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Sample records for 2007 antimicrobials division

  1. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Donald; DePaolo, Donald

    2008-07-21

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology

  2. Antimicrobial peptides trigger a division block in Escherichia coli through stimulation of a signalling system

    PubMed Central

    Yadavalli, Srujana S.; Carey, Jeffrey N.; Leibman, Rachel S.; Chen, Annie I.; Stern, Andrew M.; Roggiani, Manuela; Lippa, Andrew M.; Goulian, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are an important component of the molecular arsenal employed by hosts against bacteria. Many bacteria in turn possess pathways that provide protection against these compounds. In Escherichia coli and related bacteria, the PhoQ/PhoP signalling system is a key regulator of this antimicrobial peptide defence. Here we show that treating E. coli with sublethal concentrations of antimicrobial peptides causes cells to filament, and that this division block is controlled by the PhoQ/PhoP system. The filamentation results from increased expression of QueE, an enzyme that is part of a tRNA modification pathway but that, as we show here, also affects cell division. We also find that a functional YFP–QueE fusion localizes to the division septum in filamentous cells, suggesting QueE blocks septation through interaction with the divisome. Regulation of septation by PhoQ/PhoP may protect cells from antimicrobial peptide-induced stress or other conditions associated with high-level stimulation of this signalling system. PMID:27471053

  3. Antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolates from retail meat in the United States between 2002 and 2007.

    PubMed

    Zhao, S; Young, S R; Tong, E; Abbott, J W; Womack, N; Friedman, S L; McDermott, P F

    2010-12-01

    The emergence of antimicrobial resistance in Campylobacter spp. has been a growing public health concern globally. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility, and genetic relatedness of Campylobacter spp. recovered by the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS) retail meat program. Retail meat samples (n = 24,566) from 10 U.S. states collected between 2002 and 2007, consisting of 6,138 chicken breast, 6,109 ground turkey, 6,171 ground beef, and 6,148 pork chop samples, were analyzed. A total of 2,258 Campylobacter jejuni, 925 Campylobacter coli, and 7 Campylobacter lari isolates were identified. Chicken breast samples showed the highest contamination rate (49.9%), followed by ground turkey (1.6%), whereas both pork chops and ground beef had <0.5% contamination. The most common resistance was to doxycycline/tetracycline (46.6%), followed by nalidixic acid (18.5%), ciprofloxacin (17.4%), azithromycin and erythromycin (2.8%), telithromycin (2.4%), clindamycin (2.2%), and gentamicin (<0.1%). In a subset of isolates tested, no resistance to meropenem and florfenicol was seen. C. coli isolates showed higher resistance rates to antimicrobials, with the exception of doxycycline/tetracycline, than those seen for C. jejuni. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) fingerprinting resulted in 1,226 PFGE profiles among the 2,318 isolates, with many clones being widely dispersed throughout the 6-year sampling period.

  4. Comparison of Antimicrobial Consumption Patterns in the Swiss and Danish Cattle and Swine Production (2007–2013)

    PubMed Central

    Carmo, Luís P.; Nielsen, Liza R.; Alban, Lis; Müntener, Cedric R.; Schüpbach-Regula, Gertraud; Magouras, Ioannis

    2017-01-01

    Veterinary antimicrobial consumption patterns vary considerably across Europe. These differences are not only limited to the total amount consumed but are also observed with regards to the relative proportion of the various antimicrobial classes used. Currently, most of the data on veterinary antimicrobials are reported at sales level without any information on the consumption by different animal species. This hinders a proper comparison of antimicrobial consumption at the species level between countries. However, it is imperative to improve our understanding on antimicrobial usage patterns at the species level, as well as on the drivers contributing to those differences. This will allow for development of tailored interventions with the lowest possible risk for human health, while ensuring effective treatment of diseased livestock. An important step to attain such an objective is to perform detailed comparisons of the antimicrobial consumption in each species between countries. We compared antimicrobial consumption estimates for cattle and pigs in Switzerland and Denmark, in order to distinguish species-specific patterns and trends in consumption from 2007 to 2013. Swiss data were obtained from a previous study that assessed methodologies to stratify antimicrobial sales per species; Danish antimicrobial consumption estimates were assembled from Danish Integrated Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring and Research Programme reports. A decrease in antimicrobial consumption in milligrams per kilogram of biomass was observed for both countries (4.5% in Denmark and 34.7% in Switzerland) when comparing 2013 to 2007. For pigs and cattle, the overall consumption per kilogram of biomass of most antimicrobial classes was higher in Switzerland than in Denmark. Large variations in the relative consumption of different antimicrobial classes were also evident. Sulfonamides/trimethoprim and tetracyclines were consumed in a higher proportion in Switzerland than in Denmark, whereas

  5. Advances in the discovery of novel antimicrobials targeting the assembly of bacterial cell division protein FtsZ.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Ma, Shutao

    2015-05-05

    Currently, wide-spread antimicrobials resistance among bacterial pathogens continues being a dramatically increasing and serious threat to public health, and thus there is a pressing need to develop new antimicrobials to keep pace with the bacterial resistance. Filamentous temperature-sensitive protein Z (FtsZ), a prokaryotic cytoskeleton protein, plays an important role in bacterial cell division. It as a very new and promising target, garners special attention in the antibacterial research in the recent years. This review describes not only the function and dynamic behaviors of FtsZ, but also the known natural and synthetic inhibitors of FtsZ. In particular, the small molecules recently developed and the future directions of ideal candidates are highlighted.

  6. Antimicrobial resistance and prevalence of canine uropathogens at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Teaching Hospital, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    Ball, Katherine R; Rubin, Joseph E; Chirino-Trejo, M; Dowling, Patricia M

    2008-10-01

    Between January 2002 and June 2007, uropathogens were isolated from 473 of 1557 canine urine samples submitted to Prairie Diagnostic Services from the Western College of Veterinary Medicine Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Culture and susceptibility results were analyzed, retrospectively, to estimate the prevalence of common bacterial uropathogens in dogs with urinary tract infections and to identify changes in antimicrobial resistance. The most common pathogens identified were Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus intermedius, Enterococcus spp., and Proteus spp. Antimicrobial resistance increased during the study period, particularly among recurrent E. coli isolates. Using the formula to help select rational antimicrobial therapy (FRAT), bacterial isolates were most likely to be susceptible to gentamicin, fluoroquinolones, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, and groups 4 and 5 (third generation) cephalosporins.

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility of invasive and lower respiratory tract isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 1998 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Vanderkooi, Otto G; McConnell, Athena; Church, Deirdre L; Kellner, James D

    2009-01-01

    Previous surveys of antimicrobial resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae have found differences depending on source of isolate (eg, higher resistance in lower respiratory tract [LRT] versus invasive isolate) and age (higher resistance in children versus adults). Susceptibility profiles in the Calgary Health Region (approximately 1.25 million population) over a 10-year period were studied. Prospective laboratory-based population surveillance for S pneumoniae disease has been conducted since 1998. Patient demographics and susceptibility testing were analyzed. In total, 2382 patient isolates were available for analysis from 1998 to 2007. Of these, 1170 isolates were invasive while 496 were LRT. Patient age distribution was: younger than five years, 14%; five to 17 years, 6%; 18 to 64 years, 56%; and 65 years or older, 24%. Mean patient age was 44.8 years and 60.0% were male. The overall incidence of nonsusceptibility was: penicillin, 8.2%; amoxicillin, 0.3%; cefuroxime, 6.2%; ceftriaxone, 1.7%; erythromycin, 8.8%; trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), 25.6%; clindamycin, 2.3%; and levofloxacin, 0.2%. Overall resistance rates were stable, except for increasing erythromycin resistance from 5.4% (1998) to a high of 14.2% (2004) (P=0.007). Isolates that were nonsusceptible to penicillin or TMP-SMX were more likely to be multidrug resistant (P<0.001) compared with penicillin- or TMP-SMX-susceptible isolates. Compared with invasive isolates, LRT isolates showed more resistance to penicillin, TMP-SMX, cefuroxime and erythromycin, and were more likely to be multidrug resistant. Isolates from children younger than five years of age are more likely to be multidrug resistant and resistant to erythromycin and cefotaxime. Ongoing surveillance of S pneumoniae isolates is important because resistance rates vary by source and patient age among health care regions. PMID:21119791

  8. Selected Natural Attenuation Monitoring Data, Operable Unit 1, Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington, 2007 and 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dinicola, R.S.; Huffman, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    Previous investigations indicate that natural attenuation and biodegradation of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are substantial in groundwater beneath the 9-acre former landfill at Operable Unit 1 (OU 1), Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Keyport, Washington. Phytoremediation combined with on-going natural attenuation processes was the preferred remedy selected by the Navy, as specified in the Record of Decision for the site. The Navy planted two hybrid poplar plantations on the landfill in spring 1999 to remove and to control the migration of chlorinated VOCs in shallow groundwater. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has continued to monitor groundwater geochemistry to ensure that conditions remain favorable for contaminant biodegradation as specified in the Record of Decision. In this report are groundwater geochemical and selected VOC data collected at OU 1 by the USGS during June 18-21, 2007, and June 16-18, 2008, in support of long-term monitoring for natural attenuation. For 2007 and 2008, strongly reducing conditions (sulfate reduction and methanogenesis) most favorable for reductive dechlorination of VOCs were inferred for 9 of 16 upper-aquifer wells and piezometers in the northern and southern phytoremediation plantations. Predominant redox conditions in groundwater from the intermediate aquifer just downgradient from the landfill remained mildly reducing and somewhat favorable for reductive dechlorination of VOCs. Dissolved hydrogen (H2) concentrations measured in the upper aquifer during 2007 and 2008 generally have been lower than H2 concentrations measured before 2002. However, widespread and relatively high methane and sulfide concentrations indicate that the lower H2 concentrations measured do not support a trend from strongly to mildly reducing redox conditions because no widespread changes in groundwater redox conditions were identified that should result in less favorable conditions for the reductive dechlorination of the

  9. Serotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility, and minimal inhibitory concentrations of Actionbacillus pleuropneumoniae isolated from slaughter pigs in Taiwan (2002-2007).

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Yao; Lin, Chao-Nan; Lin, Chuen-Fu; Chang, Tsung-Chou; Chiou, Ming-Tang

    2011-02-01

    In total, 211 isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae were collected from pigs with hemorrhagic pneumonia at slaughterhouses during 2002-2007. Serotypes, antimicrobial susceptibility and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for each isolate of A. pleuropneumoniae to 10 antimicrobial agents. Serovar 1 of A. pleuropneumoniae was predominant in Taiwan in 138 of the 211 isolates, followed by serovars 2 and 5. More than 90% of collected isolates were sensitive to ceftiofur, cephalothin, and chloramphenical. However, lincospectin and gentamicin were relatively less susceptible with sensitivities of only 2.4 and 5.7%, respectively. Additionally, ceftiofur had the highest in vitro activity with an MIC(50) of 2.2 µg/ml, followed by cephalothin (2.7 µg/ml) and chloramphenicol (7.9 µg/ml). Lincospectin had the least activity with MIC(50) and MIC(90) values of 73.9 and 114.5 µg/ml, respectively. The data indicate that ceftiofur and cephalothin were extremely active against A. pleuropneumoniae and with minimum MIC values. These drugs are suitable for controlling and treating hemorrhagic pleuropneumonia outbreaks in swine.

  10. Activity of telavancin and comparator antimicrobial agents tested against Staphylococcus spp. isolated from hospitalised patients in Europe (2007-2008).

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Jones, Ronald N

    2010-10-01

    The activity of telavancin was evaluated against Staphylococcus spp. collected from European hospitals as part of an international surveillance study (2007-2008). A total of 7534 staphylococcal clinical isolates [5726 Staphylococcus aureus and 1808 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS)] were included. Isolates were tested for susceptibility according to reference methods and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were interpreted based on Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) 2010 and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) 2009 criteria. Telavancin breakpoints approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) were applied. Telavancin activity was evaluated against meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) displaying several antibiogram resistance patterns, including multidrug-resistant isolates. Telavancin was active against S. aureus [MIC(50/90) values (MICs for 50% and 90% of the isolates, respectively)=0.12/0.25mg/L; 100.0% susceptible] and CoNS (MIC(50/90)=0.12/0.25mg/L), inhibiting all isolates at < or =0.5mg/L. Similar results were observed when S. aureus were stratified by year or country of origin (MIC(50/90)=0.12/0.25mg/L). When MRSA isolates were clustered according to 48 different resistance patterns, telavancin showed consistent MIC(90) values (0.25mg/L) regardless of multidrug resistance. Amongst CoNS, telavancin was slightly more active against Staphylococcus capitis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus hominis, Staphylococcus lugdunensis and Staphylococcus xylosus (MIC(50)=0.12 mg/L) compared with Staphylococcus haemolyticus, Staphylococcus saprophyticus and Staphylococcus warneri (MIC(50)=0.25mg/L). Overall, telavancin exhibited MIC(90) results two- to eight-fold lower than comparators (daptomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, vancomycin and linezolid). Based upon MIC(90) values, telavancin demonstrated potent in vitro activity against a contemporary (2007-2008) collection of Staphylococcus spp

  11. Acute antimicrobial pesticide-related illnesses among workers in health-care facilities - California, Louisiana, Michigan, and Texas, 2002-2007.

    PubMed

    2010-05-14

    Antimicrobial pesticides (e.g., sterilizers, disinfectants, and sanitizers) are chemicals used to destroy or suppress the growth of harmful microorganisms on inanimate objects and surfaces. Health-care facilities use antimicrobial pesticides to prevent pathogen transmission from contaminated environmental surfaces. Occupational exposures to antimicrobial pesticides are known to cause adverse health effects. To assess the nature and frequency of such exposures in health-care settings, CDC analyzed data from pesticide poisoning surveillance programs in California, Louisiana, Michigan, and Texas (the only four states that regularly collect data on antimicrobial pesticide-related illness) for the period 2002-2007. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which identified 401 cases of work-related illness associated with antimicrobial pesticide exposures in health-care facilities. Most cases were identified through workers compensation systems (61%) and occurred among females (82%) and persons aged 25-54 years (73%). The most frequent occupations reported were janitors/housekeepers (24%) and nursing/medical assistants (16%). The reported mechanism of injury usually was splashes/spills (51%). The eyes were the most common organ/system affected (55%); only 15% of the 265 persons who had exposures while handling antimicrobial pesticides reported using eye protection. Reported symptoms were mostly mild and temporary. One fatality due to acute asthma and subsequent cardiopulmonary collapse was identified. Health-care facilities should educate workers about antimicrobial pesticide hazards, promote the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) as appropriate, and implement effective risk communication strategies for antimicrobial pesticide use to prevent bystander exposure. Improved design of handling equipment might prevent handler and bystander exposure.

  12. Trends of resistance to antimicrobials recommended currently and in the past for management of gonorrhea in the Apex STD center in India and comparison of antimicrobial resistance profile between 2002-2006 and 2007-2012.

    PubMed

    Bala, Manju; Singh, Vikram; Bhargava, Aradhana; Ramesh, V

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae jeopardizes public health and continues to spread out to currently recommended and older antimicrobial agents. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance provides essential clues toward the modification of treatment guidelines. The aim of the study was to determine gonococcal AMR profile and trends between 2007 and 2012 and to evaluate any change in AMR profile in comparison with published trends in 2002 to 2006. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 261 N. gonorrhoeae isolates from consecutive patients between 2007 and 2012 was determined for penicillin, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin, spectinomycin, extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefixime, cefpodoxime) and azithromycin by the disk diffusion technique and the Etest method. P value was determined using χ test for comparisons of trends between the 2 periods. In comparison of AMR trends between 2002-2006 and 2007-2012, penicillinase-producing N. gonorrhoeae, tetracycline-resistant N. gonorrhoeae, and ciprofloxacin-resistant strains increased significantly from 21.2% to 47.9% (P < 0.0001), 13.6% to 25.3% (P = 0.0002), and 78% to 89.7% (P = 0.0001), respectively. An insignificant increase from 2.4% to 4.2% (P > 0.05) in decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone and 0.8% to 1.5% (P > 0.05) for azithromycin resistance was observed. All isolates were susceptible to spectinomycin over both the periods, except for one isolate in 2002. The study highlights that there is a continuous increase in resistance to previously recommended antibiotics despite their disuse for treatment. The increase in number of strains with decreased susceptibility to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and azithromycin resistance, currently recommended for management of gonorrhea, is of serious concern. These trends should be monitored continuously to change antibiotic policy.

  13. Antimicrobial Resistance in Non-Typhoidal Salmonella from Humans, Retail Meats and Food Animals: 2002-2007

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background. The National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitor System (NARMS) tracks antimicrobial susceptibility in enteric bacteria from humans, retail meats and food animals. We analyzed changes in ceftiofur resistance (TioR), nalidixic acid resistance (NalR) and multidrug resistance (MDR-AmpC, define...

  14. Septicaemia in a population-based HIV clinical cohort in rural Uganda, 1996-2007: incidence, aetiology, antimicrobial drug resistance and impact of antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Mayanja, B N; Todd, J; Hughes, P; Van der Paal, L; Mugisha, J O; Atuhumuza, E; Tabuga, P; Maher, D; Grosskurth, H

    2010-06-01

    To describe the incidence and aetiology of septicaemia, and antimicrobial drug resistance in HIV-infected and uninfected individuals, and the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on septicaemia. Between 1996 and 2007, we followed up a rural population-based cohort of HIV-infected and uninfected participants. The aetiology and incidence of septicaemia, and antimicrobial drug resistances were determined. ART became available in 2004, and its impact on the incidence of septicaemia was examined. The overall septicaemia incidence (per 1000 pyrs) was 32.4 (95% CI 26.2-40.6) but was only 2.6 (95% CI 1.3-6.2) in HIV-negative patients and 67.1 (95% CI 53.4-85.4) in HIV-positive patients not on ART. Among those on ART, the overall incidence was 71.5 (95% CI 47.1-114.3), although it was 121.4 (95%CI 77.9-200.4) in the first year on ART and 37.4 (95%CI 18.9-85.2) in the subsequent period. Septicaemia incidence was significantly associated with lower CD4 counts. The commonest isolates were Streptococcus pneumoniae (SPN, n = 68) and Non-typhi salmonellae (NTS, n = 42). Most SPN isolates were susceptible to ceftriaxone and erythromycin, while resistance to cotrimoxazole and penicillin was common. All NTS isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, but resistance to cotrimoxazole and chloramphenicol was common. Septicaemia incidence was higher in HIV-infected than in HIV-uninfected participants, and it remained high for some time among those who started ART. Starting ART earlier at higher CD4 counts is likely to lead to lower septicaemia incidence. Both SPN and NTS, the commonest isolates, were resistant to most commonly available antimicrobials. Blood culture laboratory surveillance systems to monitor antibiotic susceptibility and inform treatment guidelines are needed in Africa.

  15. No Clear Effect of Initiating Vaccination against Common Endemic Infections on the Amounts of Prescribed Antimicrobials for Danish Weaner and Finishing Pigs during 2007–2013

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Amanda Brinch; de Knegt, Leonardo Víctor; Nielsen, Liza Rosenbaum; Alban, Lis

    2017-01-01

    It is often stated that vaccines may help reduce antimicrobial use in swine production. However, limited evidence is available outside clinical trials. We studied the change in amounts of antimicrobials prescribed for weaners and finishers in herds following initiation of vaccination against five common endemic infections: Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, porcine circovirus type II, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, and Lawsonia intracellularis. Comparison was made to the change after a randomly selected date in herds not vaccinating against each of the infections. Danish sow herds initiating vaccination during 2007–2013 were included (69–334 herds, depending on the analysis). Danish sow herds with no use of the vaccine in question were included as non-exposed herds (130–570 herds, depending on the analysis). Antimicrobial prescriptions for weaners in sow herds and for finishers in receiving herds were extracted from the VetStat database for a period of 12 months before and 6–18 months after the first purchase of vaccine, or random date and quantified as average animal daily doses (ADDs) per 100 animals per day. The herd-level difference between ADD in the period after and before vaccination was the outcome in linear regression models for weaner pigs, and linear mixed-effects models for finishing pigs, taking into account sow herds delivering pigs to two or more finisher herds. Three plausible risk factors (Baseline ADD, purchase of specific vaccine, purchase of other vaccines) and five confounders (herd size, export and herd health status, year and season) were initially considered in all 10 models. The main significant effect in all models was the Baseline ADD; the higher the Baseline ADD was for weaner and finishing pigs, the larger the decrease in ADD was following vaccination (or random date for non-vaccinating herds). Regardless of vaccination status, almost equal proportions of herds experienced a

  16. Temporal Trends of Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotypes and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns in Spain from 1979 to 2007

    PubMed Central

    Fenoll, A.; Granizo, J. J.; Aguilar, L.; Giménez, M. J.; Aragoneses-Fenoll, L.; Hanquet, G.; Casal, J.; Tarragó, D.

    2009-01-01

    Temporal trends of serotypes from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Spain from 1979 to September 2007 under antibiotic and vaccine pressure were analyzed. A significant trend in pneumococcal conjugate 7-valent vaccine (PCV7) serotypes (except serotype 4) was found, whereby the prevalence increased from the early 1980s and decreased in the 2000s for all but serotype 23F, which began decreasing in the late 1980s. Among the major non-PCV7 serotypes, a significant decrease was observed for serotypes 1, 5, and 7F in the 1980s. From the late 1990s, serotypes 1, 5, 6A, 7F, and 19A increased significantly, while serotypes 3 and 8 showed similar but nonsignificant trends over time. The incidence of IPD cases was 10.7/100,000 for the period 1996 to 2006, with reporting coverage ranging from 18% to 43%. A significant decrease in IPD incidence due to PCV7 serotypes was observed, while the incidence of non-PCV7 serotypes increased, with the consequence that there was no clear pattern in the overall incidence of IPD. Penicillin nonsusceptibility was correlated with the proportion of PCV7 serotypes. Erythromycin nonsusceptibility increased in association with long-half-life macrolide consumption and then decreased in 2004 to 2007. The increase in PCV7 serotypes and antibiotic nonsusceptibility related to antibiotic consumption in the 1980s and 1990s was reversed in the 2000s, probably as a result of PCV7 immunization. The decrease in IPD incidence due to PCV7 serotypes was mirrored by an increase in that of non-PCV7 serotypes. The impact of various preventive/therapeutic strategies on pneumococcal evolution is serotype dependent, and the dynamics remain unpredictable. PMID:19225097

  17. Antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens in Spain: latest data and changes over 11 years (1996-1997 to 2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Martín-Herrero, Jose E; Mazón, Ana; García-Delafuente, Celia; Robles, Purificación; Iriarte, Victor; Dal-Ré, Rafael; García-de-Lomas, Juan

    2010-07-01

    A nationwide multicenter susceptibility surveillance study (Susceptibility to the Antimicrobials Used in the Community in España [SAUCE] project), SAUCE-4, including 2,559 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2,287 Streptococcus pyogenes, and 2,736 Haemophilus influenzae isolates was carried out from May 2006 to June 2007 in 34 Spanish hospitals. Then, the results from SAUCE-4 were compared to those from all three previous SAUCE studies carried out in 1996-1997, 1998-1999, and 2001-2002 to assess the temporal trends in resistance and the phenotypes of resistance over the 11-year period. In SAUCE-4, on the basis of the CLSI breakpoints, penicillin (parenteral, nonmeningitis breakpoint) and cefotaxime were the antimicrobials that were the most active against S. pneumoniae (99.8% and 99.6%, respectively). Only 0.9% of isolates had a penicillin MIC of > or = 2 microg/ml. In S. pyogenes, nonsusceptibility to erythromycin was observed in 19.4% of isolates. Among the H. influenzae isolates, a beta-lactamase-positive prevalence of 15.7% was found. A statistically significant temporal decreasing trend over the 11-year period was observed for nonsusceptibility (from 60.0% to 22.9%) and resistance (from 36.5% to 0.9%) to penicillin and for the proportion of erythromycin-resistant isolates of S. pneumoniae of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLS(B)) phenotype (from 98.4% to 81.3%). A similar trend was observed for the prevalence of ampicillin resistance (from 37.6% to 16.1%), beta-lactamase production (from 25.7% to 15.7%), and beta-lactamase-negative ampicillin resistance (BLNAR) in H. influenzae (from 13.5% to 0.7%). Among erythromycin-resistant isolates of S. pyogenes, a significant increasing trend in the prevalence of MLS(B) was observed (from 7.0% to 35.5%). SAUCE-4 confirms a generalized decline in the resistance of the main respiratory pathogens to the antimicrobials as well as a shift in their resistance phenotypes.

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance among Respiratory Pathogens in Spain: Latest Data and Changes over 11 Years (1996-1997 to 2006-2007)▿

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Trallero, Emilio; Martín-Herrero, Jose E.; Mazón, Ana; García-Delafuente, Celia; Robles, Purificación; Iriarte, Victor; Dal-Ré, Rafael; García-de-Lomas, Juan

    2010-01-01

    A nationwide multicenter susceptibility surveillance study (Susceptibility to the Antimicrobials Used in the Community in España [SAUCE] project), SAUCE-4, including 2,559 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2,287 Streptococcus pyogenes, and 2,736 Haemophilus influenzae isolates was carried out from May 2006 to June 2007 in 34 Spanish hospitals. Then, the results from SAUCE-4 were compared to those from all three previous SAUCE studies carried out in 1996-1997, 1998-1999, and 2001-2002 to assess the temporal trends in resistance and the phenotypes of resistance over the 11-year period. In SAUCE-4, on the basis of the CLSI breakpoints, penicillin (parenteral, nonmeningitis breakpoint) and cefotaxime were the antimicrobials that were the most active against S. pneumoniae (99.8% and 99.6%, respectively). Only 0.9% of isolates had a penicillin MIC of ≥2 μg/ml. In S. pyogenes, nonsusceptibility to erythromycin was observed in 19.4% of isolates. Among the H. influenzae isolates, a β-lactamase-positive prevalence of 15.7% was found. A statistically significant temporal decreasing trend over the 11-year period was observed for nonsusceptibility (from 60.0% to 22.9%) and resistance (from 36.5% to 0.9%) to penicillin and for the proportion of erythromycin-resistant isolates of S. pneumoniae of the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B (MLSB) phenotype (from 98.4% to 81.3%). A similar trend was observed for the prevalence of ampicillin resistance (from 37.6% to 16.1%), β-lactamase production (from 25.7% to 15.7%), and β-lactamase-negative ampicillin resistance (BLNAR) in H. influenzae (from 13.5% to 0.7%). Among erythromycin-resistant isolates of S. pyogenes, a significant increasing trend in the prevalence of MLSB was observed (from 7.0% to 35.5%). SAUCE-4 confirms a generalized decline in the resistance of the main respiratory pathogens to the antimicrobials as well as a shift in their resistance phenotypes. PMID:20439616

  19. Prevalence, serotype diversity, and antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella in imported shipments of spice offered for entry to the United States, FY2007-FY2009.

    PubMed

    Van Doren, Jane M; Kleinmeier, Daria; Hammack, Thomas S; Westerman, Ann

    2013-06-01

    In response to increased concerns about spice safety, the U.S. FDA initiated research to characterize the prevalence of Salmonella in imported spices. Shipments of imported spices offered for entry to the United Sates were sampled during the fiscal years 2007-2009. The mean shipment prevalence for Salmonella was 0.066 (95% CI 0.057-0.076). A wide diversity of Salmonella serotypes was isolated from spices; no single serotype constituted more than 7% of the isolates. A small percentage of spice shipments were contaminated with antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella strains (8.3%). Trends in shipment prevalence for Salmonella associated with spice properties, extent of processing, and export country, were examined. A larger proportion of shipments of spices derived from fruit/seeds or leaves of plants were contaminated than those derived from the bark/flower of spice plants. Salmonella prevalence was larger for shipments of ground/cracked capsicum and coriander than for shipments of their whole spice counterparts. No difference in prevalence was observed between shipments of spice blends and non-blended spices. Some shipments reported to have been subjected to a pathogen reduction treatment prior to being offered for U.S. entry were found contaminated. Statistical differences in Salmonella shipment prevalence were also identified on the basis of export country.

  20. Educational antimicrobial susceptibility testing as a critical component of microbiology laboratory proficiency programs: American Proficiency Institute results for 2007-2011.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Glick, Teri; Sader, Helio S; Flamm, Robert K; Ross, James E; Rhomberg, Paul R; Edson, Daniel C

    2013-04-01

    External laboratory proficiency programs are an important requirement for test quality assurance (EQA) and compliance to regulatory guidelines (Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments and inspections). The American Proficiency Institute (API) regularly distributes EQA sample challenges (test events) including an Educational Sample (ES) for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Beginning in 2007, API has sent 3 ES samples annually, each a well-characterized (molecular/phenotypic methods) strain having an interesting/emerging mechanism of resistance. Hundreds of USA laboratories, usually serving small- to medium-size hospitals and clinics, participate in the API ungraded ES test event. Analysis of responses is made and reported electronically as ES critiques addressing contemporary susceptibility testing issues that affect patient therapy. Seven Gram-positive (+) and 8 Gram-negative (-) ES strains were tested over the 5 years (2007-2011) with organism identification (graded) accuracy of 95.3% (range, 91.0-99.2%) for Gram (-) and 97.0% (range, 94.2-100.0%) for Gram (+) challenges. Susceptibility testing categorical accuracy was generally greatest for the disk diffusion test (91.0/97.0%) compared to the MIC methods (commercial automated or manual) combined (89.9/96.1%, for Gram [-]/Gram [+], respectively). The most worrisome observations of these ES samples were as follows: 1) poor recognition of ESBL- and serine carbapenemase-producing strains (various types including Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapanemase) due to delayed application of Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute [CLSI] guidelines; 2) overcalling of ESBL in organisms having wild-type non-ESBL enzymes (OXA series; OXA, 1/30) due to commercial system or participant interpretive error; and 3) occasional drug-bug discords noted in nonfermentative Gram (-) bacilli. In conclusion, the API ES series of ungraded susceptibility testing challenges (accuracy was >90%) has been well received by subscribers and

  1. A Nationwide Study of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli Bacteremia in Finland Over a 10-Year Period, 1998–2007, With Special Reference to Clinical Characteristics and Antimicrobial Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Lauhio, Anneli; Ellström, Patrik; Rautelin, Hilpi

    2011-01-01

    Background. Campylobacter bacteremia is an uncommon condition, usually diagnosed in elderly and immunocompromised patients. Methods. Blood culture isolates and clinical information were collected for patients with diagnoses of Campylobacter jejuni or Campylobacter coli bacteremia in Finland from 1998 through 2007. Bacterial species were identified by means of polymerase chain reaction analysis, and minimal inhibitory concentrations for ciprofloxacin, clindamycin, doxycycline, erythromycin, gentamicin, meropenem, and metronidazole were determined with an agar dilution method. Medical records and mortality data within 1 year after the bacteremic episode were reviewed. Results. The study included 76 patients (median age, 46 years), for whom bacterial isolates (C. jejuni in 73, C. coli in 3) and clinical information were available. Most patients (70%) had no significant underlying diseases. The majority (82%) of the isolates were susceptible for all antimicrobial agents tested. However, antimicrobial therapy seemed to have only a limited effect, because no differences could be detected between patients with appropriate empirical antimicrobial treatment and those with delayed appropriate, inappropriate, or no antimicrobial therapy, either in the duration of hospitalization (median, 4 days for both groups) or in attributable mortality. The outcome of the infection was severe in 4 patients infected with C. jejuni; 2 died within 30 days, spondylodiscitis developed in 1, and Guillain-Barré syndrome developed in 1. Conclusions. C. jejuni and C. coli bacteremia occurred mainly in moderately young individuals without severe underlying diseases. The bacterial isolates were predominantly susceptible to antimicrobial agents, and the outcome of the disease was typically good, regardless of appropriate or inappropriate antimicrobial treatment given in the hospital. PMID:21921217

  2. Salmonella Newport as Reported by the Animal Arm of the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System – Enteric Bacteria (NARMS) 1997-2007

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Introduction: Since the early 1990’s there has been increasing awareness and concern regarding the development of antimicrobial resistance among bacteria of public health significance. Reports targeting zoonotic bacteria, and in particular Salmonella species, suggest that resistance is trending upw...

