. H.; Ahn, H. S.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Batkov, K. E.; Christl, M.; Fazely, A. R.; Ganel, O.; Gunasingha, R. M.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter Balloon Experiment (ATIC) is specifically designed for high energy cosmic ray ion detection. From simulation and a CERN beam test exposure we find that the design consisting of a graphite target and an energy detection device, a totally active calorimeter of BGO scintillator, gives us sufficient information to distinguish electrons from protons up to the TeV energy range. Balloon observations were successfully carried out over Antarctica in both 2000/2001 and 2002/2003 for a total of more than 35 days. This paper presents preliminary results on the spectrum of high energy electrons observed in the first ATIC flight.

  16. Balloon tracer for atmospheric pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Lichfield, E.W.; Ivey, M.D.; Zak, B.D.; Church, H.W.

    1985-01-01

    An operational prototype of the Balloon Tracer was developed and described. This prototype was designed to be capable of meeting all of the desired specifications for the Balloon Tracer. Its buoyancy adjustment subsystem is shown. Three Gilian instrument pumps operating in parallel provide a flow of about 12 litres per minute, depending upon backpressure. The miniature Klippard mechanical valves are actuated by a servo mechanism which only requires power when the state of the valves is being changed. The balloon itself for the operational prototype is just under 3 meters in diameter. A block diagram of the operational prototype payload measures ambient pressure, temperature, and humidity obtained from AIR which outputs its data in ASCII format. The vertical anemometer, which has a measured starting speed of under 2 cm/s, makes use of a Gill styrofoam propeller and a Spaulding Instruments rotation sendor. The command decoder is built around a chip developed originally for remote control television tuners. The command receiver operating on 13.8035 MHz was developed and built by Hock Engineering. The Argos transmitter is a Telonics platform transmitter terminal. The heart of the control system is an Intel 8052AH BASIC microcomputer with both random access and read only memory.

  17. Viscoelastic behaviour of pumpkin balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2008-11-01

    The lobes of the NASA ULDB pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloons are made of a thin polymeric film that shows considerable time-dependent behaviour. A nonlinear viscoelastic model based on experimental measurements has been recently established for this film. This paper presents a simulation of the viscoelastic behaviour of ULDB balloons with the finite element software ABAQUS. First, the standard viscoelastic modelling capabilities available in ABAQUS are examined, but are found of limited accuracy even for the case of simple uniaxial creep tests on ULDB films. Then, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model is implemented by means of a user-defined subroutine. This approach is verified by means of biaxial creep experiments on pressurized cylinders and is found to be accurate provided that the film anisotropy is also included in the model. A preliminary set of predictions for a single lobe of a ULDB is presented at the end of the paper. It indicates that time-dependent effects in a balloon structure can lead to significant stress redistribution and large increases in the transverse strains in the lobes.

  18. The data processor of the EUSO-Balloon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, V.; Osteria, G.

    2014-03-01

    The JEM-EUSO instrument is a wide-angle refractive telescope in near-ultraviolet wavelength region being proposed for attachment to the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) onboard International Space Station (ISS). The main scientific goal of the mission is the study of Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays (EECR) above 5 × 1019 eV. The instrument consists of high transmittance optical Fresnel lenses with a diameter of 2.5 m, a focal surface covered by ~ 5000 Multi Anode Photo Multiplier Tubes of 64 pixels, front-end readout, trigger and system electronics. The EUSO-Balloon experiment is a pathfinder mission in which a telescope of smaller dimension than the one designed for the ISS will be mounted onboard a stratospheric balloon. The main objective of this pathfinder mission, planned for 2014, is to perform a full scale end-to-end test of all the key technologies and instrumentation of JEM-EUSO detectors and to prove the global detection chain. Furthermore, EUSO-Balloon will measure the atmospheric and terrestrial UV background components, in different observational modes, fundamental for the development of the simulations. Through a series of stratospheric balloon flights performed by the French Space Agency CNES, EUSO-Balloon also has the potential to detect Extensive Air Showers from above, paving the way for any future large scale, space-based EECR observatory. In this paper we will present the Data Processor (DP) of EUSO-Balloon, which is the component of the Electronics System which performs the data management and the instrument control. More in detail, the DP controls the front-end electronics, performs the 2nd level trigger filtering, tags events with arrival time and payload position through a GPS system, manages the Mass Memory for data storage, measures live and dead time of the telescope, provides signals for time synchronization of the event, performs housekeeping monitor, and handles the interface to the telemetry system. The DP has to operate at high altitude

  19. Balloon borne arcsecond pointer feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Philip R.; Deweese, Keith D.

    2003-08-01

    A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which balloon vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. In this paper, the foundation for a high fidelity controller simulation is presented and it is shown that sub-arcsecond pointing stability can be achieved for a large instrument pointing at an inertial target. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is introduced with a coarse azimuth pointer and a pitch-yaw gimbal mount for fine pointing. An analysis and demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided along with a solution to eliminate static friction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. This paper establishes that the proposed control strategy can be made robustly stable with significant design margins. Also demonstrated is the efficacy of the proposed system in rejecting disturbances larger than those considered realistic.

  20. Three-meter balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, William F.; Fazio, G. G.; Harper, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    The Three-Meter Balloon-Borne Telescope is planned as a general purpose facility for making far-infrared and submillimeter astronomical observations from the stratosphere. It will operate throughout the spectral range 30 microns to 1 millimeter which is largely obscurred from the ground. The design is an f/13.5 Cassegrain telescope with an f/1.33 3-meter primary mirror supported with a 3-axis gimbal and stabilization system. The overall structure is 8.0 m high by 5.5 m in width by 4.0 m in depth and weighs 2000 kg. This low weight is achieved through the use of an ultra lightweight primary mirror of composite construction. Pointing and stabilization are achieved with television monitoring of the star field, flex-pivot bearing supports, gyroscopes, and magnetically levitated reaction wheels. Two instruments will be carried on each flight; generally a photometric camera and a spectrometer. A 64-element bolometer array photometric camera operating from 30 to 300 microns is planned as part of the facility. Additional instruments will be derived from KAO and other development programs.

  1. Biodegradable inflatable balloons for tissue separation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Arijit; Haim-Zada, Moran; Domb, Abraham J

    2016-10-01

    Confining radiation to a specific region (during radiation therapy) minimizes damage to surrounding tissues. Biodegradable inflatable balloons (bio-balloons) were developed. The device protects the normal tissues by increasing the gap between radiation source and critical structures. The radiation fades away while passing through the inflated balloon preventing the surrounding tissues from harmful radiation. These bio-balloons have also found clinical use to treat massive rotator cuff tear. This review summarizes the chemistry, engineering, and clinical development of these biomedical devices. These balloons are made of biodegradable polymers folded into the edge of a trocar and inserted between the tissues to be separated, and inflated by normal saline in the site of the application. The inserted balloon protects the tissues from radiation or mechanical stress. They remain inflated on site for two months and are finally eliminated within 12 months.

  2. Comparison of ozone measurement techniques using aircraft, balloon, and ground-based measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Reck, G. M.

    1977-01-01

    In order to verify the ultraviolet absorption technique used in the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program, two flight experiments were conducted employing several techniques, both in situ and remote, for measuring atmospheric ozone. The first experiment used the NASA CV-990 equipped with an ultraviolet absorption ozone monitor and an ultraviolet spectrophotometer, a balloon ozonesonde, and a Dobson station for determining and comparing the ozone concentration data. A second experiment compared ozone data from an automated sampling system aboard a B-747 with data from a manned system installed on the NASA CV-990 during a cross-country flight with both aircraft following the same flight path separated by 32 kilometers.

  3. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  4. The Electron Calorimeter (ECAL) Long Duration Balloon Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, T. G.; Adams, J. H.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Binns, W. R.; Chang, J.; Cherry, M. L.; Christl, M.; Dowkontt, P.; Ellison, B.; Isbert, J. B.; Israel, M. H.; Korotkova, N.; Panasyuk, M.; Panov, A.; Sokolskaya, N.; Stewart, M.; Watts, J.; Wefel, P.; Zatsepin, V.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate measurements of the cosmic ray electron energy spectrum in the energy region 50 GeV to greater than 1 TeV may reveal structure caused by the annihilation of exotic dark matter particles and/or individual cosmic ray sources. Here we describe a new long duration balloon (LDB) experiment, ECAL, optimized to directly measure cosmic ray electrons up to several TeV. ECAL includes a double layer silicon matrix, a scintillating optical fiber track imager, a neutron detector and a fully active calorimeter to identify more than 90% of the incident electrons with an energy resolution of about 1.7% while misidentifying only 1 in 200,000 protons and 0.8% of secondary gamma rays as electrons. Two ECAL flights in Antarctica are planned for a total exposure of 50 days with the first flight anticipate for December 2009.

  5. Balloon-assisted coil placement in wide-neck bifurcation aneurysms by use of a new, compliant balloon microcatheter.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Sebastian; Mounayer, Charbel; Piotin, Michel; Spelle, Laurent; Moret, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Two types of balloon are usually employed to perform balloon-assisted coil placement in cerebral aneurysms: oval, guide-dependent balloons for sidewall aneurysms and round balloons for bifurcation aneurysms. We report on the use of a new, more compliant, guide-dependent oval balloon microcatheter to seal wide-neck bifurcation aneurysms with coils during endovascular occlusion.

  6. Design considerations for a Martian Balloon Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redd, F.; Levesque, R. J.; Williams, G. E.

    1987-01-01

    The present NASA-sponsored design feasibility study for a balloon-borne sensor platform that is to be used over environmentally dissimilar sites on Mars gives attention to specific environmental and configurational parameters of a baseline balloon design, with a view to day/night altitude variations in response to temperature extremes. It is concluded that a Martian Balloon Rover can be developed using current technology; projected reductions in high-strength fabric density and radiation-resistant coatings will further enhance mission effectiveness, permitting either balloon size reductions or payload capacity increases.

  7. NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Thomas L.; Storey, Richard W.; Youngbluth, Otto

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon system operations are covered in this report for the period of 1979 through 1983. Meteorological data, ozone concentrations, and other data were obtained from in situ measurements. The large tethered balloon had a lifting capability of 30 kilograms to 2500 meters. The report includes descriptions of the various components of the balloon systems such as the balloons, the sensors, the electronics, and the hardware. Several photographs of the system are included as well as a list of projects including the types of data gathered.

  8. [Development of all-silicone detachable balloons].

    PubMed

    Machida, T; Aoki, S; Sasaki, Y; Sasaki, Y; Iio, M; Matsuno, A; Yoshida, S; Basugi, N

    1990-11-25

    Treatment of cerebral vascular lesions such as carotid cavernous sinus fistulas and giant aneurysms is now being performed with intravascular detachable balloon embolization techniques. We have developed several types of all-silicone detachable balloons. Our balloons have self-sealing valves (with or without collars) and detach with simple traction. The self-sealing valve is smaller than 0.6 mm and the balloon can easily be placed through a 7-F catheter. We started clinical trials and a representative case was reported.

