Science.gov

Sample records for 2006-2007 targeted investigation

  1. An investigation of a major outbreak of Rift Valley fever in Kenya: 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Nguku, Patrick M; Sharif, S K; Mutonga, David; Amwayi, Samuel; Omolo, Jared; Mohammed, Omar; Farnon, Eileen C; Gould, L Hannah; Lederman, Edith; Rao, Carol; Sang, Rosemary; Schnabel, David; Feikin, Daniel R; Hightower, Allen; Njenga, M Kariuki; Breiman, Robert F

    2010-08-01

    An outbreak of Rift Valley fever (RVF) occurred in Kenya during November 2006 through March 2007. We characterized the magnitude of the outbreak through disease surveillance and serosurveys, and investigated contributing factors to enhance strategies for forecasting to prevent or minimize the impact of future outbreaks. Of 700 suspected cases, 392 met probable or confirmed case definitions; demographic data were available for 340 (87%), including 90 (26.4%) deaths. Male cases were more likely to die than females, Case Fatality Rate Ratio 1.8 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3-3.8). Serosurveys suggested an attack rate up to 13% of residents in heavily affected areas. Genetic sequencing showed high homology among viruses from this and earlier RVF outbreaks. Case areas were more likely than non-case areas to have soil types that retain surface moisture. The outbreak had a devastatingly high case-fatality rate for hospitalized patients. However, there were up to 180,000 infected mildly ill or asymptomatic people within highly affected areas. Soil type data may add specificity to climate-based forecasting models for RVF.

  2. Final report : results of the 2006-2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The 2006-2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Barnes, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The overall goal of the investigation was to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The investigation objectives were to (1) determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, (2) delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and (3) design and implement an expanded monitoring network at Barnes (Argonne 2006a).

  3. ARL Supplementary Statistics, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Les, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents statistics on how Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries spend money on electronic resources. This report indicates that 108 ARL libraries purchased 25,006,758 electronic books. In 2006-2007, there was an ARL median of 243,725 acquisitions of electronic books (this includes one institution that purchased…

  4. Investigation of Contaminated Ground Water at Solid Waste Management Unit 12, Naval Weapons Station Charleston, North Charleston, South Carolina, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Petkewich, Matthew D.; Lowery, Mark A.; Conlon, Kevin J.; Harrelson, Larry G.

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey investigated natural and engineered remediation of chlorinated volatile organic compound (VOC) ground-water contamination at Solid Waste Management Unit 12 at the Naval Weapons Station Charleston, North Charleston, South Carolina, beginning in 2000. The primary contaminants of interest in the study are tetrachloroethene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, trichloroethene, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, vinyl chloride, 1,1-dichloroethane, and 1,1-dichloroethene. The permeable reactive barrier (PRB) along the main axis of the contaminant plume appears to be actively removing contamination. In contrast to the central area of the PRB, the data from the southern end of the PRB indicate that contaminants are moving around the PRB. Concentrations in wells 12MW-10S and 12MW-03S, upgradient from the PRB, showed a general decrease in VOC concentrations. VOC concentrations in some wells in the forest showed a sharp increase, followed by a decrease. In 2007, the VOC concentrations began to increase in well 12MW-12S, downgradient from the PRB and thought to be unaffected by the PRB. The VOC-concentration changes in the forest, such as at well 12MW-12S, may represent lateral shifting of the plume in response to changes in ground-water-flow direction or may represent movement of a contamination pulse through the forest.

  5. REAL TIME SYSTEM OPERATIONS 2006-2007

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Joseph H.; Parashar, Manu; Lewis, Nancy Jo

    2008-08-15

    The Real Time System Operations (RTSO) 2006-2007 project focused on two parallel technical tasks: (1) Real-Time Applications of Phasors for Monitoring, Alarming and Control; and (2) Real-Time Voltage Security Assessment (RTVSA) Prototype Tool. The overall goal of the phasor applications project was to accelerate adoption and foster greater use of new, more accurate, time-synchronized phasor measurements by conducting research and prototyping applications on California ISO's phasor platform - Real-Time Dynamics Monitoring System (RTDMS) -- that provide previously unavailable information on the dynamic stability of the grid. Feasibility assessment studies were conducted on potential application of this technology for small-signal stability monitoring, validating/improving existing stability nomograms, conducting frequency response analysis, and obtaining real-time sensitivity information on key metrics to assess grid stress. Based on study findings, prototype applications for real-time visualization and alarming, small-signal stability monitoring, measurement based sensitivity analysis and frequency response assessment were developed, factory- and field-tested at the California ISO and at BPA. The goal of the RTVSA project was to provide California ISO with a prototype voltage security assessment tool that runs in real time within California ISO?s new reliability and congestion management system. CERTS conducted a technical assessment of appropriate algorithms, developed a prototype incorporating state-of-art algorithms (such as the continuation power flow, direct method, boundary orbiting method, and hyperplanes) into a framework most suitable for an operations environment. Based on study findings, a functional specification was prepared, which the California ISO has since used to procure a production-quality tool that is now a part of a suite of advanced computational tools that is used by California ISO for reliability and congestion management.

  6. International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Service, 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication presents changes and modifications for 2006-2007 to the "International Rules for Precollege Science Research: Guidelines for Science and Engineering Fairs." It is written to guide fair directors, teachers, scientists, parents, and adult volunteers as they pursue their work of encouraging students to explore and investigate their…

  7. Measuring What Students Entering School Know and Can Do: PIPS Australia 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildy, Helen; Styles, Irene

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports analysis of 2006-2007 on-entry assessment data from the Performance Indicators in Primary Schools Baseline Assessment (PIPS-BLA) of random samples of students in England, Scotland, New Zealand and Australia. The analysis aimed, first, to investigate the validity and reliability of that instrument across countries and sexes, and,…

  8. Dilemmas of Dissent: International Students' Protest, Melbourne 2006/2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodan, Paul

    2008-01-01

    International students in Australia are not usually identified with protest. However, a cohort of such students at one university campus was prepared to undertake robust public protest over alleged academic mistreatment in 2006/2007, eschewing conventional internal mechanisms for the resolution of such problems. Subsequent developments revealed…

  9. ARL Academic Law Library Statistics 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2008-01-01

    This document presents results of the 2006-2007 Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Law Library Statistics Questionnaire. Of 113 ARL university libraries, 74 responded to the survey. Results for each library are presented in the following data tables: (1) collections (2-parts), including volumes in library, volumes added, monographs purchased,…

  10. Initial Results from the ANITA 2006-2007 Balloon Flight

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P.W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S.W.; Beatty, J.J.; Besson, D.Z.; Binns, W.R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J.M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P.F.; DuVernois, M.A.; Field, R.C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C.L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M.H.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J.G.; /Hawaii U. /Caltech, JPL /Hawaii U. /Minnesota U. /Hawaii U. /Ohio State U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UC, Irvine /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Caltech, JPL /SLAC /University Coll. London /Ohio State U. /SLAC /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /Hawaii U. /UCLA /Delaware U. /Hawaii U. /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /UC, Irvine

    2011-11-16

    We report initial results of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) 2006-2007 Long Duration Balloon flight, which searched for evidence of the flux of cosmogenic neutrinos. ANITA flew for 35 days looking for radio impulses that might be due to the Askaryan effect in neutrino-induced electromagnetic showers within the Antarctic ice sheets. In our initial high-threshold robust analysis, no neutrino candidates are seen, with no physics background. In a non-signal horizontal-polarization channel, we do detect 6 events consistent with radio impulses from extensive air showers, which helps to validate the effectiveness of our method. Upper limits derived from our analysis now begin to eliminate the highest cosmogenic neutrino models.

  11. Astrometric observations of Nereid in 2006-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, R. C.; Cheng, X.; Shen, K. X.; Dourneau, G.; Wang, S. H.; Hu, X. Y.; Tang, Z. H.; Xi, X. J.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we present 112 new CCD astrometric positions of Nereid, the second and faint satellite of Neptune (mv ~= 19). We observed this small satellite in the 2006-2007 period with the 1 and 2.16-m telescopes of Xinglong Station near Beijing, both equipped with large CCD detectors of 1340 × 1300 and 2080 × 2048 pixels, respectively. The high density and highly accurate star catalogue UCAC2 was used in the reduction so that a classical astrometric calibration method was applied. We have shown that our observations of Nereid appear to be of equal or higher precision (σ ~= 0.2 arcsec) than most of the recent CCD ones. The data are available in electronic form as Supplementary Material to the online version of the paper on Blackwell Synergy, at the CDS via Anonymous FTP to http://cdsarc.u-stasbg.fr or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html. E-mail: rcqiao@ntsc.ac.cn

  12. Meteorological scenario of Ethiopian floods in 2006-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jury, Mark R.

    2011-05-01

    The meteorological scenario of Ethiopian highlands floods is studied. Daily rainfall in the period 1997-2007 reveals two peaks: 23-28 July 2006 and 26-31 July 2007. National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) composites suggest that anomalous southerly monsoon flow over the West Indian Ocean is re-directed by an anomalous Arabian ridge westward across the Red Sea and Ethiopia. A tongue of moisture stretches from the Congo towards the highlands, but westerly equatorial wind anomalies are absent. Anomalous sinking motions and dry conditions are evident over the West Indian Ocean. Diurnal analysis reveals northwesterly flow over eastern Sudan during afternoon hours, whilst back-trajectory analysis highlights a Red Sea source and lifting over the eastern escarpment of Ethiopia. The upper level tropical easterly jet connects Indian and Ethiopian rainfall at intra-seasonal (~40 days) time scale; whilst low-level meridional flow convergence is evident during flood events. Hovmoller analysis on 10°N reveals cyclonic signals propagating westward from the Arabian Sea at 500 km day-1 that produces a 10-day cycle in Ethiopian rainfall. The floods in 2006-2007 occurred at the peak of the annual cycle, with diurnal controls inducing ¾ of rain in the late evening. Whilst cold surges from southern Africa played a role in the 2006 flood, bursts in the northern Hadley cell are a more general determinant. The convection associated with the 2007 flood went on to become a destructive Atlantic hurricane.

  13. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  14. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  15. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  16. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  17. 7 CFR 982.254 - Free and restricted percentages-2006-2007 marketing year.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE HAZELNUTS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Free and Restricted Percentages § 982.254 Free and... hazelnuts for the 2006-2007 marketing year shall be 8.2840 percent and 91.7160 percent, respectively....

  18. Florida's Enhancing Education through Technology (Florida EETT). Leveraging Laptops: Effective Models for Enhancing Student Achievement. 2006-2007 Evaluation Report: Classroom Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowther, Deborah L.; Strahl, J. Daniel; Ross, Steven M.; Huang, Ying

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the 2006-2007 evaluation that was focused toward investigating one primary question: What changes in tool-based, student-centered teaching happen as a result of the infusion of technology and professional development? The research methodology involved the use of trained external researchers from Florida EETT schools…

  19. Unintentional injuries among youth with developmental disabilities in the United States, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Ruth A; Taneja, Gitanjali S; Schroeder, Thomas J; Trumble, Ann C; Moyer, Patricia M; Louis, Germaine M Buck

    2013-01-01

    We examined unintentional injury among youth with and without developmental disabilities. Our nationally representative sample included 6369 injured youth, aged 0-17 years, who were seen in one of the 63 US hospital emergency rooms that participated in the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System - All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) in 2006-2007. Parents or guardians of injured youth were interviewed by telephone after the hospital visit to ascertain disability status. Denominator data were obtained from the National Health Interview Survey. Leading causes of injury were comparable for youth with and without disability. Injury rates (per 100 youth per year) were also comparable [10.4; 95% confidence interval (CI) 7.8, 13.0 and 10.5; 95% CI 8.2, 12.9, for youth with and without disability, respectively]. When examined by specific disability, the rate ratio for youth with learning disabilities versus youth without learning disability was 1.57 (95% CI 1.04, 2.10), which may represent a subgroup for targeted interventions. PMID:22757768

  20. Annual Report: Discipline, Crime, and Violence, School Year 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The "Code of Virginia" requires school divisions statewide to submit data to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) on incidents of discipline, crime, and violence (DCV). School divisions began reporting such data in 1991. This annual report focuses primarily on DCV data submitted for school year 2006-2007, with selected comparisons to prior…

  1. Insider's Guide to Graduate Programs in Clinical and Counseling Psychology. 2006/2007 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayne, Tracy J.; Norcross, John C.; Sayette, Michael A.

    2006-01-01

    Now in its 2006-2007 edition, this perennial bestseller is the resource students count on for the most current information on applying to doctoral programs in clinical or counseling psychology. The Insider's Guide presents up-to-date facts on 300 accredited programs in the United States and Canada. Each program's profile includes admissions…

  2. Potential Triggering Mechanisms for the 2006-2007 Half Dome Rockfalls, Yosemite National Park, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stock, G. M.

    2007-12-01

    Yosemite Valley is one of the most active areas of rockfall in the world, allowing for detailed examination of individual rockfall events. A rockfall database going back to 1857 reveals that more than half of all documented rockfalls were not associated with a recognizable triggering mechanism. Between July 2006 and June 2007, a series of at least eight rockfalls occurred from a single release point on the Northwest Face of Half Dome in eastern Yosemite Valley. The largest of these rockfalls occurred at 18:46 on July 27th, 2007, and had an approximate volume of 735 m3. Interestingly, all of the rockfalls occurred during the summer (June-August), with no apparent activity at the release point during the winter and spring, typically considered peak seasons for rockfall. In addition to mapping rockfall volumes and the distribution of rock debris, I investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to failure, including bedrock lithology, degree of weathering, joint density and orientation, and release point geometry. I also analyzed a number of potential rockfall triggering mechanisms, including earthquakes, precipitation, freeze-thaw, and thermal stresses. Although a number of factors contributed to weakening of the rock mass, no specific triggering mechanism(s) can be confidently linked to the rockfalls. Rather, the rockfalls likely resulted from progressive strain weakening of an overhanging arch, with initial small rockfalls destabilizing the rock mass to the point that a large failure occurred. The supposition that summertime rockfalls with unrecognized triggers are unusual has been used to support claims that rockfalls below Glacier Point were caused by wastewater discharges, but the 2006-2007 Half Dome rockfalls, which occurred in a wilderness setting, demonstrate that subtle, even unrecognizable, natural processes trigger summertime rockfalls in Yosemite Valley.

  3. Ground-Water Conditions and Studies in Georgia, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Michael F.; Painter, Jaime A.; Leeth, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collects ground-water data and conducts studies to monitor hydrologic conditions, better define ground-water resources, and address problems related to water supply, water use, and water quality. Water levels were monitored continuously, in Georgia, in a network of 184 wells during 2006 and 182 wells during 2007. Because of missing data or the short period of record (less than 3 years) for several of these wells, a total of 166 wells from the network are discussed in this report. These wells include 18 in the surficial aquifer system, 21 in the Brunswick aquifer system and equivalent sediments, 67 in the Upper Floridan aquifer, 15 in the Lower Floridan aquifer and underlying units, 10 in the Claiborne aquifer, 1 in the Gordon aquifer, 11 in the Clayton aquifer, 12 in the Cretaceous aquifer system, 2 in Paleozoic-rock aquifers, and 9 in crystalline-rock aquifers. Data from the network indicate that water levels generally declined from 2005 levels, with water levels in 99 wells below normal, 52 wells in the normal range, 12 wells above normal, and 3 wells with insufficient data for comparison of 5-year trends and period of record statistics. In addition to continuous water-level data, periodic synoptic water-level measurements were collected and used to construct potentiometric-surface maps for the Upper Floridan aquifer in Camden, Charlton, and Ware Counties, Georgia, and adjacent counties in Florida during September 2006 and 2007, in the Brunswick area during July 2006 and August 2007, and in the City of Albany-Dougherty County area during October 2006 and October 2007. In general, the configuration of the potentiometric surfaces showed little change during 2006-2007 in each of the areas. Ground-water quality in the Upper Floridan aquifer is monitored in the Albany, Savannah, and Brunswick areas and in Camden County; and water quality in the Lower Floridan aquifer is monitored in the Savannah and Brunswick areas and in Camden County. In

  4. Rift Valley Fever Virus Epidemic in Kenya, 2006/2007: The Entomologic Investigations

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Rosemary; Kioko, Elizabeth; Lutomiah, Joel; Warigia, Marion; Ochieng, Caroline; O'Guinn, Monica; Lee, John S.; Koka, Hellen; Godsey, Marvin; Hoel, David; Hanafi, Hanafi; Miller, Barry; Schnabel, David; Breiman, Robert F.; Richardson, Jason

    2010-01-01

    In December 2006, Rift Valley fever (RVF) was diagnosed in humans in Garissa Hospital, Kenya and an outbreak reported affecting 11 districts. Entomologic surveillance was performed in four districts to determine the epidemic/epizootic vectors of RVF virus (RVFV). Approximately 297,000 mosquitoes were collected, 164,626 identified to species, 72,058 sorted into 3,003 pools and tested for RVFV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Seventy-seven pools representing 10 species tested positive for RVFV, including Aedes mcintoshi/circumluteolus (26 pools), Aedes ochraceus (23 pools), Mansonia uniformis (15 pools); Culex poicilipes, Culex bitaeniorhynchus (3 pools each); Anopheles squamosus, Mansonia africana (2 pools each); Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex univittatus, Aedes pembaensis (1 pool each). Positive Ae. pembaensis, Cx. univittatus, and Cx. bitaeniorhynchus was a first time observation. Species composition, densities, and infection varied among districts supporting hypothesis that different mosquito species serve as epizootic/epidemic vectors of RVFV in diverse ecologies, creating a complex epidemiologic pattern in East Africa. PMID:20682903

  5. Rift Valley fever virus epidemic in Kenya, 2006/2007: the entomologic investigations.

    PubMed

    Sang, Rosemary; Kioko, Elizabeth; Lutomiah, Joel; Warigia, Marion; Ochieng, Caroline; O'Guinn, Monica; Lee, John S; Koka, Hellen; Godsey, Marvin; Hoel, David; Hanafi, Hanafi; Miller, Barry; Schnabel, David; Breiman, Robert F; Richardson, Jason

    2010-08-01

    In December 2006, Rift Valley fever (RVF) was diagnosed in humans in Garissa Hospital, Kenya and an outbreak reported affecting 11 districts. Entomologic surveillance was performed in four districts to determine the epidemic/epizootic vectors of RVF virus (RVFV). Approximately 297,000 mosquitoes were collected, 164,626 identified to species, 72,058 sorted into 3,003 pools and tested for RVFV by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Seventy-seven pools representing 10 species tested positive for RVFV, including Aedes mcintoshi/circumluteolus (26 pools), Aedes ochraceus (23 pools), Mansonia uniformis (15 pools); Culex poicilipes, Culex bitaeniorhynchus (3 pools each); Anopheles squamosus, Mansonia africana (2 pools each); Culex quinquefasciatus, Culex univittatus, Aedes pembaensis (1 pool each). Positive Ae. pembaensis, Cx. univittatus, and Cx. bitaeniorhynchus was a first time observation. Species composition, densities, and infection varied among districts supporting hypothesis that different mosquito species serve as epizootic/epidemic vectors of RVFV in diverse ecologies, creating a complex epidemiologic pattern in East Africa.

  6. 77 FR 42764 - Distribution of the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Digital Audio Recording Technology Royalty Funds...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... Copyright Royalty Board Distribution of the 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 Digital Audio Recording Technology Royalty Funds for the Musical Works Funds AGENCY: Copyright Royalty Board, Library of Congress. ACTION... Copyright Royalty Judges are announcing the commencement of a proceeding to determine the distribution ]...

  7. Effects of new penicillin susceptibility breakpoints for Streptococcus pneumoniae--United States, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    2008-12-19

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a common cause of pneumonia and meningitis in the United States. Antimicrobial resistance, which can result in pneumococcal infection treatment failure, is identified by measuring the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of an antimicrobial that will inhibit pneumococcal growth. Breakpoints are MICs that define infections as susceptible (treatable), intermediate (possibly treatable with higher doses), and resistant (not treatable) to certain antimicrobials. In January 2008, after a reevaluation that included more recent clinical studies, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) published new S. pneumoniae breakpoints for penicillin (the preferred antimicrobial for susceptible S. pneumoniae infections). To assess the potential effects of the new breakpoints on susceptibility categorization, CDC applied them to MICs of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) isolates collected by the Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs) system at sites in 10 states during 2006-2007. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that the percentage of IPD nonmeningitis S. pneumoniae isolates categorized as susceptible, intermediate, and resistant to penicillin changed from 74.7%, 15.0%, and 10.3% under the former breakpoints to 93.2%, 5.6%, and 1.2%, respectively, under the new breakpoints. Microbiology laboratories should be aware of the new breakpoints to interpret pneumococcal susceptibility accurately, and clinicians should be aware of the breakpoints to prescribe antimicrobials appropriately for pneumococcal infections. State and local health departments also should be aware of the new breakpoints because they might result in a decrease in the number of reported cases of penicillin-resistant pneumococcus.

  8. Radio-to-UV monitoring of AO 0235+164 by the WEBT and Swift during the 2006-2007 outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raiteri, C. M.; Villata, M.; Larionov, V. M.; Aller, M. F.; Bach, U.; Gurwell, M.; Kurtanidze, O. M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Nilsson, K.; Volvach, A.; Aller, H. D.; Arkharov, A. A.; Bachev, R.; Berdyugin, A.; Böttcher, M.; Buemi, C. S.; Calcidese, P.; Cozzi, E.; di Paola, A.; Dolci, M.; Fan, J. H.; Forné, E.; Foschini, L.; Gupta, A. C.; Hagen-Thorn, V. A.; Hooks, L.; Hovatta, T.; Joshi, M.; Kadler, M.; Kimeridze, G. N.; Konstantinova, T. S.; Kostov, A.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Lanteri, L.; Larionova, L. V.; Lee, C.-U.; Leto, P.; Lindfors, E.; Montagni, F.; Nesci, R.; Nieppola, E.; Nikolashvili, M. G.; Ohlert, J.; Oksanen, A.; Ovcharov, E.; Pääkkönen, P.; Pasanen, M.; Pursimo, T.; Ros, J. A.; Semkov, E.; Sigua, L. A.; Smart, R. L.; Strigachev, A.; Takalo, L. O.; Torii, K.; Torniainen, I.; Tornikoski, M.; Trigilio, C.; Tsunemi, H.; Umana, G.; Valcheva, A.

    2008-03-01

    Context: The blazar AO 0235+164 was claimed to show a quasi-periodic behaviour in the radio and optical bands in the past, with the main outbursts repeating every 5-6 years. However, the predicted 2004 outburst did not occur, and further analysis suggested a longer time scale, according to which the next event would have occurred in the 2006-2007 observing season. Moreover, an extra emission component contributing to the UV and soft X-ray flux was detected, whose nature is not yet clear. An optical outburst was observed in late 2006-early 2007, which triggered a Whole Earth Blazar Telescope (WEBT) campaign as well as target of opportunity (ToO) observations by the Swift satellite. Aims: In this paper, we present the radio-to-optical data taken by the WEBT together with the UV data acquired by the UltraViolet and Optical Telescope (UVOT) instrument onboard Swift to investigate both the outburst behaviour at different wavelengths and the nature of the extra emission component. Methods: Multifrequency light curves have been assembled with data from 27 observatories; optical and UV fluxes have been cleaned from the contamination of the southern active galactic nucleus (AGN). We have analysed spectral energy distributions at different epochs, corresponding to different brightness states; extra absorption by the foreground galaxy has been taken into account. Results: We found the optical outburst to be as strong as the big outbursts of the past: starting from late September 2006, a brightness increase of ~5 mag led to the outburst peak in February 19-21, 2007. We also observed an outburst at mm and then at cm wavelengths, with an increasing time delay going toward lower frequencies during the rising phase. Cross-correlation analysis indicates that the 1 mm and 37 GHz flux variations lagged behind the R-band ones by about 3 weeks and 2 months, respectively. These short time delays suggest that the corresponding jet emitting regions are only slightly separated and

  9. Firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas - United States, 2006-2007 and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    Firearm homicides and suicides are a continuing public health concern in the United States. During 2009-2010, a total of 22,571 firearm homicides and 38,126 firearm suicides occurred among U.S. residents. This includes 3,397 firearm homicides and 1,548 firearm suicides among persons aged 10-19 years; the firearm homicide rate for this age group was slightly above the all-ages rate. This report updates an earlier report that provided statistics on firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas for 2006-2007, with special emphasis on persons aged 10-19 years in recognition of the importance of early prevention efforts. Firearm homicide and suicide rates were calculated for the 50 most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) for 2009-2010 using mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Comparison statistics were recalculated for 2006-2007 to reflect revisions to MSA delineations and population estimates subsequent to the earlier report. Although the firearm homicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained above the national rate during 2009-2010, more than 75% of these MSAs showed a decreased rate from 2006-2007, largely accounting for a national decrease. The firearm homicide rate for persons aged 10-19 years exceeded the all-ages rate in many of these MSAs during 2009-2010, similar to the earlier reporting period. Conversely, although the firearm suicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained below the national rate during 2009-2010, nearly 75% of these MSAs showed an increased rate from 2006-2007, paralleling the national trend. Firearm suicide rates among persons aged 10-19 years were low compared with all-ages rates during both periods. These patterns can inform the development and monitoring of strategies directed at reducing firearm-related violence.

  10. A 2006-2007 Update on Oceanographic Conditions in the Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morison, J. H.; Steele, M.; Wahr, J.; Alkire, M.; Peralta-Ferriz, C.; Kwok, R.; Kikuchi, T.

    2007-12-01

    Trends in central Arctic Ocean conditions are updated with recently gathered data. In the late 1980s and through the 1990s we saw major shifts in the Arctic Ocean. The influence of Atlantic Water in the Arctic Ocean became more widespread and intense and the pattern of water circulation and ice drift shifted, resulting in a more cyclonic circulation. These changes became manifest in the central Arctic near the North Pole as increases in upper ocean salinity and Atlantic Water temperature. They occurred in concert with a decrease in surface atmospheric pressure. With the aim of helping to track such changes, the North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) has been maintained since 2000. Along with an automated drifting station and a deep ocean mooring near the Pole; NPEO conducts airborne hydrographic surveys that track changes along key sections radiating from the Pole. In a related project, several of us have undertaken in situ ocean bottom pressure measurements and the analysis of Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data to track changes in the distribution of ocean mass. Hydrographic measurements made by the NPEO show that between 2000 and 2005, oceanographic condition relaxed toward the pre-1990 state. Morison et al [2006] describe these changes and relate them to a decline in the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index. On the basis of in situ and GRACE bottom pressure trends, Morison et al. [2007] argue that shift back to pre-1990s circulation extended over the whole Arctic Ocean. The Spring 2007 NPEO hydrographic surveys and the 2006-2007 bottom pressure data suggest the trend towards pre-1990s conditions has now, once again, reversed. The new observations show greater salinities and bottom pressure near the Pole, indicative of increased Atlantic water presence. Temperatures have increased in the Atlantic Water core along the Eurasian flank of the Lomonosov Ridge. We will explore these most recent changes and their relation to changes in the ice cover and

  11. Genetic analysis of West Nile virus isolates from an outbreak in Idaho, United States, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Grinev, Andriyan; Chancey, Caren; Añez, Germán; Ball, Christopher; Winkelman, Valerie; Williamson, Phillip; Foster, Gregory A; Stramer, Susan L; Rios, Maria

    2013-09-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) appeared in the U.S. in 1999 and has since become endemic, with yearly summer epidemics causing tens of thousands of cases of serious disease over the past 14 years. Analysis of WNV strains isolated during the 2006-2007 epidemic seasons demonstrates that a new genetic variant had emerged coincidentally with an intense outbreak in Idaho during 2006. The isolates belonging to the new variant carry a 13 nt deletion, termed ID-Δ13, located at the variable region of the 3'UTR, and are genetically related. The analysis of deletions and insertions in the 3'UTR of two major lineages of WNV revealed the presence of conserved repeats and two indel motifs in the variable region of the 3'UTR. One human and two bird isolates from the Idaho 2006-2007 outbreaks were sequenced using Illumina technology and within-host variability was analyzed. Continued monitoring of new genetic variants is important for public health as WNV continues to evolve.

  12. Measles investigation: a moving target.

    PubMed

    Helmecke, Megan R; Elmendorf, Sarah L; Kent, Donna L; Pauze, Daniel K; Pauze, Denis R

    2014-08-01

    Measles is a highly contagious respiratory infection with significant transmission risk once thought to be on the verge of elimination. Outbreaks in Europe have resulted in resurgence; however, experience with measles is limited in the United States. We describe the impact of 2 measles cases presenting to our emergency department in May 2011. Exposure criteria were defined and revised. Guidance documents were developed and distributed. Suspect cases were masked and escorted to negative pressure. Lack of prompt IgM and polymerase chain reaction testing resulted in delayed disease confirmation. Computerized flagging systems were established. Exposed individuals were screened to determine the need for prophylaxis. Investigation costs were calculated. A total of 171 patients and visitors and 94 employees met exposure criteria. Employees had proof of immunity to measles. Of these, 43 patients and visitors returned for prophylaxis. No subsequent transmission occurred. The conservative cost for these investigations was $63,176.39. Multiple challenges were identified. Inexperience with measles can result in significant outbreaks. Although transmission did occur at another facility, it was prevented at our facility because of rapid case recognition, isolation, health care worker immunity, and multidisciplinary response. Discordance between the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee and public health guidelines for measles control created unnecessary challenges. PMID:24939517

  13. Sensitivity of mountain permafrost to extreme climatic events; a case study from the 2006-2007 air temperature anomaly in southern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksen, K.; Ødegård, R. S.; Eiken, T.; Sollid, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    An unusual synoptic situation with long periods of warm and humid southerlies produced record breaking temperatures in southern Norway during the period from July 2006 to June 2007, particularly late summer, autumn and early winter 2006-2007. For the one-year period, the temperature anomaly was 2.5-3.0 °C above the 1961-1990 average, with highest anomalies in the eastern and northern parts of southern Norway. The homogenised mean air temperature for the station Kjøremsgrende (62°06'N, 9°03'E, 626 m a.s.l.) was 2.9 °C above the 1961-1990 average. This is the warmest since records began in 1867. The most striking month was December 2006, when mean air temperature was 7.5 °C above the 1961-1990 average. At the official mountain station Fokstugu (62°11'N, 9°29'E, 972 m a.s.l.), on Dovrefjell, there were no days with temperatures below freezing in August and September. The late summer heat had a particularly strong impact on snow, ice and frozen ground in the mountains of southern Norway. Official mass balance investigations performed on three glaciers showed that they had their most negative net balances ever measured. Analysis of a leather shoe that melted out from a perennial snowfield at 2000 meters altitude was dated back 3,400 years old. Several complete arrows and a spade made from wood were also found in front of perennial snowfields. This study seeks to analyse the impact of the 2006-2007 air temperature anomaly on the ground thermal regime, including permafrost and seasonal frost, in the high mountains of Jotunheimen and Dovrefjell in southern Norway. In Jotunheimen, ground temperature data are monitored in a 129 m deep permafrost borehole, located at Juvvasshøe (61°40'N, 8°22'E, 1894 m a.s.l.), established within the PACE-project (Permafrost and Climate in Europe). On Dovrefjell ground temperatures are measured in a transect from deep seasonal frost at 1039 m a.s.l. to discontinuous mountain permafrost at 1505 m a.s.l. in 11 boreholes, 9 m deep

  14. Characterization of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli strains isolated from animal and human clinical samples in Hungary in 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Akos; Juhász-Kaszanyitzky, Éva; Mag, Tünde; Hajbel-Vékony, Gabriella; Pászti, Judit; Damjanova, Ivelina

    2013-06-01

    The proportion of Escherichia coli non-susceptible to 3(rd) generation cephalosprins from invasive clinical samples has risen in Hungary from 5.1 per cent in 2006 to 15.5 per cent in 2011. The prevalence of ESBL-production in E. coli of animal origin remains unknown. During the first stage of a probe forty-five human and 18 animal ESBL-producing E. coli strains isolated in 2006-2007 were investigated. The human strains were representatively selected from a collection of 113 ESBL-producing isolates sent to the national reference center from local laboratories across the country. A variety of ESBLs were detected (SHV-2, -5, -12, CTX-M-32) with CTX-M-15 being the most common in human and CTX-M-1 the dominant in animal isolates. Genetic characterization revealed that thirty-six human isolates (80 per cent) belonged to either the phylogenetic group (PG) B2 or D. Conversely, 15 animal isolates (83 per cent) proved to be members of the A and B1 commensal PGs. Furthermore 46 per cent of human isolates (21/45) from 12 centres belonged to the international O25-ST131/B2 clone while nine isolates from seven centers showed the O15 serotype. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) detected 22 and 11 diverse pulsotypes among 45 human and 18 animal isolates, respectively. The human and animal strains did not share any pulsotypes.

  15. John F. Kennedy Space Center's Technology Development and Application 2006-2007 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Topics covered include: Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors; Determining Trajectory of Triboelectrically Charged Particles, Using Discrete Element Modeling; Using Indium Tin Oxide To Mitigate Dust on Viewing Ports; High-Performance Polyimide Powder Coatings; Controlled-Release Microcapsules for Smart Coatings for Corrosion Applications; Aerocoat 7 Replacement Coatings; Photocatalytic Coatings for Exploration and Spaceport Design; New Materials for the Repair of Polyimide Electrical Wire Insulation; Commodity-Free Calibration; Novel Ice Mitigation Methods; Crack Offset Measurement With the Projected Laser Target Device; New Materials for Structural Composites and Protective Coatings; Fire Chemistry Testing of Spray-On Foam Insulation (SOFI); Using Aerogel-Based Insulation Material To Prevent Foam Loss on the Liquid-Hydrogen Intertank; Particle Ejection and Levitation Technology (PELT); Electrostatic Characterization of Lunar Dust; Numerical Analysis of Rocket Exhaust Cratering; RESOLVE Projects: Lunar Water Resource Demonstration and Regolith Volatile Characterization; Tribocharging Lunar Soil for Electrostatic Beneficiation; Numerically Modeling the Erosion of Lunar Soil by Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Trajectory Model of Lunar Dust Particles; Using Lunar Module Shadows To Scale the Effects of Rocket Exhaust Plumes; Predicting the Acoustic Environment Induced by the Launch of the Ares I Vehicle; Measuring Ultrasonic Acoustic Velocity in a Thin Sheet of Graphite Epoxy Composite; Hail Size Distribution Mapping; Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor Array System; Autonomous Flight Safety System - Phase III; The Photogrammetry Cube; Bird Vision System; Automating Range Surveillance Through Radio Interferometry and Field Strength Mapping Techniques; Next-Generation Telemetry Workstation; GPS Metric Tracking Unit; and Space-Based Range.

  16. Physics & Astronomy Master's Initial Employment: Data from the Degree Recipient Follow-Up Survey for the Classes of 2006, 2007 and 2008. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Patrick; Shindel, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the characteristics and initial outcomes of exiting master's degree recipients in physics and astronomy. The report covers the degree classes of 2006, 2007 and 2008. The status of exiting physics master's varied greatly by the citizenship of the degree recipient. The majority of US citizens entered or remained in the workforce…

  17. Selected Water-Quality Data for the Standard Mine, Gunnison County, Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Verplanck, Philip L.; Manning, Andrew H.; Mast, M. Alisa; Wanty, Richard B.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; Todorov, Todor; Adams, Monique

    2007-01-01

    Mine drainage and underground water samples were collected for analysis of inorganic solutes as part of a 1-year, hydrogeologic investigation of the Standard Mine and vicinity. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has listed the Standard Mine in the Elk Creek drainage near Crested Butte, Colorado, as a Superfund Site because discharge from the Standard Mine enters Elk Creek, contributing dissolved and suspended loads of zinc, cadmium, copper, and other metals to Coal Creek, which is the primary drinking-water supply for the town of Crested Butte. Water analyses are reported for mine-effluent samples from Levels 1 and 5 of the Standard Mine, underground samples from Levels 3 and 5 of the Standard Mine, mine effluent from an adit located on the Elk Lode, and two spring samples that emerged from waste-rock material below Level 5 of the Standard Mine and the adit located on the Elk Lode. Reported analyses include field parameters (pH, specific conductance, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and redox potential) and major constituents and trace elements.

  18. Topographic Change Detection at Select Archeological Sites in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collins, Brian D.; Minasian, Diane L.; Kayen, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Topographic change of archeological sites within the Colorado River corridor of Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) is a subject of interest to National Park Service managers and other stakeholders in the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program. Although long-term topographic change resulting from a variety of natural processes is typical in the Grand Canyon region, a continuing debate exists on whether and how controlled releases from Glen Canyon Dam, located immediately upstream of GCNP, are impacting rates of site erosion, artifact transport, and the preservation of archeological resources. Continued erosion of archeological sites threatens both the archeological resources and our future ability to study evidence of past cultural habitation. Understanding the causes and effects of archaeological site erosion requires a knowledge of several factors including the location and magnitude of the changes occurring in relation to archeological resources, the rate of the changes, and the relative contribution of several potential causes, including sediment depletion associated with managed flows from Glen Canyon Dam, site-specific weather patterns, visitor impacts, and long-term climate change. To obtain this information, highly accurate, spatially specific data are needed from sites undergoing change. Using terrestrial lidar data collection techniques and novel TIN- and GRID-based change-detection post-processing methods, we analyzed topographic data for nine archeological sites. The data were collected using three separate data collection efforts spanning 16 months (May 2006 to September 2007). Our results documented positive evidence of erosion, deposition, or both at six of the nine sites investigated during this time interval. In addition, we observed possible signs of change at two of the other sites. Erosion was concentrated in established gully drainages and averaged 12 cm to 17 cm in depth with maximum depths of 50 cm. Deposition was concentrated at specific

  19. Marital and job satisfaction among non-resident physicians at a Hispanic academic medical center, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Acevedo, Luis F; Céspedes-Gómez, Wayca R

    2009-01-01

    Marital satisfaction has been previously associated with job satisfaction although few studies have addressed this issue among Hispanic physicians. Marital and job satisfaction were assessed in a sample of 92 legally married non-residents physicians working at a Hispanic Academic Medical Center during the 2006-2007 academic year. Marital satisfaction was assessed using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and job satisfaction was measured using a 18-item scale. Response rate was 34.8%. Most (70.7%) of the subjects were males. Forty- five percent (45.0%) belonged to the surgical specialties group. The mean scale value for marital satisfaction was found to be in the average range. Almost all (88.7%) the participants reported being "satisfied "to "very satisfied" with their job. Ninety percent (90.0%) of the surgical specialists and 86.9% of the non-surgical specialists reported being satisfied with their job. The percentage of participants that reported to be "very satisfied" with their job, was higher among the group of surgical specialists (23.3%) than among the non-surgical specialists (13.0%) There was no significant relationship between marital satisfaction and job satisfaction. Also, no statistically significant difference was observed in the level of marital satisfaction and job satisfaction when surgical and non-surgical physicians were compared. The findings on marital satisfaction obtained in this sample were similar to those observed in a previous study of resident physicians at the same academic medical center.

  20. Marital and job satisfaction among non-resident physicians at a Hispanic academic medical center, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Colón-de Martí, Luz N; Acevedo, Luis F; Céspedes-Gómez, Wayca R

    2009-01-01

    Marital satisfaction has been previously associated with job satisfaction although few studies have addressed this issue among Hispanic physicians. Marital and job satisfaction were assessed in a sample of 92 legally married non-residents physicians working at a Hispanic Academic Medical Center during the 2006-2007 academic year. Marital satisfaction was assessed using the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (DAS) and job satisfaction was measured using a 18-item scale. Response rate was 34.8%. Most (70.7%) of the subjects were males. Forty- five percent (45.0%) belonged to the surgical specialties group. The mean scale value for marital satisfaction was found to be in the average range. Almost all (88.7%) the participants reported being "satisfied "to "very satisfied" with their job. Ninety percent (90.0%) of the surgical specialists and 86.9% of the non-surgical specialists reported being satisfied with their job. The percentage of participants that reported to be "very satisfied" with their job, was higher among the group of surgical specialists (23.3%) than among the non-surgical specialists (13.0%) There was no significant relationship between marital satisfaction and job satisfaction. Also, no statistically significant difference was observed in the level of marital satisfaction and job satisfaction when surgical and non-surgical physicians were compared. The findings on marital satisfaction obtained in this sample were similar to those observed in a previous study of resident physicians at the same academic medical center. PMID:19954085

  1. Genetic Analysis of Norovirus GII.4 Variant Strains Detected in Outbreaks of Gastroenteritis in Yokohama, Japan, from the 2006-2007 to the 2013-2014 Seasons.

    PubMed

    Kumazaki, Makoto; Usuku, Shuzo

    2015-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis, both in sporadic cases and outbreaks. Since the 1990s, the emergence of several GII.4 variants has been reported worldwide. To investigate the epidemic status of NoV, 6,724 stool samples collected from outbreaks in Yokohama, Japan, from the 2006-2007 to 2013-2014 seasons were assessed for NoVs. We genotyped one specimen from each GII outbreak and conducted a sequence analysis of the VP1 gene for several GII.4 strains. Of the 947 NoV outbreaks during our study, GII was detected in 835, and GII.4 was the predominant genotype of GII. Five different GII.4 variants, Yerseke 2006a, Den Haag 2006b (2006b), Apeldoorn 2007, New Orleans 2009, and Sydney 2012, were detected. During this study period, the most prevalent variant of GII.4 was 2006b, and in each individual season, either 2006b or Sydney 2012 was the predominant variant. Out of the 16 detected 2006b strains, 12 had some amino acid substitutions in their blockade epitope, and these substitutions were concentrated in three residues. Two of the 2006b strains detected in the 2012-2013 season had a S368E substitution, which is consistent with the amino acid residues at same site of NSW0514 (Sydney 2012 prototype). Among the 16 detected strains of Sydney 2012, a phylogenetic analysis showed that all five strains detected in Yokohama during the 2011-2012 season clustered away from the other Sydney 2012 strains that were detected in the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 seasons. These five strains and other Sydney 2012 strains in Yokohama had a few amino acid differences in the blockade epitopes compared with NSW0514. The amino acid substitutions observed in this study provide informative data about the evolution of a novel GII.4 variant.

  2. Influenza antiviral susceptibility monitoring activities in relation to national antiviral stockpiles in Europe during the winter 2006/2007 season.

    PubMed

    Meijer, A; Lackenby, A; Hay, A; Zambon, M

    2007-04-01

    Due to the influenza pandemic threat, many countries are stockpiling antivirals in the hope of limiting the impact of a future pandemic virus. Since resistance to antiviral drugs would probably significantly alter the effectiveness of antivirals, surveillance programmes to monitor the emergence of resistance are of considerable importance. During the 2006/2007 influenza season, an inventory was conducted by the European Surveillance Network for Vigilance against Viral Resistance (VIRGIL) in collaboration with the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) to evaluate antiviral susceptibility testing by the National Influenza Reference Laboratories (NIRL) in relation to the national antiviral stockpile in 30 European countries that are members of EISS. All countries except Ukraine had a stockpile of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) oseltamivir. Additionally, four countries had a stockpile of the NAI zanamivir and three of the M2 ion channel inhibitor rimantadine. Of 29 countries with a NAI stockpile, six countries' NIRLs could determine virus susceptibility by 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) and in 13 countries it could be done by sequencing. Only in one of the three countries with a rimantadine stockpile could the NIRL determine virus susceptibility, by sequencing only. However, including the 18 countries that had plans to introduce or extend antiviral susceptibility testing, the NIRLs of 21 of the 29 countries with a stockpile would be capable of susceptibility testing appropriate to the stockpiled drug by the end of the 2007/2008 influenza season. Although most European countries in this study have stockpiles of influenza antivirals, susceptibility surveillance capability by the NIRLs appropriate to the stockpiled antivirals is limited. PMID:17991386

  3. Analysis of erythemally effective UV radiation at the Mendel Station, James Ross Island in the period of 2006-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laska, K.; Prosek, P.; Budik, L.; Budikova, M.

    2009-04-01

    The results of global solar and erythemally effective ultraviolet (EUV) radiation measurements are presented. The radiation data were collected within the period of 2006-2007 at the Czech Antarctic station J. G. Mendel, James Ross Island (63°48'S, 57°53'W). Global solar radiation was measured by a Kipp&Zonen CM11 pyranometer. EUV radiation was measured according to the McKinley and Diffey Erythemal Action Spectrum with a Solar Light broadband UV-Biometer Model 501A. The effects of stratospheric ozone concentration and cloudiness (estimated as cloud impact factor from global solar radiation) on the intensity of incident EUV radiation were calculated by a non-linear regression model. The total ozone content (TOC) and cloud/surface reflectivity derived from satellite-based measurements were applied into the model for elimination of the uncertainties in measured ozone values. There were two input data of TOC used in the model. The first were taken from the Dobson spectrophotometer measurements (Argentinean Antarctic station Marambio), the second was acquired for geographical coordinates of the Mendel Station from the EOS Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument and V8.5 algorithm. Analysis of measured EUV data showed that variable cloudiness affected rather short-term fluctuations of the radiation fluxes, while ozone declines caused long-term UV radiation increase in the second half of the year. The model predicted about 98 % variability of the measured EUV radiation. The residuals between measured and modeled EUV radiation intensities were evaluated separately for the above-specified two TOC datasets, parts of seasons and cloud impact factor (cloudiness). The mean average prediction error was used for model validation according to the cloud impact factor and satellite-based reflectivity data.

  4. Microbial and Nutrient Concentration and Load Data During Stormwater Runoff at a Swine Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation in the North Carolina Coastal Plain, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harden, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes water-quality and hydrologic data collected during 2006-2007 to characterize bacteria and nutrient loads associated with overland runoff and subsurface tile drainage in spray fields at a swine concentrated animal feeding operation. Four monitoring locations were established at the Lizzie Research Site in the North Carolina Coastal Plain Physiographic Province for collecting discharge and water-quality data during stormwater-runoff events. Water stage was measured continuously at each monitoring location. A stage-discharge relation was developed for each site and was used to compute instantaneous discharge values for collected samples. Water-quality samples were collected for five storm events during 2006-2007 for analysis of nutrients and fecal indicator bacteria. Instantaneous loads of nitrite plus nitrate, total coliform, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and enterococci were computed for selected times during the five storm events.

  5. Girl child marriage and its effect on fertility in Pakistan: findings from Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Muazzam, Sana; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Raj, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Child marriage (before 18 years) is prevalent in Pakistan, which disproportionately affects young girls in rural, low income and low education households. Our study aims to determine the association between early marriage and high fertility and poor fertility health indicators among young women in Pakistan beyond those attributed to social vulnerabilities. Nationally representative data from Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey, 2006-2007, a cross-sectional observational survey, were limited to ever-married women aged 20-24 years (n = 1,560; 15% of 10,023) to identify differences in poor fertility outcomes [high fertility (three or more childbirths); rapid repeat childbirth (<24 months between births); unwanted pregnancy (any ever); pregnancy termination (any stillbirth, miscarriage or abortion ever)] by early (<18) versus adult (≥18) age at marriage. Associations between child marriage and fertility outcomes were assessed by calculating adjusted odds ratios (AORs) using logistic regression models after controlling for demographics, social equity indicators (education, wealth index, rural residence), contraception use, marriage duration and culture-specific factors (husband's desire for more children, son preference). Overall, 50% of ever-married women aged 20-24 years in Pakistan were married before the age of 18 years. Girl child marriage was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with low social equity indicators (poverty, rural residence, and no formal education). Adjusted logistic regression models showed that girl child marriage was significantly associated with high fertility (AOR 6.62; 95% CI 3.53-12.43), rapid repeat childbirth (AOR 2.88; 95% CI 1.83-4.54), unwanted pregnancy (AOR 2.90; 95% CI 1.75-4.79), and pregnancy termination (AOR 1.75; 95% CI 1.10-2.78). Girl child marriage affects half of all ever-married women aged 20-24 years in Pakistan, and increases their risk for high fertility and poor fertility health indicators, highlighting the need of

  6. Girl child marriage and its effect on fertility in Pakistan: findings from Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Nasrullah, Muazzam; Muazzam, Sana; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A; Raj, Anita

    2014-04-01

    Child marriage (before 18 years) is prevalent in Pakistan, which disproportionately affects young girls in rural, low income and low education households. Our study aims to determine the association between early marriage and high fertility and poor fertility health indicators among young women in Pakistan beyond those attributed to social vulnerabilities. Nationally representative data from Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey, 2006-2007, a cross-sectional observational survey, were limited to ever-married women aged 20-24 years (n = 1,560; 15% of 10,023) to identify differences in poor fertility outcomes [high fertility (three or more childbirths); rapid repeat childbirth (<24 months between births); unwanted pregnancy (any ever); pregnancy termination (any stillbirth, miscarriage or abortion ever)] by early (<18) versus adult (≥18) age at marriage. Associations between child marriage and fertility outcomes were assessed by calculating adjusted odds ratios (AORs) using logistic regression models after controlling for demographics, social equity indicators (education, wealth index, rural residence), contraception use, marriage duration and culture-specific factors (husband's desire for more children, son preference). Overall, 50% of ever-married women aged 20-24 years in Pakistan were married before the age of 18 years. Girl child marriage was significantly (p < 0.001) associated with low social equity indicators (poverty, rural residence, and no formal education). Adjusted logistic regression models showed that girl child marriage was significantly associated with high fertility (AOR 6.62; 95% CI 3.53-12.43), rapid repeat childbirth (AOR 2.88; 95% CI 1.83-4.54), unwanted pregnancy (AOR 2.90; 95% CI 1.75-4.79), and pregnancy termination (AOR 1.75; 95% CI 1.10-2.78). Girl child marriage affects half of all ever-married women aged 20-24 years in Pakistan, and increases their risk for high fertility and poor fertility health indicators, highlighting the need of

  7. Investigational EGFR-targeted therapies in HNSCC

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, Andre; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2010-01-01

    Importance of the Field The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an established therapeutic target in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibody cetuximab (™Erbitux) was FDA-approved for use in HNSCC in 2006. The molecular basis for the efficacy of an antibody approach compared with inhibition of EGFR tyrosine kinase function using small molecule inhibitors, or downregulation of protein expression via antisense strategies remains incompletely understood. Areas covered in this review A literature search was performed to identify studies elucidating mechanisms of action of several approaches to targeting EGFR in HNSCC (monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, antisense approaches, and ligand toxin conjugates). What the reader will gain Monoclonal antibodies decrease tumor growth via receptor endocytosis and recruitment of host immune defenses. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors bind to the ATP binding pocket of the tyrosine kinase domain, inhibiting signaling. Antisense approaches decrease EGFR expression with high specificity although drug delivery remains problematic. Ligand-toxin conjugates facilitate the entry of toxin and the ADP-ribosylation of the ribosome, thereby inhibiting translation. Take home message Elucidation mechanisms by which these different strategies inhibit EGFR function may enhance the development of more effective treatments for HNSCC and enable prospective identification of individuals who will benefit from EGFR inhibition. PMID:20415598

  8. Relationship of climate, geography, and geology to the incidence of Rift Valley fever in Kenya during the 2006-2007 outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Allen; Kinkade, Carl; Nguku, Patrick M; Anyangu, Amwayi; Mutonga, David; Omolo, Jared; Njenga, M Kariuki; Feikin, Daniel R; Schnabel, David; Ombok, Maurice; Breiman, Robert F

    2012-02-01

    We estimated Rift Valley fever (RVF) incidence as a function of geological, geographical, and climatological factors during the 2006-2007 RVF epidemic in Kenya. Location information was obtained for 214 of 340 (63%) confirmed and probable RVF cases that occurred during an outbreak from November 1, 2006 to February 28, 2007. Locations with subtypes of solonetz, calcisols, solonchaks, and planosols soil types were highly associated with RVF occurrence during the outbreak period. Increased rainfall and higher greenness measures before the outbreak were associated with increased risk. RVF was more likely to occur on plains, in densely bushed areas, at lower elevations, and in the Somalia acacia ecological zone. Cases occurred in three spatial temporal clusters that differed by the date of associated rainfall, soil type, and land usage. PMID:22302875

  9. Relationship of climate, geography, and geology to the incidence of Rift Valley fever in Kenya during the 2006-2007 outbreak.

    PubMed

    Hightower, Allen; Kinkade, Carl; Nguku, Patrick M; Anyangu, Amwayi; Mutonga, David; Omolo, Jared; Njenga, M Kariuki; Feikin, Daniel R; Schnabel, David; Ombok, Maurice; Breiman, Robert F

    2012-02-01

    We estimated Rift Valley fever (RVF) incidence as a function of geological, geographical, and climatological factors during the 2006-2007 RVF epidemic in Kenya. Location information was obtained for 214 of 340 (63%) confirmed and probable RVF cases that occurred during an outbreak from November 1, 2006 to February 28, 2007. Locations with subtypes of solonetz, calcisols, solonchaks, and planosols soil types were highly associated with RVF occurrence during the outbreak period. Increased rainfall and higher greenness measures before the outbreak were associated with increased risk. RVF was more likely to occur on plains, in densely bushed areas, at lower elevations, and in the Somalia acacia ecological zone. Cases occurred in three spatial temporal clusters that differed by the date of associated rainfall, soil type, and land usage.

  10. Multidrug-resistant North American pulsotype 2 Clostridium difficile was the predominant toxigenic hospital-acquired strain in the province of Manitoba, Canada, in 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Karlowsky, James A; Zhanel, George G; Hammond, Greg W; Rubinstein, Ethan; Wylie, John; Du, Tim; Mulvey, Michael R; Alfa, Michelle J

    2012-05-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine whether the antimicrobial susceptibility profile or genotype of hospital-acquired isolates of Clostridium difficile differed from isolates causing community-acquired disease. Five hundred diarrhoeal stool samples (one >2 ml sample per patient) from patients across Manitoba, Canada, in 2006-2007 that were reported as C. difficile toxin positive were cultured, resulting in 432 isolates of toxin-positive C. difficile for analysis. Of these 432 isolates, acquisition status could be determined for 235 (54.4%); 182 (77.4%) isolates were hospital acquired and 53 (22.6%) were community acquired. North American pulsotype (NAP) designations based on SmaI PFGE could be defined for 52.3% of the 432 isolates, with NAP2 (n=122) being the most common. Ninety-one per cent (71/78) of NAP2 isolates were recovered from patients with hospital-acquired C. difficile disease. Other NAP types and isolates with non-NAP-type PFGE patterns were less frequently associated with hospital-acquired disease. Community-acquired disease (35.3% of isolates) was associated with a wide variety of NAP types. NAP2 isolates were homogeneous (85.5% had SmaI PFGE pattern 0003) and demonstrated low susceptibility to moxifloxacin (6.6%) and clindamycin (1.6%) compared with non-NAP2 isolates (64.1-93.2% moxifloxacin susceptible; 14.1-28.2% clindamycin susceptible). All isolates of C. difficile in Manitoba were susceptible to metronidazole, piperacillin-tazobactam, amoxicillin-clavulanate and meropenem. NAP2 isolates of toxigenic C. difficile were approximately three times more common than NAP1 isolates (28.2 vs 9.1%) in Manitoba in 2006-2007, and these isolates demonstrated high levels of clonality and multidrug resistance, and were associated with hospital acquisition. PMID:22301615

  11. Multiple virus lineages sharing recent common ancestry were associated with a Large Rift Valley fever outbreak among livestock in Kenya during 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Bird, Brian H; Githinji, Jane W K; Macharia, Joseph M; Kasiiti, Jacqueline L; Muriithi, Rees M; Gacheru, Stephen G; Musaa, Joseph O; Towner, Jonathan S; Reeder, Serena A; Oliver, Jennifer B; Stevens, Thomas L; Erickson, Bobbie R; Morgan, Laura T; Khristova, Marina L; Hartman, Amy L; Comer, James A; Rollin, Pierre E; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Nichol, Stuart T

    2008-11-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) virus historically has caused widespread and extensive outbreaks of severe human and livestock disease throughout Africa, Madagascar, and the Arabian Peninsula. Following unusually heavy rainfall during the late autumn of 2006, reports of human and animal illness consistent with RVF virus infection emerged across semiarid regions of the Garissa District of northeastern Kenya and southern Somalia. Following initial RVF virus laboratory confirmation, a high-throughput RVF diagnostic facility was established at the Kenyan Central Veterinary Laboratories in Kabete, Kenya, to support the real-time identification of infected livestock and to facilitate outbreak response and control activities. A total of 3,250 specimens from a variety of animal species, including domesticated livestock (cattle, sheep, goats, and camels) and wildlife collected from a total of 55 of 71 Kenyan administrative districts, were tested by molecular and serologic assays. Evidence of RVF infection was found in 9.2% of animals tested and across 23 districts of Kenya, reflecting the large number of affected livestock and the geographic extent of the outbreak. The complete S, M, and/or L genome segment sequence was obtained from a total of 31 RVF virus specimens spanning the entire known outbreak period (December-May) and geographic areas affected by RVF virus activity. Extensive genomic analyses demonstrated the concurrent circulation of multiple virus lineages, gene segment reassortment, and the common ancestry of the 2006/2007 outbreak viruses with those from the 1997-1998 east African RVF outbreak. Evidence of recent increases in genomic diversity and effective population size 2 to 4 years prior to the 2006-2007 outbreak also was found, indicating ongoing RVF virus activity and evolution during the interepizootic/epidemic period. These findings have implications for further studies of basic RVF virus ecology and the design of future surveillance/diagnostic activities, and

  12. Teachers in the News: A Critical Analysis of One US Newspaper's Discourse on Education, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Jennifer L.

    2010-01-01

    Public education discourse in the USA has been characterized by messages of crisis shaping education policies across national contexts. Education policy solutions target a lack of qualified teachers and insufficient oversight of teacher practice as central factors in the crisis, placing teacher identity as knowledgeable, authoritative…

  13. Multistate outbreak of human Salmonella infections caused by contaminated dry dog food--United States, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    2008-05-16

    During January 1, 2006-December 31, 2007, CDC collaborated with public health officials in Pennsylvania, other states, and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to investigate a prolonged multistate outbreak of Salmonella enterica serotype Schwarzengrund infections in humans. A total of 70 cases of S. Schwarzengrund infection with the outbreak strain (XbaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis [PFGE] pattern JM6X01.0015) were identified in 19 states, mostly in the northeastern United States. This report describes the outbreak investigation, which identified the source of infection as dry dog food produced at a manufacturing plant in Pennsylvania. This investigation is the first to identify contaminated dry dog food as a source of human Salmonella infections. After handling pet foods, pet owners should wash their hands immediately, and infants should be kept away from pet feeding areas.

  14. Reduced Disparities in Birth Rates Among Teens Aged 15-19 Years - United States, 2006-2007 and 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lisa; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Cox, Shanna; Kroelinger, Charlan; Besera, Ghenet; Brittain, Anna; Fuller, Taleria R; Koumans, Emilia; Barfield, Wanda

    2016-04-29

    Teen childbearing can have negative health, economic, and social consequences for mothers and their children (1) and costs the United States approximately $9.4 billion annually (2). During 1991-2014, the birth rate among teens aged 15-19 years in the United States declined 61%, from 61.8 to 24.2 births per 1,000, the lowest rate ever recorded (3). Nonetheless, in 2014, the teen birth rate remained approximately twice as high for Hispanic and non-Hispanic black (black) teens compared with non-Hispanic white (white) teens (3), and geographic and socioeconomic disparities remain (3,4), irrespective of race/ethnicity. Social determinants associated with teen childbearing (e.g., low parental educational attainment and limited opportunities for education and employment) are more common in communities with higher proportions of racial and ethnic minorities (4), contributing to the challenge of further reducing disparities in teen births. To examine trends in births for teens aged 15-19 years by race/ethnicity and geography, CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) data at the national (2006-2014), state (2006-2007 and 2013-2014), and county (2013-2014) levels. To describe socioeconomic indicators previously associated with teen births, CDC analyzed data from the American Community Survey (ACS) (2010-2014). Nationally, from 2006 to 2014, the teen birth rate declined 41% overall with the largest decline occurring among Hispanics (51%), followed by blacks (44%), and whites (35%). The birth rate ratio for Hispanic teens and black teens compared with white teens declined from 2.9 to 2.2 and from 2.3 to 2.0, respectively. From 2006-2007 to 2013-2014, significant declines in teen birth rates and birth rate ratios were noted nationally and in many states. At the county level, teen birth rates for 2013-2014 ranged from 3.1 to 119.0 per 1,000 females aged 15-19 years; ACS data indicated unemployment was higher, and education attainment and family income were lower in

  15. Reduced Disparities in Birth Rates Among Teens Aged 15-19 Years - United States, 2006-2007 and 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Romero, Lisa; Pazol, Karen; Warner, Lee; Cox, Shanna; Kroelinger, Charlan; Besera, Ghenet; Brittain, Anna; Fuller, Taleria R; Koumans, Emilia; Barfield, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Teen childbearing can have negative health, economic, and social consequences for mothers and their children (1) and costs the United States approximately $9.4 billion annually (2). During 1991-2014, the birth rate among teens aged 15-19 years in the United States declined 61%, from 61.8 to 24.2 births per 1,000, the lowest rate ever recorded (3). Nonetheless, in 2014, the teen birth rate remained approximately twice as high for Hispanic and non-Hispanic black (black) teens compared with non-Hispanic white (white) teens (3), and geographic and socioeconomic disparities remain (3,4), irrespective of race/ethnicity. Social determinants associated with teen childbearing (e.g., low parental educational attainment and limited opportunities for education and employment) are more common in communities with higher proportions of racial and ethnic minorities (4), contributing to the challenge of further reducing disparities in teen births. To examine trends in births for teens aged 15-19 years by race/ethnicity and geography, CDC analyzed National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) data at the national (2006-2014), state (2006-2007 and 2013-2014), and county (2013-2014) levels. To describe socioeconomic indicators previously associated with teen births, CDC analyzed data from the American Community Survey (ACS) (2010-2014). Nationally, from 2006 to 2014, the teen birth rate declined 41% overall with the largest decline occurring among Hispanics (51%), followed by blacks (44%), and whites (35%). The birth rate ratio for Hispanic teens and black teens compared with white teens declined from 2.9 to 2.2 and from 2.3 to 2.0, respectively. From 2006-2007 to 2013-2014, significant declines in teen birth rates and birth rate ratios were noted nationally and in many states. At the county level, teen birth rates for 2013-2014 ranged from 3.1 to 119.0 per 1,000 females aged 15-19 years; ACS data indicated unemployment was higher, and education attainment and family income were lower in

  16. The 2006/2007 photometric activity of three chromospherically active stars: V2075 Cyg, FG UMa and BM CVn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Soydugan, E.; Bakış, H.; Doğru, D.; Doğru, S. S.; Tüysüz, M.; Kaçar, Y.; Dönmez, A.; Soydugan, F.