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from children with impetigo in China from 2003 to 2007 shows community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to be uncommon and heterogeneous.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Kong, F; Zhang, X; Brown, M; Ma, L; Yang, Y

    2009-12-01

    The number of patients with impetigo caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has been increasing. To investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility of S. aureus causing impetigo in children in China from 2003 to 2007 and further characterize isolates of CA-MRSA. We examined 984 S. aureus isolates for antimicrobial susceptibility to 11 antimicrobials using the agar dilution method. CA-MRSA isolates were analysed for Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) genes, and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing was performed. The largest proportion (94.5%) of strains were resistant to penicillin, followed by erythromycin (86.2%) and clindamycin (69.6%). In total 772 of 984 (78.5%) S. aureus strains were multiresistant. The incidence of CA-MRSA was 1.1%, with a high rate of resistance to clindamycin (90.9%) and tetracycline (72.7%), but all were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. The susceptibility profiles of MRSA to other antimicrobial agents were similar to those of methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). None of the S. aureus strains were resistant to vancomycin and fusidic acid; moreover, only one strain was resistant to mupirocin. Typing of the SCCmec showed that 54.5% were type IV, 18.2% were type V and 9.1% were type VI. All the PVL-positive CA-MRSA carried SCCmec type IV. CA-MRSA is still relatively uncommon and heterogeneous in children in China. Penicillin and erythromycin are no longer appropriate agents. Effective antibiotic agents for patients with impetigo are mupirocin and fusidic acid.

  4. Rates of antimicrobial resistance in Latin America (2004-2007) and in vitro activity of the glycylcycline tigecycline and of other antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Flávia; García, Patricia; Ronzon, Bernardo; Curcio, Daniel; Dowzicky, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    As a part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.), Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial isolates were collected from 33 centers in Latin America (centers in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, and Venezuela) from January 2004 to September 2007. Argentina and Mexico were the greatest contributors of isolates to this study. Susceptibilities were determined according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Resistance levels were high for most key organisms across Latin America: 48.3% of Staphylococcus aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant while 21.4% of Acinetobacter spp. isolates were imipenem-resistant. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase were reported in 36.7% of Klebsiella pneumoniae and 20.8% of E. coli isolates. Tigecycline was the most active agent against Gram-positive isolates. Tigecycline was also highly active against all Gram-negative organisms, with the exception of Pseuodomonas aeruginosa, against which piperacillin-tazobactam was the most active agent tested (79.3% of isolates susceptible). The in vitro activity of tigecycline against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative isolates indicates that it may be an useful tool for the treatment of nosocomial infections, even those caused by organisms that are resistant to other antibacterial agents.

  5. [Bacteria isolated from surgical infections and its susceptibilities to antimicrobial agents--special references to bacteria isolated between April 2006 and March 2007].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Nagao; Hirata, Koichi; Katsuramaki, Tadashi; Mizukuchi, Tohru; Ushijima, Yasuhide; Ushida, Tomohiro; Aikawa, Naoki; Yo, Kikuo; Mashita, Keiji; Ishikawa, Syu; Mizuno, Akira; Kubo, Shoji; Lee, Shigeru; Fujimoto, Mikio; Higaki, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Katsutoshi; Tsuji, Takeshi; Ohnishi, Hironobu; Yamaue, Hiroki; Kawai, Manabu; Takesue, Yoshio; Tanaka, Noriaki; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Takayama, Tadatoshi; Sato, Takeshi; Kato, Koumei; Yura, Jiro; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Mizuno, Isamu; Kimura, Hideyuki; Fuchimoto, Sadayoshi; Sueda, Taijiro; Hiyama, Eiso; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ooge, Hiroki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Tsumura, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Takeuchi, Hitoshi; Yasui, Yoshimasa; Ikeda, Seiyo; Yasunami, Yoichi; Ryu, Shinichiro

    2008-06-01

    Tendency of isolated bacteria from infections in abdominal surgery during the period from April 2006 to March 2007 were investigated in a multicenter study in Japan, and the following results were obtained. In this series, 474 strains including 23 strains of Candida spp. were isolated from 170 (75.2%) of 226 patients with surgical infections. Two hundred and twenty-six strains were isolated from primary infections, and 224 strains were isolated from postoperative infections. From primary infections, anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria were predominant, followed by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, while from postoperative infections aerobic Gram-positive bacteria were predominant, followed by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Among aerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rate of Staphylococcus spp. was higher from postoperative infections, while Enterococcus spp. was higher from primary infections. Among aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli was the most predominantly isolated from primary infections, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, in this order, and from postoperative infections, P. aeruginosa was the most predominantly isolated, followed by E. coli and E. cloacae. Among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, the isolation rate of Bilophila wadsworthia was the highest from primary infections, followed by Bacteroides fragilis and from postoperative infections, B. fragilis was most predominately isolated, followed by Bacteroides caccae, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and B. wadsworthia in this order. In this series, we noticed no methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, nor multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa. There were three strains of methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus, but all of them had good susceptibilities against various anti-MRSA antibiotics. We should carefully follow up B. wadsworthia.

  6. [Bacteria isolated from surgical infections and their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents--special reference to bacteria isolated between April 2007 and March 2008].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Nagao; Hasegawa, Masamitsu; Hirata, Koichi; Katsuramaki, Tadashi; Mizukuchi, Tohru; Ushijima, Yasuhide; Ushida, Tomohiro; Aikawa, Naoki; Yo, Kikuo; Yura, Jiro; Takeyama, Hiromitsu; Wakasugi, Takehiro; Taniguchi, Masaaki; Mizuno, Isamu; Mashita, Keiji; Ishikawa, Sw; Mizuno, Akira; Tsumura, Hiroaki; Yokoyama, Takashi; Moori, Noriaki; Sumita, Naoki; Kubo, Shoji; Lee, Shigeru; Oomura, Toru; Kobayashi, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Takeshi; Yamaue, Hiroki; Kawai, Manabu; Takesue, Yoshio; Tanaka, Noriaki; Kimura, Hideyuki; Iwagaki, Hiromi; Sueda, Taijiro; Hiyama, Eiso; Murakami, Yoshiaki; Ooge, Hiroki; Uemura, Kenichiro; Takeuchi, Hitoshi; Yasui, Yoshimasa; Yasunami, Yoichi; Ryu, Shinichiro

    2009-08-01

    Bacteria isolated from infections in abdominal surgery during the period from April 2007 to March 2008 were investigated in a multicenter study in Japan, and the following results were obtained. In this series, 707 strains including 24 strains of Candida spp. were isolated from 181 (79.0%) of 229 patients with surgical infections. Three hundred and ninety-five strains were isolated from primary infections, and 288 strains were isolated from postoperative infections. From primary infections, anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria were predominant, followed by aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, while from postoperative infections aerobic Gram-positive bacteria were predominant, followed by anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria. Among aerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rate of Enterococcus spp. was highest, followed by Streptococcus spp., and Staphylococcus spp. in this order, from primary infections, while Enterococcus spp. was highest, followed by Staphylococcus spp. from postoperative infections. Among aerobic Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli was the most predominantly isolated from primary infections, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter cloacae, in this order, and from postoperative infections, P. aeruginosa was most predominantly isolated, followed by E. cloacae, E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Among anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, the isolation rate of Parvimonas micra was the highest from primary infections, followed by Streptococcus constellatus and Gemella morbillorum, and from postoperative infections, Anaerococcus prevotii was most predominantly isolated. Among anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, the isolation rate of both Bacteroides fragilis and Bilophila wadsworthia were the highest from primary infections, followed by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and Campylobacter gracilis, and from postoperative infections, B. thetaiotaomicron was most predominately isolated, followed by B. fragilis, Bacteroides caccae and B

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli isolated from symbovine flies, cattle and sympatric insectivorous house martins from a farm in the Czech Republic (2006-2007).

    PubMed

    Rybaríková, Jana; Dolejská, Monika; Materna, David; Literák, Ivan; Cízek, Alois

    2010-10-01

    The prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli was tested in symbovine flies and sympatric house martins (Delichon urbica) at a dairy farm. Antimicrobial resistant E. coli was detected in 89% (n=147) of isolates from flies within a calf barn. Isolates with the same antimicrobial resistance phenotypes, genes, and pulsotypes were found between both fly and calf E. coli isolates, suggesting that the calves were the initial source of the antimicrobial resistant strains in fly isolates. Symbovine flies were considered as important reservoirs of antimicrobial resistant E. coli strains at a dairy farm, due to their intensive contact with cattle feces and manure. House martin fecal samples from the same farm contained 4.5% (n=393) of antimicrobial resistant E. coli. House martin isolates displayed different macrorestriction profiles than fly isolates and the significance of house martins as a reservoir and vector of antimicrobial resistant E. coli appears low.

  8. Antimicrobial Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Doron, Shira; Davidson, Lisa E.

    2011-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is increasing; however, antimicrobial drug development is slowing. Now more than ever before, antimicrobial stewardship is of the utmost importance as a way to optimize the use of antimicrobials to prevent the development of resistance and improve patient outcomes. This review describes the why, what, who, how, when, and where of antimicrobial stewardship. Techniques of stewardship are summarized, and a plan for implementation of a stewardship program is outlined. PMID:22033257

  9. Structures Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1995 are presented.

  10. Antimicrobials Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosinos, Eleftherios H.; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.; Mataragas, Marios

    The use of antimicrobials is a common practice for preservation of foods. Incorporation, in a food recipe, of chemical antimicrobials towards inhibition of spoilage and pathogenic micro-organisms results in the compositional modification of food. This treatment is nowadays undesirable for the consumer, who likes natural products. Scientific community reflecting consumers demand for natural antimicrobials has made efforts to investigate the possibility to use natural antimicrobials such us bacteriocins and essential oils of plant origin to inhibit microbial growth.

  11. Antimicrobial stewardship.

    PubMed

    Allerberger, F; Mittermayer, H

    2008-03-01

    The aim of antimicrobial management or stewardship programmes is to ensure proper use of antimicrobial agents in order to provide the best treatment outcomes, to lessen the risk of adverse effects (including antimicrobial resistance), and to promote cost-effectiveness. Increasingly, long-term sustainability is found to be the major focus of antimicrobial stewardship. Implementing structural measures in healthcare institutions is therefore a major, but not the sole, focus of attention in promoting prudent use of antibiotics. The problem of antimicrobial resistance requires common strategies at all levels--for the prescribers and at ward, departmental, hospital, national and international levels.

  12. Long Divisions

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-08-08

    The shadow of Saturn on the rings, which stretched across all of the rings earlier in Cassini's mission (see PIA08362), now barely makes it past the Cassini division. The changing length of the shadow marks the passing of the seasons on Saturn. As the planet nears its northern-hemisphere solstice in May 2017, the shadow will get even shorter. At solstice, the shadow's edge will be about 28,000 miles (45,000 kilometers) from the planet's surface, barely making it past the middle of the B ring. The moon Mimas is a few pixels wide, near the lower left in this image. This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 35 degrees above the ring plane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on May 21, 2016. The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 2.0 million miles (3.2 million kilometers) from Saturn. Image scale is 120 miles (190 kilometers) per pixel. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20494

  13. Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Natural products of higher plants may possess a new source of antimicrobial agents with possibly novel mechanisms of action. They are effective in the treatment of infectious diseases while simultaneously mitigating many of the side effects that are often associated with conventional antimicrobials. A method using scanning electron microscope (SEM) to study the morphology of the bacterial and fungal microbes and thus determining antimicrobial activity is presented in the chapter.

  14. Antimicrobial Pesticides

    MedlinePlus

    ... EPA United States Environmental Protection Agency Search Search Pesticides Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Antimicrobial Pesticides EPA regulates pesticides under the statutory authority of ...

  15. PROFILE OF THE GULF ECOLOGY DIVISION, UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A history of the man-made island on which the Gulf Ecology Division is located,from its origin in 1876 to the present day (2007). Contains a synopsis of current research and future plans of the division.

  16. PROFILE OF THE GULF ECOLOGY DIVISION, UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A history of the man-made island on which the Gulf Ecology Division is located,from its origin in 1876 to the present day (2007). Contains a synopsis of current research and future plans of the division.

  17. Antimicrobials for bacterial bioterrorism agents.

    PubMed

    Sarkar-Tyson, Mitali; Atkins, Helen S

    2011-06-01

    The limitations of current antimicrobials for highly virulent pathogens considered as potential bioterrorism agents drives the requirement for new antimicrobials that are suitable for use in populations in the event of a deliberate release. Strategies targeting bacterial virulence offer the potential for new countermeasures to combat bacterial bioterrorism agents, including those active against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Although early in the development of antivirulence approaches, inhibitors of bacterial type III secretion systems and cell division mechanisms show promise for the future. © 2011 Future Medicine Ltd

  18. Triclosan antimicrobial polymers

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Triclosan antimicrobial molecular fluctuating energies of nonbonding electron pairs for the oxygen atom by ether bond rotations are reviewed with conformational computational chemistry analyses. Subsequent understanding of triclosan alternating ether bond rotations is able to help explain several material properties in Polymer Science. Unique bond rotation entanglements between triclosan and the polymer chains increase both the mechanical properties of polymer toughness and strength that are enhanced even better through secondary bonding relationships. Further, polymer blend compatibilization is considered due to similar molecular relationships and polarities. With compatibilization of triclosan in polymers a more uniform stability for nonpolar triclosan in the polymer solid state is retained by the antimicrobial for extremely low release with minimum solubility into aqueous solution. As a result, triclosan is projected for long extended lifetimes as an antimicrobial polymer additive. Further, triclosan rapid alternating ether bond rotations disrupt secondary bonding between chain monomers in the resin state to reduce viscosity and enhance polymer blending. Thus, triclosan is considered for a polymer additive with multiple properties to be an antimicrobial with additional benefits as a nonpolar toughening agent and a hydrophobic wetting agent. The triclosan material relationships with alternating ether bond rotations are described through a complete different form of medium by comparisons with known antimicrobial properties that upset bacterial cell membranes through rapid fluctuating mechanomolecular energies. Also, triclosan bond entanglements with secondary bonding can produce structural defects in weak bacterial lipid membranes requiring pliability that can then interfere with cell division. Regarding applications with polymers, triclosan can be incorporated by mixing into a resin system before cure, melt mixed with thermoplastic polymers that set on cooling

  19. Antimicrobial stewardship

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Gladys W.; Wu, Jia En; Yeo, Chay Leng; Chan, Douglas; Hsu, Li Yang

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial stewardship is an emerging field currently defined by a series of strategies and interventions aimed toward improving appropriate prescription of antibiotics in humans in all healthcare settings. The ultimate goal is the preservation of current and future antibiotics against the threat of antimicrobial resistance, although improving patient safety and reducing healthcare costs are important concurrent aims. Prospective audit and feedback interventions are probably the most widely practiced of all antimicrobial stewardship strategies. Although labor-intensive, they are more easily accepted by physicians compared with formulary restriction and preauthorization strategies and have a higher potential for educational opportunities. Objective evaluation of antimicrobial stewardship is critical for determining the success of such programs. Nonetheless, there is controversy over which outcomes to measure and there is a pressing need for novel study designs that can objectively assess antimicrobial stewardship interventions despite the limitations inherent in the structure of most such programs. PMID:23302793

  20. Antimicrobial Polymer

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, William F.; Wright, Stacy C.; Taylor, Andrew C.

    2004-09-28

    A polymeric composition having antimicrobial properties and a process for rendering the surface of a substrate antimicrobial are disclosed. The polymeric composition comprises a crosslinked chemical combination of (i) a polymer having amino group-containing side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, (ii) an antimicrobial agent selected from metals, metal alloys, metal salts, metal complexes and mixtures thereof, and (iii) a crosslinking agent containing functional groups capable of reacting with the amino groups. In one example embodiment, the polymer is a polyamide formed from a maleic anhydride or maleic acid ester monomer and alkylamines thereby producing a polyamide having amino substituted alkyl chains on one side of the polyamide backbone; the crosslinking agent is a phosphine having the general formula (A).sub.3 P wherein A is hydroxyalkyl; and the metallic antimicrobial agent is selected from chelated silver ions, silver metal, chelated copper ions, copper metal, chelated zinc ions, zinc metal and mixtures thereof.

  1. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread of antimicrobial resistance. Present situation Resistance in bacteria Antibiotic resistance is present in every country. Patients with infections caused by drug-resistant bacteria are at increased risk of worse clinical outcomes ...

  2. Detailing the Division

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-10-11

    NASA Cassini spacecraft looks between Saturn A and B rings to spy structure in the Cassini Division. The Cassini Division, occupying the middle and left of the image, contains five dim bands of ring material, but not all of the division is shown here.

  3. Prevention of adverse events in hospitalized patients using an antimicrobial review program.

    PubMed Central

    Guglielmo, B J; Luber, A D; Corelli, R L; Flaherty, J F; Jacobs, R A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether an antimicrobial review system is associated with a reduction in antimicrobial-associated adverse events. DESIGN: All antimicrobial medication orders for patients hospitalized over a two-year period were evaluated. High-level interventions intended to prevent adverse antimicrobial events were collated. Based on literature estimates of adverse antimicrobial events, potential reduction of high-level adverse antimicrobial events was estimated. SETTING: Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Division of Infectious Diseases at a tertiary care teaching hospital. RESULTS: A total of 452 interventions were classified as "high-level." The incidence of preventable adverse antimicrobial events requiring intervention was 16 per 1000 antimicrobial orders. The incidence of high-level errors necessitating intervention was 4.4 per 1000 antimicrobial orders. An estimated 125 to 198 high-level adverse events were avoided. CONCLUSION: An antimicrobial review program has the potential to reduce significant adverse events in hospitalized patients. PMID:10560287

  4. Ireland (2007)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Between 51.5 and 55.5 degrees north latitude, Ireland could easily find itself buried in snow during the winter, but the island's average temperature in January is 7 degrees Celsius (45 degrees Fahrenheit). Ireland's mild climate results from the influence of the ocean current known as the North Atlantic Drift, which extends the warm waters of the Gulf Stream northward. The island enjoys mild temperatures in the summertime as well; extreme heat and cold are virtually unknown. Precipitation ranges from 78.5 centimeters (31 inches) around Dublin to 300 centimeters (118 inches) along the west coast. The mild, rainy climate is good for vegetation. In this image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite on May 2, 2007, Ireland overwhelms the viewer with hues of green, particularly in the interior, where the vegetation overlies lowlands of limestone--the remains of marine animals from an ancient sea. Little of the island's famous greenness results from trees, however. Seventeenth-century clearing removed most of the country's forests, and despite replanting efforts, Ireland is Europe's least forested country, after Iceland. The island's mild temperatures and humidity have instead blanketed the landscape in abundant grasses. Along Ireland's west coast, bare brown rocks emerge from the plant cover. In the north, the rocks are primarily ancient, crystalline rocks deposited well over a billion years ago. In the south, the rocks are primarily sandstone deposited roughly 350 million years ago. Evidence of urbanization dots the landscape, especially along the east coast. The metropolitan area of Dublin appears as an uneven patch of gray, mingled with dots of green. Human habitation is also evident around Londonderry, Belfast, and Cork.

  5. Ireland (2007)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Between 51.5 and 55.5 degrees north latitude, Ireland could easily find itself buried in snow during the winter, but the island's average temperature in January is 7 degrees Celsius (45 degrees Fahrenheit). Ireland's mild climate results from the influence of the ocean current known as the North Atlantic Drift, which extends the warm waters of the Gulf Stream northward. The island enjoys mild temperatures in the summertime as well; extreme heat and cold are virtually unknown. Precipitation ranges from 78.5 centimeters (31 inches) around Dublin to 300 centimeters (118 inches) along the west coast. The mild, rainy climate is good for vegetation. In this image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite on May 2, 2007, Ireland overwhelms the viewer with hues of green, particularly in the interior, where the vegetation overlies lowlands of limestone--the remains of marine animals from an ancient sea. Little of the island's famous greenness results from trees, however. Seventeenth-century clearing removed most of the country's forests, and despite replanting efforts, Ireland is Europe's least forested country, after Iceland. The island's mild temperatures and humidity have instead blanketed the landscape in abundant grasses. Along Ireland's west coast, bare brown rocks emerge from the plant cover. In the north, the rocks are primarily ancient, crystalline rocks deposited well over a billion years ago. In the south, the rocks are primarily sandstone deposited roughly 350 million years ago. Evidence of urbanization dots the landscape, especially along the east coast. The metropolitan area of Dublin appears as an uneven patch of gray, mingled with dots of green. Human habitation is also evident around Londonderry, Belfast, and Cork.

  6. Division Chief Meeting, April, 1929

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1929-01-01

    Caption: 'LMAL division chiefs confer with the engineer-in-charge in April 1929. Left to right: E.A. Myers, Personnel Division; Edward R. Sharp, Property and Clerical Division; Thomas Carroll, Flight Test Division; Henry J.E. Reid, engineer in chief; Carlton Kemper, Power Plants Division; Elton Miller, aerodynamics division.'

  7. Antimicrobial polymers.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Duvvuri, L Sailaja; Farah, Shady; Beyth, Nurit; Domb, Abraham J; Khan, Wahid

    2014-12-01

    Better health is basic requirement of human being, but the rapid growth of harmful pathogens and their serious health effects pose a significant challenge to modern science. Infections by pathogenic microorganisms are of great concern in many fields such as medical devices, drugs, hospital surfaces/furniture, dental restoration, surgery equipment, health care products, and hygienic applications (e.g., water purification systems, textiles, food packaging and storage, major or domestic appliances etc.) Antimicrobial polymers are the materials having the capability to kill/inhibit the growth of microbes on their surface or surrounding environment. Recently, they gained considerable interest for both academic research and industry and were found to be better than their small molecular counterparts in terms of enhanced efficacy, reduced toxicity, minimized environmental problems, resistance, and prolonged lifetime. Hence, efforts have focused on the development of antimicrobial polymers with all desired characters for optimum activity. In this Review, an overview of different antimicrobial polymers, their mechanism of action, factors affecting antimicrobial activity, and application in various fields are given. Recent advances and the current clinical status of these polymers are also discussed.

  8. Antimicrobial Stewardship

    PubMed Central

    King, Sarah; Exley, Josephine; Taylor, Jirka; Kruithof, Kristy; Larkin, Jody; Pardal, Mafalda

    2016-01-01

    Abstract RAND Europe undertook a systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness and cost effectiveness on changing the public's risk related behaviour pertaining to antimicrobial use to inform the development of a NICE public health guideline aimed at delaying antimicrobial resistance (AMR). The review considered educational interventions targeting individuals, communities or the general public delivered via any mode. Specifically, it aimed to address: 1. Which educational interventions are effective and cost-effective in changing the public's behaviour to ensure they only ask for antimicrobials when appropriate and use them correctly? 2. Which educational interventions are effective and cost-effective in changing the public's behaviour to prevent infection and reduce the spread of antimicrobial resistance? Overall, 60 studies met the inclusion criteria; 29 related to research question 1, and 36 related to research question 2 (five studies were applicable to both). The key findings are summarised in “Evidence Statements” in accordance with NICE guidelines. Evidence Statements provide a high level overview of the key features of the evidence including: the number of studies, the quality of evidence, and the direction of the estimated effect followed by a brief summary of each of the supporting studies. Studies are grouped into Evidence Statements by setting and intervention. PMID:28083399

  9. JSOU and NDIA SO/LIC Division Essays (2007)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Create several content-rich Darknet environments—a private virtual network where users connect only to people they trust7—that offer e-mail, file...chat rooms, and Darknets ). Moon: Cyber-Herding Cyber-Herding Nodes and Relationship Network Gatherer Construction Demolition Structure of Cyber-Herding...the extrem- ist messages, concentrating Web sites, and developing Darknets . A visual illustration of the entire process follows Phase 7. Phase 5

  10. Naval Research Laboratory Space Science Division Newsletter: 01/2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-20

    corona (COR1 and COR2) and the interplanetary medium between the corona and Earth (HI1 and HI2). Each of the two NASA STEREO spacecraft contains...satellite for a 3-year mission to study the solar corona . OCT: Unprecedented observations of Coronal Mass Ejections as they form at the Sun and...travel through coronal and interplanetary space to the orbit of the Earth are now being provided by the SECCHI experiment, which launched aboard NASA’s

  11. Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Bahar, Ali Adem; Ren, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase in drug-resistant infections has presented a serious challenge to antimicrobial therapies. The failure of the most potent antibiotics to kill “superbugs” emphasizes the urgent need to develop other control agents. Here we review the history and new development of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), a growing class of natural and synthetic peptides with a wide spectrum of targets including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and parasites. We summarize the major types of AMPs, their modes of action, and the common mechanisms of AMP resistance. In addition, we discuss the principles for designing effective AMPs and the potential of using AMPs to control biofilms (multicellular structures of bacteria embedded in extracellular matrixes) and persister cells (dormant phenotypic variants of bacterial cells that are highly tolerant to antibiotics). PMID:24287494

  12. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  13. Division: The Sleeping Dragon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Of the four mathematical operators, division seems to not sit easily for many learners. Division is often described as "the odd one out". Pupils develop coping strategies that enable them to "get away with it". So, problems, misunderstandings, and misconceptions go unresolved perhaps for a lifetime. Why is this? Is it a case of "out of sight out…

  14. Division Iv: Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbally, Christopher; D'Antona, Francesca; Spite, Monique; Asplund, Martin; Charbonnel, Corinne; Docobo, Jose Angel; Gray, Richard O.; Piskunov, Nikolai E.

    2012-04-01

    This Division IV was started on a trial basis at the General Assembly in The Hague 1994 and was formally accepted at the Kyoto General Assembly in 1997. Its broad coverage of ``Stars'' is reflected in its relatively large number of Commissions and so of members (1266 in late 2011). Its kindred Division V, ``Variable Stars'', has the same history of its beginning. The thinking at the time was to achieve some kind of balance between the number of members in each of the 12 Divisions. Amid the current discussion of reorganizing the number of Divisions into a more compact form it seems advisable to make this numerical balance less of an issue than the rationalization of the scientific coverage of each Division, so providing more effective interaction within a particular field of astronomy. After all, every star is variable to a certain degree and such variability is becoming an ever more powerful tool to understand the characteristics of every kind of normal and peculiar star. So we may expect, after hearing the reactions of members, that in the restructuring a single Division will result from the current Divisions IV and V.

  15. Oriented divisions, fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Scott E.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    During development, the establishment of proper tissue architecture depends upon the coordinated control of cell divisions not only in space and time, but also direction. Execution of an oriented cell division requires establishment of an axis of polarity and alignment of the mitotic spindle along this axis. Frequently, the cleavage plane also segregates fate determinants, either unequally or equally between daughter cells, the outcome of which is either an asymmetric or symmetric division, respectively. The last few years have witnessed tremendous growth in understanding both the extrinsic and intrinsic cues that position the mitotic spindle, the varied mechanisms in which the spindle orientation machinery is controlled in diverse organisms and organ systems, and the manner in which the division axis influences the signaling pathways that direct cell fate choices. PMID:24021274

  16. Chemical Engineering Division Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical Engineering Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    The 1978 ASEE Chemical Engineering Division Lecturer was Theodore Vermeulen of the University of California at Berkeley. Other chemical engineers who received awards or special recognition at a recent ASEE annual conference are mentioned. (BB)

  17. Impact of antimicrobial stewardship by infection control team in a Japanese teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Koji; Miwa, Yoshihiro; Tomono, Kazunori; Kurokawa, Nobuo

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate an effect on the antimicrobial appropriate use of the antimicrobial stewardship. We investigated the consumption of injectable antimicrobials from 2001 to 2007 and the administration period of specific antimicrobials (carbapenems, fourth-generation cephalosporins, anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) agents) in the individual patient. Since September 2004, the infection control team at Osaka University Hospital has been promoting appropriate use of antimicrobials through consultation, education, and weekly surveillance of specific antimicrobial usage. We obtained the amount of all antimicrobial injections as titer from the medical information database of the electronic medical chart system retrospectively. Antimicrobial use densities (AUD) were evaluated by measuring the number of doses administered/1000 patient-days. Although the number of inpatient admissions and operations increased 1.53- and 1.39-fold, respectively, in the seven years from 2001 to 2007, the expenditure on specific antimicrobials decreased markedly with AUD of specific antimicrobials decreasing from 39.6 to 29.2. The percentage of inpatients receiving specific antimicrobials decreased from 19.8% to 9.8%, and the ratio of the number of inpatients administered a specific antimicrobial within seven days to the number of inpatients administered each specific antimicrobial increased to over 60%. This led to reduction in the total expenditure of antimicrobials by about 100 million yen annually. The incidence of hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) infection decreased from 0.93% (2003) to 0.68% (2007). We can reduce the expenditure of antimicrobials without increasing incidence of the HA-MRSA by antimicrobial stewardship, and we think that appropriate use of antimicrobials is achieved progressively.