  9. Innovative Balloon Buoyancy Techniques for Atmospheric Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J.

    2000-01-01

    Until quite recently, the only practical means to control balloon buoyancy, and thus altitude, required consuming large amounts of fuel or the limited venting of helium balloons and/or dropping of ballast. With recent discoveries at JPL, novel long-life, balloon buoyancy techniques have been discovered that for the first time allow balloons to float in the primarily hydrogen atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune (using ambient fill-gas), and by using renewable energy sources, allow multiple controlled landings on Venus (using atmospheric temperature differences), Mars (solar heat), Titan (RTG heat), and Earth (planet radiant heat).

  10. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Science from a Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Bruno, Robin; Unwin, Stephen; Backovsky, Stan; Brugarolas, Paul; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Chen, Pin; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Krist, John; Lillie, Charles; Macintosh, Bruce; Mawet, Dimitri; Mennesson, Bertrand; Moody, Dwight; Rey, Justin; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Stuchlik, David; Trauger, John; Vasisht, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed balloon-borne science investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. Zodiac II will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of a statistically significant sample of disks. These measurements will enable us to probe these fundamental questions: what do debris disks tell us about the evolution of planetary systems; how are debris disks produced; how are debris disks shaped by planets; what materials are debris disks made of; how much dust do debris disks make as they grind down; and how long do debris disks live? In addition, Zodiac II will observe hot, young exoplanets as targets of opportunity. The Zodiac II instrument is a 1.1-m diameter SiC (Silicone carbide) telescope and an imaging coronagraph on a gondola carried by a stratospheric balloon. Its data product is a set of images of each targeted debris disk in four broad visible-wavelength bands. Zodiac II will address its science questions by taking high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Mid-latitude flights are considered: overnight test flights in the US followed by half-global flights in the Southern Hemisphere. These longer flights are required to fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to Zodiac II. On these targets, it will be 100 times more sensitive than the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS); no existing telescope can match the Zodiac II contrast and resolution performance. A second objective of Zodiac II is to use the near-space environment to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of SiC mirrors, internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging.

  11. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Science from a Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Bruno, Robin; Unwin, Stephen; Backovsky, Stan; Brugarolas, Paul; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Chen, Pin; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Krist, John; Lillie, Charles; Macintosh, Bruce; Mawet, Dimitri; Mennesson, Bertrand; Moody, Dwight; Rahman, Zahidul; Rey, Justin; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Stuchlik, David; Trauger, John; Vasisht, Gautam

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed balloon-borne science investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. Zodiac II will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of a statistically significant sample of disks. These measurements will enable us to probe these fundamental questions: what do debris disks tell us about the evolution of planetary systems; how are debris disks produced; how are debris disks shaped by planets; what materials are debris disks made of; how much dust do debris disks make sa they grind down; and how long do debris disks live? In addition, Zodiac II will observe hot, young exoplanets as targets of opportunity. The Zodiac II instrument is a 1.1-m diameter SiC telescope and an imaging coronagraph on a gondola carried by a stratospheric balloon. Its data product is a set of images of each targeted debris disk in four broad visible wavelength bands. Zodiac II will address its science questions by taking high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Mid-latitude flights are considered: overnight test flights within the United States followed by half-global flights in the Southern Hemisphere. These longer flights are required to fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to Zodiac II. On these targets, it will be 100 times more sensitive than the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS); no existing telescope can match the Zodiac II contrast and resolution performance. A second objective of Zodiac II is to use the near-space environment to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of SiC mirrors, internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging.

  12. Balloon-borne CALET prototype payload (bCALET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueyama, Yoshitaka; Torii, Shoji; Kasahara, Katsuaki; Murakami, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Shunsuke; Akaike, Yosui; Nakai, Mikio; Aiba, Toshihide; Kai, Yuuichirou; Tamura, Tadahisa; Yoshida, Kenji; Katayose, Yusaku; Saito, Yoshitaka; Fuke, Hideyuki; Kawada, Jiro; Mizuta, Eiichi; Marrocchesi, Pier Simone; Kim, Meyoung; Bigongiari, Gabriele

    The CALorimetric Electron Telescope (CALET) payload will be installed in the Japanese Experiment Module Exposed Facility (JEM-EF) of the International Space Station (ISS). We have been developing a balloon borne payload to evaluate the performance of CALET by carring out precursor flights for the electron observation in 1-1000 GeV. The first flight of bCALET was done in 2006, and the enhanced version, bCALET-2, was successfully flown in 2009. In this paper, we describe the bCALET-3 payload which is composed of Imaging Calorimeter (IMC), Total Absorption Calorimeter (TASC) and Silicon pixel Array (SIA). IMC has an area of 320mm × 320mm, and is consisted 8 x-y layers of scintillating fiber belts inserted below tungsten plates for a fine imaging of shower particles. TASC is constructed by 6 layers of BGO scintillator blocks with an area of 300mm × 300mm, for measuring the total energy deposit of incoming shower particles. SIA owns to measure the charge number of incoming particle. Each component has very similar function with CALET with about half the area of CALET. We are planning to carry out the balloon experiment by bCALET-3 in November, 2010 for the test of the CALET capability of observing the electrons.

  13. Polar Balloon Experiment for Astrophysics Research (Polar BEAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bashindzhagyan, G.; Adams, James H., Jr.; Bashindzhagyan, P.; Chilingarian, A.; Donnelly, J.; Drury, L.; Egorov, N.; Golubkov, S.; Grebenyuk, V.; Kalinin, A.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A new balloon experiment is proposed for a long duration flight around the North Pole. The primary objective of the experiment is to measure the elemental energy spectra of high-energy cosmic rays in the region up to 10(exp 15) eV. The proposed instrument involves the combination of a large collecting area (approximately 1 x 1 square m) KLEM (Kinematic Lightweight Energy Meter) device with an ionization calorimeter having a smaller collecting area (approximately 0.5 x 0.5 square m) and integrated beneath the KLEM apparatus. This combination has several important advantages. Due to the large aperture (greater than 2 square m sr) of the KLEM device a large exposure factor can be achieved with a long duration balloon flight (2-4 weeks). The calorimeter will collect about 10% of the events already registered by KLEM and provide effective cross-calibration for both energy measurement methods. Details of the experiment and its astrophysical significance will be presented.

  14. Demonstration of a Balloon Borne Arc-second Pointer Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deweese, K.; Ward, P.

    Many designs for utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments have been proposed throughout the years A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement The test results of a demonstration prototype of the design with similar ability are also presented Discussion of a high fidelity controller simulation for design analysis is presented The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis A multiple controller scheme is utilized for coarse and fine pointing Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system with extensive flight history residing above the gondola structure A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors eliminating backlash problems An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static friction are provided A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static friction from the system dynamics A control scheme involving linear

  15. Electrodynamics of the Middle Atmosphere: Superpressure Balloon Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzworth, Robert H.

    1990-01-01

    This project called Electrodynamics of the Middle Atmosphere (EMA): Superpressure Balloon Program was begun by the PI at the Aerospace Corporation in Los Angeles under joint NSF and NASA funding originally combined in one grant ATM80-17071 and has continued at the University of Washington under grants ATM8212283, ATM84-11326 and ATM86-15628 and NASA grants NAGW-724 and NAGS-635. In the EMA experiment a comprehensive set of electrical parameters was measured during eight long-duration balloon flights in the Southern Hemisphere stratosphere. These flights resulted in the largest vector electric field data set ever collected from the stratosphere which has been a treasure-trove of new phenomena. Since the stratosphere has never been electrodynamically sampled in this systematic manner before, it is perhaps not surprising that several new discoveries have been made and reported. Another way to measure the success of this first EMA project is to note that all together the total data rate was about 1 bit/sec/payload amounting to 12 MBytes (1/3 of 1 standard 1600 BPI magnetic tape) which nevertheless has resulted in 14 papers and 2 masters theses (so far! . Ten of these papers and one masters thesis specifically acknowledge the support by NASA grant NAGS-635 are discussed herein.

  16. Engineering, Instrumentation, Systems Integration and Flight Support for Balloon Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-15

    Stauber/PSL , John R. Groand/PSL D. N. Wofford /PSL Ś.2 The only previous AFOL/P 1SI. contract related to and preceding the work herein summarized was the...204 University of New Mexico Albuquerque, NM 87131 4 J.C. Erickson/PSL 5 W.L. Craddock/PSL 6 J.R. Ground/PSL 7 A.D. Maio/PSL 8 Director/PSL 9 E.P Staubor/PSL 10 D.N. Wofford /PSL it J.W. Hungate/PSL 12 Project Library/PSL -12-

  17. Second Generation Prototype Design and Testing for a High Altitude Venus Balloon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, J. L.; Kerzhanovich, V. V.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Plett, G. A.; Said, M.; Fairbrother, D.; Sandy, C.; Frederickson, T.; Sharpe, G.; Day, S.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a second generation prototype balloon intended for flight in the upper atmosphere of Venus. The design of this new prototype incorporates lessons learned from the construction and testing of the first generation prototype, including finite element analyses of the balloon stresses and deformations, measured leak performance after handling and packaging, permeability and optical property measurements on material samples, and sulfuric acid testing. An improved design for the second generation prototype was formulated based on these results, although the spherical shape and 5.5 m diameter size were retained. The resulting balloon has a volume of 87 cubic meters and is capable of carrying a 45 kg payload at a 55 km altitude at Venus. The design and fabrication of the new prototype is described, along with test data for inflation and leakage performance.

  18. Design and construction of a carbon fiber gondola for the SPIDER balloon-borne telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler, J. D.; Ade, P. A. R.; Amiri, M.; Benton, S. J.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Bryan, S. A.; Chiang, C.; Contaldi, C. C.; Crill, B. P.; Doré, O. P.; Farhang, M.; Filippini, Jeffrey P.; Fissel, L. M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Gambrel, A. E.; Gandilo, N. N.; Golwala, S.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Halpern, M.; Hasselfield, M.; Hilton, G. C.; Holmes, W. A.; Hristov, V. V.; Irwin, K. D.; Jones, W. C.; Kermish, Z. K.; Kuo, C.-L.; MacTavish, C. J.; Mason, P. V.; Megerian, K. G.; Moncelsi, L.; Morford, T.; Nagy, J. M.; Netterfield, C. B.; Rahlin, A. S.; Reintsema, C. D.; Ruhl, J. E.; Runyan, M. C.; Shariff, J. A.; Trangsrud, A.; Tucker, C.; Tucker, R. S.; Turner, A. D.; Weber, A. C.; Wiebe, D. V.; Young, E. Y.