    2009-08-01

    We present new multiband CCD photometric observations of three chromospherically active stars with long periods (V2075 Cyg, FG UMa and BM CVn). The observations were made at the Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2006 and 2007. We analyzed BVRI (Bessell) CCD observations of these three RS CVn-type SB1 binaries with the following three steps: (i) Photometric rotation periods were obtained by analyzing their light variations with a differential corrections method and a Fourier transform technique. (ii) Light variations, observed over three or more consecutive orbital cycles, were investigated by using dark (cool) spot models with the program SPOT. (iii) Surface differential rotation coefficients for the primary components of these binaries were derived using our own photometric periods together with orbital periods taken from the literature.

  17. Techniques for Monitoring Razorback Sucker in the Lower Colorado River, Hoover to Parker Dams, 2006-2007, Final Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, Gordon A.; Wydoski, Richard; Best, Eric; Hiebert, Steve; Lantow, Jeff; Santee, Mark; Goettlicher, Bill; Millosovich, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Trammel netting is generally the accepted method of monitoring razorback sucker in reservoirs, but this method is ineffective for monitoring this fish in rivers. Trammel nets set in the current become fouled with debris, and nets set in backwaters capture high numbers of nontarget species. Nontargeted fish composed 97 percent of fish captured in previous studies (1999-2005). In 2005, discovery of a large spawning aggregation of razorback sucker in midchannel near Needles, Calif., prompted the development of more effective methods to monitor this and possibly other riverine fish populations. This study examined the effectiveness of four methods of monitoring razorback sucker in a riverine environment. Hoop netting, electrofishing, boat surveys, and aerial photography were evaluated in terms of data accuracy, costs, stress on targeted fish, and effect on nontargeted fish as compared with trammel netting. Trammel netting in the riverine portion of the Colorado River downstream of Davis Dam, Arizona-Nevada yielded an average of 43 razorback suckers a year (1999 to 2005). Capture rates averaged 0.5 razorback suckers per staff day effort, at a cost exceeding $1,100 per fish. Population estimates calculated for 2003-2005 were 3,570 (95 percent confidence limits [CL] = 1,306i??i??i??-8,925), 1,768 (CL = 878-3,867) and 1,652 (CL = 706-5,164); wide confidence ranges reflect the small sample size. By-catch associated with trammel netting included common carp, game fish and, occasionally, shorebirds, waterfowl, and muskrats. Hoop nets were prone to downstream drift owing to design and anchoring problems aggravated by hydropower ramping. Tests were dropped after the 2006 field season and replaced with electrofishing. Electrofishing at night during low flow and when spawning razorback suckers moved to the shoreline proved extremely effective. In 2006 and 2007, 263 and 299 (respectively) razorback suckers were taken. Capture rates averaged 8.3 razorback suckers per staff day at a

  18. Field observations on hydrodynamic and coastal geomorphic processes off Harilaid Peninsula (Baltic Sea) in winter and spring 2006 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suursaar, Ü.; Jaagus, J.; Kont, A.; Rivis, R.; Tõnisson, H.

    2008-10-01

    Investigations of multi-layer current regime, variations in sea level and wave parameters using a bottom-mounted RDCP ( Recording Doppler Current Profiler) during 20 December 2006-23 May 2007 were integrated with surveys on changes of shorelines and contours of beach ridges at nearby Harilaid Peninsula (Saaremaa Island). A W-storm with a maximum average wind speed of 23 m s -1 occurred on 14-15 January with an accompanying sea level rise of at least 100 cm and a significant wave height of 3.2 m at the 14 m deep RDCP mooring site. It appeared that in practically tideless Estonian coastal waters, Doppler-based "vertical velocity" measurements reflect mainly site-dependent equilibrium between resuspension and sedimentation. The mooring site, 1.5 km off the Kelba Spit of Harilaid, was located in the accumulation zone, where downward fluxes dominated and fine sand settled. As a result of storms in January and April, the distal part of the accumulative gravel spit advanced by 50 m, whereas a 30-50 m retreat of the shoreline in the western and northern parts occurred at Cape Kiipsaare. The location of the beach ridges shows that the development of the spit occurs through relatively short-period but infrequent storm events, roughly 2-3 times each decade.

  19. Boundary of the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This vector data set delineates the approximate boundary of the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA). This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. The boundary of the ERWVFA was developed by combining information from two data sources. The first data source was a 1:250,000-scale geologic map of the Leadville quadrangle developed by Day and others (1999). The location of Quaternary sediments was used as a first approximation of the ERWVFA. The boundary of the ERWVFA was further refined by overlaying the geologic map with Digital Raster Graphic (DRG) scanned images of 1:24,000 topographic maps (U.S. Geological Survey, 2001). Where appropriate, the boundary of the ERWVFA was remapped to correspond with the edge of the valley-fill aquifer marked by an abrupt change in topography at the edge of the valley floor throughout the Eagle River watershed. The boundary of the ERWVFA more closely resembles a hydrogeomorphic region presented by Rupert (2003, p. 8) because it is based upon general geographic extents of geologic materials and not on an actual aquifer location as would be determined through a rigorous hydrogeologic investigation.

  20. An overview of gas hydrate and cold seep research along the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand (2006 & 2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greinert, J.; Faure, K.; Naudts, L.; de Batist, M.; Bialas, J.; Linke, P.; Pecher, I.; Rowden, R.

    2009-04-01

    Prior to 2006, the knowledge about cold seeps around New Zealand was based mainly on accidental recovery of seep fauna or methane-derived carbonates by fishermen and the detection of flares in fish-finding sonars. Lewis and Marshall (1996; NZJGG) compiled these findings, providing the first details on 13 seep sites. Four of those are located at the Hikurangi Margin along the east coast of New Zealand's North Island. Since then, three international cruises in 2006 and 2007 enhanced our knowledge considerably about methane seepage along the Hikurangi Margin, an area which has widely distributed and in places very strong BSR. Two cruises on the RV TANGAROA (led by GNS Science and NIWA, NZ) in 2006 focused on extensive reconnaissance work (multibeam mapping, seismic surveys, flare imaging, visual observations) as well as fauna sampling, geochemical pore water analyses and CTD casts including water sampling for methane analyses. Several new seep sites were discovered during these cruises. Using these data, very detailed investigations in four main working areas could be performed during a 10-week expedition with RV SONNE (SO191, led by IFM-GEOMAR, Germany). All research topics currently discussed in the scientific community were addressed using state-of-the-art equipment (e.g. deep-tow side-scan, TV-guided sampling, lander and ROV-deployments). Fourteen institutes from seven countries were involved (Australia, Belgium, Germany, New Zealand, United Kingdom, United States, Switzerland). Echosounder and sidescan surveys unmistakably revealed active seep sites by detecting bubbles in the water column and carbonate precipitation at the seafloor forming massive chemoherm complexes. These complexes are associated with typical seep fauna like tube worms, bivalve mollusk species (Calyptogena, Bathymodiolus),and bacterial mats. At the fringe of these chemoherms dark sediment patches were observed which exihibit a novel seep habitat dominated by dense beds of two new species of

  1. Probability of Elevated Nitrate Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  2. Probability of Elevated Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Concentrations in Groundwater in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of elevated volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps was developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  3. Recruiting Trends, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collegiate Employment Research Institute (NJ3), 2007

    2007-01-01

    College students who plan on entering the labor market can expect to see more job opportunities in the spring of 2007, according to information supplied by 864 companies and organizations to this year's Recruiting Trends Report. After two years of double digit growth, the expansion will slow to a modest 4% to 6%. Two opposing factors appear to be…

  4. Principals' Salaries, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Willa D.; Licciardi, Chris

    2007-01-01

    How do salaries of elementary and middle school principals compare with those of other administrators and classroom teachers? Are increases in salaries of principals keeping pace with increases in salaries of classroom teachers? And how have principals' salaries fared over the years when the cost of living is taken into account? This article…

  5. NEA Handbook 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association Research Department, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The National Education Association (NEA) Handbook is published annually for use by Association officers, national and state staff, members, and other interested leaders in the field of education. The Association's key governance documents--including the Constitution, Bylaws, and Rules, and the Legislative Program, resolutions, policy statements,…

  6. Changes in Mean Intake of Fatty Acids and Intake of Saturated and trans Fats from Potatoes: NHANES 2005–2006, 2007–2008, and 2009–201012

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Maureen L; Anderson, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that higher than usual intakes of trans fatty acids (TFAs) have adverse effects on blood lipids. Because of this, in 2006 the US FDA mandated labeling of TFAs on food packages. The food and restaurant industries, including the potato industry, reformulated their foods to reduce or eliminate partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and TFAs. Before mandatory labeling, grain-based desserts, yeast breads, and French-fried potatoes (FFPs) were the top sources of TFAs in the food supply; by 2007, potato food manufacturers and quick-service restaurants had reduced or eliminated TFAs without increasing saturated fatty acids (SFAs). FFPs are no longer a source of TFAs in the food supply. This study examined energy and fatty acid intake among children aged 6–11 y, adolescents aged 12–18 y, and adults aged ≥19 y across 3 time periods by using data from the NHANES 2005–2006, 2007–2008, and 2009–2010. On average, intakes of total energy, total fat, SFAs, and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) decreased significantly between 2005–2006 and 2009–2010 among children and adolescents; however, the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) did not change. Among adults, intakes of total fat, SFAs, and MUFAs decreased; however, total energy and PUFA intake did not change. On the day of the 2009–2010 survey, ∼13% of children and 10% of adolescents reported consuming fried FFPs, whereas <7% of adults reported consumption of fried FFPs. Intakes of SFAs and TFAs from fried FFPs decreased significantly between 2005–2006 and 2009–2010 among children, adolescents, and adults. This study confirms that intake of TFAs from FFPs is trivial. PMID:25979511

  7. Changes in mean intake of fatty acids and intake of saturated and trans fats from potatoes: NHANES 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Storey, Maureen L; Anderson, Patricia A

    2015-05-01

    Studies have shown that higher than usual intakes of trans fatty acids (TFAs) have adverse effects on blood lipids. Because of this, in 2006 the US FDA mandated labeling of TFAs on food packages. The food and restaurant industries, including the potato industry, reformulated their foods to reduce or eliminate partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and TFAs. Before mandatory labeling, grain-based desserts, yeast breads, and French-fried potatoes (FFPs) were the top sources of TFAs in the food supply; by 2007, potato food manufacturers and quick-service restaurants had reduced or eliminated TFAs without increasing saturated fatty acids (SFAs). FFPs are no longer a source of TFAs in the food supply. This study examined energy and fatty acid intake among children aged 6-11 y, adolescents aged 12-18 y, and adults aged ≥19 y across 3 time periods by using data from the NHANES 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010. On average, intakes of total energy, total fat, SFAs, and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) decreased significantly between 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 among children and adolescents; however, the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) did not change. Among adults, intakes of total fat, SFAs, and MUFAs decreased; however, total energy and PUFA intake did not change. On the day of the 2009-2010 survey, ∼13% of children and 10% of adolescents reported consuming fried FFPs, whereas <7% of adults reported consumption of fried FFPs. Intakes of SFAs and TFAs from fried FFPs decreased significantly between 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 among children, adolescents, and adults. This study confirms that intake of TFAs from FFPs is trivial.

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Prevalence and Clearance Among U.S. Blood Donors, 2006-2007: Associations with Birth Cohort, Multiple Pregnancies and Body Mass Index

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Edward L.; Fang, Junyong; YonglingTu; Cable, Ritchard; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Sacher, Ronald; Triulzi, Darrell; Gottschall, Jerome L.; Michael, P

    2010-01-01

    Background In 1992-1993, the prevalence of anti-HCV among U.S. blood donors was 0.36 percent, but contemporary data on antibody and RNA prevalence are lacking. Methods We performed a large, cross-sectional study of blood donors at six U.S. blood centers in 2006-2007. Anti-HCV was measured by EIA followed by immunoblot, and HCV RNA by nucleic acid testing. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were derived using multivariable logistic regression. Results Among 959,281 donors, 695 had anti-HCV (prevalence 0.072%), of whom 516 (74%) were RNA+ and 179 (26%) RNA-. Compared to 1992-1993, prevalence was lower and peaked in older age groups. Anti-HCV was associated with body mass index (BMI) >30 kg/m2 (aOR=0.6, 95% CI 0.5-0.8) and among women, higher gravidity (aOR for >= 5 vs. 0 pregnancies = 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.4). HCV RNA negative status was associated with Black race (aOR=0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.7), more than high-school education (aOR=1.6, 95% CI 1.1-2.4) and BMI >30 (aOR=2.4, 95% CI 1.4-3.9). Conclusions Declining HCV prevalence is most likely due to culling of seropositive donors and a birth cohort effect. We found new associations between Anti-HCV prevalence and gravidity and obesity. Recently discovered genetic factors may underlie differences in HCV RNA clearance among Black donors. PMID:20617929

  9. Groundwater Quality, Age, and Probability of Contamination, Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    The Eagle River watershed is located near the destination resort town of Vail, Colorado. The area has a fastgrowing permanent population, and the resort industry is rapidly expanding. A large percentage of the land undergoing development to support that growth overlies the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer (ERWVFA), which likely has a high predisposition to groundwater contamination. As development continues, local organizations need tools to evaluate potential land-development effects on ground- and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. To help develop these tools, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority, conducted a study in 2006-2007 of the groundwater quality, age, and probability of contamination in the ERWVFA, north-central Colorado. Ground- and surface-water quality samples were analyzed for major ions, nutrients, stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in water, tritium, dissolved gases, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) determined with very low-level laboratory methods. The major-ion data indicate that groundwaters in the ERWVFA can be classified into two major groups: groundwater that was recharged by infiltration of surface water, and groundwater that had less immediate recharge from surface water and had elevated sulfate concentrations. Sulfate concentrations exceeded the USEPA National Secondary Drinking Water Regulations (250 milligrams per liter) in many wells near Eagle, Gypsum, and Dotsero. The predominant source of sulfate to groundwater in the Eagle River watershed is the Eagle Valley Evaporite, which is a gypsum deposit of Pennsylvanian age located predominantly in the western one-half of Eagle County.

  10. Dietary patterns in the French adult population: a study from the second French national cross-sectional dietary survey (INCA2) (2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Gazan, R; Béchaux, C; Crépet, A; Sirot, V; Drouillet-Pinard, P; Dubuisson, C; Havard, S

    2016-07-01

    Identification and characterisation of dietary patterns are needed to define public health policies to promote better food behaviours. The aim of this study was to identify the major dietary patterns in the French adult population and to determine their main demographic, socio-economic, nutritional and environmental characteristics. Dietary patterns were defined from food consumption data collected in the second French national cross-sectional dietary survey (2006-2007). Non-negative-matrix factorisation method, followed by a cluster analysis, was implemented to derive the dietary patterns. Logistic regressions were then used to determine their main demographic and socio-economic characteristics. Finally, nutritional profiles and contaminant exposure levels of dietary patterns were compared using ANOVA. Seven dietary patterns, with specific food consumption behaviours, were identified: 'Small eater', 'Health conscious', 'Mediterranean', 'Sweet and processed', 'Traditional', 'Snacker' and 'Basic consumer'. For instance, the Health-conscious pattern was characterised by a high consumption of low-fat and light products. Individuals belonging to this pattern were likely to be older and to have a better nutritional profile than the overall population, but were more exposed to many contaminants. Conversely, individuals of Snacker pattern were likely to be younger, consumed more highly processed foods, had a nutrient-poor profile but were exposed to a limited number of food contaminants. The study identified main dietary patterns in the French adult population with distinct food behaviours and specific demographic, socio-economic, nutritional and environmental features. Paradoxically, for better dietary patterns, potential health risks cannot be ruled out. Therefore, this study demonstrated the need to conduct a risk-benefit analysis to define efficient public health policies regarding diet.

  11. Dietary patterns in the French adult population: a study from the second French national cross-sectional dietary survey (INCA2) (2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Gazan, R; Béchaux, C; Crépet, A; Sirot, V; Drouillet-Pinard, P; Dubuisson, C; Havard, S

    2016-07-01

    Identification and characterisation of dietary patterns are needed to define public health policies to promote better food behaviours. The aim of this study was to identify the major dietary patterns in the French adult population and to determine their main demographic, socio-economic, nutritional and environmental characteristics. Dietary patterns were defined from food consumption data collected in the second French national cross-sectional dietary survey (2006-2007). Non-negative-matrix factorisation method, followed by a cluster analysis, was implemented to derive the dietary patterns. Logistic regressions were then used to determine their main demographic and socio-economic characteristics. Finally, nutritional profiles and contaminant exposure levels of dietary patterns were compared using ANOVA. Seven dietary patterns, with specific food consumption behaviours, were identified: 'Small eater', 'Health conscious', 'Mediterranean', 'Sweet and processed', 'Traditional', 'Snacker' and 'Basic consumer'. For instance, the Health-conscious pattern was characterised by a high consumption of low-fat and light products. Individuals belonging to this pattern were likely to be older and to have a better nutritional profile than the overall population, but were more exposed to many contaminants. Conversely, individuals of Snacker pattern were likely to be younger, consumed more highly processed foods, had a nutrient-poor profile but were exposed to a limited number of food contaminants. The study identified main dietary patterns in the French adult population with distinct food behaviours and specific demographic, socio-economic, nutritional and environmental features. Paradoxically, for better dietary patterns, potential health risks cannot be ruled out. Therefore, this study demonstrated the need to conduct a risk-benefit analysis to define efficient public health policies regarding diet. PMID:27189191

  12. Investigating the effects of target heterogeneity on the cratering process.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnouin, O. S.

    2012-12-01

    Pre-existing target structures are known to influence the dynamics and morphologies of many terrestrial and planetary impact craters. Good examples include the Chesapeake and Ries craters, which both possess an inverted sombrero structure as a result of a weaker sedimentary surface layer overlying a stronger crystalline basement. But beyond such horizontal layering, closer analyses of the subsurface geology present in these and other planetary craters indicate that vertical heterogeneity in the strength and geochemistry of a target are also often present. These may influence the formation and subsequent modification of terrestrial craters. Evidence indicates that at Meteor crater, for example, pre-existing vertical jointing of the target gives this crater its square appearance, either by confining and re-directing the shock and subsequent rarefraction waves, or by allowing preferential weathering zones of weakness along the joints. In this study, we present a series of laboratory investigations and 2- and 3-dimensional numerical calculations of crater formation in a conceptually simple but physically complex target: a box of randomly distributed quartz spheres of identical size. These investigations provide constraints on how all types of target heterogeneity influence the cratering process. In both the laboratory and numerical studies, we measure the rate of crater growth, the transient crater shape, and in some instances the velocity of individual ejecta. These investigations vary the ratio of the impact shock thickness to target grain size by altering the impact velocity, projectile size, and target grain size. The laboratory data were collected at the NASA Ames vertical gun range, the NASA Johnson Space Center vertical gun range, and the University of Tokyo vertical gun range using non-intrusive diagonistic techniques. The numerical investigations were performed using the CTH hydrocode that solves the equations of motion, while conserving mass, energy, and

  13. Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica Serotype Tennessee Strain CDC07-0191, Implicated in the 2006-2007 Multistate Food-Borne Outbreak Linked to Peanut Butter in the United States.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiangyu; Salazar, Joelle K; Frezet, Stephanie; Maccannell, Duncan; Ribot, Efrain M; Fields, Patricia I; Fricke, W Florian; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serotype Tennessee strain CDC07-0191 was isolated from the 2006-2007 multistate food-borne outbreak linked to peanut butter in the United States. Here we report a high-quality draft assembly of the genome sequence of this strain, derived from a patient. This is the first reported high-quality draft genome sequence for S. enterica serotype Tennessee, which will enable in-depth studies of its transmission and virulence. PMID:23704182

  14. Temporal Evolution of Effective Upper Mantle Viscosity from Postseismic Response to the 2006-2007 Great Kuril Earthquakes: Four Years of GPS Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, M. G.; Vasilenko, N. F.; Frolov, D. I.; Freymueller, J. T.; Prytkov, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Transient surface deformation was still observed by GPS 40 years after two giant (M ~9) megathrust earthquakes in the 20th century: the 1960 Chile and the 1964 Alaska events [Hu et al., 2004; Suito and Freymueller, 2009]. The postseismic signal was attributed to viscoelastic relaxation in the Maxwell mantle wedge with constant viscosity on the order of 10^19 Pa s. In contrast, postseismic deformation for 3-4 years after the 2002 M 7.9 Denali and the 1997 M 7.6 Manyi, Tibet earthquakes requires much lower Maxwell viscosity on the order of 10^17 - 10^18 Pa s [Freed et al, 2006; Ryder et al., 2007; Biggs et al., 2009]. Also these early postseismic GPS and InSAR time series suggest an increase in viscosity with time, which would be inconsistent with a uniform Maxwell viscosity. Here we analyze surface deformation following the doublet of the 2006-2007 M > 8 Kuril megathrust earthquakes using 4 years of postseismic continuous GPS time series on the Kuril GPS Array. We split time series into four annual intervals starting at epoch 2007.5, i.e., about 7 months after the 2006 earthquake, and search for the best-fitting Maxwell viscosity year by year, after accounting for afterslip and the background interseismic strain signal. Earlier we showed that the contribution of afterslip to the Kuril postseismic displacement is small since about epoch 2007.5 [Kogan et al, 2011]. The background interseismic strain signal was not measured on the central Kurils at the stations showing the largest postseismic motion because observations started several months after the earthquakes. From analysis of trench-parallel gravity anomalies, Song and Simons [2003] proposed weak interseismic locking at the subduction interface in the central Kurils. If this hypothesis holds, we can expect small interseismic velocities at the sites affected by postseismic deformation. We tested three simple variants of corrections for interseismic motion of these sites, ranging from 0 to the mean velocity at the

  15. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-08-28

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of a targeted investigation to update the status of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater associated with grain storage operations at Hilton, Kansas. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton during the 1950s and 1960s. At the time of the CCC/USDA operation in Hilton, grain storage facilities (CCC/USDA and private) were located along the both sides of the former Union Pacific railroad tracks (Figure 1.1). The main grain storage structures were on or near the railroad right-of-way. The proposed targeted investigation, to be conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on the behalf of CCC/USDA, will supplement Argonne's Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1996-1997. The earlier investigations erroneously focused on an area east of the railroad property where the CCC/USDA did not operate, specifically on a private grain storage facility. In addition, the investigation was limited in scope, because access to railroad property was denied (Argonne 1997a,b). The hydrogeologic system at Hilton is potentially complex.

  16. Further investigation of the target resistance penetration parameter Rt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Y.; Anderson, C. E.; Orphal, D. L.

    2000-04-01

    The quasi steady-state penetration of long rods into semi-infinite targets has been described by the modified Bernoulli equation (MBE) 1/2 ρp(V-U)2+Yp=1/2 ρtU2+Rt, where Rt is a material dependent parameter corresponding to target resistance to penetration. Rosenberg and Dekel (1994) investigated the dependence of Rt on target strength Yt and impact velocity V. They found an Rt(Yt) dependence similar to the one obtained from cavity expansion analysis, and a decreasing Rt(V) dependence. Following Rosenberg and Dekel, we use AUTODYN2D/EULER to investigate further the parameter Rt. We use a strengthless projectile (Yp=0), monitor the penetration velocity, and evaluate Rt from the MBE. We find that: 1) Rt goes to zero for Yt=0; 2) Rt increases with Yt by a somewhat weaker than linear relation; 3) Rt increases with V at high impact velocity; and 4) for low values of q=1/2 ρpV2/Yt, the turned projectile material interacts with the incoming projectile, and steady state is never reached, thus Rt is not defined.

  17. Magnetically Targeted Viral Envelopes: A PET Investigation of Initial Biodistribution

    PubMed Central

    Flexman, Jennifer A.; Cross, Donna J.; Lewellen, Barbara L.; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Kim, Yongmin

    2009-01-01

    Gene and drug therapy for organ-specific diseases in part depends on the efficient delivery to a particular region of the body. We examined the biodistribution of a viral envelope commonly used as a nanoscale gene delivery vehicle using positron emission tomography (PET) and investigated the magnetic alteration of its biodistribution. Iron oxide nanoparticles and 18 F-fluoride were encapsulated by hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelopes (HVJ-Es). HVJ-Es were then injected intravenously in the rat and imaged dynamically using high-resolution PET. Control subjects received injections of encapsulated materials alone. For magnetic targeting, permanent magnets were fixed on the head during the scan. Based on the quantitative analysis of PET images, HVJ-Es accumulated in the liver and spleen and activity remained higher than control subjects for 2 h. Histological sections of the liver confirmed imaging findings. Pixel-wise activity patterns on coregistered PET images of the head showed a significantly different pattern for the subjects receiving magnetic targeting as compared to all control groups. Imaging demonstrated the initial biodistribution of a viral envelope within the rodent by providing quantitative behavior over time and in specific anatomical regions. Magnetic force altered the biodistribution of the viral envelope to a target structure, and could enable region-specific delivery of therapeutic vehicles noninvasively. PMID:18779103

  18. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  19. Final report for targeted investigations at Murdock, Nebraska, in 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2005-08-01

    headwaters area north of Waverly Road. The EPA noted, however, that no conclusive evidence is available to demonstrate whether complete capture and removal of the carbon tetrachloride plume from the aquifer are occurring by this mechanism. Specifically, the EPA questioned whether contamination continuing to migrate in the deeper subsurface beneath the tributary to Pawnee Creek might pose a threat to groundwater resources beyond the area of presently observed contaminant discharge. (2) Concentrations of carbon tetrachloride measured in groundwater from shallow monitoring well 2S, near the north-central boundary of the property formerly occupied by the CCC/USDA grain storage facility (Figure 1.1), have remained relatively constant (at approximately 40-100 mg/L) since Argonne began periodic sampling of this well in 1991, with no clear trend of decreasing values. The observed concentrations suggest that a continuing, uncharacterized source of carbon tetrachloride contamination to groundwater remains in the vadose zone soils beneath the former grain storage facility, upgradient of this well. To address these concerns, the CCC/USDA and Argonne proposed a series of targeted field investigations at the Murdock site. Four technical objectives were originally proposed in the Work Plan for this targeted investigation (Argonne 2003), and two additional objectives were authorized as the field work progressed and information accumulated. The combined technical objectives of this investigation were to accomplish the following: (1) Determine the continuity, thickness, and hydrogeologic characteristics of the aquifer in the vicinity of the Pawnee Creek tributary. (2) Characterize the present distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater and surface water in the area north of Waverly Road. (3) Determine the patterns of groundwater flow in the vicinity of the Pawnee Creek tributary and their relationship to the expected migration of the identified carbon tetrachloride plume

  20. Investigating effects of communications modulation technique on targeting performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Eusebio, Gerald; Huling, Edward

    2006-05-01

    One of the key challenges facing the global war on terrorism (GWOT) and urban operations is the increased need for rapid and diverse information from distributed sources. For users to get adequate information on target types and movements, they would need reliable data. In order to facilitate reliable computational intelligence, we seek to explore the communication modulation tradeoffs affecting information distribution and accumulation. In this analysis, we explore the modulation techniques of Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM), Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (DSSS), and statistical time-division multiple access (TDMA) as a function of the bit error rate and jitter that affect targeting performance. In the analysis, we simulate a Link 16 with a simple bandpass frequency shift keying (PSK) technique using different Signal-to-Noise ratios. The communications transfer delay and accuracy tradeoffs are assessed as to the effects incurred in targeting performance.

  1. Numerical Investigation of Yawed Impact into a Finite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. E., Jr.; Bless, S. J.; Normandia, M. J.

    1997-07-01

    It is well-known that impact inclination is detrimental to penetration performance for long-rod projectiles into semi-infinite targets. This drop-off in performance, measured as the depth of penetration normalized by the initial projectile length (P/L), is generally attributed to interference of the tail of the projectile with the side walls of the penetration cavity. However, little has been done to study the effect of impact inclination on the performance of long-rod projectiles penetrating finite targets. Reverse ballistic experiments and three-dimensional numerical simulations are used to examine the effect of impact inclination against an oblique plate. In particular, the interaction of the projectile with the plate, to include asymmetric enlargement of the penetration channel and side loading of the projectile are examined in the simulations, and compared to the experimental results.

  2. Investigation of yawed impact into a finite target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. E.; Bless, S. J.; Sharron, T. R.; Satapathy, S.; Normandia, M. J.

    1998-07-01

    It is well known that impact inclination is detrimental to penetration performance for long-rod projectiles into semi-infinite targets. The drop-off in performance, measured as the depth of penetration normalized by the initial projectile length, is generally attributed to interference of the tail of the projectile with the side walls of the penetration cavity. However, little has been done to study the effect of impact inclination on the performance of long rods penetrating finite targets. A reverse ballistic experiment and three-dimensional numerical simulations are used to examine the effect of impact inclination against an oblique plate. In particular, the interaction of the projectile with the plate, to include asymmetric enlargement of the penetration channel and side loading of the projectile, are examined in the simulations, and compared to experimental results.

  3. Investigational cancer drugs targeting cell metabolism in clinical development

    PubMed Central

    Sborov, Douglas W; Haverkos, Bradley M; Harris, Pamela J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Malignant cell transformation and tumor progression are associated with alterations in glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis, amino acid delivery and production of reactive oxygen species. With increased understanding of the role of metabolism in tumors, there has been interest in developing agents that target tumor specific metabolic pathways. Numerous promising agents targeting altered metabolic pathways are currently in Phase I – III clinical trials. Areas covered This paper reviews the early phase clinical trial development of these agents and provides perspective on the future direction of this emerging field. Specifically, the authors describe novel and repurposed therapies, focusing on the effects of each agent on tumor metabolism and results from relevant Phase I and II clinical trials. Expert opinion Metabolism modulating agents, alone and in combinations with other classes of agents, have shown efficacy in the treatment of neoplasm, which, the authors believe, will bear positive results in future studies. Because of the significant crosstalk between metabolic pathways and oncogenic signaling pathways, the authors also believe that combining metabolic modifiers with targeted agents will be an important strategy. An increased understanding of cancer metabolism, in addition to the continued study of metabolic modulators, should lead to further advances in this nascent therapeutic field in the future. PMID:25224845

  4. Rapid Increase in Ownership and Use of Long-Lasting Insecticidal Nets and Decrease in Prevalence of Malaria in Three Regional States of Ethiopia (2006-2007)

    PubMed Central

    Shargie, Estifanos Biru; Ngondi, Jeremiah; Graves, Patricia M.; Getachew, Asefaw; Hwang, Jimee; Gebre, Teshome; Mosher, Aryc W.; Ceccato, Pietro; Endeshaw, Tekola; Jima, Daddi; Tadesse, Zerihun; Tenaw, Eskindir; Reithinger, Richard; Emerson, Paul M.; Richards, Frank O.; Ghebreyesus, Tedros Adhanom

    2010-01-01

    Following recent large scale-up of malaria control interventions in Ethiopia, this study aimed to compare ownership and use of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN), and the change in malaria prevalence using two population-based household surveys in three regions of the country. Each survey used multistage cluster random sampling with 25 households per cluster. Household net ownership tripled from 19.6% in 2006 to 68.4% in 2007, with mean LLIN per household increasing from 0.3 to 1.2. Net use overall more than doubled from 15.3% to 34.5%, but in households owning LLIN, use declined from 71.7% to 48.3%. Parasitemia declined from 4.1% to 0.4%. Large scale-up of net ownership over a short period of time was possible. However, a large increase in net ownership was not necessarily mirrored directly by increased net use. Better targeting of nets to malaria-risk areas and sustained behavioural change communication are needed to increase and maintain net use. PMID:20936103

  5. Rudimentary investigation of the HIP process for tungsten target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yongli; Zhang, Jinquan; Li, Huaqing

    2008-06-01

    Zr alloy and 316-Ti stainless steel (S.S.) were selected as cladding materials for a W target. The HIP processes were performed at 1200, 1300 and 1400 °C and 180 MPa. The observation and determination for micro-morphology of the interface, diffusion depth and composition as well as their micro-hardness were conducted. The results indicated that the bonding of W-Zr and W-S.S. was good under the testing conditions. No pores or micro-cracks in the interface were observed. Grain growth of W was not observed at 1200 and 1300 °C, but it was observed at 1400 °C. The diffusion of Zr-W on the interface of W-Zr was preferred during the HIP process. The diffusion layer was 6-13 μm in thickness for W-Zr, and 13 μm for W-S.S. A peak of the hardness was observed at the interface of W-Zr or W-S.S. A part of the stainless steel cladding melted after HIP using an oxygen absorber (Zr) at 1300 °C and 180 MPa. The conditions of 1200 °C and 180 MPa without using an oxygen absorber Zr are suitable for W-S.S. bonding, while 1300 or 1400 °C and 180 MPa are better for W-Zr bonding.

  6. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Inman, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    In 1997, low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5 {micro}g/L) were detected in groundwater at Inman, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1997 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Inman from 1954 to 1965. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Inman is located in southwest McPherson County, approximately 10 mi southwest of the city of McPherson (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation at Inman, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. For this work plan, Argonne compiled historical data related to the previous investigations and grain storage operations at Inman. Through a review of documents acquired from all available sources, other potential contaminant source areas (in addition to the former CCC/USDA facility) have been identified as (1) the commercial grain storage structures northwest of Inman, along the railroad right-of-way, and (2) small former private grain storage facilities west of Main Street and near the former CCC/USDA facility at the southern edge of Inman (Figure 1.2). Previous investigations and the potential source areas are discussed in Section 2.

  7. Description and Analytical Results for Deposited Dust Samples from a Two-Year Monitoring Program Near Deer Trail, Colorado, USA, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reheis, Marith C.; Honke, Jeff; Lamothe, Paul; Fisher, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Biosolids reclaimed from municipal wastewater have been applied since 1993 on nonirrigated farmland and rangeland east of Deer Trail, Colo., by Metro Wastewater Reclamation District of Denver. The U.S. Geological Survey has monitored ground water at this site since 1993, and began monitoring the biosolids, soils, and stream sediments in 1999. To investigate the possible effects of airborne dust blowing from the application fields, passive dust samplers were deployed in 2006 and 2007. These samplers measured the quantity and composition of dust being deposited downwind of a farmed field where biosolids had been applied, compared to a farmed field upwind of the application area. The dust-deposition rates and dust compositions measured at the two study sites are consistent with rates and compositions measured elsewhere in Utah, Nevada, and California using the same methods and equipment. Higher deposition rates were measured at the biosolids site compared to the control site during 2006. Higher deposition rates at both sites appear to be associated with episodes of cultivation and harvest during dry periods. No consistent differences in elements likely to be associated with biosolids disposal were detected between the sites. However, the contents of copper, lead, and zinc in the dust samples are generally much higher than average values of these elements in crustal rocks and sediments. Such values for dust samples are consistent with measurements on modern dust samples from southern Nevada and California and probably reflect inputs from regional urban and manufacturing activities.

  8. "The Success of Captive Broodstock Programs Depends on High In-Culture Survival, ..." [from the Abstract], 2006-2007 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berejikian, Barry A.

    2009-04-08

    The success of captive broodstock programs depends on high in-culture survival, appropriate development of the reproductive system, and the behavior and survival of cultured salmon after release, either as adults or juveniles. Continuing captive broodstock research designed to improve technology is being conducted to cover all major life history stages of Pacific salmon. Accomplishments detailed in this report are listed below by major objective. Objective 1: This study documented that captively reared Chinook exhibited spawn timing similar to their founder anadromous population. An analysis of spawn timing data of captively reared Chinook salmon that had received different levels of antibiotic treatment did not suggest that antibiotic treatments during the freshwater or seawater phase of the life cycle affects final maturation timing. No effect of rearing density was found with respect to spawn timing or other reproductive behaviors. Objective 2: This study investigated the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon by exposing juvenile salmon to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression differs between coho and sockeye salmon. While temporal patterns differ between these species, exposure to arginine elicited increases in odorant receptor mRNA expression in sockeye salmon. Objective 3: This study: (i) identified the critical period when maturation is initiated in male spring Chinook salmon and when body growth affects onset of puberty, (ii) described changes in the reproductive endocrine system during onset of puberty and throughout spermatogenesis in male spring Chinook salmon, (iii) found that the rate of oocyte development prior to vitellogenesis is related to body growth in female spring Chinook, and (iv) demonstrated that growth regimes which reduce early (age 2) male maturation slow the rate of primary and early

  9. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units, 2006-2007--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The three study units are located in the Sierra Nevada region of California in parts of Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Madera, Tulare, and Kern Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The project was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems used for drinking water. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) for each study unit are defined by the depth of the screened or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for municipal and community drinking-water supply. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The assessments for the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 132 wells in the three study units during 2006 and 2007 and water-quality data reported in the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors affecting groundwater quality. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations divided by benchmark concentrations) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those

  10. Probability of Unmixed Young Groundwater (defined using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities) in the Eagle River Watershed Valley-Fill Aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rupert, Michael G.; Plummer, L. Niel

    2009-01-01

    This raster data set delineates the predicted probability of unmixed young groundwater (defined using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities) in groundwater in the Eagle River watershed valley-fill aquifer, Eagle County, North-Central Colorado, 2006-2007. This data set was developed by a cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey, Eagle County, the Eagle River Water and Sanitation District, the Town of Eagle, the Town of Gypsum, and the Upper Eagle Regional Water Authority. This project was designed to evaluate potential land-development effects on groundwater and surface-water resources so that informed land-use and water management decisions can be made. This groundwater probability map and its associated probability maps were developed as follows: (1) A point data set of wells with groundwater quality and groundwater age data was overlaid with thematic layers of anthropogenic (related to human activities) and hydrogeologic data by using a geographic information system to assign each well values for depth to groundwater, distance to major streams and canals, distance to gypsum beds, precipitation, soils, and well depth. These data then were downloaded to a statistical software package for analysis by logistic regression. (2) Statistical models predicting the probability of elevated nitrate concentrations, the probability of unmixed young water (using chlorofluorocarbon-11 concentrations and tritium activities), and the probability of elevated volatile organic compound concentrations were developed using logistic regression techniques. (3) The statistical models were entered into a GIS and the probability map was constructed.

  11. Dengue Virus 2 American-Asian Genotype Identified during the 2006/2007 Outbreak in Piauí, Brazil Reveals a Caribbean Route of Introduction and Dissemination of Dengue Virus in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Barcelos Figueiredo, Leandra; Sakamoto, Tetsu; Leomil Coelho, Luiz Felipe; de Oliveira Rocha, Eliseu Soares; Gomes Cota, Marcela Menezes; Ferreira, Gustavo Portela; de Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most widespread arthropod-borne virus, and the number and severity of outbreaks has increased worldwide in recent decades. Dengue is caused by DENV-1, DENV- 2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 which are genetically distant. The species has been subdivided into genotypes based on phylogenetic studies. DENV-2, which was isolated from dengue fever patients during an outbreak in Piaui, Brazil in 2006/2007 was analyzed by sequencing the envelope (E) gene. The results indicated a high similarity among the isolated viruses, as well as to other DENV-2 from Brazil, Central America and South America. A phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis based on DENV-2E gene sequences revealed that these viruses are grouped together with viruses of the American-Asian genotype in two distinct lineages. Our results demonstrate the co-circulation of two American-Asian genotype lineages in northeast Brazil. Moreover, we reveal that DENV-2 lineage 2 was detected in Piauí before it disseminated to other Brazilian states and South American countries, indicating the existence of a new dissemination route that has not been previously described. PMID:25127366

  12. Dengue virus 2 American-Asian genotype identified during the 2006/2007 outbreak in Piauí, Brazil reveals a Caribbean route of introduction and dissemination of dengue virus in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barcelos Figueiredo, Leandra; Sakamoto, Tetsu; Leomil Coelho, Luiz Felipe; de Oliveira Rocha, Eliseu Soares; Gomes Cota, Marcela Menezes; Ferreira, Gustavo Portela; de Oliveira, Jaquelline Germano; Kroon, Erna Geessien

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the most widespread arthropod-borne virus, and the number and severity of outbreaks has increased worldwide in recent decades. Dengue is caused by DENV-1, DENV- 2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 which are genetically distant. The species has been subdivided into genotypes based on phylogenetic studies. DENV-2, which was isolated from dengue fever patients during an outbreak in Piaui, Brazil in 2006/2007 was analyzed by sequencing the envelope (E) gene. The results indicated a high similarity among the isolated viruses, as well as to other DENV-2 from Brazil, Central America and South America. A phylogenetic and phylogeographic analysis based on DENV-2E gene sequences revealed that these viruses are grouped together with viruses of the American-Asian genotype in two distinct lineages. Our results demonstrate the co-circulation of two American-Asian genotype lineages in northeast Brazil. Moreover, we reveal that DENV-2 lineage 2 was detected in Piauí before it disseminated to other Brazilian states and South American countries, indicating the existence of a new dissemination route that has not been previously described.

  13. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units, 2006-2007--California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fram, Miranda S.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The three study units are located in the Sierra Nevada region of California in parts of Nevada, Placer, El Dorado, Madera, Tulare, and Kern Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board, in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The project was designed to provide statistically robust assessments of untreated groundwater quality within the primary aquifer systems used for drinking water. The primary aquifer systems (hereinafter, primary aquifers) for each study unit are defined by the depth of the screened or open intervals of the wells listed in the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database of wells used for municipal and community drinking-water supply. The quality of groundwater in shallower or deeper water-bearing zones may differ from that in the primary aquifers; shallower groundwater may be more vulnerable to contamination from the surface. The assessments for the Tahoe-Martis, Central Sierra, and Southern Sierra study units were based on water-quality and ancillary data collected by the USGS from 132 wells in the three study units during 2006 and 2007 and water-quality data reported in the CDPH database. Two types of assessments were made: (1) status, assessment of the current quality of the groundwater resource, and (2) understanding, identification of the natural and human factors affecting groundwater quality. The assessments characterize untreated groundwater quality, not the quality of treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentrations divided by benchmark concentrations) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those

  14. Home Education in Pennsylvania, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creason, John S., Comp.

    2008-01-01

    The 2006-07 total for home education students in Pennsylvania was 22,136. The total was comprised of 11,422 males and 10,714 females. There was a decrease of 276 students, or 1.2%, from the 2005-06 total of 22,412. It was the fourth year in a row that home education enrollments decreased and only the fifth year overall since the passage of Act 169…

  15. Annual Change Report 2006/2007

    SciTech Connect

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-11-16

    As part of continuing compliance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to provide information on any change in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system since the most recent compliance application. This requirement is identified in Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 194.4(b)(4), which states: "No later than six months after the administrator issues a certification, and at least annually thereafter, the Department shall report to the Administrator, in writing, any changes in conditions or activities pertaining to the disposal system that were not required to be reported by paragraph (b)(3) of this section and that differ from information contained in the most recent compliance application." In meeting the requirement, the DOE provides an annual report each November of all applicable changes under the above requirement. This annual report informs the EPA of changes to information in the most recent compliance recertification (the 2004 Compliance Recertification). Significant planned changes must be reported to the EPA prior to implementation by the DOE. In addition, Title 40 CFR, Section 194.4(b)(3) requires that significant unplanned changes be reported to the EPA within 24 hours or ten days, depending on the severity of the activity or condition. To date, there have been no significant unplanned changes to the certification basis. Planned changes have been submitted on an individual basis. All other changes are reported annually. Changes in activities or conditions are reviewed to determine if 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(3) reporting is necessary. As indicated above, no significant unplanned changes were identified for the time period covered by this report. The enclosed tables list those items identified for reporting under 40 CFR Section 194.4(b)(4). The majority of the items described in this report are inspections, reports, and modifications to written plans and procedures for WIPP operations.

  16. Investigation of polarized-proton target materials by differential calorimetry: preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.; Hill, J.J.

    1980-10-15

    A simple differential calorimeter was designed and operated for an investigation of the thermodynamic properties of polarized target materials. The calibration and use of the calorimeter are discussed, after a brief exposition of our motivation for this work. The results of a preliminary study of target materials is presented with emphasis on the relevance of the glass state to dynamic polarization in chemically-doped targets.

  17. Optical Investigations of Powerful Laser Actions on Massive and Flyer Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Pisarczyk, T.; Borodziuk, S.; Kasperczuk, A.; Demchenko, N. N.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Jungwirth, K.; Kralikova, B.; Krousky, E.; Masek, K.; Pfeifer, M.; Rohlena, K.; Rozanov, V. B.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Kalal, M.; Limpouch, J.; Pisarczyk, P.

    2006-01-15

    In this paper we present experimental, theoretical, and computer simulation studies of craters formation produced by high power lasers in single and double layer targets. The experimental investigation was carried out using the PALS (Prague Asterix Laser System) facility working with two different laser beam wavelengths: {lambda}1 = 1.315 {mu}m and {lambda}3 0.438 {mu}m. Two types of targets made of Al were used: single massive targets, and double targets consisting of a foil or disk (6 {mu}m thick for both cases) placed in front of the massive target part at a distance of 200-500 {mu}m. Experiments with single massive targets were performed at laser intensities in the range of 1013-1015 W/cm2 by varying the laser beam diameters on the target surface from 70 {mu}m up to 1200 {mu}m (i.e. moving the target away from the focus). The double targets were illuminated by laser energies EL = 100-500 J focused always on a diameter of 250 {mu}m. In all experiments performed the laser pulse duration was equal to 400 ps. 3-frame interferometry was employed to investigate the plasma dynamics through measurements of the electron density distribution time development as well as of the disks and foil fragments velocities. The dimensions and shapes of craters were obtained by crater replica technology and microscopy measurement. The experiments were complemented by a 2-D analytical theory and computer simulations, which helped at interpretation of the results. This way the values of laser energy absorption coefficient, ablation loading efficiency and efficiency of energy transfer, as well as two-dimensional shock wave generation at the laser-driven macroparticle impact were obtained from the measured crater parameters for both the wavelengths of laser radiation.

  18. Continuing investigations for technology assessment of /sup 99/Mo production from LEU (low enriched Uranium) targets

    SciTech Connect

    Vandergrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Currently much of the world's supply of /sup 99m/Tc for medical purposes is produced from /sup 99/Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). The need for /sup 99m/Tc is continuing to grow, especially in developing countries, where needs and national priorities call for internal production of /sup 99/Mo. This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched Uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product /sup 99/Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal are reported. These improvements continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or hastaloy. A cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets is reported. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in other current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent /sup 99/Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to (1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and (2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that both concerns can be handled and that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved.

  19. Investigating the correlations among the chemical structures, bioactivity profiles and molecular targets of small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Tiejun; Wang, Yanli; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Most of the previous data mining studies based on the NCI-60 dataset, due to its intrinsic cell-based nature, can hardly provide insights into the molecular targets for screened compounds. On the other hand, the abundant information of the compound–target associations in PubChem can offer extensive experimental evidence of molecular targets for tested compounds. Therefore, by taking advantages of the data from both public repositories, one may investigate the correlations between the bioactivity profiles of small molecules from the NCI-60 dataset (cellular level) and their patterns of interactions with relevant protein targets from PubChem (molecular level) simultaneously. Results: We investigated a set of 37 small molecules by providing links among their bioactivity profiles, protein targets and chemical structures. Hierarchical clustering of compounds was carried out based on their bioactivity profiles. We found that compounds were clustered into groups with similar mode of actions, which strongly correlated with chemical structures. Furthermore, we observed that compounds similar in bioactivity profiles also shared similar patterns of interactions with relevant protein targets, especially when chemical structures were related. The current work presents a new strategy for combining and data mining the NCI-60 dataset and PubChem. This analysis shows that bioactivity profile comparison can provide insights into the mode of actions at the molecular level, thus will facilitate the knowledge-based discovery of novel compounds with desired pharmacological properties. Availability: The bioactivity profiling data and the target annotation information are publicly available in the PubChem BioAssay database (ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubchem/Bioassay/). Contact: ywang@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov; bryant@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20947527

  20. Investigation of strategies for drug delivery by combination targeting of nanocarriers to multiple epitopes or receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papademetriou, Iason Titos

    Development of drug delivery systems (ie. nanocarriers) with controllable composition, architecture, and functionalities is heavily investigated in the field of drug delivery in order to improve clinical interventions. Designing drug nanocarriers which possess targeting properties is critical to enable them to reach the intended site of intervention in the body. To achieve this goal, the surface of drug nanocarriers can be modified with targeting moieties (antibodies, peptides, etc.) addressed to cell surface molecules expressed on the diseased tissues and cells. If these molecules are receptors capable of internalizing bound ligands via endocytosis, targeting can then enable drug transport into cells or across cellular barriers in the body. Yet, addressing nanocarriers to single targets presents limited control over cellular interactions and biodistribution. Since most cell-surface markers are not exclusively expressed in a precise site in vivo, high affinity of targeted nanocarriers may lead to non-desired accumulation in regions of the body associated with low expression. Modification of nanocarriers to achieve combined-targeting (binding to more than one cell-surface receptor) may help modulate binding to cells and also endocytosis, since cell receptors possess distinct functions and features affecting these parameters, such as their expression, location on the plasmalemma, activation in disease, mechanism of endocytosis, etc. Further, targeting nanocarriers to multiple epitopes of the same receptor, a strategy which has never been tested, may also modulate these parameters since they are highly epitope specific. In this dissertation, we investigate the effect of targeting model polymer nanocarriers to: (1) multiple receptors of similar function (intercellular-, platelet-endothelial-, and/or vascular-cell adhesion molecules), (2) multiple receptors of different function (intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and transferrin receptor), or (3) multiple epitopes of

  1. Comparing Child Protective Investigation Performance between Law Enforcement Agencies and Child Welfare Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Neil; Yampolskaya, Svetlana; Gustafson, Mara; Armstrong, Mary; McNeish, Roxann; Vargo, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the comparative effectiveness of using law enforcement agencies for child protective investigation (CPI), in contrast with the traditional approach of CPI conducted by the public child welfare agency. The analysis uses 2006-2007 data from a natural experiment conducted in Florida to show modest differences in performance and…

  2. Investigation of laser ion acceleration inside irradiated solid targets by neutron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Youssef, A.; Kodama, R.; Tampo, M.

    2006-03-15

    Origins and acceleration directions of accelerated ions inside solid LiF, CH-LiF, and LiF-CH targets irradiated by a 450 fs, 20 J, 1053 nm laser at an intensity of 3x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been investigated by neutron spectroscopy. The irradiated targets generate neutrons through the reaction {sup 7}Li (p,n){sup 7}Be between accelerated protons and background {sup 7}Li ions inside the target. The produced neutron spectra observed from two different observation angles 20 deg. and 120 deg. to the target rear-side normal. From the measured and calculated spectra, by three-dimensional Monte Carlo code, the maximum energy, the total number, and the slope temperature of the accelerated ions are investigated. The results indicate that ions are not only accelerated from the front surface toward the rear surface, but also from the rear surface toward the front surface with comparable maximum energy and higher number.

  3. Investigation of deuterated target effects on neutron yield in plasma focus device SBUMTPF1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahbazi Rad, Zahra; Abbasi Davani, Fereydoun; Shirani, Babak

    2015-04-01

    In this research, the effect of inserting deuterated solid target in plasma focus device `SBUMTPF1' on neutron yield has been investigated. The deuterated target with the diameter of 2.5 cm was placed at different heights relative to the anode tip. In each height, the best place of target (where the ion density is highest) was found from observing the effects of ions struck on the aluminum samples. Also for each height, 20 shots were performed at the optimum pressure of deuterium working gas and operating voltage, which are equal to 1.5 mbar and 24 kV, respectively. The neutron production was measured with two activation counters, which placed in 0○ and 90○ relative to the anode axis. Neutron scattering from two activation counters was calculated with MCNP4C code and the results showed that this effect is negligible. In this article, the probability of implanting deuterium ions into the titanium target was also investigated. Deviation angle of the ion emission relative to the anode axis was measured experimentally in this research and it was about 3.1○.

  4. A microfluidic device to investigate axon targeting by limited numbers of purified cortical projection neuron subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Tharin, Suzanne; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar R.; Ozdinler, Pembe Hande; Pasquina, Lincoln; Chung, Seok; Varner, Johanna; DeValence, Sarra; Kamm, Roger; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    While much is known about general controls over axon guidance of broad classes of projection neurons (those with long-distance axonal connections), molecular controls over specific axon targeting by distinct neuron subtypes are poorly understood. Corticospinal motor neurons (CSMN) are prototypical and clinically important cerebral cortex projection neurons; they are the brain neurons that degenerate in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and related motor neuron diseases, and their injury is central to the loss of motor function in spinal cord injury. Primary culture of purified immature murine CSMN has been recently established, using either fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) or immunopanning, enabling a previously unattainable level of subtype-specific investigation, but the resulting number of CSMN is quite limiting for standard approaches to study axon guidance. We developed a microfluidic system specifically designed to investigate axon targeting of limited numbers of purified CSMN and other projection neurons in culture. The system contains two chambers for culturing target tissue explants, allowing for biologically revealing axonal growth “choice” experiments. This device will be uniquely enabling for investigation of controls over axon growth and neuronal survival of many types of neurons, particularly those available only in limited numbers. PMID:23034677

  5. Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-29

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in

  6. Investigations of the Cavitation and Damage Thresholds of Histotripsy and Applications in Targeted Tissue Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli

    Histotripsy is a noninvasive ultrasound therapy that controls acoustic cavitation to mechanically fractionate soft tissue. This dissertation investigates the physical thresholds to initiate cavitation and produce tissue damage in histotripsy and factors affecting these thresholds in order to develop novel strategies for targeted tissue ablation. In the first part of this dissertation, the effects of tissue properties on histotripsy cavitation thresholds and damage thresholds were investigated. Results demonstrated that the histotripsy shock scattering threshold using multi-cycle pulses increases in stiffer tissues, while the histotripsy intrinsic threshold using single-cycle pulses is independent of tissue stiffness. Further, the intrinsic threshold slightly decreases with lower frequencies and significantly decreases with increasing temperature. The effects of tissue properties on the susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage were also investigated, demonstrating that stiffer tissues are more resistant to histotripsy. Two strategies were investigated for increasing the effectiveness of histotripsy for the treatment of stiffer tissues, with results showing that thermal preconditioning may be used to alter tissue susceptibility to histotripsy and that lower frequency treatments may increase the efficiency of histotripsy tissue ablation due to enhanced bubble expansion. In the second part of this dissertation, the feasibility of using histotripsy for targeted liver ablation was investigated in an intact in vivo porcine model, with results demonstrating that histotripsy was capable of non-invasively creating precise lesions throughout the entire liver. Additionally, a tissue selective ablation approach was developed, where histotripsy completely fractionated the liver tissue surrounding the major hepatic vessels and gallbladder while being self-limited at the boundaries of these critical structures. Finally, the long-term effects of histotripsy liver

  7. Investigation of energy partitioning from Leopard short-pulse laser interactions in mass limited targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, B.; Sawada, H.; Yabuuchi, T.; McLean, H.; Patel, P.; Beg, F.

    2013-10-01

    The energy distribution in the interaction of a high-intensity, short-pulse laser with a mass limited target was investigated by simultaneously collecting x-ray and particle data. The Leopard laser system at the Nevada Terawatt Facility delivered 15 J of energy in a 350 fs pulse duration. With a beam spot size limited to within 8 μm, the target interaction achieved a peak intensity of 1019 W/cm2 at 20° incidence. The size of the Cu foil targets was varied from 2-20 μm in thickness and from 50 by 50 μm to 2000 by 2000 μm in surface area. A Bragg crystal x-ray spectrometer and a spherical crystal imager were used to measure 7.5-9.5 keV x-rays and 8.05 keV monochromatic x-ray images respectively. The escaping electrons and protons in the rear were monitored with a magnet-based electron spectrometer and radiochromic film. Preliminary results show both a decrease of the K β/K α ratio and a stronger He α emission for smaller sized targets, less than 250 by 250 μm. The detailed analyses of the K α images and particle data will be presented.

  8. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  9. Investigating drug-target association and dissociation mechanisms using metadynamics-based algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cavalli, Andrea; Spitaleri, Andrea; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: This Account highlights recent advances and discusses major challenges in the field of drug-target recognition, binding, and unbinding studied using metadynamics-based approaches, with particular emphasis on their role in structure-based design. Computational chemistry has significantly contributed to drug design and optimization in an extremely broad range of areas, including prediction of target druggability and drug likeness, de novo design, fragment screening, ligand docking, estimation of binding affinity, and modulation of ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, toxicity) properties. Computationally driven drug discovery must continuously adapt to keep pace with the evolving knowledge of the factors that modulate the pharmacological action of drugs. There is thus an urgent need for novel computational approaches that integrate the vast amount of complex information currently available for small (bio)organic compounds, biologically relevant targets and their complexes, while also accounting accurately for the thermodynamics and kinetics of drug-target association, the intrinsic dynamical behavior of biomolecular systems, and the complexity of protein-protein networks. Understanding the mechanism of drug binding to and unbinding from biological targets is fundamental for optimizing lead compounds and designing novel biologically active ones. One major challenge is the accurate description of the conformational complexity prior to and upon formation of drug-target complexes. Recently, enhanced sampling methods, including metadynamics and related approaches, have been successfully applied to investigate complex mechanisms of drugs binding to flexible targets. Metadynamics is a family of enhanced sampling techniques aimed at enhancing the rare events and reconstructing the underlying free energy landscape as a function of a set of order parameters, usually referred to as collective variables. Studies of drug binding mechanisms have

  10. Investigation of antibacterial mechanism and identification of bacterial protein targets mediated by antibacterial medicinal plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Yong, Ann-Li; Ooh, Keng-Fei; Ong, Hean-Chooi; Chai, Tsun-Thai; Wong, Fai-Chu

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial mechanism and potential therapeutic targets of three antibacterial medicinal plants. Upon treatment with the plant extracts, bacterial proteins were extracted and resolved using denaturing gel electrophoresis. Differentially-expressed bacterial proteins were excised from the gels and subjected to sequence analysis by MALDI TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. From our study, seven differentially expressed bacterial proteins (triacylglycerol lipase, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase, flagellin, outer membrane protein A, stringent starvation protein A, 30S ribosomal protein s1 and 60 kDa chaperonin) were identified. Additionally, scanning electron microscope study indicated morphological damages induced on bacterial cell surfaces. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first time these bacterial proteins are being reported, following treatments with the antibacterial plant extracts. Further studies in this direction could lead to the detailed understanding of their inhibition mechanism and discovery of target-specific antibacterial agents.

  11. Numerical investigation on the temperature control of a NIF cryogenic target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y.; Zhou, G.; Li, Q.; Li, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical investigation was performed on the temperature control of NIF cryogenic target in order to get a temperature uniformity of 0.1mK on the surface of the capsule. Heat transfer process was discussed to find out major factors in the temperature control, tamping gas heat transfer and free convection of the tamping gas was calculated. Spherically symmetric temperature field is required due to energy released from the tritium decay within the capsule, auxiliary heating is set on the hohlraum to compensate the higher heat loss caused by the lower tamping gas thermal resistance on the mid plane. Free convection effect of the tamping gas is reduced by separating the tamping gas with plastic films and independent temperature control of the cooling arm. This research may provide theoretical foundation and reference for temperature control on the cryogenic target.