  18. Reconsidering Division Cavalry Squadrons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-05-25

    battalions because they were “the central core of the reconnaissance team,” other cavalry champions, like Major General Robert Wagner , countered that they...29 Starry, Mounted Combat, 221; Robert Wagner , “Division Cavalry: The Broken Saber,” Armor (September-October 1989): 39; Thomas Tait...Cavalry Squadron of 2025.” Armor (January-March 2015): 67-71. Wagner , Robert. “Division Cavalry: The Broken Saber.” Armor (September-October 1989

  19. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    2001-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of the NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included in this report are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported is a synopsis of the work and accomplishments completed by the Division during the 1997, 1998, and 1999 calendar years. A bibliography containing 93 citations is provided.

  20. Structures and Acoustics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acquaviva, Cynthia S.

    1999-01-01

    The Structures and Acoustics Division of NASA Glenn Research Center is an international leader in rotating structures, mechanical components, fatigue and fracture, and structural aeroacoustics. Included are disciplines related to life prediction and reliability, nondestructive evaluation, and mechanical drive systems. Reported are a synopsis of the work and accomplishments reported by the Division during the 1996 calendar year. A bibliography containing 42 citations is provided.

  1. Pathogen and antimicrobial resistance profiles of culture-proven neonatal sepsis in Southwest China, 1990-2014.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Zhou, Min; Tu, Yan; Yao, Yao; Yu, Jialin; Cheng, Shupeng

    2016-10-01

    Neonatal sepsis (NS) sustains high mortality and morbidity in China, but data on the epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance patterns of NS pathogens are limited. The clinical features, aetiology and antimicrobial resistance of culture-proven NS were analysed over a period of 25 years in the metropolitan city of Chongqing in Southwest China. The occurrence rates of neonatal early-onset sepsis (EOS) were found to gradually decrease while late-onset sepsis (LOS) was kept stable from 1990 to 2014. Although coagulase-negative staphylococcus (CoNS) sepsis accounted for most infections, the occurrence rates of CoNS sepsis gradually decreased, especially in EOS. Escherichia coli and Klebsiella were common Gram-negative bacteria. The occurrence rates of E. coli and Klebsiella remained stable in EOS; however, in LOS, those had increased mildly, especially from 2009 to 2014. Although a high-degree resistance to common first- and second-line antimicrobials was observed for the main causative pathogens of NS, the gentamicin-resistance rate declined gradually from the year 2003. Similarly, the ceftazidime-resistance rate of E. coli dropped gradually from the year 2007. The alarmingly high degree of antibiotic resistance calls for urgent evaluation and development of antibiotic policy and protocols for the treatment of NS. Clinicians should strictly control the antibiotics use, decrease invasive manipulations and shorten hospitalisation to prevent LOS. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  2. APS Science 2007.

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2008-05-30

    This report provides research highlights from the Advanced Photon Source (APS). Although these highlights represent less than 10% of the published work from the APS in 2007, they give a flavor of the diversity and impact of user research at the facility. In the strategic planning the aim is to foster the growth of existing user communities and foresee new areas of research. This coming year finds the APS engaged in putting together, along with the users, a blueprint for the next five years, and making the case for a set of prioritized investments in beamlines, the accelerator, and infrastructure, each of which will be transformational in terms of scientific impact. As this is written plans are being formulated for an important user workshop on October 20-21, 2008, to prioritize strategic plans. The fruit from past investments can be seen in this report. Examples include the creation of a dedicated beamline for x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy at Sector 8, the evolution of dedicated high-energy x-ray scattering beamlines at sectors 1 and 11, a dedicated imaging beamline at Sector 32, and new beamlines for inelastic scattering and powder diffraction. A single-pulse facility has been built in collaboration with Sector 14 (BioCARS) and Phil Anfinrud at the National Institutes of Health, which will offer exceptionally high flux for single-pulse diffraction. The nanoprobe at Sector 26, built and operated jointly by the Argonne Center for Nanoscale Materials and the X-ray Operations and Research (XOR) section of the APS X-ray Science Division, has come on line to define the state of the art in nanoscience.

  3. SMARTE 2007 TUTORIAL - JANUARY 2007 REVISION

    EPA Science Inventory

    SMARTe 2007 is a web-based decision support tool intended to help revitalization practitioners find information, perform data analysis, communicate, and evaluate future reuse options for a site or area. This tutorial CD was developed to help users navigate SMARTe 2007. It is appr...

  4. Food Antimicrobials Nanocarriers

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Padilla, Adriana; Soto, Karen M.; Hernández Iturriaga, Montserrat

    2014-01-01

    Natural food antimicrobials are bioactive compounds that inhibit the growth of microorganisms involved in food spoilage or food-borne illness. However, stability issues result in degradation and loss of antimicrobial activity. Nanoencapsulation allows protection of antimicrobial food agents from unfavorable environmental conditions and incompatibilities. Encapsulation of food antimicrobials control delivery increasing the concentration of the antimicrobials in specific areas and the improvement of passive cellular absorption mechanisms resulted in higher antimicrobial activity. This paper reviews the present state of the art of the nanostructures used as food antimicrobial carriers including nanoemulsions, nanoliposomes, nanoparticles, and nanofibers. PMID:24995363

  5. Antimicrobial AApeptides

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Peng; Shi, Yan; Teng, Peng; Cao, Annie; Xu, Hai; Li, Qi; Cai, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public concerns in the 21st century. Host-defense peptides (HDPs) can potentially mitigate the problem through bacterial membrane disruption; however, they suffer from moderate activity and low stability. We recently developed a new class of peptidomimetics termed “AApeptides”. This class of peptidomimetics can mimic the mechanism of action of HDPs, and effectively arrest the growth of multidrug resistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. As they are built on unnatural backbone, they are resistant to proteolytic degradation. In this review, we summarize the development of this class of antimicrobial peptidomimetics, and discuss the future perspective on how they can move forward on combating antibiotic resistance. PMID:27758686

  6. Division i: Fundamental Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Dennis D.; Klioner, Sergei A.; Vondrák, Jan; Evans, Dafydd Wyn; Hohenkerk, Catherine Y.; Hosokawa, Mizuhiko; Huang, Cheng-Li; Kaplan, George H.; Knežević, Zoran; Manchester, Richard N.; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Petit, Gérard; Schuh, Harald; Soffel, Michael H.; Zacharias, Norbert

    2012-04-01

    The goal of the division is to address the scientific issues that were developed at the 2009 IAU General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro. These are:•Astronomical constants-Gaussian gravitational constant, Astronomical Unit, GMSun, geodesic precession-nutation•Astronomical software•Solar System Ephemerides-Pulsar research-Comparison of dynamical reference frames•Future Optical Reference Frame•Future Radio Reference Frame•Exoplanets-Detection-Dynamics•Predictions of Earth orientation•Units of measurements for astronomical quantities in relativistic context•Astronomical units in the relativistic framework•Time-dependent ecliptic in the GCRS•Asteroid masses•Review of space missions•Detection of gravitational waves•VLBI on the Moon•Real time electronic access to UT1-UTCIn pursuit of these goals Division I members have made significant scientific and organizational progress, and are organizing a Joint Discussion on Space-Time Reference Systems for Future Research at the 2012 IAU General Assembly. The details of Division activities and references are provided in the individual Commission and Working Group reports in this volume. A comprehensive list of references related to the work of the Division is available at the IAU Division I website at http://maia.usno.navy.mil/iaudiv1/.

  7. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; Melrose, Donald B.; Benz, Arnold O.; Bogdan, Thomas J.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Martinez Pillet, Valentin

    2007-03-01

    Division II of the IAU provides a forum for astronomers studying a wide range of phenomena related to the structure, radiation and activity of the Sun, and its interaction with the Earth and the rest of the solar system. Division II encompasses three Commissions, 10, 12 and 49, and four working groups. During the last triennia the activities of the division involved some reorganization of the division and its working groups, developing new procedures for election of division and commission officers, promoting annual meetings from within the division and evaluating all the proposed meetings, evaluating the division's representatives for the IAU to international scientific organizations, and participating in general IAU business.

  8. Fuels management in the southern Appalachian Mountains, hot continental division

    Treesearch

    Matthew J. Reilly; Thomas A. Waldrop; Joseph J. O’Brien

    2012-01-01

    The Southern Appalachian Mountains, Hot Continental Mountains Division, M220 (McNab and others 2007) are a topographically and biologically complex area with over 10 million ha of forested land, where complex environmental gradients have resulted in a great diversity of forest types. Abundant moisture and a long, warm growing season support high levels of productivity...

  9. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Division Vi: Interstellar Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, Tom; Chu, You-Hua; Dyson, John; Breitschwerdt, Dieter; Burton, Mike; Cabrit, Sylvie; Caselli, Paola; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Ferland, Gary; Juvela, Mika; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kwok, Sun; Lizano, Susana; Rozyczka, Michal; Tóth, Viktor; Tsuboi, Masato; Yang, Ji

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division VI was held on Monday 10 October 2009. Apologies had been received in advance from D Breitschwerdt, P Caselli, G Ferland, M Juvela, S Lizano, M Rozyczka, V Tóth, M Tsuboi, J Yang and B-C Koo.

  11. Order Division Automated System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniemeyer, Justin M.; And Others

    This publication was prepared by the Order Division Automation Project staff to fulfill the Library of Congress' requirement to document all automation efforts. The report was originally intended for internal use only and not for distribution outside the Library. It is now felt that the library community at-large may have an interest in the…

  12. Solid State Division

    SciTech Connect

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  13. | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Cell division in Corynebacterineae

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Catriona; Bramkamp, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial cells must coordinate a number of events during the cell cycle. Spatio-temporal regulation of bacterial cytokinesis is indispensable for the production of viable, genetically identical offspring. In many rod-shaped bacteria, precise midcell assembly of the division machinery relies on inhibitory systems such as Min and Noc. In rod-shaped Actinobacteria, for example Corynebacterium glutamicum and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the divisome assembles in the proximity of the midcell region, however more spatial flexibility is observed compared to Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. Actinobacteria represent a group of bacteria that spatially regulate cytokinesis in the absence of recognizable Min and Noc homologs. The key cell division steps in E. coli and B. subtilis have been subject to intensive study and are well-understood. In comparison, only a minimal set of positive and negative regulators of cytokinesis are known in Actinobacteria. Nonetheless, the timing of cytokinesis and the placement of the division septum is coordinated with growth as well as initiation of chromosome replication and segregation. We summarize here the current knowledge on cytokinesis and division site selection in the Actinobacteria suborder Corynebacterineae. PMID:24782835

  15. Antimicrobial Drugs in Fighting against Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Ahmed, Saeed; Hao, Haihong; Wang, Xu; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-01-01

    The outbreak of antimicrobial resistance, together with the lack of newly developed antimicrobial drugs, represents an alarming signal for both human and animal healthcare worldwide. Selection of rational dosage regimens for traditional antimicrobial drugs based on pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic principles as well as development of novel antimicrobials targeting new bacterial targets or resistance mechanisms are key approaches in tackling AMR. In addition to the cellular level resistance (i.e., mutation and horizontal gene transfer of resistance determinants), the community level resistance (i.e., bilofilms and persisters) is also an issue causing antimicrobial therapy difficulties. Therefore, anti-resistance and antibiofilm strategies have currently become research hotspot to combat antimicrobial resistance. Although metallic nanoparticles can both kill bacteria and inhibit biofilm formation, the toxicity is still a big challenge for their clinical applications. In conclusion, rational use of the existing antimicrobials and combinational use of new strategies fighting against antimicrobial resistance are powerful warranties to preserve potent antimicrobial drugs for both humans and animals. PMID:27092125

  16. Painless Division with Doc Spitler's Magic Division Estimator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitler, Gail

    1981-01-01

    An approach to teaching pupils the long division algorithm that relies heavily on a consistent and logical approach to estimation is reviewed. Once learned, the division estimator can be used to support the standard repeated subtraction algorithm. (MP)

  17. Antimicrobial Treatments and Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    To limit exposure to indoor biological contamination a risk-management approach which employs various antimicrobial treatments can effectively control contaminants and reduce exposure. Antimicrobial treatment of biological contaminants, especially mold in buildings, it is often n...

  18. Antimicrobial Treatments and Efficacy

    EPA Science Inventory

    To limit exposure to indoor biological contamination a risk-management approach which employs various antimicrobial treatments can effectively control contaminants and reduce exposure. Antimicrobial treatment of biological contaminants, especially mold in buildings, it is often n...

  19. Antimicrobial Acrylic Fiber

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    other than Government procurement does not in any way obligate the U.S. Government. The fact that the Government formulated or supplied the drawings...rendered antimicrobial. The ability to regenerate the halamines (and the antimicrobial functionality) lasted through 50 home laundry washings. The...antimicrobial. The ability to regenerate the halamines (and the antimicrobial functionality) lasted through 50 home laundry washings. The chlorine

  20. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann; Adams, Luke Clyde; Ferre, Gregoire Robing; Grantcharov, Vesselin; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr; Krishnapriyan, Aditi; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore; Le Thien, Minh Quan; Lim, Jonathan Ng; Low, Thaddeus Song En; Lystrom, Levi Aaron; Ma, Xiaoyu; Nguyen, Hong T.; Pogue, Sabine Silvia; Orandle, Zoe Ann; Reisner, Andrew Ray; Revard, Benjamin Charles; Roy, Julien; Sandor, Csanad; Slavkova, Kalina Polet; Weichman, Kathleen Joy; Wu, Fei; Yang, Yang

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  1. Podcast: The Electronic Crimes Division

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Sept 26, 2016. Chris Lukas, the Special Agent in Charge of the Electronic Crimes Division within the OIG's Office of Investigations talks about computer forensics, cybercrime in the EPA and his division's role in criminal investigations.

  2. Energy Systems Divisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Applewhite, John

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the JSC Energy Systems Divisions work in propulsion. Specific work in LO2/CH4 propulsion, cryogenic propulsion, low thrust propulsion for Free Flyer, robotic and Extra Vehicular Activities, and work on the Morpheus terrestrial free flyer test bed is reviewed. The back-up slides contain a chart with comparisons of LO2/LCH4 with other propellants, and reviewing the advantages especially for spacecraft propulsion.

  3. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  4. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  5. Biorepositories | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Carefully collected and controlled high-quality human biospecimens, annotated with clinical data and properly consented for investigational use, are available through the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories listed in the charts below. Biorepositories Managed by the Division of Cancer Prevention Biorepositories Supported by the Division of Cancer Prevention Related Biorepositories | Information about accessing biospecimens collected from DCP-supported clinical trials and projects.

  6. Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group (SAPG): development and impact of the Scottish National Antimicrobial Stewardship Programme.

    PubMed

    Nathwani, Dilip; Sneddon, Jacqueline; Malcolm, William; Wiuff, Camilla; Patton, Andrea; Hurding, Simon; Eastaway, Anne; Seaton, R Andrew; Watson, Emma; Gillies, Elizabeth; Davey, Peter; Bennie, Marion

    2011-07-01

    In 2008, the Scottish Management of Antimicrobial Resistance Action Plan (ScotMARAP) was published by the Scottish Government. One of the key actions was initiation of the Scottish Antimicrobial Prescribing Group (SAPG), hosted within the Scottish Medicines Consortium, to take forward national implementation of the key recommendations of this action plan. The primary objective of SAPG is to co-ordinate and deliver a national framework or programme of work for antimicrobial stewardship. This programme, led by SAPG, is delivered by NHS National Services Scotland (Health Protection Scotland and Information Services Division), NHS Quality Improvement Scotland, and NHS National Education Scotland as well as NHS board Antimicrobial Management Teams. Between 2008 and 2010, SAPG has achieved a number of early successes, which are the subject of this review: (i) through measures to optimise prescribing in hospital and primary care, combined with infection prevention measures, SAPG has contributed significantly to reducing Clostridium difficile infection rates in Scotland; (ii) there has been engagement of all key stakeholders at local and national levels to ensure an integrated approach to antimicrobial stewardship within the wider healthcare-associated infection agenda; (iii) development and implementation of data management systems to support quality improvement; (iv) development of training materials on antimicrobial stewardship for healthcare professionals; and (v) improving clinical management of infections (e.g. community-acquired pneumonia) through quality improvement methodology. The early successes achieved by SAPG demonstrate that this delivery model is effective and provides the leadership and focus required to implement antimicrobial stewardship to improve antimicrobial prescribing and infection management across NHS Scotland.

  7. Anti-antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lloyd; Lamarre, Baptiste; Diu, Ting; Ravi, Jascindra; Judge, Peter J.; Temple, Adam; Carr, Matthew; Cerasoli, Eleonora; Su, Bo; Jenkinson, Howard F.; Martyna, Glenn; Crain, Jason; Watts, Anthony; Ryadnov, Maxim G.

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial or host defense peptides are innate immune regulators found in all multicellular organisms. Many of them fold into membrane-bound α-helices and function by causing cell wall disruption in microorganisms. Herein we probe the possibility and functional implications of antimicrobial antagonism mediated by complementary coiled-coil interactions between antimicrobial peptides and de novo designed antagonists: anti-antimicrobial peptides. Using sequences from native helical families such as cathelicidins, cecropins, and magainins we demonstrate that designed antagonists can co-fold with antimicrobial peptides into functionally inert helical oligomers. The properties and function of the resulting assemblies were studied in solution, membrane environments, and in bacterial culture by a combination of chiroptical and solid-state NMR spectroscopies, microscopy, bioassays, and molecular dynamics simulations. The findings offer a molecular rationale for anti-antimicrobial responses with potential implications for antimicrobial resistance. PMID:23737519

  8. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    PubMed

    Cisneros, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Mensa, José; Trilla, Antoni; Cainzos, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery refers to a very brief course of an antimicrobial agent initiated just before the start of the procedure. The efficacy of antimicrobials to prevent postoperative infection at the site of surgery (incisional superficial, incisional deep, or organ/space infection) has been demonstrated for many surgical procedures. Nevertheless, the majority of studies centering on the quality of preoperative prophylaxis have found that a high percentage of the antimicrobials used are inappropriate for this purpose. This work discusses the scientific basis for antimicrobial prophylaxis, provides general recommendations for its correct use and specific recommendations for various types of surgery. The guidelines for surgical antimicrobial prophylaxis are based on results from well-designed studies, whenever possible. These guidelines are focussed on reducing the incidence of infection at the surgical site while minimizing the contribution of preoperative administration of antimicrobials to the development of bacterial resistance.

  9. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  10. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  11. Annual Report: Discipline, Crime, and Violence, School Year 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The "Code of Virginia" requires school divisions statewide to submit data to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) on incidents of discipline, crime, and violence (DCV). School divisions began reporting such data in 1991. This annual report focuses primarily on DCV data submitted for school year 2006-2007, with selected comparisons…

  12. Annual Report: Discipline, Crime, and Violence, School Year 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The "Code of Virginia" requires school divisions statewide to submit data to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) on incidents of discipline, crime, and violence (DCV). School divisions began reporting such data in 1991. This annual report focuses primarily on DCV data submitted for school year 2007-2008, with selected comparisons…

  13. TIMSS 2007 Assessment Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullis, Ina V. S.; Martin, Michael O.; Ruddock, Graham J.; O'Sullivan, Christine Y.; Arora, Alka; Erberber, Ebru

    2005-01-01

    Developing the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2007 Assessment Frameworks represents an extensive collaborative effort involving individuals and expert groups from more than 60 countries around the world. The document contains three frameworks for implementing TIMSS 2007--the Mathematics Framework, the Science…

  14. jsc2007e18125

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-09

    JSC2007-E-18125 (9 April 2007) --- Astronaut Pamela A. Melroy, STS-120 commander, and United Space Alliance crew trainer John Hazelhurst exchange thoughts during a training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at Johnson Space Center. Melroy is wearing a training version of her shuttle launch and entry suit.

  15. jsc2007e18080

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-09

    JSC2007-E-18080 (9 April 2007) --- Attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits, astronauts Stephanie D. Wilson (left) and Douglas H. Wheelock, both STS-120 mission specialists, exchange thoughts as they participate in a training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at Johnson Space Center.

  16. The Spanish Blue Division

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    the German North Army Group. WORD COUNT=5933 20 ENDNOTES 1 Torres, Francisco. La Divisi6n Azul50 AFos Despu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,31...osDespu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,47. ’ Kleinfield, Gerald R. and Tambs, Lewis A. La Divisi6n espatjola de Hitler. Madrid: Editorial San Martin...1983, 25. ’ Torres, Francisco. La Divisi6n Azu150AiosDespu6s. Madrid: Editorial Fuerza Nueva , 1991,53 6 The Division was popularly known as the Blue

  17. Artificial cell division.

    PubMed

    Mange, Daniel; Stauffer, André; Petraglio, Enrico; Tempesti, Gianluca

    2004-01-01

    After a survey of the theory and some realizations of self-replicating machines, this paper presents a novel self-replicating loop endowed with universal construction and computation properties. Based on the hardware implementation of the so-called Tom Thumb algorithm, the design of this loop leads to a new kind of cellular automaton made of a processing and a control units. The self-replication of the Swiss flag serves as an artificial cell division example of the loop which, according to autopoietic evaluation criteria, corresponds to a cell showing the phenomenology of a living system.

  18. Women of the Solar Physics Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.

    2007-05-01

    In 1970, when the Solar Physics Division was established, the invitation to become a founding member of the Division was extended by the Organizing Committee to a group of 61 solar scientists of which 4 were women (6.6%). At the first SPD meeting in Huntsville AL (1970), 11% of the papers were given by women. Near that time (1973), women accounted for 8% of all AAS members. The representation of women in the SPD has more than doubled in percentage since the first years. Currently, women comprise about 15.5% of SPD members which, however, is less than the percentage in the AAS general membership (18%) in March 2007. In the 37 years that the SPD has existed, women have frequently held the office of Treasurer and Secretary of the Division and made notable contributions. Elske V.P. Smith was elected the first Treasurer of the SPD and that began a long tradition. Women appear to be considered exceptionally trustworthy since they have been reelected and occupied the position of Treasurer for 75% of the available terms. The Office of SPD Secretary has seen a woman for 13% of the terms. Yet women are practically absent among those in the top leadership positions and in the lists of prize winners of the SPD. Among the 21 SPD Chairs, only 1 woman, Judith T. Karpen, has held that office. The Hale Prize has been awarded 19 times in almost 3 decades, and all of the awardees have been men. Several aspects of the participation of women and their contributions to the Solar Physics Division of the AAS will be reviewed, and compared to that of the AAS and astronomy in general.

  19. Deconstructing Calculation Methods, Part 4: Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In the final article of a series of four, the author deconstructs the primary national strategy's approach to written division. The approach to division is divided into five stages: (1) mental division using partition; (2) short division of TU / U; (3) "expanded" method for HTU / U; (4) short division of HTU / U; and (5) long division.…

  20. Reduction of veterinary antimicrobial use in the Netherlands. The Dutch success model.

    PubMed

    Speksnijder, D C; Mevius, D J; Bruschke, C J M; Wagenaar, J A

    2015-04-01

    Use of antimicrobials in animals poses a potential risk for public health as it contributes to the selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Although knowledge of the negative consequences of extensive antimicrobial use in humans and animals accumulated over the decades, total therapeutic antimicrobial use in farm animals in the Netherlands doubled between 1990 and 2007. A series of facts and events formed a window of opportunity to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. The recent discovery of significant reservoirs of antimicrobial-resistant pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria (ESBL) in farm animals, with potential public health implications, combined with an increasing lack of confidence of the public in intensive livestock industries, and discrepancy between the very low antimicrobial use in humans and high use in animals, resulted in intensive collaboration between the government, veterinary professional organizations and important stakeholders within the livestock sector. A combination of compulsory and voluntary actions with clear reduction goals resulted in a 56% reduction in antimicrobial use in farm animals in the Netherlands between 2007 and 2012 and aims at accomplishing a 70% reduction target in 2015. This article describes and analyses the processes and actions behind this transition from an abundant antimicrobial use in farm animals towards a more prudent application of antimicrobials in farm animals in the Netherlands. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Antimicrobial applications of copper.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Marin; Hartemann, Philippe; Engels-Deutsch, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Copper has long been known to have antimicrobial activity and is used in drinking water treatment and transportation. It has been recognized by the American Environmental Protection Agency as the first metallic antimicrobial agent in 2008. With ongoing waterborne hospital-acquired infections and antibiotic resistance, research on copper as an antimicrobial agent is again very attractive. Many studies have shown that the use of copper surface and copper particles could significantly reduce the environmental bioburden. This review highlights in its first part all the conditions described in the literature to enhance copper antimicrobial activity. Secondly, the different antimicrobial applications of copper in water treatment, hospital care units and public applications are presented. Finally, the future research needs on copper as an antimicrobial agent are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Antimicrobials in beekeeping.

    PubMed

    Reybroeck, Wim; Daeseleire, Els; De Brabander, Hubert F; Herman, Lieve

    2012-07-06

    The bee diseases American and European foulbrood and nosemosis can be treated with anti-infectious agents. However, in the EU and the USA the use of these agents in beekeeping is strictly regulated due to the lack of tolerance (e.g. Maximum Residue Limit) for residues of antibiotics and chemotherapeutics in honey. This article reviews the literature dealing with antimicrobials of interest in apiculture, stability of these antimicrobials in honey, and disposition of the antimicrobials in honeybee hives.

  3. Quantitative assessment of antimicrobial resistance in livestock during the course of a nationwide antimicrobial use reduction in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Dorado-García, Alejandro; Mevius, Dik J; Jacobs, José J H; Van Geijlswijk, Inge M; Mouton, Johan W; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Heederik, Dick J

    2016-12-01

    To quantify associations between antimicrobial use and acquired resistance in indicator Escherichia coli over a period of time which involved sector-wide antimicrobial use reductions in broilers and pigs (years 2004-14), veal calves (2007-14) and dairy cattle (2005-14). Prevalence estimates of resistance were predicted for a hypothetical further decrease in antimicrobial use. Data reported annually for the resistance surveillance programme in the Netherlands were retrieved. Two multivariate random-effects logistic models per animal sector were used to relate total and class-specific antimicrobial use (as defined daily dosages per animal per year, DDDA/Y) with the probability of E. coli resistance to a panel of 10 antimicrobial agents. Positive dose-response relationships (ORs) were obtained from all models. Specific resistance phenotypes were more often associated with total antimicrobial use than with class-specific use. The most robust associations were found in pigs and veal calves. Resistance to historically widely used antimicrobials (e.g. penicillins, tetracyclines) was, in relative terms, less influenced by drug use changes over time than resistance to newer or less prescribed antimicrobials (e.g. third-/fourth-generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones). In pigs and veal calves, prevalence estimates for the most common resistance phenotypes were projected to decline ∼5%-25% during 2014-16 if total antimicrobial use reduction reached 80%; projections for poultry and dairy cows were more modest. Epidemiological evidence indicated that drug use history and co-selection of resistance are key elements for perpetuation of resistance. Data suggest that recent Dutch policies aimed at reducing total use of antimicrobials have decreased E. coli resistance in the pig and veal calf production sectors while the impact on the dairy cattle and poultry sectors is less clear. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for

  4. GRC-2007-C-02820

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-21

    Members of Glen's Exercise Countermeasures Lab work to prepare dancer Sarah Morrison in the Enhanced Zero-gravity Locomotion Simulator for a choreographed video performance entitled "Walking on Other Worlds" produced for IngenuityFest 2007

  5. GRC-2007-C-02819

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-21

    Members of Glen's Exercise Countermeasures Lab work to prepare dancer Sarah Morrison in the Enhanced Zero-gravity Locomotion Simulator for a choreographed video performance entitled "Walking on Other Worlds" produced for IngenuityFest 2007

  6. Osservazioni Mercurio nel 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frassati, M.

    2008-10-01

    Report of the Mercury Program of the UAI Planets Section, 38 observations, drawings and digital images, during the year 2007. We had evidence of the ray system around the crater Kuiper, seen as a bright area.

  7. Understanding Microbial Divisions of Labor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheren; Claessen, Dennis; Rozen, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Divisions of labor are ubiquitous in nature and can be found at nearly every level of biological organization, from the individuals of a shared society to the cells of a single multicellular organism. Many different types of microbes have also evolved a division of labor among its colony members. Here we review several examples of microbial divisions of labor, including cases from both multicellular and unicellular microbes. We first discuss evolutionary arguments, derived from kin selection, that allow divisions of labor to be maintained in the face of non-cooperative cheater cells. Next we examine the widespread natural variation within species in their expression of divisions of labor and compare this to the idea of optimal caste ratios in social insects. We highlight gaps in our understanding of microbial caste ratios and argue for a shift in emphasis from understanding the maintenance of divisions of labor, generally, to instead focusing on its specific ecological benefits for microbial genotypes and colonies. Thus, in addition to the canonical divisions of labor between, e.g., reproductive and vegetative tasks, we may also anticipate divisions of labor to evolve to reduce the costly production of secondary metabolites or secreted enzymes, ideas we consider in the context of streptomycetes. The study of microbial divisions of labor offers opportunities for new experimental and molecular insights across both well-studied and novel model systems. PMID:28066387

  8. jsc2007e18102

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-04-09

    JSC2007-E-18102 (9 April 2007) --- United Space Alliance (USA) crew trainer Adam Flagan (left) briefs astronaut Douglas H. Wheelock, STS-120 mission specialist, on the usage of a special pulley device, used to lower oneself from a trouble-plagued shuttle. The briefing came during an emergency egress training session in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility at the Johnson Space Center. Wheelock is wearing a training version of his shuttle launch and entry suit.

  9. Accelerator Technology Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-04-01

    In fiscal year (FY) 1991, the Accelerator Technology (AT) division continued fulfilling its mission to pursue accelerator science and technology and to develop new accelerator concepts for application to research, defense, energy, industry, and other areas of national interest. This report discusses the following programs: The Ground Test Accelerator Program; APLE Free-Electron Laser Program; Accelerator Transmutation of Waste; JAERI, OMEGA Project, and Intense Neutron Source for Materials Testing; Advanced Free-Electron Laser Initiative; Superconducting Super Collider; The High-Power Microwave Program; (Phi) Factory Collaboration; Neutral Particle Beam Power System Highlights; Accelerator Physics and Special Projects; Magnetic Optics and Beam Diagnostics; Accelerator Design and Engineering; Radio-Frequency Technology; Free-Electron Laser Technology; Accelerator Controls and Automation; Very High-Power Microwave Sources and Effects; and GTA Installation, Commissioning, and Operations.