    2014-07-01

    We introduce the light-weight carbon fiber and aluminum gondola designed for the Spider balloon-borne telescope. Spider is designed to measure the polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation with unprecedented sensitivity and control of systematics in search of the imprint of inflation: a period of exponential expansion in the early Universe. The requirements of this balloon-borne instrument put tight constrains on the mass budget of the payload. The Spider gondola is designed to house the experiment and guarantee its operational and structural integrity during its balloon-borne flight, while using less than 10% of the total mass of the payload. We present a construction method for the gondola based on carbon fiber reinforced polymer tubes with aluminum inserts and aluminum multi-tube joints. We describe the validation of the model through Finite Element Analysis and mechanical tests.

  19. Balloon observations of Galactic cosmic ray helium before and during a Forbush decrease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clem, J. M.; Guzik, T. G.; Lijowski, M.; Wefel, J. P.; Beatty, J. J.; Ficenec, D. J.; Tobias, S.; Mitchell, J. W.; Mckee, S.; Nutter, S.

    1993-01-01

    The energy spectrum of Galactic cosmic ray helium was measured in two different balloon experiments launched four days apart from Canada: SMILI-I on Sept 1, 1989 and MASS on Sept 5, 1989. A slow Forbush decrease began on Sept 4, 1989 and had not reached its maximum at the time of the MASS flight. Comparison of the balloon measurements shows a fractional decrease of 0.37 to 0.15 in the Helium flux between 200 and 450 MeV/nucleon (1.2-2.0 GV). The rigidity dependence is analyzed in two models and found to be steeper than previous observations. Interplanetary particle data and ground-based Neutron Monitor results are consistent with the balloon observations. Probable sources for this Forbush decrease are discussed.

  20. Intragastric Balloons in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Papademetriou, Marianna; Popov, Violeta

    2017-04-01

    Cost-effective therapies to address the growing epidemic of obesity are a leading priority in modern medicine. Intragastric balloons (IGBs) are one such option, with increased effectiveness compared with pharmacotherapy and lifestyle and a lower rate of adverse events than bariatric surgery. IGBs are endoscopically placed or swallowed space-occupying devices in the stomach. Three IGB systems were approved in 2015 to 2016 by the Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States, with more devices nearing approval. This paper reviews the adverse events and efficacy of IGBs, and practice setup, management of common complications, and dietary advice for patients.

  1. Numerical and experimental simulation of the mechanical behavior of super-pressure balloon subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siguier, J.-M.; Guigue, P.; Karama, M.; Mistou, S.; Dalverny, O.; Granier, S.

    2004-01-01

    Long duration super-pressure balloons constitute a great challenge in scientific ballooning. For any type of balloons (spherical, pumpkin, …), it is necessary to have a good knowledge of the mechanical behavior of envelopes regarding the level and the lifetime of the flight. For this reason CNES, ONERA and ENIT are carrying out a research program of modelization and experimentation in order to predict the envelope shape of a balloon in different conditions of temperature and differential pressure. This study was conducted in two parts. During the first one, we defined, with parameters obtained from unidirectional tests, the mechanical laws (elasticity, plasticity and viscosity properties of polymers) of materials involved in the envelope. These laws are introduced in a finite element code, which predicts the stress and strain status of a complex envelope structure. During the second one, we developed an experimental set-up to measure the 3D strain on a balloon subsystem, which includes envelope, assemblies and apex parts, in real flight conditions. This facility, called NIRVANA, is a 1 m 3 vacuum chamber with cooled screens equipped with a stereoscopic CCD measurement system. A 1.5 m diameter sample can be tested under differential pressure, regulated temperature (from +20 to -120 °C) and a load (up to 6 tonnes) applied on tendons. This paper presents the first results obtained from the modelizations and measurements done on an envelope sample submitted to axisymmetrical stress due to the differential pressure. This sample consists of a 50 μm multilayer polymer film with an assembly, used in 10 m diameter STRATEOLE super-pressure balloons. The modelization gives results in good accordance with the experiments and will enable us to follow this work with cold conditions, time dependence (creeping) and more complex structures.

  2. Coriolis Mass-Flowmeter for aerostatic gas amount determination in zero pressure stratosperic balloons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-07-01

    The CNES ballooning community regularly operates zero pressure balloons in many countries around the world (recently in France, Sweden, Canada and soon, Australia in 2017). An important operational flight parameter is the aerostatic gas mass injected into the balloon (currently helium and hydrogen in the study). Besides the lifting force, it determines mainly the ascent rate from which the adiabatic expansion depends directly. A too high ascent velocity in very cold air temperature profiles could result in a gas temperature drop which if too great, might induce brittleness of the envelope. A precise gas mass determination is therefore critical for performance as well as for mission safety. The various gas supply tanks in various countries all have different characteristics with possible uncertainties with regard to their volumes. This makes the currently used gas mass determination method based on supply tank pressure measurements unreliable. This method also relies on tank temperature, another source of inaccuracy in the gas amount determination. CNES has therefore prospected for alternative methods to reduce inaccuracies and perhaps also ease the operational procedures during balloon inflation. Coriolis mass-flowmeters which have reached industrial maturity, offer the great advantage over other flowmeters to be able to directly measure the mass of the transferred fluid, and not deducing it from other parameters as other types of flowmeters would do. An industrial contractor has been therefore assigned to integrate this solution into the CNES operational setup. This new system is to be tested in February 2016. The presentation will briefly explain the Coriolis flowmeter's principle and display the February 2016 performance tests' results. The expected incidence on zero pressure balloons' trajectories will also be discussed based on simulations ran on a balloon flight simulator software.

  3. Finite element analysis of balloon-expandable coronary stent deployment: influence of angioplasty balloon configuration.

    PubMed

    Martin, David; Boyle, Fergal

    2013-11-01

    Today, the majority of coronary stents are balloon-expandable and are deployed using a balloon-tipped catheter. To improve deliverability, the membrane of the angioplasty balloon is typically folded about the catheter in a pleated configuration. As such, the deployment of the angioplasty balloon is governed by the material properties of the balloon membrane, its folded configuration and its attachment to the catheter. Despite this observation, however, an optimum strategy for modelling the configuration of the angioplasty balloon in finite element studies of coronary stent deployment has not been identified, and idealised models of the angioplasty balloon are commonly employed in the literature. These idealised models often neglect complex geometrical features, such as the folded configuration of the balloon membrane and its attachment to the catheter, which may have a significant influence on the deployment of a stent. In this study, three increasingly sophisticated models of a typical semi-compliant angioplasty balloon were employed to determine the influence of angioplasty balloon configuration on the deployment of a stent. The results of this study indicate that angioplasty balloon configuration has a significant influence on both the transient behaviour of the stent and its impact on the mechanical environment of the coronary artery.

  4. 21 CFR 874.4100 - Epistaxis balloon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Epistaxis balloon. 874.4100 Section 874.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4100 Epistaxis balloon. (a)...

  5. 21 CFR 874.4100 - Epistaxis balloon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Epistaxis balloon. 874.4100 Section 874.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4100 Epistaxis balloon. (a)...

  6. 21 CFR 874.4100 - Epistaxis balloon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Epistaxis balloon. 874.4100 Section 874.4100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Surgical Devices § 874.4100 Epistaxis balloon. (a)...

  7. A review of recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from high-altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews recent results in gamma-ray astronomy obtained from experiments flown on high-altitude balloons. New generation balloon-borne imaging experiments have produced the first gamma-ray maps of the Galactic center (GC) region. Balloon flights of new gamma-ray spectrometers with improved sensitivity have provided important new information on the GC annihilation line. For the first time, the narrow 511 keV line as been resolved (FWHM approx. = 3 keV). A very interesting spectral feature at approximately 170 keV has been attributed to backscattered annihilation, probably from the vicinity of a compact object. New results from the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO)/OSSE and Granat/SIGMA experiments on the annihilation line, when considered together with the recent balloon results, have added greatly to our knowledge and understanding of the origin and distribution of this emission. Balloon-borne instruments have made important measurements of gamma-ray continuum and line emission from SN 1987A. The GRIS spectrometer unambiguously resolved the 847 and 1238 keV line emission from radioactive Co-56 synthesized during the explosion. This data indicated that simple spherically symmetric and homogeneous models did not provide an adequate description of the expanding SN shell.

  8. Intra-aortic balloon pumps.

    PubMed

    1997-05-01

    Intra-aortic balloon pumps (IABPs) are circulatory assist devices used to treat a number of cardiovascular conditions. IABPs provide temporary circulatory support by reducing the resistance to blood flow out of the heart during systole and by providing added pressure to aid in perfusing the heart during diastole. In this Evaluation, we tested three IABPs from three suppliers. We examined the units' technical performance, safety and monitoring, human factors design, transport operation, and supplier support. Rather than test all the triggering (activation) modes available, we focused our testing on the modes most commonly used on each unit. We also provide information on an IABP currently available only in Japan; although we did not test this unit, we do provide a preliminary judgment based on the information provided to us by the supplier. In the Technology Overview also included in the Evaluation, we describe the basic operation and use of an IABP, as well as review the state of the art of this technology. And in the Selection, Purchasing, and Use Guide at the conclusion of the Evaluation, we discuss such topics as balloon costs and sizing, interfacing IABPs with patient monitors, and the use of IABPs in community hospitals.

  9. Background measurements from balloon-born imaging CZT detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Jonathan A.; Narita, Tomohiko; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Bloser, Peter F.; Stahle, Carl M.; Parker, Bradford H.; Barthelmy, Scott D.

    2003-03-01

    We report detector characteristics and background measurements from two prototype imaging CdZnTe (CZT) detectors flown on a scientific balloon payload in May 2001. The detectors are both platinum-contact 10 mm × 10 mm × 5 mm CZT crystals, each with a 4 × 4 array of pixels tiling the anode. One is made from IMARAD horizontal Bridgman CZT, the other from eV Products high-pressure Bridgman CZT. Both detectors were mounted side-by-side in a flip-chip configuration and read out by a 32-channel IDE VA/TA ASIC preamp/shaper. We enclosed the detectors in the same 40o field-of-view collimator used in our previously-reported September 2000 flight. I-V curves for the detectors are diode-like, and we find that the platinum contacts adhere significantly better to the CZT surfaces than gold to previosu detectors. The detectors and instrumentation performed well in a 20-hour balloon flight on 23/24 May 2001. Although we discovered a significant instrumental background component in flight, it was possible to measure and subtract this component from the spectra. The resulting IMARAD detector background spectrum reaches ~5×10-3 counts cm-2s-1keV-1 at 100 keV and has a power-law index of ~2 at hgih energies. The eV Products detector has a similar spectrum, although there is more uncertainty in the enregy scale because of calibration complications.