  12. Investigation of the involvement of MIR185 and its target genes in the development of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Forstner, Andreas J.; Basmanav, F. Buket; Mattheisen, Manuel; Böhmer, Anne C.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Janson, Esther; Strengman, Eric; Priebe, Lutz; Degenhardt, Franziska; Hoffmann, Per; Herms, Stefan; Maier, Wolfgang; Mössner, Rainald; Rujescu, Dan; Ophoff, Roel A.; Moebus, Susanne; Mortensen, Preben B.; Børglum, Anders D.; Hougaard, David M.; Frank, Josef; Witt, Stephanie H.; Rietschel, Marcella; Zimmer, Andreas; Nöthen, Markus M.; Miró, Xavier; Cichon, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder of unclear etiology. The strongest known genetic risk factor is the 22q11.2 microdeletion. Research has yet to confirm which genes within the deletion region are implicated in schizophrenia. The minimal 1.5 megabase deletion contains MIR185, which encodes microRNA 185. Methods We determined miR-185 expression in embryonic and adult mouse brains. Common and rare variants at this locus were then investigated using a human genetics approach. First, we performed gene-based analyses for MIR185 common variants and target genes using Psychiatric Genomics Consortium genome-wide association data. Second, MIR185 was resequenced in German patients (n = 1000) and controls (n = 500). We followed up promising variants by genotyping an additional European sample (patients, n = 3598; controls, n = 4082). Results In situ hybridization in mice revealed miR-185 expression in brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. Gene-based tests revealed association between common variants in 3 MIR185 target genes (ATAT1, SH3PXD2A, NTRK3) and schizophrenia. Further analyses in mice revealed overlapping expression patterns for these target genes and miR-185. Resequencing identified 2 rare patient-specific novel variants flanking MIR185. However, follow-up genotyping provided no further evidence of their involvement in schizophrenia. Limitations Power to detect rare variant associations was limited. Conclusion Human genetic analyses generated no evidence of the involvement of MIR185 in schizophrenia. However, the expression patterns of miR-185 and its target genes in mice, and the genetic association results for the 3 target genes, suggest that further research into the involvement of miR-185 and its downstream pathways in schizophrenia is warranted. PMID:24936775

  13. Act-Up, other AIDS groups targeted for FBI surveillance. Federal Bureau of Investigations.

    PubMed

    1995-06-01

    Documents obtained by a civil rights group, the Center for Constitutional Rights, showed that the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) monitored the activities of Act-Up, Gay Men's Health Crisis (GMHC), the Coalition for Lesbian and Gay Rights, and Senior Action in a Gay Environment. Act-Up was the main target from 1988 through 1992, the years it staged its most conspicuous demonstrations against the Federal government's policy on AIDS. According to one of the documents, George Bush, then president, complained about Act-Up holding protests and tossing condoms outside his summer home in Maine in 1992. The documents showed that the organization posed little threat of harm.

  14. Pathway as a Pharmacological Target for Herbal Medicines: An Investigation from Reduning Injection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Zhang, Wenjuan; Wang, Zhengzhong; Shar, Piar Ali; Xiao, Wei; Wang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    As a rich natural resource for drug discovery, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) plays an important role in complementary and alternative medical systems. TCM shows a daunting complexity of compounds featuring multi-components and multi-targets to cure diseases, which thus always makes it extremely difficult to systematically explain the molecular mechanisms adequately using routine methods. In the present work, to reveal the systematic mechanism of herbal formulae, we developed a pathway-based strategy by combining the pathways integrating, target selection, reverse drug targeting and network analysis together, and then exemplified it by Reduning injection (RDN), a clinically widely used herbal medicine injection, in combating inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effects exerted by the major ingredients of RDN at signaling pathways level were systematically investigated. More importantly, our predicted results were also experimentally validated. Our strategy provides a deep understanding of the pharmacological functions of herbal formulae from molecular to systematic level, which may lead to more successful applications of systems pharmacology for drug discovery and development. PMID:25830385

  15. Investigation of target and ground clutter reflections on the correlation between transmitted and received noise signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allebach, Joshua M.; Narayanan, Ram M.; Himed, Braham

    2016-05-01

    The use of noise waveforms for radar has been popular for many years; however, not much work has been done to extend their use to long range applications. To understand the practicality of using noise for this work, the correlation values between transmitted and received signals were investigated as well as the ratio of reflected to transmitted power. This was done for both ground clutter and simple shapes representing targets of interest. Reflections from these different surfaces are dependent on the frequency of operation, polarization, angle of incidence, and target material. To act as a direct comparison to the noise waveform, a chirp signal was also reflected from these surfaces and correlated with the originally transmitted signal. For terrain, it was found that the noise offers similar correlation patterns as the chirp waveform but slightly larger reflected power for certain cases. Additionally, noise waveforms have decreased correlation values compared to chirp waveforms at low angles. For the simple shaped targets, the noise and chirp signals had similar correlation patterns, values, and power ratios.

  16. Investigation of FOXM1 as a Potential New Target for Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Azusa; Fukushima, Satoshi; Nakahara, Satoshi; Yamashita, Junji; Tokuzumi, Aki; Aoi, Jun; Ichihara, Asako; Kanemaru, Hisashi; Jinnin, Masatoshi; Ihn, Hironobu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that immunotherapies and molecular targeted therapies are effective for advanced melanoma. Non-antigen-specific immunotherapies such as immunocheckpoint blockades have been shown to be effective in the treatment of advanced melanoma. However, the response rates remain low. To improve their efficacy, they should be combined with antigen-specific immunotherapy. Elevated expression of the transcription factor, Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), has been reported in various human cancers, and it has been shown to have potential as a target for immunotherapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the FOXM1 expression in human melanoma samples and cell lines, to evaluate the relationship between the FOXM1 expression and the clinical features of melanoma patients and to investigate the association between the FOXM1 and MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways in melanoma cell lines. We conducted the quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting analyses of melanoma cell lines, and investigated melanoma and nevus tissue samples by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. We performed MEK siRNA and PI3K/AKT inhibitor studies and FOXM1 siRNA studies in melanoma cell lines. We found that FOXM1 was expressed in all of the melanoma cell lines, and was expressed in 49% of primary melanomas, 67% of metastatic melanomas and 10% of nevi by performing immunohistochemical staining. Metastatic melanoma samples exhibited significantly higher mRNA levels of FOXM1 (p = 0.004). Primary melanomas thicker than 2 mm were also more likely to express FOXM1. Patients whose primary melanoma expressed FOXM1 had a significantly poorer overall survival compared to patients without FOXM1 expression (p = 0.024). Downregulation of FOXM1 by siRNA significantly inhibited the proliferation of melanoma cells, and blockade of the MAPK and PI3K/AKT pathways decreased the FOXM1 expression in melanoma cell lines. In conclusion, FOXM1 is considered to be a new therapeutic target for

  17. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-03-31

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN.

  18. Electrical stimulation alleviates depressive-like behaviors of rats: investigation of brain targets and potential mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lim, L W; Prickaerts, J; Huguet, G; Kadar, E; Hartung, H; Sharp, T; Temel, Y

    2015-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising therapy for patients with refractory depression. However, key questions remain with regard to which brain target(s) should be used for stimulation, and which mechanisms underlie the therapeutic effects. Here, we investigated the effect of DBS, with low- and high-frequency stimulation (LFS, HFS), in different brain regions (ventromedial prefrontal cortex, vmPFC; cingulate cortex, Cg; nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell; lateral habenula, LHb; and ventral tegmental area) on a variety of depressive-like behaviors using rat models. In the naive animal study, we found that HFS of the Cg, vmPFC, NAc core and LHb reduced anxiety levels and increased motivation for food. In the chronic unpredictable stress model, there was a robust depressive-like behavioral phenotype. Moreover, vmPFC HFS, in a comparison of all stimulated targets, produced the most profound antidepressant effects with enhanced hedonia, reduced anxiety and decreased forced-swim immobility. In the following set of electrophysiological and histochemical experiments designed to unravel some of the underlying mechanisms, we found that vmPFC HFS evoked a specific modulation of the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), which have long been linked to mood. Finally, using a neuronal mapping approach by means of c-Fos expression, we found that vmPFC HFS modulated a brain circuit linked to the DRN and known to be involved in affect. In conclusion, HFS of the vmPFC produced the most potent antidepressant effects in naive rats and rats subjected to stress by mechanisms also including the DRN. PMID:25826110

  19. Investigation of targeted biomolecules in a micro-fluxgate-based bio-sensing system.

    PubMed

    Lei, Jian; Lei, Chong; Wang, Tao; Yang, Zhen; Zhou, Yong

    2014-04-01

    An investigation of targeted biomolecules was accomplished by combining a micro-fluxgate-based bio-sensing system and Dynabeads. The fluxgate sensor for biomolecule detection was fabricated by Micro Electro-Mechanical system technology, including thick photoresist lithography, electroplating and chemical wet etching. The magnetic core of the sensor was made of Fe-based amorphous ribbon core and three dimension solenoid coils were used as magnetic sensitive elements. The micro-fluxgate-based bio-sensing system was characterized firstly in different concentrations of Dynabeads, and a concentration as low as 100 ng/ml was detected with an external dc magnetic field in the range of 525 μT to 875 μT. Sandwich assays are performed using antibody-antigen pair combination of biotin-streptavidin on a separated Au film substrate surface with a self-assembled layer. Detection of Alpha Fetoprotein antigens with different concentrations was performed and a minimum detectable concentration of 1 pg/ml was achieved by the bio-sensing system. It is of considerable interest due to its potential application in the biomedical field based on known specific binding of target and labels. PMID:24292779

  20. Targeted Protein Degradation by Salmonella under Phagosome-Mimicking Culture Conditions Investigated Using Comparative Peptidomics

    SciTech Connect

    Manes, Nathan P.; Gustin, Jean K.; Rue, Joanne; Mottaz, Heather M.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Zimmer, Jennifer S.; Metz, Thomas O.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.; Heffron, Fred

    2007-04-01

    The pathogen Salmonella enterica is known to cause both food poisoning and typhoid fever. Due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant isolates and the threat of bioterrorism (e.g., contamination of the food supply), there is a growing need to study this bacterium. In this investigation, comparative peptidomics was used to study Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium cultured in either a rich medium or in an acidic, low magnesium, and minimal nutrient medium designed to roughly mimic the macrophage phagosomal compartment (within which Salmonella are known to survive). Native peptides from cleared cell lysates were enriched by using isopropanol extraction and analyzed by using both LC-MS/MS and LC-FTICR-MS. We identified 5,163 distinct peptides originating from 682 proteins and the data clearly indicated that compared to cells cultured in the rich medium, Salmonella cultured in the phagosome-mimicking medium had dramatically higher abundances of a wide variety of protein degradation products, especially from ribosomal proteins. Salmonella from the same cultures were also analyzed by using bottom-up proteomics, and when the peptidomic and proteomic data were analyzed together, two clusters of proteins targeted for proteolysis were tentatively identified. Possible roles of targeted proteolysis by phagocytosed Salmonella are discussed.

  1. Home health agencies: targets of anti-fraud and abuse investigations.

    PubMed

    Richardson, C

    1995-08-01

    Increased health care fraud and abuse investigations could result in home health agencies, and other targets, becoming politically acceptable casualties of war in the battle to balance the federal budget. To protect themselves, home health agencies would be well advised to conduct internal fraud and abuse audits on an annual basis and to develop corporate compliance plans (see Newsletter, Vol. 9, No. 7, July 1994, at 16, and next month's issue, which will discuss corporate compliance programs as well as the OIG's new voluntary disclosure program). In addition, purchasers of home health agencies should be especially vigilant of fraud and abuse problems during the due diligence phase of the acquisition and, if problems are discovered, should consider whether voluntary disclosure to the OIG and settlement of any resulting claims is an appropriate condition of closing.

  2. Computational and experimental investigation of supersonic convection over a laser heated target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marineau, Eric C.

    This research concerns the development and validation of simulation of the beam-target interaction to determine the target temperature distribution as a function of time for a given target geometry, surface radiation intensity and free stream flow condition. The effect of a turbulent supersonic flow was investigated both numerically and experimentally. Experiments were in the Virginia Tech supersonic wind tunnel with a Mach 4 nozzle, ambient total temperature, total pressure of 160 psi and Reynolds number of 5x107/m. The target consisted of a 6.35 mm stainless steel plate painted at black. The target was irradiated with a 300 Watt continuous beam Ytterbium fiber laser generating a 4 mm Gaussian beam at 1.08 micron 10 cm from the leading edge where a 4 mm turbulent boundary layer prevailed. An absorbed laser power of 65, 81, 101, 120 Watts was used leading to a maximum heat flux between 1035 to 1910 W/cm 2. The target surface and backside temperature was measured using a mid-wave infrared camera. The backside temperature was also measured using eight type-K thermocouples. Two tests are made, one with the flow-on and the other with the flow-off. For the flow-on case, the laser is turned on after the tunnel starts and the flow reaches a steady state. For the flow-off case, the plate is heated at the same power but without the supersonic flow. The cooling effect is seen by subtracting the flow-off temperature from the flow-on temperature. This temperature subtraction is useful in cancelling the bias errors such that the overall uncertainty is significantly reduced. A new conjugate heat transfer algorithm was implemented in the GASP solver and validated by predicting the temperature distribution inside a cooled nozzle wall. The conjugate heat transfer algorithm was used to simulate the experiments at 81 and 65 Watts. Most computations were performed using the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model on a 280; 320 cell grid. A grid convergence study was performed. At 65 Watts

  3. Structural investigation of inhibitor designs targeting 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase from the shikimate pathway of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Marcio V.B.; Snee, William C.; Bromfield, Karen M.; Payne, Richard J.; Palaninathan, Satheesh K.; Ciulli, Alessio; Howard, Nigel I.; Abell, Chris; Sacchettini, James C.; Blundell, Tom L.

    2011-09-06

    The shikimate pathway is essential in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its absence from humans makes the enzymes of this pathway potential drug targets. In the present paper, we provide structural insights into ligand and inhibitor binding to 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase (dehydroquinase) from M. tuberculosis (MtDHQase), the third enzyme of the shikimate pathway. The enzyme has been crystallized in complex with its reaction product, 3-dehydroshikimate, and with six different competitive inhibitors. The inhibitor 2,3-anhydroquinate mimics the flattened enol/enolate reaction intermediate and serves as an anchor molecule for four of the inhibitors investigated. MtDHQase also forms a complex with citrazinic acid, a planar analogue of the reaction product. The structure of MtDHQase in complex with a 2,3-anhydroquinate moiety attached to a biaryl group shows that this group extends to an active-site subpocket inducing significant structural rearrangement. The flexible extensions of inhibitors designed to form {pi}-stacking interactions with the catalytic Tyr{sup 24} have been investigated. The high-resolution crystal structures of the MtDHQase complexes provide structural evidence for the role of the loop residues 19-24 in MtDHQase ligand binding and catalytic mechanism and provide a rationale for the design and efficacy of inhibitors.

  4. Investigating the photosensitizer-potential of targeted gallium corrole using multimode optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Lubow, Jay; Chu, David; Gross, Zeev; Gray, Harry B.; Farkas, Daniel L.; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K.

    2011-02-01

    We recently developed a novel therapeutic particle, HerGa, for breast cancer treatment and detection. HerGa consists of a tumor-targeted cell penetration protein noncovalently assembled with a gallium-metallated corrole. The corrole is structurally similar to porphyrin, emits intense fluorescence, and has proven highly effective for breast tumor treatment preclinically, without light exposure. Here, we tested HerGa as a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy and investigated its mechanism of action using multimode optical imaging. Using confocal fluorescence imaging, we observed that HerGa disrupts the mitochondrial membrane potential in situ, and this disruption is substantially augmented by light exposure. In addition, spectral and fluorescence lifetime imaging were utilized to both validate the mitochondrial membrane potential disruption and investigate HerGa internalization, allowing us to optimize the timing for light dosimetry. We observed, using advanced multimode optical imaging, that light at a specific wavelength promotes HerGa cytotoxicity, which is likely to cause disruption of mitochondrial function. Thus, we can identify for the first time the capacity of HerGa as a photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy and reveal its mechanism of action, opening possibilities for therapeutic intervention in human breast cancer management.

  5. Investigating Synthetic Oligonucleotide Targeting of Mir31 in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Hildyard, John CW; Wells, Dominic J

    2016-01-01

    Exon-skipping via synthetic antisense oligonucleotides represents one of the most promising potential therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), yet this approach is highly sequence-specific and thus each oligonucleotide is of benefit to only a subset of patients. The discovery that dystrophin mRNA is subject to translational suppression by the microRNA miR31, and that miR31 is elevated in the muscle of DMD patients, raises the possibility that the same oligonucleotide chemistries employed for exon skipping could be directed toward relieving this translational block. This approach would act synergistically with exon skipping where possible, but by targeting the 3’UTR it would further be of benefit to the many DMD patients who express low levels of in-frame transcript. We here present investigations into the feasibility of combining exon skipping with several different strategies for miR31-modulation, using both in vitro models and the mdx mouse (the classical animal model of DMD), and monitoring effects on dystrophin at the transcriptional and translational level. We show that despite promising results from our cell culture model, our in vivo data failed to demonstrate similarly reproducible enhancement of dystrophin translation, suggesting that miR31-modulation may not be practical under current oligonucleotide approaches. Possible explanations for this disappointing outcome are discussed, along with suggestions for future investigations. PMID:27525173

  6. Clinical investigation of TROP-2 as an independent biomarker and potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peng; Yu, Hai-Zheng; Cai, Jian-Hui

    2015-09-01

    Colon cancer is associated with a severe demographic and economic burden worldwide. The pathogenesis of colon cancer is highly complex and involves sequential genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Despite extensive investigation, the pathogenesis of colon cancer remains to be elucidated. As the third most common type of cancer worldwide, the treatment options for colon cancer are currently limited. Human trophoblast cell‑surface marker (TROP‑2), is a cell‑surface transmembrane glycoprotein overexpressed by several types of epithelial carcinoma. In addition, TROP‑2 has been demonstrated to be associated with tumorigenesis and invasiveness in solid types of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protein expression of TROP‑2 in colon cancer tissues, and further explore the association between the expression of TROP‑2 and clinicopathological features of patients with colon cancer. The expression and localization of the TROP‑2 protein was examined using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. Finally, the expression of TROP‑2 expression was correlated to conventional clinicopathological features of colon cancer using a χ2 test. The results revealed that TROP‑2 protein was expressed at high levels in the colon cancer tissues, which was associated with the development and pathological process of colon cancer. Therefore, TROP‑2 may be used as a biomarker to determine the clinical prognosis, and as a potential therapeutic target in colon cancer.

  7. Investigating Synthetic Oligonucleotide Targeting of Mir31 in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hildyard, John Cw; Wells, Dominic J

    2016-01-01

    Exon-skipping via synthetic antisense oligonucleotides represents one of the most promising potential therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), yet this approach is highly sequence-specific and thus each oligonucleotide is of benefit to only a subset of patients. The discovery that dystrophin mRNA is subject to translational suppression by the microRNA miR31, and that miR31 is elevated in the muscle of DMD patients, raises the possibility that the same oligonucleotide chemistries employed for exon skipping could be directed toward relieving this translational block. This approach would act synergistically with exon skipping where possible, but by targeting the 3'UTR it would further be of benefit to the many DMD patients who express low levels of in-frame transcript. We here present investigations into the feasibility of combining exon skipping with several different strategies for miR31-modulation, using both in vitro models and the mdx mouse (the classical animal model of DMD), and monitoring effects on dystrophin at the transcriptional and translational level. We show that despite promising results from our cell culture model, our in vivo data failed to demonstrate similarly reproducible enhancement of dystrophin translation, suggesting that miR31-modulation may not be practical under current oligonucleotide approaches. Possible explanations for this disappointing outcome are discussed, along with suggestions for future investigations. PMID:27525173

  8. Investigation of measureable parameters that correlate with automatic target recognition performance in synthetic aperture sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazagnaire, Julia; Cobb, J. T.; Isaacs, Jason

    2015-05-01

    There is a desire in the Mine Counter Measure community to develop a systematic method to predict and/or estimate the performance of Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithms that are detecting and classifying mine-like objects within sonar data. Ideally, parameters exist that can be measured directly from the sonar data that correlate with ATR performance. In this effort, two metrics were analyzed for their predictive potential using high frequency synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images. The first parameter is a measure of contrast. It is essentially the variance in pixel intensity over a fixed partition of relatively small size. An analysis was performed to determine the optimum block size for this contrast calculation. These blocks were then overlapped in the horizontal and vertical direction over the entire image. The second parameter is the one-dimensional K-shape parameter. The K-distribution is commonly used to describe sonar backscatter return from range cells that contain a finite number of scatterers. An Ada-Boosted Decision Tree classifier was used to calculate the probability of classification (Pc) and false alarm rate (FAR) for several types of targets in SAS images from three different data sets. ROC curves as a function of the measured parameters were generated and the correlation between the measured parameters in the vicinity of each of the contacts and the ATR performance was investigated. The contrast and K-shape parameters were considered separately. Additionally, the contrast and K-shape parameter were associated with background texture types using previously labeled high frequency SAS images.

  9. Investigating microRNA-Target Interaction-Supported Tissues in Human Cancer Tissues Based on miRNA and Target Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wan J.; Lin, Feng-Mao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Wang, Hsiuying

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that a small non-coding RNA, microRNA (miRNA) down-regulates its mRNA targets. This effect is regarded as an important role in various biological processes. Many studies have been devoted to predicting miRNA-target interactions. These studies indicate that the interactions may only be functional in some specific tissues, which depend on the characteristics of an miRNA. No systematic methods have been established in the literature to investigate the correlation between miRNA-target interactions and tissue specificity through microarray data. In this study, we propose a method to investigate miRNA-target interaction-supported tissues, which is based on experimentally validated miRNA-target interactions. The tissue specificity results by our method are in accordance with the experimental results in the literature. Availability and Implementation Our analysis results are available at http://tsmti.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/ and http://www.stat.nctu.edu.tw/hwang/tsmti.html. PMID:24756070

  10. Global investigation of the co-evolution of MIRNA genes and microRNA targets during soybean domestication.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tengfei; Fang, Chao; Ma, Yanming; Shen, Yanting; Li, Congcong; Li, Qing; Wang, Min; Liu, Shulin; Zhang, Jixiang; Zhou, Zhengkui; Yang, Rui; Wang, Zheng; Tian, Zhixi

    2016-02-01

    Although the selection of coding genes during plant domestication has been well studied, the evolution of MIRNA genes (MIRs) and the interaction between microRNAs (miRNAs) and their targets in this process are poorly understood. Here, we present a genome-wide survey of the selection of MIRs and miRNA targets during soybean domestication and improvement. Our results suggest that, overall, MIRs have higher evolutionary rates than miRNA targets. Nonetheless, they do demonstrate certain similar evolutionary patterns during soybean domestication: MIRs and miRNA targets with high expression and duplication status, and with greater numbers of partners, exhibit lower nucleotide divergence than their counterparts without these characteristics, suggesting that expression level, duplication status, and miRNA-target interaction are essential for evolution of MIRs and miRNA targets. Further investigation revealed that miRNA-target pairs that are subjected to strong purifying selection have greater similarities than those that exhibited genetic diversity. Moreover, mediated by domestication and improvement, the similarities of a large number of miRNA-target pairs in cultivated soybean populations were increased compared to those in wild soybeans, whereas a small number of miRNA-target pairs exhibited decreased similarity, which may be associated with the adoption of particular domestication traits. Taken together, our results shed light on the co-evolution of MIRs and miRNA targets during soybean domestication.

  11. Investigating inertial confinement fusion target fuel conditions through x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2012-05-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are designed to produce hot, dense fuel in a neutron-producing core that is surrounded by a shell of compressing material. The x-rays emitted from ICF plasmas can be analyzed to reveal details of the temperatures, densities, gradients, velocities, and mix characteristics of ICF targets. Such diagnostics are critical to understand the target performance and to improve the predictive power of simulation codes.

  12. Experimental investigation of a liquid lead-bismuth target hydrodynamics without an ion guide diaphragm

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, Yu.I.; Sotov, M.I.; Poletaev, G.P.

    1997-12-01

    At present, melt Pb-Bi eutectic is being considered as one type of coolant in the target of acceleration-driven systems. The active part of a target, which is the main unit of the liquid-metal circuit, can be considered in two variants: with diaphragm on the ion guide and without it. The diaphragm is the most vulnerable unit of a target thermally and from the standpoint of radiation damage. Therefore, research on substantiation of a target version without a diaphragm has begun.

  13. Investigations on nanoconfinement of low-molecular antineoplastic agents into biocompatible magnetic matrices for drug targeting.

    PubMed

    Tomoiaga, Alina Maria; Cioroiu, Bogdan Ionel; Nica, Valentin; Vasile, Aurelia

    2013-11-01

    Magnetic mesoporous silica nanoparticles are employed as biocompatible matrices to host low-molecular antineoplastic drugs. 5-Fluorouracil is a well-known antimetabolite drug used to treat many malignancies: colon, rectal, breast, head and neck, pancreatic, gastric, esophageal, liver and G-U (bladder, penile, vulva, prostate), skin cancers (basal cell and keratosis). Unfortunately severe gastrointestinal, hematological, neural, cardiac and dermatological toxic effects are often registered due to its cytotoxicity. Thus, this work focuses on development of a magnetic silica nanosystem, capable of hosting high amounts of 5-fluorouracil and delivers it in a targeted manner, under the influence of external magnetic field. There are few reports on nanoconfinement of this particular small molecule antimetabolite on mesoporous silica hosts. Therefore we have investigated different ways to confine high amounts of 5-FU within amino-modified and non-modified mesopores of the silica shell, from water and ethanol, under magnetic stirring and ultrasound irradiation. Also, we have studied the adsorption process from water as a function of pH in order to rationalize drug-support interactions. It is shown that nature of the solvent has great influence on diffusion of small molecules into mesopores, which is slower from alcoholic solutions. More importantly, sonication is proven as an excellent alternative to long adsorption tests, since the time necessary to reach equilibrium is drastically reduced to 1h and higher amounts of drug may be immobilized within the mesopores of amino-modified magnetic silica nanoparticles. These results are highly important for optimization of drug immobilization process in order to attain desired release profile. PMID:23777792

  14. Experimental investigation of penetration performance of shaped charge into concrete targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng; Ma, Tianbao; Ning, Jianguo

    2008-06-01

    In order to develop a tandem warhead that can effectively destroy concrete targets, this paper explores the penetration performance of shaped charges with different cone angles and liner materials into concrete targets by means of experiments. The penetration process and the destruction mechanism of concrete targets by shaped charges and kinetic energy projectiles are analyzed and compared. Experimental results suggest that both kinetic energetic projectile and shaped charge are capable of destroying concrete targets, but the magnitudes of damage are different. Compared with a kinetic energy projectile, a shaped charge has more significant effect of penetration into the target, and causes very large spalling area. Hence, a shaped charge is quite suitable for first-stage charge of tandem warhead. It is also found that, with the increase of shaped charge liner cone angle, the depth of penetration decreases gradually while the hole diameter becomes larger. Penetration depth with copper liner is larger than of aluminum liner but hole diameter is relatively smaller, and the shaped charge with steel liner is between the above two cases. The shaped charge with a cone angle of 100° can form a jet projectile charge (JPC). With JPC, a hole with optimum depth and diameter on concrete targets can be formed, which guarantees that the second-stage warhead smoothly penetrates into the hole and explodes at the optimum depth to achieve the desired level of destruction in concrete targets.

  15. Evaluation of Docking Target Functions by the Comprehensive Investigation of Protein-Ligand Energy Minima

    PubMed Central

    Oferkin, Igor V.; Katkova, Ekaterina V.; Sulimov, Alexey V.; Kutov, Danil C.; Sobolev, Sergey I.; Voevodin, Vladimir V.; Sulimov, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    The adequate choice of the docking target function impacts the accuracy of the ligand positioning as well as the accuracy of the protein-ligand binding energy calculation. To evaluate a docking target function we compared positions of its minima with the experimentally known pose of the ligand in the protein active site. We evaluated five docking target functions based on either the MMFF94 force field or the PM7 quantum-chemical method with or without implicit solvent models: PCM, COSMO, and SGB. Each function was tested on the same set of 16 protein-ligand complexes. For exhaustive low-energy minima search the novel MPI parallelized docking program FLM and large supercomputer resources were used. Protein-ligand binding energies calculated using low-energy minima were compared with experimental values. It was demonstrated that the docking target function on the base of the MMFF94 force field in vacuo can be used for discovery of native or near native ligand positions by finding the low-energy local minima spectrum of the target function. The importance of solute-solvent interaction for the correct ligand positioning is demonstrated. It is shown that docking accuracy can be improved by replacement of the MMFF94 force field by the new semiempirical quantum-chemical PM7 method. PMID:26693223

  16. Theoretical investigation of the thermal hydraulic behaviour of a slab-type liquid metal target

    SciTech Connect

    Dury, T.V.; Smith, B.L.

    1996-06-01

    The thermal hydraulics codes CFDS-FLOW3D and ASTEC have been used to simulate a slabtype design of ESS spallation target. This design is single-skinned, and of tapering form (in the beam direction), with rounded sides in a cross-section through a plane normal to the beam. The coolant fluid used is mercury, under forced circulation, with an inlet temperature of 180{degrees}C. The goal of these computer studies was to understand the behaviour of the coolant flow, and hence to arrive at a design which optimises the heat extraction for a given beam power - in the sense of: (1) minimising the peak local fluid temperature within the target, (2) maintaining an acceptable temperature level and distribution over and through the target outer wall, (3) keeping the overall fluid pressure loss through the complete target to a minimum, (4) staying within the physical limits of overall size required, particularly in the region of primary spallation. Two- and three-dimensional models have been used, with different arrangements and design of internal baffles, and different coolant flow distributions at the target inlet. Nominal total inlet mass flow was 245 kg/s, and a heat deposition profile used which was based on the proton beam energy distribution. This gave a nominal total heat load of 3.23 MW - of which 8.2kW were deposited in the window steel.

  17. Investigation of efficient shock acceleration of ions using high energy lasers in low density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antici, P.; Gauthier, M.; D'Humieres, E.; Albertazzi, B.; Beaucourt, C.; Böker, J.; Chen, S.; Dervieux, V.; Feugeas, J. L.; Glesser, M.; Levy, A.; Nicolai, P.; Romagnani, L.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Pepin, H.; Fuchs, J.

    2012-10-01

    Intense research is being conducted on sources of laser-accelerated ions and their applications that have the potential of becoming novel particle sources. In most experiments, a high intensity and short laser pulse interacts with a solid density target. It was recently shown that a promising way to accelerate ions to higher energies and in a collimated beam is to use under-dense or near-critical density targets instead of solid ones. In these conditions, simulations have revealed that protons are predicted to be accelerated by a collisionless shock mechanism that significantly increases their energy. We present recent experiments performed on the 100 TW LULI laser (France) and the TITAN facility at LLNL, USA. The near critical density plasma was prepared by exploding thin solid foils by a long laser pulse. The plasma density profile was controlled by varying the target thickness and the delay between the long and the short laser pulse. When exploding the target, we obtained proton energies that are comparable if not higher than what was obtained under similar laser conditions, but with solid targets which make them a promising candidate for an efficient proton source.

  18. Exploratory investigation of the HIPPO gas-jet target fluid dynamic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, Zach; Shi, Ke; Jemcov, Aleksandar; Couder, Manoel

    2016-08-01

    In order to optimize the performance of gas-jet targets for future nuclear reaction measurements, a detailed understanding of the dependence of the gas-jet properties on experiment design parameters is required. Common methods of gas-jet characterization rely on measuring the effective thickness using nuclear elastic scattering and energy loss techniques; however, these tests are time intensive and limit the range of design modifications which can be explored to improve the properties of the jet as a nuclear reaction target. Thus, a more rapid jet-characterization method is desired. We performed the first steps towards characterizing the gas-jet density distribution of the HIPPO gas-jet target at the University of Notre Dame's Nuclear Science Laboratory by reproducing results from 20Ne(α,α)20Ne elastic scattering measurements with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations performed with the state-of-the-art CFD software ANSYS Fluent. We find a strong sensitivity to experimental design parameters of the gas-jet target, such as the jet nozzle geometry and ambient pressure of the target chamber. We argue that improved predictive power will require moving to three-dimensional simulations and additional benchmarking with experimental data.

  19. Investigation on Soft X-Ray Lasers with a Picosecond-Laser-Irradiated Gas Puff Target

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedorowiez, H; Bartnik, A; Jarocki, R; Rakowski, R; Dunn, J; Smith, R F; Hunter, J; Hilsen, J; Shlyaptsev, V N

    2002-10-09

    We present results of experimental studies on transient gain soft x-ray lasers with a picosecond-laser-irradiated gas puff target. The target in a form of an elongated gas sheet is formed by pulsed injection of gas through a slit nozzle using a high-pressure electromagnetic valve developed and characterized at the Institute of Optoelectronics. The x-ray laser experiments were performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory using the tabletop Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET) laser to irradiate argon, krypton or xenon gas puff targets. Soft x-ray lasing in neon-like argon on the 3p-3s transition at 46.9 nm and the 3d-3p transition at 45.1 nm have been demonstrated, however, no amplification for nickel-like krypton or xenon was observed. Results of the experiments are presented and discussed.

  20. A loud right-apical systolic murmur is associated with the diagnosis of secondary pulmonary arterial hypertension: retrospective analysis of data from 201 consecutive client-owned dogs (2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Ohad, D G; Lenchner, I; Bdolah-Abram, T; Segev, G

    2013-12-01

    Canine pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains under-recognized and under-treated despite being prevalent. This retrospective study investigated whether selected historical and physical examination findings were associated with the diagnosis of canine PAH, defined as tricuspid regurgitation (TR) with a confirmed systolic pressure gradient ≥ 35 mm Hg. Two hundred and one client-owned dogs (PAH group, n=96; control group, n=105) were studied. Dogs in the control group had TR with a confirmed systolic gradient <35 mm Hg. All dogs underwent a complete physical examination and a complete echocardiographic assessment. A loud systolic right-apical murmur (RAM) was significantly associated with TR ≥ 35 mm Hg. The proportion of dogs with PAH significantly increased as the RAM grade increased, with odds ratios of 4.4-37.6 for Grades 3/6-5/6 (P=0.004 to <0.001), respectively. A stronger right-than-left apical-murmur had a positive predictive value (PPV) of 83% and was 96% specific for TR ≥ 35 mm Hg, and when combined with syncope, it had a PPV of 92% and was 92% specific. A Grade ≥ 4/6 RAM had a PPV of 85% and was 93% specific. Syncope with a Grade ≥ 4/6 RAM had a PPV of 94% and was 92% specific. Ascites combined with a Grade ≥ 4 or ≥ 5/6 RAM had a PPV of 100% and was 100% specific for TR ≥ 35 mm Hg. For each of these three murmur categories (Grades ≥ 4/6, ≥ 5/6, and a louder-right-than-left murmur), when detected with no concurrent ascites or syncope, the positive likelihood ratio varied from 4.6 to 6.4. A loud systolic RAM in dogs with degenerative valve disease is highly suggestive of concurrent PAH.

  1. Perceived-Target-Language-Use Survey in the English Classrooms in China: Investigation of Classroom-Related and Institutional Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yan, Edith M. Y.; Fung, Irene Y. Y.; Liu, Lili; Huang, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study investigated the extent and contexts of target language (TL) use in English language classrooms. Participants were 2,906 students from seven secondary schools and four universities in the more developed cities in southern China. They were put into five groups according to their educational stage and whether their content…

  2. On-Demand Targeting: Investigating Biology with Proximity-Directed Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Long, Marcus J C; Poganik, Jesse R; Aye, Yimon

    2016-03-23

    Proximity enhancement is a central chemical tenet underpinning an exciting suite of small-molecule toolsets that have allowed us to unravel many biological complexities. The leitmotif of this opus is "tethering"-a strategy in which a multifunctional small molecule serves as a template to bring proteins/biomolecules together. Scaffolding approaches have been powerfully applied to control diverse biological outcomes such as protein-protein association, protein stability, activity, and improve imaging capabilities. A new twist on this strategy has recently appeared, in which the small-molecule probe is engineered to unleash controlled amounts of reactive chemical signals within the microenvironment of a target protein. Modification of a specific target elicits a precisely timed and spatially controlled gain-of-function (or dominant loss-of-function) signaling response. Presented herein is a unique personal outlook conceptualizing the powerful proximity-enhanced chemical biology toolsets into two paradigms: "multifunctional scaffolding" versus "on-demand targeting". By addressing the latest advances and challenges in the established yet constantly evolving multifunctional scaffolding strategies as well as in the emerging on-demand precision targeting (and related) systems, this Perspective is aimed at choosing when it is best to employ each of the two strategies, with an emphasis toward further promoting novel applications and discoveries stemming from these innovative chemical biology platforms. PMID:26907082

  3. Preliminary investigations on the use of uranium silicide targets for fission Mo-99 production

    SciTech Connect

    Cols, H.; Cristini, P.; Marques, R.

    1997-08-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) of Argentine Republic owns and operates an installation for production of molybdenum-99 from fission products since 1985, and, since 1991, covers the whole national demand of this nuclide, carrying out a program of weekly productions, achieving an average activity of 13 terabecquerel per week. At present they are finishing an enlargement of the production plant that will allow an increase in the volume of production to about one hundred of terabecquerel. Irradiation targets are uranium/aluminium alloy with 90% enriched uranium with aluminium cladding. In view of international trends held at present for replacing high enrichment uranium (HEU) for enrichment values lower than 20 % (LEU), since 1990 the authors are in contact with the RERTR program, beginning with tests to adapt their separation process to new irradiation target conditions. Uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) was chosen as the testing material, because it has an uranium mass per volume unit, so that it allows to reduce enrichment to a value of 20%. CNEA has the technology for manufacturing miniplates of uranium silicide for their purposes. In this way, equivalent amounts of Molybdenum-99 could be obtained with no substantial changes in target parameters and irradiation conditions established for the current process with Al/U alloy. This paper shows results achieved on the use of this new target.

  4. On-Demand Targeting: Investigating Biology with Proximity-Directed Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Long, Marcus J C; Poganik, Jesse R; Aye, Yimon

    2016-03-23

    Proximity enhancement is a central chemical tenet underpinning an exciting suite of small-molecule toolsets that have allowed us to unravel many biological complexities. The leitmotif of this opus is "tethering"-a strategy in which a multifunctional small molecule serves as a template to bring proteins/biomolecules together. Scaffolding approaches have been powerfully applied to control diverse biological outcomes such as protein-protein association, protein stability, activity, and improve imaging capabilities. A new twist on this strategy has recently appeared, in which the small-molecule probe is engineered to unleash controlled amounts of reactive chemical signals within the microenvironment of a target protein. Modification of a specific target elicits a precisely timed and spatially controlled gain-of-function (or dominant loss-of-function) signaling response. Presented herein is a unique personal outlook conceptualizing the powerful proximity-enhanced chemical biology toolsets into two paradigms: "multifunctional scaffolding" versus "on-demand targeting". By addressing the latest advances and challenges in the established yet constantly evolving multifunctional scaffolding strategies as well as in the emerging on-demand precision targeting (and related) systems, this Perspective is aimed at choosing when it is best to employ each of the two strategies, with an emphasis toward further promoting novel applications and discoveries stemming from these innovative chemical biology platforms.

  5. Investigation of apoptotic events at molecular level induced by SERS guided targeted theranostic nanoprobe.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Nisha; Nair, Lakshmi V; Karunakaran, Varsha; Joseph, Manu M; Nair, Jyothi B; N, Ramya A; Jayasree, Ramapurath S; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we have examined distinctive structural and functional variations of cellular components during apoptotic cell death induced by a targeted theranostic nanoprobe, MMP-SQ@GNR@LAH-DOX, which acted as a SERS "on/off" probe in the presence of a MMP protease and executed synergistic photothermal chemotherapy, as reflected by the SERS fingerprinting, corresponding to the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. PMID:27211810

  6. Investigation of apoptotic events at molecular level induced by SERS guided targeted theranostic nanoprobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Nisha; Nair, Lakshmi V.; Karunakaran, Varsha; Joseph, Manu M.; Nair, Jyothi B.; N, Ramya A.; Jayasree, Ramapurath S.; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    Herein, we have examined distinctive structural and functional variations of cellular components during apoptotic cell death induced by a targeted theranostic nanoprobe, MMP-SQ@GNR@LAH-DOX, which acted as a SERS ``on/off'' probe in the presence of a MMP protease and executed synergistic photothermal chemotherapy, as reflected by the SERS fingerprinting, corresponding to the phosphodiester backbone of DNA.Herein, we have examined distinctive structural and functional variations of cellular components during apoptotic cell death induced by a targeted theranostic nanoprobe, MMP-SQ@GNR@LAH-DOX, which acted as a SERS ``on/off'' probe in the presence of a MMP protease and executed synergistic photothermal chemotherapy, as reflected by the SERS fingerprinting, corresponding to the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03385g

  7. Methods for Investigation of Targeted Kinase Inhibitor Therapy using Chemical Proteomics and Phosphorylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bin; Haura, Eric B.; Smalley, Keiran S.; Eschrich, Steven A.; Koomen, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation acts as a molecular switch for many regulatory events in signaling pathways that drive cell division, proliferation, and apoptosis. Because of the critical nature of these protein post-translational modifications in cancer, drug development programs often focus on inhibitors for kinases and phosphatases, which control protein phosphorylation. Numerous kinase inhibitors have entered clinical use, but prediction of their efficacy and a molecular basis for patient response remain uncertain. Chemical proteomics, the combination of drug affinity chromatography with mass spectrometry, identifies potential target proteins that bind to the drugs. Phosphorylation profiling can complement chemical proteomics by cataloging modifications in the target kinases and their downstream substrates using phosphopeptide enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry. These experiments shed light on the mechanism of disease development and illuminate candidate biomarkers to guide personalized therapeutic strategies. In this review, commonly applied technologies and workflows are discussed to illustrate the role of proteomics in examining tumor biology and therapeutic intervention using kinase inhibitors. PMID:20361944

  8. Investigation of Lead Target Nuclei Used on Accelerator-Driven Systems for Tritium Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tel, E.; Aydin, A.

    2012-02-01

    High-current proton accelerators are being researched at Los Alamos National Laboratory and other laboratories for accelerator production of tritium, transmuting long-lived radioactive waste into shorter-lived products, converting excess plutonium, and producing energy. These technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. Through ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions, neutrons are produced and are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial fusion power plant. Rubbia succeeded in a proposal of a full scale demonstration plant of the Energy Amplifier. This plant is to be known the accelerator-driven system (ADS). The ADS can be used for production of neutrons in spallation neutron source and they can act as an intense neutron source in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, capable of incinerating nuclear waste and of producing energy. Thorium and Uranium are nuclear fuels and Lead, Bismuth, Tungsten are the target nuclei in these reactor systems. The spallation targets can be Pb, Bi, W, etc. isotopes and these target material can be liquid or solid. Naturally Lead includes the 204Pb (%1.42), 206Pb (%24.1), 207Pb (%22.1) and 208Pb (%52.3) isotopes. The design of ADS systems and also a fusion-fission hybrid reactor systems require the knowledge of a wide range of better data. In this study, by using Hartree-Fock method with an effective nucleon-nucleon Skyrme interactions rms nuclear charge radii, rms nuclear mass radii, rms nuclear proton, neutron radii and neutron skin thickness were calculated for the 204, 206, 208Pb isotopes . The calculated results have been compared with those of the compiled experimental and theoretical values of other studies.

  9. On-Demand Targeting: Investigating Biology with Proximity-Directed Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Proximity enhancement is a central chemical tenet underpinning an exciting suite of small-molecule toolsets that have allowed us to unravel many biological complexities. The leitmotif of this opus is “tethering”—a strategy in which a multifunctional small molecule serves as a template to bring proteins/biomolecules together. Scaffolding approaches have been powerfully applied to control diverse biological outcomes such as protein–protein association, protein stability, activity, and improve imaging capabilities. A new twist on this strategy has recently appeared, in which the small-molecule probe is engineered to unleash controlled amounts of reactive chemical signals within the microenvironment of a target protein. Modification of a specific target elicits a precisely timed and spatially controlled gain-of-function (or dominant loss-of-function) signaling response. Presented herein is a unique personal outlook conceptualizing the powerful proximity-enhanced chemical biology toolsets into two paradigms: “multifunctional scaffolding” versus “on-demand targeting”. By addressing the latest advances and challenges in the established yet constantly evolving multifunctional scaffolding strategies as well as in the emerging on-demand precision targeting (and related) systems, this Perspective is aimed at choosing when it is best to employ each of the two strategies, with an emphasis toward further promoting novel applications and discoveries stemming from these innovative chemical biology platforms. PMID:26907082

  10. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    PubMed

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  11. Application of microgravity and containerless environments to the investigation of fusion target fabrication technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kendall, J. M.; Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W.-K.; Helizon, R. S.; Youngberg, C. L.; Feng, I.-A.; Wang, T. G.

    After the first observation of the core-centering force within a liquid shell in the KC-135 flight experiment, this force was successfully reproduced in terrestrial laboratories using two experimental techniques. The core-centering force generated for a compound drop system in the neutral buoyancy tank provides the first correlation between theoretical and experimental results. When this force was generated in a more realistic fusion-pellet system using the focusing-radiator levitating system, it was shown that this is a very strong force indeed in view of the fact that the ratio of specific gravities between the water and the core is approximately five. It is believed that this centering force will contribute significantly to an overall understanding of the fabrication physics of a fusion target system. Results from experiments in a vertical drag-free wind tunnel and in a 16-ft low pressure drop furnace suggest that eliminating or reducing the aerodynamic drag on fusion pellets during their formation stage will prevent the decentering of the bubble. Metallic and metallic glass fusion targets are seen as holding promise for improving and simplifying the fabrication process for ablative-type fusion targets.

  12. A novel microfluidic co-culture system for investigation of bacterial cancer targeting.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jung Woo; Song, Sukhyun; Shin, Jennifer H

    2013-08-01

    Although bacterial cancer targeting in animal models has been previously demonstrated and suggested as a possible therapeutic tool, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms responsible for cancer specificity would be required prior to clinical applications. To visualize bacterial preference for cancer cells over normal cells and to elucidate the cancer-targeting mechanism, a simple microfluidic platform has been developed for in vitro studies. This platform allows simultaneous cultures of multiple cell types in independent culture environments in isolated chambers, and creates a stable chemical gradient across a collagen-filled passage between each of these cell culture chambers and the central channel. The established chemical gradient induces chemotactic preferential migration of bacteria toward a particular cell type for quantitative analysis. As a demonstration, we tested differential bacterial behavior on a two-chamber device where we quantified bacterial preference based on the difference in fluorescence intensities of green fluorescence protein (GFP)-expressing bacteria at two exits of the collagen-filled passages. Analysis of the chemotactic behavior of Salmonella typhimurium toward normal versus cancer hepatocytes using the developed platform revealed an apparent preference for cancer hepatocytes. We also demonstrate that alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is one of the key chemo-attractants for S. typhimurium in targeting liver cancer.

  13. The 2006-2007 Kuril Islands great earthquake sequence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lay, T.; Kanamori, H.; Ammon, C.J.; Hutko, Alexander R.; Furlong, K.; Rivera, L.

    2009-01-01

    The southwestern half of a ???500 km long seismic gap in the central Kuril Island arc subduction zone experienced two great earthquakes with extensive preshock and aftershock sequences in late 2006 to early 2007. The nature of seismic coupling in the gap had been uncertain due to the limited historical record of prior large events and the presence of distinctive upper plate, trench and outer rise structures relative to adjacent regions along the arc that have experienced repeated great interplate earthquakes in the last few centuries. The intraplate region seaward of the seismic gap had several shallow compressional events during the preceding decades (notably an MS 7.2 event on 16 March 1963), leading to speculation that the interplate fault was seismically coupled. This issue was partly resolved by failure of the shallow portion of the interplate megathrust in an MW = 8.3 thrust event on 15 November 2006. This event ruptured ???250 km along the seismic gap, just northeast of the great 1963 Kuril Island (Mw = 8.5) earthquake rupture zone. Within minutes of the thrust event, intense earthquake activity commenced beneath the outer wall of the trench seaward of the interplate rupture, with the larger events having normal-faulting mechanisms. An unusual double band of interplate and intraplate aftershocks developed. On 13 January 2007, an MW = 8.1 extensional earthquake ruptured within the Pacific plate beneath the seaward edge of the Kuril trench. This event is the third largest normal-faulting earthquake seaward of a subduction zone on record, and its rupture zone extended to at least 33 km depth and paralleled most of the length of the 2006 rupture. The 13 January 2007 event produced stronger shaking in Japan than the larger thrust event, as a consequence of higher short-period energy radiation from the source. The great event aftershock sequences were dominated by the expected faulting geometries; thrust faulting for the 2006 rupture zone, and normal faulting for the 2007 rupture zone. A large intraplate compressional event occurred on 15 January 2009 (Mw = 7.4) near 45 km depth, below the rupture zone of the 2007 event and in the vicinity of the 16 March 1963 compressional event. The fault geometry, rupture process and slip distributions of the two great events are estimated using very broadband teleseismic body and surface wave observations. The occurrence of the thrust event in the shallowest portion of the interplate fault in a region with a paucity of large thrust events at greater depths suggests that the event removed most of the slip deficit on this portion of the interplate fault. This great earthquake doublet demonstrates the heightened seismic hazard posed by induced intraplate faulting following large interplate thrust events. Future seismic failure of the remainder of the seismic gap appears viable, with the northeastern region that has also experienced compressional activity seaward of the megathrust warranting particular attention. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  14. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald; DePaolo, Donald

    2008-07-21

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology, climate systems, and environmental engineering. Building on this scientific foundation, we also perform applied earth science research and technology development to support DOE in a number of its program areas. We currently organize our efforts in the following Division Programs: Fundamental and Exploratory Research--fundamental research in geochemistry, geophysics, and hydrology to provide a basis for new and improved energy and environmental technologies; Climate and Carbon Sciences--carbon cycling in the terrestrial biosphere and oceans, and global and regional climate modeling, are the cornerstones of a major developing divisional research thrust related to understanding and mitigating the effects of increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere; Energy Resources--collaborative projects with industry to develop or improve technologies for the exploration and production of oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs, and for the development of bioenergy; Environmental Remediation and Water Resources--innovative technologies for locating, containing, and remediating metals, radionuclides, chlorinated solvents, and energy-related contaminants in soils and groundwaters; Geologic Carbon Sequestration--development and testing of methods for introducing carbon dioxide to subsurface geologic reservoirs, and predicting and monitoring its subsequent migration; and Nuclear Waste and Energy--theoretical, experimental, and simulation studies of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These programs draw from each of ESD's disciplinary departments: Climate Science, Ecology, Geochemistry, Geophysics, and Hydrogeology. Short descriptions of these departments are provided as introductory material. In this document, we present summaries of selected current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, the projects described here are representative of the nature and breadth of the ESD research effort. We are proud of our scientific accomplishments and we hope that you will find this material useful and exciting. A list of publications for the period from January 2006 to June 2007, along with a listing of our personnel, are also appended. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally.

  15. Annual State of Public Education Report, SY 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guam Public School System, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The report addresses the reporting requirements of Public Law 26-26 and the programs and activities that affect student achievement as described in the Guam Public School System's Board-adopted District Action Plan (DAP). This is an annual report on progress towards increasing student achievement with the ultimate aim of Preparing Students for…

  16. Americans’ Awareness, Knowledge and Behaviors Regarding Fats: 2006-2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In recent years, epidemiologic and clinical studies, public and regulatory policy activity, and media coverage have focused on issues related to trans fats. To help raise awareness and understanding of trans fats and other fats, the American Heart Association (AHA) launched the “Face...

  17. Americans’ Awareness, Knowledge and Behaviors Regarding Fats: 2006-2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: In recent years, epidemiologic and clinical studies, public and regulatory policy activity, and media coverage have focused on issues related to trans fat. To help raise awareness and understanding of trans fats and other fats, the American Heart Association (AHA) launched the “Face ...

  18. National influenza surveillance in Vietnam, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien T; Dharan, Nila J; Le, Mai T Q; Nguyen, Nguyen B; Nguyen, Chung T; Hoang, Dong V; Tran, Huu N; Bui, Chien T; Dang, Dat T; Pham, Dinh N; Nguyen, Hoa T; Phan, Tu V; Dennis, David T; Uyeki, Timothy M; Mott, Joshua; Nguyen, Yen T

    2009-12-11

    In 2006, national influenza surveillance was implemented in Vietnam. Epidemiologic and demographic data and a throat swab for influenza testing were collected from a subset of outpatients with influenza-like illness (ILI). During January 1, 2006 through December 31, 2007, of 184,521 ILI cases identified at surveillance sites, 11,082 were tested and 2112 (19%) were positive for influenza by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Influenza viruses were detected year-round, and similar peaks in influenza activity were observed in all surveillance regions, coinciding with cooler and rainy periods. Studies are needed to ascertain the disease burden and impact of influenza in Vietnam. PMID:19853073

  19. Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G.; Munz, Carrie S.

    2008-11-04

    This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2006 through March 2007 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 26922. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). Funding from USFWS was for work to contribute to a study of potential interactions between introduced Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and wild steelhead O. mykiss. Funding from LCFEG was for work to evaluate the effects of nutrient enrichment in small streams. A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2006 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

  20. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance," which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs," provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school, including…

  1. Shillapoo Wildlife Area, Annual Report 2006-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Calkins, Brian

    2006-10-01

    This report summarizes accomplishments, challenges and successes on WDFW's Shillapoo Wildlife Area funded under Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wildlife Mitigation Program (BPA project No.2003-012-00) during the Fiscal Year 07 contract period October 1, 2006-September 30, 2007. The information presented here is intended to supplement that contained in BPA's PISCES contract development and reporting system. The organization below is by broad categories of work but references are made to individual work elements in the PISCES Statement of Work as appropriate. The greatest success realized during this contract period was significant positive changes in the vegetative community in several wetland basins throughout the wildlife area. This major goal is being achieved in part by new equipment and operation capability funded under the BPA contract, state capital and migratory bird stamp funds, and the past or ongoing investment of other partners including Ducks Unlimited, The Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), Clark Public Utilities and others. We continue to be challenged by requirements under the archaeological and historic preservation act necessary to protect many sensitive sites known to occur within the wildlife area. The problems encountered to date have been largely administrative in nature and those experienced this year were unforeseen and probably unavoidable. Early in the contract period, WDFW and BPA had agreed to have a BPA staff archaeologist perform the survey and reporting work. Unexpectedly, just prior to the expected start date for the surveys, the employee resigned leaving BPA's staff short handed and necessitated contracting the work with an archaeological consultant. This delay caused us to forego work on several projects that are now deferred until the next contract period. The most notable projects impacted by this unfortunate circumstance are those involving the construction or repair of fences.

  2. Tennessee advanced practice nurse compensation survey results 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, representatives from Middle Tennessee Advanced Practice Nurses (MTAPN), Greater Memphis Area Advanced Practice Nurses (GMAAPN), and Northeast Tennessee Nurse Practitioners Association (NETNPA) decided to poll APNs in Tennessee to compare data with the most recent results from the Advance for Nurse Practitioners national NP survey. Every other year, Advance for Nurse Practitioners publishes salary survey results from their survey. Most recently, in January 2006, an average nationwide salary for all APNs was reported at $74,812, with Tennessee's average at $71,068.

  3. An Exploration of Pennsylvania Corrective Action Plans, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan-Davis, Carrie Lynn

    2013-01-01

    With the "No Child Left Behind Act of 2001" ("NCLB"), signed into law on January 8, 2002, schools nationwide have been challenged to improve student achievement. Several middle and junior high schools in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania were identified as being in need of Corrective Action in 2006 based upon data from the…

  4. Astronomia.pl: Portal activity in 2006-2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czart, K.; Pomierny, J.

    2008-06-01

    We present the latest activity of Astronomia.pl - the Polish Astronomy Portal, the most popular internet portal about astronomy in Poland. Astronomia.pl is a wide-ranging portal, covering news, a database of articles, books, lectures, an astronomical calendar, a newsletter, a virtual library of diploma theses, a discussion forum, chat, galleries, a catalogue of websites and other services. The portal also owns several additional services like an on-line lexicon with biographies of astronomers, a website about Polish planetariums and a server for websites created by astronomy amateurs. There is also small part of the portal in English.

  5. The Independent Technical Analysis Process Final Report 2006-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Duberstein, Corey; Ham, Kenneth; Dauble, Dennis; Johnson, Gary

    2007-03-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide technical analytical support for system-wide fish passage information (BPA Project No. 2006-010-00). The goal of this project was to produce rigorous technical analysis products using independent analysts and anonymous peer reviewers. This project provided an independent technical source for non-routine fish passage analyses while allowing routine support functions to be performed by other well-qualified entities. The Independent Technical Analysis Process (ITAP) was created to provide non-routine analysis for fish and wildlife agencies and tribes in particular and the public in general on matters related to juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage through the mainstem hydrosystem. The process was designed to maintain the independence of analysts and reviewers from parties requesting analyses, to avoid potential bias in technical products. The objectives identified for this project were to administer a rigorous, transparent process to deliver unbiased technical assistance necessary to coordinate recommendations for storage reservoir and river operations that avoid potential conflicts between anadromous and resident fish. Seven work elements, designated by numbered categories in the Pisces project tracking system, were created to define and accomplish project goals as follows: (1) 118 Coordination - Coordinate technical analysis and review process: (a) Retain expertise for analyst/reviewer roles. (b) Draft research directives. (c) Send directive to the analyst. (d) Coordinate two independent reviews of the draft report. (e) Ensure reviewer comments are addressed within the final report. (2) 162 Analyze/Interpret Data - Implement the independent aspects of the project. (3) 122 Provide Technical Review - Implement the review process for the analysts. (4) 132 Produce Annual Report - FY06 annual progress report with Pisces Disseminate (5) 161 Disseminate Raw/Summary Data and Results - Post technical products on the ITAP web site. (6) 185-Produce Pisces Status Report - Provide periodic status reports to BPA. (7) 119 Manage and Administer Projects - project/contract administration.

  6. Investigating a multi-purpose target for electron linac based photoneutron sources for BNCT of deep-seated tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, S. Farhad; Rasouli, Fatemeh S.

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies in BNCT have focused on investigating appropriate neutron sources as alternatives for nuclear reactors. As the most prominent facilities, the electron linac based photoneutron sources benefit from two consecutive reactions, (e, γ) and (γ, n). The photoneutron sources designed so far are composed of bipartite targets which involve practical problems and are far from the objective of achieving an optimized neutron source. This simulation study deals with designing a compact, optimized, and geometrically simple target for a photoneutron source based on an electron linac. Based on a set of MCNPX simulations, tungsten is found to have the potential of utilizing as both photon converter and photoneutron target. Besides, it is shown that an optimized dimension for such a target slows-down the produced neutrons toward the desired energy range while keeping them economy, which makes achieving the recommended criteria for BNCT of deep-tumors more available. This multi-purpose target does not involve complicated designing, and can be considered as a significant step toward finding application of photoneutron sources for in-hospital treatments. In order to shape the neutron beam emitted from such a target, the beam is planned to pass through an optimized arrangement of materials composed of moderators, filters, reflector, and collimator. By assessment with the recommended in-air parameters, it is shown that the designed beam provides high intensity of desired neutrons, as well as low background contamination. The last section of this study is devoted to investigate the performance of the resultant beam in deep tissue. A typical simulated liver tumor, located within a phantom of human body, was subjected to the irradiation of the designed spectrum. The dosimetric results, including evaluated depth-dose curves and carried out in-phantom parameters show that the proposed configuration establishes acceptable agreement between the appropriate neutron intensity, and

  7. Structural investigation into the differential target enzyme regulation displayed by plant calmodulin isoforms.

    PubMed

    Yamniuk, Aaron P; Vogel, Hans J

    2005-03-01

    The conserved calmodulin (CaM) isoform SCaM-1 and the divergent SCaM-4 from soybean bind to many of the same target enzymes, but differentially activate or competitively inhibit them. Class 1 target enzymes are activated by both calcium (Ca(2+))-bound SCaM-1 (Ca(2+)-SCaM-1) and Ca(2+)-bound SCaM-4 (Ca(2+)-SCaM-4), while class 2 enzymes are activated by Ca(2+)-SCaM-1 but competitively inhibited by Ca(2+)-SCaM-4, and class 3 enzymes are activated by Ca(2+)-SCaM-4 but competitively inhibited by Ca(2+)-SCaM-1. To determine whether these differences can be attributed to unique interactions with the CaM-binding domains (CaMBD) of these enzymes, we have studied the binding of each protein to peptides derived from the CaMBD of a representative target enzyme from each of these three classes. Using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and isothermal titration calorimetry, we demonstrate that the N- and C-domains of either Ca(2+)-SCaM bind to each peptide to form structurally compact complexes driven by the burial of hydrophobic surfaces. Interestingly, the interactions with the CaMBD peptides from classes 1 and 2 are similar for the two proteins; however, binding to the peptide from class 3 is structurally and thermodynamically distinct for Ca(2+)-SCaM-1 and -4. We also demonstrate that both calcium-free SCaM-1 (apo-SCaM-1) and calcium-free SCaM-4 (apo-SCaM-4) bind to the CaMBD from cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, and that the interactions are similar to each other and to the interactions with apo-mammalian CaM. Therefore, the apo-SCaMs are also capable of binding to the same target enzymes, which could provide an additional mechanism for CaM-dependent signaling in plants.

  8. Preparation and study of Titanium Nitride films by reactive sputtering and an investigation of target poisoning during the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziz, Tareque; Rumaiz, Abdul

    Titanium Nitride (TiNx) thin films were prepared by reactive dc sputtering in presence of Ar-N2 plasma. The thin films were grown on Quartz and pure Si surfaces. The Ar-N2 content ratio was gradually varied while the substrate and the Titanium target were kept at room temperature. Structural properties, optical and electrical properties of the thin films were studied by using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and XRD and 4 probe resistivity measurement. Target poisoning of the Ti target was also studied by varying reactive gas concentration and measuring the target current. A study of target current vs growth rate of the films was performed to investigate the onset of ``poison'' mode.Although there was an insignificant drop in plasma current, we noticed a drop in the deposition rate. This result was tested against Monte Carlo simulations using SRIM simulations. Effects of annealing on the crystallinity and the sheet resistance will also be discussed. The work has been supported by BSA,DOE.

  9. Detecting pop-out targets in contexts of varying homogeneity: investigating homogeneity coding with event-related brain potentials (ERPs).