  10. Divisions of geologic time-major chronostratigraphic and geochronologic units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2010-01-01

    Effective communication in the geosciences requires consistent uses of stratigraphic nomenclature, especially divisions of geologic time. A geologic time scale is composed of standard stratigraphic divisions based on rock sequences and is calibrated in years. Over the years, the development of new dating methods and the refinement of previous methods have stimulated revisions to geologic time scales. Advances in stratigraphy and geochronology require that any time scale be periodically updated. Therefore, Divisions of Geologic Time, which shows the major chronostratigraphic (position) and geochronologic (time) units, is intended to be a dynamic resource that will be modified to include accepted changes of unit names and boundary age estimates. This fact sheet is a modification of USGS Fact Sheet 2007-3015 by the U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Names Committee.

  11. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, Jack S.

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  12. The Division of Household Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitze, Glenna D.; Huber, Joan

    A study was conducted to test the following hypotheses concerning division of household labor (DOHL) between husbands and wives: (1) the division of household labor is somewhat affected by the availability of time, especially the wife's time; (2) there are strong effects of relative power, as measured by market-related resources, marital…

  13. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, Donald B.; Martínez Pillet, Valentin; Webb, David F.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Kosovichev, Alexander; von Steiger, Rudolf

    Division II of the IAU provides a forum for astronomers and astrophysicists studying a wide range of phenomena related to the structure, radiation and activity of the Sun, and its interaction with the Earth and the rest of the solar system. Division II encompasses three Commissions, 10, 12 and 49, and four Working Groups.

  14. Division III--Another Ballgame.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grites, Thomas J.; James, G. Larry

    1986-01-01

    The non-scholarship athletes of Division III represent a substantial group of advisees that are similar to, and yet different from the scholarship athlete. Division III student-athletes, their characteristics, situations, and needs are examined and specific efforts to improve their quality of student life are identified. (MLW)

  15. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun; Mishra, Biswajit; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Golla, Radha; Wang, Xiuqing

    2015-01-01

    This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms. PMID:25806720

  16. Alternative Antimicrobial Approach: Nano-Antimicrobial Materials

    PubMed Central

    Beyth, Nurit; Houri-Haddad, Yael; Domb, Avi; Khan, Wahid; Hazan, Ronen

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous existing potent antibiotics and other antimicrobial means, bacterial infections are still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the need to develop additional bactericidal means has significantly increased due to the growing concern regarding multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilm associated infections. Consequently, attention has been especially devoted to new and emerging nanoparticle-based materials in the field of antimicrobial chemotherapy. The present review discusses the activities of nanoparticles as an antimicrobial means, their mode of action, nanoparticle effect on drug-resistant bacteria, and the risks attendant on their use as antibacterial agents. Factors contributing to nanoparticle performance in the clinical setting, their unique properties, and mechanism of action as antibacterial agents are discussed in detail. PMID:25861355

  17. Antimicrobial prophylaxis in adults.

    PubMed

    Enzler, Mark J; Berbari, Elie; Osmon, Douglas R

    2011-07-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is commonly used by clinicians for the prevention of numerous infectious diseases, including herpes simplex infection, rheumatic fever, recurrent cellulitis, meningococcal disease, recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis, influenza, infective endocarditis, pertussis, and acute necrotizing pancreatitis, as well as infections associated with open fractures, recent prosthetic joint placement, and bite wounds. Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis is recommended for various surgical procedures to prevent surgical site infections. Optimal antimicrobial agents for prophylaxis should be bactericidal, nontoxic, inexpensive, and active against the typical pathogens that can cause surgical site infection postoperatively. To maximize its effectiveness, intravenous perioperative prophylaxis should be administered within 30 to 60 minutes before the surgical incision. Antimicrobial prophylaxis should be of short duration to decrease toxicity and antimicrobial resistance and to reduce cost.

  18. Physics Division computer facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cyborski, D.R.; Teh, K.M.

    1995-08-01

    The Physics Division maintains several computer systems for data analysis, general-purpose computing, and word processing. While the VMS VAX clusters are still used, this past year saw a greater shift to the Unix Cluster with the addition of more RISC-based Unix workstations. The main Divisional VAX cluster which consists of two VAX 3300s configured as a dual-host system serves as boot nodes and disk servers to seven other satellite nodes consisting of two VAXstation 3200s, three VAXstation 3100 machines, a VAX-11/750, and a MicroVAX II. There are three 6250/1600 bpi 9-track tape drives, six 8-mm tapes and about 9.1 GB of disk storage served to the cluster by the various satellites. Also, two of the satellites (the MicroVAX and VAX-11/750) have DAPHNE front-end interfaces for data acquisition. Since the tape drives are accessible cluster-wide via a software package, they are, in addition to replay, used for tape-to-tape copies. There is however, a satellite node outfitted with two 8 mm drives available for this purpose. Although not part of the main cluster, a DEC 3000 Alpha machine obtained for data acquisition is also available for data replay. In one case, users reported a performance increase by a factor of 10 when using this machine.

  19. 2007 Maryland Adolescent Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Periodically, Maryland's sixth, eighth, tenth, and twelfth graders are surveyed to determine the nature, extent, and trend of alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) use among adolescents. The "2007 Maryland Adolescent Survey (MAS)" presents the latest findings regarding ATOD use by Maryland's adolescents and compares State and local…

  20. Public Education Finances, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Census Bureau, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Every five years, the U.S. Census Bureau conducts a Census of Government Finance, as authorized by law under Title 13, U.S. Code, Section 182. The 2007 Census, similar to annual surveys and censuses of governments conducted for many years, covers the entire range of government finance activities--revenue, expenditure, debt, and assets (cash and…

  1. Maryland's forest resources, 2007

    Treesearch

    T.W. Lister; J. Perdue; W. McWilliams; D. Meneguzzo; C. Barnett; B. O’Connell

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Maryland based on an annual inventory (2004-2007) conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station of the U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information please refer to the last...

  2. Michigan's Forest Resources, 2007

    Treesearch

    S.A. Pugh

    2008-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for Michigan based on an annual inventory (2003-2007) conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the Northern Research Station, U.S. Forest Service. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, are updated annually. For more information please refer to page 4 of this report...

  3. Public Policy Agenda, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for federal and state policymakers, the association's members, and other interested organizations and…

  4. The News. Winter 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, Ray, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This Winter 2007 quarterly newsletter from the Community College League of California includes: (1) Incumbents: Some Win, Some Lose in November Trustee Elections; (2) Voters Approve $2 Billion in Bonds; (3) Photos from the "Together We Can" conference; (4) Report, Media Criticize Transfer, Completion Rates and Colleges; (5) District…

  5. Public Policy Agenda, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for federal and state policymakers, the association's members, and other interested organizations and…

  6. The 2007 Legislative Briefing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grove, Jeffrey; Gaines, Gale F., Comp.

    2007-01-01

    "The 2007 Legislative Briefing" is a topical summary of actions during the 2006 legislative sessions that affect education in the 16 SREB states. Topics include state budgets and the economy, tax and revenue, school finance, teacher compensation, licensure, certification and evaluation of teachers, strengthening elementary and secondary…

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  8. Injury patterns in Division I collegiate swimming.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Brian R; Ebinger, Alexander E; Lawler, Michael P; Britton, Carla L

    2009-10-01

    In the last 25 years, it is estimated that over 42,000 male and female swimmers have competed at the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-A level. Despite the magnitude of these numbers, little is known about the epidemiology of collegiate swimming injuries. Purpose To describe the pattern of injuries incurred for one NCAA Division I collegiate men's and women's swimming team over 5 seasons. Descriptive epidemiology study. Musculoskeletal and head injuries reported in the Sports Injury Management System for a Division I swimming team from 2002-2007 were identified. Gender, body part, year of eligibility, position, stroke specialty, scholarship status, and team activity during which the injury occurred and lost time were recorded. Risk of injury was assessed relative to gender, stroke specialty, and year of eligibility. From 2002-2007, 44 male and 50 female athletes competed for the University of Iowa swimming and diving team. The overall injury rates were estimated as 4.00 injuries per 1000 exposures for men and 3.78 injuries per 1000 exposures for women. Thirty-seven percent of injuries resulted in missed time. The shoulder/upper arm was the most frequently injured body part followed by the neck/back. Freshman swimmers suffered the most injuries as well as the highest mean number of injuries per swimmer. A significant pattern of fewer injuries in later years of eligibility was also demonstrated. The relative risk (RR) for injury was higher among nonfreestyle stroke specialties (RR, 1.33 [1.00-1.77]). Injury most often occurred as a result of, or during, practice for all swimmers. However, 38% of injuries were the result of team activities outside of practice or competition, such as strength training. No significant relationship was found between occurrence of injury and gender or scholarship status. There was no significant relationship between body part injured and stroke specialty. An increased number of total injuries and an increased risk

  9. Time-division SQUID multiplexers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irwin, K. D.; Vale, L. R.; Bergren, N. E.; Deiker, S.; Grossman, E. N.; Hilton, G. C.; Nam, S. W.; Reintsema, C. D.; Rudman, D. A.; Huber, M. E.

    2002-02-01

    SQUID multiplexers make it possible to build arrays of thousands of low-temperature bolometers and microcalorimeters based on superconducting transition-edge sensors with a manageable number of readout channels. We discuss the technical tradeoffs between proposed time-division multiplexer and frequency-division multiplexer schemes and motivate our choice of time division. Our first-generation SQUID multiplexer is now in use in an astronomical instrument. We describe our second-generation SQUID multiplexer, which is based on a new architecture that significantly reduces the dissipation of power at the first stage, allowing thousands of SQUIDs to be operated at the base temperature of a cryostat. .

  10. Physics division annual report 2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  11. Division rules for polygonal cells.

    PubMed

    Cowan, R; Morris, V B

    1988-03-07

    A number of fascinating mathematical problems concerning the division of two-dimensional space are formulated from questions about the planes of cell division in embryonic epithelia. Their solution aids in the quantitative description of cellular arrangement in epithelia. Cells, considered as polygons, site their division line according to stochastic rules, eventually forming a tessellation of the plane. The equilibrium distributions for the resulting mix of polygonal types are explored for a range of stochastic rules. We find surprising links with some classical distributions from the theory of probability.

  12. Division Iii: Planetary Systems Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meech, Karen; Valsecchi, Giovanni; Bowell, Edward L.; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Boss, Alan; Cellino, Alberto; Consolmagno, Guy; Fernandez, Julio; Irvine, William; Lazzaro, Daniela; Michel, Patrick; Noll, Keith; Schulz, Rita; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Zhu, Jin

    2012-04-01

    Division III, with 1126 members, is the third largest of the 12 IAU Divisions, focusing on subject matter related to the physical study of interplanetary dust, comets, minor planets, satellites, planets, planetary systems and astrobiology. Within the Division are very active working groups that are responsible for planetary system and small body nomenclature, as well as a newly created working group on Near Earth Objects which was established order to investigate the requirements for international ground-and/or space-based NEO surveys to characterize 90% of all NEOs with diameters >40m in order to establish a permanent international NEO Early Warning System.

  13. Proceedings of the 2007 ANS Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization - DD and R 2007

    SciTech Connect

    2008-01-15

    The American Nuclear Society (ANS) Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination, and Reutilization (DD and R 2007), 'Capturing Decommissioning Lessons Learned', is sponsored by the ANS Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization; Environmental Sciences; and Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Divisions. This meeting provides a forum for an international exchange of technical knowledge and project management experience gained from the ongoing process of decommissioning nuclear facilities. Of particular note is the number of projects that are approaching completion. This document gathers 113 presentations given at this meeting.

  14. Ground-water conditions in Utah, spring of 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burden, Carole B.; Allen, David V.; Danner, M.R.; Enright, Michael; Cillessen, J.L.; Gerner, S.J.; Eacret, Robert J.; Downhour, Paul; Slaugh, Bradley A.; Swenson, Robert L.; Howells, James H.; Christiansen, Howard K.; Fisher, Martel J.

    2007-01-01

    This is the forty-fourth in a series of annual reports that describe ground-water conditions in Utah. Reports in this series, published cooperatively by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality, provide data to enable interested parties to maintain awareness of changing ground-water conditions.This report, like the others in the series, contains information on well construction, ground-water withdrawal from wells, water-level changes, precipitation, streamflow, and chemical quality of water. Information on well construction included in this report refers only to wells constructed for new appropriations of ground water. Supplementary data are included in reports of this series only for those years or areas which are important to a discussion of changing ground-water conditions and for which applicable data are available.This report includes individual discussions of selected significant areas of ground-water development in the State for calendar year 2006. Most of the reported data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Utah Department of Natural Resources, Division of Water Resources and Division of Water Rights, and the Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality. This report is available online at http://www.waterrights.utah. gov/ and http://ut.water.usgs.gov/newUTAH/GW2007.pdf.

  15. Fast Disinfecting Antimicrobial Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Ahmad E.; Dabkowski, Jeffery M.; Nüsslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N.

    2013-01-01

    Silicon wafers and glass surfaces were functionalized with facially amphiphilic antimicrobial copolymers using the “grafting from” technique. Surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to grow poly(butylmethacrylate)-co-poly(Boc-aminoethyl methacrylate) from the surfaces. Upon Boc-deprotection, these surfaces became highly antimicrobial and killed S. aureus and E. coli 100% in less than 5 min. The molecular weight and grafting density of the polymer were controlled by varying the polymerization time and initiator surface density. Antimicrobial studies showed that the killing efficiency of these surfaces was independent of polymer layer thickness or grafting density within the range of surfaces studied. PMID:19177651

  16. Fast disinfecting antimicrobial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Madkour, Ahmad E; Dabkowski, Jeffery M; Nusslein, Klaus; Tew, Gregory N

    2009-01-20

    Silicon wafers and glass surfaces were functionalized with facially amphiphilic antimicrobial copolymers using the "grafting from" technique. Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was used to grow poly(butylmethacrylate)-co-poly(Boc-aminoethyl methacrylate) from the surfaces. Upon Boc-deprotection, these surfaces became highly antimicrobial and killed S. aureus and E. coli 100% in less than 5 min. The molecular weight and grafting density of the polymer were controlled by varying the polymerization time and initiator surface density. Antimicrobial studies showed that the killing efficiency of these surfaces was independent of polymer layer thickness or grafting density within the range of surfaces studied.

  17. 2007 Western States Fire Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howell, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    A general overview of the Ikhana Uninhabited Air System (UAS) is presented. The contents include: 1) Ikhana UAS; 2) Ikhana UAS / Ground Control Station (GCS); 3) Ikhana UAS / Antennas; 4) Western States Fire Mission 2007 Partners; 5) FAA Certificate of Authorization (COA); 6) Western States Fire Missions (WSFM) 2007; 7) WSFM 1-4 2007; 8) California Wildfire Emergency Response 2007; 9) WSFM 5-8 Emergency Response 2007; 10) WSFM Achievements; and 11) WSFM Challenges.

  18. An Analysis of Division Commander Lessons Learned

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-24

    Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle Barracks: U.S. Army Military History Institute...1985. 2. U.S. Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle Barracks: U.S. Army...Military History Institute, 1986. 3. U.S. Department of the Army. Division Command Lessons Learned Program : Experiences in Division Command. Carlisle 4

  19. Vegetation Types in Coastal Louisiana in 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sasser, Charles E.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Mouton, Edmond; Linscombe, Jeb; Hartley, Steve B.

    2008-01-01

    During the summer and fall of 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Fur and Refuge Division jointly completed an aerial survey to collect data on 2007 vegetation types in coastal Louisiana. The current map presents the data collected in this effort. The 2007 aerial survey was conducted by using techniques developed over the last thirty years while conducting similar vegetation surveys. Transects flown were oriented in a north-south direction and spaced 1.87 mi (3 km) apart and covered coastal marshes from the Texas State line to the Mississippi State line and from the northern extent of fresh marshes to the southern end of saline (saltwater) marshes on the beaches of the Gulf of Mexico or of coastal bays. Navigation along these transects and to each sampling site was accomplished by using Global Positioning System (GPS) technology and geographic information system (GIS) software. As the surveyors reached each sampling station, observed areas of marsh were assigned as fresh, intermediate, brackish, or saline (saltwater) types, and dominant plant species were listed and ranked according to abundance. Delineations of marsh boundaries usually followed natural levees, bayous, or other features that impede or restrict water flow.

  20. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1984-07-01

    E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included.

  1. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, David F.; Melrose, Donald B.; Benz, Arnold O.; Bogdan, Thomas J.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Martinez-Pillet, Valentin

    2007-12-01

    Division II provides a forum for astronomers studying a wide range of problems related to the structure, radiation and activity of the Sun, and its interaction with the Earth and the rest of the solar system.

  2. Division II: Sun and Heliosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, Donald B.; Martinez Pillet, Valentin; Webb, David F.; Bougeret, Jean-Louis; Klimchuk, James A.; Kosovichev, Alexander; van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; von Steiger, Rudolf

    2010-05-01

    This report is on activities of the Division at the General Assembly in Rio de Janeiro. Summaries of scientific activities over the past triennium have been published in Transactions A, see Melrose et al. (2008), Klimchuk et al. (2008), Martinez Pillet et al. (2008) and Bougeret et al. (2008). The business meeting of the three Commissions were incorporated into the business meeting of the Division. This report is based in part on minutes of the business meeting, provided by the Secretary of the Division, Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, and it also includes reports provided by the Presidents of the Commissions (C10, C12, C49) and of the Working Groups (WGs) in the Division.

  3. Division III: Planetary Systems Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowell, Edward L. G.; Meech, Karen J.; Williams, Iwan P.; Boss, Alan; Courtin, Régis; Gustafson, Bo Å. S.; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Mayor, Michel; Spurný, Pavel; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Fernández, Julio A.; Huebner, Walter F.; Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Schulz, Rita M.; Valsecchi, Giovanni B.; Witt, Adolf N.

    2010-05-01

    The meeting was opened by Ted Bowell, president, at 11 am. The 2006 Division III meetings were reviewed by Guy Consolmagno, secretary; as the minutes of those meetings have already been published, they were assumed to be approved.

  4. Division Iii: Planetary System Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Iwan P.; Bowell, Edward L. G.; Marov, Mikhail Ya.; Consolmagno, Guy J.; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Boss, Alan P.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Levasseur-Regord, Anny-Chantal; Morrison, David; Tinney, Christopher G.

    2007-12-01

    Division III gathers astronomers engaged in the study of a comprehensive range of phenomena in the solar system and its bodies, from the major planets via comets to meteorites and interplanetary dust.

  5. Prophylactic and metaphylactic antimicrobial use in Belgian fattening pig herds.

    PubMed

    Callens, Bénédicte; Persoons, Davy; Maes, Dominiek; Laanen, Maria; Postma, Merel; Boyen, Filip; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Butaye, Patrick; Catry, Boudewijn; Dewulf, Jeroen

    2012-09-01

    The monitoring of antimicrobial use is an essential step to control the selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance. Between January and October 2010 data on prophylactic and metaphylactic antimicrobial use were collected retrospectively on 50 closed or semi-closed pig herds. Ninety-three percent of the group treatments were prophylactic whereas only 7% were methaphylactic. The most frequently used antimicrobials orally applied at group level were colistin (30.7%), amoxicillin (30.0%), trimethoprim-sulfonamides (13.1%), doxycycline (9.9%) and tylosin (8.1%). The most frequently applied injectable antimicrobials were tulathromycin (45.0%), long acting ceftiofur (40.1%) and long acting amoxicillin (8.4%). The treatment incidences (TI) based on the used daily dose pig (UDD(pig) or the actually administered dose per day per kg pig of a drug) for all oral and injectable antimicrobial drugs was on average 200.7 per 1000 pigs at risk per day (min=0, max=699.0), while the TI based on the animal daily dose pig (ADD(pig) or the national defined average maintenance dose per day per kg pig of a drug used for its main indication) was slightly higher (average=235.8, min=0, max=1322.1). This indicates that in reality fewer pigs were treated with the same amount of antimicrobials than theoretically possible. Injectable products were generally overdosed (79.5%), whereas oral treatments were often underdosed (47.3%). In conclusion, this study shows that prophylactic group treatment was applied in 98% of the visited herds and often includes the use of critically important and broad-spectrum antimicrobials. In Belgium, the guidelines for prudent use of antimicrobials are not yet implemented.

  6. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics and in materials science. In addition, this report describes development work on accelerators and on instrumentation for plasma diagnostics, nitrogen exchange rates in tissue, and breakdown in gases by microwave pulses.

  7. E-Division activities report

    SciTech Connect

    Barschall, H.H.

    1981-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics and in material science. In addition this report describes work on accelerators, microwaves, plasma diagnostics, determination of atmospheric oxygen and of nitrogen in tissue.

  8. Pharmacogenomics of antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    Aung, Ar Kar; Haas, David W; Hulgan, Todd; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial efficacy and toxicity varies between individuals owing to multiple factors. Genetic variants that affect drug-metabolizing enzymes may influence antimicrobial pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, thereby determining efficacy and/or toxicity. In addition, many severe immune-mediated reactions have been associated with HLA class I and class II genes. In the last two decades, understanding of pharmacogenomic factors that influence antimicrobial efficacy and toxicity has rapidly evolved, leading to translational success such as the routine use of HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity reactions. This article examines recent advances in the field of antimicrobial pharmacogenomics that potentially affect treatment efficacy and toxicity, and challenges that exist between pharmacogenomic discovery and translation into clinical use. PMID:25495412

  9. Pharmacogenomics of antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Aung, Ar Kar; Haas, David W; Hulgan, Todd; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial efficacy and toxicity varies between individuals owing to multiple factors. Genetic variants that affect drug-metabolizing enzymes may influence antimicrobial pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, thereby determining efficacy and/or toxicity. In addition, many severe immune-mediated reactions have been associated with HLA class I and class II genes. In the last two decades, understanding of pharmacogenomic factors that influence antimicrobial efficacy and toxicity has rapidly evolved, leading to translational success such as the routine use of HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity reactions. This article examines recent advances in the field of antimicrobial pharmacogenomics that potentially affect treatment efficacy and toxicity, and challenges that exist between pharmacogenomic discovery and translation into clinical use.

  10. What are Antimicrobial Pesticides?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Antimicrobial pesticides are substances or mixtures of substances used to destroy or suppress the growth of harmful microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, or fungi on inanimate objects and surfaces.

  11. Novel antimicrobial textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Unchin

    2003-10-01

    Many microorganisms can survive, and perhaps proliferate on textiles, generating adverse effects such as: disease transmission, odor generation, pH changes, staining, discoloration and loss of performance. These adverse effects may threaten users' health, deteriorate textile properties and degrade service quality. It may, therefore, be desirable to incorporate antimicrobials on textiles for controlling the growth of microorganisms. This dissertation focuses on the development of antimicrobial fibers and fabrics by integration of antimicrobials with these textiles. The applications of hydantoin-based halamines were mainly investigated in the research. The typical process is that hydantoin containing compounds are grafted onto textiles and transformed to halamine by chlorination. Hydantoin-based halamines are usually chloramines that release chlorine (Cl+) via cleavage of the -NCl functional group which attacks and kills microbes. The antimicrobial behavior is rechargeable many times by rinsing the fiber or fabric with chlorine-containing solution. Some quaternary ammonium type antimicrobials were also investigated in this research. The choice of integrating techniques is dependant on both the textile and antimicrobial compounds. In this dissertation, the nine approaches were studied for incorporating antimicrobial with various textiles: (1) co-extrusion of fibers with halamine precursor additive; (2) grafting of the quaternary ammonium compounds onto ethylene-co-acrylic acid fiber for creating quaternary ammonium type antimicrobial fiber; (3) entrapment of the additives in thermally bonded bicomponent nonwoven fabrics; (4) attaching antimicrobial additives to surfaces with latex adhesive coating; (5) grafting of antimicrobial compounds onto rubber latex via UV exposure; (6) reaction of halamine with needle-punched melamine formaldehyde nonwoven fabric and laminates; (7) coating melamine resin onto tent fabrics and laminates; (8) synthesis of super absorbent polymer

  12. Antimicrobial compounds in tears.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Alison M

    2013-12-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Antimicrobial Compounds in Tears

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    The tear film coats the cornea and conjunctiva and serves several important functions. It provides lubrication, prevents drying of the ocular surface epithelia, helps provide a smooth surface for refracting light, supplies oxygen and is an important component of the innate defense system of the eye providing protection against a range of potential pathogens. This review describes both classic antimicrobial compounds found in tears such as lysozyme and some more recently identified such as members of the cationic antimicrobial peptide family and surfactant protein-D as well as potential new candidate molecules that may contribute to antimicrobial protection. As is readily evident from the literature review herein, tears, like all mucosal fluids, contain a plethora of molecules with known antimicrobial effects. That all of these are active in vivo is debatable as many are present in low concentrations, may be influenced by other tear components such as the ionic environment, and antimicrobial action may be only one of several activities ascribed to the molecule. However, there are many studies showing synergistic/additive interactions between several of the tear antimicrobials and it is highly likely that cooperativity between molecules is the primary way tears are able to afford significant antimicrobial protection to the ocular surface in vivo. In addition to effects on pathogen growth and survival some tear components prevent epithelial cell invasion and promote the epithelial expression of innate defense molecules. Given the protective role of tears a number of scenarios can be envisaged that may affect the amount and/or activity of tear antimicrobials and hence compromise tear immunity. Two such situations, dry eye disease and contact lens wear, are discussed here. PMID:23880529

  14. Army Posture Statement 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-14

    and overhead. We are now well underway in deploying the Lean Six Sigma methodology as a vehicle to seek continuous process improvement, eliminate...and morale. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint Commands...between 2007 and 2013. • Implemented Lean Six Sigma methodology within all Army Commands, Direct Reporting Units, Army Service Components of Joint

  15. New York's Forests 2007

    Treesearch

    Richard H. Widmann; Sloane Crawford; Charles Barnett; Brett J. Butler; Grant M. Domke; Douglas M. Griffith; Mark A. Hatfield; Cassandra M. Kurtz; Tonya W. Lister; Randall S. Morin; W. Keith Moser; Charles H. Perry; Rachel Riemann; Christopher W. Woodall

    2012-01-01

    This report summarizes the first full annual inventory of New York's forests, conducted in 2002-2007 by the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. New York's forests cover 19.0 million acres; 15.9 million acres are classified as timberland and 3.1 million acres as reserved and other forest land. Forest land is dominated by the maple/beech/birch...

  16. Antimicrobial usage in dogs and cats in first opinion veterinary practices in the UK.

    PubMed

    Mateus, A; Brodbelt, D C; Barber, N; Stärk, K D C

    2011-10-01

    To provide baseline data on patterns of antimicrobial usage in dogs and cats through the analysis of data stored in electronic practice management systems. Clinical data from 11 first opinion veterinary practices were extracted for the year 2007. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to assess the usage of antimicrobials. Widespread usage of systemic broad-spectrum antimicrobials was observed. Antimicrobials most frequently used in both species were potentiated amoxicillin (44·4% and 46.1% in cats and dogs, respectively) and amoxicillin (14·3% and 20·7%). Cephalexin (13·4%) and cefovecin (15·0%) were also commonly used in dogs and cats, respectively. Systemic critically important antimicrobials in human medicine were widely used in dogs (60·5%) and cats (82·7%). Topical antimicrobials used in both species included fusidic acid (48·4% and 54·8%), framycetin (20·4% and 13·4%), polymyxin B (12·6% and 9·3%) and neomycin (6·5% and 6·6%). Inappropriate usage of broad-spectrum antimicrobials may contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance and loss of efficacy of antimicrobials in veterinary settings. Data recorded in practice management systems were demonstrated to be a practical source for monitoring antimicrobial usage in pets. © 2011 Royal Veterinary College.

  17. [Antimicrobial agents in eyedrops].

    PubMed

    Sklubalová, Z

    2004-05-01

    Microbial contamination of ophthalmic drops means a risk of serious injury to the eye. Ophthalmic drops must therefore comply with sterility requirements. Protection of multiple-dose drops against secondary contamination is ensured by an addition of an antimicrobial agent. Selection of a suitable antimicrobial agent is conditioned by many factors, such as the spectrum of effect, properties of the preparation, compatibility with the components of the preparation and the container, and the technology of manufacture. Although the added antimicrobial substance ensures the safety of the preparation, on the other hand it can produce a number of negative effects in the eye tissue. The present paper summarizes pharmacopoeial requirements for microbial quality of ophthalmic drops, outlining the properties and efficacy of antimicrobial substances commonly used in ophthalmic drops (benzalkonium chloride BAC, cetrimide CTM, phenyl mercuric salts PHg, thiomersal TM, chlorobutanol ChB, benzyl alcohol BA, phenyl ethyl alcohol PEA, chlorohexidin ChX, parabens PB), their typical concentrations and combinations, including the parameters of formulation and the interactions which affect their activity. It deals with the toxicity of these antimicrobial substances, side effects on the eye tissue, and alternatives to the use of antimicrobial agents.

  18. Beyond Cookies: Understanding Various Division Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jong, Cindy; Magruder, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Having a deeper understanding of division derived from multiple models is of great importance for teachers and students. For example, students will benefit from a greater understanding of division contexts as they study long division, fractions, and division of fractions. The purpose of this article is to build on teachers' and students'…

  19. Beyond Cookies: Understanding Various Division Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jong, Cindy; Magruder, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Having a deeper understanding of division derived from multiple models is of great importance for teachers and students. For example, students will benefit from a greater understanding of division contexts as they study long division, fractions, and division of fractions. The purpose of this article is to build on teachers' and students'…

  20. Coe Receives 2007 Gilbert Award

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogue, Scott W.; Coe, Robert S.

    2008-05-01

    Robert S. Coe received the 2007 William Gilbert Award at the 2007 AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. The award recognizes outstanding and unselfish work in magnetism of Earth materials and of the Earth and planets.