  10. OLIMPO: a balloon-borne, arcminute-resolution survey of the sky at mm and sub-mm wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masi, S.; Ade, P.; Boscaleri, A.; de Bernardis, P.; de Petris, M.; de Troia, G.; Fabrini, M.; Iacoangeli, A.; Lamagna, L.; Lange, A.; Lubin, P.; Mauskopf, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Melchiorri, F.; Nati, L.; Nati, F.; Orlando, A.; Piacentini, F.; Pierre, M.; Pisano, G.; Polenta, G.; Rephaeli, Y.; Romeo, G.; Salvaterra, L.; Savini, G.; Valiante, E.; Yvon, D.

    2003-08-01

    We describe OLIMPO, a balloon-borne telescope devoted to cosmological and astrophysical surveys in the mm and sub-mm range. We summarize the relevant science (principally surveys of SZ clusters, of the sub-mm cosmic background and observations of galactic and cirrus dust) and the innovative sub-systems we have developed. The test flight of the telescope is planned for July 2004; the long duration flight is planned for the end of 2005.

  11. A Balloon-Borne, Advanced Scintillator Compton Telescope with Silicon Photomultiplier Readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloser, Peter

    We propose to continue our development of new medium-energy gamma-ray instrumentation by constructing and flying a balloon- borne Compton telescope using advanced scintillator materials combined with silicon photomultiplier readouts. There is an urgent need in high-energy astronomy for a medium-energy gamma-ray mission covering the energy range from 0.4 - 20 MeV to follow the success of the COMPTEL instrument on CGRO. Judging by the Astro2010 Decadal Survey and subsequent Physics of the Cosmos technology report, such a mission will have to fit within the Explorer Program, or be realizable using a series of ultra-long duration balloon (ULDB) flights, if it is to become reality in the foreseeable future. This in turn will require the use of relatively robust, low- cost, off-the-shelf technologies that can nonetheless achieve at least an order of magnitude improvement in sensitivity over COMPTEL. Fortunately, high-performance scintillators, such as Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), Cerium Bromide (CeBr3), and p-terphenyl, and compact readout devices, such as silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), are already commercially available and capable of meeting this need. In previous work we have demonstrated that a Compton telescope consisting of an organic scintillator scattering layer and a LaBr3 calorimeter effectively rejects background under balloon-flight conditions, using time-of-flight (ToF) discrimination. In separate work, we have shown that the combination of LaBr3 scintillator with a SiPM readout performs well as a gamma-ray spectrometer, and that SiPM readouts can effectively perform pulseshape discrimination (PSD) using organic scintillators such as stilbene. Finally, through the Gamma-Ray Polarimeter Experiment (GRAPE) balloon program we have flightvalidated a balloon gondola suitable for ULDB missions, including rough pointing, aspect determination, and telemetry systems. We now propose to combine these efforts. We will construct an Advanced Scintillator Compton

  12. Primary cosmic ray particles with z 35 (VVH particles). [very heavy particle detection by high altitude balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanford, G. E., Jr.; Friedlander, M. W.; Hoppe, M.; Klarmann, J.; Walker, R. M.; Wefel, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    Large areas of nuclear emulsions and plastic detectors were exposed to the primary cosmic radiation during high altitude balloon flights. From the analysis of 141 particle tracks recorded during a total exposure of 1.3 x 10 to the 7th power sq m ster.sec., a charge spectrum of the VVH particles has been derived.

  13. Utilization of sounding rockets and balloons in the German Space Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preu, Peter; Friker, Achim; Frings, Wolfgang; Püttmann, Norbert

    2005-08-01

    Sounding rockets and balloons are important tools of Germany's Space Programme. DLR manages these activities and promotes scientific experiments and validation programmes within (1) Space Science, (2) Earth Observation, (3) Microgravity Research and (4) Re-entry Technologies (SHEFEX). In Space Science the present focus is at atmospheric research. Concerning Earth Observation balloon-borne measurements play a key role in the validation of atmospheric satellite sounders (ENVISAT). TEXUS and MAXUS sounding rockets are successfully used for short duration microgravity experiments. The Sharp Edge Flight Experiment SHEFEX will deliver data from a hypersonic flight for the validation of a new Thermal Protection System (TPS), wind tunnel testing and numerical analysis of aerothermodynamics. Signing the Revised Esrange and Andøya Special Project (EASP) Agreement 2006-2010 in June 2004 Germany has made an essential contribution to the long-term availability of the Scandinavian ranges for the European science community.

  14. Data Retrieved by ARCADE-R2 Experiment On Board the BEXUS-17 Balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbetta, M.; Branz, F.; Carron, A.; Olivieri, L.; Prendin, J.; Sansone, F.; Savioli, L.; Spinello, F.; Francesconi, A.

    2015-09-01

    The Autonomous Rendezvous, Control And Docking Experiment — Reflight 2 (ARCADE-R2) is a technology demonstrator aiming to prove automatic attitude determination and control, rendezvous and docking capabilities for small scale spacecraft and aircraft. The development of such capabilities could be fundamental to create, in the near future, fleets of cooperative, autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles for mapping, surveillance, inspection and remote observation of hazardous environments; small-class satellites could also benefit from the employment of docking systems to extend and reconfigure their mission profiles. ARCADE-R2 is designed to test these technologies on a stratospheric flight on board the BEXUS-17 balloon, allowing to demonstrate them in a harsh environment subjected to gusty winds and high pressure and temperature variations. In this paper, ARCADE-R2 architecture is introduced and the main results obtained from a stratospheric balloon flight are presented.

  15. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimetre Telescope (BLAST) and BLASTPol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale, Enzo; Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Balloon observations from Antarctica have proven an effective and efficient way to address open Cosmological questions as well as problems in Galactic astronomy. The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimetre Telescope (BLAST) is a sub-orbital mapping experiment which uses 270 bolometric detectors to image the sky in three wavebands centred at 250, 350 and 500 μm with a 1.8 m telescope. In the years before Herschel launched, BLAST provided data of unprecedented angular and spectral coverage in frequency bands close to the peak of dust emission in star forming regions in our Galaxy, and in galaxies at cosmological distances. More recently, BLASTPol was obtained by reconfiguring the BLAST focal plane as a submillimetric polarimeter to study the role that Galactic magnetic fields have in regulating the processes of star-formation. The first and successful BLASTPol flight from Antarctica in 2010 is followed by a second flight, currently scheduled for the end of 2012.

  16. Development of EXITE3, Imaging Detectors and a Long Duration Balloon Gondola

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In this Report we summarize the work conducted for the EXITE program under grant NAG5-5103. This grant supported the ongoing EXITE program at Harvard for the development of imaging hard x-ray detectors and telescopes over the 3 year period 1997-2000 with a one year extension to 2001 to transition to the next SR&T grant in this program. Work was conducted in three major parts: analysis of the EXITE2 balloon flight data (from our May 1997 flight); development of pixellated imaging Cd-Zn-Te detector arrays and readout systems for the proposed EXITE3 detector and telescope; and development of systems for a Long Duration Balloon (LDB) gondola. Progress on all three major aspects of this research is summarized for each of the years of this grant.

  17. A Low-Cost Sounding Balloon Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saba, Marcelo M. F.; Mirisola, Luiz G. B.; Iguchi, Marcio

    2005-12-01

    Watching the meteorological balloons customarily launched from our city, we wondered how we could develop an experiment to allow our students to effectively gather data about the low atmosphere and at the same time ke6ep our limited financial budget. When you hear about atmospheric balloons, you usually think about balloons with large envelopes of nylon or mylar with payloads between 1 or 10 kg. They ascend to very high altitudes, have a data radio transmitter, and are not recoverable. This setup would be too expensive for us. In order to keep the cost low, the payload containing the data recorded had to be recovered, and therefore, the balloon must not go tens of kilometers away. We ruled out tethered balloons, which would not have recovery problems but can hardly go beyond 100 m high because of the weight of the tether and of lateral winds. Based on some estimates of ascension speed for small balloons and probable horizontal wind intensities, we decided that in order to easily recover the payload we had to limit its ascension to about 2 km high. At this altitude, the payload would have to be released from the balloon by means of a timer.

  18. Scientific ballooning on a shoestring budget: The Montana Space Grant Consortium's BOREALIS program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klumpar, D.; Kirn, S.; Hiscock, W.

    High altitude ballooning using Latex weather balloons provides frequent and low cost opportunities to carry small meaningful scientific payloads to well in excess of 100,000 feet. Maximizing payload scientific capability requires utilization of the newest available miniature, low-power, light-weight technologies to minimize system mass and size. The Balloon Outreach, Research, Exploration And Land Imaging System (BOREALIS) program of the Montana Space Grant Consortium has provided for undergraduate student teams to build payload systems up to 5.4 kg to conduct high altitude flight experiments. In the university setting such a program provides direct experience to students in the fabrication and operation of (near)space flight systems and payloads, and subsequent analysis of the scientific data. Over the course of the past three years 19 successful balloon flights have been conducted, with full payload recovery, reaching altitudes in excess of 110,000 feet, providing rewarding and exciting developmental test flights for satellite subsystems and mini-science missions to the edge of space. Missions have included measurement of Ozone altitude profiles, UV and Cosmic Ray fluxes, and atmospheric temperature and pressure soundings. In addition to providing hands on training at our colleges and universities for future scientists and engineers; by involving the public, a much larger audience is exposed to the scientific research process. In this paper we describe our methodologies and program accomplishments, including the design of a payload support system utilizing commercially available subsystems. More information may be found at http://spacegrant.montana.edu/borealis/index.asp

  19. A balloon-borne aerosol spectrometer for high altitude low aerosol concentration measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, G.S. ); Weiss, R.E. )

    1990-08-01

    Funded by Air Force Wright Aeronautical Laboratory, a new balloon-borne high altitude aerosol spectrometer, for the measurement of cirrus cloud ice crystals, has been developed and successfully flown by Sandia National Laboratories and Radiance Research. This report (1) details the aerosol spectrometer design and construction, (2) discusses data transmission and decoding, (3) presents data collected on three Florida flights in tables and plots. 2 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Fracture characteristics of balloon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc A.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt was made to determine the failure modes of high altitude scientific balloons through an investigation of the fracture characteristics of the thin polyethylene films. Two films were the subject of the evaluation, Winzen Int.'s Stratafilm SF-85 and Raven Industries' Astro-E. Research began with an investigation of the film's cold brittleness point and it's effect on the ultimate strength and elasticity of the polyethylene film. A series of preliminary investigations were conducted to develop an understanding of the material characteristics. The primary focus of this investigation was on the notch sensitivity of the films. Simple stress strain tests were also conducted to enable analysis employing fracture toughness parameters. Studies were conducted on both film types at 23 C (room temperature), -60 C, -90 C, and -120 C.