    PubMed

    Schubö, Anna; Wykowska, Agnieszka; Müller, Hermann J

    2007-03-23

    Searching for a target among many distracting context elements might be an easy or a demanding task. Duncan and Humphreys (Duncan, J., Humphreys, G.W., 1989. Visual search and stimulus similarity. Psychol. Rev. 96, 433-458) showed that not only the target itself plays a role in the difficulty of target detection. Similarity among context elements and dissimilarity of target and context are two main factors also affecting search efficiency. Moreover, many studies have shown that search becomes particularly efficient with large set sizes and perfectly homogeneous context elements, presumably due to grouping processes involved in target-context segmentation. Especially N2p amplitude has been found to be modulated by the number of context elements and their homogeneity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of context elements of different heterogeneities on search performance using event-related brain potentials (ERPs). Results showed that contexts with perfectly homogeneous elements were indeed special: they were most efficient in visual search and elicited a large N2p differential amplitude effect. Increasing context heterogeneity led to a decrease in search performance and a reduction in N2p differential amplitude. Reducing the number of context elements led to a marked performance decrease for random heterogeneous contexts but not for grouped heterogeneous contexts. Behavioral and N2p results delivered evidence (a) in favor of specific processing modes operating on different spatial scales (b) for the existence of homogeneity coding postulated by Duncan and Humphreys.

  10. Investigation of Coulombic bremsstrahlung spectra of metallic targets for the photon energy region of 1-100keV.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A S

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the formation of bremsstrahlung spectra by ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) in metallic targets by (35)S beta particles has been investigated in the photon energy region of 1-100keV. From the experimental measurements and the theoretical results obtained from Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe Heitler (EBH) theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) (FmodBH) theories for OB and Avdonina and Pratt (FmodBH+PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS) having the contribution of PB into OB, it has been found that the contribution of PB into BS in a target is limited to a low energy region only and also varies with the atomic number of target material. The FmodBH+PB theory is in agreement with the experimental results in low energy regions of the target, whereas at high energy region FmodBH is found to give better agreement. Further, the present experimental results indicate that the screening effects in the Coulombic bremsstrahlung process cannot be neglected in the high energy region, and the multiple scattering and secondary electron emissions effects in thick target are required to be taken into account in describing the bremsstrahlung process. PMID:27400163

  11. Investigation of Coulombic bremsstrahlung spectra of metallic targets for the photon energy region of 1-100keV.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amrit; Dhaliwal, A S

    2016-09-01

    In the present paper, the formation of bremsstrahlung spectra by ordinary bremsstrahlung (OB) and polarization bremsstrahlung (PB) in metallic targets by (35)S beta particles has been investigated in the photon energy region of 1-100keV. From the experimental measurements and the theoretical results obtained from Elwert corrected (non-relativistic) Bethe Heitler (EBH) theory, modified Elwert factor (relativistic) (FmodBH) theories for OB and Avdonina and Pratt (FmodBH+PB) theory for total bremsstrahlung (BS) having the contribution of PB into OB, it has been found that the contribution of PB into BS in a target is limited to a low energy region only and also varies with the atomic number of target material. The FmodBH+PB theory is in agreement with the experimental results in low energy regions of the target, whereas at high energy region FmodBH is found to give better agreement. Further, the present experimental results indicate that the screening effects in the Coulombic bremsstrahlung process cannot be neglected in the high energy region, and the multiple scattering and secondary electron emissions effects in thick target are required to be taken into account in describing the bremsstrahlung process.

  12. Investigation of the effect of physical parameters on the design of tumour targeting agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Joanne Lois

    Tumour targeting using radiolabelled antibodies for radioimmunodetection (RAID) and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been studied for many years. The main factors that have limited clinical success are low tumour uptake, immunogenicity and poor therapeutic ratios. This thesis has applied current technology to make advances in this area of research. The effect of physical parameters (antibody size, valency, affinity and charge) on the design of tumour targeting agents was studied by constructing divalent (DFM) and trivalent (TFM) forms of the murine anti-CEA antibody A5B7 Fab' by chemical cross-linking. This involves partial reduction of the hinge disulphides to expose thiol (-SH) groups and subsequent reaction with a maleimide cross-linker to form a thioether bond at the hinge region. Previous studies have suggested that the stability of thioether bonds is superior to naturally occurring disulphide bonds present at the hinge region of IgG and F(ab')2. The aim was to compare the functional affinities and in vivo tumour targeting in nude mice bearing human tumour xenografts of DFM and TFM to similar sized parent IgG and F(ab')2. Radiolabelling with 131I and 90Y was also compared with a view to determine which combination would be optimal for RIT. Results clearly demonstrated a significantly faster on-rate of DFM compared to all other antibody forms and estimated dosimetry analysis suggested that DFM would be the most suitable antibody form radiolabelled with 131I for RIT. Both F(ab')2 and DFM showed high kidney uptake levels on labelling with which is unacceptable for RIT. Despite the improved tumour: blood ratios for TFM, the increased estimated dose to normal tissues and lower therapeutic effect in RIT studies suggests that the most promising combination with the radionuclide appears to be IgG. A humanised version of A5B7 hFab' has been constructed previously in order to reduce its immunogenicity in man. The in vivo stability of hDFM proved to be superior to hF(ab')2

  13. Verification and Validation of the RAGE Hydrocode in Preparation for Investigation of Impacts into a Volatile-rich Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plesko, C. S.; Asphaug, E.; Gisler, G. R.; Gittings, M. L.

    2005-01-01

    Before a hydrocode is used to investigate a question of scientific interest, it should be tested against analogous laboratory experiments and problems with analytical solutions. The Radiation Adaptive Grid Eulerian (RAGE) hydrocode[1], developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC)[2,3] has been subjected to many tests during its development.[4,5] We extend and review this work, emphasizing tests relevant to impact cratering into volatile-rich targets.

  14. Investigation of metallic and metallic glass hollow spheres for fusion target application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, M. C.; Kendall, J. M.; Wang, T. G.; Johnson, W. L.

    1982-01-01

    The first successful formation of submillimeter and millimeter spherical shells of tin and of a gold-lead-antimony alloy by means of the hollow-jet instability technique developed by Kendall is reported. Examination of tin specimens by SEM reveals that surface quality varies from poor to excellent. Whereas the metal is employed only as a convenient and inexpensive material, the gold alloy is important in that it is hard, has a high atomic number, and may be solidified into the amorphous state through the provision of a modest cooling rate. AuPbSb spherules up to 1.5 mm in diameter are produced using LN2 or chilled methanol as a coolant. It is found that these amorphous samples possess a superb surface smoothness compatible with fusion target requirements. It is noted that hollow spheres currently made of this alloy have an average outside diameter of 2000 microns.

  15. Investigations into uniaxial deformation of textured polycrystalline targets using X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGonegle, David; Milathianaki, Despina; Remington, Bruce; Wark, Justin; Higginbotham, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    Most dynamic compression experiments make use of targets with some degree of texture, however, little attention has been paid to how this affects in situ diffraction patterns. This preferred grain orientation results in variation in intensity around the Debye-Scherrer ring, and is often ignored by integrating data azimuthally. However, we demonstrate that this variation provides important information about reorientation of the crystal lattice, which is unobtainable with traditional powder diffraction. In particular we describe how to obtain the orientational relationship between two phases within a phase transition, as well as how to distinguish between competing plasticity mechanisms, such as slip and twinning. The geometries we propose are ideal for study by 4th generation sources such as LCLS.

  16. Investigating Mitochondria as a Target for Treating Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Terluk, Marcia R.; Kapphahn, Rebecca J.; Soukup, Lauren M.; Gong, Hwee; Gallardo, Christopher; Montezuma, Sandra R.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed world. Although the pathological mechanisms have not been definitively elucidated, evidence suggests a key role for mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction. The current study used our unique collection of human retinal samples graded for the donor's stage of AMD to address fundamental questions about mtDNA damage in the retina. To evaluate the distribution of mtDNA damage in the diseased retina, damage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neural retina from individual donors were compared. To directly test a long-held belief that the macula is selectively damaged with AMD, RPE mtDNA damage was measured in the macula and peripheral sections from individual donors. Small segments of the entire mt genome were examined to determine whether specific regions are preferentially damaged. Our results show that mtDNA damage is limited to the RPE, equivalent mtDNA damage is found in the macular and peripheral RPE, and sites of damage are localized to regions of the mt genome that may impact mt function. These results provide a scientific basis for targeting the RPE mitochondria with therapies that protect and enhance mt function as a strategy for combating AMD. PMID:25948278

  17. Qualitative investigation of targets for and barriers to interventions to prevent psychosis relapse

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early signs based relapse prevention interventions for psychosis show promise. In order to examine how they might be improved we sought to better understand the early relapse process, service users’ abilities to identify early signs, and any potential facilitators and barriers to early signs interventions. Methods Data from in-depth interviews with a convenience sample of service users with psychosis varying in gender, age, duration of mental health problems, and time since last relapse were analysed using a thematic approach. Interview transcripts were coded inductively and relationships between emerging themes were examined by the research team to provide a thorough synthesis of the data. Results Three central themes emerged from the analysis: 1) recognising risk factors (how risk factors were identified and linked to relapse, and reactions to such risk factors); 2) identifying early signs (issues related to both recognising and recalling signs of relapse); 3) reacting to deterioration (participants’ thoughts and feelings in response to early signs, including help seeking and its challenges). Conclusions There was considerable variation in the attention participants had paid to pre-relapse signs, the ease with which they were able to recall them, and their reactions to them. For many, there were substantial barriers to help seeking from services. A family or friend confidant was an important means of assistance, although the supportive presence of significant others was not always available. Based on these results, a number of recommendations about facilitating service users’ recognition of early signs and targeting potential accelerants of relapse are made. PMID:25030092

  18. Investigating mitochondria as a target for treating age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Terluk, Marcia R; Kapphahn, Rebecca J; Soukup, Lauren M; Gong, Hwee; Gallardo, Christopher; Montezuma, Sandra R; Ferrington, Deborah A

    2015-05-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed world. Although the pathological mechanisms have not been definitively elucidated, evidence suggests a key role for mitochondrial (mt) dysfunction. The current study used our unique collection of human retinal samples graded for the donor's stage of AMD to address fundamental questions about mtDNA damage in the retina. To evaluate the distribution of mtDNA damage in the diseased retina, damage in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and neural retina from individual donors were compared. To directly test a long-held belief that the macula is selectively damaged with AMD, RPE mtDNA damage was measured in the macula and peripheral sections from individual donors. Small segments of the entire mt genome were examined to determine whether specific regions are preferentially damaged. Our results show that mtDNA damage is limited to the RPE, equivalent mtDNA damage is found in the macular and peripheral RPE, and sites of damage are localized to regions of the mt genome that may impact mt function. These results provide a scientific basis for targeting the RPE mitochondria with therapies that protect and enhance mt function as a strategy for combating AMD. PMID:25948278

  19. New molecular targets in the pathophysiology of obesity and available treatment options under investigation.

    PubMed

    Valsamakis, G; Lois, K; Kumar, S; Mastorakos, G

    2014-08-01

    The pharmacotherapy of obesity has historically recorded an overall poor safety and efficacy profile largely because of the complex mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of obesity. It is hoped that a better understanding of the regulation of body weight will lead us to the development of effective and safer drugs. Recent advances in our understanding of the regulation of energy homeostasis has allowed the design of novel anti-obesity drugs targeting specific molecules crucial for the modulation of energy balance, including drugs that induce satiety, modulate nutrient absorption or influence metabolism or lipogenesis. Almost a decade after the Food and Drug Administration approved the first weight loss medication, it recently approved two novel anti-obesity drugs Belviq (lorcaserin) and Qsymia (topiramate and phentermine), thus signalling the beginning of a new era in the pharmacotherapy of obesity. It is believed that the next generation of weight-loss drugs will be based on combination treatments with gut hormones in a manner that mimics the changes underlying surgically induced weight loss thus introducing the so called 'bariatric pharmacotherapy'. An in-depth understanding of the interrelated physiological and behavioural effects of these new molecules together with the development of new treatment paradigms is needed so that future disappointments in the field of obesity pharmacotherapy may be avoided. PMID:25826792

  20. Time domain investigation of transceiver functions using a known reference target.

    PubMed

    Feuillade, C; Meredith, R W; Chotiros, N P; Clay, C S

    2002-12-01

    During August 1998, a bottom scattering tank experiment was performed at the Applied Research Laboratory, University of Texas to measure wideband acoustic reverberation from multiple objects (e.g., cobbles and pebbles) placed on a sediment simulation of the sea floor. In preparation for processing and analyzing the experimental data, time domain scattering measurements made with stainless steel and glass balls suspended in the water column were used to calibrate the sonar transceiver system by deconvolving the theoretical impulse response for steel and glass spheres, obtained via the Faran elastic sphere scattering model, from the scattered time signals. It is the analysis of these calibration measurements which forms the subject of this paper. Results show the critical importance of accurate input-output system calibrations for time domain sound scattering research, and successfully demonstrate a time domain method for accurately calibrating the complete sonar transceiver function, i.e., both the amplitude and time dependence, using a known reference target. The work has implications for boundary and volume scattering applications.

  1. Investigation of Control System and Display Variations on Spacecraft Handling Qualities for Docking with Stationary and Rotating Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, E. Bruce; Goodrich, Kenneth H.; Bailey, Randall E.; Barnes, James R.; Ragsdale, William A.; Neuhaus, Jason R.

    2010-01-01

    This paper documents the investigation into the manual docking of a preliminary version of the Crew Exploration Vehicle with stationary and rotating targets in Low Earth Orbit. The investigation was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center in the summer of 2008 in a repurposed fixed-base transport aircraft cockpit and involved nine evaluation astronauts and research pilots. The investigation quantified the benefits of a feed-forward reaction control system thruster mixing scheme to reduce translation-into-rotation coupling, despite unmodeled variations in individual thruster force levels and off-axis center of mass locations up to 12 inches. A reduced rate dead-band in the phase-plane attitude controller also showed some promise. Candidate predictive symbology overlaid on a docking ring centerline camera image did not improve handling qualities, but an innovative attitude status indicator symbol was beneficial. The investigation also showed high workload and handling quality problems when manual dockings were performed with a rotating target. These concerns indicate achieving satisfactory handling quality ratings with a vehicle configuration similar to the nominal Crew Exploration Vehicle may require additional automation.

  2. IODP Deep Biosphere Research Workshop report - a synthesis of recent investigations, and discussion of new research questions and drilling targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orcutt, B. N.; LaRowe, D. E.; Lloyd, K. G.; Mills, H.; Orsi, W.; Reese, B. K.; Sauvage, J.; Huber, J. A.; Amend, J.

    2014-04-01

    During the past decade, the IODP (International Ocean Discovery Program) has fostered a significant increase in deep biosphere investigations in the marine sedimentary and crustal environments, and scientists are well-poised to continue this momentum into the next phase of the IODP. The goals of this workshop were to evaluate recent findings in a global context, synthesize available biogeochemical data to foster thermodynamic and metabolic activity modeling and measurements, identify regional targets for future targeted sampling and dedicated expeditions, foster collaborations, and highlight the accomplishments of deep biosphere research within IODP. Twenty-four scientists from around the world participated in this one-day workshop sponsored by IODP-MI and held in Florence, Italy, immediately prior to the Goldschmidt 2013 conference. A major topic of discussion at the workshop was the continued need for standard biological sampling and measurements across IODP platforms. Workshop participants renew the call to IODP operators to implement recommended protocols.

  3. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  4. Ligand binding to anti-cancer target CD44 investigated by molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tin Trung; Tran, Duy Phuoc; Pham Dinh Quoc Huy; Hoang, Zung; Carloni, Paolo; Van Pham, Phuc; Nguyen, Chuong; Li, Mai Suan

    2016-07-01

    CD44 is a cell-surface glycoprotein and receptor for hyaluronan, one of the major components of the tumor extracellular matrix. There is evidence that the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan promotes breast cancer metastasis. Recently, the molecule F-19848A was shown to inhibit hyaluronan binding to receptor CD44 in a cell-based assay. In this study, we investigated the mechanism and energetics of F-19848A binding to CD44 using molecular simulation. Using the molecular mechanics/Poisson Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method, we obtained the binding free energy and inhibition constant of the complex. The van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the extended portion of F-19848A play key roles in the binding affinity. We screened natural products from a traditional Chinese medicine database to search for CD44 inhibitors. From combining pharmaceutical requirements with docking and molecular dynamics simulations, we found ten compounds that are potentially better or equal to the F-19848A ligand at binding to CD44 receptor. Therefore, we have identified new candidates of CD44 inhibitors, based on molecular simulation, which may be effective small molecules for the therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27342250

  5. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  6. Investigation of ultrashort pulse laser ablation of solid targets by measuring the ablation-generated momentum using a torsion pendulum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Nan; Wang, Wentao; Zhu, Xiaonong; Liu, Jiansheng; Xu, Kuanhong; Huang, Peng; Zhao, Jiefeng; Li, Ruxin; Wang, Mingwei

    2011-04-25

    50 fs - 12 ps laser pulses are employed to ablate aluminum, copper, iron, and graphite targets. The ablation-generated momentum is measured with a torsion pendulum. Corresponding time-resolved shadowgraphic measurements show that the ablation process at the optimal laser fluence achieving the maximal momentum is primarily dominated by the photomechanical mechanism. When laser pulses with specific laser fluence are used and the pulse duration is tuned from 50 fs to 12 ps, the generated momentum firstly increases and then remains almost constant, which could be attributed to the change of the ablation mechanism involved from atomization to phase explosion. The investigation of the ablation-generated momentum also reveals a nonlinear momentum-energy conversion scaling law, namely, as the pulse energy increases, the momentum obtained by the target increases nonlinearly. This may be caused by the effective reduction of the dissipated energy into the surrounding of the ablation zone as the pulse energy increases, which indicates that for femtosecond laser the dissipated energy into the surrounding target is still significant.

  7. Image quality assessment using the dead leaves target: experience with the latest approach and further investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artmann, Uwe

    2015-02-01

    The so-called texture loss is a critical parameter in the objective image quality assessment of todays cameras. Especially cameras build in mobile phones show significant loss of low contrast, fine details which are hard to describe using standard resolution measurement procedures. The combination of very small form factor and high pixel count leads to a high demand of noise reduction in the signal-processing pipeline of these cameras. Different work groups within ISO and IEEE are investigating methods to describe the texture loss with an objective method. The so-called dead leaves pattern has been used for quite a while in this context. Image Engineering presented a new intrinsic approach at the Electronic Imaging Conference 2014, which promises to solve the open issue of the original approach, which could be influenced by noise and artifacts. In this paper, we present our experience with the new approach for a large set of different imaging devices. We show, that some sharpening algorithm found in todays cameras can significantly influence the Spatial Frequency Response based on the Dead Leaves structure (SFRDeadLeaves) results and therefore make an objective evaluation of the perceived image quality even harder. For an objective comparison of cameras, the resulting SFR needs to be reduced to a small set of numbers, ideally a single number. The observed sharpening algorithms lead to much better numerical results, while the image quality already degrades due to strong sharpening. So the measured, high SFRDeadLeaves result is not wrong, as it reflects the artificially enhanced SFR, but the numerical result cannot be used as the only number to describe the image quality. We propose to combine the SFRDeadLeaves measurement with other SFR measurement procedures as described in ISO12233:2014. Based on the three different SFR functions using the dead leaves pattern, sinusoidal Siemens Stars and slanted edges, it is possible to obtain a much better description if the

  8. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Murray, James L; Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Zhao, Zhongming; Rubin, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics.

  9. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feixiong; Murray, James L; Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Zhao, Zhongming; Rubin, Donald H

    2016-09-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  10. Systems Biology-Based Investigation of Cellular Antiviral Drug Targets Identified by Gene-Trap Insertional Mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Junfei; Sheng, Jinsong; Rubin, Donald H.

    2016-01-01

    Viruses require host cellular factors for successful replication. A comprehensive systems-level investigation of the virus-host interactome is critical for understanding the roles of host factors with the end goal of discovering new druggable antiviral targets. Gene-trap insertional mutagenesis is a high-throughput forward genetics approach to randomly disrupt (trap) host genes and discover host genes that are essential for viral replication, but not for host cell survival. In this study, we used libraries of randomly mutagenized cells to discover cellular genes that are essential for the replication of 10 distinct cytotoxic mammalian viruses, 1 gram-negative bacterium, and 5 toxins. We herein reported 712 candidate cellular genes, characterizing distinct topological network and evolutionary signatures, and occupying central hubs in the human interactome. Cell cycle phase-specific network analysis showed that host cell cycle programs played critical roles during viral replication (e.g. MYC and TAF4 regulating G0/1 phase). Moreover, the viral perturbation of host cellular networks reflected disease etiology in that host genes (e.g. CTCF, RHOA, and CDKN1B) identified were frequently essential and significantly associated with Mendelian and orphan diseases, or somatic mutations in cancer. Computational drug repositioning framework via incorporating drug-gene signatures from the Connectivity Map into the virus-host interactome identified 110 putative druggable antiviral targets and prioritized several existing drugs (e.g. ajmaline) that may be potential for antiviral indication (e.g. anti-Ebola). In summary, this work provides a powerful methodology with a tight integration of gene-trap insertional mutagenesis testing and systems biology to identify new antiviral targets and drugs for the development of broadly acting and targeted clinical antiviral therapeutics. PMID:27632082

  11. Preparation of liposomal amiodarone and investigation of its cardiomyocyte-targeting ability in cardiac radiofrequency ablation rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhuge, Ying; Zheng, Zhi-Feng; Xie, Mu-Qing; Li, Lin; Wang, Fang; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an amiodarone hydrochloride (ADHC)-loaded liposome (ADHC-L) formulation and investigate its potential for cardiomyocyte targeting after cardiac radiofrequency ablation (CA) in vivo. The ADHC-L was prepared by thin-film method combined with ultrasonication and extrusion. The preparation process was optimized by Box-Behnken design with encapsulation efficiency as the main evaluation index. The optimum formulation was quantitatively obtained with a diameter of 99.9±0.4 nm, a zeta potential of 35.1±10.9 mV, and an encapsulation efficiency of 99.5%±13.3%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the liposomes were spherical particles with integrated bilayers and well dispersed with high colloidal stability. Pharmacokinetic studies were investigated in rats after intravenous administration, which revealed that compared with free ADHC treatment, ADHC-L treatment showed a 5.1-fold increase in the area under the plasma drug concentration-time curve over a period of 24 hours (AUC0-24 h) and an 8.5-fold increase in mean residence time, suggesting that ADHC-L could facilitate drug release in a more stable and sustained manner while increasing the circulation time of ADHC, especially in the blood. Biodistribution studies of ADHC-L demonstrated that ADHC concentration in the heart was 4.1 times higher after ADHC-L treatment in CA rat model compared with ADHC-L sham-operated treatment at 20 minutes postinjection. Fluorescence imaging studies further proved that the heart-targeting ability of ADHC-L was mainly due to the CA in rats. These results strongly support that ADHC-L could be exploited as a potential heart-targeting drug delivery system with enhanced bioavailability and reduced side effects for arrhythmia treatment after CA. PMID:27313453

  12. Preparation of liposomal amiodarone and investigation of its cardiomyocyte-targeting ability in cardiac radiofrequency ablation rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhuge, Ying; Zheng, Zhi-Feng; Xie, Mu-Qing; Li, Lin; Wang, Fang; Gao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop an amiodarone hydrochloride (ADHC)-loaded liposome (ADHC-L) formulation and investigate its potential for cardiomyocyte targeting after cardiac radiofrequency ablation (CA) in vivo. The ADHC-L was prepared by thin-film method combined with ultrasonication and extrusion. The preparation process was optimized by Box–Behnken design with encapsulation efficiency as the main evaluation index. The optimum formulation was quantitatively obtained with a diameter of 99.9±0.4 nm, a zeta potential of 35.1±10.9 mV, and an encapsulation efficiency of 99.5%±13.3%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the liposomes were spherical particles with integrated bilayers and well dispersed with high colloidal stability. Pharmacokinetic studies were investigated in rats after intravenous administration, which revealed that compared with free ADHC treatment, ADHC-L treatment showed a 5.1-fold increase in the area under the plasma drug concentration–time curve over a period of 24 hours (AUC0–24 h) and an 8.5-fold increase in mean residence time, suggesting that ADHC-L could facilitate drug release in a more stable and sustained manner while increasing the circulation time of ADHC, especially in the blood. Biodistribution studies of ADHC-L demonstrated that ADHC concentration in the heart was 4.1 times higher after ADHC-L treatment in CA rat model compared with ADHC-L sham-operated treatment at 20 minutes postinjection. Fluorescence imaging studies further proved that the heart-targeting ability of ADHC-L was mainly due to the CA in rats. These results strongly support that ADHC-L could be exploited as a potential heart-targeting drug delivery system with enhanced bioavailability and reduced side effects for arrhythmia treatment after CA. PMID:27313453

  13. Meta-Analysis of PECS with Individuals with ASD: Investigation of Targeted versus Non-Targeted Outcomes, Participant Characteristics, and Implementation Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Davis, John L.; Lund, Emily M.; Goodwyn, Fara D.; Simpson, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is a widely used picture/icon aided augmentative communication system designed for learners with autism and other developmental disorders. This meta-analysis analyzes the extant empirical literature for PECS relative to targeted (functional communication) and non-targeted concomitant outcomes…

  14. Residual obesity stigma: an experimental investigation of bias against obese and lean targets differing in weight-loss history.

    PubMed

    Latner, Janet D; Ebneter, Daria S; O'Brien, Kerry S

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated stigma directed at formerly obese persons who lost weight and became lean (through behavioral or surgical methods), or lost weight but remained obese, relative to weight-stable obese and weight-stable lean persons. This study also compared stigma directed at obese persons following exposure to descriptions of persons who lost weight vs. remained weight stable. In a between-subject experimental design, participants (n = 273) were randomly assigned to read vignettes describing targets varying across two dimensions, weight stability (i.e., weight stable or weight lost) and current weight (i.e., currently obese or currently lean). Participants completed measures of stigma against specific targets and measures of stigma against obese individuals in general. Lean individuals who were formerly obese were stigmatized more on attractiveness than weight-stable lean individuals, and as much as currently obese individuals. Stigma across domains was greater among currently obese individuals (regardless of whether they had lost weight from a higher weight) than among currently lean individuals. After reading vignettes describing weight loss, participants demonstrated greater obesity stigma than after reading vignettes describing weight-stable individuals. These results suggest that residual stigma remains against people who have previously been obese, even when they have lost substantial amounts of weight and regardless of their weight-loss method. Exposure to portrayals of the malleability of body weight, such as those promoted in the popular media, may significantly worsen obesity stigma. PMID:22395810

  15. Investigation on wide-band scattering of a 2-D target above 1-D randomly rough surface by FDTD method.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Guo, Li-Xin; Jiao, Yong-Chang; Li, Ke

    2011-01-17

    Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) algorithm with a pulse wave excitation is used to investigate the wide-band composite scattering from a two-dimensional(2-D) infinitely long target with arbitrary cross section located above a one-dimensional(1-D) randomly rough surface. The FDTD calculation is performed with a pulse wave incidence, and the 2-D representative time-domain scattered field in the far zone is obtained directly by extrapolating the currently calculated data on the output boundary. Then the 2-D wide-band scattering result is acquired by transforming the representative time-domain field to the frequency domain with a Fourier transform. Taking the composite scattering of an infinitely long cylinder above rough surface as an example, the wide-band response in the far zone by FDTD with the pulsed excitation is computed and it shows a good agreement with the numerical result by FDTD with the sinusoidal illumination. Finally, the normalized radar cross section (NRCS) from a 2-D target above 1-D rough surface versus the incident frequency, and the representative scattered fields in the far zone versus the time are analyzed in detail.

  16. Experimental investigation of a moving averaging algorithm for motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction in dynamic MLC target tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jai-Woong; Sawant, Amit; Suh, Yelin; Cho, Byung-Chul; Suh, Tae-Suk; Keall, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: In dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) motion tracking with complex intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) fields, target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction can cause beam holds, which increase beam delivery time by up to a factor of 4. As a means to balance delivery efficiency and accuracy, a moving average algorithm was incorporated into a dynamic MLC motion tracking system (i.e., moving average tracking) to account for target motion perpendicular to the MLC leaf travel direction. The experimental investigation of the moving average algorithm compared with real-time tracking and no compensation beam delivery is described. Methods: The properties of the moving average algorithm were measured and compared with those of real-time tracking (dynamic MLC motion tracking accounting for both target motion parallel and perpendicular to the leaf travel direction) and no compensation beam delivery. The algorithm was investigated using a synthetic motion trace with a baseline drift and four patient-measured 3D tumor motion traces representing regular and irregular motions with varying baseline drifts. Each motion trace was reproduced by a moving platform. The delivery efficiency, geometric accuracy, and dosimetric accuracy were evaluated for conformal, step-and-shoot IMRT, and dynamic sliding window IMRT treatment plans using the synthetic and patient motion traces. The dosimetric accuracy was quantified via a {gamma}-test with a 3%/3 mm criterion. Results: The delivery efficiency ranged from 89 to 100% for moving average tracking, 26%-100% for real-time tracking, and 100% (by definition) for no compensation. The root-mean-square geometric error ranged from 3.2 to 4.0 mm for moving average tracking, 0.7-1.1 mm for real-time tracking, and 3.7-7.2 mm for no compensation. The percentage of dosimetric points failing the {gamma}-test ranged from 4 to 30% for moving average tracking, 0%-23% for real-time tracking, and 10%-47% for no compensation

  17. Investigating the Fluorescence Quenching of Doxorubicin in Folic Acid Solutions and its Relation to Ligand-Targeted Nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Husseini, Ghaleb A; Kanan, Sofian; Al-Sayah, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Folic acid (FA) is one of the most utilized moieties in active (ligand) drug delivery. The folate receptor is widely expressed on the surface of several cell lines and tumors; including ovarian, brain, kidney, breast, and lung cancers. During our previous experiments with Doxorubicin (Dox) encapsulated in folate-targeted micelles, we found that flow cytometry underestimated the amount of drug that accu- mulates inside cells. We attributed this effect to the quenching of Dox by FA and herein investigate this phenomenon in an attempt to obtain a correction factor that could be applied to the fluorescence of Dox in the presence of FA. Initially, we examine the effect of pH on the fluorescence spectra of FA, Dox, equimolar solutions of FA and Dox in water, HCI (0.1 M), and NaOH (0.1 M) solutions. We then measure the effect of the gradual increase of FA concentration on the fluorescence intensity of Dox in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solutions (pH of 7.4). Using the Stern-Volmer equation, we estimate the association constant of FA-Dox to be K(SV) = 1.5 x 10(4) M(-1). Such an association constant indicates that at the concentrations of FA used in targeted drug delivery systems, a significant concentration of Dox exists as FA-Dox complexes with a quenched fluorescence. Therefore, we conclude that when Dox is used in FA-active drug delivery systems, a correction factor is needed to predict the correct fluorescence intensity of agent in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27433596

  18. Investigating the Role of a Racially Biased Incident on Changes in Culture and Climate Indicators across Targeted and Non-Targeted Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeung, Fanny P.; Johnston, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the influences of a racially biased incident targeting Asian students at a compositionally diverse public research institution on the U.S. West coast after an unplanned incident that occurred during data collection of the Diverse Learning Environments survey. This occurrence created a unique opportunity to explore how 2 cohorts…

  19. Investigation of vital pathogenic target orotate phosphoribosyltransferases (OPRTase) from Thermus thermophilus HB8: Phylogenetic and molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Surekha, Kanagarajan; Prabhu, Damodharan; Richard, Mariadasse; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayashree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2016-06-01

    Biosynthesis pathways of pyrimidine and purine are shown to play an important role in regular cellular activities. The biosynthesis can occur either through de novo or salvage pathways based on the requirement of the cell. The pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway has been linked to several disorders and various autoimmune diseases. Orotate phosphoribosyl transferase (OPRTase) is an important enzyme which catalyzes the conversion of orotate to orotate monophosphate in the fifth step of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Phylogenetic analysis of 228 OPRTase sequences shows the distribution of proteins across different living forms of life. High structural similarities between Thermusthermophilus and other organisms kindled us to concentrate on OPRTase as an anti-pathogenic target. In this study, a homology model of OPRTase was constructed using 2P1Z as a template. About 100 ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the conformational stability and dynamic patterns of the protein. The amino acid residues (Met1, Asp2, Glu43, Ala44, Glu47, Lys51, Ala157 and Leu158) lining in the binding site were predicted using SiteMap. Further, structure based virtual screening was performed on the predicted binding site using ChemBridge, Asinex, Binding, NCI, TosLab and Zinc databases. Compounds retrieved from the screening collections were manually clustered. The resultant protein-ligand complexes were subjected to molecular dynamics simulations, which further validates the binding modes of the hits. The study may provide better insight for designing potent anti-pathogenic agent. PMID:26861612

  20. Colorectal cancer targeted Irinotecan-Assam Bora rice starch based microspheres: a mechanistic, pharmacokinetic and biochemical investigation.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki; Akhter, Sohail; Anwar, Mohammed; Kumar, Atul; Rahman, Mahfoozur; Talasaz, Azita Hajhossein; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the colon-targeted Irinotecan Hydrochloride (ITC-HCl) loaded microspheres by pharmacokinetic and biochemical studies. The microspheres were prepared by double emulsion solvent evaporation method with natural polymer Assam Bora rice starch. The microspheres were characterized for their micromeritics properties, incorporation efficiency, in vitro and in vivo drug release studies. The release study confirmed the insignificant release of ITC-HCl in physiological condition of stomach and small intestine and major drug release in the caecal content. In vivo release study of the optimized microsphere was compared with immediate release (IR) ITC-HCl. ITC-HCl was distributed predominantly in the upper GI tract from the IR, whereas ITC-HCl was distributed primarily to the lower part of GI tract from the microspheres formulation. Enhanced levels of liver enzymes were found in animals given IR ITC-HCl as well as augmented levels of serum albumin, creatinine, leucocytopenia and thrombocytopenia was also observed. In summary, Assam Bora rice starch microspheres exhibit slow and extended release of ITC-HCl over longer periods of time with reduced systemic side-effects. PMID:23013140

  1. Mechanistic investigation of the on-surface enzymatic digestion (oSED) protein adsorption detection method using targeted mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Undin, Torgny; Dahlin, Andreas; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Lind, Sara Bergström

    2016-03-01

    This study describes our efforts to study some of the mechanistic aspects of the earlier established on-surface enzymatic digestion (oSED) method. In a multitude of application areas, it has become important to be able to fully characterize and understand selective protein adsorption to biomaterial surfaces for various applications, including biomedicine (implants), nanotechnology (microchip surfaces and sensors) and materials sciences. Herein, the investigation of the mechanistic aspects was based on microdialysis catheter tubes that were flushed with controlled protein solutions mimicking the extracellular fluid of the brain. The protein adsorption properties were monitored using high-resolution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with a targeted method. The temporally resolved results show that most proteins stay adsorbed onto the surface during the entire digestion process and are only cut away piece by piece, whereas smaller proteins and peptides seem to desorb rather easily from the surface. This information will simplify the interpretation of data generated using the oSED method and can also be used for the characterization of the physicochemical properties controlling the adsorption of individual proteins to specific surfaces.

  2. Investigating the effect of tumor vascularization on magnetic targeting in vivo using retrospective design of experiment.

    PubMed

    Mei, Kuo-Ching; Bai, Jie; Lorrio, Silvia; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2016-11-01

    Nanocarriers take advantages of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) to accumulate passively in solid tumors. Magnetic targeting has shown to further enhance tumor accumulation in response to a magnetic field gradient. It is widely known that passive accumulation of nanocarriers varies hugely in tumor tissues of different tumor vascularization. It is hypothesized that magnetic targeting is likely to be influenced by such factors. In this work, magnetic targeting is assessed in a range of subcutaneously implanted murine tumors, namely, colon (CT26), breast (4T1), lung (Lewis lung carcinoma) cancer and melanoma (B16F10). Passively- and magnetically-driven tumor accumulation of the radiolabeled polymeric magnetic nanocapsules are assessed with gamma counting. The influence of tumor vasculature, namely, the tumor microvessel density, permeability and diameter on passive and magnetic tumor targeting is assessed with the aid of the retrospective design of experiment (DoE) approach. It is clear that the three tumor vascular parameters contribute greatly to both passive and magnetically targeted tumor accumulation but play different roles when nanocarriers are targeted to the tumor with different strategies. It is concluded that tumor permeability is a rate-limiting factor in both targeting modes. Diameter and microvessel density influence passive and magnetic tumor targeting, respectively. PMID:27573135

  3. An Investigation into the Transportation of Irradiated Uranium/Aluminum Targets from a Foreign Nuclear Reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories Site in Ontario, Canada - 12249

    SciTech Connect

    Clough, Malcolm; Jackson, Austin

    2012-07-01

    This investigation required the selection of a suitable cask and development of a device to hold and transport irradiated targets from a foreign nuclear reactor to the Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario, Canada. The main challenge was to design and validate a target holder to protect the irradiated HEU-Al target pencils during transit. Each of the targets was estimated to have an initial decay heat of 118 W prior to transit. As the targets have little thermal mass the potential for high temperature damage and possibly melting was high. Thus, the primary design objective was to conceive a target holder to dissipate heat from the targets. Other design requirements included securing the targets during transportation and providing a simple means to load and unload the targets while submerged five metres under water. A unique target holder (patent pending) was designed and manufactured together with special purpose experimental apparatus including a representative cask. Aluminum dummy targets were fabricated to accept cartridge heaters, to simulate decay heat. Thermocouples were used to measure the temperature of the test targets and selected areas within the target holder and test cask. After obtaining test results, calculations were performed to compensate for differences between experimental and real life conditions. Taking compensation into consideration the maximum target temperature reached was 231 deg. C which was below the designated maximum of 250 deg. C. The design of the aluminum target holder also allowed generous clearance to insert and unload the targets. This clearance was designed to close up as the target holder is placed into the cavity of the transport cask. Springs served to retain and restrain the targets from movement during transportation as well as to facilitate conductive heat transfer. The target holder met the design requirements and as such provided data supporting the feasibility of transporting targets over a relatively long period of time

  4. Investigation of electron-beam charging for inertial-confinement-fusion targets. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 3-82

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.; Elsayed-Ali, H.E.

    1982-04-01

    Techniques for charging inertial confinement fusion targets using electron beam are investigated. A brief review of the various possible charging techniques is presented, along with a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each. The reasons for selecting the electron beam charging and a physical picture of the charging mechanism are described. Experimental results are presented and compared with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Principal investigators data package for Project Initiation Conference (PIC): EUVS sounding rocket no. 36.117CL. Target: Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan

    1993-01-01

    The region of the UV between 500 and 1200 A is a rich one for the study of planetary and astrophysical targets. EUV atmospheric spectroscopy opens up an important window on ion and neutral nitrogen, oxygen, and noble gas emissions. In this document we describe the specific scientific background and motivations for this Venus EUV rocket observation along with experiment design and mission parameters.

  6. Investigation into the electromagnetic impulses from long-pulse laser illuminating solid targets inside a laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tao; Yang, Jinwen; Yang, Ming; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Weiming; Li, Tingshuai; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Xiao, Shaoqiu

    2016-09-01

    Emission of the electromagnetic pulses (EMP) due to laser-target interaction in laser facility had been evaluated using a cone antenna in this work. The microwave in frequencies ranging from several hundreds of MHz to 2 GHz was recorded when long-pulse lasers with several thousands of joules illuminated the solid targets, meanwhile the voltage signals from 1 V to 4 V were captured as functions of laser energy and backlight laser, where the corresponding electric field strengths were obtained by simulating the cone antenna in combination with conducting a mathematical process (Tiknohov Regularization with L curve). All the typical coupled voltage oscillations displayed multiple peaks and had duration of up to 80 ns before decaying into noise and mechanisms of the EMP generation was schematically interpreted in basis of the practical measuring environments. The resultant data were expected to offer basic know-how to achieve inertial confinement fusion.

  7. Investigation into the electromagnetic impulses from long-pulse laser illuminating solid targets inside a laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Tao; Yang, Jinwen; Yang, Ming; Wang, Chuanke; Yang, Weiming; Li, Tingshuai; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Xiao, Shaoqiu

    2016-06-01

    Emission of the electromagnetic pulses (EMP) due to laser-target interaction in laser facility had been evaluated using a cone antenna in this work. The microwave in frequencies ranging from several hundreds of MHz to 2 GHz was recorded when long-pulse lasers with several thousands of joules illuminated the solid targets, meanwhile the voltage signals from 1 V to 4 V were captured as functions of laser energy and backlight laser, where the corresponding electric field strengths were obtained by simulating the cone antenna in combination with conducting a mathematical process (Tiknohov Regularization with L curve). All the typical coupled voltage oscillations displayed multiple peaks and had duration of up to 80 ns before decaying into noise and mechanisms of the EMP generation was schematically interpreted in basis of the practical measuring environments. The resultant data were expected to offer basic know-how to achieve inertial confinement fusion.

  8. Investigations into the seeding of instabilities due to x-ray preheat in beryllium-based inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, E. N.; Greenfield, S. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Cobble, J. A.; Luo, S. N.; Montgomery, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.

    2010-05-15

    The geometry of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules makes them susceptible to various types of hydrodynamic instabilities at different stages during an ICF implosion. From the beginnings of ICF research, it has been known that grain-level anisotropy and defects could be a significant source of instability seeding in solid beryllium capsules. We report on experiments conducted at the Trident laser facility [S. H. Batha et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10F305 (2008)] to measure dynamic surface roughening from hard x-ray preheat due to anisotropic thermal expansion. M-band emission from laser-produced gold plasma was used to heat beryllium targets with different amounts of copper doping to temperatures comparable to ICF ignition preheat levels. Dynamic roughening measurements were made on the surface away from the plasma at discrete times up to 8 ns after the beginning of the drive pulse using a surface displacement interferometer with nanometer scale sensitivity. Undoped large-grained targets were measured to roughen between 15 and 50 nm rms. Fine-grained, copper-doped targets were observed to roughen near the sensitivity limit of the interferometer. The results of this work have shed light on the effects of high-Z doping and microstructural refinement on the dynamics of differential thermal expansion and have shown that current ICF capsule designs using beryllium are very effective in reducing preheat related roughening ahead of the first shock.

  9. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, H.; Kar, S.; Cantono, G.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Doria, D.; Gwynne, D.; Macchi, A.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a 'self' proton probing arrangement - i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed.

  10. Investigations into the Seeding of Instabilities due to X-ray Preheat in Beryllium-Based Inertial Confinement Fusion Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, Eric

    2009-11-01

    The geometry of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules makes them susceptible to various types of hydrodynamic instabilities at different stages during an ICF implosion. From the beginnings of ICF research, it has been known that grain-level anisotropy and defects could be a primary source of instability seeding in solid capsules. This has steered ICF designs to include amorphous materials such as plastic; however, the benefits of low-Z metallic materials, i.e. beryllium, has kept these materials the focus of much research. Recently, experiments were conducted at the Trident laser facility to measure dynamic surface roughening from hard x-ray preheat. M-band emission from laser produced gold plasma was used to heat beryllium targets with different amounts of copper doping to temperatures comparable to National Ignition Facility (NIF) preheat levels. Temporal and spectral x-ray diagnostics were used to estimate the target heating, which was also predicted by multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics calculations. Wave profiles of varying complexity due to differences in copper doping were observed with free surface line imaging velocity interferometry. Dynamic roughening measurements were made on the surface away from the plasma at discrete times up to 8 ns after the beginning of the drive pulse using a surface displacement interferometer with nanometer scale sensitivity. Undoped, large-grained targets were measured to roughen between 15 and 50 nm rms depending on variations in x-ray absorption through the target thickness. Fine-grained, copper-doped targets were observed to roughen near the sensitivity limit of the interferometer and approached the Rev2 NIC design point of 0.9 nm. The results of this combined experimental and modeling effort have shed light on the effects of high-Z doping and microstructural refinement on the dynamics of differential thermal expansion and have shown that current NIF capsule designs using beryllium are very effective in reducing

  11. A Monte Carlo investigation of low-Z target image quality generated in a linear accelerator using Varian's VirtuaLinac

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, David; Robar, James L.; Sawkey, Daren

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work was the demonstration and validation of VirtuaLinac with clinical photon beams and to investigate the implementation of low-Z targets in a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Linac) using Monte Carlo modeling. Methods: VirtuaLinac, a cloud based web application utilizing Geant4 Monte Carlo code, was used to model the Linac treatment head components. Particles were propagated through the lower portion of the treatment head using BEAMnrc. Dose distributions and spectral distributions were calculated using DOSXYZnrc and BEAMdp, respectively. For validation, 6 MV flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams were generated and compared to measurement for square fields, 10 and 40 cm wide and at d{sub max} for diagonal profiles. Two low-Z targets were investigated: a 2.35 MeV carbon target and the proposed 2.50 MeV commercial imaging target for the TrueBeam platform. A 2.35 MeV carbon target was also simulated in a 2100EX Clinac using BEAMnrc. Contrast simulations were made by scoring the dose in the phosphor layer of an IDU20 aSi detector after propagating through a 4 or 20 cm thick phantom composed of water and ICRP bone. Results: Measured and modeled depth dose curves for 6 MV flattened and FFF beams agree within 1% for 98.3% of points at depths greater than 0.85 cm. Ninety three percent or greater of points analyzed for the diagonal profiles had a gamma value less than one for the criteria of 1.5 mm and 1.5%. The two low-Z target photon spectra produced in TrueBeam are harder than that from the carbon target in the Clinac. Percent dose at depth 10 cm is greater by 3.6% and 8.9%; the fraction of photons in the diagnostic energy range (25–150 keV) is lower by 10% and 28%; and contrasts are lower by factors of 1.1 and 1.4 (4 cm thick phantom) and 1.03 and 1.4 (20 cm thick phantom), for the TrueBeam 2.35 MV/carbon and commercial imaging beams, respectively. Conclusions: VirtuaLinac is a promising new tool for Monte Carlo modeling of

  12. Ultrasound effects on brain-targeting mannosylated liposomes: in vitro and blood–brain barrier transport investigations

    PubMed Central

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Aldawsari, Hibah

    2015-01-01

    Delivering drugs to intracerebral regions can be accomplished by improving the capacity of transport through blood–brain barrier. Using sertraline as model drug for brain targeting, the current study aimed at modifying its liposomal vesicles with mannopyranoside. Box-Behnken design was employed to statistically optimize the ultrasound parameters, namely ultrasound amplitude, time, and temperature, for maximum mannosylation capacity, sertraline entrapment, and surface charge while minimizing vesicular size. Moreover, in vitro blood–brain barrier transport model was established to assess the transendothelial capacity of the optimized mannosylated vesicles. Results showed a dependence of vesicular size, mannosylation capacity, and sertraline entrapment on cavitation and bubble implosion events that were related to ultrasound power amplitude, temperature. However, short ultrasound duration was required to achieve >90% mannosylation with nanosized vesicles (<200 nm) of narrow size distribution. Optimized ultrasound parameters of 65°C, 27%, and 59 seconds for ultrasound temperature, amplitude, and time were elucidated to produce 81.1%, 46.6 nm, and 77.6% sertraline entrapment, vesicular size, and mannosylation capacity, respectively. Moreover, the transendothelial ability was significantly increased by 2.5-fold by mannosylation through binding with glucose transporters. Hence, mannosylated liposomes processed by ultrasound could be a promising approach for manufacturing and scale-up of brain-targeting liposomes. PMID:26244012

  13. Investigation and optimization of formulation parameters on preparation of targeted anti-CD205 tailored PLGA nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Sheikh Tasnim; Haddadi, Azita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of various formulation parameters on anti-CD205 antibody decorated poly(d, l-lactide co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in terms of their ability to target dendritic cells (DCs). In brief, emulsification solvent evaporation technique was adapted to design NP formulations using two different viscosity grades (low and high) of both ester and carboxylic acid terminated PLGA. Incorporation of ligand was achieved following physical adsorption or chemical conjugation processes. The physicochemical characterizations of formulations were executed to assess the effects of different solvents (chloroform and ethyl acetate), stabilizer percentage, polymer types, polymer viscosities, ligand-NP bonding types, cross-linkers, and cryoprotectants (sucrose and trehalose). Modification of any of these parameters shows significant improvement of physicochemical properties of NPs. Ethyl acetate was the solvent of choice for the formulations to ensure better emulsion formation. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of anti-CD205 antibody in the NP formulation. Finally, cytotoxicity assay confirmed the safety profile of the NPs for DCs. Thus, ligand modified structurally concealed PLGA NPs is a promising delivery tool for targeting DCs in vivo. PMID:26677326

  14. Investigating the cellular fate of a DNA-targeted platinum-based anticancer agent by orthogonal double-click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xin; Ding, Song; Liu, Fang; Kucera, Gregory L; Bierbach, Ulrich

    2014-03-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was used to study a platinum-based anticancer agent in intact NCI-H460 lung cancer cells. Orthogonal copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (click) reactions were used to simultaneously determine the cell-cycle-specific localization of the azide-functionalized platinum-acridine agent 1 and monitor its effects on nucleic acid metabolism. Copper-catalyzed postlabeling showed advantages over copper-free click chemistry using a dibenzocyclooctyne (DIBO)-modified reporter dye, which produced high background levels in microscopic images and failed to efficiently label platinum adducts in chromatin. Compound 1 was successfully labeled with the fluorophore DIBO to yield 1* (characterized by in-line high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray mass spectrometry). 1 and 1* show a high degree of colocalization in the confocal images, but the ability of 1* to target the (compacted) chromatin was markedly reduced, most likely owing to the steric bulk introduced by the DIBO tag. Nuclear platinum levels correlated inversely with the ability of the cells to synthesize DNA and cause cell cycle arrest, as confirmed by bivariate flow cytometry analysis. In addition, a decrease in the level of cellular transcription, shrinkage of the nucleolar regions, and redistribution of RNA into the cytosol were observed. Postlabeling in conjunction with colocalization experiments is a useful tool for studying the cell killing mechanism of this type of DNA-targeted agent.

  15. Investigation and optimization of formulation parameters on preparation of targeted anti-CD205 tailored PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jahan, Sheikh Tasnim; Haddadi, Azita

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of various formulation parameters on anti-CD205 antibody decorated poly(d, l-lactide co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in terms of their ability to target dendritic cells (DCs). In brief, emulsification solvent evaporation technique was adapted to design NP formulations using two different viscosity grades (low and high) of both ester and carboxylic acid terminated PLGA. Incorporation of ligand was achieved following physical adsorption or chemical conjugation processes. The physicochemical characterizations of formulations were executed to assess the effects of different solvents (chloroform and ethyl acetate), stabilizer percentage, polymer types, polymer viscosities, ligand-NP bonding types, cross-linkers, and cryoprotectants (sucrose and trehalose). Modification of any of these parameters shows significant improvement of physicochemical properties of NPs. Ethyl acetate was the solvent of choice for the formulations to ensure better emulsion formation. Infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of anti-CD205 antibody in the NP formulation. Finally, cytotoxicity assay confirmed the safety profile of the NPs for DCs. Thus, ligand modified structurally concealed PLGA NPs is a promising delivery tool for targeting DCs in vivo. PMID:26677326

  16. Targeting Aurora A kinase activity with the investigational agent alisertib increases the efficacy of cytarabine through a FOXO-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Kevin R.; Nawrocki, Steffan T.; Espitia, Claudia M.; Zhang, Mengkun; Yang, Johnny J.; Padmanabhan, Swaminathan; Ecsedy, Jeffrey; Giles, Francis J.; Carew, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Novel therapies are urgently needed to improve clinical outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The investigational drug alisertib (MLN8237) is a novel Aurora A kinase inhibitor being studied in multiple Phase I and II studies. We investigated the preclinical efficacy and pharmacodynamics of alisertib in AML cell lines, primary AML cells, and mouse models of AML. Here we report that alisertib disrupted cell viability, diminished clonogenic survival, induced expression of the FOXO3a targets p27 and BIM, and triggered apoptosis. A link between Aurora A expression and sensitivity to ara-C was established, suggesting that Aurora A inhibition may be a promising strategy to increase the efficacy of ara-C. Accordingly, alisertib significantly potentiated the anti-leukemic activity of ara-C in both AML cell lines and primary blasts. Targeted FOXO3a knockdown significantly blunted the pro-apoptotic effects of the alisertib/ara-C combination, indicating that it is an important regulator of sensitivity to these agents. In vivo studies demonstrated that alisertib significantly augmented the efficacy of ara-C without affecting its pharmacokinetic profile and led to the induction of p27 and BIM. Our collective data indicate that targeting Aurora A with alisertib represents a novel approach to increase the efficacy of ara-C that warrants further investigation. PMID:22488249

  17. Investigating the Social Engagement of Children with Autism in Mainstream Schools for the Purpose of Identifying Learning Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conn, Carmel

    2014-01-01

    The social needs of children with autism are complex, and their inclusion in mainstream schools necessitates a consideration of the nature of a child's participation in peer culture and how it is received by others. The case study reported here sought to investigate the social engagement of a child with autism and his peers using naturalistic…

  18. Distance-to-Agreement Investigation of Tomotherapy's Bony Anatomy-Based Autoregistration and Planning Target Volume Contour-Based Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Suh, Steve; Schultheiss, Timothy E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To compare Tomotherapy's megavoltage computed tomography bony anatomy autoregistration with the best achievable registration, assuming no deformation and perfect knowledge of planning target volume (PTV) location. Methods and Materials: Distance-to-agreement (DTA) of the PTV was determined by applying a rigid-body shift to the PTV region of interest of the prostate from its reference position, assuming no deformations. Planning target volume region of interest of the prostate was extracted from the patient archives. The reference position was set by the 6 degrees of freedom (dof)—x, y, z, roll, pitch, and yaw—optimization results from the previous study at this institution. The DTA and the compensating parameters were calculated by the shift of the PTV from the reference 6-dof to the 4-dof—x, y, z, and roll—optimization. In this study, the effectiveness of Tomotherapy's 4-dof bony anatomy–based autoregistration was compared with the idealized 4-dof PTV contour-based optimization. Results: The maximum DTA (maxDTA) of the bony anatomy-based autoregistration was 3.2 ± 1.9 mm, with the maximum value of 8.0 mm. The maxDTA of the contour-based optimization was 1.8 ± 1.3 mm, with the maximum value of 5.7 mm. Comparison of Pearson correlation of the compensating parameters between the 2 4-dof optimization algorithms shows that there is a small but statistically significant correlation in y and z (0.236 and 0.300, respectively), whereas there is very weak correlation in x and roll (0.062 and 0.025, respectively). Conclusions: We find that there is an average improvement of approximately 1 mm in terms of maxDTA on the PTV going from 4-dof bony anatomy-based autoregistration to the 4-dof contour-based optimization. Pearson correlation analysis of the 2 4-dof optimizations suggests that uncertainties due to deformation and inadequate resolution account for much of the compensating parameters, but pitch variation also makes a statistically significant

  19. Investigation of glucose-modified liposomes using polyethylene glycols with different chain lengths as the linkers for brain targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fulan; Yao, Nian; Qin, Yao; Zhang, Qianyu; Chen, Huali; Yuan, Mingqing; Tang, Jie; Li, Xiankun; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Wu, Yong; Hai, Li; He, Qin

    2012-01-01

    Background An intimidating challenge to transporting drugs into the brain parenchyma is the presence of the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Glucose is an essential nutritional substance for brain function sustenance, which cannot be synthesized by the brain. Its transport primarily depends on the glucose transporters on the brain capillary endothelial cells. In this paper, the brain-targeted properties of glucose-modified liposomes using polyethylene glycols with different chain lengths as the linkers were compared and evaluated to establish an optimized drug-delivery system. Methods Coumarin 6-loaded liposomes (GLU200-LIP, GLU400-LIP, GLU1000-LIP, and GLU2000-LIP) composed of phospholipids and glucose-derived cholesterols were prepared by thin-film dispersion-ultrasound method. The BBB model in vitro was developed to evaluate the transendothelial ability of the different liposomes crossing the BBB. The biodistribution of liposomes in the mice brains was identified by in vivo and ex vivo nearinfrared fluorescence imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy and further analyzed quantitatively by high-performance liquid chromatography. Results Glucose-derived cholesterols were synthesized and identified, and coumarin 6-loaded liposomes were prepared successfully. The particle sizes of the four types of glucose-modified liposomes were around or smaller than 100 nm with a polydispersity index less than 0.300. GLU400-LIP, GLU1000-LIP, and GLU2000-LIP achieved higher cumulative cleared volumes on BBB model in vitro after 6 hours compared with GLU200-LIP (P < 0.05) and were significantly higher than that of the conventional liposome (P < 0.001). The qualitative and quantitative biodistribution results in the mice showed that the accumulation of GLU1000-LIP in the brain was the highest among all the groups (P < 0.01 versus LIP). Conclusion The data indicated that GLU400-LIP, GLU1000-LIP, and GLU2000-LIP all possess the potential of brain targeting, among which GLU1000-LIP

  20. Investigating the cubosomal ability for transnasal brain targeting: In vitro optimization, ex vivo permeation and in vivo biodistribution.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Fatma Elzahraa; Elsayed, Ibrahim; Gad, Mary Kamal; Badr, Ahmed; Mohamed, Magdi Ibrahim

    2015-07-25

    The aim of this study was to enhance the risperidone delivery to the brain through the transnasal route via optimization of cubosomal gel. Cubosomes were prepared using glycerol mono-oleate (GMO), Pluronic F127 (PF127) and Tween 80 (T80). The prepared formulae were characterized by testing their particle size, polydispersity index, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, in vitro drug release and transmission electron microscopy. Central composite design was planned for the formulae optimization and the selected formula (containing PF127 with concentration 15 mg/g GMO and T80 with concentration of 20mg/L) was re-prepared in presence of gelling polymer (gellan gum or polyox). The optimal cubosomal gel (containing 0.4% w/v polyox) had been subjected to ex-vivo permeation, histopathological evaluation and in vivo biodistribution studies. It showed significantly higher transnasal permeation and better distribution to the brain, when compared to the used control (drug solution and/or suspension). Finally, the cubosomal gel could be considered as a promising carrier for brain targeting of CNS acting drugs through the transnasal route.

  1. Investigation of the dynamic thermal infrared signatures of a calibration target instrumented with a network of 1-wire temperature sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Gareth D.; Merken, Patrick

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we describe the temperature and thermal variations from a painted geometrical target (CUBI) fitted with a network of internally mounted 1-wire temperature sensors. The sensors, which were calibrated in a temperature-controlled oven, were recorded every 20 seconds over a period from May to December 2015. This amounts to an archive of approximately 180 days of near uninterrupted data. Two meteorological stations collocated with the CUBI on a roof test site, record relevant environmental parameters every few minutes. In this paper, we analyze the data for only one day, 2 October 2015, for which a wavelet analysis highlights the contribution of different temporal fluctuations to total signature. We selected this specific day since it represented simple environmental conditions, and additionally images from a 3-5 microns (MWIR) thermal imager were recorded. Finally, we demonstrate that a wavelet decomposition of the temperature signature to be a useful method to characterize dynamic temperature changes, and perhaps a method to verify prediction models for varying fluctuation scales.

  2. Investigating an organ-targeting platform based on hydroxyapatite nanoparticles using a novel in situ method of radioactive ¹²⁵Iodine labeling.