  1. Unconventional energy resources: 2007-2008 review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warwick, P.D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper summarizes five 2007-2008 resource commodity committee reports prepared by the Energy Minerals Division (EMD) of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Current United States and global research and development activities related to gas hydrates, gas shales, geothermal resources, oil sands, and uranium resources are included in this review. These commodity reports were written to advise EMD leadership and membership of the current status of research and development of unconventional energy resources. Unconventional energy resources are defined as those resources other than conventional oil and natural gas that typically occur in sandstone and carbonate rocks. Gas hydrate resources are potentially enormous; however, production technologies are still under development. Gas shale, geothermal, oil sand, and uranium resources are now increasing targets of exploration and development, and are rapidly becoming important energy resources that will continue to be developed in the future. ?? 2009 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  2. Building an Academic Colorectal Division

    PubMed Central

    Koltun, Walter A.

    2014-01-01

    Colon and rectal surgery is fully justified as a valid subspecialty within academic university health centers, but such formal recognition at the organizational level is not the norm. Creating a colon and rectal division within a greater department of surgery requires an unfailing commitment to academic concepts while promulgating the improvements that come in patient care, research, and teaching from a specialty service perspective. The creation of divisional identity then opens the door for a strategic process that will grow the division even more as well as provide benefits to the institution within which it resides. The fundamentals of core values, academic commitment, and shared success reinforced by receptive leadership are critical. Attention to culture, commitment, collaboration, control, cost, and compensation leads to a successful academic division of colon and rectal surgery. PMID:25067922

  3. Ultrafast charge division imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan; Woo, Brian; Odom, Robert W.

    2000-11-01

    We have developed position computing electronics having less than 60 ns dead times for resistive anode encoders, a form of charge division imaging detector. These electronics are at least a factor of 5 faster than anything available commercially and are based on using a fast, self-resetting charge integrator and subrange digital division techniques. Our primary application for this detector is secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS)/ions imaging and we demonstrate that SIMS imaging applications using these ultrafast electronics can readily be performed at ion intensities above 106 cps. This article discusses the overall electronics design and presents experimental data on dead-time measurements, detector lateral resolution, and SIMS imaging.

  4. General principles of antimicrobial therapy.

    PubMed

    Leekha, Surbhi; Terrell, Christine L; Edson, Randall S

    2011-02-01

    Antimicrobial agents are some of the most widely, and often injudiciously, used therapeutic drugs worldwide. Important considerations when prescribing antimicrobial therapy include obtaining an accurate diagnosis of infection; understanding the difference between empiric and definitive therapy; identifying opportunities to switch to narrow-spectrum, cost-effective oral agents for the shortest duration necessary; understanding drug characteristics that are peculiar to antimicrobial agents (such as pharmacodynamics and efficacy at the site of infection); accounting for host characteristics that influence antimicrobial activity; and in turn, recognizing the adverse effects of antimicrobial agents on the host. It is also important to understand the importance of antimicrobial stewardship, to know when to consult infectious disease specialists for guidance, and to be able to identify situations when antimicrobial therapy is not needed. By following these general principles, all practicing physicians should be able to use antimicrobial agents in a responsible manner that benefits both the individual patient and the community.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella enterica isolated from bulk tank milk and milk filters in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella isolates were recovered from bulk tank milk as part of the National Animal Health Monitoring System (NAHMS) Dairy 2002 and 2007 surveys. In-line milk filters were also tested in the 2007 survey. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance among ...

  6. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    PubMed

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides from Fish

    PubMed Central

    Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Diamond, Gill

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are found widely distributed through Nature, and participate in the innate host defense of each species. Fish are a great source of these peptides, as they express all of the major classes of AMPs, including defensins, cathelicidins, hepcidins, histone-derived peptides, and a fish-specific class of the cecropin family, called piscidins. As with other species, the fish peptides exhibit broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, killing both fish and human pathogens. They are also immunomodulatory, and their genes are highly responsive to microbes and innate immuno-stimulatory molecules. Recent research has demonstrated that some of the unique properties of fish peptides, including their ability to act even in very high salt concentrations, make them good potential targets for development as therapeutic antimicrobials. Further, the stimulation of their gene expression by exogenous factors could be useful in preventing pathogenic microbes in aquaculture. PMID:24594555

  8. Antimicrobial activity of spices.

    PubMed

    Arora, D S; Kaur, J

    1999-08-01

    Spices have been shown to possess medicinal value, in particular, antimicrobial activity. This study compares the sensitivity of some human pathogenic bacteria and yeasts to various spice extracts and commonly employed chemotherapeutic substances. Of the different spices tested only garlic and clove were found to possess antimicrobial activity. The bactericidal effect of garlic extract was apparent within 1 h of incubation and 93% killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Salmonella typhi was achieved within 3 h. Yeasts were totally killed in 1 h by garlic extract but in 5 h with clove. Some bacteria showing resistance to certain antibiotics were sensitive to extracts of both garlic and clove. Greater anti-candidal activity was shown by garlic than by nystatin. Spices might have a great potential to be used as antimicrobial agents.

  9. Antimicrobial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marilyn; Silley, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of our current understanding of the mechanisms associated with the development of antimicrobial drug resistance, international differences in definitions of resistance, ongoing efforts to track shifts in drug susceptibility, and factors that can influence the selection of therapeutic intervention. The latter presents a matrix of complex variables that includes the mechanism of drug action, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of the antimicrobial agent in the targeted patient population, the pharmacodynamics (PD) of the bacterial response to the antimicrobial agent, the PK/PD relationship that will influence dose selection, and the integrity of the host immune system. Finally, the differences between bacterial tolerance and bacterial resistance are considered, and the potential for non-traditional anti-infective therapies is discussed.

  10. Peptide Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Jenssen, Håvard; Hamill, Pamela; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2006-01-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides are produced by all complex organisms as well as some microbes and have diverse and complex antimicrobial activities. Collectively these peptides demonstrate a broad range of antiviral and antibacterial activities and modes of action, and it is important to distinguish between direct microbicidal and indirect activities against such pathogens. The structural requirements of peptides for antiviral and antibacterial activities are evaluated in light of the diverse set of primary and secondary structures described for host defense peptides. Peptides with antifungal and antiparasitic activities are discussed in less detail, although the broad-spectrum activities of such peptides indicate that they are important host defense molecules. Knowledge regarding the relationship between peptide structure and function as well as their mechanism of action is being applied in the design of antimicrobial peptide variants as potential novel therapeutic agents. PMID:16847082

  11. Polyphenols as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Daglia, Maria

    2012-04-01

    Polyphenols are secondary metabolites produced by higher plants, which play multiple essential roles in plant physiology and have potential healthy properties on human organism, mainly as antioxidants, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antihypertensive, and antimicrobial agents. In the present review the antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal activities of the most active polyphenol classes are reported, highlighting, where investigated, the mechanisms of action and the structure-activity relationship. Moreover, considering that the microbial resistance has become an increasing global problem, and there is a compulsory need to find out new potent antimicrobial agents as accessories to antibiotic therapy, the synergistic effect of polyphenols in combination with conventional antimicrobial agents against clinical multidrug-resistant microorganisms is discussed.

  12. 75 FR 65523 - Dawson Metal Company, Inc., Industrial Division, Jamestown, NY; Notice of Negative Determination...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Employment and Training Administration Dawson Metal Company, Inc., Industrial Division, Jamestown, NY; Notice... metal fabrication. The initial negative determination based on the findings that the subject firm did... regarding ] purchases of precision sheet metal fabrication for 2007, 2008, and January through April...

  13. Determining the Existence of an Athletic Stigma on a NCAA Division II University Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jennifer C. M.

    2010-01-01

    This project replicated a previous study by Simons, Bosworth, Fujita, and Jenson (2007) examining the existence of an athletic stigma on a university campus. For this investigation, the researcher adapted the original instrument and surveyed 252 athletes on a comprehensive Midwestern NCAA Division II university campus. The survey provided both…

  14. Preface: Phonons 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrin, Bernard

    2007-06-01

    Conference logo The conference PHONONS 2007 was held 15-20 July 2007 in the Conservatoire National des Arts et Métiers (CNAM) Paris, France. CNAM is a college of higher technology for training students in the application of science to industry, founded by Henri Grégoire in 1794. This was the 12th International Conference on Phonon Scattering in Condensed Matter. This international conference series, held every 3 years, started in France at Sainte-Maxime in 1972. It was then followed by meetings at Nottingham (1975), Providence (1979), Stuttgart (1983), Urbana-Champaign (1986), Heidelberg (1989), Ithaca (1992), Sapporo (1995), Lancaster (1998), Dartmouth (2001) and St Petersburg (2004). PHONONS 2007 was attended by 346 delegates from 37 different countries as follows: France 120, Japan 45, Germany 25, USA 25, Russia 21, Italy 13, Poland 9, UK 9, Canada 7, The Netherlands 7, Finland 6, Spain 6, Taiwan 6, Greece 4, India 4, Israel 4, Ukraine 4, Serbia 3, South Africa 3, Argentina 2, Belgium 2, China 2, Iran 2, Korea 2, Romania 2, Switzerland 2, and one each from Belarus, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Brazil, Bulgaria, Egypt, Estonia, Mexico, Moldova, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Turkey. There were 5 plenary lectures, 14 invited talks and 84 oral contributions; 225 posters were presented during three poster sessions. The first plenary lecture was given by H J Maris who presented fascinating movies featuring the motion of a single electron in liquid helium. Robert Blick gave us a review on the new possibilities afforded by nanotechnology to design nano-electomechanical systems (NEMS) and the way to use them to study elementary and fundamental processes. The growing interest for phonon transport studies in nanostructured materials was demonstrated by Arun Majumdar. Andrey Akimov described how ultrafast acoustic solitons can monitor the optical properties of quantum wells. Finally, Maurice Chapellier told us how

  15. Institutional Plan FY 2003 - 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Chartock, Michael; Hansen, Todd

    2003-01-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 2003-2007 Institutional Plan describes the strategic directions and key issues that Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory management must address with the Department of Energy (DOE) in charting its future as a multiprogram national laboratory. The Plan provides an overview of the Laboratory's mission, strategic plan, initiatives, and the resources required to fulfill its role in support of national needs in fundamental science and technology, energy resources, and environmental quality. The Plan facilitates the Department of Energy's ongoing efforts to strengthen the Integrated Laboratory System. Preparation and review of the Institutional Plan is one element of the Department of Energy's strategic management planning activities, implemented through an annual planning process. The Plan supports the President's Management Agenda and the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993. The Plan complements the current performance-based contract between the Department of Energy and the Regents of the University of California, and summarizes Best Management Practices for a potential future results-based contract as a basis for achieving DOE goals and the Laboratory's scientific and operations objectives. It identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of national energy policy and research needs and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the Plan is coordinated by the Planning and Strategic Development Office from information contributed by Berkeley Lab's scientific and support divisions and DOE comments on prior years' plans. The Laboratory Mission section identifies the specific strengths of Berkeley Lab that contribute to the mission in general and the Integrated Laboratory System in particular. The Laboratory Strategic Plan section identifies the existing activities in support of DOE Office of Science and other sponsors; support for DOE goals; and the Laboratory Scientific Vision and

  16. Environmental Transport Division: 1979 report

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Schubert, J.F.; Bowman, W.W.; Adams, S.E.

    1980-03-01

    During 1979, the Environmental Transport Division (ETD) of the Savannah River Laboratory conducted atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic, and marine studies, which are described in a series of articles. Separate abstracts were prepared for each. Publications written about the 1979 research are listed at the end of the report.

  17. Preschool Children's Informal Division Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blevins-Knabe, Belinda

    The purpose of this study was to examine the division procedures of preschool children to determine whether such procedures involved one-to-one correspondence. Large and small numerosity trials were included so that the amount of effort and ease of using other procedures would vary. Odd and even number trials were included to determine whether…

  18. The Trouble with Long Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    The fourth graders were ready to learn long division; however, their teachers were hesitant to begin the unit--just as they are every year. In a grade-level meeting with the school's math consultant, the teachers voiced their typical concerns. The math consultant was a university mathematics education professor spending a semester of sabbatical…

  19. Manpower Division Looks at CETA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    The Manpower Division at the American Vocational Association (AVA) convention in Houston was concerned about youth unemployment and about the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA)--its problems and possibilities. The panel discussion reported here reveals some differing perspectives and a general consensus--that to improve their role in…

  20. Divisions of geologic time (Bookmark)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2012-05-03

    DescriptionThis bookmark, designed for use with U.S. Geological Survey activities at the second USA Science and Engineering Festival (April 26–29, 2012), is adapted from the more detailed Fact Sheet 2010–3059 "Divisions of Geologic Time." The information that it presents is widely sought by educators and students.

  1. Understanding Partitive Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Jack M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Concrete experience should be a first step in the development of new abstract concepts and their symbolization. Presents concrete activities based on Hyde and Nelson's work with egg cartons and Steiner's work with money to develop students' understanding of partitive division when using fractions. (MDH)

  2. newsletter | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Psychological Sciences Division: 1985 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Naval Research, Washington, DC. Psychological Sciences Div.

    This booklet describes research carried out under sponsorship of the Psychological Sciences Division of the U.S. Office of Naval Research during Fiscal Year 1985. The booklet is divided into three programmatic research areas: (1) Engineering Psychology; (2) Personnel and Training; and (3) Group Psychology. Each program is described by an overview…

  4. Home | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Our Research The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into cancer. |

  5. Understanding Partitive Division of Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ott, Jack M.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Concrete experience should be a first step in the development of new abstract concepts and their symbolization. Presents concrete activities based on Hyde and Nelson's work with egg cartons and Steiner's work with money to develop students' understanding of partitive division when using fractions. (MDH)

  6. 75 FR 70031 - Antitrust Division

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Open... National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Open Axis... Consulting Corp., Miami Beach, FL; Mobiata, Ann Arbor, MI; AOl Marketing, Minneapolis, MN; eNett...

  7. Phased cell division, specific division rates and other biological observations of Dinophysis populations in sub-surface layers off the south coast of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, Hazel; Velo-Suarez, Lourdes; Reguera, Beatriz; Raine, Robin

    2014-03-01

    The proportions of viable cells of Dinophysis spp. that were paired (dividing) and recently divided during a cell cycle were measured on populations of D. acuta and D. acuminata observed off the south coast of Ireland in July 2007 and July 2009. Both species exhibited phased cell division in 2009 with maximum frequency of division (fmax) 2 h after sunrise. Different patterns of division (timing of fmax) were shown by D. acuta in 2007, when the population aggregated in a thin layer was transported by a coastal jet flow. High resolution (decimetre-scale) profiles within the thin layer showed large differences in the vertical distribution of biological properties (feeding status, mortality). Values of the specific growth rate μ were compared to estimates derived in similar fashion from observations on Dinophysis populations elsewhere. Different patterns exhibited by the same species in different regions may be attributed to adaptations to latitudinal differences (length of photoperiod). The question of whether phased cell division always occurs in Dinophysis populations, and the incorporation of the potential specific division rate into models of Dinophysis growth are discussed. Comprehensive field data sets demonstrate the impact of the results on the coherence of Dinophysis populations during their transport along the Irish coast in jet-like flows towards sites of intensive shellfish culture.

  8. Physics division annual report 2000.

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K., ed.

    2001-10-04

    This report summarizes the research performed in 2000 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory and medium energy physics research, and accelerator research and development. As the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and the nuclear science community create a new long range plan for the field in 2001, it is clear that the research of the Division is closely aligned with and continues to help define the national goals of our field. The NSAC 2001 Long Range Plan recommends as the highest priority for major new construction the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA), a bold step forward for nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The accelerator R&D in the Physics Division has made major contributions to almost all aspects of the RIA design concept and the community was convinced that this project is ready to move forward. 2000 saw the end of the first Gammasphere epoch at ATLAS, One hundred Gammasphere experiments were completed between January 1998 and March 2000, 60% of which used the Fragment Mass Analyzer to provide mass identification in the reaction. The experimental program at ATLAS then shifted to other important research avenues including proton radioactivity, mass measurements with the Canadian Penning Trap and measurements of high energy gamma-rays in nuclear reactions with the MSU/ORNL/Texas A&M BaF{sub 2} array. ATLAS provided 5460 beam-research hours for user experiments and maintained an operational reliability of 95%. Radioactive beams accounted for 7% of the beam time. ATLAS also provided a crucial test of a key RIA concept, the ability to accelerate multiple charge states in a superconducting heavy-ion linac. This new capability was immediately used to increase the performance for a scheduled experiment. The medium energy program continued to make strides in examining how the quark-gluon structure of matter

  9. Antimicrobial resistance challenged with metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Aziz, Alaa S; Agatemor, Christian; Etkin, Nola

    2017-02-01

    Antimicrobial resistance threatens the achievements of science and medicine, as it deactivates conventional antimicrobial therapeutics. Scientists respond to the threat by developing new antimicrobial platforms to prevent and treat infections from these resistant strains. Metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules are emerging as an alternative to conventional platforms because they combine multiple mechanisms of action into one platform due to the distinctive properties of metals. For example, metals interact with intracellular proteins and enzymes, and catalyse various intracellular processes. The macromolecular architecture offers a means to enhance antimicrobial activity since several antimicrobial moieties can be conjugated to the scaffold. Further, these macromolecules can be fabricated into antimicrobial materials for contact-killing medical implants, fabrics, and devices. As volatilization or leaching out of the antimicrobial moieties from the macromolecular scaffold is reduced, these medical implants, fabrics, and devices can retain their antimicrobial activity over an extended period. Recent advances demonstrate the potential of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules as effective platforms that prevent and treat infections from resistant strains. In this review these advances are thoroughly discussed within the context of examples of metal-based antimicrobial macromolecules, their mechanisms of action and biocompatibility.

  10. Antimicrobial peptides keep insect endosymbionts under control.

    PubMed

    Login, Frédéric H; Balmand, Séverine; Vallier, Agnès; Vincent-Monégat, Carole; Vigneron, Aurélien; Weiss-Gayet, Michèle; Rochat, Didier; Heddi, Abdelaziz

    2011-10-21

    Vertically transmitted endosymbionts persist for millions of years in invertebrates and play an important role in animal evolution. However, the functional basis underlying the maintenance of these long-term resident bacteria is unknown. We report that the weevil coleoptericin-A (ColA) antimicrobial peptide selectively targets endosymbionts within the bacteriocytes and regulates their growth through the inhibition of cell division. Silencing the colA gene with RNA interference resulted in a decrease in size of the giant filamentous endosymbionts, which escaped from the bacteriocytes and spread into insect tissues. Although this family of peptides is commonly linked with microbe clearance, this work shows that endosymbiosis benefits from ColA, suggesting that long-term host-symbiont coevolution might have shaped immune effectors for symbiont maintenance.

  11. 76 FR 4724 - Emerson Transportation Division, a Division of Emerson Electric, Including Workers Located...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ..., Including Workers Located Throughout the United States; Bridgeton, MO; Amended Certification Regarding... Emerson Transportation Division, a division of Emerson Electric, including workers located throughout...

  12. Antimicrobial Tolerance in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    The tolerance of microorganisms in biofilms to antimicrobial agents is examined through a meta-analysis of literature data. A numerical tolerance factor comparing the rates of killing in the planktonic and biofilm states is defined to provide a quantitative basis for the analysis. Tolerance factors for biocides and antibiotics range over three orders of magnitude. This variation is not explained by taking into account the molecular weight of the agent, the chemistry of the agent, the substratum material, or the speciation of the microorganisms. Tolerance factors do depend on the areal cell density of the biofilm at the time of treatment and on the age of the biofilm as grown in a particular experimental system. This suggests that there is something that happens during biofilm maturation, either physical or physiological, that is essential for full biofilm tolerance. Experimental measurements of antimicrobial penetration times in biofilms range over orders of magnitude, with slower penetration (>12 min) observed for reactive oxidants and cationic molecules. These agents are retarded through the interaction of reaction, sorption, and diffusion. The specific physiological status of microbial cells in a biofilm contributes to antimicrobial tolerance. A conceptual framework for categorizing physiological cell states is discussed in the context of antimicrobial susceptibility. It is likely that biofilms harbor cells in multiple states simultaneously (e.g., growing, stress-adapted, dormant, inactive) and that this physiological heterogeneity is an important factor in the tolerance of the biofilm state. PMID:26185072

  13. Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kristen; Stoffella, Sylvia; Meyers, Rachel; Girotto, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The frequent use of antimicrobials in pediatric patients has led to a significant increase in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections among children. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been created in many hospitals in an effort to curtail and optimize the use of antibiotics. Pediatric-focused programs are necessary because of the differences in antimicrobial need and use among this patient population, unique considerations and dosing, vulnerability for resistance due to a lifetime of antibiotic exposure, and the increased risk of adverse events. This paper serves as a position statement of the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) who supports the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programs for all pediatric patients. PPAG also believes that a pediatric pharmacy specialist should be included as part of that program and that services be covered by managed care organizations and government insurance entities. PPAG also recommends that states create legislation similar to that in existence in California and Missouri and that a federal Task Force for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria be permanently established. PPAG also supports post-doctoral pharmacy training programs in antibiotic stewardship.

  14. Multifactorial antimicrobial wood protectants

    Treesearch

    Robert D. Coleman; Carol A. Clausen

    2008-01-01

    It is unlikely that a single antimicrobial compound, whether synthetic or natural, will provide the ‘magic bullet’ for eliminating multiple biological agents affecting wood products. Development of synergistic combinations of selected compounds, especially those derived from natural sources, is recognized as a promising approach to improved wood protection. Recent...

  15. Multidimensional signatures in antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yount, Nannette Y.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    Conventional analyses distinguish between antimicrobial peptides by differences in amino acid sequence. Yet structural paradigms common to broader classes of these molecules have not been established. The current analyses examined the potential conservation of structural themes in antimicrobial peptides from evolutionarily diverse organisms. Using proteomics, an antimicrobial peptide signature was discovered to integrate stereospecific sequence patterns and a hallmark three-dimensional motif. This striking multidimensional signature is conserved among disulfide-containing antimicrobial peptides spanning biological kingdoms, and it transcends motifs previously limited to defined peptide subclasses. Experimental data validating this model enabled the identification of previously unrecognized antimicrobial activity in peptides of known identity. The multidimensional signature model provides a unifying structural theme in broad classes of antimicrobial peptides, will facilitate discovery of antimicrobial peptides as yet unknown, and offers insights into the evolution of molecular determinants in these and related host defense effector molecules. PMID:15118082

  16. Environmental Report 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, S; Gallegos, G; Berg, L L; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S; Doman, J L; Ferry, L S; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Kumamoto, G; Larson, J; MacQueen, D H; Paterson, L; Revelli, M A; Ridley, M; Rueppel, D; Wegrecki, A M; Wilson, K; Woollett, J

    2008-09-24

    The purposes of the 'Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2007' are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites--the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.lln.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2007: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status

  17. Report: EPA Did Not Properly Process a Hospital Disinfectant and Sanitizer Registration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #2007-P-00018, March 29, 2007. EPA’s Office of Pesticides Program-Antimicrobials Division (OPP-AD) did not properly process registration for an antimicrobial pesticide that was the subject of our review.

  18. 2007 LDRD ANNUAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    French, T

    2008-12-16

    I am pleased to present the fiscal year 2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This represents the first year that SRNL has been eligible for LDRD participation and our results to date demonstrate we are off to an excellent start. SRNL became a National Laboratory in 2004, and was designated the 'Corporate Laboratory' for the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in 2006. As you will see, we have made great progress since these designations. The LDRD program is one of the tools SRNL is using to enable achievement of our strategic goals for the DOE. The LDRD program allows the laboratory to blend a strong basic science component into our applied technical portfolio. This blending of science with applied technology provides opportunities for our scientists to strengthen our capabilities and delivery. The LDRD program is vital to help SRNL attract and retain leading scientists and engineers who will help build SRNL's future and achieve DOE mission objectives. This program has stimulated our research staff creativity, while realizing benefits from their participation. This investment will yield long term dividends to the DOE in its Environmental Management, Energy, and National Security missions.

  19. 2007 Research and Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddlebaugh, Stephen M. (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is pushing the envelope of research and technology in aeronautics, space exploration, science, and space operations. Our research in aeropropulsion, structures and materials, and instrumentation and controls is enabling next-generation transportation systems that are faster, more environmentally friendly, more fuel efficient, and safer. Our research and development of space flight systems is enabling advanced power, propulsion, communications, and human health systems that will advance the exploration of our solar system. This report selectively summarizes NASA Glenn Research Center s research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 2007. Comprising 104 short articles submitted by the staff scientists and engineers, the report is organized into six major sections: Aeropropulsion, Power and Space Propulsion, Communications, Space Processes and Experiments, Instrumentation and Controls, and Structures and Materials. It is not intended to be a comprehensive summary of all the research and technology work done over the past fiscal year; most of the work is reported in Glenn-published technical reports, journal articles, and presentations. For each article in this report, a Glenn contact person has been identified, and where possible, a reference document is listed so that additional information can be easily obtained.

  20. Light Sources 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M. Q.; Devonshire, R.

    2007-04-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the 11th International Symposium on the Science and Technology of Light Sources (LS:11) held in Fudan University, Shanghai, China in the period May 20th to 24th, 2007. In the 32 years since the first symposium was held in Loughborough, UK, the LS series has established itself as the major international event which brings together on a regular basis the world's leading scientists and engineers involved in the research and development of light source technologies. The participants come from the R&D laboratories of the world’s leading light source manufacturing companies and from research groups in universities, government laboratories and research institutes. The highly multi-disciplinary nature of the field results in a unique mix of physicists, chemists, chemical physicists, materials scientists and electrical, electronic and mechanical engineers attending the symposia. The more than 250 papers in these LS:11 proceedings provide an excellent overview of the current status of light source science and technology. The energy efficiency and light emission characteristics of existing technologies continue to be improved, solid state technologies are advancing rapidly and innovation flourishes generally. Audience Professional scientists and engineers involved in light source related R&D. Postgraduate-level students in the physical sciences, applied mathematics, materials science, and electrical and electronic engineering. The contents will also be of interest to anyone with a background in science and engineering wishing to gain an overview of current activity in this important global industry and research field.

  1. Preface: LEHTSC2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyanagi, Hiroyuki

    2008-03-01

    LEHTSC2007 was held at AIST in Tsukuba, Japan, from 31 October to 3 November, and was attended by 110 scientists from twelve countries. In late October, the autumn leaves of the beautiful ginkgo trees change colour from verdant green to bright yellow, as always. For its part, the conference set out to search for the `Genome information', addressing the greatest unsolved mystery in current condensed matter physics, that is, the pairing mechanism of high temperature superconductivity (HTSC). Although there has been much effort and tremendous accumulated knowledge since the discovery of HTSC by Bednorz and Müller in 1986, we have failed to reach an unified view on the microscopic mechanism of HTSC. The fact that no mechanism has yet been accepted as an universal model may indicate that we may still be lacking `some important ingredients'. The search for the `missing ingredients' is now being accelerated as experimental techniques have improved to become state-of-the-art and overwhelmingly detailed information is readily attainable. Our attitude of cooperative communication is even more needed. Unfortunately, researchers with different ideas often tend to `phase-separate', and cross participation in scientific meetings is low. A complex phenomena like HTSC, often show different `shapes and colours' which can easily lead to misunderstanding if we narrow our view. This issue is expressed in the subtitle, `Spin, phonon, or the third way?' meaning that the `missing ingredients' (electron-lattice interaction) which has long been neglected must be properly taken into account to reach an understanding of the true mechanism. As Chairman of the Organizing Committee, I would like to express my greatest appreciation to all invited speakers, oral and poster contributors as their works confirmed that we are indeed taking the third way. In total there were 53 invited and contributed oral talks and 25 poster presentations. All lectures were followed by active comments and

  2. Fires in Myanmar (2007)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In Southeast Asia, fires are common and widespread throughout the dry season, which roughly spans the northern hemisphere winter months. People set fires to clear crop stubble and brush and to prepare grazing land for a new flush of growth when the rainy season arrives. These intentional fires are too frequently accompanied by accidental fires that invade nearby forests and woodlands. The combination of fires produces a thick haze that alternately lingers and disperses, depending on the weather. This image from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite shows fire activity on March 19, 2007, across eastern India, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, and China. Places where MODIS detected actively burning fires are marked in red on the image. The darker green areas are generally more wooded areas or forests, while the paler green and tan areas are agricultural land. Smoke pools over low-lying areas of the hilly terrain in gray pockets. The green tops of rolling hills in Thailand emerge from a cloud of low-lying smoke. According to news reports from Thailand, the smoke blanket created air quality conditions that were considered unhealthy for all groups, and it prompted the Thai Air Force to undertake cloud-seeding attempts in an effort to cleanse the skies with rain. Commercial air traffic was halted due to poor visibility.

  3. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    SciTech Connect

    Wade, C

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  4. Electronics Division research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacRoberts, M. D. J.; Courtney, E. J.

    1984-03-01

    The status of the research development activities in the Electronics Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is described. Much of the work described is sponsored by the Laboratory; however, other topics are included for completeness. The Fuels Cells for Transportation Applications and the majority of the electrochemistry research are reported separately in LA-9787-PR. The Thermionic Integrated Circuits are being reported separately. The following topics are continuations of articles reported in Electronics Division Research and Development, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982 (LA-9726-PR): Photoconductive Circuit Elements, Photoconductive Materials for Far-Infrared Detector Applications, Saturable Ferromagnetic Elements, Repetitive Opening Switches, Capacitor Test Facility, Fast Gating of Microchannel-Plate Image Intensifiers, and Oxygen-Reduction Reaction - Electrode Kinetics and Electrocatalysis. The following topics are new work or were included for completeness: Photoconductive Power Switches, Ion Beam Analysis, Link Access Control and Encryption System, Coded Aperture Imaging of Gamma-Ray Sources, and Multilayer Printed Wiring Boards.

  5. Water Resources Division training catalog

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hotchkiss, W.R.; Foxhoven, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The National Training Center provides technical and management sessions nesessary for the conductance of the U.S. Geological Survey 's training programs. This catalog describes the facilities and staff at the Lakewood Training Center and describes Water Resources Division training courses available through the center. In addition, the catalog describes the procedures for gaining admission, formulas for calculating fees, and discussion of course evaluations. (USGS)

  6. Unemployment and Household Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamir, Boas

    1986-01-01

    Addresses the relationship between unemployment of men and women and the division of labor in their households and how the psychological well-being of unemployed individuals related to the division of labor in their families. Changes in the employment status of men and women had only limited effects on household division of labor. (Author/ABL)

  7. 7 CFR 29.16 - Division.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Division. 29.16 Section 29.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.16 Division. Tobacco Division, Agricultural Marketing Service,...