  1. The testing of balloon fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Junius David; Moore, Irwin L

    1920-01-01

    Report describes methods and materials used in waterproofing and fireproofing airplane fabrics using dopes. The determination of the probable life of a balloon fabric in service by experimental means is of great value in choosing the most suitable fabrics for a given purpose and in pointing the way to improvements in compounding and construction. The usefulness of exposure to the weather for this purpose has been amply demonstrated. Various attempts have been made to reproduce by artificial means the conditions promoting deterioration in service, but without marked success. Exposure to the weather remains the most satisfactory method for this purpose, and a consideration of the characteristics of such tests is therefore important. This report presents the results of a typical series of exposure tests made in 1917.

  2. Collection of Stratospheric Samples using Balloon-Borne Payload System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant; Sreejith, A. G.; Kumble, Sheshashayi; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Kj, Nirmal; Suresh, Ambily; Chakravortty, Dipshikha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere at stratospheric altitudes contains dust particles from soil lifted by weather, volcanic dust, man-made aerosols, IDP (Interplanetary Dust Particles) - remnants of comets and asteroids, and even interstellar dust. Satellite observations suggest that approximately 100--300 tons of cosmic dust enter Earth's atmosphere every day. However, very little is known about the microbial life in the upper atmosphere, where conditions are very much similar to that on Mars and possibly on some exoplanets. Stratosphere provides a good opportunity to study the existence or survival of biological life in these conditions. Despite the importance of this topic to astrobiology, stratospheric microbial diversity/survival remains largely unexplored, probably due to significant difficulties in the access and ensuring the absence of contamination of the samples. To conduct a detailed study into this, we are developing the balloon-borne payload system SAMPLE (Stratospheric Altitude Microbiology Probe for Life Existence) to collect dust samples from stratosphere and bring them in an hygienic and uncontaminated manner to a suitable laboratory environment, where further study will be conducted to establish the possibility of microbial life in the upper atmosphere. This balloon-borne payload system will rise through the atmosphere till it reaches an altitude of about 25-30 km above sea level. The payload consists of detachable pre-sterilized sampling chambers designed to collect and contain the dust samples and get them back to the surface without contamination during the flight, a microprocessor and a controller which will determine the altitude of the payload system to actively monitor the opening and closing of the sample collection chambers. For contamination control, we will have two extra chambers, one of which will fly but not open, and one will remain closed on the ground. Other onboard devices include environmental sensors, GPS tracking devices, cameras to monitor

  3. Multiorder etalon sounder (MOES) development and test for balloon experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hays, Paul B.; Wnag, Jinxue; Wu, Jian

    1993-01-01

    concept and laboratory experiments were worked on for the past several years. Both theoretical studies and laboratory prototype experiments showed that MOES is very competitive compared with other high resolution sounders in terms of complexity and performance and has great potential as a compact and rugged high resolution atmospheric temperature and trace species sounder from the polar platform or the geostationary platform. The logical next step is to convert our laboratory prototype to a balloon instrument, so that field test of MOES can be carried out to prove the feasibility and capability of this new technology. Some of the activities related to the development of MOES for a possible balloon flight demonstration are described. Those research activities include the imaging quality study on the CLIO, the design and construction of a MOES laboratory prototype, the test and calibration of the MOES prototype, and the design of the balloon flight gondola.

  4. Accurate Determination of the Volume of an Irregular Helium Balloon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenthal, Jack; Bradvica, Rafaela; Karl, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper, Zable described an experiment with a near-spherical balloon filled with impure helium. Measuring the temperature and the pressure inside and outside the balloon, the lift of the balloon, and the mass of the balloon materials, he described how to use the ideal gas laws and Archimedes' principal to compute the average molecular…

  5. Investigating Diffusion and Entropy with Carbon Dioxide-Filled Balloons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jadrich, James; Bruxvoort, Crystal

    2010-01-01

    Fill an ordinary latex balloon with helium gas and you know what to expect. Over the next day or two the volume will decrease noticeably as helium escapes from the balloon. So what happens when a latex balloon is filled with carbon dioxide gas? Surprisingly, carbon dioxide balloons deflate at rates as much as an order of magnitude faster than…

  6. Modular and Reusable Power System Design for the BRRISON Balloon Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truesdale, Nicholas A.

    High altitude balloons are emerging as low-cost alternatives to orbital satellites in the field of telescopic observation. The near-space environment of balloons allows optics to perform near their diffraction limit. In practice, this implies that a telescope similar to the Hubble Space Telescope could be flown for a cost of tens of millions as opposed to billions. While highly feasible, the design of a balloon telescope to rival Hubble is limited by funding. Until a prototype is proven and more support for balloon science is gained, projects remain limited in both hardware costs and man hours. Thus, to effectively create and support balloon payloads, engineering designs must be efficient, modular, and if possible reusable. This thesis focuses specifically on a modular power system design for the BRRISON comet-observing balloon telescope. Time- and cost-saving techniques are developed that can be used for future missions. A modular design process is achieved through the development of individual circuit elements that span a wide range of capabilities. Circuits for power conversion, switching and sensing are designed to be combined in any configuration. These include DC-DC regulators, MOSFET drivers for switching, isolated switches, current sensors and voltage sensing ADCs. Emphasis is also given to commercially available hardware. Pre-fabricated DC-DC converters and an Arduino microcontroller simplify the design process and offer proven, cost-effective performance. The design of the BRRISON power system is developed from these low-level circuits elements. A board for main power distribution supports the majority of flight electronics, and is extensible to additional hardware in future applications. An ATX computer power supply is developed, allowing the use of a commercial ATX motherboard as the flight computer. The addition of new capabilities is explored in the form of a heater control board. Finally, the power system as a whole is described, and its overall

  7. Balloon UV experiments for astronomical and atmospheric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A. G., Sreejith; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; K., Nirmal; Ambily, S.; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-08-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) window has been largely unexplored through balloons for astronomy. We discuss here the development of a compact near-UV spectrograph with fiber optics input for balloon flights. It is a modified Czerny-Turner system built using off-the-shelf components. The system is portable and scalable to different telescopes. The use of reflecting optics reduces the transmission loss in the UV. It employs an image-intensified CMOS sensor, operating in photon counting mode, as the detector of choice. A lightweight pointing system developed for stable pointing to observe astronomical sources is also discussed, together with the methods to improve its accuracy, e.g. using the in-house build star sensor and others. Our primary scientific objectives include the observation of bright Solar System objects such as visible to eye comets, Moon and planets. Studies of planets can give us valuable information about the planetary aurorae, helping to model and compare atmospheres of other planets and the Earth. The other major objective is to look at the diffuse UV atmospheric emission features (airglow lines), and at column densities of trace gases. This UV window includes several lines important to atmospheric chemistry, e.g. SO2, O3, HCHO, BrO. The spectrograph enables simultaneous measurement of various trace gases, as well as provides better accuracy at higher altitudes compared to electromechanical trace gas measurement sondes. These lines contaminate most astronomical observations but are poorly characterized. Other objectives may include sprites in the atmosphere and meteor ashes from high altitude burn-outs. Our recent experiments and observations with high-altitude balloons are discussed.

  8. Innovations in Balloon Catheter Technology in Rhinology.

    PubMed

    D'Anza, Brian; Sindwani, Raj; Woodard, Troy D

    2017-03-31

    Since being introduced more than 10 years ago, balloon catheter technology (BCT) has undergone several generations of innovations. From construction to utilization, there has been a myriad of advancements in balloon technology. The ergonomics of the balloon dilation systems have improved with a focus on limiting the extra assembly. "Hybrid" BCT procedures have shown promise in mucosal preservation, including treating isolated complex frontal disease. Multiple randomized clinical trials report improved long-term outcomes in stand-alone BCT, including in-office use. The ever-expanding technological innovations ensure BCT will be a key component in the armamentarium of the modern sinus surgeon.

  9. Stratospheric electric field measurements with transmediterranean balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Morena, B. A.; Alberca, L. F.; Curto, J. J.; Holzworth, R. H.

    1993-01-01

    The horizontal component of the stratospheric electric field was measured using a balloon in the ODISEA Campaign of Transmediterranean Balloon Program. The balloon flew between Trapani (Sicily) and El Arenosillo (Huelva, Spain) along the 39 deg N parallel at a height between 34 and 24 km. The high values found for the field on fair-weather and its quasi-turbulent variation, both in amplitude and direction, are difficult to explain with the classical electric field source. A new source, first described by Holzworth (1989), is considered as possibly causing them.

  10. A comparative study of internally and externally capped balloons using small scale test balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Douglas P.

    1994-01-01

    Caps have been used to structurally reinforce scientific research balloons since the late 1950's. The scientific research balloons used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) use internal caps. A NASA cap placement specification does not exist since no empirical information exisits concerning cap placement. To develop a cap placement specification, NASA has completed two in-hangar inflation tests comparing the structural contributions of internal caps and external caps. The tests used small scale test balloons designed to develop the highest possible stresses within the constraints of the hangar and balloon materials. An externally capped test balloon and an internally capped test balloon were designed, built, inflated and simulated to determine the structural contributions and benefits of each. The results of the tests and simulations are presented.