    PubMed

    Ignjatović, Nenad; Vranješ Djurić, Sanja; Mitić, Zarko; Janković, Drina; Uskoković, Dragan

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we have investigated the synthesis of nanoparticles of hydroxyapatite (HAp) and hydroxyapatite coated with chitosan (HAp/Ch) and the chitosan-poly-d,l-lactide-co-glycolide polymer blend (HAp/Ch-PLGA) as an organ-targeting system. We have examined and defined the final destination, as well as the dynamics and the pathways of the synthesized particles following intravenous administration in vivo. The XRD, ZP, FT-IR and SEM analyses have confirmed that the hydroxyapatite nanoparticles with d50=72 nm are coated with polymers. Radioactive 125-Iodine ((125)I), a low energy gamma emitter, was used to develop a novel in situ method for the radiolabeling of particles and investigation of their biodistribution. (125)I-labeled particles exhibited high stability in saline and serum over the second day, which justified their use in the following in vivo studies. The biodistribution of (125)I-labeled particles after intravenous injection in rats differed significantly: HAp particles mostly targeted the liver, HAp/Ch the spleen and the liver, while HAp/Ch-PLGA targeted the lungs. Twenty-four hours post injection, HAp particles were excreted completely, while both (125)I-HAp/Ch and (125)I-HAp/Ch-PLGA were retained in the body for a prolonged period of time with more than 20% of radioactivity still found in different organs. PMID:25175234

  3. PET radiotracer [18F]-P6 selectively targeting COX-1 as a novel biomarker in ovarian cancer: Preliminary investigation

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Jashim; Vitale, Paola; Panella, Andrea; Crews, Brenda C.; Daniel, Cristina K.; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Nickels, Mike; Tantawy, Mohammed N.; Manning, H. Charles; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Scilimati, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), but not COX-2, is expressed at high levels in the early stages of human epithelial ovarian cancer where it seems to play a key role in cancer onset and progression. As a consequence, COX-1 is an ideal biomarker for early ovarian cancer detection. A series of novel fluorinated COX-1-targeted imaging agents derived from P6 was developed by using a highly selective COX-1 inhibitor as a lead compound. Among these new compounds, designed by structural modification of P6, 3-(5-chlorofuran-2-yl)-5-(fluoromethyl)-4-phenylisoxazole ([18/19F]-P6) is the most promising derivative [IC50 = 2.0 μM (purified oCOX-1) and 1.37 μM (hOVCAR-3 cell COX-1)]. Its tosylate precursor was also prepared and, a method for radio[18F]chemistry was developed and optimized. The radiochemistry was carried out using a carrier-free K18F/Kryptofix 2.2.2 complex, that afforded [18F]-P6 in good radio-chemical yield (18%) and high purity (>95%). In vivo PET/CT imaging data showed that the radiotracer [18F]-P6 was selectively taken up by COX-1-expressing ovarian carcinoma (OVCAR 3) tumor xenografts as compared with the normal leg muscle. Our results suggest that [18F]-P6 might be an useful radiotracer in preclinical and clinical settings for in vivo PET-CT imaging of tissues that express elevated levels of COX-1. PMID:24832612

  4. Investigation of Human Cancers for Retrovirus by Low-Stringency Target Enrichment and High-Throughput Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Vinner, Lasse; Mourier, Tobias; Friis-Nielsen, Jens; Gniadecki, Robert; Dybkaer, Karen; Rosenberg, Jacob; Langhoff, Jill Levin; Cruz, David Flores Santa; Fonager, Jannik; Izarzugaza, Jose M. G.; Gupta, Ramneek; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Willerslev, Eske; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Hansen, Anders Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Although nearly one fifth of all human cancers have an infectious aetiology, the causes for the majority of cancers remain unexplained. Despite the enormous data output from high-throughput shotgun sequencing, viral DNA in a clinical sample typically constitutes a proportion of host DNA that is too small to be detected. Sequence variation among virus genomes complicates application of sequence-specific, and highly sensitive, PCR methods. Therefore, we aimed to develop and characterize a method that permits sensitive detection of sequences despite considerable variation. We demonstrate that our low-stringency in-solution hybridization method enables detection of <100 viral copies. Furthermore, distantly related proviral sequences may be enriched by orders of magnitude, enabling discovery of hitherto unknown viral sequences by high-throughput sequencing. The sensitivity was sufficient to detect retroviral sequences in clinical samples. We used this method to conduct an investigation for novel retrovirus in samples from three cancer types. In accordance with recent studies our investigation revealed no retroviral infections in human B-cell lymphoma cells, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma or colorectal cancer biopsies. Nonetheless, our generally applicable method makes sensitive detection possible and permits sequencing of distantly related sequences from complex material. PMID:26285800

  5. Investigating the Structural Variability and Binding Modes of the Glioma Targeting NFL-TBS.40-63 Peptide on Tubulin.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Yoann; Savarin, Philippe; Robert, Charles H; Takahashi, Masayuki; Eyer, Joel; Prevost, Chantal; Sacquin-Mora, Sophie

    2015-06-16

    NFL-TBS.40-63 is a 24 amino acid peptide corresponding to the tubulin-binding site located on the light neurofilament subunit, which selectively enters glioblastoma cells, where it disrupts their microtubule network and inhibits their proliferation. We investigated its structural variability and binding modes on a tubulin heterodimer using a combination of NMR experiments, docking, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Our results show that, while lacking a stable structure, the peptide preferentially binds on a specific single site located near the β-tubulin C-terminal end, thus giving us precious hints regarding the mechanism of action of the NFL-TBS.40-63 peptide's antimitotic activity at the molecular level.

  6. Using of the Boolean Stochastic Generation method to target field investigations: the Mortisa landslide (eastern Italian Alps) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossi, Giulia; Marcato, Gianluca; Gottardi, Guido; Borgatti, Lisa

    2016-04-01

    When designing the geotechnical model of a landslide the information to define the soil profile within the slope is usually inferred from a small amount of data. This is particularly true for large landslides where the study area is vast and the variability of terrains is high. In this framework, a method allowing the best locations for further field investigation campaigns to be identified would be extremely useful. The Boolean Stochastic Generation method (BoSG), which randomly generates different soil distributions of two definite soil types in both 2D and 3D models, is a newly developed algorithm that can guide in this process. In this work the method has been applied to the Mortisa landslide case study, which is located in the Cortina d'Ampezzo valley (Veneto, Italy), part of the Dolomites UNESCO World Heritage list. The mudslide is 3.5 km long, stretching from 1750 to 1300 m a.s.l., and is located in a highly antrophized area where is damaging some buildings and a national road with its almost continuous movements. In fact, from year 2008, GNSS surveys recorded rates of displacements reaching 1.2 m/year in the most active parts of the landslide; the movements occur on a slip surfaces are located between 20 and 50 m below the surface. From the borecores some wooden samples were extracted allowing to reconstruct the sequence of events that led to the development of the present-day Mortisa slope. Interdigitated layers of gravel in a silty clay matrix originated from subsequent earth and debris flows events since the Lateglacial compose the landslide body, a condition that is particularly apt to be investigated with BoSG. A BoSG run for the Mortisa landslide was performed calculating 1200 soil configurations and using laboratory test parameters for the silty-clay matrix. The results were stacked in a tridimensional matrix in order to calculate the mean and the standard deviation (SD) of displacements for each element of the model mesh. In this way maps of the SD

  7. Investigation of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase pathway to elucidate off-target prenatal effects of pharmaceuticals: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Boland, M R; Tatonetti, N P

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian diseases contain important biological information regarding developmental effects of gene mutations that can guide drug discovery and toxicity efforts. In this review, we focus on Smith–Lemli–Opitz syndrome (SLOS), a rare Mendelian disease characterized by compound heterozygous mutations in 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR7) resulting in severe fetal deformities. We present a compilation of SLOS-inducing DHCR7 mutations and the geographic distribution of those mutations in healthy and diseased populations. We observed that several mutations thought to be disease causing occur in healthy populations, indicating an incomplete understanding of the condition and highlighting new research opportunities. We describe the functional environment around DHCR7, including pharmacological DHCR7 inhibitors and cholesterol and vitamin D synthesis. Using PubMed, we investigated the fetal outcomes following prenatal exposure to DHCR7 modulators. First-trimester exposure to DHCR7 inhibitors resulted in outcomes similar to those of known teratogens (50 vs 48% born-healthy). DHCR7 activity should be considered during drug development and prenatal toxicity assessment. PMID:27401223

  8. Design and Reporting of Targeted Anticancer Preclinical Studies: A Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies Investigating Sorafenib Antitumor Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mattina, James; MacKinnon, Nathalie; Henderson, Valerie C; Fergusson, Dean; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-08-15

    The validity of preclinical studies of candidate therapeutic agents has been questioned given their limited ability to predict their fate in clinical development, including due to design flaws and reporting bias. In this study, we examined this issue in depth by conducting a meta-analysis of animal studies investigating the efficacy of the clinically approved kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. MEDLINE, Embase, and BIOSIS databases were searched for all animal experiments testing tumor volume response to sorafenib monotherapy in any cancer published until April 20, 2012. We estimated effect sizes from experiments assessing changes in tumor volume and conducted subgroup analyses based on prespecified experimental design elements associated with internal, construct, and external validity. The meta-analysis included 97 experiments involving 1,761 animals. We excluded 94 experiments due to inadequate reporting of data. Design elements aimed at reducing internal validity threats were implemented only sporadically, with 66% reporting animal attrition and none reporting blinded outcome assessment or concealed allocation. Anticancer activity against various malignancies was typically tested in only a small number of model systems. Effect sizes were significantly smaller when sorafenib was tested against either a different active agent or combination arm. Trim and fill suggested a 37% overestimation of effect sizes across all malignancies due to publication bias. We detected a moderate dose-response in one clinically approved indication, hepatocellular carcinoma, but not in another approved malignancy, renal cell carcinoma, or when data were pooled across all malignancies tested. In support of other reports, we found that few preclinical cancer studies addressed important internal, construct, and external validity threats, limiting their clinical generalizability. Our findings reinforce the need to improve guidelines for the design and reporting of preclinical cancer studies

  9. Investigation of in vivo potential of scorpion venom against skin tumorigenesis in mice via targeting markers associated with cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Al Asmari, Abdulrahman K; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world in spite of the advances made in its management. In this study, we investigated the in vivo anti-tumorigenic potential of the venom obtained from a medically important scorpion species Leiurus quinquestriatus on chemically induced skin cancer in mice. Animals were divided into five groups, with 13 animals in each group. All the treatments were given topically on the shaved dorsal surface of the skin. Animals in Group 1 received vehicle only (0.2 mL acetone). Moreover, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA, 400 nmol per mouse) was applied to all the animals in the remaining four groups. After 1 week, different concentrations of venom (17.5 μg, 35 μg, and 52.5 μg per animal) were applied to each animal in the Groups III–V. Thirty minutes after the application of venom, croton oil was applied on the same position where venom was administered to the animals of Groups III–V. Animals in Group II were treated as the positive control (without venom) and received croton oil as in Groups III–V. The findings of this study revealed that venom extract of L. quinquestriatus inhibits DMBA + croton oil-induced mouse skin tumor incidence and tumor multiplicity. Venom treatment also decreased the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Immunohistochemistry results showed a downregulation of the expression of molecular markers such as Ki-67, nuclear factor kappa-B, cyclooxygenase-2, B-cell lymphoma-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor, in venom-treated animals. Our findings suggest that the venom of L. quinquestriatus possesses in vivo anticancer potential and may be used in the development of anticancer molecules. PMID:27799739

  10. Work plan : targeted investigation to assess current conditions associated with the carbon tetrachloride plume downgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility at Milford, Nebraska.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-07-09

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility at Milford, Nebraska. In May 2008, the CCC/USDA directed the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, as its technical consultant, to develop a work plan for a targeted investigation at the Milford site. The purpose of the targeted investigation is to assess the current extent and configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume downgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility and proximal to the banks of the Big Blue River, which borders the area of concern to the east, southeast, and northeast. In 1995, carbon tetrachloride contamination was detected by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services in a private drinking water well and a livestock well 1.25 mi south of Milford (Figure 1.1). The Trojan drinking water well is located directly downgradient (approximately 300 ft east) of the former CCC/USDA facility. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination were also found in the Troyer livestock well, approximately 1,200 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility.

  11. Transonic and Supersonic Flutter Investigation of 1/2-Size Models of All-Movable Canard Surface of an Expendable Powered Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhlin, Charles L.; Tuovila, W. J.

    1961-01-01

    A transonic and a supersonic flutter investigation of 1/2-size models of the all-movable canard surface of an expendable powered target has been conducted in the Langley transonic blowdown tunnel and in the Langley 9- by 18-inch supersonic aeroelasticity tunnel, respectively. The transonic investigation covered a Mach number range from 0.7 to 1.3, and the supersonic investigation was made at Mach numbers 1.3, 2.O, and 2.55. The effects on the flutter characteristics of the models of different levels of stiffness and of free play in the pitch control linkage were examined. The semispan models, which were tested at an angle of attack of 0 deg, had pitch springs with the scaled design and 1/2 the scaled design pitch stiffness and total free play in pitch ranging from 0 to 1 deg. An additional model configuration which had a pitch spring 1/4 the scaled design pitch stiffness and no free play in pitch was included in the supersonic tests. All model configurations investigated were flutter free up to dynamic pressures 32 percent greater than those required for flight throughout the Mach number range. Several model configurations were tested to considerably higher dynamic pressures without obtaining flutter at both transonic and supersonic speeds.

  12. SU-E-I-10: Investigation On Detectability of a Small Target for Different Slice Direction of a Volumetric Cone Beam CT Image

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C; Han, M; Baek, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the detectability of a small target for different slice direction of a volumetric cone beam CT image and its impact on dose reduction. Methods: Analytic projection data of a sphere object (1 mm diameter, 0.2/cm attenuation coefficient) were generated and reconstructed by FDK algorithm. In this work, we compared the detectability of the small target from four different backprojection Methods: hanning weighted ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 1), hanning weighted ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON2), ramp filter with linear interpolation (RECON 3), and ramp filter with Fourier interpolation (RECON4), respectively. For noise simulation, 200 photons per measurement were used, and the noise only data were reconstructed using FDK algorithm. For each reconstructed volume, axial and coronal slice were extracted and detection-SNR was calculated using channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with dense difference-of-Gaussian (D-DOG) channels. Results: Detection-SNR of coronal images varies for different backprojection methods, while axial images have a similar detection-SNR. Detection-SNR{sup 2} ratios of coronal and axial images in RECON1 and RECON2 are 1.33 and 1.15, implying that the coronal image has a better detectability than axial image. In other words, using coronal slices for the small target detection can reduce the patient dose about 33% and 15% compared to using axial slices in RECON 1 and RECON 2. Conclusion: In this work, we investigated slice direction dependent detectability of a volumetric cone beam CT image. RECON 1 and RECON 2 produced the highest detection-SNR, with better detectability in coronal slices. These results indicate that it is more beneficial to use coronal slice to improve detectability of a small target in a volumetric cone beam CT image. This research was supported by the MSIP (Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning), Korea, under the IT Consilience Creative Program (NIPA-2014-H0201

  13. Investigation of chemical diversity in different parts and origins of ethnomedicine Gentiana rigescens Franch using targeted metabolite profiling and multivariate statistical analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yu; Zhang, Ji; Shen, Tao; Zhao, Yan-Li; Zuo, Zhi-Tian; Wang, Yuan-Zhong; Li, Wan-Yi

    2016-02-01

    Gentiana rigescens, an ethnomedicine, is widely cultivated in Yunnan province of China. Although a wide range of metabolites including iridoid glycosides, flavonoids and triterpenoids have been reported in this ethnomedicine, the data on accumulation and distribution of metabolites in certain parts are limited. In this study, targeted metabolic fingerprinting of iridoid glycosides based on liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-UV-MS/MS) was developed to investigate the metabolic similarities and differences in different parts and origins. Thirty-one compounds, including iridoid glycosides and flavonoids, were detected from targeted metabolite profiling and plausibly assigned to the different parts of G. rigescens. Multivariate statistical analysis was designed to reveal close chemical similarities between all the selected samples and to identify key metabolites characteristic of the standard. The results suggested that accumulation and distribution of metabolites in aerial and underground parts were different. Moreover, root samples tended to be grouped on the basis of the geographical closeness of region. Five metabolites can be considered as potential markers for the classification of underground parts from different regions. These results provided chemical information on the potential pharmaceutical value for further research, making G. rigescens ideal for the rational usage of different parts and exploitation of the source.

  14. A targeted multiplexed proteomic investigation identifies ketamine-induced changes in immune markers in rat serum and expression changes in protein kinases/phosphatases in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Rahmoune, Hassan; Tricklebank, Mark; Guest, Paul C; Bahn, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    There is substantial interest in the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine in psychiatric research because it exerts acute psychotomimetic and rapid antidepressant effects in rodents and humans. Here, we investigated proteomic changes in brain and serum after acute treatment of rats with ketamine using two targeted proteomic profiling methods. Multiplex immunoassay profiling of serum identified altered levels of interleukin 4, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and fibroblast growth factor 9, suggesting a link between ketamine exposure and peripheral inflammation and growth factor dysregulation. Selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry profiling of rat brain tissue found that proteomic changes occurred in the frontal cortex and to a greater extent in the hippocampus. This involved changes in signaling kinases and proteases such as protein kinase C beta, neurochondrin (NCDN), calcineurin, extracellular signal-regulated kinsase 1 (ERK1), and mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR). Furthermore, altered levels were found for proteins associated with neurotransmitter metabolism (mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, catechol O-methyl transferase, synaptic vesicle endo-/exocytosis (vesicle fusing ATPase (NSF), synapsin 1 (SYN1), syndapin-1 (PACN1)). Consistent with previous global proteomic studies, we confirmed known changes in mitochondrial complex I, prohibitin (PHB) and neurofilament proteins (neurofilament light chain and α-internexin (AINX)). Taken together, the proteomic changes parallel those described in human psychiatric pathology. The results will help to elucidate ketamine's mechanism of action, which will facilitate development of novel drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and major depressive disorder. PMID:25363195

  15. Longitudinal laser ion acceleration in low density targets: experimental optimization on the Titan laser facility and numerical investigation of the ultra-high intensity limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Humières, E.; Chen, S.; Lobet, Mathieu; Sciscio, M.; Antici, Patrizio; Bailly-Grandvaux, Mathieu; Gangolf, Thomas; Revet, Guilhem; Santos, Joao J.; Schroer, Anna-Marie; Willi, O.; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir T.; Pepin, Henri; Fuchs, Julien

    2015-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest the possibility of enhancing the efficiency and ease of laser acceleration of protons and ions using underdense or near critical plasmas through electrostatic shocks. Very promising results were recently obtained in this regime. In these experiments, a first ns pulse was focused on a thin target to explode it and a second laser with a high intensity was focused on the exploded foil. The delay between two lasers allowed to control the density gradient seen by the second laser pulse. The transition between various laser ion acceleration regimes depending on the density gradient length was studied. With a laser energy of a few Joules, protons with energies close to the energies of TNSA accelerated protons were obtained for various exploded foils configurations. In the high energy regime (~180 J), protons with energies significantly higher than the ones of TNSA accelerated protons were obtained when exploding the foil while keeping a good beam quality. These results demonstrate that low-density targets are promising candidates for an efficient proton source that can be optimized by choosing appropriate plasma conditions. New experiments were also performed in this regime with gas jets. Scaling shock acceleration in the low density regime to ultra high intensities is a challenge as radiation losses and electron positron pair production change the optimization of the shock process. Using large-scale Particle-In-Cell simulations, the transition to this regime in which intense beams of relativistic ions can be produced is investigated.

  16. Targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing multiple reaction monitoring on quantitative changes in proteins that regulate volatile biosynthesis of strawberry fruit at different ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Du, Lina; Li, Li; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Forney, Charles F; Fillmore, Sherry; Zhang, ZhaoQi; Li, XiHong

    2015-08-01

    A targeted quantitative proteomic investigation employing the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM, SRM) technique was conducted on strawberry fruit at different development stages. We investigated 22 proteins and isoforms from 32 peptides with 111 peptide transitions, which may be involved in the volatile aroma biosynthesis pathway. The normalized protein abundance was significantly changed in coincidence with increased volatile production and advanced fruit maturities. Among them, alcohol acyltransferase (AAT), quinone oxidoreductase (QR), malonyl Co-A decarboxylase, (MLYCD), pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC), acetyl Co-A carboxylase (ACCase), and acyl Co-A synthetase (ACAs) were increased significantly. Several alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs), and 3-oxoacyl-ACP synthase were significantly decreased. Furthermore, the expression of seven genes related to strawberry volatile production was also investigated using real-time qPCR. Among the tested genes, QR, AAT, ACCase, OMT, PDC and ADH showed increased up-regulation during fruit ripening, while 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IMD) decreased. Strong correlation between quantitative proteomic data and gene expression suggested that AAT, QR, ACCase, and PDC played critical roles in volatile biosynthesis of strawberry during fruit ripening. Poor correlation between protein abundance and gene expression of ADH was found.

  17. Low-energy fission investigated in reactions of 750 AMeV238U-ions with Pb and Be targets. I. Nuclear charge distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbruster, P.; Bernas, M.; Czajkowski, S.; Geissel, H.; Aumann, T.; Dessagne, Ph.; Donzaud, C.; Hanelt, E.; Heinz, A.; Hesse, M.; Kozhuharov, C.; Miehe, Ch.; Münzenberg, G.; Pfützner, M.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Schwab, W.; Stéphan, C.; Sümmerer, K.; Tassan-Got, L.; Voss, B.

    1996-12-01

    Charge distributions of fragments from low energy nuclear fission are investigated in reactions of highly fissile238U projectiles at relativistic energies (750 A·MeV) with a heavy (Pb) and a light (Be) target. The fully stripped fission fragments are separated by the Fragment Separator (FRS). Their high kinetic energies in the laboratory system allow the identification of all atomic numbers by using Multiple-Sampling Ionization Chambers (MUSIC). The elemental distributions of fragments observed at larger magnetic rigidities than the238U projectiles show asymmetric break-up and odd-even effects. They indicate a low energy fission process, induced mainly by dissociation in the electro-magnetic field for the U/Pb-system, or by peripheral nuclear interactions for the U/Be-system.

  18. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasma DNA from Cancer Patients: Factors Influencing Consistency with Tumour DNA and Prospective Investigation of Its Utility for Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaisaki, Pamela J.; Cutts, Anthony; Popitsch, Niko; Camps, Carme; Pentony, Melissa M.; Wilson, Gareth; Page, Suzanne; Kaur, Kulvinder; Vavoulis, Dimitris; Henderson, Shirley; Gupta, Avinash; Middleton, Mark R.; Karydis, Ioannis; Talbot, Denis C.; Schuh, Anna; Taylor, Jenny C.

    2016-01-01

    Use of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a liquid biopsy has been proposed for potential identification and monitoring of solid tumours. We investigate a next-generation sequencing approach for mutation detection in ctDNA in two related studies using a targeted panel. The first study was retrospective, using blood samples taken from melanoma patients at diverse timepoints before or after treatment, aiming to evaluate correlation between mutations identified in biopsy and ctDNA, and to acquire a first impression of influencing factors. We found good concordance between ctDNA and tumour mutations of melanoma patients when blood samples were collected within one year of biopsy or before treatment. In contrast, when ctDNA was sequenced after targeted treatment in melanoma, mutations were no longer found in 9 out of 10 patients, suggesting the method might be useful for detecting treatment response. Building on these findings, we focused the second study on ctDNA obtained before biopsy in lung patients, i.e. when a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer had been made, but no treatment had started. The main objective of this prospective study was to evaluate use of ctDNA in diagnosis, investigating the concordance of biopsy and ctDNA-derived mutation detection. Here we also found positive correlation between diagnostic lung biopsy results and pre-biopsy ctDNA sequencing, providing support for using ctDNA as a cost-effective, non-invasive solution when the tumour is inaccessible or when biopsy poses significant risk to the patient. PMID:27626278

  19. Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing of Plasma DNA from Cancer Patients: Factors Influencing Consistency with Tumour DNA and Prospective Investigation of Its Utility for Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kaisaki, Pamela J; Cutts, Anthony; Popitsch, Niko; Camps, Carme; Pentony, Melissa M; Wilson, Gareth; Page, Suzanne; Kaur, Kulvinder; Vavoulis, Dimitris; Henderson, Shirley; Gupta, Avinash; Middleton, Mark R; Karydis, Ioannis; Talbot, Denis C; Schuh, Anna; Taylor, Jenny C

    2016-01-01

    Use of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a liquid biopsy has been proposed for potential identification and monitoring of solid tumours. We investigate a next-generation sequencing approach for mutation detection in ctDNA in two related studies using a targeted panel. The first study was retrospective, using blood samples taken from melanoma patients at diverse timepoints before or after treatment, aiming to evaluate correlation between mutations identified in biopsy and ctDNA, and to acquire a first impression of influencing factors. We found good concordance between ctDNA and tumour mutations of melanoma patients when blood samples were collected within one year of biopsy or before treatment. In contrast, when ctDNA was sequenced after targeted treatment in melanoma, mutations were no longer found in 9 out of 10 patients, suggesting the method might be useful for detecting treatment response. Building on these findings, we focused the second study on ctDNA obtained before biopsy in lung patients, i.e. when a tentative diagnosis of lung cancer had been made, but no treatment had started. The main objective of this prospective study was to evaluate use of ctDNA in diagnosis, investigating the concordance of biopsy and ctDNA-derived mutation detection. Here we also found positive correlation between diagnostic lung biopsy results and pre-biopsy ctDNA sequencing, providing support for using ctDNA as a cost-effective, non-invasive solution when the tumour is inaccessible or when biopsy poses significant risk to the patient. PMID:27626278

  20. Investigation of temporal profiles at the symmetrical points of the target in tissue phantoms by time-resolved fluorescence diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locharoenrat, Kitsakorn

    2013-06-01

    We have performed a target size dependence of fluorescence temporal profile from an Indocyanine Green (ICG) target filled in a phantom by Fluorescence Diffuse Optical Tomography (FDOT) method. From the results of experiment and statistical analysis, we have found that the geometry effect of target size was one of the key parameters in temporal profile determining the resolution of the optical reconstruction images.

  1. Investigation of folate-conjugated fluorescent silica nanoparticles for targeting delivery to folate receptor-positive tumors and their internalization mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hong; Lou, Changchun; Xu, Mingming; Wu, Chunhui; Miyoshi, Hirokazu; Liu, Yiyao

    2011-01-01

    Multifunctionalized nanoparticles (NPs) are emerging as ideal tools for gene/drug delivery, bioimaging, labeling, or intracellular tracking in biomedical applications, and have attracted considerable attention owing to their unique advantages. In this study, fluorescent silica NPs were synthesized by a modified Stöber method using conjugates of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPS) and maleimide-fluorescein isothiocyanate (maleimide-FITC). Mean diameters of the NPs were controlled between 212–2111 nm by regulating MPS concentration in the reaction mixture. Maleimide-FITC molecules were doped into NPs or conjugated to the surface of NPs through the chemical reaction of maleimide and thiol groups. The data showed that the former NPs are better than the latter by comparing their fluorescence intensity. Furthermore, folate molecules were linked to the FITC-doped silica NPs by using polyethylene glycol (PEG) (NH2-PEG-maleimide) as a spacer, thus forming folate receptor targeting fluorescent NPs, referred to as NPs(FITC)-PEG-Folate. The quantitative analysis of cellular internalization into different cancer cells showed that the delivery efficiency of KB cells (folate receptor-positive cells) is more than six-fold higher than that of A549 cells (folate receptor-negative cells). The delivery efficiency of KB cells decreased significantly after free folate addition to the cell culture medium because the folate receptors were occupied by the free folate. The NPs endocytosis mechanism was also investigated. It was shown that clathrin, an inhibitor of cell phagocytosis, markedly decreased the NPs uptake into KB cells, suggesting that it plays an important role in NPs cellular internalization. These results demonstrated that the novel particles of NPs(FITC)-PEG-Folate are promising for fluorescent imaging or targeting delivery to folate receptor-positive tumors. PMID:21976977

  2. In Vivo Pharmacodynamic Target Investigation of Two Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors, ACT-387042 and ACT-292706, in the Neutropenic Murine Thigh Model against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Lepak, A J; Seiler, P; Surivet, J P; Ritz, D; Kohl, C; Andes, D R

    2016-06-01

    ACT-387042 and ACT-292706 are two novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and penicillin- and fluoroquinolone-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae We used the neutropenic murine thigh infection model to characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK)/pharmacodynamics (PD) of these investigational compounds against a group of 10 S. aureus and S. pneumoniae isolates with phenotypic resistance to beta-lactams and fluoroquinolones. The in vitro activities of the two compounds were very similar (MIC range, 0.03 to 0.125 mg/liter). Plasma pharmacokinetics were determined for each compound by using four escalating doses administered by the subcutaneous route. In treatment studies, mice had 10(7.4) to 10(8) CFU/thigh at the start of therapy with ACT-387042 and 10(6.7) to 10(8.3) CFU/thigh at the start of therapy with ACT-292706. A dose-response relationship was observed with all isolates over the dose range. Maximal kill approached 3 to 4 log10 CFU/thigh compared to the burden at the start of therapy for the highest doses examined. There was a strong relationship between the PK/PD index AUC/MIC ratio (area under the concentration-time curve over 24 h in the steady state divided by the MIC) and therapeutic efficacy in the model (R(2), 0.63 to 0.82). The 24-h free-drug AUC/MIC ratios associated with net stasis for ACT-387042 against S. aureus and S. pneumoniae were 43 and 10, respectively. The 24-h free-drug AUC/MIC ratios associated with net stasis for ACT-292706 against S. aureus and S. pneumoniae were 69 and 25, respectively. The stasis PD targets were significantly lower for S. pneumoniae (P < 0.05) for both compounds. The 1-log-kill AUC/MIC ratio targets were ∼2- to 4-fold higher than stasis targets. Methicillin, penicillin, or ciprofloxacin resistance did not alter the magnitude of the AUC/MIC ratio required for efficacy. These results should be

  3. Investigation on non-glass laser fusion targets: their fabrication, characterization, and transport. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 2-81, progress report, June 1, 1980-January 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.

    1981-01-01

    A summary is presented of the research progress made under LLNL Subcontract 8320003 for the period of June 1, 1980 through January 31, 1981. The main theme of the research has continued to be the development of techniques for fabricating, characterizing, and transporting laser fusion targets on a continuous basis. The target fabrication techniques are intended mainly for non-glass spherical shell targets, both cryogenic and non-cryogenic. Specifically, progress has been made in each of the following categories. (1) Investigation of liquid hydrogen behavior inside a spherical laser fusion target. (2) Development of automated target characterization scheme. (3) Study of cryogenic target fabrication scheme utilizing cold-gas-levitation and electric field positioning. (4) Development of a cryogenic target fabrication system based on target free-fall method. (5) Generation of hydrogen powder using electro-hydrodynamic spraying. (6) Study of target-charging techniques for application to contactless cryogenic target fabrication. (7) Development of hollow metal sphere production technique. A brief summary of the research progress made in each category is presented.

  4. A multimodal approach to investigate biomarkers for psychosis in a clinical setting: the integrative neuroimaging studies in schizophrenia targeting for early intervention and prevention (IN-STEP) project.

    PubMed

    Koike, Shinsuke; Takano, Yosuke; Iwashiro, Norichika; Satomura, Yoshihiro; Suga, Motomu; Nagai, Tatsuya; Natsubori, Tatsunobu; Tada, Mariko; Nishimura, Yukika; Yamasaki, Syudo; Takizawa, Ryu; Yahata, Noriaki; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Yamasue, Hidenori; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal clinical investigations and biological measurements have determined not only progressive brain volumetric and functional changes especially around the onset of psychosis but also the abnormality of developmental pathways based on gene-environment interaction model. However, these studies have contributed little to clinical decisions on their diagnosis and therapeutic choices because of subtle differences between patients and healthy controls. A multi-modal approach may resolve this limitation and is favorable to explore the pathophysiology of psychosis. The integrative neuroimaging studies for schizophrenia targeting early intervention and prevention (IN-STEP) is a research project aimed at exploring the pathophysiological features of the onset of psychosis and investigating possible predictive biomarkers for the clinical treatment of psychosis. Since 2008, we have adopted blood sampling, neurocognitive batteries, neurophysiological assessment, structural imaging, and functional imaging longitudinally for help-seeking ultra-high-risk (UHR) individuals and patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP). Here, we intend to introduce the IN-STEP research study protocol and present preliminary clinical findings. Thirty-seven UHR individuals and 30 patients with FEP participated in this study. Six months later, there was no difference in objective and subjective scores between the groups, which suggests that young people having symptoms and functional deficits should be cared for regardless of their history of psychosis according to their clinical stages. The rate of transition to psychosis was 7.1%, 8.0%, and 35.3% (at 6, 12, and 24months, respectively). Through this research project, we expect to clarify the pathophysiological features around the onset of psychosis and improve the prognosis of psychosis through clinical application. PMID:23219075

  5. Speckle Interferometry at Mount Wilson Observatory: Observations Obtained in 2006-2007 and 35 New Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartkopf, William I.; Mason, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    Results are presented for 607 speckle interferometric observations of double stars, as well as 222 measures of single stars or unresolved pairs. All data were obtained in 2006 and 2007 at the Mount Wilson Observatory, using the 2.5 m Hooker telescope. Separations range from 0.06 to 6.31, with a median of 0.34. These three observing runs concentrated on binaries in need of confirmation (mainly Hipparcos and Tycho pairs), as well as systems in need of improved orbital elements. New orbital solutions have been determined for 35 systems as a result.

  6. 78 FR 50113 - Distribution of 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 Cable Royalty Funds

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office LIBRARY OF CONGRESS...: Copyright Royalty Board, Library of Congress. ACTION: Initiation of Phase II proceeding and request for... Library of Congress, James Madison Memorial Building, LM-401, 101 Independence Avenue, SE., Washington,...

  7. Prevalence and subtypes of influenza A viruses in wild waterfowl in Norway 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Germundsson, Anna; Madslien, Knut I; Hjortaas, Monika Jankowska; Handeland, Kjell; Jonassen, Christine Monceyron

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of influenza A virus infection, and the distribution of different subtypes of the virus, were studied in 1529 ducks and 1213 gulls shot during ordinary hunting from August to December in two consecutive years, 2006 and 2007, in Norway. The study was based on molecular screening of cloacal and tracheal swabs, using a pan-influenza A RT-PCR. Samples found to be positive for influenza A virus were screened for the H5 subtype, using a H5 specific RT-PCR, and, if negative, further subtyped by a RT-PCR for the 3'-part of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene, encompassing almost the entire HA2, and the full-length of the neuraminidase (NA) gene, followed by sequencing and characterization. The highest prevalence (12.8%) of infection was found in dabbling ducks (Eurasian Wigeon, Common Teal and Mallard). Diving ducks (Common Goldeneye, Common Merganser, Red-breasted Merganser, Common Scoter, Common Eider and Tufted Duck) showed a lower prevalence (4.1%). In gulls (Common Gull, Herring Gull, Black-headed Gull, Lesser Black-headed Gull, Great Black-backed Gull and Kittiwake) the prevalence of influenza A virus was 6.1%. The infection prevalence peaked during October for ducks, and October/November for gulls. From the 16 hemagglutinin subtypes known to infect wild birds, 13 were detected in this study. Low pathogenic H5 was found in 17 dabbling ducks and one gull. PMID:20426812

  8. Monitor and Evaluate the Genetic Characteristics of Supplemented Salmon and Steelhead, 2006-2007 Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berntson, Ewann; Waples, Robin S.; Moran, Paul

    2008-11-20

    This progress report offers a summary of genetic monitoring and evaluation research related to artificial propagation of Chinook salmon and steelhead in the Snake River basin. Our principal goal has been to characterize the relative (and net) reproductive success of hatchery fish spawning in the wild in multiple sub-basins. We address a critical uncertainty identified in essentially all tribal, state, and federal recovery planning efforts. Beyond simple description of those patterns of differential reproductive success, we seek to understand the biotic and abiotic factors that contribute to our observations, including genetic and environmental elements, and the real time effects of hatchery reform. We adopt two fundamentally different approaches that capture processes operating at different geographic scales. Our tier 2 design monitors changes in gene frequency through time in hatchery and wild populations. These studies monitor spatial and temporal genetic change over broad river basins and sub-basins. Tier 3 studies, by contrast, are able to construct pedigrees in naturally spawning populations that include hatchery and wild fish. We can then use actual matings to infer the fitness of hatchery versus wild individuals, based on the numbers of offspring we observe in our progeny samples. We get extraordinary detail from the tier 3 studies but only for a single river system. Thus, tier 2 studies provide breadth of information, whereas tier 3 studies offer unparalleled depth of insight for single discrete systems. We exceeded our goals in almost all areas for both tier 2 and tier 3 studies, and, where we did not, we offer an explanation of why, and what future action will be taken (Lessons Learned). All subcontracts were let as expected, providing smolt trapping, tissue sampling, genotyping, and analysis. Our inter-laboratory standardization efforts with tribal, state, and federal agencies were highly successful in this period. These standardization activities have been an on-going element of this study, beginning with WDFW's forays into DNA markers in the late 1990s and continuing and becoming more formalized with the initiation of the newer genetics laboratories (CRITFC, USFWS, and IDFG). This report is intended to document success in achieving collection and genotyping goals. Data analyses, presentation, and publication are keeping pace with data collection; however, detailed results are not presented at this time. A complete and comprehensive analysis and description of results will be provided in published manuscripts and in the 2009 annual report (the culmination of the current 3-year rolling review cycle). In the first section of this report, we present accomplishments related to individual projects within this genetic monitoring program. Subsequent to the standard reporting categories, we provide a Specific Obligations section that lists accomplishments exactly as the deliverables are presented in the Pisces Statement of Work. This approach results in a small amount of redundancy, but we try to minimize obvious cases. The goal is to provide our accomplishments in a format that is easily compared to the Work-Element-driven format of Pisces, yet also provide a narrative that shows continuity with the individual studies that make up this research program.

  9. Learning Styles of Sophomore Students of PUP Laboratory High School (SY 2006-2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castolo, Carmencita L.; Rebusquillo, Lizyl R.

    2008-01-01

    Learning styles have a big contribution to the academic performance of a student. Awareness of one's learning styles will help a person maximize his potential in accumulating learning to the best of his ability with the use of his preferred learning styles. The teacher's awareness of the student's learning styles will help him/her select teaching…

  10. Handbook 2006-2007: Federal Student Aid. Volume 3--Calculating Awards & Packaging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Every eligible program, including graduate programs, must have a defined academic year. Award limits are generally connected to a period of time. For instance, all of the programs except Federal Work-Study have a maximum amount that can be awarded for an academic year or award year. This handbook is a resource for learning about Federal Student…

  11. Council on Library and Information Resources: Annual Report, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council on Library and Information Resources, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This annual report of the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) contains an overview of activities of the Council between July 1, 2006 and June 30, 2007. These include programs, awards, publications, advisory groups, grants and contracts, and financial statements. It also includes a list of staff, a letter from the chairperson Paula…

  12. Federal Student Aid Handbook, 2006-2007. Volume 1: Student Eligibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    There are many factors to be considered when reviewing a student's application for aid from the FSA programs, such as whether the student is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident, whether the student is making satisfactory academic progress, and whether the student has a defaulted FSA loan. This volume of the Federal Student Aid Handbook discusses…

  13. Miami-Dade County Public Schools Statistical Abstract 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Research Services, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present, in summary fashion, statistical information on the status of public education in Miami-Dade County. Information is provided in the areas of organization, educational programs and services, achievement, and other outcomes of schooling. Also included are multi-year statistics on student population,…

  14. Hydrologic conditions in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2010-01-01

    Much of the surface water that flows into the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge (FPNWR) probably exits southward through Fakahatchee Strand as it did prior to development, because culverts and bridges constructed along I-75 allow overland flow to continue southward within the strand. During the dry season and periods of low water levels, however, much of the flow is diverted westward by the I-75 Canal into Merritt Canal at the southwestern corner of the FPNWR. Substantial drainage of groundwater from the FPNWR into the I-75 Canal is indicated by (1) greater surface-water outflows than inflows in the FPNWR, (2) flows that increase to the west along the I-75 Canal, and (3) correlation of rapid groundwater-level declines at sites close to the I-75 Canal with rapid declines in canal surface-water levels due to operation of a control structure in the Merritt Canal. This drainage of groundwater probably occurs through permeable limestone exposed in the I-75 Canal bank below a cap rock layer. Compared to predevelopment conditions, the time currently required to drain ponded water in some areas of the refuge should be less because of accelerated groundwater discharge into the I-75 Canal caused by the lowering of water levels in the canal during the peak of the wet season extending into the early dry season. This drainage probably reduces the duration of the hydroperiod in these wetlands from the wet season into the dry season, possibly reducing or limiting the extent or vitality of wildlife and plant community habitats.

  15. International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Status: 2006 - 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David E.; Gentry, Gregory J.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) system includes regenerative and non-regenerative technologies that provide the basic life support functions to support the crew, while maintaining a safe and habitable shirtsleeve environment. This paper provides a summary of the U.S. ECLS system activities over the past year, covering the period of time between March 2006 and February 2007. The ISS continued permanent crew operations, with the start of Phase 3 of the ISS Assembly Sequence. Work continued on the Phase 3 pressurized elements and the continued manufacturing and testing of the regenerative ECLS equipment.

  16. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim

    2009-05-11

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality (specifically dissolved oxygen and temperature) is the main limiting factor in our fisheries.

  17. Classroom Notes Plus: A Quarterly of Teaching Ideas, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Teachers of English, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This document is a compilation of the four issues in the 24th volume of "Classroom Notes Plus." issue of "Classroom Notes Plus" contains descriptions of original, unpublished teaching practices, and of adapted ideas. The August 2006 issue (v24 n1) includes: More Choice Leads to More Reading (Amy Ishee); Book-of-the Month Reports (Patricia Crist);…

  18. Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn

    2007-03-01

    In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking more water than it should. This information is available at some of the sites and assists operators in determining if the site is running within the site specific design criteria. (10) Data were collected at Gleed when the protective metal plates were set down to the forebay floor and when they were raised to expose most of the screens. These data were sent to USBR personnel for use in looking for ways to reduce high approach velocities and erratic flow pattern at Gleed. (11) Alternatives to a screen site at Taylor are apparently being considered. A lot of effort was spent in 2005 and 2006 trying to increase water to the site, but it still was unable to operate within NMFS criteria for much of the year and may be a hazard to juvenile salmonids at times.

  19. A National Children's Resiliency Response Initiative: 2006-2007 Plan to Help Katrina's Kids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Alice Mae

    2006-01-01

    The 2006 National Resiliency Response Initiative for Katrina's Kids is a systematic approach to providing resiliency support to the over 200,000 children victimized by one of the worst natural disasters in American history. From the Gulf States region, children suffered trauma during and after Hurricane Katrina as they became displaced young…

  20. Evaluation of the 2006-2007 Students' Creative Response to Conflict Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yungbluth, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    A quasi-experimental pre- and post-test design was used to evaluate the Students' Creative Response to Conflict (SCRC) program, which is based on the principles of conflict resolution education and social-emotional learning. It is predicted that SCRC will influence students to reduce their approval of aggression and associated problem behaviors…

  1. Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program - Entiat River Snorkel Surveys, 2006-2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Nelle, R.D.

    2007-10-01

    The USFWS Mid-Columbia River Fishery Resource Office conducted snorkel surveys at 11 sites during the summer 2006 survey period and at 15 sites during fall 2006 and winter 2007 survey periods as part of the Integrated Status and Effectiveness Monitoring Program in the Entiat River. A total of 39,898 fish from 14 species/genera and an unknown category were enumerated. Chinook salmon were the overall most common fish observed and comprised 19% of fish enumerated followed by mountain whitefish (18%) and rainbow trout (14%). Day and night surveys were conducted during the summer 2006 period (August), while night surveys were conducted during the fall 2006 (October) and winter 2007 (February/March) surveys. This is second annual progress report to Bonneville Power Administration for the snorkel surveys conducted in the Entiat River as related to long-term effectiveness monitoring of restoration programs in this watershed. The objective of this study is to monitor the fish habitat utilization of planned in-stream restoration efforts in the Entiat River by conducting pre- and post-construction snorkel surveys at selected treatment and control sites.

  2. Forecast and Validation of the Rift Valley fever outbreak in East Africa: 2006-2007

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background The instantaneous occurrence of El Nino / Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm events and anomalous warming of the equatorial western Indian Ocean (WIO) are associated with elevated and widespread rainfall over East Africa. Such, sustained, heavy rainfall in East is associated with the emerg...

  3. Large listeriosis outbreak linked to cheese made from pasteurized milk, Germany, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Koch, Judith; Dworak, Regine; Prager, Rita; Becker, Biserka; Brockmann, Stefan; Wicke, Amal; Wichmann-Schauer, Heidi; Hof, Herbert; Werber, Dirk; Stark, Klaus

    2010-12-01

    A commercial cheese (acid curd) made from pasteurized milk caused a large listeriosis outbreak in Germany from October 2006 through February 2007. The Listeria monocytogenes outbreak strain was identified in humans and in cheese samples from a patient's home and from the production plant. During the outbreak period, 189 patients were affected, which was 97% above the mean case number for the respective time period of the years 2002 to 2005. Of patients with available detailed information on cheese consumption (n=47), 70% reported to have consumed the incriminated cheese product. Recent European food safety alerts due to Listeria-contaminated cheeses more often concerned products made from pasteurized or heat-treated milk than from raw milk. The findings should be considered in prevention guidelines addressing vulnerable populations.

  4. The In-flight Spectroscopic Performance of the Swift XRT CCD Camera During 2006-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godet, O.; Beardmore, A.P.; Abbey, A.F.; Osborne, J.P.; Page, K.L.; Evans, P.; Starling, R.; Wells, A.A.; Angelini, L.; Burrows, D.N.; Kennea, J.; Campana, S.; Chincarini, G.; Citterio, O.; Cusumano, G.; LaParola, V.; Mangano, V.; Mineo, T.; Giommi, P.; Perri, M.; Capalbi, M.; Tamburelli, F.

    2007-01-01

    The Swift X-ray Telescope focal plane camera is a front-illuminated MOS CCD, providing a spectral response kernel of 135 eV FWHM at 5.9 keV as measured before launch. We describe the CCD calibration program based on celestial and on-board calibration sources, relevant in-flight experiences, and developments in the CCD response model. We illustrate how the revised response model describes the calibration sources well. Comparison of observed spectra with models folded through the instrument response produces negative residuals around and below the Oxygen edge. We discuss several possible causes for such residuals. Traps created by proton damage on the CCD increase the charge transfer inefficiency (CTI) over time. We describe the evolution of the CTI since the launch and its effect on the CCD spectral resolution and the gain.

  5. Travel-related dengue virus infection, The Netherlands, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Baaten, Gijs G G; Sonder, Gerard J B; Zaaijer, Hans L; van Gool, Tom; Kint, Joan A P C M; van den Hoek, Anneke

    2011-05-01

    To assess the incidence of and risk factors for clinical and subclinical dengue virus (DENV) infection, we prospectively studied 1,207 adult short-term travelers from the Netherlands to dengue-endemic areas. Participants donated blood samples for serologic testing before and after travel. Blood samples were tested for antibodies against DENV. Seroconversion occurred in 14 (1.2%) travelers at risk. The incidence rate was 14.6 per 1,000 person-months. The incidence rate was significantly higher for travel during the rainy months. Dengue-like illness occurred in 5 of the 14 travelers who seroconverted. Seroconversion was significantly related to fever, retro-orbital pain, myalgia, arthralgia, and skin rash. The risk for DENV infection for short-term travelers to dengue-endemic areas is substantial. The incidence rate for this study is comparable with that in 2 other serology-based prospective studies conducted in the 1990s.

  6. Documentation of Data Collection in Currituck Sound, North Carolina and Virginia, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fine, Jason M.

    2008-01-01

    During 2006 and 2007, scientists from Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina Estuarine Research Reserve, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Geological Survey collected hydrologic and water-quality data at nine sites in and around Currituck Sound. Hydrologic and water-quality data were collected at five tributary sites--the Northwest River near Moyock, Tull Creek near Currituck, and Intracoastal Waterway near Coinjock in North Carolina, and the Albemarle and Chesapeake Canal near Princess Anne, and the North Landing River near Creeds in Virginia. In addition, data were collected at one site at the mouth of Currituck Sound (Currituck Sound at Point Harbor, North Carolina). Only water-quality data were collected at three sites in Currituck Sound and Back Bay-Currituck Sound near Jarvisburg, and Upper Currituck Sound near Corolla in North Carolina, and Back Bay near Back Bay in Virginia. The hydrologic data included water elevation and velocity, and discharge. The water-quality data included discrete samples and continuous measurements of water temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, pH, turbidity, and chlorophyll a. The hydrologic and water-quality data collected for this study were quality assured by the U.S. Geological Survey and stored in the National Water Information System database. The data collected for this project are being used to develop an unsteady multidimensional hydrodynamic and water-quality model of Currituck Sound by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The purpose of this model is to provide the basis for planning and the development of best-management practices and restoration projects for Currituck Sound and its tributaries.

  7. Television and video viewing time among children aged 2 years - Oregon, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    2010-07-16

    Excessive exposure of children to television and videos (viewing time) is associated with impaired childhood development and childhood obesity. In 2001, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended that children watch no more than 1 to 2 hours of "quality programming" per day, and that televisions be removed from children's bedrooms. To determine the risk for excessive viewing time among children aged 2 years, CDC and the Oregon Public Health Division analyzed 2006 and 2007 data from the Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring Survey follow-back survey (Oregon PRAMS-2), which was used to re-interview mothers who had participated in PRAMS. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which indicated that, on a typical day, 19.6% of children aged 2 years spent >or=2 hours watching television or videos. A total of 18.2% of children had a television in their bedroom; these children were more likely to have >or=2 hours viewing time compared with children without a television in the bedroom (34.1% versus 16.3%). In multivariable analysis, >or=2 hours of viewing time was positively associated with the presence of a television in the child's bedroom, non-Hispanic black maternal race/ethnicity, fewer than four outings with the child during the preceding week, and was negatively associated with obtaining child care in a child care center. In Oregon, these findings support the AAP recommendations that health professionals, parents, and caregivers recognize the extent of children's media consumption, and that televisions be removed from children's bedrooms. Other states should consider conducting similar surveys.

  8. Dynamic Conformational Change Regulates the Protein-DNA Recognition: An Investigation on Binding of a Y-Family Polymerase to Its Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Xiakun; Liu, Fei; Maxwell, Brian A.; Wang, Yong; Suo, Zucai; Wang, Haijun; Han, Wei; Wang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-DNA recognition is a central biological process that governs the life of cells. A protein will often undergo a conformational transition to form the functional complex with its target DNA. The protein conformational dynamics are expected to contribute to the stability and specificity of DNA recognition and therefore may control the functional activity of the protein-DNA complex. Understanding how the conformational dynamics influences the protein-DNA recognition is still challenging. Here, we developed a two-basin structure-based model to explore functional dynamics in Sulfolobus solfataricus DNA Y-family polymerase IV (DPO4) during its binding to DNA. With explicit consideration of non-specific and specific interactions between DPO4 and DNA, we found that DPO4-DNA recognition is comprised of first 3D diffusion, then a short-range adjustment sliding on DNA and finally specific binding. Interestingly, we found that DPO4 is under a conformational equilibrium between multiple states during the binding process and the distributions of the conformations vary at different binding stages. By modulating the strength of the electrostatic interactions, the flexibility of the linker, and the conformational dynamics in DPO4, we drew a clear picture on how DPO4 dynamically regulates the DNA recognition. We argue that the unique features of flexibility and conformational dynamics in DPO4-DNA recognition have direct implications for low-fidelity translesion DNA synthesis, most of which is found to be accomplished by the Y-family DNA polymerases. Our results help complete the description of the DNA synthesis process for the Y-family polymerases. Furthermore, the methods developed here can be widely applied for future investigations on how various proteins recognize and bind specific DNA substrates. PMID:25188490

  9. Computational investigation of ⁹⁹Mo production yield via proton irradiation of natU and ²³²Th targets.

    PubMed

    Mirvakili, Seyed Mohammad; Alizadeh, Masoumeh; Vaziri, Atyeh Joze; Gholamzadeh, Zohreh; Davari, Amin

    2015-07-01

    Accelerators have some advantages such as safety and cheaper operating and decommissioning costs for (99)Mo production. Yield theoretical calculation using computational codes can powerfully estimate usefulness of a proposed nuclear reaction for a routine manufacturing. In this work, Monte Carlo-based code was used to compute (99)Mo yield in (232)Th and (nat)U proton-irradiated targets, as well as maximum applicable beam current. Results showed that the code well agrees with published experimental data. The targets can bear maximum beam current of 30 µA. Targets from (232)Th provides higher (99)Mo yield. PMID:25898237

  10. Investigating the Effect of Ligand Amount and Injected Therapeutic Activity: A Simulation Study for 177Lu-Labeled PSMA-Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kletting, Peter; Schuchardt, Christiane; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Shahinfar, Mostafa; Singh, Aviral; Glatting, Gerhard; Baum, Richard P; Beer, Ambros J

    2016-01-01

    In molecular radiotherapy with 177Lu-labeled prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) peptides, kidney and/or salivary glands doses limit the activity which can be administered. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the ligand amount and injected activity on the tumor-to-normal tissue biologically effective dose (BED) ratio for 177Lu-labeled PSMA peptides. For this retrospective study, a recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was adapted for PSMA targeting peptides. General physiological parameters were taken from the literature. Individual parameters were fitted to planar gamma camera measurements (177Lu-PSMA I&T) of five patients with metastasizing prostate cancer. Based on the estimated parameters, the pharmacokinetics of tumor, salivary glands, kidneys, total body and red marrow was simulated and time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated for different peptide amounts. Based on these simulations, the absorbed doses and BEDs for normal tissue and tumor were calculated for all activities leading to a maximal tolerable kidney BED of 10 Gy2.5/cycle, a maximal salivary gland absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy/cycle and a maximal red marrow BED of 0.25 Gy15/cycle. The fits yielded coefficients of determination > 0.85, acceptable relative standard errors and low parameter correlations. All estimated parameters were in a physiologically reasonable range. The amounts (for 25-29 nmol) and pertaining activities leading to a maximal tumor dose, considering the defined maximal tolerable doses to organs of risk, were calculated to be 272±253 nmol (452±420 μg) and 7.3±5.1 GBq. Using the actually injected amount (235±155 μg) and the same maximal tolerable doses, the potential improvement for the tumor BED was 1-3 fold. The results suggest that currently given amounts for therapy are in the appropriate order of magnitude for many lesions. However, for lesions with high binding site density or lower perfusion, optimizing the peptide

  11. Investigating the Effect of Ligand Amount and Injected Therapeutic Activity: A Simulation Study for 177Lu-Labeled PSMA-Targeting Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Schuchardt, Christiane; Kulkarni, Harshad R.; Shahinfar, Mostafa; Singh, Aviral; Glatting, Gerhard; Baum, Richard P.; Beer, Ambros J.

    2016-01-01

    In molecular radiotherapy with 177Lu-labeled prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) peptides, kidney and/or salivary glands doses limit the activity which can be administered. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the ligand amount and injected activity on the tumor-to-normal tissue biologically effective dose (BED) ratio for 177Lu-labeled PSMA peptides. For this retrospective study, a recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was adapted for PSMA targeting peptides. General physiological parameters were taken from the literature. Individual parameters were fitted to planar gamma camera measurements (177Lu-PSMA I&T) of five patients with metastasizing prostate cancer. Based on the estimated parameters, the pharmacokinetics of tumor, salivary glands, kidneys, total body and red marrow was simulated and time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated for different peptide amounts. Based on these simulations, the absorbed doses and BEDs for normal tissue and tumor were calculated for all activities leading to a maximal tolerable kidney BED of 10 Gy2.5/cycle, a maximal salivary gland absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy/cycle and a maximal red marrow BED of 0.25 Gy15/cycle. The fits yielded coefficients of determination > 0.85, acceptable relative standard errors and low parameter correlations. All estimated parameters were in a physiologically reasonable range. The amounts (for 25−29 nmol) and pertaining activities leading to a maximal tumor dose, considering the defined maximal tolerable doses to organs of risk, were calculated to be 272±253 nmol (452±420 μg) and 7.3±5.1 GBq. Using the actually injected amount (235±155 μg) and the same maximal tolerable doses, the potential improvement for the tumor BED was 1–3 fold. The results suggest that currently given amounts for therapy are in the appropriate order of magnitude for many lesions. However, for lesions with high binding site density or lower perfusion, optimizing the

  12. Investigating the Effect of Ligand Amount and Injected Therapeutic Activity: A Simulation Study for 177Lu-Labeled PSMA-Targeting Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kletting, Peter; Schuchardt, Christiane; Kulkarni, Harshad R; Shahinfar, Mostafa; Singh, Aviral; Glatting, Gerhard; Baum, Richard P; Beer, Ambros J

    2016-01-01

    In molecular radiotherapy with 177Lu-labeled prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) peptides, kidney and/or salivary glands doses limit the activity which can be administered. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of the ligand amount and injected activity on the tumor-to-normal tissue biologically effective dose (BED) ratio for 177Lu-labeled PSMA peptides. For this retrospective study, a recently developed physiologically based pharmacokinetic model was adapted for PSMA targeting peptides. General physiological parameters were taken from the literature. Individual parameters were fitted to planar gamma camera measurements (177Lu-PSMA I&T) of five patients with metastasizing prostate cancer. Based on the estimated parameters, the pharmacokinetics of tumor, salivary glands, kidneys, total body and red marrow was simulated and time-integrated activity coefficients were calculated for different peptide amounts. Based on these simulations, the absorbed doses and BEDs for normal tissue and tumor were calculated for all activities leading to a maximal tolerable kidney BED of 10 Gy2.5/cycle, a maximal salivary gland absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy/cycle and a maximal red marrow BED of 0.25 Gy15/cycle. The fits yielded coefficients of determination > 0.85, acceptable relative standard errors and low parameter correlations. All estimated parameters were in a physiologically reasonable range. The amounts (for 25-29 nmol) and pertaining activities leading to a maximal tumor dose, considering the defined maximal tolerable doses to organs of risk, were calculated to be 272±253 nmol (452±420 μg) and 7.3±5.1 GBq. Using the actually injected amount (235±155 μg) and the same maximal tolerable doses, the potential improvement for the tumor BED was 1-3 fold. The results suggest that currently given amounts for therapy are in the appropriate order of magnitude for many lesions. However, for lesions with high binding site density or lower perfusion, optimizing the peptide

  13. Comprehensive genetic testing identifies targetable genomic alterations in most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, specifically adenocarcinoma, single institute investigation

    PubMed Central

    Won, Brian M.; Patton, Kathryn Alexa; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Hoffman, Philip C.; Hensing, Thomas; Hogarth, D. Kyle; Malik, Renuka; MacMahon, Heber; Mueller, Jeffrey; Simon, Cassie A.; Vigneswaran, Wickii T.; Wigfield, Christopher H.; Ferguson, Mark K.; Husain, Aliya N.; Vokes, Everett E.; Salgia, Ravi

    2016-01-01

    This study reviews extensive genetic analysis in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in order to: describe how targetable mutation genes interrelate with the genes identified as variants of unknown significance; assess the percentage of patients with a potentially targetable genetic alterations; evaluate the percentage of patients who had concurrent alterations, previously considered to be mutually exclusive; and characterize the molecular subset of KRAS. Thoracic Oncology Research Program Databases at the University of Chicago provided patient demographics, pathology, and results of genetic testing. 364 patients including 289 adenocarcinoma underwent genotype testing by various platforms such as FoundationOne, Caris Molecular Intelligence, and Response Genetics Inc. For the entire adenocarcinoma cohort, 25% of patients were African Americans; 90% of KRAS mutations were detected in smokers, including current and former smokers; 46% of EGFR and 61% of ALK alterations were detected in never smokers. 99.4% of patients, whose samples were analyzed by next-generation sequencing (NGS), had genetic alterations identified with an average of 10.8 alterations/tumor throughout different tumor subtypes. However, mutations were not mutually exclusive. NGS in this study identified potentially targetable genetic alterations in the majority of patients tested, detected concurrent alterations and provided information on variants of unknown significance at this time but potentially targetable in the future. PMID:26934441

  14. "Value Added" Modern Languages Teaching in the Classroom: An Investigation into How Teachers' Use of Classroom Target Language Can Aid Pupils' Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crichton, Hazel

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents some of the preliminary findings of a study into modern languages (ML) learning in five Scottish secondary schools. Five ML teachers were observed and audio-recorded over a period of several weeks while teaching their third-year classes (pupils aged 14-15 years). All the teachers used the target language extensively in their…

  15. Targets and targeting.

    PubMed

    Will, E

    2001-08-01

    Using the vocabulary of ballistics in medicine for emphasis can result in misleading exaggeration and semantic confusion. The dual meaning of target as either aiming point (aim at) or outcome (aim to achieve) creates a muddle in the efforts to comply with quality assurance initiatives. Disentangling the two meanings allows new approaches to the clinical technology required in a modern health care environment. An example can be shown in new strategies for the management of renal anemia with iron and erythropoietin. The potential to shape outcome distributions through validated, preemptive intervention thresholds offers the predictable results required by patients and payers. Using the management of patient cohorts as a platform for outcomes creates no necessary conflict with individualized clinical care. Future guideline statements should include the likely characteristics of compliant outcome populations, as a prompt to clinical goals and as an indication of the necessary cost and effort of compliance with treatment standards. Overemphasis in language is no substitute for considered clinical methodology.

  16. Investigation of contribution of incomplete fusion in the total fusion process induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at near barrier energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharab, Rajesh; Chahal, Rajiv; Kumar, Rajiv

    2016-02-01

    We have studied the relative contribution of incomplete fusion (ICF) and complete fusion (CF) in total fusion (TF) induced by 9Be on 181Ta target at energies in the vicinity of Coulomb barrier using classical dynamical model and Wong's formula in conjugation with energy dependent Woods-Saxon formula. It is found that at above barrier energies ICF contributes almost 30% in TF while at energies below the barrier qualitatively its contribution is much more than thirty percent.

  17. A novel drug discovery strategy: Mechanistic investigation of an enantiomeric antitumor agent targeting dual p53 and NF-κB pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Woo Shik; Wu, Yuelin; Li, Jin; Yao, Jianzhong; Dong, Guoqiang; Zhang, Wen; Sham, Yuk Yin; Miao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    The p53 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathways play crucial roles in human cancer development. Simultaneous targeting of both pathways is an attractive therapeutic strategy against cancer. In this study, we report an antitumor molecule that bears a pyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrazole scaffold and functions as an enantiomeric inhibitor against both the p53-MDM2 interaction and the NF-κB activation. It is a first-in-class enantiomeric inhibitor with dual efficacy for cancer therapy. Synergistic effect was observed in vitro and in vivo. Docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies further provided insights into the nature of stereoselectivity. PMID:25350970

  18. Investigation of xFe2O4 (x = Mn, Co) doped hydroxylapatite ferromagnetic biomaterials for the treatment of damaged bone and magnetically targeted drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Vikas; Singh, K. J.; Kaur, Kulwinder; Bhatia, Gaurav

    2016-05-01

    Magnetically attracted MnFe2O4 and CoFe2O4 doped hydroxylapatite samples have been prepared by using co-precipitation method in the laboratory. Bioactive nature of samples has been confirmed from XRD spectra. Ferromagnetic behavior of samples has been studied by using vibration sample magnetometer. Human osteoblast cell line MG63 has been used to explore the cell viability of samples. Drug carrier ability of samples has been checked with gentamycin as an antibiotic and results show that samples can be used as excellent drug carriers. Drug loaded samples can be easily targeted to specific area due to their attractive nature towards external magnetic field. Our results indicate that prepared samples possess good bioactive as well as ferromagnetic behavior with drug carrier ability and hence, our samples can be potential candidates for the clinical applications.