  8. IFLA Advisory Group on Division 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloss, Marjorie E.; Hegedus, Peter; Law, Derek; Nilsen, Sissel; Raseroka, Kay; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Wu, Jianzhong

    Following the 1999 IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions) Conference, the Executive Board established an Advisory group to examine issues that were raised concerning Division 8, specifically the recommendation to mainstream Section 8 activities with the other seven divisions, thus dissolving this division. This…

  9. [The Library of Congress Manuscript Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchelmore, Elizabeth

    The first of this set of two papers discusses the administration and activities of the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress. The function of the Division is to safeguard, help acquire, classify and catalog, and make useful the collections of manuscripts in its possessions. To accomplish this the Division maintains a reading room and…

  10. Analytical Chemistry Division's sample transaction system

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, J.S.; Tilson, P.A.

    1980-10-01

    The Analytical Chemistry Division uses the DECsystem-10 computer for a wide range of tasks: sample management, timekeeping, quality assurance, and data calculation. This document describes the features and operating characteristics of many of the computer programs used by the Division. The descriptions are divided into chapters which cover all of the information about one aspect of the Analytical Chemistry Division's computer processing.

  11. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  12. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  13. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  14. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  15. 7 CFR 11.8 - Division hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the Division. (ii) An appellant or an agency, acting through any appropriate official, may request the... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Division hearings. 11.8 Section 11.8 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture NATIONAL APPEALS DIVISION National Appeals Divison Rules of...

  16. Asymmetric centrosome behavior and the mechanisms of stem cell division

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Yukiko M.; Fuller, Margaret T.

    2008-01-01

    The ability of dividing cells to produce daughters with different fates is an important developmental mechanism conserved from bacteria to fungi, plants, and metazoan animals. Asymmetric outcomes of a cell division can be specified by two general mechanisms: asymmetric segregation of intrinsic fate determinants or asymmetric placement of daughter cells into microenvironments that provide extrinsic signals that direct cells to different states. For both, spindle orientation must be coordinated with the localization of intrinsic determinants or source of extrinsic signals to achieve the proper asymmetric outcome. Recent work on spindle orientation in Drosophila melanogaster male germline stem cells and neuroblasts has brought into sharp focus the key role of differential centrosome behavior in developmentally programmed asymmetric division (for reviews see Cabernard, C., and C.Q. Doe. 2007. Curr. Biol. 17:R465–R467; Gonzalez, C. 2007. Nat. Rev. Genet. 8:462–472). These findings provide new insights and suggest intriguing new models for how cells coordinate spindle orientation with their cellular microenvironment to regulate and direct cell fate decisions within tissues. PMID:18209101

  17. School Libraries Count! A National Survey of School Library Media Programs, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Librarians (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The American Library Association's (ALA's) divisions for academic and public libraries--the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) and the Public Library Association (PLA)--have long collected and reported annual statistics about the types of libraries they represent. This year, 2007, the American Association of School Librarians…

  18. A comparison of antimicrobial usage in human and veterinary medicine in France from 1999 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Moulin, Gérard; Cavalié, Philippe; Pellanne, Isabelle; Chevance, Anne; Laval, Arlette; Millemann, Yves; Colin, Pierre; Chauvin, Claire

    2008-09-01

    The antimicrobials allowed and amounts sold in veterinary and human medicine in France were compared to see if the same antimicrobial drugs are used in veterinary and human medicine, and to the same extent. Registers of all approved antimicrobial commercial products, kept by the French Agency for Veterinary Medicinal Products (AFSSA ANMV) for animals and the French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS) for humans, were compared to determine whether the same antimicrobials were approved in 2007 for use in both human and animal populations. Sales data were collected from pharmaceutical companies between 1999 and 2005 by the AFSSA ANMV and AFSSAPS. Usage of the different antimicrobial anatomical therapeutic chemical (ATC) classes in human and veterinary medicines was recorded. Data were expressed in tonnes of active ingredients and were then related to the animal and human biomasses to compare usages expressed in mg/kg. All antimicrobial ATC classes were used in both human and veterinary medicine. Tetracyclines accounted for the most sales in veterinary medicine. beta-Lactams predominated in human medicine. A decrease in the amounts consumed by both human and animal populations was observed during the study. In 2005, 760 tonnes were used in human medicine and 1320 tonnes in veterinary medicine, corresponding to 199 and 84 mg/kg of live weight in human and animal populations, respectively. The same antimicrobial drugs were used in human and veterinary medicines but the quantitative patterns of use were different. Expression of antimicrobial usage is a key point to address when comparing usage trends.

  19. 75 FR 16843 - Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division, Sipco, Inc., Division, Including Leased...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division, Sipco, Inc..., 2009, applicable to workers of Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division and Sipco, Inc... of Core Manufacturing, Multi-Plastics, Inc., Division and Sipco, Inc., Division, including...

  20. Assessment of antimicrobial usage and residues in commercial chicken eggs from smallholder poultry keepers in Morogoro municipality, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Nonga, H E; Simon, C; Karimuribo, E D; Mdegela, R H

    2010-08-01

    Occurrence of antimicrobial residues in commercial chicken eggs was determined in Morogoro municipality between January and February 2007. Twenty smallholder farmers were interviewed on the types of antimicrobials, reasons of use and their awareness on antimicrobial withdrawal period. Seventy egg samples were collected for qualitative antimicrobial drug residues analysis by use of agar well diffusion and Delvotest SP assays. It was found that farmers use antimicrobial drugs as prophylaxis and treatment of common chicken diseases namely fowl typhoid (85%), infectious bursa disease (Gumboro) (65%) infectious coryza (65%), collibacilosis (55%), coccidiosis (54%), Newcastle disease (50%), helminthosis (20%) and fowl pox (15%). Antimicrobials accounted for 85% of the drugs commonly used. It was also found that 65% of the farmers treat their chicken themselves. The common drugs were oxytetracycline (75%), egg booster (50%), amprolium (35%), sulphamethoxypyridazine (35%), sulphanilamide (25%), chlortetracyclines (10%), chloramphenicol (10%), sulphadiazine-trimethoprim (20%), duoxycycline (20%), sulphadiazine (25%) and flumequine (10%). Eighty per cent of the farmers had knowledge on antimicrobial withdrawal period sold eggs before withdrawal period and almost 85% were unaware of possible effects of antimicrobial residues in humans. All 70 eggs were positive to antimicrobial residues by Delvotest kit, but 21.4% positive with agar well diffusion test. It was concluded that the presence of antimicrobial residues in table eggs could be of public health significance to the egg consumers in Morogoro municipality.

  1. Michigan School Privatization Survey 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Daniel J.; LaFaive, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    From April 25 through June 30, 2007, the Mackinac Center for Public Policy conducted its fifth survey of the privatization of bus, food and janitorial services among Michigan's 552 conventional public school districts. All Michigan school districts responded. In 2007, the Mackinac Center also conducted a nationwide survey of state education…

  2. THE Journal's 2007 Innovators: 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Through a variety of efforts large and small, across schools, districts, and even oceans, educators are making teaching and learning alive through the pioneering use of technology. Together, they are "T.H.E. Journal"'s class of 2007 Innovators. This article presents the class of 2007 Innovators along with their profiles. They are: (1) Edith…

  3. THE Journal's 2007 Innovators: 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    T.H.E. Journal, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Through a variety of efforts large and small, across schools, districts, and even oceans, educators are making teaching and learning alive through the pioneering use of technology. Together, they are "T.H.E. Journal"'s class of 2007 Innovators. This article presents the class of 2007 Innovators along with their profiles. They are: (1) Edith…

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance in Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Thanner, Sophie; Drissner, David; Walsh, Fiona

    2016-04-19

    In this article, the current knowledge and knowledge gaps in the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in livestock and plants and importance in terms of animal and human health are discussed. Some recommendations are provided for generation of the data required in order to develop risk assessments for AMR within agriculture and for risks through the food chain to animals and humans. Copyright © 2016 Thanner et al.

  5. Antimicrobial Resistance in Agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Thanner, Sophie; Drissner, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this article, the current knowledge and knowledge gaps in the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in livestock and plants and importance in terms of animal and human health are discussed. Some recommendations are provided for generation of the data required in order to develop risk assessments for AMR within agriculture and for risks through the food chain to animals and humans. PMID:27094336

  6. An investigation of antimicrobial usage patterns by small animal veterinarians in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Chipangura, John K; Eagar, Hayley; Kgoete, Marcia; Abernethy, Darrell; Naidoo, Vinny

    2017-01-01

    At present very little information is available on antimicrobial use patterns in small animal veterinary practice in South Africa. The aim of this study was firstly to provide some indication of antimicrobial use patterns, and secondly to ascertain if the country's small animal veterinarians make use of prudent use guidelines to optimise their antimicrobial use in order to minimise the development of antimicrobial resistance. In order to understand use patterns, a questionnaire was circulated to registered South African veterinarians, whose responses were evaluated by descriptive statistics. The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance was evaluated for dogs from samples submitted for culture and susceptibility testing for the period 2007-2013 from the only faculty of Veterinary Science in the country. The resistance data was organized into contingency tables and yearly trends in resistance evaluated by means of a chi-square. The use of antimicrobials from the survey were compared to the laboratory result to ascertain the degree of prudent use of the antimicrobials in small animal practice in a developing country. The responses from the questionnaire indicated that South African veterinarians predominantly (91.16%) used antimicrobials empirically before resorting to laboratory testing and that antimicrobial compounding and off label use (86.19%) of human registered medication was common practice. A worrying finding was that a large number of clients attempted antimicrobial treatment of their pets prior to seeking veterinary assistance. In terms of monitored resistance, annual prevalence of resistance was above 10% and multiple drug resistance was above 50% for all the isolates. It is concluded that antimicrobial resistant bacteria are present in small companion animal practice in South Africa which requires better implementation of prudent use guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antimicrobials and QT prolongation.

    PubMed

    Mason, Jay W

    2017-05-01

    Solithromycin, a ketolide/macrolide antibiotic, has recently been reported to be free of the expected QT-prolonging effect of macrolides. It appears that its keto substitution provides a structural basis for this observation, as the other two tested ketolides also have minimal QT effect.Among non-cardiovascular therapies, antimicrobials probably carry the greatest potential to cause cardiac arrhythmias. This is a result of their propensity to bind to the delayed rectifier potassium channel, IKr, inducing QT prolongation and risk of torsades de pointes ventricular tachycardia, their frequent interference with the metabolism of other QT prolongers and their susceptibility to metabolic inhibition by numerous commonly used drugs.Unfortunately, there is evidence that medical practitioners do not take account of the QT/arrhythmia risk of antimicrobials in their prescribing practices. Education on this topic is sorely needed. When a macrolide is indicated, a ketolide should be considered in patients with a QT risk. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides and Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Samantha; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Koon, Hon Wai

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important components of innate immunity. They are often expressed in response to colonic inflammation and infection. Over the last several years, the roles of several antimicrobial peptides have been explored. Gene expression of many AMPs (beta defensin HBD2-4 and cathelicidin) is induced in response to invasion of gut microbes into the mucosal barrier. Some AMPs are expressed in a constitutive manner (alpha defensin HD 5-6 and beta defensin HBD1), while others (defensin and bactericidal/permeability increasing protein BPI) are particularly associated with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) due to altered defensin expression or development of autoantibodies against Bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI). Various AMPs have different spectrum and strength of antimicrobial effects. Some may play important roles in modulating the colitis (cathelicidin) while others (lactoferrin, hepcidin) may represent biomarkers of disease activity. The use of AMPs for therapeutic purposes is still at an early stage of development. A few natural AMPs were shown to be able to modulate colitis when delivered intravenously or intracolonically (cathelicidin, elafin and SLPI) in mouse colitis models. New AMPs (synthetic or artificial non-human peptides) are being developed and may represent new therapeutic approaches against colitis. This review discusses the latest research developments in the AMP field with emphasis in innate immunity and pathophysiology of colitis. PMID:22950497

  9. [Neruda and antimicrobial resistance].

    PubMed

    Cotera, Alejandro

    2011-07-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has been a problem in medicine, since their incorporation to clinical practice. Numerous papers have been written on the subject. The analysis of two poems by Pablo Neruda "How much does a man live" and "Larynx", included in the volume "Estravagario" and published for the first time in 1957 and 1958, give us an incredible revelation about the concept of resistance. In these poems aureomycin, the first antimicrobial of the family of tetracyclines, was included as a poetic figure and the therapeutic action of antimicrobials was described. "Never so much bugs died I tons of them fell I but the few that remained olive I manifested their perversity". These writings incorporated novel concepts, even for physicians of that time and described the closeness of death that a patient may perceive during the course of a given disease. The capacity of Pablo Neruda to extract the essence of situations and to anticipate to conditions that only years later became clinically relevant problems, is noteworthy.

  10. [Antimicrobial mechanisms of action].

    PubMed

    Calvo, Jorge; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2009-01-01

    A large number of families and groups of antimicrobial agents are of clinical interest. The mechanisms by which compounds with antibacterial activity inhibit growth or cause bacterial death are varied and depend on the affected targets. The bacterial cell wall-a unique structure in most bacteria that is absent in eukaryotic cells-can be affected in several ways: at different stages of synthesis (fosfomycin, cycloserine) or transport (bacitracin, mureidomycins) of its metabolic precursors, or by a direct action on its structural organization (beta-lactams, glycopeptides). The main drugs affecting the cytoplasmic membrane are polymyxins and daptomycin. Protein synthesis can be blocked by a large variety of compounds that affect any of the phases of this process, including activation (mupirocin), initiation (oxazolidinones, aminoglycosides), binding of the tRNA amino acid complex to ribosomes (tetracyclines, glycylcyclines) and elongation (amphenicols, lincosamides, macrolides, ketolides, streptogramins, fusidic acid). The metabolism of nucleic acids can be altered at the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase or in the process of DNA coiling (quinolones); some compounds affect DNA directly (nitroimidazoles, nitrofurans). Trimethoprim and sulfamides (often used in combination) are examples of antimicrobial agents that block bacterial metabolic pathways. Some compounds are unable to inhibit or kill bacteria in themselves, but can block bacterial mechanisms of resistance, enhancing the activity of other antimicrobials administered in combination. Among this group of agents, only certain beta-lactamase inhibitors are currently in clinical use.

  11. Substandard/Counterfeit Antimicrobial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kelesidis, Theodoros

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs are a growing global problem. The most common substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials include beta-lactams (among antibiotics) and chloroquine and artemisin derivatives (among antimalarials). The most common type of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs have a reduced amount of the active drug, and the majority of them are manufactured in Southeast Asia and Africa. Counterfeit antimicrobial drugs may cause increased mortality and morbidity and pose a danger to patients. Here we review the literature with regard to the issue of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobials and describe the prevalence of this problem, the different types of substandard/counterfeit antimicrobial drugs, and the consequences for the individuals and global public health. Local, national, and international initiatives are required to combat this very important public health issue. PMID:25788516

  12. 49 CFR 177.841 - Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials. 177.841... PUBLIC HIGHWAY Loading and Unloading § 177.841 Division 6.1 and Division 2.3 materials. (See also § 177... by other appropriate method, and the marking removed. (b) (c) Division 2.3 (poisonous gas) or...

  13. 1. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southwest, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southwest, showing front (east) facade and north side, 213 Division Street is visible at left and 217 Division Street appears at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  14. A division's worth of data.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Christopher; Shearer, Marianne; Gardner, Karina; Kelly, Jill

    2011-03-01

    Throughout the international community there is an increasing focus on the benefits of collecting, pooling and analysing patient data. General practice provides a great opportunity to create a comprehensive database of the Australian population as 90% of Australians visit their general practitioner each year and general practices are increasingly computerised. This article discusses the facilitatory role divisions of general practice can play in harnessing quality data from general practice and the benefits that may follow. It describes experience from 3 years of data pooling by the Melbourne East General Practice Network in Victoria and makes recommendations for other organisations interested in data collection.

  15. Semiannual Report: Apr 1, 2007 - Sept 30, 2007

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Semiannual Report #EPA-350-R-07-003, Nov, 2007. This semiannual report includes details on these and other issues, including investigations that resulted in payments to the Federal Government and criminal, civil, or administrative actions.

  16. 2007 Annual Health Physics Report for the HEU Transparency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Radev, R

    2008-04-09

    During the 2007 calendar year, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provided health physics support for the Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Program for external and internal radiation protection and technical expertise related to BDMS radioactive sources and Russian radiation safety regulatory compliance. For the calendar year 2007, there were 172 person-trips that required dose monitoring of the U.S. monitors. Of the 172 person-trips, 160 person-trips were SMVs and 12 person-trips were Transparency Monitoring Office (TMO) trips. There were 12 monitoring visits by TMO monitors to facilities other than UEIE and 10 to UEIE itself. There were two monitoring visits (source changes) that were back to back with 14 monitors. LLNL's Hazard Control Division laboratories provided the dosimetry services for the HEU Transparency monitors.

  17. Structure-activity relationships and action mechanisms of collagen-like antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Ryo; Dazai, Yui; Mima, Takehiko; Koide, Takaki

    2017-01-01

    An antimicrobial triple-helical peptide, R3, was previously obtained from a collagen-like combinatorial peptide library. In this research, based on structure-activity relationship studies of R3, a more potent peptide, RR4, with increased positive net charge and charge density relative to R3, was developed. RR4 exhibited antimicrobial activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains, including multidrug-resistant strains. Its action could be attributed to entry into cells and interactions with intercellular molecules such as DNA/RNA that inhibited cell division rather than increasing bacterial membrane permeability. Furthermore, RR4 exhibited remarkable stability in serum and low cytotoxicity.

  18. NEN Division Funding Gap Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Esch, Ernst I.; Goettee, Jeffrey D.; Desimone, David J.; Lakis, Rollin E.; Miko, David K.

    2012-09-05

    The work in NEN Division revolves around proliferation detection. The sponsor funding model seems to have shifted over the last decades. For the past three lustra, sponsors are mainly interested in funding ideas and detection systems that are already at a technical readiness level 6 (TRL 6 -- one step below an industrial prototype) or higher. Once this level is reached, the sponsoring agency is willing to fund the commercialization, implementation, and training for the systems (TRL 8, 9). These sponsors are looking for a fast turnaround (1-2 years) technology development efforts to implement technology. To support the critical national and international needs for nonprolifertion solutions, we have to maintain a fluent stream of subject matter expertise from the fundamental principals of radiation detection through prototype development all the way to the implementation and training of others. NEN Division has large funding gaps in the Valley of Death region. In the current competitive climate for nuclear nonproliferation projects, it is imminent to increase our lead in this field.

  19. Structures Division 1994 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center Structures Division is an international leader and pioneer in developing new structural analysis, life prediction, and failure analysis related to rotating machinery and more specifically to hot section components in air-breathing aircraft engines and spacecraft propulsion systems. The research consists of both deterministic and probabilistic methodology. Studies include, but are not limited to, high-cycle and low-cycle fatigue as well as material creep. Studies of structural failure are at both the micro- and macrolevels. Nondestructive evaluation methods related to structural reliability are developed, applied, and evaluated. Materials from which structural components are made, studied, and tested are monolithics and metal-matrix, polymer-matrix, and ceramic-matrix composites. Aeroelastic models are developed and used to determine the cyclic loading and life of fan and turbine blades. Life models are developed and tested for bearings, seals, and other mechanical components, such as magnetic suspensions. Results of these studies are published in NASA technical papers and reference publication as well as in technical society journal articles. The results of the work of the Structures Division and the bibliography of its publications for calendar year 1994 are presented.

  20. National Lakes Assessment 2007 Results

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Lakes Assessment samples over 1,000 lakes, ponds and reservoirs across the country. Key findings from this assessment in 2007 include the biological condition and most widespread stressors of these waterbodies.

  1. Environmental Energy Technologies Division Newsletter, Fall 2007,Vol.4, No. 4)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allan

    2007-12-14

    This issue's special focus is on advanced lithium ionbatteries for hybrid electric vehicle applications. The four articlesaddressing this area explore the modeling of lithium ion batterychemistries; the use of advanced diagnostic methods to study the physicsand chemistry of battery materials; a laboratory for advanced batterytesting; and approaches for improving battery safety. EETD's research isfunded by the Department of Energy's BATT (Batteries for AdvancedTransportation Technologies) program, FreedomCar and Vehicle TechnologiesProgram.

  2. Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella isolated from Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra Linnaeus, 1758) in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Manuela; Pedroso, Nuno Miguel; Sales-Luís, Teresa; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Tavares, Luís; Vilela, Cristina Lobo

    2010-10-01

    Eurasian otters (Lutra lutra Linnaeus, 1758) are present in a wide range of aquatic environments. Salmonella isolates have been obtained from otters at rehabilitation centers and in the wild and are sometimes associated with serious illnesses. Antimicrobial-resistant Salmonella were isolated from otter fecal samples collected in March 2006, September 2007, and March 2008 in two river basins in southern Portugal. From 67 samples tested, five were positive for Salmonella (7.58%). None of the isolates were susceptible to all antimicrobials tested, and all were resistant to multiple antimicrobials. Our results confirm the role of otters as potential carriers of Salmonella and the importance of environmental exposure to antimicrobial agents in selection for resistance in bacteria.

  3. The research agenda of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases for antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Peters, N Kent; Dixon, Dennis M; Holland, Steven M; Fauci, Anthony S

    2008-04-15

    Antimicrobial resistance is an intrinsic and inevitable aspect of microbial survival that continually challenges human health. Research on antimicrobial resistance is central to the mission of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). In fiscal year 2007, NIAID invested more than USD800 million to support basic and translational research on antimicrobials, more than USD200 million of which is devoted to understanding the causes, consequences, and treatments of antimicrobial drug resistance. The complex process that facilitates the transformation of ideas into therapies requires a pipeline that runs from bench to bedside, and NIAID has leveraged the entire spectrum of conventional and biodefense resources. NIAID works in partnership with other federal agencies, industry, foundation partners, and foreign governments. The basic and clinical research supported by NIAID will, ideally, continue to yield profound rewards in terms of the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases.

  4. Plant antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Nawrot, Robert; Barylski, Jakub; Nowicki, Grzegorz; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Buchwald, Waldemar; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a component of barrier defense system of plants. They have been isolated from roots, seeds, flowers, stems, and leaves of a wide variety of species and have activities towards phytopathogens, as well as against bacteria pathogenic to humans. Thus, plant AMPs are considered as promising antibiotic compounds with important biotechnological applications. Plant AMPs are grouped into several families and share general features such as positive charge, the presence of disulfide bonds (which stabilize the structure), and the mechanism of action targeting outer membrane structures.

  5. Engineering Antimicrobials Refractory to Resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multi-drug resistant superbugs are a persistent problem in modern health care, demonstrating the need for a new class of antimicrobials that can address this concern. Triple-acting peptidoglycan hydrolase fusions are a novel class of antimicrobials which have qualities well suited to avoiding resis...

  6. Use of Antimicrobials during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Nicolle, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    The use of any drug during pregnancy is complicated by concerns of adverse effects, not only on the pregnant woman, but also on the fetus. This paper provides an overview of the use of antimicrobials in pregnancy, based on current knowledge of fetal development and on available documented experience. The author also discusses the use of specific antimicrobial agents during pregnancy. PMID:21263935

  7. Antimicrobial stewardship: philosophy versus practice.

    PubMed

    Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth S; Kaye, Keith S; DePestel, Daryl D; Hermsen, Elizabeth D

    2014-10-15

    To promote the judicious use of antimicrobials and preserve their usefulness in the setting of growing resistance, a number of policy-making bodies and professional societies have advocated the development of antimicrobial stewardship programs. Although these programs have been implemented at many institutions in the United States, their impact has been difficult to measure. Current recommendations advocate the use of both outcome and process measures as metrics for antimicrobial stewardship. Although patient outcome metrics have the greatest impact on the quality of care, the literature shows that antimicrobial use and costs are the indicators measured most frequently by institutions to justify the effectiveness of antimicrobial stewardship programs. The measurement of more meaningful outcomes has been constrained by difficulties inherent to these measures, lack of funding and resources, and inadequate study designs. Antimicrobial stewardship can be made more credible by refocusing the antimicrobial review process to target specific disease states, reassessing the usefulness of current metrics, and integrating antimicrobial stewardship program initiatives into institutional quality and safety efforts. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Absorbent silver (I) antimicrobial fabrics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In recent years, silver in form of silver ions, has been gaining importance in the wound management as an effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. Silver has a long history as an antimicrobial agent, especially in the treatment of wounds. Alginates and carboxymethyl (CM) cotton contain carboxyl...

  9. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  10. Change in antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum field isolates.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Al-Rashdan, Mohammad

    2011-06-02

    This study compares the antimicrobial susceptibility over time between two groups of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) isolates from the same geographical area. Minimum inhibitory concentration of 13 antimicrobials was determined against two groups of MG isolates from chickens. Group 1 strains (n=22) were isolated in 2004-2005 while group 2 strains (n=7) were isolated in 2007-2008. Minimum inhibitory concentration 50 for group 1 versus group 2 was 4/4, 0.5/0.5, ≤ 0.031/≥ 64, ≤ 0.031/2, ≤ 0.031/0.125, 1/0.5, 1/1, ≤ 0.031/≤ 0.031, ≤ 0.031/2, ≤ 0.031/2, 1/4, ≤ 0.031/0.062, and 0.062/2 μg/ml against gentamicin, spectinomycin, erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, florfenicol, thiamphenicol, tiamulin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline, respectively. There was a statistically significant increase in resistance of group 2 to erythromycin, tilmicosin, tylosin, ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, doxycycline, and oxytetracycline. This dramatic increase in resistance against 8 antimicrobials belonging to three different families of antimicrobials in a relatively short period of time appears to be rare and of concern. The cause of this increased resistance observed in group 2 of MG isolates was not determined and should be further investigated. Monitoring of MG field strain susceptibility is highly recommended to implement successful treatment and prophylaxis programs in endemic areas. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. How to fight antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Cédric; Brouqui, Philippe

    2007-03-01

    Antimicrobial misuse results in the development of resistance and superbugs. Over recent decades, resistance has been increasing despite continuing efforts to control it, resulting in increased mortality and cost. Many authorities have proposed local, regional and national guidelines to fight against this phenomenon, and the usefulness of these programmes has been evaluated. Multifaceted intervention seems to be the most efficient method to control antimicrobial resistance. Monitoring of bacterial resistance and antibiotic use is essential, and the methodology has now been homogenized. The implementation of guidelines and infection control measures does not control antimicrobial resistance and needs to be reinforced by associated measures. Educational programmes and rotation policies have not been evaluated sufficiently in the literature. Combination antimicrobial therapy is inefficient in controlling antimicrobial resistance.

  12. Antimicrobial dyes and mechanosensitive channels.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Ramiz A

    2013-08-01

    The search for new and effective antimicrobial agents has never been as important; however, since the discovery of antibiotics, exploring the antimicrobial activity of dyes has been forgotten. Antimicrobial dyes are an untapped resource and have the ability to potentially combat the spread of drug-resistant bacteria either alone or as antimicrobial adjuvants. The mechanosensitive ion channel of large conductance (MscL) is highly conserved and ubiquitous in bacterial species. There is evidence to suggest that at least one triphenylmethane dye acts through the highly conserved MscL channel and combining the two approaches of exploring the mechanism of action of other triphenylmethane dyes or antimicrobial dyes in general and the novel MscL target provides a new opportunity for further exploration.

  13. Chloroplast division checkpoint in eukaryotic algae

    PubMed Central

    Sumiya, Nobuko; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-ya

    2016-01-01

    Chloroplasts evolved from a cyanobacterial endosymbiont. It is believed that the synchronization of endosymbiotic and host cell division, as is commonly seen in existing algae, was a critical step in establishing the permanent organelle. Algal cells typically contain one or only a small number of chloroplasts that divide once per host cell cycle. This division is based partly on the S-phase–specific expression of nucleus-encoded proteins that constitute the chloroplast-division machinery. In this study, using the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, we show that cell-cycle progression is arrested at the prophase when chloroplast division is blocked before the formation of the chloroplast-division machinery by the overexpression of Filamenting temperature-sensitive (Fts) Z2-1 (Fts72-1), but the cell cycle progresses when chloroplast division is blocked during division-site constriction by the overexpression of either FtsZ2-1 or a dominant-negative form of dynamin-related protein 5B (DRP5B). In the cells arrested in the prophase, the increase in the cyclin B level and the migration of cyclin-dependent kinase B (CDKB) were blocked. These results suggest that chloroplast division restricts host cell-cycle progression so that the cell cycle progresses to the metaphase only when chloroplast division has commenced. Thus, chloroplast division and host cell-cycle progression are synchronized by an interactive restriction that takes place between the nucleus and the chloroplast. In addition, we observed a similar pattern of cell-cycle arrest upon the blockage of chloroplast division in the glaucophyte alga Cyanophora paradoxa, raising the possibility that the chloroplast division checkpoint contributed to the establishment of the permanent organelle. PMID:27837024

  14. Divisions Panel Discussion: Astronomy for Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govender, Kevin; Hemenway, Mary Kay; Wolter, Anna; Haghighipour, Nader; Yan, Yihua; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Silva, David; Guinan, Edward

    2016-10-01

    The main purpose of this panel discussion was to encourage conversation around potential collaborations between the IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) and IAU Divisions. The discussion was facilitated by the OAD and the conversation revolved mainly around two questions: (i) What should the OAD be doing to enhance the work of the Divisions? (ii) What could the Divisions (both members and respective scientific discipline in general) contribute towards the implementation of the IAU strategic plan?

  15. Major Programs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations, research networks, investigator-initiated grants, postdoctoral training, and specialized resources across the United States. |

  16. Imaging Asymmetric T Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Charnley, Mirren; Russell, Sarah M

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) controls cell fate decisions in model organisms such as Drosophila and C. elegans and has recently emerged as a mediator of T cell fate and hematopoiesis. The most appropriate methods for assessing ACD in T cells are still evolving. Here we describe the methods currently applied to monitor and measure ACD of developing and activated T cells. We provide an overview of approaches for capturing cells in the process of cytokinesis in vivo, ex vivo, or during in vitro culture. We provide methods for in vitro fixed immunofluorescent staining and for time-lapse analysis. We provide an overview of the different approaches for quantification of ACD of lymphocytes, discuss the pitfalls and concerns in interpretation of these analyses, and provide detailed methods for the quantification of ACD in our group.