  11. A new stratospheric sounding platform based on unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) droppable from meteorological balloon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efremov, Denis; Khaykin, Sergey; Lykov, Alexey; Berezhko, Yaroslav; Lunin, Aleksey

    High-resolution measurements of climate-relevant trace gases and aerosols in the upper troposphere and stratosphere (UTS) have been and remain technically challenging. The high cost of measurements onboard airborne platforms or heavy stratospheric balloons results in a lack of accurate information on vertical distribution of atmospheric constituents. Whereas light-weight instruments carried by meteorological balloons are becoming progressively available, their usage is constrained by the cost of the equipment or the recovery operations. The evolving need in cost-efficient observations for UTS process studies has led to development of small airborne platforms - unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), capable of carrying small sensors for in-situ measurements. We present a new UAV-based stratospheric sounding platform capable of carrying scientific payload of up to 2 kg. The airborne platform comprises of a latex meteorological balloon and detachable flying wing type UAV with internal measurement controller. The UAV is launched on a balloon to stratospheric altitudes up to 20 km, where it can be automatically released by autopilot or by a remote command sent from the ground control. Having been released from the balloon the UAV glides down and returns to the launch position. Autopilot using 3-axis gyro, accelerometer, barometer, compas and GPS navigation provides flight stabilization and optimal way back trajectory. Backup manual control is provided for emergencies. During the flight the onboard measurement controller stores the data into internal memory and transmits current flight parameters to the ground station via telemetry. Precise operation of the flight control systems ensures safe landing at the launch point. A series of field tests of the detachable stratospheric UAV has been conducted. The scientific payload included the following instruments involved in different flights: a) stratospheric Lyman-alpha hygrometer (FLASH); b) backscatter sonde; c) electrochemical

  12. GRAINE project: The first balloon-borne, emulsion gamma-ray telescope experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Satoru; Aoki, Shigeki; Kamada, Keiki; Mizutani, Saki; Nakagawa, Ryo; Ozaki, Keita; Rokujo, Hiroki

    2015-04-01

    The GRAINE project (Gamma-Ray Astro-Imager with Nuclear Emulsion) has been developed for the observation of cosmic γ-rays in the energy range 10 MeV-100 GeV with a precise (0.08°} at 1-2 GeV), polarization-sensitive, large-aperture-area (˜10 m^2) emulsion telescope by repeated long-duration balloon flights. In 2011, the first balloon-borne experiment was successfully performed with a 12.5 × 10cm^2 aperture area and 4.6 hour flight duration for a feasibility and performance test. Systematic detection, energy reconstruction, and timestamping of γ-ray events were performed across the whole area of the emulsion film, up to 45° incident zenith angle, down to 50 MeV γ-ray energy, with 97% detection reliability, 0.2 sec timestamp accuracy, and 98% timestamp reliability. A γ-ray data checking and calibration method was created using the γ-rays produced in the converter. We measured the atmospheric γ-ray flux in the energy range 50-300 MeV and obtained a first understanding of the cosmic γ-ray background. By combining the attitude data, we established a procedure for determining the γ-ray arrival direction in celestial coordinates. The first flight of the balloon-borne emulsion telescope confirmed its potential as a high-performance cosmic γ-ray detector.

  13. The 37-day flight of CREAM during the 2009-2010 austral summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Eun-Suk

    The balloon-borne Cosmic Ray Energetics And Mass (CREAM) experiment was launched from McMurdo Station Antarctica on December 1, 2009, an early-launch record for Antarctic Long Duration Balloon (LDB) flights. A cumulative exposure of ˜ 156 days was achieved when this 37-day fifth flight of CREAM was terminated over the Ross Ice Shelf on January 8, 2010. Combining a sampling calorimeter for energy measurement with multiple charge detectors for particle identification, CREAM-V provided a large data sample to measure elemental spectra for 1 ≤ Z ≤ 26 in energies above 1014 eV. This was the first time that CREAM was supported with the standard Support Instrumentation Package (SIP) for LDB payloads. The first four flights were supported by the Command and Data Module (CDM) developed by the NASA Wallops Flight Facility for Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) flights. The instrument performance, results from the ongoing data analysis, and future plans will be presented.

  14. Flight Project Data Book

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) is responsible for the overall planning, directing, executing, and evaluating that part of the overall NASA program that has the goal of using the unique characteristics of the space environment to conduct a scientific study of the universe, to understand how the Earth works as an integrated system, to solve practical problems on Earth, and to provide the scientific and technological research foundation for expanding human presence beyond Earth orbit into the solar system. OSSA guides its program toward leadership through its pursuit of excellence across the full spectrum of disciplines. OSSA pursues these goals through an integrated program of ground-based laboratory research and experimentation, suborbital flight of instruments on airplanes, balloons, and sounding rockets; flight of instruments and the conduct of research on the Shuttle/Spacelab system and on Space Station Freedom; and development and flight of automated Earth-orbiting and interplanetary spacecraft. The OSSA program is conducted with the participation and support of other Government agencies and facilities, universities throughout the United States, the aerospace contractor community, and all of NASA's nine Centers. In addition, OSSA operates with substantial international participation in many aspects of our Space Science and Applications Program. OSSA's programs currently in operation, those approved for development, and those planned for future missions are described.

  15. Performance, Goals, and Status of the Upcoming Nuclear Compton Telescope Balloon Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowell, Alexander; Barriere, N.; Boggs, S. E.; Tomsick, J.; von Doetinchem, P.; Zoglauer, A.; Amman, M.; Luke, P.; Jean, P.; von Ballmoos, P.; Chang, H.; Chiu, J.; Yang, C.; Shang, J.; Lin, C. H.; Chou, Y.; Chang, Y. H.

    2013-04-01

    The Nuclear Compton Telescope (NCT) is a wide-field gamma-ray imager utilizing state of the art, cross-strip germanium detectors for Compton imaging of astrophysical sources. NCT underwent a prototype flight in 2005 to verify the instrumental background, and a first-light ConUS flight in 2009 which resulted in a detection of the Crab nebula as a verification of the instrument sensitivity. Unfortunately, a launch mishap during NCT's first science campaign in 2010 left the instrument largely destroyed. A rebuild of the NCT instrument is currently underway with an expected return to flight readiness in late 2013. The rebuilt NCT detector system is comprised of twelve high-purity germanium detectors and an active CsI scintillator shield. The cryogenics system has been redesigned and now employs a cryocooler, which, along with an all-new, low-mass gondola, qualifies NCT to fly on the Ultra Long Duration balloon (ULDB) platform. ULDB flights may last up to 100 days, effectively improving NCT's sensitivity over the course of a flight and opening up new science opportunities. The NCT collaboration is currently proposing to NASA for the science flight program, which will include an LDB flight from Kiruna, Sweden in 2014 and a ULDB flight from Wanaka, New Zealand in 2016. MEGAlib/GEANT4 simulations of the instrument were performed for the two launch scenarios and the instrument performance was determined. Primary science goals for the NCT balloon flights include mapping of the galactic bulge/disk positron annihilation line at 511 keV in order to shed light on the positron source(s), mapping of 26Al (1.809 MeV) and 60Fe (1.173 MeV and 1.333 MeV) emission to uncover the galactic history of core-collapse supernovae, and detection and measurement of polarization from gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallice, A.; Wienhold, F. G.; Hoyle, C. R.; Immler, F.; Peter, T.

    2011-10-01

    A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ∼30-35 km altitude) is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI) campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. In its present state, the model does not account for solar radiation, i.e. it is only able to describe the ascent of balloons during the night. It could however be adapted to also represent daytime soundings, with solar radiation modeled as a diffusive process. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s-1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s-1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study) in the orographically

  17. Beam Tests of the Balloon-Borne ATIC Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganel, O.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Ahn, E. J.; Ampe, J.; Bashindzhagyan, G.; Case, G.; Chang, J.; Ellison, S.; Fazely, A.; Gould, R.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced Thin Ionization Calorimeter (ATIC) balloon-borne experiment is designed to perform cosmic-ray elemental spectra measurement from 50 GeV to 100 TeV for nuclei from hydrogen to iron. These measurements are expected to provide crucial hints about some of the most fundamental questions in astroparticle physics today. ATTIC'S design centers on an 18 radiation length (X(sub Omnicron)) deep bismuth germanate (BGO) calorimeter, preceded by a 0.75 lambda(sub int) graphite target. In September 1999 the ATIC detector was exposed to high-energy beams at CERN's SPS accelerator, within the framework of the development program for the Advanced Cosmic-ray Composition Experiment for the Space Station (ACCESS). In December 2000 - January 2001, ATIC flew on the first of a series of long duration balloon (LDB) flights from McMurdo Station, Antarctica. We present here results from the 1999 beam-tests, including energy resolutions for electrons and protons at several beam energies from 100 GeV to 375 GeV, as well as signal linearity and collection efficiency estimates. We show how these results compare with expectations based on simulations, and their expected impacts on mission performance.

  18. The Helium Balloon Project: Expanding Student Horizons...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1973-01-01

    An activity involving future elementary school teachers designed around inexpensive balloons which when launched contained postcards to determine the geographic location of the landing. The investigation is student-centered, involving unknown questions, and was conducted for enjoyment. (DF)

  19. Mass and radius of cosmic balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yun

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic balloons are spherical domain walls with relativistic particles trapped inside. We derive the exact mass and radius relations for a static cosmic balloon using Gauss-Codazzi equations. The cosmic balloon mass as a function of its radius, M(R), is found to have a functional form similar to that of fermion soliton stars, with a fixed point at 2GM(R)/R approximately or equal to 0.486 which corresponds to the limit of infinite central density. We derive a simple analytical approximation for the mass density of a spherically symmetric relativistic gas star. When applied to the computation of the mass and radius of a cosmic balloon, the analytical approximation yields fairly good agreement with the exact numerical solutions.

  20. Balloon Measurements of Winds in Planetary Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, S.; Kitchen, A.; Perry, R.; Petersen, P.; Slater, J.; Oudrhiri, K.; Asmar, S.; Atkinson, D.

    2014-06-01

    Atmospheric dynamics can be better measured if data is recorded from many spatially separated capsules. One method under study is to use a planetary lander that releases multiple balloon-bourne transceivers that can be Doppler tracked by the lander.

  1. Investigations of Balloon and Aeroplane Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbons, Willis A; Smith, Omar H

    1917-01-01

    Report presents the experimental results of fabrics used for balloons and aeroplanes. Tensile properties, surface roughness, skin friction, flammability, permeability, and water absorption were tested for different combinations of materials.

  2. Support of the balloon-borne ultraviolet stellar spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timothy, J. G.

    1986-05-01

    A (256 x 1024)-pixel imaging ultraviolet Multi-mode Microchannel Array (MAMA) detector system for flight was fabricated, evaluated, and environmentally tested for flight on the Balloon Borne Ultraviolet Stellar Spectrograph (BUSS). The goal of the program was to replace the existing SEC Vidicon with the pulse-counting MAMA detector in order to, first, improve the overall sensitivity of the BUSS telescope and spectrograph for observations of stars down to m sub v = 7 and fainter, and, second, to improve the spectral resolution and wavelength accuracy by eliminating the image drifts in the Vidicon caused by magnetic field effects. A sealed MAMA detector tube structure employing a remotely processed photocathode mounted on a window in proximity focus with the front face of the MCP was developed to avoid contamination produced by a noisy and unstable device. The configuration of the BUSS detector system in its flight ready configuration is shown. The quantum efficiency curve for the semi-transparent Cs2Te photocathode is also shown.