  19. Investigation of targeted pyrrolizidine alkaloids in traditional Chinese medicines and selected herbal teas sourced in Ireland using LC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Caroline T; Gosetto, Francesca; Danaher, Martin; Sabatini, Stefano; Furey, Ambrose

    2014-01-01

    Publications linking hepatotoxicity to the use of herbal preparations are escalating. Herbal teas, traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) and dietary supplements have been shown to contain pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). Acute PA toxicosis of the liver can result in sinusoidal-obstruction syndrome, also known as veno-occlusive disease (VOD). This paper describes a sensitive and robust method for the detection of targeted PAs and their N-oxides (PANOs) in herbal products (selected herbal teas and TCMs) sourced within Ireland. The sample preparation includes a simple acidic extraction with clean-up via solid-phase extraction (SPE). Sample extracts were accurately analysed by using LC-ESI-MS/MS applying for the first time a pentafluorophenyl (PFP) core-shell column to the chromatographic separation of PAs and PANOs. The method was validated for selectivity, taking into consideration matrix effects, specificity, linearity, precision and trueness. Limits of detection (LOD) and limits of quantitation (LOQ) were quantified for all PAs and PANOs ranging from 0.4 to 1.9 µg kg⁻¹ and from 1.3 to 6.3 µg kg⁻¹, respectively. In this study 10 PAs and four PANOs were targeted because they are commercially available as reference standards. Therefore, this study can only report the levels of these PAs and PANOs analysed in the herbal teas and TCMs. The results reported represent the minimum levels of PAs and PANOs present in the samples analysed; commercially available herbal teas (n = 18) and TCMs (n = 54). A total of 50% herbal teas and 78% Chinese medicines tested positive for one or more PAs and/or PANOs included within this study, ranging from 10 to 1733 and from 13 to 3668 µg kg⁻¹, respectively.

  20. Sputter target

    DOEpatents

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  1. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  2. PoSSuM v.2.0: data update and a new function for investigating ligand analogs and target proteins of small-molecule drugs.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jun-ichi; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Tomii, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    PoSSuM (http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/) is a database for detecting similar small-molecule binding sites on proteins. Since its initial release in 2011, PoSSuM has grown to provide information related to 49 million pairs of similar binding sites discovered among 5.5 million known and putative binding sites. This enlargement of the database is expected to enhance opportunities for biological and pharmaceutical applications, such as predictions of new functions and drug discovery. In this release, we have provided a new service named PoSSuM drug search (PoSSuMds) at http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/drug_search/, in which we selected 194 approved drug compounds retrieved from ChEMBL, and detected their known binding pockets and pockets that are similar to them. Users can access and download all of the search results via a new web interface, which is useful for finding ligand analogs as well as potential target proteins. Furthermore, PoSSuMds enables users to explore the binding pocket universe within PoSSuM. Additionally, we have improved the web interface with new functions, including sortable tables and a viewer for visualizing and downloading superimposed pockets.

  3. Investigation of new 2-aryl substituted Benzothiopyrano[4,3-d]pyrimidines as kinase inhibitors targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Salerno, Silvia; Marini, Anna Maria; Fornaciari, Giacomo; Simorini, Francesca; La Motta, Concettina; Taliani, Sabrina; Sartini, Stefania; Da Settimo, Federico; García-Argáez, Aída Nelly; Gia, Ornella; Cosconati, Sandro; Novellino, Ettore; D'Ocon, Pilar; Fioravanti, Anna; Orlandi, Paola; Bocci, Guido; Dalla Via, Lisa

    2015-10-20

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) pathway has emerged as one of the most important positive modulators of Angiogenesis, a central process implicated in tumour growth and metastatic dissemination. This led to the design and development of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule ATP-competitive VEGFR-inhibitors. In this study, we describe the synthesis and the biological evaluation of novel 2-aryl substituted benzothiopyrano-fused pyrimidines 1a-i, 2a-i and 3a-i. The ability of the compounds to target the VEGF pathway was determined in vitro exploiting the compounds' antiproliferative efficacy against HUVEC cells. The VEGFR-2 inhibition was confirmed by enzymatic assays on recombinant human kinase insert domain receptor (KDR), by cell-based phospho-VEGFR-2 inhibition assays, and by ex vivo rat aortic ring tests. The selectivity profile of the best performing derivatives belonging to series 2 was further explored combining modeling studies and additional assays in a panel of human cell lines and other kinases.

  4. PoSSuM v.2.0: data update and a new function for investigating ligand analogs and target proteins of small-molecule drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun-ichi; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Mizuguchi, Kenji; Tomii, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    PoSSuM (http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/) is a database for detecting similar small-molecule binding sites on proteins. Since its initial release in 2011, PoSSuM has grown to provide information related to 49 million pairs of similar binding sites discovered among 5.5 million known and putative binding sites. This enlargement of the database is expected to enhance opportunities for biological and pharmaceutical applications, such as predictions of new functions and drug discovery. In this release, we have provided a new service named PoSSuM drug search (PoSSuMds) at http://possum.cbrc.jp/PoSSuM/drug_search/, in which we selected 194 approved drug compounds retrieved from ChEMBL, and detected their known binding pockets and pockets that are similar to them. Users can access and download all of the search results via a new web interface, which is useful for finding ligand analogs as well as potential target proteins. Furthermore, PoSSuMds enables users to explore the binding pocket universe within PoSSuM. Additionally, we have improved the web interface with new functions, including sortable tables and a viewer for visualizing and downloading superimposed pockets. PMID:25404129

  5. Development of numerical model to investigate the laser driven shock waves from aluminum target into ambient air at atmospheric pressure and its comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Sakaraboina, Sai Shiva; Chelikani, Leela; Ikkurthi, Venkata Ramana; C. D., Sijoy; Chaturvedi, Shashank; Acrhem Collaboration; Cad Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    A one-dimensional, three-temperature (electron, ion and thermal radiation) numerical model to study the laser induced shock wave (LISW) propagation from aluminum target in ambient air at atmospheric pressure is developed. The hydrodynamic equations of mass, momentum and energy are solved by using an implicit scheme in Lagrangian form. The model considers the laser absorption to take place via inverse-bremsstrahlung due to electron-ion (e-i) process. The flux limited electron thermal energy transport and e-i thermal energy relaxation equations are solved implicitly. The experimental characterization of spatio-temporal evolution of the LISW in air generated by focusing a second harmonic (532 nm, 7ns) of Nd:YAG laser on to surface of Al is performed using shadowgraphy technique with a temporal resolution of 1.5 ns. The radius of SW (2 - 5 mm) and its pressure (40 - 80 MPa) observed in the experiments over 0.2 μs-10 μs time scales were comparable with the numerical results for laser intensities ranging from 2.0 × 1010 to 1.4 × 1011 W/cm2. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program.

  6. Investigating the plasma parameters of an Ar/O{sub 2} discharge during the sputtering of Al targets in an inverted cylindrical magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Mensah, Samuel L. E-mail: scrr004@gmail.com; Gordon, Matt; Naseem, Hameed H.

    2014-09-15

    The plasma parameters and reaction kinetics in an inverted cylindrical magnetron chamber have been studied with an energy resolved mass spectrometer during the sputtering of aluminum targets in an Ar/O{sub 2} discharge. Mixtures of argon and oxygen were studied as a function of oxygen percentage (0%–90%) in the discharge. The plasma was powered at 4 kW and 40 kHz at a process pressure of 5 mTorr. Al{sup +}, Al, AlO, AlO{sup +}, O{sub 2}{sup +}, O{sup +}, Al{sub 2}O{sup +}, and Ar{sup +} were among the species detected in the discharge. The deposition rate of the deposited thin film decreased with increasing oxygen percentage in the discharge and results indicated that the pure gamma-alumina was obtained when the percentage of oxygen was approximately 70%. The linear plot of energy distributions of the positively charged film forming species changed from a single peak to a bimodal distribution as the percentage of oxygen exceeds 65%. In a log plot, however, the distributions showed multiple peaks ranging from 2 eV to 78 eV. Fluctuations of about 1 eV in peak energies were observed.

  7. Measurements of sputtered neutrals and ions and investigation of their roles on the plasma properties during rf magnetron sputtering of Zn and ZnO targets

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloul, L.; Stafford, L.

    2013-11-15

    Langmuir probe and optical absorption spectroscopy measurements were used to determine the line-integrated electron density, electron temperature, and number density of Ar atoms in metastable {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} levels in a 5 mTorr, rf magnetron sputtering plasmas used for the deposition of ZnO-based thin films. While the average electron energy and density of Ar atoms in {sup 3}P{sub 2} and {sup 3}P{sub 0} excited states were fairly independent of self-bias voltage, the Ar {sup 3}P{sub 2}-to-electron number density ratio decreased by approximately a factor of 5 when going from −115 V to −300 V. This decrease was correlated to an increase by about one order of magnitude of the number density of sputtered Zn atoms determined by absolute actinometry measurements on Zn I using either Ar or Xe as the actinometer gas. These results were also found to be in excellent agreement with the predictions of a global model accounting for Penning ionization of sputtered Zn particles. The importance of the latter reactions was further confirmed by plasma sampling mass spectrometry showing a double peak structure for Zn ions: a low-energy component ascribed to thermalized ions created in the gas phase (by direct electron impact and by Penning ionization) and a high-energy tail due to ions ejected from the target and reaching quasi-collisionlessly the substrate surface.

  8. A Cervical Hemi-Contusion Spinal Cord Injury Model for the Investigation of Novel Therapeutics Targeting Proximal and Distal Forelimb Functional Recovery.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Sarah E; Sunshine, Michael D; Fischedick, Amanda E; Moritz, Chet T; Horner, Philip J

    2015-12-15

    Cervical spinal cord contusion is the most common human spinal cord injury, yet few rodent models replicate the pathophysiological and functional sequela of this injury. Here, we modified an electromechanical injury device and characterized the behavioral and histological changes occurring in response to a lateralized C4 contusion injury in rats. A key feature of the model includes a non-injurious touch phase where the spinal cord surface is dimpled with a consistent starting force. Animals were either left intact as a control, received a non-injury-producing touch on the surface of the cord ("sham"), or received a 0.6 mm or a 0.8 mm displacement injury. Rats were then tested on the forelimb asymmetry use test, CatWalk, and the Irvine, Beatties, and Bresnahan (IBB) cereal manipulation task to assess proximal and distal upper limb function for 12 weeks. Injuries of moderate (0.6 mm) and large (0.8 mm) displacement showed consistent differences in forelimb asymmetry, metrics of the CatWalk, and sub-scores of the IBB. Overall findings indicated long lasting proximal and distal upper limb deficits following 0.8 mm injury but transient proximal with prolonged distal limb deficits following 0.6 mm injury. Significant differences in loss of ipsilateral unmyelinated and myelinated white matter was detected between injury severities. Demyelination was primarily localized to the dorsolateral region of the hemicord and extended further rostral following 0.8 mm injury. These findings establish the C4 hemi-contusion injury as a consistent, graded model for testing novel treatments targeting forelimb functional recovery.

  9. Understanding the role of physician attire on patient perceptions: a systematic review of the literature— targeting attire to improve likelihood of rapport (TAILOR) investigators

    PubMed Central

    Petrilli, Christopher Michael; Mack, Megan; Petrilli, Jennifer Janowitz; Hickner, Andy; Saint, Sanjay; Chopra, Vineet

    2015-01-01

    Although patients often prefer formal physician attire, perceptions of attire are influenced by age, locale, setting and context of care. Policy-based interventions that target such factors appear necessary. PMID:25600254

  10. The results of a low-speed wind tunnel test to investigate the effects of the Refan JT8D engine target thrust reverser on the stability and control characteristics of the Boeing 727-200 airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupcis, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of the Refan JT8D side engine target thrust reverser on the stability and control characteristics of the Boeing 727-200 airplane were investigated using the Boeing-Vertol 20 x 20 ft Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. A powered model of the 727-200 was tested in groud effect in the landing configuration. The Refan target reverser configuration was evaluated relative to the basic production 727 airplane with its clamshell-deflector door thrust reverser design. The Refan configuration had slightly improved directional control characteristics relative to the basic airplane. Clocking the Refan thrust reversers 20 degrees outboard to direct the reverser flow away from the vertical tail, had little effect on directional control. However, clocking them 20 degrees inboard resulted in a complete loss of rudder effectiveness for speeds greater than 90 knots. Variations in Refan reverser lip/fence geometry had a minor effect on directional control.

  11. Achieving national influenza vaccine targets--an investigation of the factors affecting influenza vaccine uptake in older people and people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Parmar, H; McCann, R

    2002-06-01

    A survey by postal questionnaire of a random sample of community residents with diabetes mellitus and those aged 75 years was undertaken in one Health Authority area to examine the factors associated with influenza vaccine uptake in these groups. The questionnaire sought: information on vaccine uptake and non-uptake over the previous three winter periods; patient attitudes to and knowledge about influenza and influenza vaccine; sources of patients' information; and patients' views on improving vaccine uptake. Self-reported vaccine uptake had increased in people with diabetes from 53.9% in 1997-98 to 67.6% in 1999-2000, and in people aged 75 years and over from 63.5% in 1997-98 to 70.2% in 1999-2000. Factors significantly associated with vaccine uptake in people with diabetes included a history of previous vaccination OR 40 (95% confidence interval 9,206), recommendation by a health professional OR 14 (2.9, 90) and belief that the vaccine protects against flu OR 5.6 (1.8, 18.9). Factors significantly associated with vaccine uptake in older people included the belief that the vaccine protects against flu OR 23 (8.4, 69.4), a history of previous vaccination OR 10 (3.9, 28.3) and not being concerned about side-effects OR 4 (2.1, 7.9). Information given by a health professional was the only source of information found to significantly influence vaccine uptake. Interventions suggested to increase uptake include provision of more information and better access to influenza vaccination. It is concluded that uptake rates for influenza vaccine have increased over the last three years to 67.4% in people with diabetes and 70.2% in people aged 75 and over. Professionals play a key role in influencing the decision to have influenza vaccine. Information about influenza and its vaccine needs to be combined with improvements in service provision if overall target uptake rates of 70% (65% in those aged 65 years and over) are to be achieved.

  12. Genome-wide investigation of cellular targets and mode of action of the antifungal bacterial metabolite 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Troppens, Danielle M; Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Papkovsky, Dmitri B; O'Gara, Fergal; Morrissey, John P

    2013-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a proven model to investigate the effects of small molecules and drugs on fungal and eukaryotic cells. In this study, the mode of action of an antifungal metabolite, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG), was determined. Applying a combination of genetic and physiological approaches, it was established that this bacterial metabolite acts as a proton ionophore and dissipates the proton gradient across the mitochondrial membrane. The uncoupling of respiration and ATP synthesis ultimately leads to growth inhibition and is the primary toxic effect of DAPG. A genome-wide screen identified 154 DAPG-tolerant mutants and showed that there are many alterations in cellular metabolism that can confer at least some degree of tolerance to this uncoupler. One mutant, ydc1, was studied in some more detail as it displayed increased tolerance to both DAPG and the uncoupler carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and appears to be unconnected to other tolerant mutant strains. Deleting YDC1 alters sphingolipid homoeostasis in the cell, and we suggest here that this may be linked to reduced drug sensitivity. Sphingolipids and their derivatives are important eukaryotic signal molecules, and the observation that altering homoeostasis may affect yeast response to metabolic uncoupling agents raises some intriguing questions for future studies.

  13. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, T.; Uneri, A.; Ketcha, M. D.; Reaungamornrat, S.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Aygun, N.; Lo, S.-F.; Wolinsky, J.-P.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2016-04-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE  <  6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of  >14% however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved

  14. 3D–2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D–2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D–2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE > 30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE < 6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1–2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE = 5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved the

  15. 3D-2D image registration for target localization in spine surgery: investigation of similarity metrics providing robustness to content mismatch.

    PubMed

    De Silva, T; Uneri, A; Ketcha, M D; Reaungamornrat, S; Kleinszig, G; Vogt, S; Aygun, N; Lo, S-F; Wolinsky, J-P; Siewerdsen, J H

    2016-04-21

    In image-guided spine surgery, robust three-dimensional to two-dimensional (3D-2D) registration of preoperative computed tomography (CT) and intraoperative radiographs can be challenged by the image content mismatch associated with the presence of surgical instrumentation and implants as well as soft-tissue resection or deformation. This work investigates image similarity metrics in 3D-2D registration offering improved robustness against mismatch, thereby improving performance and reducing or eliminating the need for manual masking. The performance of four gradient-based image similarity metrics (gradient information (GI), gradient correlation (GC), gradient information with linear scaling (GS), and gradient orientation (GO)) with a multi-start optimization strategy was evaluated in an institutional review board-approved retrospective clinical study using 51 preoperative CT images and 115 intraoperative mobile radiographs. Registrations were tested with and without polygonal masks as a function of the number of multistarts employed during optimization. Registration accuracy was evaluated in terms of the projection distance error (PDE) and assessment of failure modes (PDE  >  30 mm) that could impede reliable vertebral level localization. With manual polygonal masking and 200 multistarts, the GC and GO metrics exhibited robust performance with 0% gross failures and median PDE < 6.4 mm (±4.4 mm interquartile range (IQR)) and a median runtime of 84 s (plus upwards of 1-2 min for manual masking). Excluding manual polygonal masks and decreasing the number of multistarts to 50 caused the GC-based registration to fail at a rate of >14%; however, GO maintained robustness with a 0% gross failure rate. Overall, the GI, GC, and GS metrics were susceptible to registration errors associated with content mismatch, but GO provided robust registration (median PDE  =  5.5 mm, 2.6 mm IQR) without manual masking and with an improved runtime (29.3 s). The GO metric improved

  16. LIQUID TARGET

    DOEpatents

    Martin, M.D.; Salsig, W.W. Jr.

    1959-01-13

    A liquid handling apparatus is presented for a liquid material which is to be irradiated. The apparatus consists essentially of a reservoir for the liquid, a target element, a drain tank and a drain lock chamber. The target is in the form of a looped tube, the upper end of which is adapted to be disposed in a beam of atomic particles. The lower end of the target tube is in communication with the liquid in the reservoir and a means is provided to continuously circulate the liquid material to be irradiated through the target tube. Means to heat the reservoir tank is provided in the event that a metal is to be used as the target material. The apparatus is provided with suitable valves and shielding to provide maximum safety in operation.

  17. Tackling Targets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This document is designed to help British training and enterprise councils (TECs) and further education (FE) colleges develop and implement strategies for achieving the National Targets for Education and Training (NTET), which were developed by the Confederation of British Industry in 1992 and endorsed by the British government. The findings from…

  18. Approved Programme and Budget, 2006-2007. General Conference, Thirty-Third Session, Paris, 2005 (33 C/5)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This document provides direction and focus for the third and last phase of the period covered by the Medium-Term Strategy for 2002-2007 (31 C/4 Approved). Hence it has been designed to cast UNESCO's action in response to the strategic objectives, cross-cutting themes and expected outcomes of document 31 C/4, building upon the achievements,…

  19. Equity and Life-Long Learning: An Analysis of White Paper No. 16 (2006/2007) of Norway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haugen, Cecilie Ronning

    2010-01-01

    Nationally and internationally equity in education has become a key goal. In Norway, a White Paper has been tabled to address how equity can be improved through education. In this paper the pedagogic and knowledge orientation of the initiatives are analyzed and discussed in relation to two models of equity: "equity through equality" and "equity…

  20. 78 FR 50114 - Distribution of 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 Satellite...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Notice Requesting Comments, 70 FR 46193 (Aug. 9, 2005), Docket 2005-2 CRB SD 2001-2003; Notice Requesting Comments, 73 FR 5597 (Jan. 30, 2008), Docket 2008-5 CRB SD 1999-2000; Notice Requesting Comments, 75 FR 4423 (Jan. 27, 2010) Docket 2010-2 CRB SD 2004-2007; Notice Requesting Comments, 75 FR 66799 (Oct....

  1. Comparison of 2006-2007 Water Years and Historical Water-Quality Data, Upper Gunnison River Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solberg, P.A.; Moore, Bryan; Smits, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Population growth and changes in land use have the potential to affect water quality and quantity in the upper Gunnison River basin. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Land Management, City of Gunnison, Colorado River Water Conservation District, Crested Butte South Metropolitan District, Gunnison County, Hinsdale County, Mount Crested Butte Water and Sanitation District, National Park Service, Town of Crested Butte, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, and Western State College established a water-quality monitoring program in the upper Gunnison River basin to characterize current water-quality conditions and to assess the effects of increased urban development and other land-use changes on water quality. The monitoring network has evolved into two groups of stations - stations that are considered long term and stations that are considered rotational. The long-term stations are monitored to assist in defining temporal changes in water quality (how conditions may change over time). The rotational stations are monitored to assist in the spatial definition of water-quality conditions (how conditions differ throughout the basin) and to address local and short-term concerns. Some stations in the rotational group were changed beginning in water year 2007. Annual summaries of the water-quality data from the monitoring network provide a point of reference for discussions regarding water-quality monitoring in the upper Gunnison River basin. This summary includes data collected during water years 2006 and 2007. The introduction provides a map of the sampling sites, definitions of terms, and a one-page summary of selected water-quality conditions at the network stations. The remainder of the summary is organized around the data collected at individual stations. Data collected during water years 2006 and 2007 are compared to historical data, State water-quality standards, and Federal water-quality guidelines. Data were collected following USGS protocols (U.S. Geological Survey, variously dated).

  2. American Council of Learned Societies Annual Report for the Years 2006-2007 and 2005-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) provides the humanities and related social sciences with leadership, opportunities for innovation, and national and international representation. The American Council of Learned Societies was created in 1919 to represent the United States in the Union Academique Internationale. Its mission is "the…

  3. International Space Station (ISS) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) System Overview of Events: February 2006 - 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gentry, Gregory J.; Reysa, Richard P.; Williams, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) continues to mature and operate its life support equipment. Major events occurring between February 2006 and February 2007 are discussed in this paper, as are updates from previously ongoing hardware anomalies. This paper addresses the major ISS operation events over the last year. Impact to overall ISS operations is also discussed.

  4. Sanitary Sewer Overflows and Association with Gastrointestinal Illness: A case crossover analysis of Massachusetts Data, 2006-2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) occur when untreated sewage is discharged into water sources potentially causing contamination. SSOs are primarily caused by heavy rainfall, which is expected to become heavier and more episodic due to climate change. We conducted a case-crossover ...

  5. Status and Monitoring of Natural and Supplemented Chinook Salmon in Johnson Creek, Idaho, 2006-2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rabe, Craig D.; Nelson, Douglas D.

    2008-11-17

    The Nez Perce Tribe Johnson Creek Artificial Propagation Enhancement Project (JCAPE) has conducted juvenile and adult monitoring and evaluation studies for its 10th consecutive year. Completion of adult and juvenile Chinook salmon studies were conducted for the purpose of evaluating a small-scale production initiative designed to increase the survival of a weak but recoverable spawning aggregate of summer Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha. The JCAPE program evaluates the life cycle of natural origin (NOR) and hatchery origin (HOR) supplementation fish to quantify the key performance measures: abundance, survival-productivity, distribution, genetics, life history, habitat, and in-hatchery metrics. Operation of a picket style weir and intensive multiple spawning ground surveys were completed to monitor adult Chinook salmon and a rotary screw trap was used to monitor migrating juvenile Chinook salmon in Johnson Creek. In 2007, spawning ground surveys were conducted on all available spawning habitat in Johnson Creek and one of its tributaries. A total of 63 redds were observed in the index reach and 11 redds for all other reaches for a combined count of 74 redds. Utilization of carcass recovery surveys and adult captures at an adult picket weir yielded a total estimated adult escapement to Johnson Creek of 438 Chinook salmon. Upon deducting fish removed for broodstock (n=52), weir mortality/ known strays (n=12), and prespawning mortality (n=15), an estimated 359 summer Chinook salmon were available to spawn. Estimated total migration of brood year 2005 NOR juvenile Chinook salmon at the rotary screw trap was calculated for three seasons (summer, fall, and spring). The total estimated migration was 34,194 fish; 26,671 of the NOR migrants left in the summer (July 1 to August 31, 2005) as fry/parr, 5,852 left in the fall (September 1 to November 21, 2005) as presmolt, and only 1,671 NOR fish left in the spring (March 1 to June 30, 2006) as smolt. In addition, there were 120,415 HOR supplementation smolts released into Johnson Creek during the week of March 12, 2007. Life stage-specific juvenile survival from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was calculated for brood year 2005 NOR and HOR supplementation juvenile Chinook salmon. Survival of NOR parr Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 16.2%. Survival of NOR presmolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 28.2% and 22.3%. Survival of NOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 44.7% and 32.9%. Survival of HOR smolt Chinook salmon migrating from Johnson Creek to Lower Granite and McNary dams was 31.9% and 26.2%. Multi-year analysis on smolt to adult return rate's (SAR's) and progeny to parent ratio's (P:P's) were calculated for NOR and HOR supplementation Brood Year 2002 Chinook salmon. SAR's were calculated from Johnson Creek to Johnson Creek (JC to JC), Lower Granite Dam to Lower Granite (LGD to LGD), and Lower Granite Dam to Johnson Creek (LGD to JC); for NOR fish SAR's were 0.16%, 1.16% and 1.12%, while HOR supplementation SAR's from JC to JC, LGD to LGD and LGD to JC were 0.04%, 0.19% and 0.13%. P:P's for all returning NOR and HOR supplemented adults were under replacement levels at 0.13 and 0.65, respectively. Recruit per spawner estimates (R/S) for Brood Year 2005 adult Chinook salmon were also calculated for NOR and HOR supplemented Chinook salmon at JC and LGD. R/S estimates for NOR and HOR supplemented fish at JC were 231 and 1,745, while R/S estimates at LGD were 67 and 557. Management recommendations address (1) effectiveness of data collection methods, (2) sufficiency of data quality (statistical power) to enable management recommendations, (3) removal of uncertainty and subsequent cessation of M&E activities, and (4) sufficiency of findings for program modifications prior to five-year review.

  6. Runoff simulations from the Greenland ice sheet at Kangerlussuaq from 2006-2007 to 2007/08. West Greenland

    SciTech Connect

    Mernild, Sebastian Haugard; Hasholt, Bent; Van Den Broeke, Michiel; Liston, Glen

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on runoff from a large sector of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) - the Kangerlussuaq drainage area, West Greenland - for the runoff observation period 2006/07 to 2007/08. SnowModel, a state-of-the-art snow-evolution modeling system, was used to simulate winter accumulation and summer ablation processes, including runoff. Independent in situ end-of-winter snow depth and high-resolution runoff observations were used for validation of simulated accumulation and ablation processes. Runoff was modeled on both daily and hourly time steps, filling a data gap of runoff exiting part of the GrIS. Using hourly meteorological driving data instead of smoothed daily-averaged data produced more realistic meteorological conditions in relation to snow and melt threshold surface processes, and produced 6-17% higher annual cumulative runoff. The simulated runoff series yielded useful insights into the present conditions of inter-seasonal and inter-annual variability of Kangerlussuaq runoff, and provided an acceptable degree of agreement between simulated and observed runoff. The simulated spatial runoff distributions, in some areas of the GrIS terminus, were as high as 2,750 mm w.eq. of runoff for 2006/07, while only 900 mm w.eq was simulated for 2007/08. The simulated total runoff from Kangerlussuaq was 1.9 km{sup 3} for 2006/07 and 1.2 km{sup 3} for 2007/08, indicating a reduction of 35-40% caused by the climate conditions and changes in the GrIS freshwater storage. The reduction in runoff from 2006/07 to 2007/08 occurred simultaneously with the reduction in the overall pattern of satellite-derived GrIS surface melt from 2007 to 2008.

  7. Ecological Assessment of Wadeable Streams on O`ahu, Hawai'i, 2006-2007: A Pilot Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolff, Reuben H.; Koch, Linda A.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006-07, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Pacific Islands Water Science Center (PIWSC), in cooperation with the Hawai'i Department of Health (HDOH), conducted a pilot study as a participant in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Wadeable Streams Assessment (WSA) program. Forty randomly selected sites on perennial streams on O'ahu, Hawai'i, were surveyed for habitat characteristics, water chemistry, and benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages. Of the original sampling frame of approximately 505.2 miles of perennial stream, roughly 96.7 +or- 30.7 miles were found to be nonperennial or estuarine and another 200.5 +or- 64.7 miles were judged to be inaccessible. The scope of this report presents an assessment of the remaining 208 +or- 57.6 miles of accessible, wadeable, perennial stream length on O'ahu. Benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were used to determine the ecological condition at each site. Components of the benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages were assessed using the multimetric Preliminary-Hawaiian Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity (P-HBIBI) developed by Wolff (2005). Based on the P-HBIBI scores, an estimated 5.8 +or- 5.8 percent of the island's total stream length is in most disturbed condition, 56 +or- 13.5 percent is in intermediately disturbed condition, and 38.2 +or- 13.2 percent is in least disturbed condition. Windward O'ahu had the highest percentage of stream length in least disturbed biological condition at 56.7 +or- 20.8 percent. Using the relative abundance of insects, one of the core metrics that make up the P-HBIBI, 43.4 +or- 14.2 percent of the islandwide stream length was classified in the most disturbed condition - 52 +or- 31.2 percent of the Honolulu region stream length and 51.4 +or- 23.3 percent of the windward O'ahu stream length. An analysis of total nitrogen (N) estimated approximately 41.1 +or- 13.7 percent of the stream length on O'ahu was in most disturbed condition. Regionally, the Honolulu region had the largest proportion, 61.3 +or- 28.6 percent, of most disturbed stream length in terms of total N. An analysis of total phosphorus (P) classified approximately 43.2 +or- 14 percent of the stream length on O'ahu as most disturbed. Regionally, windward O'ahu had the largest proportion, 78.4 +or- 19.5 percent, of stream length classified as most disturbed. An analysis of embeddedness classified 30.3 +or- 14.7 percent of O'ahu's stream length as most. Regionally, windward O'ahu had the largest proportion, 43.3 +or- 17.1 percent, of stream length classified as most disturbed as compared to the reference condition. An analysis of riparian disturbance, an index of the in-channel, riparian, and near-stream human activities, classified 43 +or- 13 percent of stream length on O'ahu as most disturbed. The Honolulu region had the largest proportion of stream length, 86.3 +or- 13.7 percent, classified as most disturbed. The information in this report is the first attempt in Hawai'i to assess the islandwide ecological condition of wadeable, perennial streams on O'ahu using the USEPA WSA probabilistic design. This study has demonstrated that such an assessment is practical and that it can provide information that may help the USEPA and HDOH in determining the status of aquatic ecosystems on O'ahu, Hawai'i. This study provides a baseline assessment of the current islandwide ecological condition and identifies potential environmental stressors. It can be used, with future WSA studies in Hawai'i, to measure the changes in those conditions and the effectiveness of management efforts to protect, restore, and maintain Hawai'i's aquatic environment.

  8. Council of the Great City Schools High School Reform Survey, School Year 2006-2007. Urban Indicator. Spring 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In response to a request by the Secondary Education Sub-Committee of its Achievement Task Force, the Council of the Great City Schools surveyed its membership in the fall of 2007 to gather information on a variety of high school reform issues. An electronic file of the survey was emailed to the curriculum directors in each member district in…

  9. Evolution of Information Management at the GSFC Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC): 2006-2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempler, Steven; Lynnes, Christopher; Vollmer, Bruce; Alcott, Gary; Berrick, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Increasingly sophisticated National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth science missions have driven their associated data and data management systems from providing simple point-to-point archiving and retrieval to performing user-responsive distributed multisensor information extraction. To fully maximize the use of remote-sensor-generated Earth science data, NASA recognized the need for data systems that provide data access and manipulation capabilities responsive to research brought forth by advancing scientific analysis and the need to maximize the use and usability of the data. The decision by NASA to purposely evolve the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Earth Sciences (GES) Data and Information Services Center (DISC) and other information management facilities was timely and appropriate. The GES DISC evolution was focused on replacing the EOSDIS Core System (ECS) by reusing the In-house developed disk-based Simple, Scalable, Script-based Science Product Archive (S4PA) data management system and migrating data to the disk archives. Transition was completed in December 2007

  10. Gastrointestinal Helminth Parasites of Double-Crested Cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) at Four Sites in Saskatchewan, Canada, 2006-2007.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We examined the gastrointestinal parasite fauna of adult double-crested cormorants from breeding colonies on four very different lakes spanning a major ecotone from prairie to boreal forest in Saskatchewan, Canada. Our objectives were to document regional parasite fauna, and identify potential diff...

  11. Sea surface carbon dioxide at the Georgia time series site (2006-2007): Air-sea flux and controlling processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Cai, Wei-Jun; Hu, Xinping; Sabine, Christopher; Jones, Stacy; Sutton, Adrienne J.; Jiang, Li-Qing; Reimer, Janet J.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) in surface seawater was continuously recorded every three hours from 18 July 2006 through 31 October 2007 using a moored autonomous pCO2 (MAPCO2) system deployed on the Gray's Reef buoy off the coast of Georgia, USA. Surface water pCO2 (average 373 ± 52 μatm) showed a clear seasonal pattern, undersaturated with respect to the atmosphere in cold months and generally oversaturated in warm months. High temporal resolution observations revealed important events not captured in previous ship-based observations, such as sporadically occurring biological CO2 uptake during April-June 2007. In addition to a qualitative analysis of the primary drivers of pCO2 variability based on property regressions, we quantified contributions of temperature, air-sea exchange, mixing, and biological processes to monthly pCO2 variations using a 1-D mass budget model. Although temperature played a dominant role in the annual cycle of pCO2, river inputs especially in the wet season, biological respiration in peak summer, and biological production during April-June 2007 also substantially influenced seawater pCO2. Furthermore, sea surface pCO2 was higher in September-October 2007 than in September-October 2006, associated with increased river inputs in fall 2007. On an annual basis this site was a moderate atmospheric CO2 sink, and was autotrophic as revealed by monthly mean net community production (NCP) in the mixed layer. If the sporadic short productive events during April-May 2007 were missed by the sampling schedule, one would conclude erroneously that the site is heterotrophic. While previous ship-based pCO2 data collected around this buoy site agreed with the buoy CO2 data on seasonal scales, high resolution buoy observations revealed that the cruise-based surveys undersampled temporal variability in coastal waters, which could greatly bias the estimates of air-sea CO2 fluxes or annual NCP, and even produce contradictory results.

  12. Target assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Richard A.

    1980-01-01

    A target for a proton beam which is capable of generating neutrons for absorption in a breeding blanket includes a plurality of solid pins formed of a neutron emissive target material disposed parallel to the path of the beam and which are arranged axially in a plurality of layers so that pins in each layer are offset with respect to pins in all other layers, enough layers being used so that each proton in the beam will strike at least one pin with means being provided to cool the pins. For a 300 mA, 1 GeV beam (300 MW), stainless steel pins, 12 inches long and 0.23 inches in diameter are arranged in triangular array in six layers with one sixth of the pins in each layer, the number of pins being such that the entire cross sectional area of the beam is covered by the pins with minimum overlap of pins.

  13. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, D.J.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Koehler, C.

    1999-06-29

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression. 5 figs.

  14. Accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Schlyer, David J.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Koehler, Conrad

    1999-01-01

    A target includes a body having a depression in a front side for holding a sample for irradiation by a particle beam to produce a radioisotope. Cooling fins are disposed on a backside of the body opposite the depression. A foil is joined to the body front side to cover the depression and sample therein. A perforate grid is joined to the body atop the foil for supporting the foil and for transmitting the particle beam therethrough. A coolant is circulated over the fins to cool the body during the particle beam irradiation of the sample in the depression.

  15. Foveal target repetitions reduce crowding.

    PubMed

    Sayim, Bilge; Greenwood, John A; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Crowding is the limitation of peripheral vision by clutter. Objects that are easily identified when presented in isolation are hard to identify when presented flanked by similar close-by objects. It is often assumed that the signal of a crowded target is irretrievably lost because it is combined with the signals of the flankers. Here, we asked whether a target signal can be enhanced (or retrieved) by items presented far outside the crowding region. We investigated whether remote items matching a peripheral, crowded target enhanced discrimination compared to remote items not matching the target. In Experiment 1, we presented the remote item at different locations in the visual field and found that, when presented in the fovea, a matching remote item improved target discrimination compared to a nonmatching remote item. In Experiment 2, we varied stimulus onset asynchronies between target and remote items and found a strong effect when the remote item was presented simultaneously with the target. The effect diminished (or was absent) with increasing temporal separation. In Experiment 3, we asked whether semantic knowledge of a target was sufficient to improve target discrimination and found that this was not the case. We conclude that crowded target signals are not irretrievably lost. Rather, their accurate recognition is facilitated in the presence of remote items that match the target. We suggest that long-range grouping mechanisms underlie this "uncrowding" effect.

  16. November 2007 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-02-28

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility (during most of the interval 1949-1974) at Barnes, Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to investigate this contamination. In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells at 19 distinct locations, 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a plume that appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2007). The present report presents the results of the November 2007 sampling event that followed the targeted investigation.

  17. The target effect: visual memory for unnamed search targets.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark D; Williams, Carrick C

    2014-01-01

    Search targets are typically remembered much better than other objects even when they are viewed for less time. However, targets have two advantages that other objects in search displays do not have: They are identified categorically before the search, and finding them represents the goal of the search task. The current research investigated the contributions of both of these types of information to the long-term visual memory representations of search targets. Participants completed either a predefined search or a unique-object search in which targets were not defined with specific categorical labels before searching. Subsequent memory results indicated that search target memory was better than distractor memory even following ambiguously defined searches and when the distractors were viewed significantly longer. Superior target memory appears to result from a qualitatively different representation from those of distractor objects, indicating that decision processes influence visual memory.

  18. Follicular penetration and targeting.

    PubMed

    Lademann, Jürgen; Otberg, Nina; Jacobi, Ute; Hoffman, Robert M; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2005-12-01

    In the past, intercellular penetration was assumed to be the most important penetration pathway of topically applied substances. First hints that follicular penetration needs to be taken into consideration were confirmed by recent investigations, presented during the workshop "Follicular Penetration and Targeting" at the 4th Intercontinental Meeting of Hair Research Societies", in Berlin 2004. Hair follicles represent an efficient reservoir for the penetration of topically applied substances with subsequent targeting of distinct cell populations, e.g., nestin-expressing follicular bulge cells. The volume of this reservoir can be determined by differential stripping technology. The follicular penetration processes are significantly influenced by the state of the follicular infundibulum; recent experimental investigations could demonstrate that it is essential to distinguish between open and closed hair follicles. Topically applied substances can only penetrate into open hair follicle. Knowledge of follicular penetration is of high clinical relevance for functional targeting of distinct follicular regions. Human hair follicles show a hair-cycle-dependent variation of the dense neuronal and vascular network. Moreover, during hair follicle cycling with initiation of anagen, newly formed vessels occur. Thus, the potential of nestin-expressing hair follicle stem cells to form neurons and blood vessels was investigated.

  19. Kootenai River Fisheries Investigation : Stock Status of Burbot : Project Progress Report 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Paragamian, Valughn L.; Laude Dorothy C.

    2008-12-26

    Objectives of this investigation were to (1) monitor the population status and recruitment of burbot Lota lota in the Kootenai River, Idaho and British Columbia, Canada during the winter of 2006-2007; (2) evaluate the selective withdrawal system in place at Libby Dam to maintain the river temperature near Bonners Ferry between 1-4 C (November-December) to improve burbot migration and spawning activity; and (3) determine if a hatching success of 10% of eyed burbot embryos could be achieved through extensive rearing and produce fingerlings averaging 9.8 cm in six months. Water temperature did not fall below the upper limit (4 C) until mid-January but was usually maintained between 1-4 C January through February and was acceptable. Snowpack was characterized by a 101% of normal January runoff forecast. Adult burbot were sampled with hoop nets and slat traps. Only three burbot were captured in hoop nets, all at Ambush Rock (rkm 244.5). No burbot were caught in either slat traps or juvenile sampling gear, indicating the population is nearly extirpated. Burbot catch per unit effort in hoop nets was 0.003 fish/net d. Extensive rearing was moved to a smaller private pond and will be reported in the 2008-2009 annual report.

  20. Enhanced target factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Akram; Abdollahi, Hamid; Maeder, Marcel

    2016-03-10

    Target testing or target factor analysis, TFA, is a well-established soft analysis method. TFA answers the question whether an independent target test vector measured at the same wavelengths as the collection of spectra in a data matrix can be excluded as the spectrum of one of the components in the system under investigation. Essentially, TFA cannot positively prove that a particular test spectrum is the true spectrum of one of the components, it can, only reject a spectrum. However, TFA will not reject, or in other words TFA will accept, many spectra which cannot be component spectra. Enhanced Target Factor Analysis, ETFA addresses the above problem. Compared with traditional TFA, ETFA results in a significantly narrower range of positive results, i.e. the chance of a false positive test result is dramatically reduced. ETFA is based on feasibility testing as described in Refs. [16-19]. The method has been tested and validated with computer generated and real data sets.

  1. An investigation of duck circovirus and co-infection in Cherry Valley ducks in Shandong Province, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingxiao; Jiang, Shijin; Wu, Jiaqiang; Zhao, Qin; Sun, Yani; Kong, Yibo; Li, Xiaoxia; Yao, Meiling; Chai, Tongjie

    2009-01-13

    The co-infection of duck circovirus (DuCV) with Riemerella anatipestifer (RA) or/and Escherichia coli (E. coli) or/and duck hepatitis virus I (DHV-I) in Cherry Valley ducks in China's Shandong Province was investigated by using polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR)-based methods. For this study, 742 ducks sampled at random from 70 duck farms during 2006-2007 were examined using PCR and dot-blot hybridisation (DBH) tests. Overall the DuCV infection rate was 33.29%. Compared with those at 2 weeks of age, the ducks at 3-4 weeks of age were more susceptible to DuCV infection. Compared with the DuCV-negative ones, the DuCV-positive ducks had a higher rate of infection by DHV-I (25.5% vs. 7.475%), RA (23.48% vs. 8.28%) and E. coli (16.19% vs. 4.85%). This investigation shows that DuCV infection is common in Cherry Valley ducks on some farms in Shandong Province.

  2. Species of Redundancy in Visual Target Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben-David, Boaz M.; Algom, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We report a series of investigations into the effects of common names, physical identity, and physical similarity on visual detection time. The effect of these factors on the capacity of the system processing the signals was also examined. We used a redundant targets design with separate testing of the target-distractor (single target),…

  3. Development of targeted radiotherapy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Guillermina; Murphy, Consuelo A.; Villarreal, José E.; Pedraza, Martha; García, Laura; Tendilla, José I.; Paredes, Lydia

    2001-10-01

    Conventional or external beam radiotherapy, has been a viable alternative for cancer treatment. Although this technique is effective, its use is limited if the patient has multiple malignant lesions (metastases). An alternative approach is based on the design of radiopharmaceuticals that, to be administered in the patient, are directed specifically toward the target cell producing a selective radiation delivery. This treatment is known as targeted radiotherapy. We have summarized and discussed some results related to our investigations on the development of targeted radiotherapy systems, including aspects of internal dosimetry.

  4. Genome-Wide Investigation Using sRNA-Seq, Degradome-Seq and Transcriptome-Seq Reveals Regulatory Networks of microRNAs and Their Target Genes in Soybean during Soybean mosaic virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kangfu; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in a variety of cellular processes through regulation of their target gene expression. Accumulated experimental evidence has demonstrated that infections by viruses are associated with the altered expression profile of miRNAs and their mRNA targets in the host. However, the regulatory network of miRNA-mRNA interactions during viral infection remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed small RNA (sRNA)-seq, degradome-seq and as well as a genome-wide transcriptome analysis to profile the global gene and miRNA expression in soybean following infections by three different Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) isolates, L (G2 strain), LRB (G2 strain) and G7 (G7 strain). sRNA-seq analyses revealed a total of 253 soybean miRNAs with a two-fold or greater change in abundance compared with the mock-inoculated control. 125 transcripts were identified as the potential cleavage targets of 105 miRNAs and validated by degradome-seq analyses. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis showed that total 2679 genes are differentially expressed in response to SMV infection including 71 genes predicted as involved in defense response. Finally, complex miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks were derived using the RNAseq, small RNAseq and degradome data. This work represents a comprehensive, global approach to examining virus-host interactions. Genes responsive to SMV infection are identified as are their potential miRNA regulators. Additionally, regulatory changes of the miRNAs themselves are described and the regulatory relationships were supported with degradome data. Taken together these data provide new insights into molecular SMV-soybean interactions and offer candidate miRNAs and their targets for further elucidation of the SMV infection process. PMID:26963095

  5. Genome-Wide Investigation Using sRNA-Seq, Degradome-Seq and Transcriptome-Seq Reveals Regulatory Networks of microRNAs and Their Target Genes in Soybean during Soybean mosaic virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Arsovski, Andrej Adam; Yu, Kangfu; Wang, Aiming

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in a variety of cellular processes through regulation of their target gene expression. Accumulated experimental evidence has demonstrated that infections by viruses are associated with the altered expression profile of miRNAs and their mRNA targets in the host. However, the regulatory network of miRNA-mRNA interactions during viral infection remains largely unknown. In this study, we performed small RNA (sRNA)-seq, degradome-seq and as well as a genome-wide transcriptome analysis to profile the global gene and miRNA expression in soybean following infections by three different Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) isolates, L (G2 strain), LRB (G2 strain) and G7 (G7 strain). sRNA-seq analyses revealed a total of 253 soybean miRNAs with a two-fold or greater change in abundance compared with the mock-inoculated control. 125 transcripts were identified as the potential cleavage targets of 105 miRNAs and validated by degradome-seq analyses. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis showed that total 2679 genes are differentially expressed in response to SMV infection including 71 genes predicted as involved in defense response. Finally, complex miRNA-mRNA regulatory networks were derived using the RNAseq, small RNAseq and degradome data. This work represents a comprehensive, global approach to examining virus-host interactions. Genes responsive to SMV infection are identified as are their potential miRNA regulators. Additionally, regulatory changes of the miRNAs themselves are described and the regulatory relationships were supported with degradome data. Taken together these data provide new insights into molecular SMV-soybean interactions and offer candidate miRNAs and their targets for further elucidation of the SMV infection process.

  6. Mesothelioma treatment: Are we on target? A review

    PubMed Central

    Hiddinga, Birgitta I.; Rolfo, Christian; van Meerbeeck, Jan P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted treatment is a therapy directed at a specific molecular target close to a hallmark of cancer. The target should be measurable with a biomarker and measurement of the target should correlate with clinical outcome when targeted treatment is administered. Current clinical guidelines do not recommend targeted or biological therapy in MPM. However, since these recommendations came out, new agents have been investigated in MPM. This review updates the use of targeted and biological treatment in patients with mesothelioma. PMID:26257929

  7. Direct drive fuel target optimization in HIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, S.; Kawata, S.; Hisatomi, Y.; Kurosaki, T.; Barada, D.; Ogoyski, A. I.

    2013-11-01

    This study investigates a target for heavy ion fusion (HIF) using light target materials. In this study, the target structure, the heavy ion beam (HIB) input pulse shape and the HIB input pulse energy are optimized for the maximal fusion energy output. We performed two-dimensional fluid implosion simulations to obtain a high pellet gain. The optimized target shows a high yield of a gain 223. The input Pb beam energy is 1.8 MJ.

  8. Magnetized Target Fusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is under consideration as a means of building a low mass, high specific impulse, and high thrust propulsion system for interplanetary travel. This unique combination is the result of the generation of a high temperature plasma by the nuclear fusion process. This plasma can then be deflected by magnetic fields to provide thrust. Fusion is initiated by a small traction of the energy generated in the magnetic coils due to the plasma's compression of the magnetic field. The power gain from a fusion reaction is such that inefficiencies due to thermal neutrons and coil losses can be overcome. Since the fusion reaction products are directly used for propulsion and the power to initiate the reaction is directly obtained from the thrust generation, no massive power supply for energy conversion is required. The result should be a low engine mass, high specific impulse and high thrust system. The key is to successfully initiate fusion as a proof-of-principle for this application. Currently MSFC is implementing MTF proof-of-principle experiments. This involves many technical details and ancillary investigations. Of these, selected pertinent issues include the properties, orientation and timing of the plasma guns and the convergence and interface development of the "pusher" plasma. Computer simulations of the target plasma's behavior under compression and the convergence and mixing of the gun plasma are under investigation. This work is to focus on the gun characterization and development as it relates to plasma initiation and repeatability.

  9. Effects of target typicality on categorical search

    PubMed Central

    Maxfield, Justin T.; Stalder, Westri D.; Zelinsky, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of target typicality in a categorical visual search task was investigated by cueing observers with a target name, followed by a five-item target present/absent search array in which the target images were rated in a pretest to be high, medium, or low in typicality with respect to the basic-level target cue. Contrary to previous work, we found that search guidance was better for high-typicality targets compared to low-typicality targets, as measured by both the proportion of immediate target fixations and the time to fixate the target. Consistent with previous work, we also found an effect of typicality on target verification times, the time between target fixation and the search judgment; as target typicality decreased, verification times increased. To model these typicality effects, we trained Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifiers on the target categories, and tested these on the corresponding specific targets used in the search task. This analysis revealed significant differences in classifier confidence between the high-, medium-, and low-typicality groups, paralleling the behavioral results. Collectively, these findings suggest that target typicality broadly affects both search guidance and verification, and that differences in typicality can be predicted by distance from an SVM classification boundary. PMID:25274990

  10. Targeted therapies for cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000902.htm Targeted therapies for cancer To use the sharing features on ... cells so they cannot spread. How Does Targeted Therapy Work? Targeted therapy drugs work in a few ...

  11. Investigating Students Misbehavior in Classroom Management in State and Private Primary Schools with a Comparative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durmuscelebi, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    The research aims to showing the students misbehaviors in formal and private primary schools according to the perceptions of class teachers working in Kayseri in 2006-2007 academic year The data has been collected with the questionnaire developed by the researcher based on review survey and expert ideas. Questionnaire is applied to 245 teachers in…

  12. Experience with IPNS targets

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.; Hins, A.G.

    1993-12-31

    Three targets have operated in the IPNS Neutron Scattering Facility. The first, a depleted Uranium target, served from 1981 until it was replaced in 1988 by the Enriched Uranium Booster Target. The Booster Target had operated for nearly three years when it suffered a cladding leak and was replaced with the retired depleted Uranium target. That target reached its end-of-life after less than one year`s further operation, and was replaced with an identical one newly assembled from spare components, which is still operating satisfactorily. This paper reviews the operating history of the IPNS targets and the findings reached during analysis of the failures. Similarities with ISIS target experience, preliminary conclusions and plans for providing spares and improved targets are discussed. We present some preliminary results from the hot cell examination of the failed depleted Uranium target.

  13. Molecular and cellular targets.

    PubMed

    Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang

    2006-06-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion, and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins, and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  14. Molecular and Cellular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2008-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistage process consisting of initiation, promotion and progression stages and each stage may be a possible target for chemopreventive agents. A significant outcome of these investigations on the elucidation of molecular and cellular mechanisms is the explication of signal transduction pathways induced by tumor promoters in cancer development. The current belief today is that cancer may be prevented or treated by targeting specific cancer genes, signaling proteins and transcription factors. The molecular mechanisms explaining how normal cells undergo neoplastic transformation induced by tumor promoters are rapidly being clarified. Accumulating research evidence suggests that many of dietary factors, including tea compounds, may be used alone or in combination with traditional chemotherapeutic agents to prevent or treat cancer. The potential advantage of many natural or dietary compounds seems to focus on their potent anticancer activity combined with low toxicity and very few adverse side effects. This review summarizes some of our recent work regarding the effects of the various tea components on signal transduction pathways involved in neoplastic cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:16688728

  15. Electrically charged targets

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Ronald K.; Hunt, Angus L.

    1984-01-01

    Electrically chargeable laser targets and method for forming such charged targets in order to improve their guidance along a predetermined desired trajectory. This is accomplished by the incorporation of a small amount of an additive to the target material which will increase the electrical conductivity thereof, and thereby enhance the charge placed upon the target material for guidance thereof by electrostatic or magnetic steering mechanisms, without adversely affecting the target when illuminated by laser energy.

  16. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms.

  17. Polarized internal target apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Holt, R.J.

    1984-10-10

    A polarized internal target apparatus with a polarized gas target of improved polarization and density (achieved by mixing target gas atoms with a small amount of alkali metal gas atoms, and passing a high intensity polarized light source into the mixture to cause the alkali metal gas atoms to become polarized which interact in spin exchange collisions with target gas atoms yielding polarized target gas atoms) is described.

  18. High or Low Target Prevalence Increases the Dual-Target Cost in Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menneer, Tamaryn; Donnelly, Nick; Godwin, Hayward J.; Cave, Kyle R.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a dual-target cost in visual search. In the current study, the relationship between search for one and search for two targets was investigated to examine the effects of target prevalence and practice. Color-shape conjunction stimuli were used with response time, accuracy and signal detection measures. Performance…

  19. Target deconvolution strategies in drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Terstappen, Georg C; Schlüpen, Christina; Raggiaschi, Roberto; Gaviraghi, Giovanni

    2007-11-01

    Recognition of some of the limitations of target-based drug discovery has recently led to the renaissance of a more holistic approach in which complex biological systems are investigated for phenotypic changes upon exposure to small molecules. The subsequent identification of the molecular targets that underlie an observed phenotypic response--termed target deconvolution--is an important aspect of current drug discovery, as knowledge of the molecular targets will greatly aid drug development. Here, the broad panel of experimental strategies that can be applied to target deconvolution is critically reviewed.

  20. Polarized tritium target development

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.E.; Fedchak, J.A.; Kowalczyk, R.S.

    1995-08-01

    Work began on the development of a completely sealed polarized tritium target for experiments at CEBAF. Because of the similarities between optical pumping of tritium and hydrogen, all prototype work is done with hydrogen. We constructed a test station for filling glassware with hydrogen, where we can dissociate molecular hydrogen and monitor the purity of the gas. A simple two-cell glass system was constructed, consisting of a region in which the molecular hydrogen is dissociated with an RF discharge and a region where the atoms can be optically pumped. So far, a clean discharge was obtained in the glassware. With this system, we plan to investigate ways to eliminate the discharge from the optical pumping region and test the quality of the discharge once the pumping cell is coated with drifilm.

  1. Identification of actin as a 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 target in neuroblastoma cells: mass spectrometric, computational, and functional approaches to investigate the effect on cytoskeletal derangement.

    PubMed

    Aldini, Giancarlo; Carini, Marina; Vistoli, Giulio; Shibata, Takahiro; Kusano, Yuri; Gamberoni, Luca; Dalle-Donne, Isabella; Milzani, Aldo; Uchida, Koji

    2007-03-13

    A proteomic approach was used to identify 15-deoxy-Delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) protein targets in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By using biotinylated 15d-PGJ2, beta-actin was found as the major adducted protein; at least 12 proteins were also identified as minor biotin-positive spots, falling in different functional classes, including glycolytic enzymes (enolase and lactate dehydrogenase), redox enzymes (biliverdin reductase), and a eukaryotic regulatory protein (14-3-3gamma). 15d-PGJ2 induced marked morphological changes in the actin filament network and in particular promoted F-actin depolymerization as confirmed by Western blot analysis. By using a mass spectrometric approach, we found that 15d-PGJ2 reacts with isolated G-actin in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio and selectively binds the Cys374 site through a Michael adduction mechanism. Computational studies showed that the covalent binding of 15d-PGJ2 induces a significant unfolding of actin structure and in particular that 15d-PGJ2 distorts the actin subdomains 2 and 4, which define the nucleotide binding sites impeding the nucleotide exchange. The functional effect of 15d-PGJ2 on G-actin was studied by polymerization measurement: in the presence of 15d-PGJ2, a lower amount of F-actin forms, as followed by the increase in pyrenyl-actin fluorescence intensity, as the major effect of increasing 15d-PGJ2 concentrations occurs on the maximum extent of actin polymerization, whereas it is negligible on the initial rate of reaction. In summary, the results here reported give an insight into the role of 15d-PGJ2 as a cytotoxic compound in neuronal cell dysfunction. Actin is the main protein cellular target of 15d-PGJ2, which specifically binds through a Michael adduction to Cys374, leading to a protein conformational change that can explain the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton, F-actin depolymerization, and impairment of G-actin polymerization. PMID:17297918

  2. A bioanalytical investigation on the exquisitely strong in vitro potency of the EGFR-DNA targeting type II combi-molecule ZR2003 and its mitigated in vivo antitumour activity.

    PubMed

    Golabi, Nahid; Brahimi, Fouad; Huang, Ying; Rachid, Zakaria; Qiu, Qiyu; Larroque-Lombard, Anne-Laure; Jean-Claude, Bertrand J

    2011-11-01

    ZR2003 is a type II of combi-molecule designed to target DNA and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) without requirement for hydrolysis. In human tumour cell lines cultured as monolayers, it showed 6.5-35 fold greater activity than Iressa. Further evaluation in 3D organ-like multilayer aggregates showed that it could block proliferation at submicromolar level. However, despite the superior potency of ZR2003 over Iressa in vitro, its activity xenograft models was not significantly different from that of Iressa. To rationalize these results, we determined the tumour concentration of both ZR2003 and Iressa in vivo and more importantly in vitro in multicellular aggregates. The results showed that in A431 and 4T1 xenografts, the level of ZR2003 absorbed in the tumours were consistently 2-fold less than those generated by Iressa. Likewise, in the multicellular aggregates model, the penetration of ZR2003 was consistently lower than Iressa. In serum containing media, the level of extractable or free ZR2003 was also inferior to those of Iressa. The results from this bioanalytical study, suggest that the discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo potency of ZR2003 when compared with Iressa, may be imputed to its significantly lower tumour concentration.

  3. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

    1994-02-15

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

  4. Magnetically attached sputter targets

    DOEpatents

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly.

  5. Attentional Control via Parallel Target-Templates in Dual-Target Search

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Doug J. K.; Zobay, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous search for two targets has been shown to be slower and less accurate than independent searches for the same two targets. Recent research suggests this ‘dual-target cost’ may be attributable to a limit in the number of target-templates than can guide search at any one time. The current study investigated this possibility by comparing behavioural responses during single- and dual-target searches for targets defined by their orientation. The results revealed an increase in reaction times for dual- compared to single-target searches that was largely independent of the number of items in the display. Response accuracy also decreased on dual- compared to single-target searches: dual-target accuracy was higher than predicted by a model restricting search guidance to a single target-template and lower than predicted by a model simulating two independent single-target searches. These results are consistent with a parallel model of dual-target search in which attentional control is exerted by more than one target-template at a time. The requirement to maintain two target-templates simultaneously, however, appears to impose a reduction in the specificity of the memory representation that guides search for each target. PMID:24489793

  6. FLIR target screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, R.

    1982-01-01

    Methods for the segmentation and recognition of individual targets sensed with forward looking infrared detectors are discussed. Particular attention is given to an adaptive multi-scenario target screener.

  7. The investigation of Mitogen-Activated Protein kinase Phosphatase-1 as a potential pharmacological target in non-small cell lung carcinomas, assisted by non-invasive molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    impeded the ability of cell migration and invasion in vitro. Cells pre-treated with triptolide (a MKP-1 inhibitor), reversed rosiglitazone-mediated cell invasion and migration. Conclusion The induction of MKP-1 could significantly suppress the proliferative and metastatic abilities of NSCLC both in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, MKP-1 could be considered as a potential therapeutic target in NSCLC therapy and PPARγ agonists could be explored for combined chemotherapy. PMID:20226009

  8. High Power Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory Smith

    2011-08-01

    The development of high power cryogenic targets for use in parity violating electron scattering has been a crucial ingredient in the success of those experiments. As we chase the precision frontier, the demands and requirements for these targets have grown accordingly. We discuss the state of the art, and describe recent developments and strategies in the design of the next generation of these targets.

  9. An actionable climate target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geden, Oliver

    2016-05-01

    The Paris Agreement introduced three mitigation targets. In the future, the main focus should not be on temperature targets such as 2 or 1.5 °C, but on the target with the greatest potential to effectively guide policy: net zero emissions.

  10. Plasma sheath driven targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brownell, J. H.; Freeman, B. L.

    1980-02-01

    Plasma focus driven target implosions are simulated using hydrodynamic-burn codes. Support is given to the idea that the use of a target in a plasma focus should allow 'impedance matching' between the fuel and gun, permitting larger fusion yields from a focus-target geometry than the scaling laws for a conventional plasma focus would predict.