  17. Physics division annual report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    This report highlights the research performed in 2005 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The mission of Nuclear Physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the matter that makes up stars, planets and human life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission and 2005 was a year of great progress. One of the most exciting developments is the initiation of the Californium Rare Ion Breeder Upgrade, CARIBU. By combining a Cf-252 fission source, the gas catcher technology developed for rare isotope beams, a high-resolution isobar separator, and charge breeding ECR technology, CARIBU will make hundreds of new neutron-rich isotope beams available for research. The cover illustration shows the anticipated intensities of low-energy beams that become available for low-energy experiments and for injection into ATLAS for reacceleration. CARIBU will be completed in early 2009 and provide us with considerable experience in many of the technologies developed for a future high intensity exotic beam facility. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the isomeric states in {sup 252}No that helps pin down the single particle structure expected for superheavy elements, and a new low-background measurement of {sup 16}N beta-decay to determine the {sup 12}C({alpha},{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction rate that is so important in astrophysical environments. Precise mass measurements shed new light on the unitarity of the quark weak-mixing matrix in the search for physics beyond the standard model. ATLAS operated for 4686 hours of research in FY2005 while achieving 95% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium-Energy Physics, radium isotopes were

  18. Factors associated with usage of antimicrobials in commercial mink (Neovison vison) production in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Jensen, V F; Sommer, H M; Struve, T; Clausen, J; Chriél, M

    2016-04-01

    The American mink (Neovison vison) is used for commercial fur production in Denmark. In recent years, antimicrobial prescription for Danish mink has been increasing. In this study, the patterns and trends in antimicrobial use in mink were described and a multi-variable variance analysis was carried out with the objective of identifying risk factors for antimicrobial use on herd level. The study was based on register data for 2007-2012. Information on antimicrobial use was obtained from the national database VetStat, monitoring all medicinal products used for animals on prescription level. Data on microbiological feed quality was obtained from the Voluntary Feed Control under the Mink producers Organization, and data on herd size and the relation between farm and feed producer was obtained from the registers at Kopenhagen Fur, based on yearly reporting from the mink producers. Descriptive analysis showed a clear significant effect of season on antimicrobial use, with a peak in "treatment proportions", TP (defined daily doses per kg biomass-days) in May, around the time of whelping, and a high level in the following months. In autumn, a minor peak in antimicrobial use occurred throughout the study period. From 2007 to 2011, a 102% increase in annual antimicrobial TP was noted; on herd level, the increase was associated with an increasing frequency of prescription, and a decrease in the amounts prescribed in months with prescription. A binomial model showed that on herd level, the annual number of months with antimicrobial prescription was significantly (p<0.01) affected by feed producer, veterinarian, disease (specific laboratory diagnosis) infection, herd size and year, with an interaction between feed producer and year. A log-normal model showed that in months with antimicrobial use, the TP on herd level was significantly (p<0.001) affected by year, month (season), feed producer, feed quality score, veterinarian, herd size and laboratory confirmed diagnosis of

  19. Division J Commission 28: Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, John S.; Davies, Roger L.; Courteau, Stéphane; Dekel, Avishai; Franx, Marijn; Jog, Chanda J.; Jogee, Sardha; Nakai, Naomasa; Rubio, Monica; Tacconi, Linda; Terlevich, Elena

    2016-04-01

    IAU Commission 28 (IAU C28: Galaxies) was founded in the late 1930s at which time it had only a small membership (see the historical notes by Sadler et al. 2007). When C28 ended its existence in 2015 there were well over 1000 members on its books. The membership had grown to the point where the effort to keep track of active participants had become a major task. During the C28s tenure 27 IAU Symposia have been devoted to galaxies, the third highest number (Mickaelian 2014)

  20. Antimicrobial mechanism of monocaprylate.

    PubMed

    Hyldgaard, Morten; Sutherland, Duncan S; Sundh, Maria; Mygind, Tina; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    2012-04-01

    Monoglyceride esters of fatty acids occur naturally and encompass a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Monocaprylate is generally regarded as safe (GRAS) and can function both as an emulsifier and as a preservative in food. However, knowledge about its mode of action is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to elucidate the mechanism behind monocaprylate's antimicrobial effect. The cause of cell death in Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii was investigated by examining monocaprylate's effect on cell structure, membrane integrity, and its interaction with model membranes. Changes in cell structure were visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and propidium iodide staining showed membrane disruption, indicating the membrane as a site of action. This indication was confirmed by measuring calcein leakage from membrane vesicles exposed to monocaprylate. AFM imaging of supported lipid bilayers visualized the integration of monocaprylate into the liquid disordered, and not the solid ordered, phase of the membrane. The integration of monocaprylate was confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance measurements, showing an abrupt increase in mass and hydration of the membrane after exposure to monocaprylate above a threshold concentration. We hypothesize that monocaprylate destabilizes membranes by increasing membrane fluidity and the number of phase boundary defects. The sensitivity of cells to monocaprylate will therefore depend on the lipid composition, fluidity, and curvature of the membrane.

  1. Antimicrobial resistance in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Conly, John

    2002-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has increased rapidly during the last decade, creating a serious threat to the treatment of infectious diseases. Canada is no exception to this worldwide phenomenon. Data from the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program have revealed that the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as a proportion of S. aureus isolates, increased from 1% in 1995 to 8% by the end of 2000, and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus has been documented in all 10 provinces since the first reported outbreak in 1995. The prevalence of nonsusceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae in Canada in 2000 was found to be 12%. Human antimicrobial prescriptions, adjusted for differences in the population, declined 11% based on the total number of prescriptions dispensed between 1995 and 2000. There was also a 21% decrease in β-lactam prescriptions during this same period. These data suggest that systematic efforts to reduce unnecessary prescribing of antimicrobials to outpatients in Canada, beginning after a national consensus conference in 1997, may be having an impact. There is, however, still a need for continued concerted efforts on a national, provincial and regional level to quell the rising tide of antibiotic resistance. PMID:12406948

  2. Antimicrobial Mechanism of Monocaprylate

    PubMed Central

    Hyldgaard, Morten; Sutherland, Duncan S.; Sundh, Maria; Mygind, Tina

    2012-01-01

    Monoglyceride esters of fatty acids occur naturally and encompass a broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity. Monocaprylate is generally regarded as safe (GRAS) and can function both as an emulsifier and as a preservative in food. However, knowledge about its mode of action is lacking. The aim of this study was therefore to elucidate the mechanism behind monocaprylate's antimicrobial effect. The cause of cell death in Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Zygosaccharomyces bailii was investigated by examining monocaprylate's effect on cell structure, membrane integrity, and its interaction with model membranes. Changes in cell structure were visible by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and propidium iodide staining showed membrane disruption, indicating the membrane as a site of action. This indication was confirmed by measuring calcein leakage from membrane vesicles exposed to monocaprylate. AFM imaging of supported lipid bilayers visualized the integration of monocaprylate into the liquid disordered, and not the solid ordered, phase of the membrane. The integration of monocaprylate was confirmed by quartz crystal microbalance measurements, showing an abrupt increase in mass and hydration of the membrane after exposure to monocaprylate above a threshold concentration. We hypothesize that monocaprylate destabilizes membranes by increasing membrane fluidity and the number of phase boundary defects. The sensitivity of cells to monocaprylate will therefore depend on the lipid composition, fluidity, and curvature of the membrane. PMID:22344642

  3. Comparison of antemortem antimicrobial treatment regimens to antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of postmortem lung isolates from feedlot cattle with bronchopneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lamm, Catherine G; Love, Brenda C; Krehbiel, Clint R; Johnson, Nicholas J; Step, Douglas L

    2012-03-01

    A retrospective study was performed to compare the treatment regimens in feedlot cattle that died with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) to the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the microorganisms isolated from lungs. Forty-three cattle submitted by the Willard Sparks Beef Research Center (WSBRC) to the Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory for postmortem examination during 2007 had bronchopneumonia (acute = 16, subacute = 5, or chronic = 22). Lungs from cattle were cultured aerobically (40 cattle) and for Mycoplasma spp. (34 cattle). Susceptibility panels were performed. At least 1 BRD pathogen (Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, Mycoplasma bovis, or Arcanobacterium pyogenes) was isolated from 39 cattle, and 77% (30/39) had multiple organisms recovered. Mycoplasmal infections were common (25/34) and a major component of mixed infections (24/25). The majority (60%) of the M. haemolytica, P. multocida, and H. somni isolates were resistant to tetracycline. Most of the H. somni isolates (67%) were susceptible to tilmicosin (Ti), enrofloxacin (En), ceftiofur (Ce), and florfenicol, despite extensive treatment with Ti, En, and Ce (75% of isolates were from cattle that received each antimicrobial once). Most of the M. haemolytica (65%) and P. multocida (79%) isolates were susceptible to En and Ce, despite antemortem treatment of cattle with these antimicrobials. Hence, the current study reports a discrepancy between the antemortem treatment of clinical BRD and the susceptibility patterns of the bacteria isolated from lungs postmortem. Based on these findings, factors other than antimicrobial resistance are playing a role in the death of feedlot cattle with BRD.

  4. 75 FR 45166 - Jeld-Wen, Inc., Hawkins Window Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers of Nicolet Staffing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Employment and Training Administration Jeld-Wen, Inc., Hawkins Window Division, Including On-Site Leased...- clad windows and patio doors did not contribute to worker group separations and that the subject firm... windows and patio doors during 2007, 2008, January through April 2008, and January through April 2009. The...

  5. Moral Reasoning of Division III and Division I Athletes: Is There a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoll, Sharon Kay; And Others

    This study sought to examine the potentially corrupting influences of media attention, money, and the accompanying stress on the moral reasoning of student athletes at both Division I and Division III National College Athletics Association (NCAA) schools. Subjects were 718 nonathletes and 277 randomly selected athletes at a Division I school and…

  6. Changes in the antibiotic susceptibility of anaerobic bacteria from 2007-2009 to 2010-2012 based on the CLSI methodology.

    PubMed

    Hastey, Christine J; Boyd, Halsey; Schuetz, Audrey N; Anderson, Karen; Citron, Diane M; Dzink-Fox, Jody; Hackel, Meredith; Hecht, David W; Jacobus, Nilda V; Jenkins, Stephen G; Karlsson, Maria; Knapp, Cynthia C; Koeth, Laura M; Wexler, Hannah; Roe-Carpenter, Darcie E

    2016-12-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of anaerobic isolates was conducted at four independent sites from 2010 to 2012 and compared to results from three sites during the period of 2007-2009. This data comparison shows significant changes in antimicrobial resistance in some anaerobic groups. Therefore, we continue to recommend institutions regularly perform susceptibility testing when anaerobes are cultured from pertinent sites. Annual generation of an institutional-specific antibiogram is recommended for tracking of resistance trends over time.

  7. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne continues to

  8. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P.; Belland, Robert J.; Cox, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments. PMID:27505160

  9. Research Networks Map | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations and research networks at more than 100 sites across the United States. Seven Major Programs' sites are shown on this map. | The Division of Cancer Prevention supports major scientific collaborations and research networks at more than 100 sites across the United States.

  10. The Division of Labor as Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freidson, Eliot

    1976-01-01

    Three different principles and ideologies by which the division of labor can be organized are sketched, along with their consequences for variation in structure and content. It is noted that the reality of the division of labor lies in the social interaction of its participants. (Author/AM)

  11. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders....

  12. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders....

  13. Polarized Cell Division of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Abdelrahman, Yasser; Ouellette, Scot P; Belland, Robert J; Cox, John V

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial cell division predominantly occurs by a highly conserved process, termed binary fission, that requires the bacterial homologue of tubulin, FtsZ. Other mechanisms of bacterial cell division that are independent of FtsZ are rare. Although the obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading bacterial cause of sexually transmitted infections and trachoma, lacks FtsZ, it has been assumed to divide by binary fission. We show here that Chlamydia divides by a polarized cell division process similar to the budding process of a subset of the Planctomycetes that also lack FtsZ. Prior to cell division, the major outer-membrane protein of Chlamydia is restricted to one pole of the cell, and the nascent daughter cell emerges from this pole by an asymmetric expansion of the membrane. Components of the chlamydial cell division machinery accumulate at the site of polar growth prior to the initiation of asymmetric membrane expansion and inhibitors that disrupt the polarity of C. trachomatis prevent cell division. The polarized cell division of C. trachomatis is the result of the unipolar growth and FtsZ-independent fission of this coccoid organism. This mechanism of cell division has not been documented in other human bacterial pathogens suggesting the potential for developing Chlamydia-specific therapeutic treatments.

  14. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division, 1991 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Ed.

    This report documents research and development performed under the sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research in fiscal year 1991. It provides abstracts (title, principal investigator, project code, objective, approach, progress, and related reports) of projects of three program divisions (cognitive…

  15. New Study Designs | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention is expanding clinical research beyond standard trial designs to find interventions that may play a role in more than one prevalent disease. | The Division of Cancer Prevention is expanding clinical research beyond standard trial designs to find interventions that may play a role in more than one prevalent disease.

  16. Teaching Cell Division: Basics and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mike U.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of cell division that includes only the essential concepts necessary for understanding genetics and evolution. Makes recommendations based on published research and teaching experiences that can be used to judge the merits of potential activities and materials for teaching cell division. Makes suggestions regarding the…

  17. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  18. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  19. Chloroplast division: a work of ARTEMIS.

    PubMed

    Osteryoung, Katherine W

    2002-12-23

    Chloroplasts contain three membrane systems that constrict together during division of the organelle. A newly identified protein, ARTEMIS, may shed light on the nuclear control of chloroplast division, and also on the mechanism of thylakoid membrane fission and how this is coordinated with fission of the two envelope membranes.

  20. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1990 Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Willard S., Jr., Ed.

    Research and development efforts carried out under sponsorship of the Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division of the Office of Naval Research during fiscal year 1990 are described in this compilation of project description summaries. The Division's research is organized in three types of programs: (1) Cognitive Science (the human learner--cognitive…

  1. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders. (a... approval, as pipeline companies are not permitted to accept or run oil from leased Indian lands until after... division order at any time or require the pipeline company to discontinue to run the oil of any lessee who...

  2. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders. (a... approval, as pipeline companies are not permitted to accept or run oil from leased Indian lands until after... division order at any time or require the pipeline company to discontinue to run the oil of any lessee who...

  3. Teaching Cell Division: Basics and Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Mike U.; Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a concise overview of cell division that includes only the essential concepts necessary for understanding genetics and evolution. Makes recommendations based on published research and teaching experiences that can be used to judge the merits of potential activities and materials for teaching cell division. Makes suggestions regarding the…

  4. 25 CFR 227.19 - Division orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Division orders. 227.19 Section 227.19 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Rents and Royalties § 227.19 Division orders. (a...

  5. Understanding Division of Fractions: An Alternative View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredua-Kwarteng, E.; Ahia, Francis

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer three alternatives to patterns or visualization used to justify division of fraction "algorithm" invert and multiply". The three main approaches are historical, similar denominators and algebraic, that teachers could use to justify the standard algorithm of division of fraction. The historical approach uses…

  6. Introduction to JPL's Mechanical Systems Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, Kendra

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Mechanical Systems Division. It reviews the projects, both past and current that the engineers of this division have worked on. It also reviews the work environment as an exciting place for the entry level engineer.

  7. On Durkheim's Explanation of Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rueschemeyer, Dietrich

    1982-01-01

    In De la Division du Travail Social, Durkheim's causal explanation for secular increases in the division of labor and the differentiation of social structure is flawed. His metatheoretical concerns expressed in the critique of utilitarian social theory flawed his contributions to a causal explanation of social differentiation. (Author/AM)

  8. The Changing Nature of Division III Athletics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, William

    2014-01-01

    Non-selective Division III institutions often face challenges in meeting their enrollment goals. To ensure their continued viability, these schools recruit large numbers of student athletes. As a result, when compared to FBS (Football Bowl Division) institutions these schools have a much higher percentage of student athletes on campus and a…

  9. "American Gothic" and the Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    Provides historical review of gender-based division of labor. Argues that gender-based division of labor served a purpose in survival of tribal communities but has lost meaning today and may be a handicap to full use of human talent and ability in the arts. There is nothing in various art forms which make them more appropriate for males or…

  10. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  11. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  12. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  13. Novel formulations for antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; de Melo Carrasco, Letícia Dias

    2014-10-09

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  14. Jim Milledge: Hypoxia Honoree 2007.

    PubMed

    Nickol, Annabel

    2007-01-01

    Jim Milledge is well known to the international "Hypoxia" community for his many contributions to many high altitude medical and scientific expeditions, including the recent Extreme Everest Expedition in the aspring of 2007! His role as a physician, scientist, teacher, mentor and fried is cherished by those who have had the pleasure of working with him, either at home in the U.K., or abroad during his many forays into thin air. In 2007 the International Hypoxia Symposium honored Jim for his outstanding service and role in leading the entire field of high altitude medicine and physiology.

  15. Antimicrobial peptides: therapeutic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su-Jin; Park, Sung Jean; Mishig-Ochir, Tsogbadrakh; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2014-12-01

    The increasing appearance of multidrug-resistant pathogens has created an urgent need for suitable alternatives to current antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), which act as defensive weapons against microbes, have received great attention because of broad-spectrum activities, unique action mechanisms and rare antibiotic-resistant variants. Despite desirable characteristics, they have shown limitations in pharmaceutical development due to toxicity, stability and manufacturing costs. Because of these drawbacks, only a few AMPs have been tested in Phase III clinical trials and no AMPs have been approved by the US FDA yet. However, these obstacles could be overcome by well-known methods such as changing physicochemical characteristics and introducing nonnatural amino acids, acetylation or amidation, as well as modern techniques like molecular targeted AMPs, liposomal formulations and drug delivery systems. Thus, the current challenge in this field is to develop therapeutic AMPs at a reasonable cost as well as to overcome the limitations.

  16. The physiology of bacterial cell division.

    PubMed

    Egan, Alexander J F; Vollmer, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial cell division is facilitated by the divisome, a dynamic multiprotein assembly localizing at mid-cell to synthesize the stress-bearing peptidoglycan and to constrict all cell envelope layers. Divisome assembly occurs in two steps and involves multiple interactions between more than 20 essential and accessory cell division proteins. Well before constriction and while the cell is still elongating, the tubulin-like FtsZ and early cell division proteins form a ring-like structure at mid-cell. Cell division starts once certain peptidoglycan enzymes and their activators have moved to the FtsZ-ring. Gram-negative bacteria like Escherichia coli simultaneously synthesize and cleave the septum peptidoglycan during division leading to a constriction. The outer membrane constricts together with the peptidoglycan layer with the help of the transenvelope spanning Tol-Pal system.

  17. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  18. Gravity and the orientation of cell division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, C. E.

    1997-01-01

    A novel culture system for mammalian cells was used to investigate division orientations in populations of Chinese hamster ovary cells and the influence of gravity on the positioning of division axes. The cells were tethered to adhesive sites, smaller in diameter than a newborn cell, distributed over a nonadhesive substrate positioned vertically. The cells grew and divided while attached to the sites, and the angles and directions of elongation during anaphase, projected in the vertical plane, were found to be random with respect to gravity. However, consecutive divisions of individual cells were generally along the same axis or at 90 degrees to the previous division, with equal probability. Thus, successive divisions were restricted to orthogonal planes, but the choice of plane appeared to be random, unlike the ordered sequence of cleavage orientations seen during early embryo development.

  19. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  20. [Antimicrobial prophylaxis in surgery].

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Nagao

    2004-02-01

    Antimicrobial prophylaxis is widely performed in any surgical procedures to prevent postoperative infections. However, we have neither double-blind placebo-controlled studies nor sufficient surveillance of postoperative infections that are common in Europe and the United States, and therefore there is little convincing scientific basis accounting for the validity of this therapy. In addition, prophylactic agent is still uncovered by medical insurance despite the persistent arguments as to its necessity. To establish the guidelines in our own country, a greater deal of evidence needs to be accumulated. Strategies for antimicrobial prophylaxis should be determined based on the types of possible postoperative infections and the classifications of operations according to contamination levels in individual operative fields. This process may involve the precise selection of prophylactic agents for suspected contaminating bacterial species in each operative organ and their administration regimens suitable for the individual surgery. Upon selection of prophylactic agents for postoperative infections, various conditions should be considered: e.g., susceptibility, resistance, blood concentrations, urinary excretion, transition into body fluid and tissues, and adverse reactions. The first and second generations of cephem and cephamycin derivatives can be the first choice, but the use of various other antibacterial agents may be necessary for resistant bacterial strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae (PRSP). Cyclic therapy based on penicillins (including mixtures), cephems (including cephamycins) and phosphomycins also seems useful for such resistant strains. At present, there is only limited evidence supporting the importance of prophylactic agents. Controlled trials employing well-designed protocols that endure scientific criticism must be done with due consideration for medical economics.

  1. Physics division annual report 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example of the

  2. 49 CFR 1242.03 - Made by accounting divisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Made by accounting divisions. 1242.03 Section 1242... accounting divisions. The separation shall be made by accounting divisions, where such divisions are maintained, and the aggregate of the accounting divisions reported for the quarter and for the year. ...

  3. 49 CFR 1242.03 - Made by accounting divisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Made by accounting divisions. 1242.03 Section 1242... accounting divisions. The separation shall be made by accounting divisions, where such divisions are maintained, and the aggregate of the accounting divisions reported for the quarter and for the year....

  4. ES Review: Selections from 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The second edition of the "ES Review" brings together, in one setting, abridged versions of research reports, outside articles and op-eds, book reviews, and other Education Sector publications. The 2007 edition features: (1) K-12 Accountability (Laboratories of Reform: Virtual High Schools and Innovation in Public Education (Bill…

  5. State Governance Action Report, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the State Governance Action Report for 2007. Compiled in this report are state policy developments, including legislation, commissions, and studies, affecting the structure, responsibilities, and operations of public higher education governing boards and institutionally related foundations. Governance and governance-related…

  6. 2007 Youth Policy Summit Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reid, Ellen; Fussell, Annemarie; Templin, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The NCSSSMST (National Consortium for Specialized Secondary Schools of Mathematics, Science and Technology) and Keystone Science School co-sponsored two Youth Policy Summits during the summer of 2007. Forty students represented 10 high schools from across the country at each Summit, meeting for a week in June and August at Keystone Science School…

  7. Monetary Policy after August 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertler, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author describes conceptually how to think about the dramatic changes in monetary policy since the sub-prime crisis of August 2007. He also discusses how to incorporate these changes and related economic concepts in the teaching of an undergraduate class in macroeconomics. A distinction is made between conventional and…

  8. Recruiting Trends, 2006-2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collegiate Employment Research Institute (NJ3), 2007

    2007-01-01

    College students who plan on entering the labor market can expect to see more job opportunities in the spring of 2007, according to information supplied by 864 companies and organizations to this year's Recruiting Trends Report. After two years of double digit growth, the expansion will slow to a modest 4% to 6%. Two opposing factors appear to be…

  9. State Governance Action Report, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the State Governance Action Report for 2007. Compiled in this report are state policy developments, including legislation, commissions, and studies, affecting the structure, responsibilities, and operations of public higher education governing boards and institutionally related foundations. Governance and governance-related…

  10. Il Bolide delle Geminidi (2007)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeri, D.

    2010-12-01

    On December 14th, 2007 at 22:24:18 ± 1 UT, a bright Geminid fireball illuminated part territory of Central Italy. In this report we show estimation of the mass and size, the atmospheric trajectory and the orbit of the meteoroid obtained by triangulation method. Our results are compared with orbital elements of Phaethon (3200) asteroid.

  11. Current Issues Survey Report, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, John S.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    The Eighth Annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey asked campus information technology leaders to rate the most critical IT challenges facing them, their campuses, and/or their systems. Four findings associated with all respondents to this year's survey merit special mention. First, for the 2007 survey, the CIC decided to split a key issue choice…

  12. 2007 coal preparation buyer's guide

    SciTech Connect

    2007-04-15

    The guide contains brief descriptions and contact details of 86 US companies supplying coal preparation equipment who exhibited at the 24th annual Coal Prep exhibition and conference, 30 April - 3 May 2007, in Lexington, KY, USA. An index of categories of equipment available from the manufacturers is included.

  13. ES Review: Selections from 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smiles, Robin, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    The second edition of the "ES Review" brings together, in one setting, abridged versions of research reports, outside articles and op-eds, book reviews, and other Education Sector publications. The 2007 edition features: (1) K-12 Accountability (Laboratories of Reform: Virtual High Schools and Innovation in Public Education (Bill…

  14. Monetary Policy after August 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gertler, Mark

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author describes conceptually how to think about the dramatic changes in monetary policy since the sub-prime crisis of August 2007. He also discusses how to incorporate these changes and related economic concepts in the teaching of an undergraduate class in macroeconomics. A distinction is made between conventional and…

  15. Current Issues Survey Report, 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, John S.; DeBlois, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    The Eighth Annual EDUCAUSE Current Issues Survey asked campus information technology leaders to rate the most critical IT challenges facing them, their campuses, and/or their systems. Four findings associated with all respondents to this year's survey merit special mention. First, for the 2007 survey, the CIC decided to split a key issue choice…

  16. Recruiting Trends, 2007-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collegiate Employment Research Institute (NJ3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the recruiting trends for 2007-2008. This year's report is based on 994 respondents, including 84 K-12 school districts. The researchers focused attention on growing companies, based on lists from Forbes and Inc. magazines, and as a result, they have more small and medium-size employers represented this year. The sample…

  17. Antimicrobial Pesticide Use Site Index

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Use Site Index provides guidance to assist applicants for antimicrobial pesticide registration by helping them identify the data requirements necessary to register a pesticide or support their product registrations.

  18. Antimicrobial seafood packaging: a review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suman; Ho Lee, Myung; Park, Lnsik; Shin, Yangjai; Lee, Youn Suk

    2016-06-01

    Microorganisms are the major cause of spoilage in most seafood products; however, only few microbes, called the specific spoilage organisms (SSOs), contribute to the offensive off-flavors associated with seafood spoilage. In food, microbial degradation manifests itself as spoilage, or changes in the sensory properties of a food product, rendering it unsuitable for human consumption. The use of antimicrobial substances can control the general microflora as well as specific microorganisms related to spoilage to provide products with higher safety and better quality. Many antimicrobial compounds have been evaluated in film structures for use in seafood, especially organic acids and their salts, enzymes, bacteriocins; some studies have considered inorganic compounds such as AgSiO2, zinc oxide, silver zeolite, and titanium oxide. The characteristics of some organic antimicrobial packaging systems for seafood and their antimicrobial efficiency in film structures are reviewed in this article.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Vorachit, M; Chongtrakool, P; Arkomsean, S; Boonsong, S

    2000-02-05

    Four strains of Burkholderia pseudomallei were used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and time-kill curves with 13 single antimicrobial agents: ceftazidime, piperacillin, imipenem, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, doxycycline, cotrimoxazole, kanamycin, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin, trovafloxacin, clarithromycin, azithromycin and meropenem. The time-kill studies were also performed with 33 pairs of combinations of the above antimicrobial agents: 15 combinations which would be expected to be used for acute therapy and 18 combinations for maintenance therapy. The results show that the single and combination antimicrobial agents with bactericidal effects against the four strains of B. pseudomallei which should be used for clinical trials in acute melioidosis are: imipenem, meropenem, and imipenem + azithromycin. The combination antimicrobial agents which should be further studied for the ability to eliminate biofilm and intracellular killing effect are ciprofloxacin + clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin + azithromycin, and imipenem + azithromycin.

  20. Automation of antimicrobial activity screening.

    PubMed

    Forry, Samuel P; Madonna, Megan C; López-Pérez, Daneli; Lin, Nancy J; Pasco, Madeleine D

    2016-03-01

    Manual and automated methods were compared for routine screening of compounds for antimicrobial activity. Automation generally accelerated assays and required less user intervention while producing comparable results. Automated protocols were validated for planktonic, biofilm, and agar cultures of the oral microbe Streptococcus mutans that is commonly associated with tooth decay. Toxicity assays for the known antimicrobial compound cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) were validated against planktonic, biofilm forming, and 24 h biofilm culture conditions, and several commonly reported toxicity/antimicrobial activity measures were evaluated: the 50 % inhibitory concentration (IC50), the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Using automated methods, three halide salts of cetylpyridinium (CPC, CPB, CPI) were rapidly screened with no detectable effect of the counter ion on antimicrobial activity.

  1. Antimicrobial peptides: properties and applicability.

    PubMed

    van 't Hof, W; Veerman, E C; Helmerhorst, E J; Amerongen, A V

    2001-04-01

    All organisms need protection against microorganisms, e. g. bacteria, viruses and fungi. For many years, attention has been focused on adaptive immunity as the main antimicrobial defense system. However, the adaptive immune system, with its network of humoral and cellular responses is only found in higher animals, while innate immunity is encountered in all living creatures. The turning point in the appreciation of the innate immunity was the discovery of antimicrobial peptides in the early eighties. In general these peptides act by disrupting the structural integrity of the microbial membranes. It has become clear that membrane-active peptides and proteins play a crucial role in both the innate and the adaptive immune system as antimicrobial agents. This review is focused on the functional and structural features of the naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, and discusses their potential as therapeutics.

  2. Antimicrobial Peptides Targeting Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Malanovic, Nermina; Lohner, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have remarkably different structures as well as biological activity profiles, whereupon most of these peptides are supposed to kill bacteria via membrane damage. In order to understand their molecular mechanism and target cell specificity for Gram-positive bacteria, it is essential to consider the architecture of their cell envelopes. Before AMPs can interact with the cytoplasmic membrane of Gram-positive bacteria, they have to traverse the cell wall composed of wall- and lipoteichoic acids and peptidoglycan. While interaction of AMPs with peptidoglycan might rather facilitate penetration, interaction with anionic teichoic acids may act as either a trap for AMPs or a ladder for a route to the cytoplasmic membrane. Interaction with the cytoplasmic membrane frequently leads to lipid segregation affecting membrane domain organization, which affects membrane permeability, inhibits cell division processes or leads to delocalization of essential peripheral membrane proteins. Further, precursors of cell wall components, especially the highly conserved lipid II, are directly targeted by AMPs. Thereby, the peptides do not inhibit peptidoglycan synthesis via binding to proteins like common antibiotics, but form a complex with the precursor molecule, which in addition can promote pore formation and membrane disruption. Thus, the multifaceted mode of actions will make AMPs superior to antibiotics that act only on one specific target. PMID:27657092

  3. [Antimicrobial resistance in developing countries].