  3. Thermal Control of the Balloon-Borne HEROES Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Brian

    2013-01-01

    The High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun (HEROES) telescope is scheduled to fly on a high altitude balloon from Fort Sumner, New Mexico in the Fall of 2013. Once it reaches an altitude of 40km it will observe the Sun, Crab Nebula, and other astrophysical objects in the hard X-Ray spectrum (20-75keV) for around 28 hours. The HEROES project is a joint effort between Marshall and Goddard Space Flight Centers (MSFC and GSFC), and will utilize the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope, which last flew in 2011 in Australia. The addition of new systems will allow the telescope to view the Sun, and monitor the mechanical alignment of the structure during flight. This paper will give an overview of the telescope, and then provide a description of the thermal control method used on HEROES. The thermal control is done through a passive cold-bias design. Detailed thermal analyses were performed in order to prove the design. This will be discussed along with the results of the analyses. HEROES is funded by the NASA Hands-On Project Experience (HOPE) Training Opportunity. The HOPE opportunity provides early career employees within NASA hands on experience with a yearlong flight project. HOPE was awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer, and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  4. The protoMIRAX hard X-ray imaging balloon experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braga, João; D'Amico, Flavio; Avila, Manuel A. C.; Penacchioni, Ana V.; Rodrigo Sacahui, J.; de Santiago, Valdivino A.; Mattiello-Francisco, Fátima; Strauss, Cesar; Fialho, Márcio A. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The protoMIRAX hard X-ray imaging telescope is a balloon-borne experiment developed as a pathfinder for the MIRAX satellite mission. The experiment consists essentially in a coded-aperture hard X-ray (30-200 keV) imager with a square array (13 × 13) of 2 mm-thick planar CZT detectors with a total area of 169 cm2. The total, fully-coded field-of-view is 21° × 21° and the angular resolution is 1°43'. Aims: The main objective of protoMIRAX is to carry out imaging spectroscopy of selected bright sources to demonstrate the performance of a prototype of the MIRAX hard X-ray imager. In this paper we describe the protoMIRAX instrument and all the subsystems of its balloon gondola, and we show simulated results of the instrument performance. Methods: Detailed background and imaging simulations were performed for protoMIRAX balloon flights. The 3σ sensitivity for the 30-200 keV range is ~1.9 × 10-5 photons cm-2 s-1 for an integration time of 8 h at an atmospheric depth of 2.7 g cm-2 and an average zenith angle of 30°. We developed an attitude-control system for the balloon gondola and new data handling and ground systems that also include prototypes for the MIRAX satellite. Results: We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations of the camera response at balloon altitudes, showing the expected background level and the detailed sensitivity of protoMIRAX. We also present the results of imaging simulations of the Crab region. Conclusions: The results show that protoMIRAX is capable of making spectral and imaging observations of bright hard X-ray source fields. Furthermore, the balloon observations will carry out very important tests and demonstrations of MIRAX hardware and software in a near space environment.

  5. CNES super pressure balloons assessment and new developments to prepare Strateole-2 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venel, Stephanie; Spel, Martin; Cocquerez, Philippe; Meyer, Jean-Renaud; Nicot, Jean-Marc.; Parot, Gael; Perraud, Sophie

    The French Space Agency, CNES, has developed, since about twelve years ago, super pressure balloons (SPB) that float on constant density (isopycnic) surfaces in the lowermost stratosphere, carrying 40 to 50 kg payloads, during typically three months. These SPB have been successfully deployed in flotilla of about 20 balloons for different scientific campaigns all over the world in different configuration sizes from 8,5 to 12 m diameter, mainly to document the chemistry and dynamics of the atmosphere, to study gravity waves, and to provide in-situ atmospheric profiles thanks to the NCAR driftsonde payloada. This paper will describe the main results and lessons achieved during the last CONCORDIASI campaign in 2010 over the Antarctic region. Thus, anomalies on the on-board system were investigated and explained by the effect of atmospheric particles fluxes. Also related to these flights, an accurate thermal model was built to evaluate the temperature distribution in the balloon, and several ageing tests have been made to better understand the effect of solar exposure on the different balloon materials. This paper will also present the new developments in progress for the future STRATEOLE-2 campaign dedicated to advance the knowledge of coupling processes between the troposphere and the stratosphere in the deep tropics, and foreseen in 2018-2019. In particular, a new command-control system will be developed to be in conformity with the CNES safety rules, and in continuation with the new zero pressure balloons system named NOSYCA. New solar panels are under investigation. Finally, two new balloon sizes will grow the SPB family to respond to the scientist demand of two special altitude densities.

  6. STRATO 02/2015 - The Perseids 2015 stratospheric balloon mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Lenža, L.; Kapuš, J.; Erdziak, J.; Slošiar, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present the first results of the MeteorCam03 experiment that allowed the observation of meteors from the stratosphere. The experiment provides a new perspective of meteor observations, mainly due to the lower extinction in these layers of the Earth's atmosphere. For the implementation of the experiment the Perseid meteor shower maximum was chosen, since the Perseids (together with the Geminid meteor shower) are one of the most active streams observable from the northern hemisphere. The MeteorCam03 experiment was part of a stratospheric balloon flight with platform JULO-X codenamed STRATO 02/2015, whose launch was carried out by the Slovak Organization for Space Activities (SOSA).

  7. NASA balloon: Aircraft ranging, data and voice experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wishna, S.; Hamby, C.; Reed, D.

    1972-01-01

    A series of tests to evaluate, at L-band, the ranging, voice, and data communications concepts proposed for the air traffic control experiment of the Applications Technology Satellite-F are described. The ground station facilities, balloon platforms and the aircraft were supplied by the European Space Research Organization. One ground simulation and two aircraft flights at low elevation angles were conducted. Even under high interference conditions good performance was obtained for both voice communications and side tone ranging. High bit errors occurred in the data channels resulting in false commands. As a result of the experience gained in operating the equipment in an aircraft environment several recommendations were made for improving the equipment performance.

  8. Cervical balloon for dysfunctional labor following amniotomy.

    PubMed

    Lurie, S; Rabinerson, D; Feinstein, M; Mamet, Y

    1998-01-01

    The conventional treatment for arrest of protracted active phase dilatation is amniotomy and oxitocin. This kind of labor dystocia is associated with an increased incidence in Cesarean delivery. We describe the use of cervical balloon after amniotomy for protracted active phase dilatation. We have used this approach in five parturients. All five patients had a spontaneous vaginal delivery. Intrapartum cervical balloon in patients with dysfunctional labor may reduce the need for Cesarean delivery.

  9. Progress of super-pressure balloon development: A new "tawara" concept with improved stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, H.; Izutsu, N.; Akita, D.; Iijima, I.; Kato, Y.; Kawada, J.; Matsushima, K.; Matsuzaka, Y.; Mizuta, E.; Namiki, M.; Nonaka, N.; Ohta, S.; Saito, Y.; Sato, T.; Seo, M.; Shoji, Y.; Takada, A.; Tamura, K.; Toriumi, M.; Yamada, K.; Yamagami, T.; Yoshida, T.

    2011-09-01

    The super-pressure balloon (SPB) has been expected to be a flight vehicle that can provide a long flight duration to science. Since 1997, we have developed the SPB. Now we are at the phase of developing an SPB of a practical size. In 2009, we carried out a test flight of a pumpkin-shaped SPB with a 60,000 m 3 volume. The undesirable result of this flight aroused us to resolve the deployment instability of the pumpkin-shaped SPB, which has been known as one of the most challenging issues confronting SPB development. To explore this deployment issue, in 2010, we carried out a series of ground tests. From results of these tests, we found that an SPB design modified from pumpkin, named "tawara", can be a good candidate to greatly improve the deployment stability of the lobed SPB.

  10. Hybrid designs for super-pressure balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schur, W.; Baginski, F.

    The desire of the scientific community to fly large payloads at mid latitudes over durations of months while keeping altitude has propelled NASA on the path of developing an Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) design. The first design considered for ULDB was a spherical balloon, but the strength of its fabric composite fell far short of the capacity goal set by NASA. Therefore, an alternative design, the pumpkin-shape balloon, was chosen. For large balloons with a large number of gores, the pumpkin design is found to be susceptible to flawed deployment. While research on pumpkin balloon deployment is on-going, the spherical balloon design has stirred new interest for certain applications. Current spherical super-pressure designs have a load skirt that consists of straps that are attached tangentially to the fully inflated sphere. The attachment points constitute stress raisers, and the straps provide an opportunity for entanglement. The pneumatic envelope is a compliant structure that accommodates concentrated loads by large out-of-plane deformation. By embedding sufficient unidirectional strength elements in the skin that radiate from the nadir upward, we will demonstrate that the load skirt is unnecessary and the entanglement problem is avoided. We will use analytical investigations to establish the advantages of this hybrid design.

  11. CNES super pressure balloons upgrade for Strateole-2 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venel, Stephanie; Cocquerez, Philippe; Hertzog, Albert

    2016-07-01

    The French Space Agency, CNES, has developed, since about twelve years ago, super pressure balloons (SPB) that float on constant density (isopycnic) surfaces in the lowermost stratosphere, carrying 40 to 50 kg payloads, during typically three months. These SPB have been successfully deployed in flotilla of about 20 balloons for different scientific campaigns all over the world in different configuration sizes from 8,5 to 12 m diameter, mainly to document the chemistry and dynamics of the atmosphere, to study gravity waves, and to provide in-situ atmospheric profiles thanks to the NCAR driftsonde payload. The SPB housekeeping gondola used from 2005 to 2011 now needs to be upgraded in order to increase the flights' safety and to improve its performance with up to date equipment's. The control center will also be redesigned. These modifications take into account the experience acquired during the last SPB campaigns, mainly during CONCORDIASI, with 19 flights over Antarctica from September 2010 to January 2011. After a successful preliminary design review, the project is now conducting the detailed conception phase. This new system is developed for STRATEOLE-2, a project dedicated to the coupling processes between the troposphere and the stratosphere in the deep tropics, using several types of instruments, both for in situ and remote measurements in the atmosphere. STRATEOLE -2 includes two measurement campaigns, three years spaced to study the quasi biennial oscillation. Since the scientific payloads are fully self-standing, some technical solutions will be common with the CNES housekeeping gondola, such as the renewable power system. This paper will describe the STRATEOLE-2 project and the developments in progress for the SPB system upgrade.

  12. Balloon Borne Arc-Second Pointer Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, Philip R.; DeWeese, Keith D.

    2003-01-01

    For many years scientists have been utilizing stratospheric balloons as low-cost platforms on which to conduct space science experiments. A major hurdle in extending the range of experiments for which these vehicles are useful has been the imposition of the gondola dynamics on the accuracy with which an instrument can be kept pointed at a celestial target. A significant number of scientists have sought the ability to point their instruments with jitter in the arc-second range. This paper presents the design and analysis of a stratospheric balloon borne pointing system that is able to meet this requirement. The foundation for a high fidelity controller simulation is presented. The flexibility of the flight train is represented through generalized modal analysis. A multiple controller scheme is introduced for coarse and fine pointing. Coarse azimuth pointing is accomplished by an established pointing system, with extensive flight history, residing above the gondola structure. A pitch-yaw gimbal mount is used for fine pointing, providing orthogonal axes when nominally on target. Fine pointing actuation is from direct drive dc motors, eliminating backlash problems. An analysis of friction nonlinearities and a demonstration of the necessity in eliminating static fiction are provided. A unique bearing hub design is introduced that eliminates static fiction from the system dynamics. A control scheme involving linear accelerometers for enhanced disturbance rejection is also presented. Results from a linear analysis of the total system and the high fidelity simulation are given. This paper establishes that the proposed control strategy can be made robustly stable with significant design margins. Also demonstrated is the efficacy of the proposed system in rejecting disturbances larger than those considered realistic. Finally, we see that sub arc-second pointing stability can be achieved for a large instrument pointing at an inertial target.