  11. Targeting HER2

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Karen J; Baidoo, Kwamena E; Nayak, Tapan K; Regino, Celeste AS; Garmestani, Kayhan; Brechbiel, Martin W

    2010-01-01

    The potential of the HER2-targeting antibody trastuzumab as a radioimmunoconjugate useful for both imaging and therapy was investigated. Conjugation of trastuzumab with the acyclic bifunctional chelator CHX-A″-DTPA yielded a chelate:protein ratio of 3.4 ± 0.3; the immunoreactivity of the antibody unaffected. Radiolabeling was efficient, routinely yielding a product with high specific activity. Tumor targeting was evaluated in mice bearing subcutaneous (s.c.) xenografts of colorectal, pancreatic, ovarian and prostate carcinomas. High uptake of the radioimmunoconjugate, injected intravenously (i.v.), was observed in each of the models and the highest tumor %ID/g (51.18 ± 13.58) was obtained with the ovarian (SKOV-3) tumor xenograft. Specificity was demonstrated by the absence of uptake of 111In-trastuzumab by melanoma (A375) s.c. xenografts and 111In-HuIgG by s.c. LS-174T xenografts. Minimal uptake of i.v. injected 111In-trastuzumab in normal organs was confirmed in non-tumor-bearing mice. The in vivo behavior of 111In-trastuzumab in mice bearing intraperitoneal (i.p.) LS-174T tumors resulted in a tumor %ID/g of 130.85 ± 273.34 at 24 h. Visualization of tumor, s.c. and i.p. xenografts was achieved by γ-scintigraphy and PET imaging. Blood pool was evident as expected but cleared over time. The blood pharmacokinetics of i.v. and i.p. injected 111In-trastuzumab was determined in mice with and without tumors. The data from these in vitro and in vivo studies supported advancement of radiolabeled trastuzumab into two clinical studies, a Phase 0 imaging study in the Molecular Imaging Program of the National Cancer Institute and a Phase 1 radioimmunotherapy study at the University of Alabama. PMID:20716957

  12. Watershed Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec; Shive, Louise

    2004-01-01

    Investigating local watersheds presents middle school students with authentic opportunities to engage in inquiry and address questions about their immediate environment. Investigation activities promote learning in an investigations interdisciplinary context as students explore relationships among chemical, biological, physical, geological, and…

  13. Forensics Investigator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Career Profiles Forensics Investigator Overview Description Forensic science technicians investigate crimes by collecting and analyzing physical evidence. Often, they specialize in areas such as ...

  14. CASP9 Target Classification

    PubMed Central

    Kinch, Lisa N.; Shi, Shuoyong; Cheng, Hua; Cong, Qian; Pei, Jimin; Mariani, Valerio; Schwede, Torsten; Grishin, Nick V.

    2011-01-01

    The Critical Assessment of Protein Structure Prediction round 9 (CASP9) aimed to evaluate predictions for 129 experimentally determined protein structures. To assess tertiary structure predictions, these target structures were divided into domain-based evaluation units that were then classified into two assessment categories: template based modeling (TBM) and template free modeling (FM). CASP9 targets were split into domains of structurally compact evolutionary modules. For the targets with more than one defined domain, the decision to split structures into domains for evaluation was based on server performance. Target domains were categorized based on their evolutionary relatedness to existing templates as well as their difficulty levels indicated by server performance. Those target domains with sequence-related templates and high server prediction performance were classified as TMB, while those targets without identifiable templates and low server performance were classified as FM. However, using these generalizations for classification resulted in a blurred boundary between CASP9 assessment categories. Thus, the FM category included those domains without sequence detectable templates (25 target domains) as well as some domains with difficult to detect templates whose predictions were as poor as those without templates (5 target domains). Several interesting examples are discussed, including targets with sequence related templates that exhibit unusual structural differences, targets with homologous or analogous structure templates that are not detectable by sequence, and targets with new folds. PMID:21997778

  15. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  16. Bar coded retroreflective target

    SciTech Connect

    Vann, C.S.

    2000-01-25

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  17. Bar coded retroreflective target

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    2000-01-01

    This small, inexpensive, non-contact laser sensor can detect the location of a retroreflective target in a relatively large volume and up to six degrees of position. The tracker's laser beam is formed into a plane of light which is swept across the space of interest. When the beam illuminates the retroreflector, some of the light returns to the tracker. The intensity, angle, and time of the return beam is measured to calculate the three dimensional location of the target. With three retroreflectors on the target, the locations of three points on the target are measured, enabling the calculation of all six degrees of target position. Until now, devices for three-dimensional tracking of objects in a large volume have been heavy, large, and very expensive. Because of the simplicity and unique characteristics of this tracker, it is capable of three-dimensional tracking of one to several objects in a large volume, yet it is compact, light-weight, and relatively inexpensive. Alternatively, a tracker produces a diverging laser beam which is directed towards a fixed position, and senses when a retroreflective target enters the fixed field of view. An optically bar coded target can be read by the tracker to provide information about the target. The target can be formed of a ball lens with a bar code on one end. As the target moves through the field, the ball lens causes the laser beam to scan across the bar code.

  18. Investigation of E. coli and Virus Reductions Using Replicate, Bench-Scale Biosand Filter Columns and Two Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark; Stauber, Christine E; DiGiano, Francis A; de Aceituno, Anna Fabiszewski; Sobsey, Mark D

    2015-09-01

    The biosand filter (BSF) is an intermittently operated, household-scale slow sand filter for which little data are available on the effect of sand composition on treatment performance. Therefore, bench-scale columns were prepared according to the then-current (2006-2007) guidance on BSF design and run in parallel to conduct two microbial challenge experiments of eight-week duration. Triplicate columns were loaded with Accusand silica or crushed granite to compare virus and E. coli reduction performance. Bench-scale experiments provided confirmation that increased schmutzdecke growth, as indicated by decline in filtration rate, is the primary factor causing increased E. coli reductions of up to 5-log10. However, reductions of challenge viruses improved only modestly with increased schmutzdecke growth. Filter media type (Accusand silica vs. crushed granite) did not influence reduction of E. coli bacteria. The granite media without backwashing yielded superior virus reductions when compared to Accusand. However, for columns in which the granite media was first backwashed (to yield a more consistent distribution of grains and remove the finest size fraction), virus reductions were not significantly greater than in columns with Accusand media. It was postulated that a decline in surface area with backwashing decreased the sites and surface area available for virus sorption and/or biofilm growth and thus decreased the extent of virus reduction. Additionally, backwashing caused preferential flow paths and deviation from plug flow; backwashing is not part of standard BSF field preparation and is not recommended for BSF column studies. Overall, virus reductions were modest and did not meet the 5- or 3-log10 World Health Organization performance targets. PMID:26308036

  19. Investigation of E. coli and Virus Reductions Using Replicate, Bench-Scale Biosand Filter Columns and Two Filter Media.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Mark; Stauber, Christine E; DiGiano, Francis A; de Aceituno, Anna Fabiszewski; Sobsey, Mark D

    2015-08-25

    The biosand filter (BSF) is an intermittently operated, household-scale slow sand filter for which little data are available on the effect of sand composition on treatment performance. Therefore, bench-scale columns were prepared according to the then-current (2006-2007) guidance on BSF design and run in parallel to conduct two microbial challenge experiments of eight-week duration. Triplicate columns were loaded with Accusand silica or crushed granite to compare virus and E. coli reduction performance. Bench-scale experiments provided confirmation that increased schmutzdecke growth, as indicated by decline in filtration rate, is the primary factor causing increased E. coli reductions of up to 5-log10. However, reductions of challenge viruses improved only modestly with increased schmutzdecke growth. Filter media type (Accusand silica vs. crushed granite) did not influence reduction of E. coli bacteria. The granite media without backwashing yielded superior virus reductions when compared to Accusand. However, for columns in which the granite media was first backwashed (to yield a more consistent distribution of grains and remove the finest size fraction), virus reductions were not significantly greater than in columns with Accusand media. It was postulated that a decline in surface area with backwashing decreased the sites and surface area available for virus sorption and/or biofilm growth and thus decreased the extent of virus reduction. Additionally, backwashing caused preferential flow paths and deviation from plug flow; backwashing is not part of standard BSF field preparation and is not recommended for BSF column studies. Overall, virus reductions were modest and did not meet the 5- or 3-log10 World Health Organization performance targets.

  20. The drug target genes show higher evolutionary conservation than non-target genes.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wenhua; Xu, Yongdeng; Guo, Yiying; Yu, Ziqi; Feng, Guanglong; Liu, Panpan; Luan, Meiwei; Zhu, Hongjie; Liu, Guiyou; Zhang, Mingming; Lv, Hongchao; Duan, Lian; Shang, Zhenwei; Li, Jin; Jiang, Yongshuai; Zhang, Ruijie

    2016-01-26

    Although evidence indicates that drug target genes share some common evolutionary features, there have been few studies analyzing evolutionary features of drug targets from an overall level. Therefore, we conducted an analysis which aimed to investigate the evolutionary characteristics of drug target genes. We compared the evolutionary conservation between human drug target genes and non-target genes by combining both the evolutionary features and network topological properties in human protein-protein interaction network. The evolution rate, conservation score and the percentage of orthologous genes of 21 species were included in our study. Meanwhile, four topological features including the average shortest path length, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficient and degree were considered for comparison analysis. Then we got four results as following: compared with non-drug target genes, 1) drug target genes had lower evolutionary rates; 2) drug target genes had higher conservation scores; 3) drug target genes had higher percentages of orthologous genes and 4) drug target genes had a tighter network structure including higher degrees, betweenness centrality, clustering coefficients and lower average shortest path lengths. These results demonstrate that drug target genes are more evolutionarily conserved than non-drug target genes. We hope that our study will provide valuable information for other researchers who are interested in evolutionary conservation of drug targets.

  1. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  2. Integrin Targeted MR Imaging.

    PubMed

    Tan, Mingqian; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2011-01-19

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful medical diagnostic imaging modality for integrin targeted imaging, which uses the magnetic resonance of tissue water protons to display tissue anatomic structures with high spatial resolution. Contrast agents are often used in MRI to highlight specific regions of the body and make them easier to visualize. There are four main classes of MRI contrast agents based on their different contrast mechanisms, including T(1), T(2), chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) agents, and heteronuclear contrast agents. Integrins are an important family of heterodimeric transmembrane glycoproteins that function as mediators of cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. The overexpressed integrins can be used as the molecular targets for designing suitable integrin targeted contrast agents for MR molecular imaging. Integrin targeted contrast agent includes a targeting agent specific to a target integrin, a paramagnetic agent and a linker connecting the targeting agent with the paramagnetic agent. Proper selection of targeting agents is critical for targeted MRI contrast agents to effectively bind to integrins for in vivo imaging. An ideal integrin targeted MR contrast agent should be non-toxic, provide strong contrast enhancement at the target sites and can be completely excreted from the body after MR imaging. An overview of integrin targeted MR contrast agents based on small molecular and macromolecular Gd(III) complexes, lipid nanoparticles and superparamagnetic nanoparticles is provided for MR molecular imaging. By using proper delivery systems for loading sufficient Gd(III) chelates or superparamagnetic nanoparticles, effective molecular imaging of integrins with MRI has been demonstrated in animal models.

  3. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Kenny, P.A.; Lee, G.Y.; Bissell, M.J.

    2006-11-07

    Despite some notable successes cancer remains, for the most part, a seemingly intractable problem. There is, however, a growing appreciation that targeting the tumor epithelium in isolation is not sufficient as there is an intricate mutually sustaining synergy between the tumor epithelial cells and their surrounding stroma. As the details of this dialogue emerge, new therapeutic targets have been proposed. The FDA has already approved drugs targeting microenvironmental components such as VEGF and aromatase and many more agents are in the pipeline. In this article, we describe some of the 'druggable' targets and processes within the tumor microenvironment and review the approaches being taken to disrupt these interactions.

  4. Infrared target array development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. A.

    1980-04-01

    The US Army Yuma Proving Ground (USAYPG) was requested to develop and acquire a series of infrared targets with controllable thermal signatures to support the test and evaluation of the Target Acquisition Designation System/Pilot Night Vision System (TADS/PNVS) subsystems of the Advanced Attack Helicopter (AAH) Fire Control System. Prior to this development effort, no capability beyond the use of real-scene targets existed at USAYPG to provide thermally active targets with characteristic signatures in the infrared band. Three targets were acquired: (1) a detection target; (2) a recognition target; and (3) a laser scoring board. It is concluded that design goals were met and the system was delivered in time to perform its function. The system provides sufficient thermal realism and has advanced the state-of-the-art of infrared imaging system test and evaluation. It is recommended that the Field Equivalent Bar Target (FEBT) system be validated as a potential test standard and that environmentally 'hardened' targets be acquired for continued thermal sight testing.

  5. HIRFL-CSR internal cluster target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Caojie; Lu, Rongchun; Cai, Xiaohong; Yu, Deyang; Ruan, Fangfang; Xue, Yingli; Zhang, Jianming; Torpokov, D. K.; Nikolenko, D.

    2013-12-01

    Since HIRFL-CSR internal cluster target was built, it has played a key role in in-ring experiments at HIRFL-CSR. So far it have been operated with five gas species as targets for scattering experiments, i.e. hydrogen, nitrogen, argon, neon, and krypton. The obtained highest thickness for hydrogen target amounts up to 1012 atoms/cm2, and those of other targets are larger than 1013 atoms/cm2 with the background pressure of 10-11 mbar in CSR. The target thickness can be varied by regulating the nozzle temperature and pressure of the inlet gas. The first online internal target experiment dedicated to investigate radioactive electron capture (REC) process with Xe54+ ions colliding with the nitrogen target demonstrated the stability and reliability of the internal target system. In addition, hydrogen and krypton were also tested online in recent experiments, which indicate the target system can meet experimental requirements for the thickness of target, pressure in scattering chamber, and long-term stability.

  6. Summary Public School Indicators for the Provinces and Territories, 2000/2001 to 2006/2007. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockington, Riley

    2009-01-01

    This report provides trends on public school enrolments, educators and expenditures. It uses figures provided by provincial and territorial departments of education on public elementary and secondary schools. Tables and definitions are appended. A cumulative index is included. (Contains 80 charts, 35 tables and 5 endnotes.)

  7. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts,and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in > 11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 0.4 - 1.8 x 10(exp 3) s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx 2 - 9 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus two emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4) x 10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. Within the framework of the magnetar model, the net spin-down of the star could be explained by regions of the superfluid that rotate. slower than the rest. The bursts, flux enhancements, and pulse morphology changes can be explained as arising from crustal deformations due to stresses imposed by the highly twisted internal magnetic field. However, unlike other AXP outbursts, we cannot account for a major twist being implanted in the magnetosphere.

  8. Surveillance for high pathogenicity avian influenza virus in wild birds in the Pacific Flyway of the United States, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dusek, R.J.; Bortner, J.B.; DeLiberto, T.J.; Hoskins, J.; Franson, J. Christian; Bales, B.D.; Yparraguirre, D.; Swafford, S.R.; Ip, H.S.

    2009-01-01

    In 2006 the U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Department of Interior, and cooperating state fish and wildlife agencies began surveillance for high-pathogenicity avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus in wild birds in the Pacific Flyway of the United States. This surveillance effort was highly integrated in California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, and western Montana, with collection of samples coordinated with state agencies. Sampling focused on live wild birds, hunterkilled waterfowl during state hunting seasons, and wild bird mortality events. Of 20,888 samples collected, 18,139 were from order Anseriformes (waterfowl) and 2010 were from order Charadriiformes (shorebirds), representing the two groups of birds regarded to be the primary reservoirs of avian influenza viruses. Although 83 birds were positive by H5 real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR), no HPAI H5N1 virus was found. Thirty-two virus isolates were obtained from the H5- positive samples, including low-pathogenicity H5 viruses identified as H5N2, H5N3, and H5N9.

  9. Postseismic gravity change after the 2006-2007 great earthquake doublet and constraints on the asthenosphere structure in the central Kuril Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Shin-Chan; Sauber, Jeanne; Pollitz, Fred

    2016-04-01

    Large earthquakes often trigger viscoelastic adjustment for years to decades depending on the rheological properties and the nature and spatial extent of coseismic stress. The 2006 Mw8.3 thrust and 2007 Mw8.1 normal fault earthquakes of the central Kuril Islands resulted in significant postseismic gravity change in Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) but without a discernible coseismic gravity change. The gravity increase of ~4 μGal, observed consistently from various GRACE solutions around the epicentral area during 2007-2015, is interpreted as resulting from gradual seafloor uplift by ~6 cm produced by postseismic relaxation. The GRACE data are best fit with a model of 25-35 km for the elastic thickness and ~1018 Pa s for the Maxwell viscosity of the asthenosphere. The large measurable postseismic gravity change (greater than coseismic change) emphasizes the importance of viscoelastic relaxation in understanding tectonic deformation and fault-locking scenarios in the Kuril subduction zone.

  10. Antimicrobial Resistance among Respiratory Pathogens in Spain: Latest Data and Changes over 11 Years (1996-1997 to 2006-2007)▿

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Martín-Herrero, Jose E.; Mazón, Ana; García-Delafuente, Celia; Robles, Purificación; Iriarte, Victor; Dal-Ré, Rafael; García-de-Lomas, Juan

    2010-01-01

    A nationwide multicenter susceptibility surveillance study (Susceptibility to the Antimicrobials Used in the Community in España [SAUCE] project), SAUCE-4, including 2,559 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2,287 Streptococcus pyogenes, and 2,736 Haemophilus influenzae isolates was carried out from May 2006 to June 2007 in 34 Spanish hospitals. Then, the results from SAUCE-4 were compared to those from all three previous SAUCE studies carried out in 1996-1997, 1998-1999, and 2001-2002 to assess the temporal trends in resistance and the phenotypes of resistance over the 11-year period. In SAUCE-4, on the basis of the CLSI breakpoints, penicillin (parenteral, nonmeningitis breakpoint) and cefotaxime were the antimicrobials that were the most active against S. pneumoniae (99.8% and 99.6%, respectively). Only 0.9% of isolates had a penicillin MIC of ≥2 μg/ml. In S. pyogenes, nonsusceptibility to erythromycin was observed in 19.4% of isolates. Among the H. influenzae isolates, a β-lactamase-positive prevalence of 15.7% was found. A statistically significant temporal decreasing trend over the 11-year period was observed for nonsusceptibility (from 60.0% to 22.9%) and resistance (from 36.5% to 0.9%) to penicillin and for the proportion of erythromycin-resistant isolates of S. pneumoniae of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype (from 98.4% to 81.3%). A similar trend was observed for the prevalence of ampicillin resistance (from 37.6% to 16.1%), β-lactamase production (from 25.7% to 15.7%), and β-lactamase-negative ampicillin resistance (BLNAR) in H. influenzae (from 13.5% to 0.7%). Among erythromycin-resistant isolates of S. pyogenes, a significant increasing trend in the prevalence of MLSB was observed (from 7.0% to 35.5%). SAUCE-4 confirms a generalized decline in the resistance of the main respiratory pathogens to the antimicrobials as well as a shift in their resistance phenotypes. PMID:20439616

  11. Antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens in Spain: latest data and changes over 11 years (1996-1997 to 2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Martín-Herrero, Jose E; Mazón, Ana; García-Delafuente, Celia; Robles, Purificación; Iriarte, Victor; Dal-Ré, Rafael; García-de-Lomas, Juan

    2010-07-01

    A nationwide multicenter susceptibility surveillance study (Susceptibility to the Antimicrobials Used in the Community in España [SAUCE] project), SAUCE-4, including 2,559 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2,287 Streptococcus pyogenes, and 2,736 Haemophilus influenzae isolates was carried out from May 2006 to June 2007 in 34 Spanish hospitals. Then, the results from SAUCE-4 were compared to those from all three previous SAUCE studies carried out in 1996-1997, 1998-1999, and 2001-2002 to assess the temporal trends in resistance and the phenotypes of resistance over the 11-year period. In SAUCE-4, on the basis of the CLSI breakpoints, penicillin (parenteral, nonmeningitis breakpoint) and cefotaxime were the antimicrobials that were the most active against S. pneumoniae (99.8% and 99.6%, respectively). Only 0.9% of isolates had a penicillin MIC of > or = 2 microg/ml. In S. pyogenes, nonsusceptibility to erythromycin was observed in 19.4% of isolates. Among the H. influenzae isolates, a beta-lactamase-positive prevalence of 15.7% was found. A statistically significant temporal decreasing trend over the 11-year period was observed for nonsusceptibility (from 60.0% to 22.9%) and resistance (from 36.5% to 0.9%) to penicillin and for the proportion of erythromycin-resistant isolates of S. pneumoniae of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) phenotype (from 98.4% to 81.3%). A similar trend was observed for the prevalence of ampicillin resistance (from 37.6% to 16.1%), beta-lactamase production (from 25.7% to 15.7%), and beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin resistance (BLNAR) in H. influenzae (from 13.5% to 0.7%). Among erythromycin-resistant isolates of S. pyogenes, a significant increasing trend in the prevalence of MLS(B) was observed (from 7.0% to 35.5%). SAUCE-4 confirms a generalized decline in the resistance of the main respiratory pathogens to the antimicrobials as well as a shift in their resistance phenotypes.

  12. Science Assessments for Students with Disabilities in School Year 2006-2007: What We Know about Participation, Performance, and Accommodations. Synthesis Report 77

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurlow, Martha; Rogers, Christopher; Christensen, Laurene

    2010-01-01

    The success of all students, including students with disabilities, on statewide assessments in mathematics and reading/English language arts has been examined closely. This is due, in part, to the role of these content areas in school accountability for the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) known as "No Child Left Behind" (NCLB).…

  13. Sequential Rift Valley Fever Outbreaks in Kenya, Somalia, and Tanzania in 2006-2007 Associated with Multiple Lineages of the Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine testing for Campylobacter spp. in the food chain is primarily directed toward detection of C. jejuni and C. coli, thus the presence of novel Campylobacter spp., and their relative contribution to human illness, is not well understood. A survey to determine the presence of Campylobacter spp....

  14. Pesticides in Water and Suspended Sediment of the Alamo and New Rivers, Imperial Valley/Salton Sea Basin, California, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orlando, James L.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.

    2008-01-01

    Water and suspended-sediment samples were collected at eight sites on the Alamo and New Rivers in the Imperial Valley/Salton Sea Basin of California and analyzed for both current-use and organochlorine pesticides by the U.S. Geological Survey. Samples were collected in the fall of 2006 and spring of 2007, corresponding to the seasons of greatest pesticide use in the basin. Large-volume water samples (up to 650 liters) were collected at each site and processed using a flow-through centrifuge to isolate suspended sediments. One-liter water samples were collected from the effluent of the centrifuge for the analysis of dissolved pesticides. Additional samples were collected for analysis of dissolved organic carbon and for suspended-sediment concentrations. Water samples were analyzed for a suite of 61 current-use and organochlorine pesticides using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. A total of 25 pesticides were detected in the water samples, with seven pesticides detected in more than half of the samples. Dissolved concentrations of pesticides observed in this study ranged from below their respective method detection limits to 8,940 nanograms per liter (EPTC). The most frequently detected compounds in the water samples were chlorpyrifos, DCPA, EPTC, and trifluralin, which were observed in more than 75 percent of the samples. The maximum concentrations of most pesticides were detected in samples from the Alamo River. Maximum dissolved concentrations of carbofuran, chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and malathion exceeded aquatic life benchmarks established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for these pesticides. Suspended sediments were analyzed for 87 current-use and organochlorine pesticides using microwave-assisted extraction, gel permeation chromatography for sulfur removal, and either carbon/alumina stacked solid-phase extraction cartridges or deactivated Florisil for removal of matrix interferences. Twenty current-use pesticides were detected in the suspended-sediment samples, including pyrethroid insecticides and fungicides. Fourteen legacy organochlorine pesticides also were detected in the suspended-sediment samples. Greater numbers of current-use and organochlorine pesticides were observed in the Alamo River samples in comparison with the New River samples. Maximum concentrations of current-use pesticides in suspended-sediment samples ranged from below their method detection limits to 174 micrograms per kilogram (pendimethalin). Most organochlorine pesticides were detected at or below their method detection limits, with the exception of p,p'-DDE, which had a maximum concentration of 54.2 micrograms per kilogram. The most frequently detected current-use pesticides in the suspended-sediment samples were chlorpyrifos, permethrin, tetraconazole, and trifluralin, which were observed in more than 83 percent of the samples. The organochlorine degradates p,p'-DDD and p,p'-DDE were detected in all suspended-sediment samples.

  15. Evidence of magma intrusion at Fourpeaked volcano, Alaska in 2006-2007 from a rapid-response seismic network and volcanic gases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardine, M.; West, M.; Werner, C.; Doukas, M.

    2011-01-01

    On September 17th, 2006, Fourpeaked volcano had a widely-observed phreatic eruption. At the time, Fourpeaked was an unmonitored volcano with no known Holocene activity, based on limited field work. Airborne gas sampling began within days of the eruption and a modest seismic network was installed in stages. Vigorous steaming continued for months; however, there were no further eruptions similar in scale to the September 17 event. This eruption was followed by several months of sustained seismicity punctuated by vigorous swarms, and SO2 emissions exceeding a thousand tons/day. Based on observations during and after the phreatic eruption, and assuming no recent pre-historical eruptive activity at Fourpeaked, we propose that the activity was caused by a minor injection of new magma at or near 5km depth beneath Fourpeaked, which remained active over several months as this magma equilibrated into the crust. By early 2007 declining seismicity and SO2 emission signaled the end of unrest. Because the Fourpeaked seismic network was installed in stages and the seismicity was punctuated by discrete swarms, we use Fourpeaked to illustrate quantitatively the efficacy and shortcomings of rapid response seismic networks for tracking volcanic earthquakes.

  16. A national interactive web-based physical activity intervention in women, evaluation of the american heart association choose to move program 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Sarah B; Redberg, Rita F; Blumenthal, Roger S; Gandhi, Anu; Robb, Karen J; Mora, Samia

    2012-06-15

    Increased physical activity (PA) is associated with improvement of cardiac risk factors and prevention of cardiovascular disease, yet many women remain sedentary. With rising Internet use, Web-based interventions provide an alternative to improve PA, but their effectiveness for change in PA and quality of life (QOL) in a real-world setting is unknown. Participants were United States women ≥18 years old who received 12 weekly PA modules and completed surveys on PA, QOL, and readiness for PA at registration (registration cohort, n = 3,796) or registration and 12 weeks (evaluation cohort, n = 892). QOL was assessed with a modified Short Form-36 with subscores for energy and well-being. Participants showed significant (p <0.001) favorable changes in PA (baseline, median 240 kcal/week, interquartile range 62 to 667; 12 weeks, 343 kcal/week, 131 to 828), stage of readiness for PA, and body mass index (baseline, 29.3 kg/m(2), 24.9 to 34.7; 12 weeks, 28.9 kg/m(2), 24.6 to 34.2). Significant improvements (p <0.0001) were also found in composite scores for energy and well-being. Compliance with PA guideline recommendations increased from 15.8% to 21.4%. Program weeks completed (p = 0.03), energy (p = 0.04), and well-being (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with achieving guideline compliance. In women reporting no PA at baseline (n = 88), program participation resulted in 54.6% achieving some PA and another 9.1% achieving total compliance with recommendations. In conclusion, in this national cohort of women, a 12-week Web-based intervention improved PA and QOL measurements, resulting in higher short-term PA guideline compliance and better QOL. Increasing use of this simple Web-based tool could improve PA and promote disease prevention.

  17. The 2006-2007 Active Phase Of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts, and Burst Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gavril, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2009-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in >11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10(exp 3)s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx. 2 - 6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus three emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4)x10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. We discuss these events in the context of the magnetar model.

  18. Predominance of rotavirus G2P[4] and emergence of G12P[9] strains in Asunción, Paraguay, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Magaly; Amarilla, Alberto A; Galeano, Maria E; Aquino, Victor H; Fariña, Norma; Russomando, Graciela; Parra, Gabriel I

    2010-04-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe diarrhea in children worldwide. Monitoring the diversity of rotavirus strains is of great importance for current and future vaccination programs. To determine the diversity of rotavirus circulating in Asuncion, Paraguay, between 2006 and 2007, we carried out a molecular characterization of rotaviruses detected in children <5 years old and adults (>18 years old). We found that the most common circulating strain was G2P[4] (69/143), followed by G9P[8] (37/143). The temporal distribution of strains showed that, in children, G2P[4] was predominant in 2006, and that G2P[4] and G9P[8] were co-predominant in 2007, whereas in adults, G2P[4] was predominant in both years. Additionally, one G9P[6] and three G12P[9] strains were found in adult samples, making this the first report of these strains circulating in Paraguay. Sequence analysis of the G12P[9] strains suggests across-border migration of this strain within the southern cone of America.

  19. The Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna ultra-high energy neutrino detector: Design, performance, and sensitivity for 2006-2007 balloon flight

    SciTech Connect

    Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; Barwick, S. W.; Beatty, J. J.; Besson, D. Z.; Binns, W. R.; Chen, C.; Chen, P.; Clem, J. M.; Connolly, A.; Dowkontt, P. F.; DuVernois, M. A.; Field, R. C.; Goldstein, D.; Goodhue, A.; Hast, C.; Hebert, C. L.; Hoover, S.; Israel, M. H.; Learned, J. G.

    2009-05-23

    In this article, we present a comprehensive report on the experimental details of the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) long-duration balloon payload, including the design philosophy and realization, physics simulations, performance of the instrument during its first Antarctic flight completed in January of 2007, and expectations for the limiting neutrino detection sensitivity.

  20. Expanding Access and Increasing Success in Postsecondary Education for Arizonans. The Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) 2006-2007 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The work of the Arizona Commission for Postsecondary Education (ACPE) is guided by a 5 year strategic plan. The purpose of the plan is to provide focus for the activity of this small agency and its eight staff members in order to increase productivity and impact in the areas of its statutory authority. The mission and goals were accepted by…

  1. Epidemiological study on leishmaniasis in an area of environmental tourism and ecotourism, State of Mato Grosso do Sul, 2006-2007.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Ana Rachel Oliveira de; Nunes, Vânia Lúcia Brandão; Galati, Eunice Aparecida Bianchi; de Arruda, Carla Cardozo Pinto; Santos, Mirella Ferreira da Cunha; Rocca, Maria Elizabeth Gizi; Aquino, Ricardo Braga

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to carry out a serological survey of canine leishmaniasis and identify the phlebotomine fauna in the urban area of Bonito, Mato Grosso do Sul. The serological survey was conducted on a sample of 303 dogs, by means of the indirect immunofluorescence test. Phlebotomines were captured using automated light traps. The serological survey found that 30% of the dogs were seropositive, both from the center and from all districts of the town. A total of 2,772 specimens of phlebotomines were caught and the species most found was Lutzomyia longipalpis (90.4%), which corroborated its role as the vector of for canine visceral leishmaniasis in the region. Phlebotomines of the species Bichromomyia flaviscutellata (the main vector for Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis) and Nyssomyia whitmani (the vector for Leishmania (Viannia) brasiliensis) were also caught. The findings indicate the need for continuous epidemiological surveillance, with attention towards diminishing the vector breeding sites and the transmission of these diseases in that region.

  2. Target visibility for multiple maneuvering target tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabordo, Madeleine G.; Aboutanios, Elias

    2015-05-01

    We present a recursion of the probability of target visibility and its applications to analysis of track life and termination in the context of Global Nearest Neighbour (GNN) approach and Probability Hypothesis Density (PHD) filter. In the presence of uncertainties brought about by clutter; decisions to retain a track, terminate it or initialise a new track are based on probability, rather than on distance criterion or estimation error. The visibility concept is introduced into a conventional data-association-oriented multitarget tracker, the GNN; and a random finite set based-tracker, the PHD filter, to take into account instances when targets become invisible or occluded by obstacles. We employ the natural logarithmof the Dynamic Error Spectrum to assess the performance of the trackers with and without probability of visibility incorporated. Simulation results show that the performance of the GNN tracker with visibility concept incorporated is significantly enhanced.

  3. Gene targeting in livestock.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A J; Marques, M M; McWhir, J

    2003-01-01

    The development of nuclear transfer from tissue culture cells in livestock made it possible in principle to produce animals with subtle, directed genetic changes by in vitro modification of nuclear donor cells. In the short period since nuclear transfer was first performed, gene targeting in livestock has become a reality. Although gene targeting has immediate potential in biotechnology, it is unclear whether there are practical agricultural applications, at present. The first livestock targeting experiments have been directed at engineering animals either to render their organs immunologically compatible for human transplantation, or for improving the commercial production of recombinant proteins in the transgenic mammary gland. All successful examples of targeting have involved target loci that are expressed in the nuclear donor cell line. Two important barriers to the further development of this technology are adapting protocols for non-expressed genes and modifying procedures to enhance the lifespan of targeted cells in vitro. This review provides data that illustrate the difficulty in targeting non-expressed genes and discusses some of the practical issues associated with providing targeted nuclear donor cells that are competent for nuclear transfer.

  4. Knowing Your Learning Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Connie M.; Brookhart, Susan M.; Long, Beverly A.

    2011-01-01

    No matter what we decide students need to learn, not much will happen until students understand what they are supposed to learn during a lesson and set their sights on learning it. Crafting learning targets for each lesson and deliberately sharing them with students is one way to give students the direction they need. Targets that tell students…

  5. Methodology for target discrimination.

    PubMed

    McNolty, F; Clow, R

    1980-03-15

    The objective is to distinguish the true target from point-target imitators and from extended-target clutter in the exoatmospheric regime. Matched filters are carefully studied from the viewpoint of SNR enhancement and pulse recognition. The matched filter structure takes into account photon noise, modulation noise, generation-recombination (GR) noise, contact noise, and various thermal noise sources. A multicolor radiant-intensity structure for target discrimination is developed by analyzing the uncertainties in such target irradiance parameters as range, temperature, projected area, and emissivity. Bias terms, variances, and other statistical descriptors are derived. Certain statistical discrimination techniques are discussed that exploit the radiant-intensity format. Helstrom's method for processing radar signals is adapted to a fourchannel pulse-recognition system for which degradation due to arrival time delays and mismatched filters is discussed.

  6. Advanced Targeted Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Arachchige, Mohan C M; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2015-01-01

    Targeted drug delivery has been the major topic in drug formulation and delivery. As nanomedicine emerges to create nano scale therapeutics and diagnostics, it is still essential to embed targeting capability to these novel systems to make them useful. Here we discuss various targeting approaches for delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic nano materials in view of search for more universal methods to target diseased tissues. Many diseases are accompanied with hypoxia and acidosis. Coating nanoparticles with pH Low Insertion Peptides (pHLIPs) increases efficiency of targeting acidic diseased tissues. It has been showing promising results to create future nanotheranostics for cancer and other diseases which are dominating in the present world. PMID:25615945

  7. Infrared Target Array Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntire, Thomas O.; Scott, Edward A.

    1982-03-01

    A "life size" thermal target array has been developed to facilitate in-flight testing of airborne weapon systems containing night vision subsystems. This in-flight testing to measure the performance of the night vision subsystem and its effect on overall weapon system performance is essential to the test and evaluation process of the particular weapon under test. This measurement of subsystem performance is called the Modulation Transfer Function, or MTF. In addition, a laser designator subsystem is frequently incorporated in a precision guided munition weapon system. In the test and evaluation of the designator, such quantities as beam quality (energy distribution), beam divergence, and beam wander are of interest. The thermal targets may be used to evaluate armored weapon systems. The capability of providing carefully controlled and variable thermal signatures in a field test environment is considered unique. The thermal target array consists of three targets: A six bar recognition target, a two bar detection target, and a laser designator scoring board (cross-hair). The image dimensions of 2.3 meters by 2.3 meters were derived from an optimized threat envelope. The thermal signatures of the targets are controllable to within 0.3 C about a differential setpoint. This differential setpoint is measured between the active element and the target background (or "ambient"). Several differential temperature settings are available to the test officer: 1.25°C, 3°C, 5°C, 7.5°C, and 10°C. This paper reviews the thermal array test objectives, target array fabrication, methodology of target utilization, and representative results.

  8. Coping with investigators and investigations.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D O; Fee, M K

    1991-09-01

    Most businesses in highly regulated industries like health care are likely to face an investigation at some point. By knowing ahead of time how to properly respond to investigators' requests and by exercising caution during the investigation, health care agencies can minimize the potential damage.

  9. Advances in targeted genome editing.

    PubMed

    Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Ousterout, David G; Gersbach, Charles A

    2012-08-01

    New technologies have recently emerged that enable targeted editing of genomes in diverse systems. This includes precise manipulation of gene sequences in their natural chromosomal context and addition of transgenes to specific genomic loci. This progress has been facilitated by advances in engineering targeted nucleases with programmable, site-specific DNA-binding domains, including zinc finger proteins and transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs). Recent improvements have enhanced nuclease performance, accelerated nuclease assembly, and lowered the cost of genome editing. These advances are driving new approaches to many areas of biotechnology, including biopharmaceutical production, agriculture, creation of transgenic organisms and cell lines, and studies of genome structure, regulation, and function. Genome editing is also being investigated in preclinical and clinical gene therapies for many diseases.

  10. Targeted Learning in Healthcare Research.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Susan

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of Big Data in healthcare encourages investigators to seek answers to big questions. However, nonparametric approaches to analyzing these data can suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and traditional parametric modeling does not necessarily scale. Targeted learning (TL) combines semiparametric methodology with advanced machine learning techniques to provide a sound foundation for extracting information from data. Predictive models, variable importance measures, and treatment benefits and risks can all be addressed within this framework. TL has been applied in a broad range of healthcare settings, including genomics, precision medicine, health policy, and drug safety. This article provides an introduction to the two main components of TL, targeted minimum loss-based estimation and super learning, and gives examples of applications in predictive modeling, variable importance ranking, and comparative effectiveness research.

  11. Antihyperlipidemic therapies targeting PCSK9.

    PubMed

    Weinreich, Michael; Frishman, William H

    2014-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a major cause of cardiovascular disease despite the availability of first-line cholesterol-lowering agents such as statins. A new therapeutic approach to lowering low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) acts by blocking LDL-receptor degradation by serum proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9). Human monoclonal antibodies that target PCSK9 and its interaction with the LDL receptor are now in clinical trials (REGN727/SAR23653, AMG145, and RN316). These agents are administered by either subcutaneous or intravenous routes, and have been shown to have major LDL-C and apolipoprotein B effects when combined with statins. A phase III clinical trial program evaluating clinical endpoints is now in progress. Other PCSK9-targeted approaches are in early stages of investigation, including natural inhibitors of PCSK9, RNA interference, and antisense inhibitors.

  12. Targeted Learning in Healthcare Research.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Susan

    2015-12-01

    The increasing availability of Big Data in healthcare encourages investigators to seek answers to big questions. However, nonparametric approaches to analyzing these data can suffer from the curse of dimensionality, and traditional parametric modeling does not necessarily scale. Targeted learning (TL) combines semiparametric methodology with advanced machine learning techniques to provide a sound foundation for extracting information from data. Predictive models, variable importance measures, and treatment benefits and risks can all be addressed within this framework. TL has been applied in a broad range of healthcare settings, including genomics, precision medicine, health policy, and drug safety. This article provides an introduction to the two main components of TL, targeted minimum loss-based estimation and super learning, and gives examples of applications in predictive modeling, variable importance ranking, and comparative effectiveness research. PMID:27441404

  13. Nuclear target development

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, J.P.; Thomas, G.E.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces thin foil targets needed for experiments performed at the ATLAS and Dynamitron accelerators. Targets are not only produced for the Physics Division but also for other divisions and occasionally for other laboratories and universities. In the past year, numerous targets were fabricated by vacuum evaporation either as self-supporting foils or on various substrates. Targets produced included Ag, Au, {sup 10,11}B, {sup 138}Ba, Be, {sup 12}C, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 155,160}Gd, {sup 76}Ge, In, LID, {sup 6}LiH, Melamine, Mg, {sup 142,150}Nd, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 206,208}Pb, {sup 194}Pt, {sup 28}Si, {sup 144,148}Sm, {sup 120,122,124}Sn, Ta, {sup 130}Te, ThF{sub 4}, {sup 46,50}Ti, TiH, U, UF{sub 4}, {sup 182}W and {sup 170}Yb. Polypropylene and aluminized polypropylene, along with metallized Mylar were produced for experiments at ATLAS. A number of targets of {sup 11}B of various thickness were made for the DEP 2-MeV Van de Graff accelerator. An increased output of foils fabricated using our small rolling mill included targets of Au, C, {sup 50}Cr, Cu, {sup 155,160}Gd, Mg, {sup 58}Ni, {sup 208}Pb, {sup 105,110}Pd. Sc, Ti, and {sup 64,66}Zn.

  14. Applying target shadow models for SAR ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papson, Scott; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2007-04-01

    Recent work has suggested that target shadows in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images can be used effectively to aid in target classification. The method outlined in this paper has four steps - segmentation, representation, modeling, and selection. Segmentation is the process by which a smooth, background-free representation of the target's shadow is extracted from an image chip. A chain code technique is then used to represent the shadow boundary. Hidden Markov modeling is applied to sets of chain codes for multiple targets to create a suitable bank of target representations. Finally, an ensemble framework is proposed for classification. The proposed model selection process searches for an optimal ensemble of models based on various target model configurations. A five target subset of the MSTAR database is used for testing. Since the shadow is a back-projection of the target profile, some aspect angles will contain more discriminatory information then others. Therefore, performance is investigated as a function of aspect angle. Additionally, the case of multiple target looks is considered. The capability of the shadow-only classifier to enhance more traditional classification techniques is examined.

  15. STIS target acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraemer, Steve; Downes, Ron; Katsanis, Rocio; Crenshaw, Mike; McGrath, Melissa; Robinson, Rich

    1997-01-01

    We describe the STIS autonomous target acquisition capabilities. We also present the results of dedicated tests executed as part of Cycle 7 calibration, following post-launch improvements to the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) flight software. The residual pointing error from the acquisitions are < 0.5 CCD pixels, which is better than preflight estimates. Execution of peakups show clear improvement of target centering for slits of width 0.1 sec or smaller. These results may be used by Guest Observers in planning target acquisitions for their STIS programs.

  16. USGS aerial resolution targets.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Salamonowicz, P.H.

    1982-01-01

    It is necessary to measure the achievable resolution of any airborne sensor that is to be used for metric purposes. Laboratory calibration facilities may be inadequate or inappropriate for determining the resolution of non-photographic sensors such as optical-mechanical scanners, television imaging tubes, and linear arrays. However, large target arrays imaged in the field can be used in testing such systems. The USGS has constructed an array of resolution targets in order to permit field testing of a variety of airborne sensing systems. The target array permits any interested organization with an airborne sensing system to accurately determine the operational resolution of its system. -from Author

  17. Fire investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, A.

    There was considerable progress made on several fronts of fire investigation in the United States in recent years. Progress was made in increasing the quantity of fire investigation and reporting, through efforts to develop the National Fire Incident Reporting System. Improving overall quality of fire investigation is the objective of efforts such as the Fire Investigation Handbook, which was developed and published by the National Bureau of Standards, and the upgrading and expanding of the ""dictionary'' of fire investigation and reporting, the NFPA 901, Uniform Coding for Fire Protection, system. The science of fire investigation as furthered also by new approaches to post fire interviews being developed at the University of Washington, and by in-depth research into factors involved in several large loss fires, including the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. Finally, the use of special study fire investigations - in-depth investigations concentrating on specific fire problems - is producing new glimpses into the nature of the national fire problem. A brief description of the status of efforts in each of these areas is discussed.

  18. Nras in melanoma: targeting the undruggable target.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Mario; Merelli, Barbara; Massi, Daniela

    2014-11-01

    RAS belongs to the guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins' family, and oncogenic mutations in codons 12, 13, or 61 of RAS family occur in approximately one third of all human cancers with N-RAS mutations found in about 15-20% of melanomas. The importance of RAS signaling as a potential target in cancer is emphasized not only by the prevalence of RAS mutations, but also by the high number of RAS activators and effectors identified in mammalian cells that places the RAS proteins at the crossroads of several, important signaling networks. Ras proteins are crucial crossroads of signaling pathways that link the activation of cell surface receptors with a wide variety of cellular processes leading to the control of proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. Furthermore, oncogenic ras proteins interfere with metabolism of tumor cells, microenvironment's remodeling, evasion of the immune response, and finally contributes to the metastatic process. After 40 years of basic, translational and clinical research, much is now known about the molecular mechanisms by which these monomeric guanosine triphosphatase-binding proteins promote cellular malignancy, and it is clear that they regulate signaling pathways involved in the control of cell proliferation, survival, and invasiveness. In this review we summarize the biological role of RAS in cancer by focusing our attention on the biological rational and strategies to target RAS in melanoma.

  19. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Oyewole, Anne O; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    Redox homeostasis is maintained by the antioxidant defense system, which is responsible for eliminating a wide range of oxidants, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxides, and metals. Mitochondria-localized antioxidants are widely studied because the mitochondria, the major producers of intracellular ROS, have been linked to the cause of aging and other chronic diseases. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants have shown great potential because they cross the mitochondrial phospholipid bilayer and eliminate ROS at the heart of the source. Growing evidence has identified mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ and tiron, as potentially effective antioxidant therapies against the damage caused by enhanced ROS generation. This literature review summarizes the current knowledge on mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and their contribution to the body's antioxidant defense system. In addition to addressing the concerns surrounding current antioxidant strategies, including difficulties in targeting antioxidant treatment to sites of pathologic oxidative damage, we discuss promising therapeutic agents and new strategic approaches.

  20. Multiple shell fusion targets

    DOEpatents

    Lindl, J.D.; Bangerter, R.O.

    1975-10-31

    Multiple shell fusion targets for use with electron beam and ion beam implosion systems are described. The multiple shell targets are of the low-power type and use a separate relatively low Z, low density ablator at large radius for the outer shell, which reduces the focusing and power requirements of the implosion system while maintaining reasonable aspect ratios. The targets use a high Z, high density pusher shell placed at a much smaller radius in order to obtain an aspect ratio small enough to protect against fluid instability. Velocity multiplication between these shells further lowers the power requirements. Careful tuning of the power profile and intershell density results in a low entropy implosion which allows breakeven at low powers. For example, with ion beams as a power source, breakeven at 10-20 Terrawatts with 10 MeV alpha particles for imploding a multiple shell target can be accomplished.

  1. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Saved Articles » My ACS » + - Text Size Target Heart Rate Calculator Compute your best workout Enter your age ... is your age? years. How to Check Your Heart Rate Right after you stop exercising, take your pulse: ...

  2. Investigating white-nose syndrome in bats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blehert, David S.

    2009-01-01

    A devastating, emergent disease afflicting hibernating bats has pread from the northeast to the mid-Atlantic region of the United States at an alarming rate. Since the winter of 2006-2007, hundreds of thousands of insect-eating bats from at least nine states have died from this new disease, named White-Nose Syndrome (WNS). The disease is named for the white fungus often seen on the muzzles, ears, and wings of bats. This disease poses a threat to cave hibernating bats of the United States and potentially all temperate regions of the world. USGS scientists from the National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) and the Fort Collins Science Center (FORT), in collaboration with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and others have linked a newly described, cold-loving fungus to WNS.

  3. Liposomes for cardiovascular targeting.

    PubMed

    Levchenko, Tatyana S; Hartner, William C; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-04-01

    Liposome-based pharmaceuticals used within the cardiovascular system are reviewed in this article. The delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents by plain liposomes and liposomes with surface-attached targeting antibodies or polyethylene glycol to prolong their circulation time and accumulation at vascular injuries, ischemic zones or sites of thrombi are also discussed. An overview of the advantages and disadvantages of liposome-mediated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo targeting is presented, including discussion of the targeting of liposomes to pathological sites on the blood vessel wall and a description of liposomes that can be internalized by endothelial cells. Diagnostic liposomes used to target myocardial infarction and the relative importance of liposome size, targetability of immunoliposomes and prolonged circulation time on the efficiency of sealing hypoxia-induced plasma membrane damage to cardiocytes are discussed as a promising approach for therapy. The progress in the use of targeted liposomal plasmids for the transfection of hypoxic cardiomyocytes and myocardium is presented. Stent-mediated liposomal-based drug delivery is also reviewed briefly. PMID:22834079

  4. How Does Target Duration Affect Object Substitution Masking?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gellatly, Angus; Pilling, Michael; Carter, Wakefield; Guest, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Object substitution masking (OSM) is typically studied using a brief search display. The target item may be indicated by a cue/mask surrounding but not overlapping it. Report of the target is reduced when mask offset trails target offset rather than being simultaneous with it. We report 5 experiments investigating whether OSM can be obtained if…

  5. Quaternary investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The primary purpose of the Quaternary investigation is to provide information on the location and age of Quaternary deposits for use in evaluating the presence or absence of neotectonic deformation or paleoliquefaction features within the Savannah River Site (SRS) region. The investigation will provide a basis for evaluating the potential for capable faults and associated deformation in the SRS vicinity. Particular attention will be paid to the Pen Branch fault.

  6. Gene Therapy and Targeted Toxins for Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Maria G.; Candolfi, Marianela; Kroeger, Kurt; King, Gwendalyn D.; Curtin, James F.; Yagiz, Kader; Mineharu, Yohei; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia; Muhammad, AKM Ghulam; Foulad, David; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro R.

    2011-01-01

    The most common primary brain tumor in adults is glioblastoma. These tumors are highly invasive and aggressive with a mean survival time of nine to twelve months from diagnosis to death. Current treatment modalities are unable to significantly prolong survival in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma. As such, glioma is an attractive target for developing novel therapeutic approaches utilizing gene therapy. This review will examine the available preclinical models for glioma including xenographs, syngeneic and genetic models. Several promising therapeutic targets are currently being pursued in pre-clinical investigations. These targets will be reviewed by mechanism of action, i.e., conditional cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses, tumor suppressors/oncogenes, and immune stimulatory approaches. Preclinical gene therapy paradigms aim to determine which strategies will provide rapid tumor regression and long-term protection from recurrence. While a wide range of potential targets are being investigated preclinically, only the most efficacious are further transitioned into clinical trial paradigms. Clinical trials reported to date are summarized including results from conditionally cytotoxic, targeted toxins, oncolytic viruses and oncogene targeting approaches. Clinical trial results have not been as robust as preclinical models predicted; this could be due to the limitations of the GBM models employed. Once this is addressed, and we develop effective gene therapies in models that better replicate the clinical scenario, gene therapy will provide a powerful approach to treat and manage brain tumors. PMID:21453286

  7. Targeted therapies in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bronte, F; Bronte, G; Cusenza, S; Fiorentino, E; Rolfo, C; Cicero, G; Bronte, E; Di Marco, V; Firenze, A; Angarano, G; Fontana, T; Russo, A

    2014-01-01

    The onset of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is related to the development of non-neoplastic liver disease, such as viral infections and cirrhosis. Even though patients with chronic liver diseases undergo clinical surveillance for early diagnosis of HCC, this cancer is often diagnosed in advanced stage. In this case locoregional treatment is not possible and systemic therapies are the best way to control it. Until now sorafenib, a Raf and multi-kinase inhibitor has been the best, choice to treat HCC systemically. It showed a survival benefit in multicenter phase III trials. However the proper patient setting to treat is not well defined, since the results in Child-Pugh B patients are conflicting. To date various new target drugs are under developed and other biological treatments normally indicated in other malignancies are under investigation also for HCC. These strategies aim to target the different biological pathways implicated in HCC development and progression. The target drugs studied in HCC include anti-VEGF and anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mTOR inhibitors. The most important challenge is represented by the best integration of these drugs with standard treatments to achieve improvement in overall survival and quality of life.

  8. A heuristic multiple target tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaupre, J. C. F.; Farooq, M.; Roy, J. M. J.

    1992-04-01

    The potential of applying recent developments in expert systems to multiple target tracking (MTT) is investigated. Standard MTT algorithms can generate relatively unreliable target state estimates. The multiple hypotheses tracker (MHT) is a very powerful algorithm, and demanding in computer resources, which can handle difficult situations by differing the formulation of hard decisions and which forms hypothetical tracks with associated probability values. It is proposed that heuristics can be formulated to improve MHT performance. These rules act on the tracks, hypotheses, and corresponding probability values to decide which hypotheses are most representative of reality. In effect, the MHT algorithm is modified to accept and process knowledge of the context or environment in which it operates and on its own strengths and weaknesses. To evaluate the performance of this concept, a prototype has been built which simulates the environment of a small military flight training school as viewed through the returns of a modified area surveillance radar. In a scenario involving nine targets behaving within regulated directives, the tracking prototype successfully displays timely, accurate, and dependable information.

  9. TARGETED THERAPIES FOR PANCREATIC CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Danovi, S A; Wong, H H; Lemoine, N R

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic cancer is a devastating malignancy and a leading cause of cancer mortality. Furthermore, early diagnosis represents a serious hurdle for clinicians as symptoms are non-specific and usually manifest in advanced, treatment-resistant stages of the disease. Sources of data Here, we review the rationale and progress of targeted therapies currently under investigation. Areas of agreement At present, chemoradiation regimes are administered palliatively, and produce only marginal survival benefits, underscoring a desperate need for more effective treatment modalities. Areas of controversy Questions have been raised as to whether erlotinib, the only targeted therapy to attain a statistically significant increase in median survival, is cost-effective. Growing points The last decade of research has provided us with a wealth of information regarding the molecular nature of pancreatic cancer, leading to the identification of signalling pathways and their respective components which are critical for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Areas timely for developing research These proteins thus represent ideal targets for novel molecular therapies which embody an urgently needed novel treatment strategy. PMID:18753179

  10. Target discrimination strategies in optics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Allard, Lars; Henriksson, Markus; Jonsson, Per; Pettersson, Magnus

    2013-10-01

    Detection and localisation of optical assemblies used for weapon guidance or sniper rifle scopes has attracted interest for security and military applications. Typically a laser system is used to interrogate a scene of interest and the retro-reflected radiation is detected. Different system approaches for area coverage can be realised ranging from flood illumination to step-and-stare or continuous scanning schemes. Independently of the chosen approach target discrimination is a crucial issue, particularly if a complex scene such as in an urban environment and autonomous operation is considered. In this work target discrimination strategies in optics detection are discussed. Typical parameters affecting the reflected laser radiation from the target are the wavelength, polarisation properties, temporal effects and the range resolution. Knowledge about the target characteristics is important to predict the target discrimination capability. Two different systems were used to investigate polarisation properties and range resolution information from targets including e.g. road signs, optical reflexes, rifle sights and optical references. The experimental results and implications on target discrimination will be discussed. If autonomous operation is required target discrimination becomes critical in order to reduce the number of false alarms.

  11. Creation of mixed beam from alloy target and couple of pure targets with laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Shunsuke Sekine, Megumi; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Munemoto, Naoya; Horioka, Kazuhiko; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Jin, Qianyu

    2014-02-15

    To create mixed species ion beam with laser pulses, we investigated charge state distributions of plasma formed from both Al-Fe alloy targets and pure Al and Fe targets placed close together. With two targets, we observed that the two kinds of atoms were mixed when the interval of two laser pulses was large enough (40 μs). On the other hand, when the interval was 0.0 μs, we observed fewer Fe ions and they did not mix well with the Al ions. The two species were mixed well in the plasma from the alloy target. Furthermore, we observed that specific charge states of Fe ions increased. From the results, it was determined that we can use two pure targets to mix two species whose difference of the drift velocity is large. On the other hand, we must use an alloy target when the drift velocities of the species are close.

  12. Production Target Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Woloshun, Keith Albert; Dale, Gregory E.; Olivas, Eric Richard

    2015-07-28

    The Northstar 99Mo production target, a cylindrical length of 100Mo rod, has evolved considerably since its first conception.  The cylinder was very early sliced into disks to increase the heat transfer area, first to 1 mm thick disks then to the current 0.5 mm thick.  The coolant was changed early in the target development from water to helium to eliminate corrosion and dissolution.  The diameter has increased from initially 6 mm to 12 mm, the current diameter of the test target now at ANL, to nominally 28 mm (26-30.6 mm, depending upon optimal beam spot size and shape).  The length has also changed to improve the production to cost ratio, so now the target is nominally 41 mm long (excluding coolant gaps between disks), and irradiated on both ends.  This report summarizes the current status of the plant target design.

  13. Burglar Target Selection

    PubMed Central

    Townsley, Michael; Bernasco, Wim; Ruiter, Stijn; Johnson, Shane D.; White, Gentry; Baum, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study builds on research undertaken by Bernasco and Nieuwbeerta and explores the generalizability of a theoretically derived offender target selection model in three cross-national study regions. Methods: Taking a discrete spatial choice approach, we estimate the impact of both environment- and offender-level factors on residential burglary placement in the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Australia. Combining cleared burglary data from all study regions in a single statistical model, we make statistical comparisons between environments. Results: In all three study regions, the likelihood an offender selects an area for burglary is positively influenced by proximity to their home, the proportion of easily accessible targets, and the total number of targets available. Furthermore, in two of the three study regions, juvenile offenders under the legal driving age are significantly more influenced by target proximity than adult offenders. Post hoc tests indicate the magnitudes of these impacts vary significantly between study regions. Conclusions: While burglary target selection strategies are consistent with opportunity-based explanations of offending, the impact of environmental context is significant. As such, the approach undertaken in combining observations from multiple study regions may aid criminology scholars in assessing the generalizability of observed findings across multiple environments. PMID:25866418

  14. Targeted assets risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouwsema, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Risk assessments utilising the consolidated risk assessment process as described by Public Safety Canada and the Centre for Security Science utilise the five threat categories of natural, human accidental, technological, human intentional and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive (CBRNE). The categories of human intentional and CBRNE indicate intended actions against specific targets. It is therefore necessary to be able to identify which pieces of critical infrastructure represent the likely targets of individuals with malicious intent. Using the consolidated risk assessment process and the target capabilities list, coupled with the CARVER methodology and a security vulnerability analysis, it is possible to identify these targeted assets and their weaknesses. This process can help emergency managers to identify where resources should be allocated and funding spent. Targeted Assets Risk Analysis (TARA) presents a new opportunity to improve how risk is measured, monitored, managed and minimised through the four phases of emergency management, namely, prevention, preparation, response and recovery. To reduce risk throughout Canada, Defence Research and Development Canada is interested in researching the potential benefits of a comprehensive approach to risk assessment and management. The TARA provides a framework against which potential human intentional threats can be measured and quantified, thereby improving safety for all Canadians.

  15. Adequacy target in hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Canaud, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Over the last decade, the concept of dialysis adequacy has evolved to become a component of the optimal dialysis that includes quantitative and qualitative aspects. Current method used to assess dialysis efficacy in ESRD patients relies on a targeting approach using several vital indicators. Dialysis quality is a complex and evolutionary concept that has to be viewed in a quality assurance process to improve outcomes of ESRD patients. To simplify this assessment we propose a quantitative approach including several steps: the first step consists of selecting pertinent indicators (targets) tracking specific uremia metabolic abnormalities and defining suitable range values (target values); the second step consists of defining a method checking that targeted values are achieved on a regular basis; the third step consists of validating that targeted values offer the best survival to ESRD patients; the fourth step consists of correcting treatment prescription (treatment schedule) and implementation (effective treatment delivered) to improve treatment delivery and performances. Based on this approach, it is then possible to assess the efficacy of dialysis therapy both at the individual and at the dialysis unit level, that can be easily implemented in a computerized automatic control system. PMID:15599891

  16. High power density targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellemoine, Frederique

    2013-12-01

    In the context of new generation rare isotope beam facilities based on high-power heavy-ion accelerators and in-flight separation of the reaction products, the design of the rare isotope production targets is a major challenge. In order to provide high-purity beams for science, high resolution is required in the rare isotope separation. This demands a small beam spot on the production target which, together with the short range of heavy ions in matter, leads to very high power densities inside the target material. This paper gives an overview of the challenges associated with this high power density, discusses radiation damage issues in targets exposed to heavy ion beams, and presents recent developments to meet some of these challenges through different projects: FAIR, RIBF and FRIB which is the most challenging. Extensive use of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) has been made at all facilities to specify critical target parameters and R&D work at FRIB successfully retired two major risks related to high-power density and heavy-ion induced radiation damage.

  17. The Sinuous Target

    SciTech Connect

    Zwaska, R.

    2015-06-01

    We report on the concept for a target material comprised of a multitude of interlaced wires of small dimension. This target material concept is primarily directed at high-power neutrino targets where the thermal shock is large due to small beam sizes and short durations; it also has applications to other high-power targets, particularly where the energy deposition is great or a high surface area is preferred. This approach ameliorates the problem of thermal shock by engineering a material with high strength on the micro-scale, but a very low modulus of elasticity on the meso-scale. The low modulus of elasticity is achieved by constructing the material of spring-like wire segments much smaller than the beam dimension. The intrinsic bends of the wires will allow them to absorb the strain of thermal shock with minimal stress. Furthermore, the interlaced nature of the wires provides containment of any segment that might become loose. We will discuss the progress on studies of analogue materials and fabrication techniques for sinuous target materials.