  13. The atmospheric nightglow in the 300- 400 nm wavelength . Results by the balloon-borne experiment "BABY"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catalano, O.; Agnetta, G.; Biondo, B.; Celi, F.; Di Raffaele, R.; Giarrusso, S.; Linsley, J.; La Rosa, G.; Lo Bue, A.; Mangano, A.; Russo, F.

    2002-03-01

    The balloon-borne experiment, named BAckground BYpass (BABY) belongs to a wider program that has as its final goal the detection and study of high-energy cosmic rays from space (satellite, Space Station). An information of fundamental importance for this class of projects concerns the nighttime background light. The instrument designed to detect fluorescence photons is basically composed of two collimated photomultipliers: a single photon-counting PMT and a charge integration PMT. We briefly report the details of the design, operation and performance of the detector, which was designed and completely built at the IFCAI-CNR Institute in Palermo. Preliminary analysis and results of the nocturnal background in the range of 300- 400 nm are presented for the whole duration of the flight during the 1998 Mediterranean balloon flight campaign. A substantial part of the flight was at night over the sea.

  14. Comparison of a Balloon Guide Catheter and a Non-Balloon Guide Catheter for Mechanical Thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Aglaé; Buerke, Boris; Stracke, Christian P; Berkemeyer, Shoma; Mosimann, Pascal J; Schwindt, Wolfram; Alcázar, Pedro; Cnyrim, Christian; Niederstadt, Thomas; Chapot, René; Heindel, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy with the use of a stent retriever in acute ischemic stroke, performed by using a balloon guide catheter or non-balloon guide catheter. Materials and Methods In accordance with the institutional review board approval obtained at the two participating institutions, retrospective analysis was performed in 183 consecutive patients treated between 2013 and 2014 for occlusions in the middle cerebral artery or carotid terminus by using a stent retriever with a balloon guide catheter (n = 102) at one center and a non-balloon guide catheter (n = 81) at the other center. Data on procedure duration, number of passes, angiographic findings, type of stent retriever used, and expertise of the operators were collected. Successful recanalization was defined as grade 3 or 2b modified Treatment in Cerebral Ischemia recanalization accomplished in up to three passes. Univariate and multivariate subgroup analyses were conducted to control for the confounding variables of prior thrombolysis, location of occlusion, and operator expertise. Results Successful recanalization with the balloon guide catheter was achieved in 89.2% of thrombectomies (91 of 102) versus 67.9% (55 of 81) achieved with the non-balloon guide catheter (P = .0004). The one-pass thrombectomy rate with the balloon guide catheter was significantly higher than for that with the non-balloon guide catheter (63.7% [65 of 102] vs 35.8% [29 of 81], respectively; P = .001). The procedure duration was significantly shorter by using the balloon guide catheter than the non-balloon guide catheter (median, 20.5 minutes vs 41.0 minutes, respectively; P < .0001). Conclusion The effectiveness of mechanical thrombectomy with stent retrievers in acute ischemic stroke in the anterior circulation in terms of angiographic results and procedure duration was improved when performed in combination with the balloon guide catheter. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  15. High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun Balloon-Borne Telescope: Astrophysical Pointing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Ramsey, Brian; Apple, Jeff; Kurt, Dietz; Tennant, Allyn; Swartz, Douglas; Christe, Steven D.; Shih, Albert

    2014-01-01

    On September 21, 2013, the High Energy Replicated Optics to Explore the Sun, or HEROES, balloon-borne x-ray telescope launched from the Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility's site in Ft. Summer, NM. The flight lasted for approximately 27 hours and the observational targets included the Sun and astrophysical sources GRS 1915+105 and the Crab Nebula. Over the past year, the HEROES team upgraded the existing High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) balloon-borne telescope to make unique scientific measurements of the Sun and astrophysical targets during the same flight. The HEROES Project is a multi-NASA Center effort with team members at both Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and is led by Co-PIs (one at each Center). The HEROES payload consists of the hard X-ray telescope HERO, developed at MSFC, combined with several new systems. To allow the HEROES telescope to make observations of the Sun, a new solar aspect system was added to supplement the existing star camera for fine pointing during both the day and night. A mechanical shutter was added to the star camera to protect it during solar observations and two alignment monitoring systems were added for improved pointing and post-flight data reconstruction. This mission was funded by the NASA HOPE (Hands-On Project Experience) Training Opportunity awarded by the NASA Academy of Program/Project and Engineering Leadership, in partnership with NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Office of the Chief Engineer and Office of the Chief Technologist.

  16. Development of a new large balloon launch technique for the low density supersonic decelerator project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Danny

    D. Ball1 and 2 E. Klein 1,2 Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility Danny.Ball@csbf.nasa.gov/Fax 903-723-8068 Erich.Klein@csbf.nasa.gov/Fax 903-723-8068 Scientific balloon flights have served for decades as a unique and cost effective platform for conducting world class space science and for developing and testing new technologies for exploration. These technologies have ranged from detector development to in situ testing of unique cutting edge space systems. The Earth’s stratosphere is an analog to Mars’s atmosphere and provides as close to an in situ environment to test a reentry system. Previous in situ tests for a Mars reentry system were a series of drop tests that were conducted from stratospheric balloon flights in 2004 to test a NASA Mars subsonic parachute entry design. In 2014 and 2015 a series of balloon flights to test a Mars prototype reentry system are planned. The JPL Mars Science Laboratory’s Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) effort is intended to test the system by flying different new drag devices on three tests, at full scale and at supersonic speeds, high in Earth’s stratosphere, simulating entry into the atmosphere of Mars. To start the tests, the system must be first lofted to the stratosphere via a large high altitude balloon. NASA has been launching high altitude balloons to support science for many years, but with LDSD there are unique challenges with performing the test and lofting the test system to the stratosphere. The test involves launching a Star 48 Motor on a balloon to a set float altitude, orienting the payload, and then releasing the system from the balloon to start the test where the rocket motor is ignited to accelerate the test system to supersonic speeds. Safety is a significant driver in the development process for all phases of any balloon launch operation. Because a rocket motor is part of the payload to be launched, the balloon launching operations for the LDSD project have required a completely fresh look to

  17. An implementation of Software Defined Radios for federated aerospace networks: Informing satellite implementations using an inter-balloon communications experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhtyamov, Rustam; Cruz, Ignasi Lluch i.; Matevosyan, Hripsime; Knoll, Dominik; Pica, Udrivolf; Lisi, Marco; Golkar, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    Novel space mission concepts such as Federated Satellite Systems promise to enhance sustainability, robustness, and reliability of current missions by means of in-orbit sharing of space assets. This new paradigm requires the utilization of several technologies in order to confer flexibility and re-configurability to communications systems among heterogeneous spacecrafts. This paper illustrates the results of the experimental demonstration of the value proposition of federated satellites through two stratospheric balloons interoperating with a tracking ground station through Commercial Off-The-Shelf Software Defined Radios (SDRs). The paper reports telemetry analysis and characterizes the communications network that was realized in-flight. Furthermore, it provides details on an in-flight anomaly experienced by one of the balloons, which was recovered through the use of the federated technology that has been developed. The anomaly experienced led to the early loss of the directional link from the ground station to the affected stratospheric balloon node after 15 min in flight. Nevertheless, thanks to the federated approach among the systems, the ground station was still able to retrieve the balloon's data in real time through the network system, for which the other balloon operated as a federated relay for 45 min in flight, uninterrupted. In other words, the federated approach to the system allowed triplicating the useful lifetime of the defective system, which would have not been possible to realize otherwise. Such anomaly coincidentally demonstrated the value of the federated approach to space systems design. The paper paves the way for future tests on space assets.

  18. Balloon angioplasty of the bilateral renal arteries by Takayasu arteritis with a paclitaxel-eluting balloon.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Tobias; Esmaeili, Anoosh; Behnke-Hall, Kachina

    2015-10-01

    We report about a 12-year-old girl who presented with a blood pressure difference between the extremities with the suspicion of an aortic coarctation. After imaging and laboratory tests, the diagnosis of Takayasu arteritis was made. Owing to persistent arterial hypertension despite medical treatment, we initiated a treatment with a balloon angioplasty of the renal arteries with an eluting balloon.

  19. [Intragastric balloon: a review concerning alternative balloons compared to the classical ones (Bioenterics)].

    PubMed

    Martínez Olmos, Miguel Ángel; Cancer, Emilia; Bretón, Irene; Álvarez, Visitación; Abilés, Verónica; Abilés, Jimena; Peláez, Noelia; Mellado, Carmen; Mazure, Rose-Anne; Culebras, Jesús Manuel

    2014-10-06

    Since de Tarpon Springs Consensus Conference in 1987, the Bioenterics Intragastric Balloon represents the standard model for obesity treatment with this technique. Nevertheless, over the last 30 years, especially for the last ten years, novel concept of balloons has appeared, as well as new alternative models, which are reviewed in this paper.

  20. Cosmic radiation dose measurements from the RaD-X flight campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertens, Christopher J.; Gronoff, Guillaume P.; Norman, Ryan B.; Hayes, Bryan M.; Lusby, Terry C.; Straume, Tore; Tobiska, W. Kent; Hands, Alex; Ryden, Keith; Benton, Eric; Wiley, Scott; Gersey, Brad; Wilkins, Richard; Xu, Xiaojing

    2016-10-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission obtained measurements for improving the understanding of cosmic radiation transport in the atmosphere and human exposure to this ionizing radiation field in the aircraft environment. The value of dosimetric measurements from the balloon platform is that they can be used to characterize cosmic ray primaries, the ultimate source of aviation radiation exposure. In addition, radiation detectors were flown to assess their potential application to long-term, continuous monitoring of the aircraft radiation environment. The RaD-X balloon was successfully launched from Fort Sumner, New Mexico (34.5°N, 104.2°W) on 25 September 2015. Over 18 h of flight data were obtained from each of the four different science instruments at altitudes above 20 km. The RaD-X balloon flight was supplemented by contemporaneous aircraft measurements. Flight-averaged dosimetric quantities are reported at seven altitudes to provide benchmark measurements for improving aviation radiation models. The altitude range of the flight data extends from commercial aircraft altitudes to above the Pfotzer maximum where the dosimetric quantities are influenced by cosmic ray primaries. The RaD-X balloon flight observed an absence of the Pfotzer maximum in the measurements of dose equivalent rate.