  18. Targeted assets risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Bouwsema, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Risk assessments utilising the consolidated risk assessment process as described by Public Safety Canada and the Centre for Security Science utilise the five threat categories of natural, human accidental, technological, human intentional and chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive (CBRNE). The categories of human intentional and CBRNE indicate intended actions against specific targets. It is therefore necessary to be able to identify which pieces of critical infrastructure represent the likely targets of individuals with malicious intent. Using the consolidated risk assessment process and the target capabilities list, coupled with the CARVER methodology and a security vulnerability analysis, it is possible to identify these targeted assets and their weaknesses. This process can help emergency managers to identify where resources should be allocated and funding spent. Targeted Assets Risk Analysis (TARA) presents a new opportunity to improve how risk is measured, monitored, managed and minimised through the four phases of emergency management, namely, prevention, preparation, response and recovery. To reduce risk throughout Canada, Defence Research and Development Canada is interested in researching the potential benefits of a comprehensive approach to risk assessment and management. The TARA provides a framework against which potential human intentional threats can be measured and quantified, thereby improving safety for all Canadians. PMID:23615063

  19. Viatical investigation.

    PubMed

    1995-10-01

    Viatical Benefits, a viatical settlement company in Fort Lauderdale, FL, is reportedly under investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for using high-pressure sales tactics to sell policies to investors. The SEC has declined comment, and Egbert Jaeger, the president of Viatical Benefits, has denied any investigation. This investigation follows a preliminary injunction filed by a Federal judge against Life Partners Inc. of Waco, TX, in August. The SEC claimed that Life Partners repackaged life insurance contracts as securities for investors, in violation of Federal securities laws. Viatical settlements enable persons with HIV to sell their life insurance policies at a discount, providing clients with sixty to eighty percent of the face value in cash to use for living expenses. Viatical settlement companies usually act as brokers in the sale of the policies. PMID:11362822

  20. Investigation Organizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, Tina; Carvalho, Robert; Keller, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the folloving:Overview of the Application; Input Data; Analytical Process; Tool's Output; and Application of the Results of the Analysis.The tool enables the first element through a Web-based application that can be accessed by distributed teams to store and retrieve any type of digital investigation material in a secure environment. The second is accomplished by making the relationships between information explicit through the use of a semantic network-a structure that literally allows an investigator or team to "connect -the-dots." The third element, the significance of the correlated information, is established through causality and consistency tests using a number of different methods embedded within the tool, including fault trees, event sequences, and other accident models. And finally, the evidence gathered and structured within the tool can be directly, electronically archived to preserve the evidence and investigative reasoning.

  1. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  2. Targeted antithrombotic protein micelles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wookhyun; Haller, Carolyn; Dai, Erbin; Wang, Xiowei; Hagemeyer, Christoph E; Liu, David R; Peter, Karlheinz; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2015-01-26

    Activated platelets provide a promising target for imaging inflammatory and thrombotic events along with site-specific delivery of a variety of therapeutic agents. Multifunctional protein micelles bearing targeting and therapeutic proteins were now obtained by one-pot transpeptidation using an evolved sortase A. Conjugation to the corona of a single-chain antibody (scFv), which binds to the ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) of activated GPIIb/IIIa receptors, enabled the efficient detection of thrombi. The inhibition of thrombus formation was subsequently accomplished by incorporating the catalytically active domain of thrombomodulin (TM) onto the micelle corona for the local generation of activated protein C, which inhibits the formation of thrombin. An effective strategy has been developed for the preparation of protein micelles that can be targeted to sites of activated platelets with broad potential for treatment of acute thrombotic events. PMID:25504546

  3. Setting reference targets

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, R.E.

    1997-04-01

    Reference Targets are used to represent virtual quantities like the magnetic axis of a magnet or the definition of a coordinate system. To explain the function of reference targets in the sequence of the alignment process, this paper will first briefly discuss the geometry of the trajectory design space and of the surveying space, then continue with an overview of a typical alignment process. This is followed by a discussion on magnet fiducialization. While the magnetic measurement methods to determine the magnetic centerline are only listed (they will be discussed in detail in a subsequent talk), emphasis is given to the optical/mechanical methods and to the task of transferring the centerline position to reference targets.

  4. Magnetized Target Fusion collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intrator, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) may be a low cost path to fusion, in a regime that is intermediate between magnetic and inertial fusion energy. It requires compression of a magnetized target plasma and consequent heating to fusion relevant conditions inside a converging flux conserver. We hope to demonstrate the physics basis for MTF, with a Field Reversed Configuration (FRC) target plasma to be translated axially to a compression region. We show recent and improved FRC formation data, example deformable liner implosions, and a conceptual design for the upcoming translation experiments, and describe a multi institution collaboration. The FRC is an elongated, compact toroid equilibrium that is extreme among magnetic configurations, and relaxed to a non force free state. There is high plasma beta, small toroidal field, cross-field diamagnetic current and flows, vanishing rotational transform, magnetic shear, helicity and anomalously large resistivity. Scientific issues include MTF with and without FRC's, and fundamental plasma physics beyond MHD, relevant to geophysical and astrophysical phenomena.

  5. Phoenix Color Targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    These images of three Phoenix color targets were taken on sols 1 and 2 by the Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on board the Phoenix lander. The bottom target was imaged in approximate color (SSI's red, green, and blue filters: 600, 530, and 480 nanometers), while the others were imaged with an infrared filter (750 nanometers). All of them will be imaged many times over the mission to monitor the color calibration of the camera. The two at the top show grains 2 to 3 millimeters in size that were likely lifted to the Phoenix deck during landing. Each of the large color chips on each target contains a strong magnet to protect the interior material from Mars' magnetic dust.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. No Child Left Behind Act: Education Actions Could Improve the Targeting of School Improvement Funds to Schools Most in Need of Assistance. Report to Congressional Requesters. GAO-08-380

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Cornelia M.

    2008-01-01

    Under the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLBA), the federal government provides millions of dollars annually to assist schools that have not met state academic goals. In the 2006-2007 school year, over 10,000 such schools were identified for improvement. NCLBA requires states to set aside 4 percent of their Title I funds to pay for school improvement…

  7. Protein search for multiple targets on DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lange, Martin; Kochugaeva, Maria; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2015-09-14

    Protein-DNA interactions are crucial for all biological processes. One of the most important fundamental aspects of these interactions is the process of protein searching and recognizing specific binding sites on DNA. A large number of experimental and theoretical investigations have been devoted to uncovering the molecular description of these phenomena, but many aspects of the mechanisms of protein search for the targets on DNA remain not well understood. One of the most intriguing problems is the role of multiple targets in protein search dynamics. Using a recently developed theoretical framework we analyze this question in detail. Our method is based on a discrete-state stochastic approach that takes into account most relevant physical-chemical processes and leads to fully analytical description of all dynamic properties. Specifically, systems with two and three targets have been explicitly investigated. It is found that multiple targets in most cases accelerate the search in comparison with a single target situation. However, the acceleration is not always proportional to the number of targets. Surprisingly, there are even situations when it takes longer to find one of the multiple targets in comparison with the single target. It depends on the spatial position of the targets, distances between them, average scanning lengths of protein molecules on DNA, and the total DNA lengths. Physical-chemical explanations of observed results are presented. Our predictions are compared with experimental observations as well as with results from a continuum theory for the protein search. Extensive Monte Carlo computer simulations fully support our theoretical calculations.

  8. Laboratory investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-09-01

    The primary objectives were to examine the site-specific physical, chemical, and biological factors that impact construction, durability and performance of the proposed 5-MW (sub e) solar pond system at the Salton Sea. The interactions of the water, salt, and soil of the site and on material compatibility were examined. Potential interactions of the water/brine and soil are particularly important because the pond will utilize the naturally occurring clays as a bottom seal. Although there is a considerable and growing solar pond literature, little written information deals with the important site-specific investigations of water, salt, and soil. Therefore, technical effort was directed toward identifying the factors that should be investigated and determining methods of investigation. As a result, a by-product was the development of an approach for site-specific investigations and some specific methodologies. This development should continue in order to establish a generic approach for evaluating the suitability of any site for the construction of large-scale solar ponds.

  9. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Janse, Daniel M.

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  10. Targeting peroxiredoxins against leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chuan-Xu; Zhou, Hu-Chen; Yin, Qian-Qian; Wu, Ying-Li; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-15

    Peroxiredoxins (Prx), a family of small non-seleno peroxidases, are important regulators for cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), which contribute to many signaling pathways and pathogenesis of diseases. Targeting redox homeostasis is being developed as a promising therapeutic strategy for many diseases such as cancers. This mini-review attempts to focus on our recent discoveries on adenanthin as the first natural molecule to specifically target the resolving cysteines of Prx I and Prx II and thus inhibit their peroxidase activities, and its role in differentiation induction in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemic cells.

  11. Foam encapsulated targets

    DOEpatents

    Nuckolls, John H.; Thiessen, Albert R.; Dahlbacka, Glen H.

    1983-01-01

    Foam encapsulated laser-fusion targets wherein a quantity of thermonuclear fuel is embedded in low density, microcellular foam which serves as an electron conduction channel for symmetrical implosion of the fuel by illumination of the target by one or more laser beams. The fuel, such as DT, is contained within a hollow shell constructed of glass, for example, with the foam having a cell size of preferably no greater than 2 .mu.m, a density of 0.065 to 0.6.times.10.sup.3 kg/m.sup.3, and external diameter of less than 200 .mu.m.

  12. Integrin Targeted Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Millard, Melissa; Odde, Srinivas; Neamati, Nouri

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that function as mechanosensors, adhesion molecules and signal transduction platforms in a multitude of biological processes. As such, integrins are central to the etiology and pathology of many disease states. Therefore, pharmacological inhibition of integrins is of great interest for the treatment and prevention of disease. In the last two decades several integrin-targeted drugs have made their way into clinical use, many others are in clinical trials and still more are showing promise as they advance through preclinical development. Herein, this review examines and evaluates the various drugs and compounds targeting integrins and the disease states in which they are implicated. PMID:21547158

  13. Targeting the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Bournazou, Eirini; Bromberg, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Persistent JAK-STAT3 signaling is implicated in many aspects of tumorigenesis. Apart from its tumor-intrinsic effects, STAT3 also exerts tumor-extrinsic effects, supporting tumor survival and metastasis. These involve the regulation of paracrine cytokine signaling, alterations in metastatic sites rendering these permissive for the growth of cancer cells and subversion of host immune responses to create an immunosuppressive environment. Targeting this signaling pathway is considered a novel promising therapeutic approach, especially in the context of tumor immunity. In this article, we will review to what extent JAK-STAT3-targeted therapies affect the tumor microenvironment and whether the observed effects underlie responsiveness to therapy. PMID:24058812

  14. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  15. Target-Rich Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perna, Mark C.

    2005-01-01

    Target marketing is defining school enrollment goals and then developing a strategic plan to accomplish those goals through the use of specific communication vehicles and community focus. It is critical to reach the right audience, with the right message, at the right time, for the right cost. In this brief article, the author describes several…

  16. Target fragmentation in radiobiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.; Townsend, Lawrence W.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear reactions in biological systems produce low-energy fragments of the target nuclei seen as local high events of linear energy transfer (LET). A nuclear-reaction formalism is used to evaluate the nuclear-induced fields within biosystems and their effects within several biological models. On the basis of direct ionization interaction, one anticipates high-energy protons to have a quality factor and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of unity. Target fragmentation contributions raise the effective quality factor of 10 GeV protons to 3.3 in reasonable agreement with RBE values for induced micronuclei in bean sprouts. Application of the Katz model indicates that the relative increase in RBE with decreasing exposure observed in cell survival experiments with 160 MeV protons is related solely to target fragmentation events. Target fragment contributions to lens opacity given an RBE of 1.4 for 2 GeV protons in agreement with the work of Lett and Cox. Predictions are made for the effective RBE for Harderian gland tumors induced by high-energy protons. An exposure model for lifetime cancer risk is derived from NCRP 98 risk tables, and protraction effects are examined for proton and helium ion exposures. The implications of dose rate enhancement effects on space radiation protection are considered.

  17. Cancer immunotherapy targeting neoantigens.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong-Chen; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-02-01

    Neoantigens are antigens encoded by tumor-specific mutated genes. Studies in the past few years have suggested a key role for neoantigens in cancer immunotherapy. Here we review the discoveries of neoantigens in the past two decades and the current advances in neoantigen identification. We also discuss the potential benefits and obstacles to the development of effective cancer immunotherapies targeting neoantigens.

  18. Targets of curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hongyu; Beevers, Christopher S.; Huang, Shile

    2010-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), an orange-yellow component of turmeric or curry powder, is a polyphenol natural product isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa. For centuries, curcumin has been used in some medicinal preparation or used as a food-coloring agent. In recent years, extensive in vitro and in vivo studies suggested curcumin has anticancer, antiviral, antiarthritic, anti-amyloid, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. The underlying mechanisms of these effects are diverse and appear to involve the regulation of various molecular targets, including transcription factors (such as nuclear factor-κB), growth factors (such as vascular endothelial cell growth factor), inflammatory cytokines (such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin 1 and interleukin 6), protein kinases (such as mammalian target of rapamycin, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and Akt) and other enzymes (such as cyclooxygenase 2 and 5 lipoxygenase). Thus, due to its efficacy and regulation of multiple targets, as well as its safety for human use, curcumin has received considerable interest as a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention and/or treatment of various malignant diseases, arthritis, allergies, Alzheimer’s disease, and other inflammatory illnesses. This review summarizes various in vitro and in vivo pharmacological aspects of curcumin as well as the underlying action mechanisms. The recently identified molecular targets and signaling pathways modulated by curcumin are also discussed here. PMID:20955148

  19. Opportunity Spies Its Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a forward-looking view of the Meridiani Planum plains that lie between the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity and its primary drive target, 'Endurance Crater.' The images in this image mosaic were taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 88.

  20. Right on Target

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article features the Target Community and Educational Services program, a salaried arrangement that allows students at McDaniel College to complete their studies while living with, and managing, clients with developmental disabilities. In what is believed to be the only arrangement of its kind in the U.S., full-time graduate students agree to…

  1. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-07-15

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners.

  2. Targeted radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lawrence E.; DeNardo, Gerald L.; Meredith, Ruby F.

    2008-01-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) seeks molecular and functional targets within patient tumor sites. A number of agents have been constructed and labeled with beta, alpha, and Auger emitters. Radionuclide carriers spanning a broad range of sizes; e.g., antibodies, liposomes, and constructs such as nanoparticles have been used in these studies. Uptake, in percent-injected dose per gram of malignant tissue, is used to evaluate the specificity of the targeting vehicle. Lymphoma (B-cell) has been the primary clinical application. Extension to solid tumors will require raising the macroscopic absorbed dose by several-fold over values found in present technology. Methods that may effect such changes include multistep targeting, simultaneous chemotherapy, and external sequestration of the agent. Toxicity has primarily involved red marrow so that marrow replacement can also be used to enhance future TRT treatments. Correlation of toxicities and treatment efficiency has been limited by relatively poor absorbed dose estimates partly because of using standard (phantom) organ sizes. These associations will be improved in the future by obtaining patient-specific organ size and activity data with hybrid SPECT∕CT and PET∕CT scanners. PMID:18697529

  3. High purity tungsten targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    High purity tungsten, which is used for targets in X-ray tubes was considered for space processing. The demand for X-ray tubes was calculated using the growth rates for dental and medical X-ray machines. It is concluded that the cost benefits are uncertain.

  4. Human frontal eye fields and target switching.

    PubMed

    Muggleton, Neil G; Juan, Chi-Hung; Cowey, Alan; Walsh, Vincent; O'Breathnach, Uinsionn

    2010-02-01

    The frontal eye fields (FEF) have typically been predominantly investigated in terms of their role in the generation of eye movements. Lesions to this area, either accidental or experimental, disrupt saccades and electrical stimulation elicits eye movements. Recently there has been increasing interest in the involvement of this area in visual processes, including in tasks where eye movements were either not required or were precluded. In addition to being involved in a range of visual tasks, evidence from visual search paradigms has suggested that this area might be important when the defining quality of the target is unpredictable or that it may be involved in priming. We investigated the role of FEF in a task requiring localisation of a target defined by colour, in which the target colour was either maintained or switched across trials. Disruption of performance was seen on the task when transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was delivered over the left FEF, specifically elevating response times on trials when the target and distracter colours were switched rather than affecting any benefit of repetition of the target attribute (priming). This result is consistent with altered modulation of extrastriate areas, consequently affecting the speed with which a switch of the target colour could be detected. This both offers an explanation for effects seen in unpredictable feature search and is consistent with other TMS and microstimulation studies showing that FEF modulates responses of extrastriate cortex. PMID:19409541

  5. Tumor-Targeted Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    ElBayoumi, Tamer A.; Torchilin, Vladimir P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The efficacy of drug delivery systems can be enhanced by making them target-specific via the attachment of various ligands. We attempted to enhance tumor accumulation and therapeutic effect of doxorubicin-loaded long-circulating PEGylated liposomes (Doxil®, ALZA Corp.) by coupling to their surface the anti-cancer monoclonal antibody 2C5 (mAb 2C5) with nuclesome (NS)-restricted activity, that can recognize the surface of various tumor but not normal cells and specifically targets pharmaceutical carriers to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Following earlier in vitro results with various cancer cell lines, the mAb 2C5-liposomes were studied in vivo vs. plain and non-specific IgG-liposomes. Experimental design Antibody coupling to Doxil® was performed via the “post-insertion” technique. Using 111In-labeled liposomes, the tissue biodistribution and pharmacokinetic profile were studied, as well as their accumulation in tumors in mice was followed by the whole-body γ-scintigraphic imaging. Therapeutic efficacy of mAb 2C5-targeted Doxil® vs. non-specific IgG-modified and original Doxil® controls was followed by registering live tumor growth and determining tumor weights upon mice sacrifice. Results mAb2C5 antibody-targeted liposomes demonstrate enhanced accumulation in tumors, and the in vivo therapeutic activity of the mAb 2C5-Doxil® treatment was found to be significantly superior, resulting in final tumor weights of only 25-40% compared to all Doxil® control treatments, when tested against the subcutaneous primary murine tumors of 4T1 and C26 and human PC3 tumor in nude mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the remarkable capability of 2C5-targeted Doxil® to specifically deliver its cargo into various tumors significantly increasing the efficacy of therapy. PMID:19276264

  6. An optical consensus correlator for cluttered targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnam, Roger S.

    1992-08-01

    The phase-only Consensus Correlator improves the probability of detection of targets obscured by other objects such as a stand of trees. The technique involves masking out most of the input scene and using a standard correlator to search for small pieces of the expected target shape. The areas of the input scene that are found to contain pieces of the target are combined in a final correlation. The Consensus Correlator reduces the transfer of noise that is interspersed with pieces of the target in the input scene to the vicinity of the correlation spike in the correlation plane. A preliminary investigation of an appropriate figure of merit for comparing correlation spikes produced by different inputs and phase-only filters is also presented.

  7. Gene Targeting in Neuroendocrinology.

    PubMed

    Candlish, Michael; De Angelis, Roberto; Götz, Viktoria; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-09-20

    Research in neuroendocrinology faces particular challenges due to the complex interactions between cells in the hypothalamus, in the pituitary gland and in peripheral tissues. Within the hypothalamus alone, attempting to target a specific neuronal cell type can be problematic due to the heterogeneous nature and level of cellular diversity of hypothalamic nuclei. Because of the inherent complexity of the reproductive axis, the use of animal models and in vivo experiments are often a prerequisite in reproductive neuroendocrinology. The advent of targeted genetic modifications, particularly in mice, has opened new avenues of neuroendocrine research. Within this review, we evaluate various mouse models used in reproductive neuroendocrinology and discuss the different approaches to generate genetically modified mice, along with their inherent advantages and disadvantages. We also discuss a variety of versatile genetic tools with a focus on their potential use in reproductive neuroendocrinology.

  8. Phoenix on Target

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This topography map illustrates where NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander is targeted to land on May 25, 2008, based on expectations as of noon pacific time (3 p.m. eastern time), May 24, 2008.

    Phoenix is most likely to land at the cross-shaped target at the center of the red ellipse and least likely to land at the ellipse's edges. The ellipse is positioned over the northern arctic plains of Mars, and is approximately 70 kilometers (44 miles) long.

    The topography data was taken by NASA's Mars Global Surveyor. It shows exaggerated differences in the height of the terrain.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  9. Mitochondria-targeting particles

    PubMed Central

    Wongrakpanich, Amaraporn; Geary, Sean M; Joiner, Mei-ling A; Anderson, Mark E; Salem, Aliasger K

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are a promising therapeutic target for the detection, prevention and treatment of various human diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, ischemia-reperfusion injury, diabetes and obesity. To reach mitochondria, therapeutic molecules need to not only gain access to specific organs, but also to overcome multiple barriers such as the cell membrane and the outer and inner mitochondrial membranes. Cellular and mitochondrial barriers can be potentially overcome through the design of mitochondriotropic particulate carriers capable of transporting drug molecules selectively to mitochondria. These particulate carriers or vectors can be made from lipids (liposomes), biodegradable polymers, or metals, protecting the drug cargo from rapid elimination and degradation in vivo. Many formulations can be tailored to target mitochondria by the incorporation of mitochondriotropic agents onto the surface and can be manufactured to desired sizes and molecular charge. Here, we summarize recently reported strategies for delivering therapeutic molecules to mitochondria using various particle-based formulations. PMID:25490424

  10. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Norain, Abdullah; Dadachova, Ekaterina

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 60,000 individuals in the United States and 132,000 worldwide are yearly diagnosed with melanoma. Until recently, treatment options for patients with stages III-IV metastatic disease were limited and offered marginal, if any, improvement in overall survival. The situation changed with the introduction of B-RAF inhibitors and anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 immunotherapies into the clinical practice. With only some patients responding well to the immune therapies and with very serious side effects and high costs of immunotherapy, there is still room for other approaches for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma could be divided into the domains of radioimmunotherapy (RIT), radiolabeled peptides, and radiolabeled small molecules. RIT of melanoma is currently experiencing a renaissance with the clinical trials of alpha-emitter (213)Bi-labeled and beta-emitter (188)Rhenium-labeled monoclonal antibodies in patients with metastatic melanoma producing encouraging results. The investigation of the mechanism of efficacy of melanoma RIT points at killing of melanoma stem cells by RIT and involvement of immune system such as complement-dependent cytotoxicity. The domain of radiolabeled peptides for targeted melanoma therapy has been preclinical so far, with work concentrated on radiolabeled peptide analogues of melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor and on melanin-binding peptides. The field of radiolabeled small molecule produced radioiodinated benzamides that cross the cellular membrane and bind to the intracellular melanin. The recent clinical trial demonstrated measurable antitumor effects and no acute or midterm toxicities. We are hopeful that the targeted radionuclide therapy of metastatic melanoma would become a clinical reality as a stand-alone therapy or in combination with the immunotherapies such as anti-PD1 programmed cell death protein 1 monoclonal antibodies

  11. Targeting biodefense markets.

    PubMed

    Olinger, Gene Garrard

    2009-10-01

    The "World Vaccine Congress 2009" held in Washington D.C. (April 20-23, 2009) sponsored several sessions focused on the vaccine market targeting biodefense. On day one of the congress, a panel discussion outlined the federal progress in medical countermeasure preparedness that included emerging infections, influenza, and biodefense focuses. The second day, a session focused on the biodefense vaccine market with both government and industry members discussing the opportunities and challenges associated with the budding market. PMID:19855169

  12. Method for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1979-01-01

    Method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  13. Apparatus for forming targets

    DOEpatents

    Woerner, Robert L.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method for cryoinduced uniform deposition of cryogenic materials, such as deuterium-tritium (DT) mixtures, on the inner surface of hollow spherical members, such as inertially imploded targets. By vaporizing and quickly refreezing cryogenic materials contained within a hollow spherical member, a uniform layer of the materials is formed on the inner surface of the spherical member. Heating of the cryogenic material, located within a non-isothermal compact freezing cell, is accomplished by an electrical heat pulse, whereafter the material is quickly frozen forming a uniform layer on the inner surface of the spherical member. The method is not restricted to producing a frozen layer on only the inner surface of the innermost hollow member, but where multiple concentric hollow spheres are involved, such as in multiple shell targets for lasers, electron beams, etc., layers of cryogenic material may also be formed on the inner surface of intermediate or outer spherical members, thus providing the capability of forming targets having multiple concentric layers or shells of frozen DT.

  14. Targeting Inactive Enzyme Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sijiu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Wu, Li; Yu, Xiao; Xue, Ting; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Ya-Qiu, Long; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a therapeutic target for diabetes, obesity, as well as cancer. Identifying inhibitory compounds with good bioavailability is a major challenge of drug discovery programs targeted toward PTPs. Most current PTP active site-directed pharmacophores are negatively charged pTyr mimetics which cannot readily enter the cell. This lack of cell permeability limits the utility of such compounds in signaling studies and further therapeutic development. We identify aryl diketoacids as novel pTyr surrogates and show that neutral amide-linked aryl diketoacid dimers also exhibit excellent PTP inhibitory activity. Kinetic studies establish that these aryl diketoacid derivatives act as noncompetitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Crystal structures of ligand-bound PTP1B reveal that both the aryl diketoacid and its dimeric derivative bind PTP1B at the active site, albeit with distinct modes of interaction, in the catalytically inactive, WPD loop open conformation. Furthermore, dimeric aryl diketoacids are cell permeable and enhance insulin signaling in hepatoma cells, suggesting that targeting the inactive conformation may provide a unique opportunity for creating active site-directed PTP1B inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties. PMID:19012396

  15. New targets for DBS.

    PubMed

    Benabid, Alim Louis; Torres, Napoleon

    2012-01-01

    The specific effect of DBS at high frequency, discovered during a VIM thalamotomy, was extended to the older targets of ablative neurosurgery such as the pallidum, for tremor in Parkinson's disease (PD), dyskinesias, essential tremor, as well as the internal capsule to treat psychiatric disorders (OCD). A second wave of targets came from basic research, enabled by the low morbidity, reversibility, and adaptability of DBS. This was the case for the subthalamic nucleus (STN) which improves the triad of dopaminergic symptoms, and the pedunculopontine nucleus (PPN) for gait disorders in PD. The new concepts of the role of basal ganglia in psychiatric disorders indicate the subgenual cortex CG 25 for severe resistant depression, the accumbens nucleus for depression, anorexia nervosa, and addiction, and the thalamus intralaminar nuclei for minimally conscious states. Serendipity and a scientific approach have provided several instances where targets have produced unexpected effects (such as STN in OCD), as well as limbic effects observed during attempts at VMH stimulation for obesity: this might offer a novel way to treat mild cognitive impairment, or memory deficits reported in Alzheimer's disease. While these might provide solutions for as yet unsolved problems, attention must be paid to ethical considerations. PMID:22166437

  16. Targeted Endoscopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Wang, Thomas D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Endoscopy has undergone explosive technological growth in over recent years, and with the emergence of targeted imaging, its truly transformative power and impact in medicine lies just over the horizon. Today, our ability to see inside the digestive tract with medical endoscopy is headed toward exciting crossroads. The existing paradigm of making diagnostic decisions based on observing structural changes and identifying anatomical landmarks may soon be replaced by visualizing functional properties and imaging molecular expression. In this novel approach, the presence of intracellular and cell surface targets unique to disease are identified and used to predict the likelihood of mucosal transformation and response to therapy. This strategy can result in the development of new methods for early cancer detection, personalized therapy, and chemoprevention. This targeted approach will require further development of molecular probes and endoscopic instruments, and will need support from the FDA for streamlined regulatory oversight. Overall, this molecular imaging modality promises to significantly broaden the capabilities of the gastroenterologist by providing a new approach to visualize the mucosa of the digestive tract in a manner that has never been seen before. PMID:19423025

  17. Radiation calibration targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Several prominent features of Mars Pathfinder and surrounding terrain are seen in this image, taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder on July 4 (Sol 1), the spacecraft's first day on the Red Planet. Portions of a lander petal are at the lower part of the image. At the left, the mechanism for the high-gain antenna can be seen. The dark area along the right side of the image represents a portion of the low-gain antenna. The radiation calibration target is at the right. The calibration target is made up of a number of materials with well-characterized colors. The known colors of the calibration targets allow scientists to determine the true colors of the rocks and soils of Mars. Three bull's-eye rings provide a wide range of brightness for the camera, similar to a photographer's grayscale chart. In the middle of the bull's-eye is a 5-inch tall post that casts a shadow, which is distorted in this image due to its location with respect to the lander camera.

    A large rock is located at the near center of the image. Smaller rocks and areas of soil are strewn across the Martian terrain up to the horizon line.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  18. Calibrating Reach Distance to Visual Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mon-Williams, Mark; Bingham, Geoffrey P.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the calibration of reach distance by gradually distorting the haptic feedback obtained when participants grasped visible target objects. The authors found that the modified relationship between visually specified distance and reach distance could be captured by a straight-line mapping function. Thus, the relation could be…

  19. Bioinformatic challenges in targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Reker, Daniel; Malmström, Lars

    2012-09-01

    Selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry is an emerging targeted proteomics technology that allows for the investigation of complex protein samples with high sensitivity and efficiency. It requires extensive knowledge about the sample for the many parameters needed to carry out the experiment to be set appropriately. Most studies today rely on parameter estimation from prior studies, public databases, or from measuring synthetic peptides. This is efficient and sound, but in absence of prior data, de novo parameter estimation is necessary. Computational methods can be used to create an automated framework to address this problem. However, the number of available applications is still small. This review aims at giving an orientation on the various bioinformatical challenges. To this end, we state the problems in classical machine learning and data mining terms, give examples of implemented solutions and provide some room for alternatives. This will hopefully lead to an increased momentum for the development of algorithms and serve the needs of the community for computational methods. We note that the combination of such methods in an assisted workflow will ease both the usage of targeted proteomics in experimental studies as well as the further development of computational approaches. PMID:22866949

  20. [Compatible low target feature coatings].

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei; Gao, Hai-chao; Dai, Song-tao

    2008-09-01

    Indium tin oxide (ITO) film has low reflectance in near infrared band while high reflectance in infrared band, and its dielectric constant can be described by Drude free-electron model. SiO film has very strong absorption at certain infrared wavelength By combining them, certain spectral selectivity can be realized. In the present paper, the authors investigated SiO/ITO films in terms of spectrum selectivity, and discussed the influence of film structure on reflection spectrum. By means of the computation of reflection spectrum with characteristic matrix, the authors found that SiO/ITO film can be used as a compatible infrared low target feature coating by properly adjusting film arrangement and selecting suitable film parameters.

  1. Pharmacotherapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Yif'at; Masters, Colin L; Barnham, Kevin J; Bush, Ashley I; Adlard, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder which is characterized by an increasing impairment in normal memory and cognitive processes that significantly diminishes a person's daily functioning. Despite decades of research and advances in our understanding of disease aetiology and pathogenesis, there are still no effective disease-modifying drugs available for the treatment of AD. However, numerous compounds are currently undergoing pre-clinical and clinical evaluations. These candidate pharma-cotherapeutics are aimed at various aspects of the disease, such as the microtubule-associated τ-protein, the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and metal ion dyshomeostasis – all of which are involved in the development and progression of AD. We will review the way these pharmacological strategies target the biochemical and clinical features of the disease and the investigational drugs for each category. PMID:19040415

  2. 19 CFR 210.51 - Period for concluding investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... administrative law judge shall issue an order setting a target date for completion of the investigation. If the target date does not exceed 16 months from the date of institution of the investigation, the order of the administrative law judge shall be final and not subject to interlocutory review. If the target date exceeds...

  3. Emergence and robustness of target waves in a neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ying; Jin, Wuyin; Ma, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Target waves in excitable media such as neuronal network can regulate the spatial distribution and orderliness as a continuous pacemaker. Three different schemes are used to develop stable target wave in the network, and the potential mechanism for emergence of target waves in the excitable media is investigated. For example, a local pacing driven by external periodical forcing can generate stable target wave in the excitable media, furthermore, heterogeneity and local feedback under self-feedback coupling are also effective to generate continuous target wave as well. To discern the difference of these target waves, a statistical synchronization factor is defined by using mean field theory and artificial defects are introduced into the network to block the target wave, thus the robustness of these target waves could be detected. However, these target waves developed from the above mentioned schemes show different robustness to the blocking from artificial defects. A regular network of Hindmarsh-Rose neurons is designed in a two-dimensional square array, target waves are induced by using three different ways, and then some artificial defects, which are associated with anatomical defects, are set in the network to detect the effect of defects blocking on the travelling waves. It confirms that the robustness of target waves to defects blocking depends on the intrinsic properties (ways to generate target wave) of target waves.

  4. Controlling Chaos, Targeting, and Transport.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollt, Erik Matthew Arnold

    1995-01-01

    The sensitivity that defines chaotic dynamics makes accessible a wide range of behaviors using arbitrarily small control signals. "Controlling chaos" attempts to cause large changes in the dynamics using only small perturbations. In targeting, one attempts to find a fast path from an initial condition {bf a} to a target point {bf b} by exploiting the fact that transport times for a chaotic system are highly sensitive to initial conditions and parameter values. The main difficulty is finding the switching points, the times and places to apply judiciously chosen perturbations. I present a new technique to find rough orbits (epsilon chains) that rapidly achieve a desired transport. The strategy is to build the epsilon chain from segments of a long orbit. In two-dimensional maps, long orbits have recurrences in neighborhoods where faster orbits must also pass. Long orbits of higher dimensional maps are likely to have recurrences, albeit less frequently. The recurrences are used as switching points between segments. If a local hyperbolicity condition is satisfied, then a nearby shadow orbit might be constructed. In one example, I show that transport times for the standard map can typically be reduced by a factor of 10^4. In another example, I apply the technique to the restricted three-body problem from which I find a low energy Earth-Moon transfer orbit which requires 38% less characteristic velocity than a comparable Hohmann transfer orbit. In yet another example, a symbol dynamics model has a closed-form expression for the optimal transporting orbit from near {bf a} to near {bf b}. I compare the optimal orbit to the targeted orbit resulting from removing recurrences, which also takes a particularly simple form in symbol dynamics. The techniques developed here do not require a closed-form representation of the map. Using the standard map as an example, I demonstrate that predictions from a time series may be sufficient for targeting. Finally, as a contribution to the

  5. Semi-annual monitoring report for Barnes, Kansas, for July-December 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-04-27

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events (Argonne 2008a-d, 2009a,b) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the seventh quarterly monitoring event, conducted in September-October, and

  6. March-June 2009 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-09-08

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events (Argonne 2008a-d, 2009) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the fifth and sixth quarterly monitoring events, conducted in March and June

  7. July 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-20

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b) and March 2008 (Argonne 2008c) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). This current report presents the results of the third monitoring event, conducted in July 2008. During this third monitoring event, low-flow sampling methods were used to purge and sample all wells. This was the second event at

  8. March 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2007). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2007) and the initial monitoring in November 2007 (Argonne 2008) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels slightly exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigation indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2007). In particular, the local school district (USD 223) handled, stored, and disposed of chemicals including carbon tetrachloride. This current report presents the results of the second quarterly monitoring event, conducted in March 2008. During this second

  9. October 2008 monitoring results for Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-02-26

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Barnes, Kansas, during most of the interval 1949-1974. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was initially detected in 1986 in the town's public water supply wells. In 2006-2007, the CCC/USDA conducted a comprehensive targeted investigation at and near its former property in Barnes to characterize this contamination. Those results were reported previously (Argonne 2008a). In November 2007, the CCC/USDA began quarterly groundwater monitoring at Barnes. The monitoring is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with the recommendations made in the report for the 2006-2007 targeted investigation (Argonne 2008a). The objective is to monitor the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Barnes. The sampling is presently conducted in a network of 28 individual monitoring wells (at 19 distinct locations), 2 public water supply wells, and 1 private well (Figure 1.1). The results of the 2006-2007 targeted investigation and the subsequent monitoring events in November 2007 (Argonne 2008b), March 2008 (Argonne 2008c), and July 2008 (Argonne 2008d) demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at levels exceeding the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. The contaminant plume appears to extend from the former CCC/USDA property northwestward, toward the Barnes public water supply wells. Information obtained during the 2006-2007 investigations indicates that at least one other potential source might have contributed to the groundwater contaminant plume (Argonne 2008a). The former agriculture building owned by the local school district, located immediately east of well PWS3, is also a potential source of the contamination. This current report presents the results of the fourth

  10. Difficulty-related changes in inter-regional neural synchrony are dissociated between target and non-target processing.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Woo; Cha, Kwang Su; Choi, Jong Doo; Jung, Ki-Young; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2015-04-01

    The major purpose of this study was to explore the changes in the local/global gamma-band neural synchronies during target/non-target processing due to task difficulty under an auditory three-stimulus oddball paradigm. Multichannel event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded from fifteen healthy participants during the oddball task. In addition to the conventional ERP analysis, we investigated the modulations in gamma-band activity (GBA) and inter-regional gamma-band phase synchrony (GBPS) for infrequent target and non-target processing due to task difficulty. The most notable finding was that the difficulty-related changes in inter-regional GBPS (33-35 Hz) at P300 epoch (350-600 ms) completely differed for target and non-target processing. As task difficulty increased, the GBPS significantly reduced for target processing but increased for non-target processing. This result contrasts with the local neural synchrony in gamma-bands, which was not affected by task difficulty. Another major finding was that the spatial patterns of functional connectivity were dissociated for target and non-target processing with regard to the difficult task. The spatial pattern for target processing was compatible with the top-down attention network, whereas that for the non-target corresponded to the bottom-up attention network. Overall, we found that the inter-regional gamma-band neural synchronies during target/non-target processing change significantly with task difficulty and that this change is dissociated between target and non-target processing. Our results indicate that large-scale neural synchrony is more relevant for the difference in information processing between target and non-target stimuli.

  11. Bone marrow-targeted liposomal carriers

    PubMed Central

    Sou, Keitaro; Goins, Beth; Oyajobi, Babatunde O.; Travi, Bruno L.; Phillips, William T.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Bone marrow targeted drug delivery systems appear to offer a promising strategy for advancing diagnostic, protective, and/or therapeutic medicine for the hematopoietic system. Liposome technology can provide a drug delivery system with high bone marrow targeting that is mediated by specific phagocytosis in bone marrow. Area covered This review focuses on a bone marrow specific liposome formulation labeled with technetium-99m (99mTc). Interspecies differences in bone marrow distribution of the bone marrow targeted formulation are emphasized. This review provides a liposome technology to target bone marrow. In addition, the selection of proper species for the investigation of bone marrow targeting is suggested. Expert opinion It can be speculated that the bone marrow macrophages have a role in the delivery of lipids to the bone marrow as a source of energy and for membrane biosynthesis or in the delivery of fat soluble vitamins for hematopoiesis. This homeostatic system offers a potent pathway to deliver drugs selectively into bone marrow tissues from blood. High selectivity of the present BMT-liposome formulation for bone marrow suggests the presence of an active and specific mechanism, but specific factors affecting the uptake of the bone marrow MPS are still unknown. Further investigation of this mechanism will increase our understanding of factors required for effective transport of agents to the bone marrow, and may provide an efficient system for bone marrow delivery for therapeutic purposes. PMID:21275831

  12. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    , the targets identified had little or no established link to the diseases considered. In others, molecular targets of CBD were entirely consistent with those already actively exploited in relevant, clinically used, neurological treatments. Finally, CBD was found to act upon a number of targets that are linked to neurological therapeutics but that its actions were not consistent withmodulation of such targets that would derive a therapeutically beneficial outcome. Overall, we find that while >65 discrete molecular targets have been reported in the literature for CBD, a relatively limited number represent plausible targets for the drug's action in neurological disorders when judged by the criteria we set. We conclude that CBD is very unlikely to exert effects in neurological diseases through modulation of the endocannabinoid system. Moreover, a number of other molecular targets of CBD reported in the literature are unlikely to be of relevance owing to effects only being observed at supraphysiological concentrations. Of interest and after excluding unlikely and implausible targets, the remaining molecular targets of CBD with plausible evidence for involvement in therapeutic effects in neurological disorders (e.g., voltage-dependent anion channel 1, G protein-coupled receptor 55, CaV3.x, etc.) are associated with either the regulation of, or responses to changes in, intracellular calcium levels. While no causal proof yet exists for CBD's effects at these targets, they represent the most probable for such investigations and should be prioritized in further studies of CBD's therapeutic mechanism of action. PMID:26264914

  13. Molecular Targets of Cannabidiol in Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Ibeas Bih, Clementino; Chen, Tong; Nunn, Alistair V W; Bazelot, Michaël; Dallas, Mark; Whalley, Benjamin J

    2015-10-01

    , the targets identified had little or no established link to the diseases considered. In others, molecular targets of CBD were entirely consistent with those already actively exploited in relevant, clinically used, neurological treatments. Finally, CBD was found to act upon a number of targets that are linked to neurological therapeutics but that its actions were not consistent withmodulation of such targets that would derive a therapeutically beneficial outcome. Overall, we find that while >65 discrete molecular targets have been reported in the literature for CBD, a relatively limited number represent plausible targets for the drug's action in neurological disorders when judged by the criteria we set. We conclude that CBD is very unlikely to exert effects in neurological diseases through modulation of the endocannabinoid system. Moreover, a number of other molecular targets of CBD reported in the literature are unlikely to be of relevance owing to effects only being observed at supraphysiological concentrations. Of interest and after excluding unlikely and implausible targets, the remaining molecular targets of CBD with plausible evidence for involvement in therapeutic effects in neurological disorders (e.g., voltage-dependent anion channel 1, G protein-coupled receptor 55, CaV3.x, etc.) are associated with either the regulation of, or responses to changes in, intracellular calcium levels. While no causal proof yet exists for CBD's effects at these targets, they represent the most probable for such investigations and should be prioritized in further studies of CBD's therapeutic mechanism of action.

  14. Event parameters - fixed target

    SciTech Connect

    Poskanzer, A.; Ritter, H.G.; Ludewigt, B.; Foley, K.; Borenstein, S.; Platner, E.; Love, W.; Keane, D.; Plasil, F.

    1984-06-15

    This subgroup has focussed on detectors for fixed target experiments which have full azimuthal coverage. The general scope of the working group was to consider (1) the configuration of an idealized detector, and (2) various configurations of practical detectors that could be implemented on a relatively short time scale. The second category includes possible upgrades and modifications of existing experimental facilities. Beams of both 15 GeV/A sulphur at the AGS and 200 GeV/A oxygen at the SPS were considered.

  15. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  16. Non-Targeted Analysis Challenge (Non-targeted screening workshop)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This brief presentation is intended to motivate discussion of the "Non-Targeted Analysis Challenge" at the Advancing Non-Targeted Analyses of Xenobiotics in Environmental and Biological Media workshop held at the EPA RTP campus.

  17. Efficient target detection in cluttered FLIR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Jesmin F.; Alam, Mohammad S.

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we investigated automatic target detection and classification of low and high contrast targets present in unknown forward looking infrared (FLIR) image sequence. The detection algorithm, based on morphology based preprocessing, acts as a prescreener that selects possible candidate target regions, comprising both true targets and false alarms and places expected target-sized marker to those preselected regions. The application of simple non-linear grayscale operations in the proposed detection algorithm leads to real-time implementations. By considering the known target and background specific attributes, extracted from the training samples, the clutter rejection module discriminates between true target and false alarms previously identified by the detection algorithm. Two approaches are employed for object classification where one uses local features of the image and the other uses template matching technique such as image correlation. For the first approach, to extract features, we employed two methods - nonlinear filtering for texture energy measurement and wavelet decomposition by expending Daubechies high and low pass filter coefficients. Then for classification, a neural network based classifier is used. In the second approach minimax distance transform correlation filter (MDTCF) is applied that minimizes the average squared distance from the filtered true-class training images to a filtered reference image while maximizing the mean squared distance (MSD) of the filtered false-class training images to this filtered reference image. Then classification is performed using the squared distance of a filtered test image to the chosen filtered reference image. The performance of the proposed technique is analyzed for i) neural network with nonlinear texture filtering, ii) neural network with wavelet decomposition and iii) correlation filtering. Preliminary results indicate that the proposed detection algorithms can locate both hot and cold targets

  18. Target Asteroids! Observing Targets for 2014 July through September

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergenrother, Carl; Hill, Dolores

    2014-07-01

    Asteroids to be observed by the Target Asteroids! program during the period of July to September 2014 are presented. In addition to asteroids on the original Target Asteroids! list of easily accessible spacecraft targets, an effort has been made to identify other asteroids that are 1) brighter and easier to observe for small telescope users and 2) analogous to (101955) Bennu, the target asteroid of the OSIRIS-REx sample return mission.

  19. Target Asteroids! Observing Targets for 2014 April through June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergenrother, Carl; Hill, Dolores

    2014-04-01

    Asteroids to be observed by the Target Asteroids! program during the period of 2014 April through June are presented. In addition to asteroids on the original Target Asteroids! list of easily accessible spacecraft targets, an effort has been made to identify other asteroids that are 1) brighter and easier to observe for small telescope users and 2) analogous to 101955 Bennu, the target asteroid of the OSIRIS-REx sample return mission.

  20. Target Asteroids! Observing Targets for 2014 October through December

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hergenrother, Carl; Hill, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Asteroids to be observed by the Target Asteroids! program during the period of October to December 2014 are presented. In addition to asteroids on the original Target Asteroids! list of easily accessible spacecraft targets, an effort has been made to identify other asteroids that are 1) brighter and easier to observe for small telescope users and 2) analogous to (101955) Bennu, the target asteroid of the OSIRIS-REx sample return mission.

  1. A tritium target system for. mu. CF

    SciTech Connect

    Zmeskal, J.; Ackerbauer, P. . Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik); Sherman, R.H. ); Durham, W.B.; Heard, H.C. ); Neumann, W. ); Bossy, H. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (

    1990-12-01

    An apparatus has been constructed for the safe handling of tritium as part of a series of muon-catalyzed fusion experiments. The equipment was designed to handle 100 kCi of tritium. The main parts of this system are the oil-free high vacuum and transfer system, and the quadrupole mass analyzer for a direct determination of the target content. The system was used successfully for five continuous periods of operation of over one month each. A new target system was constructed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for ultimate use at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) to investigate the high temperature and high pressure region. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Targeting adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Two different types of adipose tissues can be found in humans enabling them to respond to starvation and cold: white adipose tissue (WAT) is generally known and stores excess energy in the form of triacylglycerol (TG), insulates against cold, and serves as a mechanical cushion. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) helps newborns to cope with cold. BAT has the capacity to uncouple the mitochondrial respiratory chain, thereby generating heat rather than adenosine triphosphate (ATP). The previously widely held view was that BAT disappears rapidly after birth and is no longer present in adult humans. Using positron emission tomography (PET), however, it was recently shown that metabolically active BAT occurs in defined regions and scattered in WAT of the adult and possibly has an influence on whole-body energy homeostasis. In obese individuals adipose tissue is at the center of metabolic syndrome. Targeting of WAT by thiazolidinediones (TZDs), activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) a ‘master’ regulator of fat cell biology, is a current therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Since its unique capacity to increase energy consumption of the body and to dissipate surplus energy as heat, BAT offers new perspectives as a therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and associated diseases such as type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Recent discoveries of new signaling pathways of BAT development give rise to new therapeutic possibilities in order to influence BAT content and activity. PMID:23102228

  3. Targeted therapy for sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Forscher, Charles; Mita, Monica; Figlin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are tumors of mesenchymal origin that make up approximately 1% of human cancers. They may arise as primary tumors in either bone or soft tissue, with approximately 11,280 soft tissue tumors and 2,650 bone tumors diagnosed each year in the United States. There are at least 50 different subtypes of soft tissue sarcoma, with new ones described with ever-increasing frequency. One way to look at sarcomas is to divide them into categories on the basis of their genetic make-up. One group of sarcomas has an identifiable, relatively simple genetic signature, such as the X:18 translocation seen in synovial sarcoma or the 11:22 translocation seen in Ewing’s sarcoma. These specific abnormalities often lead to the presence of fusion proteins, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, which are helpful as diagnostic tools and may become therapeutic targets in the future. Another group of sarcomas is characterized by complex genetic abnormalities as seen in leiomyosarcoma, osteosarcoma, and undifferentiated sarcoma. It is important to keep these distinctions in mind when contemplating the development of targeted agents for sarcomas. Different abnormalities in sarcoma could be divided by tumor subtype or by the molecular or pathway abnormality. However, some existing drugs or drugs in development may interfere with or alter more than one of the presented pathways. PMID:24669185

  4. Liquid Hydrogen: Target, Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mulholland, G.T.; Harigel, G.G.

    2004-06-23

    In 1952 D. Glaser demonstrated that a radioactive source's radiation could boil 135 deg. C superheated-diethyl ether in a 3-mm O glass vessel and recorded bubble track growth on high-speed film in a 2-cm3 chamber. This Bubble Chamber (BC) promised improved particle track time and spatial resolution and cycling rate. Hildebrand and Nagle, U of Chicago, reported Liquid Hydrogen minimum ionizing particle boiling in August 1953. John Wood created the 3.7-cm O Liquid Hydrogen BC at LBL in January 1954. By 1959 the Lawrence Berkley Laboratory (LBL) Alvarez group's '72-inch' BC had tracks in liquid hydrogen. Within 10 years bubble chamber volumes increased by a factor of a million and spread to every laboratory with a substantial high-energy physics program. The BC, particle accelerators and special separated particle beams created a new era of High Energy Physics (HEP) experimentation. The BC became the largest most complex cryogenic installation at the world's HEP laboratories for decades. The invention and worldwide development, deployment and characteristics of these cryogenic dynamic target/detectors and related hydrogen targets are described.

  5. Investigational Approaches for Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Surmont, Veerle F.; van Thiel, Eric R. E.; Vermaelen, Karim; van Meerbeeck, Jan P.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. In view of the poor survival benefit from first-line chemotherapy and the lack of subsequent effective treatment options, there is a strong need for the development of more effective treatment approaches for patients with MPM. This review will provide a comprehensive state of the art of new investigational approaches for mesothelioma. In an introductory section, the etiology, epidemiology, natural history, and standard of care treatment for MPM will be discussed. This review provide an update of the major clinical trials that impact mesothelioma treatment, discuss the impact of novel therapeutics, and provide perspective on where the clinical research in mesothelioma is moving. The evidence was collected by a systematic analysis of the literature (2000–2011) using the databases Medline (National Library of Medicine, USA), Embase (Elsevier, Netherlands), Cochrane Library (Great Britain), National Guideline Clearinghouse (USA), HTA Database (International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment – INAHTA), NIH database (USA), International Pleural Mesothelioma Program – WHOLIS (WHO Database), with the following keywords and filters: mesothelioma, guidelines, treatment, surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, review, investigational, drugs. Currently different targeted therapies and biologicals are under investigation for MPM. It is important that the molecular biologic research should first focus on mesothelioma-specific pathways and biomarkers in order to have more effective treatment options for this disease. The use of array technology will be certainly an implicit gain in the identification of new potential prognostic or biomarkers or important pathways in the MPM pathogenesis. Probably a central mesothelioma virtual tissue bank may contribute to the ultimate goal to identify druggable targets and to develop personalized treatment for the MPM patients. PMID

  6. Optimization of archaeogeophysical investigations in complex environments on example of advanced magnetic data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eppelbaum, L. V.

    2012-04-01

    How an archaeological-geophysical investigation could be optimised? Obviously, researchers a priori suggest to receiving maximum of archaeogeophysical information by minimal monetary and time expenditures. However, this solution of this task is not trivial one. Let us consider this problem on example of one of the most frequently applied archaeogeophysical methods - archaeomagnetic survey. The archaeomagnetic research optimisation can be solved on the basis of following criterions: (1) Necessary expenditures for realization of the integration (cost criterion C), (2) Necessary time for realization of the integration (time criterion T ), (3) Informativeness of archaeomagnetic examination (informational criterion Π). Criterions C and T can be easily determined by a direct calculation whereas evaluation of the criterion Π is a complex research problem. Besides this, it should be taken into account that criterions C and T , from one side, and criterion Π from other side, contradict with each other. A principal logical-heuristic model of the archaeomagnetic information can be described in the following form (after Eppelbaum et al. (2003)): II = Q U R U V, where Q is the quantitative estimation of archaeogeophysical information, R is the estimation of informational reliability corresponding to the semantic criterion, V is the estimation of informational value according to the pragmatic criterion, and U is the symbol of unification. Parameter Q Significance of the parameter Q will increase when we will apply the most effective processing and interpreting schemes. From the geophysical point of view, parameter Q is the most essential one. The developed advanced interpreting system for complex environments (oblique magnetization, rugged terrain relief and unknown level of the normal magnetic field) (Khesin et al., 1988, 1996; Eppelbaum et al., 2000, 2001; Eppelbaum et al., 2004, 2006, 2007; Finkelstein and Eppelbaum, 2007; Eppelbaum, 2010a, 2011a, 2011b; Eppelbaum and

  7. Enzymatic Targets in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Luciana; Mendonça, Francisco J B; da Silva, Marcelo S; Scotti, Marcus T

    2016-01-01

    One of the most neglected disease is the Sleeping sickness or Human African Trypanosomiasis (HAT), which is mostly restricted to poor regions of Africa. The disease is caused by parasitic infection with Trypanosoma brucei (T. brucei), and is acquired through the bite of the tsetse fly. In the first stage of the disease, the parasite is in the blood, but in stage 2, the infective form reaches the brain, causing great weakness and death. The few existing drugs against this infection, are highly toxic, and can cause the emergence of resistant forms of the parasite. Also, these drugs are not readily available. New drugs are needed. Many researchers are investigating new enzyme targets for the parasite, searching for more efficient and selective inhibitors that are capable to cause the parasite death with less toxicity to the host. Trypanothione reductase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase, 6-phospho-gluconate dehydrogenase, and UDP 4'-galactose epimerase are some of the enzymes involved in the studies reported on this review. In addition, we have applied ligandbased- virtual screening, using Random Forest associated with structure-based-virtual screening (docking), to a small dataset of 225 alkaloids from the Menispermaceae family (in-house data bank). The aim of this study is to select structures with potential inhibitory activity against trypanothione reductase from Trypanosoma brucei. The computer-aided drug design study selected certain alkaloids that might be worth further investigation. PMID:26983886

  8. A Note on Inflation Targeting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Ching-chong; Chang, Juin-jen

    2001-01-01

    Presents a pedagogical graphical exposition to illustrate the stabilizing effect of price target zones. Finds that authorities' commitment to defend a price target zone affects the public's inflation expectations and, in turn, reduces actual inflation. (RLH)

  9. Target Operational Experience at the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Riemer, Bernie; Janney, Jim G; Kaminskas, Saulius; McClintock, David A; Rosenblad, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has operated at unprecedented power levels for a short-pulse spallation source. Target operations have been successful but not without difficulties. Three targets out of the eight used to date have ended life unexpectedly causing interruptions to the neutron science users. The first of a kind mercury target design experiences beam-pulse induced cavitation damage that is suspected in one of the target leaks. The two other targets suffered early failures due to defective welds. Diagnosing the causes of target leaks and understanding of the progression of cavitation erosion and radiation damage effects has made use of post-irradiation examination (PIE) capabilities. As a result of PIE, review of quality assurance practices and related investigations, design changes are being implemented and manufacturing oversight improved. This paper describes SNS target operating experience, including the more important observations and lessons learned.

  10. Characterization of solid hydrogen targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, M.C.; Bailey, J.M.; Beer, G.A.

    1995-12-01

    In experiments using the TRIUMF solid hydrogen target systems, knowledge of target thickness and uniformity is often essential in order to extract physical parameters from the data. We have characterized the thickness and uniformity of frozen targets using the energy loss of alpha particles. An accuracy of about 5% was achieved, a limit imposed by the uncertainty in the stopping powers. Details of the method are described and the thickness calibration of the target is presented.

  11. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics. PMID:23126904

  12. Electromagnetic targeting of guns

    SciTech Connect

    Pogue, E.W.; Boat, R.M.; Holden, D.N.; Lopez, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Electromagnetic pulse (EMP) signals produced from explosives being fired have been reported in the literature for fifty years. When a gun is fired it produces an EMP muzzle blast signal. The strength and nature of these signals was first analyzed in the early 1970s, while the results were interesting, no follow-up studies were conducted. With modern detection and signal processing technology, we believe that these signals could be used to instantaneously locate guns of virtually all calibers as they fire. The objective of our one-year project was to establish the basic nature of these signals and their utility in the concept of electromagnetic targeting of guns.

  13. ORION laser target diagnosticsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; Wright, M. J.; Hood, B. A.; Kemshall, P.

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  14. ORION laser target diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Bentley, C D; Edwards, R D; Andrew, J E; James, S F; Gardner, M D; Comley, A J; Vaughan, K; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S; Rothman, S D; Daykin, S; Masoero, S J; Palmer, J B; Meadowcroft, A L; Williams, B M; Gumbrell, E T; Fyrth, J D; Brown, C R D; Hill, M P; Oades, K; Wright, M J; Hood, B A; Kemshall, P

    2012-10-01

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  15. ORION laser target diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, C. D.; Edwards, R. D.; Andrew, J. E.; James, S. F.; Gardner, M. D.; Comley, A. J.; Vaughan, K.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Rothman, S. D.; Daykin, S.; Masoero, S. J.; Palmer, J. B.; Meadowcroft, A. L.; Williams, B. M.; Gumbrell, E. T.; Fyrth, J. D.; Brown, C. R. D.; Hill, M. P.; Oades, K.; and others

    2012-10-15

    The ORION laser facility is one of the UK's premier laser facilities which became operational at AWE in 2010. Its primary mission is one of stockpile stewardship, ORION will extend the UK's experimental plasma physics capability to the high temperature, high density regime relevant to Atomic Weapons Establishment's (AWE) program. The ORION laser combines ten laser beams operating in the ns regime with two sub ps short pulse chirped pulse amplification beams. This gives the UK a unique combined long pulse/short pulse laser capability which is not only available to AWE personnel but also gives access to our international partners and visiting UK academia. The ORION laser facility is equipped with a comprehensive suite of some 45 diagnostics covering optical, particle, and x-ray diagnostics all able to image the laser target interaction point. This paper focuses on a small selection of these diagnostics.

  16. Target detection portal

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    A portal apparatus for screening persons or objects for the presence of trace amounts of target substances such as explosives, narcotics, radioactive materials, and certain chemical materials. The portal apparatus can have a one-sided exhaust for an exhaust stream, an interior wall configuration with a concave-shape across a horizontal cross-section for each of two facing sides to result in improved airflow and reduced washout relative to a configuration with substantially flat parallel sides; air curtains to reduce washout; ionizing sprays to collect particles bound by static forces, as well as gas jet nozzles to dislodge particles bound by adhesion to the screened person or object. The portal apparatus can be included in a detection system with a preconcentrator and a detector.

  17. Rotating Target Development for SNS Second Target Station

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, Thomas J; Rennich, Mark J; Crawford, Roy K; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Janney, Jim G

    2010-01-01

    A rotating target for the second target station (STS) at SNS has been identified as an option along with a mercury target. Evaluation of the rotating target alternative for STS has started at 1.5 MW which is considered an upper bound for the power. Previous preconceptual design work for a 3 MW rotating target is being modified for the lower power level. Transient thermal analysis for a total loss of active water cooling has been done for a simplified 2D model of the target and shielding monolith which shows that peak temperatures are well below the level at which tungsten vaporization by steam could exceed site boundary dose limits. Design analysis and integration configuration studies have been done for the target-moderator-reflector assembly which maximizes the number of neutron beam lines and provides for replacement of the target and moderators. Target building hot cell arrangement for this option will be described. An option for operation in rough vacuum without a proton beam window using Ferro fluid seals on a vertical shaft is being developed. A full scale prototypic drive module based on the 3 MW preconceptual design has been fabricated and successfully tested with a shaft and mock up target supplied by the ESS-Bilbao team. Overall planning leading to decision between mercury and the rotating target in 2011 will be discussed

  18. The rationale for targeted therapies in medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Tobey J; Aguilera, Dolly; Castellino, Robert C

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most frequent malignant brain tumor in children. Patients with MB who are classified as having high-risk disease or those with recurrent disease respond poorly to current therapies and have an increased risk of MB-related mortality. Preclinical studies and molecular profiling of MB tumors have revealed upregulation or activation of several key signaling pathways such as the sonic hedgehog and WNT pathways. Although the exact mechanisms underlying MB tumorigenesis remain poorly understood, inhibiting these key pathways with molecularly targeted therapies represents an important approach to improving MB outcomes. Several molecularly targeted therapies are already under clinical investigation in MB patients. We discuss current preclinical and clinical data, as well as data from clinical trials of targeted therapies that are either ongoing or in development for MB. PMID:24305711

  19. SLC Transporters as Therapeutic Targets: Emerging Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lawrence; Yee, Sook Wah; Kim, Richard B.; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) transporters — a family of more than 300 membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the transport of a wide array of substrates across biological membranes — have important roles in physiological processes ranging from the cellular uptake of nutrients to the absorption of drugs and other xenobiotics. Several classes of marketed drugs target well-known SLC transporters, such as neurotransmitter transporters, and human genetic studies have provided powerful insight into the roles of more-recently characterized SLC transporters in both rare and common diseases, indicating a wealth of new therapeutic opportunities. This Review summarizes knowledge on the roles of SLC transporters in human disease, describes strategies to target such transporters, and highlights current and investigational drugs that modulate SLC transporters, as well as promising drug targets. PMID:26111766

  20. SLC transporters as therapeutic targets: emerging opportunities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lawrence; Yee, Sook Wah; Kim, Richard B; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2015-08-01

    Solute carrier (SLC) transporters - a family of more than 300 membrane-bound proteins that facilitate the transport of a wide array of substrates across biological membranes - have important roles in physiological processes ranging from the cellular uptake of nutrients to the absorption of drugs and other xenobiotics. Several classes of marketed drugs target well-known SLC transporters, such as neurotransmitter transporters, and human genetic studies have provided powerful insight into the roles of more-recently characterized SLC transporters in both rare and common diseases, indicating a wealth of new therapeutic opportunities. This Review summarizes knowledge on the roles of SLC transporters in human disease, describes strategies to target such transporters, and highlights current and investigational drugs that modulate SLC transporters, as well as promising drug targets.