    PubMed

    Blomberg, Bjørn

    2008-11-06

    While bacterial infections are one of the most important causes of disease and death in developing countries, the prevalence and consequences of antimicrobial resistance are not well known. This is a review article based on literature retrieved from a non-systematic review and own experience from research on the topic. Research on antimicrobial resistance is increasing in developing countries, but most of the data are obtained from referral hospitals in capitals and major cities. Multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria, including ESBL-(extended-spectrum beta-lactamase) producing bacteria have been documented in several countries and are associated with increased lethality. The most serious resistance problems in developing countries are associated with Gram-negative bacteria and tuberculosis and may result in increased risk of death. Developing countries have a much higher overall burden of infectious diseases than the rich western countries and also poor access to newer antibiotics, which can be lifesaving when treating infections caused by resistant bacteria. To combat overuse and misuse of antibiotics, the diagnosis of infectious diseases must be strengthened and antimicrobial resistance must be emphasized in education of health professionals and the general public. There is a need for improved surveillance of antimicrobial resistance and strengthened quality control of antimicrobial drugs. In the long-term perspective, poverty reduction, improved living conditions and hygiene, safe water supplies and access to quality health care (including vaccination and HIV care), may contribute to prevent emerging antimicrobial resistance.

  4. Alaska climate divisions based on objective methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeloff, H.; Bieniek, P. A.; Bhatt, U. S.; Thoman, R.; Walsh, J. E.; Daly, C.; Shulski, M.

    2010-12-01

    Alaska is vast geographically, is located at high latitudes, is surrounded on three sides by oceans and has complex topography, encompassing several climate regions. While climate zones exist, there has not been an objective analysis to identify regions of homogeneous climate. In this study we use cluster analysis on a robust set of weather observation stations in Alaska to develop climate divisions for the state. Similar procedures have been employed in the contiguous United States and other parts of the world. Our analysis, based on temperature and precipitation, yielded a set of 10 preliminary climate divisions. These divisions include an eastern and western Arctic (bounded by the Brooks Range to the south), a west coast region along the Bering Sea, and eastern and western Interior regions (bounded to the south by the Alaska Range). South of the Alaska Range there were the following divisions: an area around Cook Inlet (also including Valdez), coastal and inland areas along Bristol Bay including Kodiak and Lake Iliamna, the Aleutians, and Southeast Alaska. To validate the climate divisions based on relatively sparse station data, additional sensitivity analysis was performed. Additional clustering analysis utilizing the gridded North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) was also conducted. In addition, the divisions were evaluated using correlation analysis. These sensitivity tests support the climate divisions based on cluster analysis.

  5. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides (Division...

  6. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides (Division...

  7. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides (Division...

  8. 2007 Microbial Population Biology (July 22-26, 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony M. Dean Nancy Ryan Gray

    2008-04-01

    Microbial Population Biology covers a diverse range of cutting edge issues in the microbial sciences and beyond. Firmly founded in evolutionary biology and with a strongly integrative approach, past meetings have covered topics ranging from the dynamics and genetics of adaptation to the evolution of mutation rate, community ecology, evolutionary genomics, altruism, and epidemiology. This meeting is never dull: some of the most significant and contentious issues in biology have been thrashed out here. We anticipate the 2007 meeting being no exception. The final form of the 2007 meeting is yet to be decided, but the following topics are likely to be included: evolutionary emergence of infectious disease and antibiotic resistance, genetic architecture and implications for the evolution of microbial populations, ageing in bacteria, biogeography, evolution of symbioses, the role of microbes in ecosystem function, and ecological genomics.

  9. Evolution of in vitro antimicrobial resistance in an equine hospital over 3 decades

    PubMed Central

    Malo, Annie; Cluzel, Caroline; Labrecque, Olivia; Beauchamp, Guy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Leclere, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    This study identified antimicrobial resistance patterns of commonly isolated bacteria at the Equine Hospital of the Université de Montréal between 2007 and 2013, and compared the results with the resistance patterns observed in tests performed in previous decades in the same hospital. A total of 396 antimicrobial susceptibility tests were analyzed by the Kirby-Bauer method during the period 2007 to 2013 and compared to 233 and 255 tests completed in 1986 to 1988 and 1996 to 1998, respectively. The most common bacteria were Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) and Escherichia coli. Except for resistance of coagulase-positive staphylococci to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, there was no overall increase in resistance observed between 1986 to 1988 and 2007 to 2013 for antimicrobials reported for all 3 periods. However, between 1996 to 1998 and 2007 to 2013, there was an increase in in vitro resistance to enrofloxacin for E. coli and Enterobacter spp., and to ceftiofur for Enterobacter spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci. No increase in resistance was observed for S. zooepidemicus and no isolate was resistant to penicillin. PMID:27429463

  10. Evolution of in vitro antimicrobial resistance in an equine hospital over 3 decades.

    PubMed

    Malo, Annie; Cluzel, Caroline; Labrecque, Olivia; Beauchamp, Guy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Leclere, Mathilde

    2016-07-01

    This study identified antimicrobial resistance patterns of commonly isolated bacteria at the Equine Hospital of the Université de Montréal between 2007 and 2013, and compared the results with the resistance patterns observed in tests performed in previous decades in the same hospital. A total of 396 antimicrobial susceptibility tests were analyzed by the Kirby-Bauer method during the period 2007 to 2013 and compared to 233 and 255 tests completed in 1986 to 1988 and 1996 to 1998, respectively. The most common bacteria were Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) and Escherichia coli. Except for resistance of coagulase-positive staphylococci to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, there was no overall increase in resistance observed between 1986 to 1988 and 2007 to 2013 for antimicrobials reported for all 3 periods. However, between 1996 to 1998 and 2007 to 2013, there was an increase in in vitro resistance to enrofloxacin for E. coli and Enterobacter spp., and to ceftiofur for Enterobacter spp. and coagulase-positive staphylococci. No increase in resistance was observed for S. zooepidemicus and no isolate was resistant to penicillin.

  11. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  12. History of the Fluids Engineering Division

    DOE PAGES

    Cooper, Paul; Martin, C. Samuel; O'Hern, Timothy J.

    2016-08-03

    The 90th Anniversary of the Fluids Engineering Division (FED) of ASME will be celebrated on July 10–14, 2016 in Washington, DC. The venue is ASME's Summer Heat Transfer Conference (SHTC), Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting (FEDSM), and International Conference on Nanochannels and Microchannels (ICNMM). The occasion is an opportune time to celebrate and reflect on the origin of FED and its predecessor—the Hydraulic Division (HYD), which existed from 1926–1963. Furthermore, the FED Executive Committee decided that it would be appropriate to publish concurrently a history of the HYD/FED.

  13. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, A.L.; Schwartz, L.L.

    1980-04-30

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1979 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract iself is given only under the name of the first author or the first Earth Sciences Division author. A topical index at the end of the report provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division.

  14. Biology and Medicine Division: Annual report 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The Biology and Medicine Division continues to make important contributions in scientific areas in which it has a long-established leadership role. For 50 years the Division has pioneered in the application of radioisotopes and charged particles to biology and medicine. There is a growing emphasis on cellular and molecular applications in the work of all the Division's research groups. The powerful tools of genetic engineering, the use of recombinant products, the analytical application of DNA probes, and the use of restriction fragment length polymorphic DNA are described and proposed for increasing use in the future.

  15. Asymmetric stem cell division: lessons from Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wu, Pao-Shu; Egger, Boris; Brand, Andrea H

    2008-06-01

    Asymmetric cell division is an important and conserved strategy in the generation of cellular diversity during animal development. Many of our insights into the underlying mechanisms of asymmetric cell division have been gained from Drosophila, including the establishment of polarity, orientation of mitotic spindles and segregation of cell fate determinants. Recent studies are also beginning to reveal the connection between the misregulation of asymmetric cell division and cancer. What we are learning from Drosophila as a model system has implication both for stem cell biology and also cancer research.

  16. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1990 Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    f D-/a33 773 ! COGNITIVE AND NEURAL SCIENCES -DIVISION 1990 PROGRAMS P .. i I’ • . M,’AR ’ OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH 800 NORTH QUINCY STREET ARLINGTON... Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1990 Programs PE 61153N * 6. AUTHOR(S)I Edited by W-illard S. Vaughan 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...NOTES This is a compilation of abstracts representing R&D sponsured by the ONR Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division. 12a. DISTRIBUTION AVAILABILITY

  17. History of the Fluids Engineering Division

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Paul; Martin, C. Samuel; O'Hern, Timothy J.

    2016-08-03

    The 90th Anniversary of the Fluids Engineering Division (FED) of ASME will be celebrated on July 10–14, 2016 in Washington, DC. The venue is ASME's Summer Heat Transfer Conference (SHTC), Fluids Engineering Division Summer Meeting (FEDSM), and International Conference on Nanochannels and Microchannels (ICNMM). The occasion is an opportune time to celebrate and reflect on the origin of FED and its predecessor—the Hydraulic Division (HYD), which existed from 1926–1963. Furthermore, the FED Executive Committee decided that it would be appropriate to publish concurrently a history of the HYD/FED.

  18. Overview of the Applied Aerodynamics Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A major reorganization of the Aeronautics Directorate of the Langley Research Center occurred in early 1989. As a result of this reorganization, the scope of research in the Applied Aeronautics Division is now quite different than that in the past. An overview of the current organization, mission, and facilities of this division is presented. A summary of current research programs and sample highlights of recent research are also presented. This is intended to provide a general view of the scope and capabilities of the division.

  19. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  20. 6. Contextual view of Fairbanks Company, looking south along Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Contextual view of Fairbanks Company, looking south along Division Street, showing relationship of factory to surrounding area, 213, 215, & 217 Division Street appear on right side of street - Fairbanks Company, 202 Division Street, Rome, Floyd County, GA

  1. 3. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking southeast, showing rear (west) facade and north side, Fairbanks Company appears at left and 215 Division Street is visible at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  2. 2. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Oblique view of 215 Division Street, looking northeast, showing rear (west) facade and south side, 217 Division Street is visible at left and Fairbanks Company appears at right - 215 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  3. 3. Oblique view of 213 Division Street, looking northeast, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Oblique view of 213 Division Street, looking northeast, showing rear (west) facade and south side, 215 Division Street is visible at left and Fairbanks Company appears at right - 213 Division Street (House), Rome, Floyd County, GA

  4. 2. JL photographer, summer 1978. View from south of Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. JL photographer, summer 1978. View from south of Division Avenue Punting and Filtration plant. - Division Avenue Pumping Station & Filtration Plant, West 45th Street and Division Avenue, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, OH

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus intermedius isolates from clinical cases of canine pyoderma in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Blunt, Catherine A; van Vuuren, Moritz; Picard, Jacqueline

    2013-05-16

    Successful treatment of canine pyoderma has become compromised owing to the development of antimicrobial resistance with accompanying recurrence of infection. Canine skin samples submitted to a veterinary diagnostic laboratory for microbiological culture and sensitivity between January 2007 and June 2010, from which Staphylococcus intermedius was isolated, were selected for this investigation. Antimicrobial resistance of S. intermedius was most prevalent with reference to ampicillin followed by resistance to tetracycline and then potentiated sulphonamides. In general, antimicrobial resistance was low and very few methicillin-resistant isolates were detected. Temporal trends were not noted, except for ampicillin, with isolates becoming more susceptible, and potentiated sulphonamides (co-trimoxazole), with isolates becoming more resistant. In general, both the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration tests yielded similar results for the antimicrobial agents tested. The main difference was evident in the over-estimation of resistance by the Kirby-Bauer test for ampicillin, co-trimoxazole, penicillin and doxycycline. Knowledge of trends in bacterial resistance is important for veterinarians when presented with canine pyoderma. Analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of S. intermedius isolated from canine pyodermas will guide veterinarians' use of the most appropriate agent and encourage prudent use of antimicrobials in companion animals.

  6. Antimicrobial activity of flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Cushnie, T P Tim; Lamb, Andrew J

    2005-11-01

    Flavonoids are ubiquitous in photosynthesising cells and are commonly found in fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, stems, flowers, tea, wine, propolis and honey. For centuries, preparations containing these compounds as the principal physiologically active constituents have been used to treat human diseases. Increasingly, this class of natural products is becoming the subject of anti-infective research, and many groups have isolated and identified the structures of flavonoids possessing antifungal, antiviral and antibacterial activity. Moreover, several groups have demonstrated synergy between active flavonoids as well as between flavonoids and existing chemotherapeutics. Reports of activity in the field of antibacterial flavonoid research are widely conflicting, probably owing to inter- and intra-assay variation in susceptibility testing. However, several high-quality investigations have examined the relationship between flavonoid structure and antibacterial activity and these are in close agreement. In addition, numerous research groups have sought to elucidate the antibacterial mechanisms of action of selected flavonoids. The activity of quercetin, for example, has been at least partially attributed to inhibition of DNA gyrase. It has also been proposed that sophoraflavone G and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate inhibit cytoplasmic membrane function, and that licochalcones A and C inhibit energy metabolism. Other flavonoids whose mechanisms of action have been investigated include robinetin, myricetin, apigenin, rutin, galangin, 2,4,2'-trihydroxy-5'-methylchalcone and lonchocarpol A. These compounds represent novel leads, and future studies may allow the development of a pharmacologically acceptable antimicrobial agent or class of agents.

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tam, James P.; Wang, Shujing; Wong, Ka H.; Tan, Wei Liang

    2015-01-01

    Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic), lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms. PMID:26580629

  8. Peptides and Peptidomimetics for Antimicrobial Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Jenssen, Håvard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce and highlight a few classes of traditional antimicrobial peptides with a focus on structure-activity relationship studies. After first dissecting the important physiochemical properties that influence the antimicrobial and toxic properties of antimicrobial peptides, the contributions of individual amino acids with respect to the peptides antibacterial properties are presented. A brief discussion of the mechanisms of action of different antimicrobials as well as the development of bacterial resistance towards antimicrobial peptides follows. Finally, current efforts on novel design strategies and peptidomimetics are introduced to illustrate the importance of antimicrobial peptide research in the development of future antibiotics. PMID:26184232

  9. Editorial of the Special Issue Antimicrobial Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Piozzi, Antonella; Francolini, Iolanda

    2013-01-01

    The special issue “Antimicrobial Polymers” includes research and review papers concerning the recent advances on preparation of antimicrobial polymers and their relevance to industrial settings and biomedical field. Antimicrobial polymers have recently emerged as promising candidates to fight microbial contamination onto surfaces thanks to their interesting properties. In this special issue, the main strategies pursued for developing antimicrobial polymers, including polymer impregnation with antimicrobial agents or synthesis of polymers bearing antimicrobial moieties, were discussed. The future application of these polymers either in industrial or healthcare settings could result in an extremely positive impact not only at the economic level but also for the improvement of quality of life. PMID:24005863

  10. Antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from horses: Epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Maddox, T W; Clegg, P D; Williams, N J; Pinchbeck, G L

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance poses a significant threat to the continued successful use of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of bacterial infections. While the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from man has been studied extensively, less work has been undertaken in companion animals, particularly horses. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been identified as a cause of infections, with a low prevalence of nasal carriage by horses in the community but higher for hospitalised horses. Molecular characterisation has shown methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains either to be predominantly of types associated with horses or of sequence type ST398. Antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli (including multidrug-resistant and extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing isolates) have caused infections and been documented in faecal carriage by horses, with many significant resistance mechanisms identified. More sporadic reports and molecular characterisation exist for resistance in other bacteria such as enterococci, Salmonella, Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas species. Limited work has been undertaken evaluating risk factors and much of the epidemiology of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from horses remains to be determined.

  11. Antimicrobial anxiety: the impact of stress on antimicrobial immunity

    PubMed Central

    Radek, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Leukocytes and epithelial cells are fundamental to antimicrobial immunity. Their antimicrobial responses are an evolutionarily conserved component of the innate immune system and are influenced by the host’s response to external stimuli. The efficacy of host defense via antimicrobial responses derives from the ability of AMPs to rapidly identify and eradicate foreign microbes and activate proinflammatory pathways, and from the capacity of later innate and adaptive immune responses to amplify protection through distinct biochemical mechanisms. Recent advances in neuroimmunology have identified a direct link between the neuroendocrine and immune systems, where environmental stimuli are generally believed to promote a transient effect on the immune system in response to environmental challenges and are presumably brought back to baseline levels via neuroendocrine pathways. Stress is an environmental stimulus that flares from a variety of circumstances and has become engrained in human society. Small bouts of stress are believed to enhance the host’s immune response; however, prolonged periods of stress can be detrimental through excess production of neuroendocrine-derived mediators that dampen immune responses to invasive pathogens. Elucidation of the mechanisms behind stress-induced immune modulation of antimicrobial responses will ultimately lead to the development of more effective therapeutic interventions for pathologic conditions. It is the intent of this review to broaden the existing paradigm of how stress-related molecules dampen immune responses through suppression of antimicrobial mechanisms, and to emphasize that bacteria can use these factors to enhance microbial pathogenesis during stress. PMID:20442225

  12. 2007 TOXICOLOGY AND RISK ASSESSMENT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has announced The 2007 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference Cincinnati Marriott North, West Chester (Cincinnati), OHApril 23- 26, 2007 - Click to register!The Annual Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference is a unique meeting where several Government Agencies come together to discuss toxicology and risk assessment issues that are not only of concern to the government, but also to a broader audience including academia and industry. The theme of this year's conference is Emerging Issues and Challenges in Risk Assessment and the preliminary agenda includes: Plenary Sessions and prominent speakers (tentative) include: Issues of Emerging Chemical ContaminantsUncertainty and Variability in Risk Assessment Use of Mechanistic data in IARC evaluationsParallel Sessions:Uncertainty and Variability in Dose-Response Assessment Recent Advances in Toxicity and Risk Assessment of RDX The Use of Epidemiologic Data for Risk Assessment Applications Cumulative Health Risk Assessment:

  13. 2007 TOXICOLOGY AND RISK ASSESSMENT ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA has announced The 2007 Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference Cincinnati Marriott North, West Chester (Cincinnati), OHApril 23- 26, 2007 - Click to register!The Annual Toxicology and Risk Assessment Conference is a unique meeting where several Government Agencies come together to discuss toxicology and risk assessment issues that are not only of concern to the government, but also to a broader audience including academia and industry. The theme of this year's conference is Emerging Issues and Challenges in Risk Assessment and the preliminary agenda includes: Plenary Sessions and prominent speakers (tentative) include: Issues of Emerging Chemical ContaminantsUncertainty and Variability in Risk Assessment Use of Mechanistic data in IARC evaluationsParallel Sessions:Uncertainty and Variability in Dose-Response Assessment Recent Advances in Toxicity and Risk Assessment of RDX The Use of Epidemiologic Data for Risk Assessment Applications Cumulative Health Risk Assessment:

  14. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  15. Nanoengineering: Super symmetry in cell division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kerwyn Casey

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial cells can be sculpted into different shapes using nanofabricated chambers and then used to explore the spatial adaptation of protein oscillations that play an important role in cell division.

  16. About DCP | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) is the primary unit of the National Cancer Institute devoted to cancer prevention research. DCP provides funding and administrative support to clinical and laboratory researchers, community and multidisciplinary teams, and collaborative scientific networks. |

  17. [Diagnosticum of abnormalities of plant meiotic division].

    PubMed

    Shamina, N V

    2006-01-01

    Abnormalities of plant meiotic division leading to abnormal meiotic products are summarized schematically in the paper. Causes of formation of monads, abnormal diads, triads, pentads, polyads, etc. have been observed in meiosis with both successive and simultaneous cytokinesis.

  18. WESTERN ECOLOGY DIVISION - GENERAL INFORMATION SHEET

    EPA Science Inventory

    abstract for flyer - general information The Western Ecology Division (WED), part of EPAs National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, provides information to EPA offices and regions nationwide to improve understanding of how human activities affect estuarine,...

  19. Synthetic Division, Taylor Polynomials, Partial Fractions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Howard B.

    1989-01-01

    Reviews the underpinnings of synthetic division. Shows how to quickly obtain the coefficients of the Taylor expansion of a polynomial about a point, and a partial fraction decomposition of a polynomial. (MVL)

  20. 2007 Chemical Biological Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-11

    Keynote – Mr. Jean Reed, Special Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Chemical and Biological Defense Programs 9:45AM – 10:30AM BREAK (Exhibit Area...a-SiO2 are important adsorbents – many other materials are based on a silicate or aluminosilicate chemical composition 2. Pinto and Elliott, Phys...2007 Tom Harris, C. Dougherty, J. Sontowski, SAIC (harrist@saic.com) Jacques Moussafir, Julien Commanay, ARIA Technologies (jmoussafir@aria.fr

  1. Virginia’s forests, 2007

    Treesearch

    Anita K. Rose

    2009-01-01

    Between 2002 and 2007, the Forest Service’s Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program conducted the eighth inventory of the forests of Virginia. About 15.7 million acres, or 62 percent, of Virginia was forested. The majority (12.4 million acres) of Virginia’s forest land was in nonindustrial private forest ownership. Public ownership and forest industry ranked second...

  2. Photojournal Home Page Graphic 2007

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image is an unannotated version of the Photojournal Home Page graphic released in October 2007. This digital collage contains a highly stylized rendition of our solar system and points beyond. As this graphic was intended to be used as a navigation aid in searching for data within the Photojournal, certain artistic embellishments have been added (color, location, etc.). Several data sets from various planetary and astronomy missions were combined to create this image.

  3. Public health response to a rabid kitten--four states, 2007.

    PubMed

    2008-01-04

    On July 24, 2007, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) was notified by the North Carolina Division of Public Health (NCDPH) of a stray, rabid kitten that had been handled by players on several girls' softball teams during a tournament in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. This report summarizes the public health response to exposure to the rabid kitten and highlights the importance of multistate collaboration in a rabid animal investigation.

  4. 3. Perspective view of Express Building looking northeast, with Division ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Perspective view of Express Building looking northeast, with Division Street in foreground - American Railway Express Company Freight Building, 1060 Northeast Division Street, Bend, Deschutes County, OR

  5. Contacts in the Office of Pesticide Programs, Registration Division

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Registration Division (RD) is responsible product registrations, amendments, registrations, tolerances, experimental use permits, and emergency exemptions for conventional chemical pesticides. Find contacts in this division.

  6. Plastid Division: Evolution, Mechanism and Complexity

    PubMed Central

    Maple, Jodi; Møller, Simon Geir

    2007-01-01

    Background The continuity of chloroplasts is maintained by division of pre-existing chloroplasts. Chloroplasts originated as bacterial endosymbionts; however, the majority of bacterial division factors are absent from chloroplasts and the eukaryotic host has added several new components. For example, the ftsZ gene has been duplicated and modified, and the Min system has retained MinE and MinD but lost MinC, acquiring at least one new component ARC3. Further, the mechanism has evolved to include two members of the dynamin protein family, ARC5 and FZL, and plastid-dividing (PD) rings were most probably added by the eukaryotic host. Scope Deciphering how the division of plastids is coordinated and controlled by nuclear-encoded factors is key to our understanding of this important biological process. Through a number of molecular-genetic and biochemical approaches, it is evident that FtsZ initiates plastid division where the coordinated action of MinD and MinE ensures correct FtsZ (Z)-ring placement. Although the classical FtsZ antagonist MinC does not exist in plants, ARC3 may fulfil this role. Together with other prokaryotic-derived proteins such as ARC6 and GC1 and key eukaryotic-derived proteins such as ARC5 and FZL, these proteins make up a sophisticated division machinery. The regulation of plastid division in a cellular context is largely unknown; however, recent microarray data shed light on this. Here the current understanding of the mechanism of chloroplast division in higher plants is reviewed with an emphasis on how recent findings are beginning to shape our understanding of the function and evolution of the components. Conclusions Extrapolation from the mechanism of bacterial cell division provides valuable clues as to how the chloroplast division process is achieved in plant cells. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that the highly regulated mechanism of plastid division within the host cell has led to the evolution of features unique to the

  7. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  8. NRL Radar Division C++ Coding Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-05

    when writing C++ code. It is primarily addressed to all those involved in the production of C++ code for Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) Radar Division... writing C++ code for NRL Radar Division applications. The ISO 9000 and the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) state that coding standards are...Naming This section contains a set of conventions on how to choose, write , and administer the names for all entities over which the programmer has

  9. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  10. Weapons Experiments Division Explosives Operations Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Laintz, Kenneth E.

    2012-06-19

    Presentation covers WX Division programmatic operations with a focus on JOWOG-9 interests. A brief look at DARHT is followed by a high level overview of explosives research activities currently being conducted within in the experimental groups of WX-Division. Presentation covers more emphasis of activities and facilities at TA-9 as these efforts have been more traditionally aligned with ongoing collaborative explosive exchanges covered under JOWOG-9.

  11. Peroxisome division and proliferation in plants.

    PubMed

    Aung, Kyaw; Zhang, Xinchun; Hu, Jianping

    2010-06-01

    Peroxisomes are eukaryotic organelles with crucial functions in development. Plant peroxisomes participate in various metabolic processes, some of which are co-operated by peroxisomes and other organelles, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts. Defining the complete picture of how these essential organelles divide and proliferate will be instrumental in understanding how the dynamics of peroxisome abundance contribute to changes in plant physiology and development. Research in Arabidopsis thaliana has identified several evolutionarily conserved major components of the peroxisome division machinery, including five isoforms of PEROXIN11 proteins (PEX11), two dynamin-related proteins (DRP3A and DRP3B) and two FISSION1 proteins (FIS1A/BIGYIN and FIS1B). Recent studies in our laboratory have also begun to uncover plant-specific factors. DRP5B is a dual-localized protein that is involved in the division of both chloroplasts and peroxisomes, representing an invention of the plant/algal lineage in organelle division. In addition, PMD1 (peroxisomal and mitochondrial division 1) is a plant-specific protein tail anchored to the outer surface of peroxisomes and mitochondria, mediating the division and/or positioning of these organelles. Lastly, light induces peroxisome proliferation in dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings, at least in part, through activating the PEX11b gene. The far-red light receptor phyA (phytochrome A) and the transcription factor HYH (HY5 homologue) are key components in this signalling pathway. In summary, pathways for the division and proliferation of plant peroxisomes are composed of conserved and plant-specific factors. The sharing of division proteins by peroxisomes, mitochondria and chloroplasts is also suggesting possible co-ordination in the division of these metabolically associated plant organelles.

  12. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Henry, A.L.; Hornady, B.F.

    1981-10-15

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author.

  13. Network evaluation for F-Division

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, J.K.; Carr, R.B.; Lee, F.D.

    1986-05-16

    This report contains an evaluation of the computer and computer network needs of F-Division. The main intent is to identify ways in which all computational aspects of F-Division might interact more effectively. This includes the physics, engineering, and clerical staffs. Consideration is given to usage of the Octopus computer system, computer control of experiments, data analysis, computer aided design (CAD) and word processing issues.

  14. The fencing problem and Coleochaete cell division.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuandi; Dou, Mingya; Zhou, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    The findings in this study suggest that the solution of a boundary value problem for differential equation system can be used to discuss the fencing problem in mathematics and Coleochaete, a green algae, cell division. This differential equation model in parametric expression is used to simulate the two kinds of cell division process, one is for the usual case and the case with a "dead" daughter cell.

  15. Division II: Commission 10: Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Scrijver, Karel J.; Klimchuk, James A.; Charbonneau, Paul; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Hasan, S. Sirajul; Hudson, Hugh S.; Kusano, Kanya; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Peter, Hardi; Vršnak, Bojan; Yan, Yihua

    2015-08-01

    The Business Meeting of Commission 10 was held as part of the Business Meeting of Division II (Sun and Heliosphere), chaired by Valentin Martínez-Pillet, the President of the Division. The President of Commission 10 (C10; Solar activity), Lidia van Driel-Gesztelyi, took the chair for the business meeting of C10. She summarised the activities of C10 over the triennium and the election of the incoming OC.

  16. Friday's Agenda | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    TimeAgenda8:00 am - 8:10 amWelcome and Opening RemarksLeslie Ford, MDAssociate Director for Clinical ResearchDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCIEva Szabo, MD Chief, Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research GroupDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCI8:10 am - 8:40 amClinical Trials Statistical Concepts for Non-StatisticiansKevin Dodd, PhD |

  17. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  18. A survey of Clostridium spiroforme antimicrobial susceptibility in rabbit breeding.

    PubMed

    Agnoletti, Fabrizio; Ferro, Tiziana; Guolo, Angela; Marcon, Barbara; Cocchi, Monia; Drigo, Ilenia; Mazzolini, Elena; Bano, Luca

    2009-04-14

    Rabbit meat breeding may be heavily affected by enterotoxaemia due to Clostridium spiroforme. Data on its antimicrobial susceptibility are insufficient, presumably because of difficulties in cultivating and identifying the pathogen. Our aim is therefore to provide this information to veterinary practitioners by focusing on a panel of therapeutics used in intensive rabbit units. Lincomycin was also checked in order to investigate the origin of resistance to macrolides. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined with the agar dilution method according to the CLSI M11-A7 protocol (2007). MIC(50) and MIC(90) were, respectively, 64 and 64microg/ml for tiamulin, 32 and 32microg/ml for norfloxacin, 0.063 and 0.125microg/ml for amoxicillin, and 8 and 16microg/ml for doxycycline. MIC(50) and MIC(90) were 256microg/ml for sulphadimethoxine, spiramycin and lincomycin. Our results have shown that intrinsic or acquired antimicrobial resistances are diffuse in the C. spiroforme population and suggest focusing on prevention rather than on treatment of clostridial overgrowth, by reducing risk factors and using antimicrobials prudently.

  19. Structure, function and controls in microbial division.

    PubMed

    Vicente, M; Errington, J

    1996-04-01

    Several crucial genes required for bacterial division lie close together in a region called the dcw cluster. Within the cluster, gene expression is subject to complex transcriptional regulation, which serves to adjust the cell cycle in response to growth rate. The pivotally important FtsZ protein, which is needed to initiate division, is now known to interact with many other components of the division machinery in Escherichia coli. Some biochemical properties of FtsZ, and of another division protein called FtsA, suggest that they are similar to the eukaryotic proteins tubulin and actin respectively. Cell division needs to be closely co-ordinated with chromosome partitioning. The mechanism of partitioning is poorly understood, though several genes involved in this process, including several muk genes, have been identified. The min genes may participate in both septum positioning and chromosome partitioning. Coupled transcription and translation of membrane-associated proteins might also be important for partitioning. In the event of a failure in the normal partitioning process, Bacillus subtilis, at least, has a mechanism for removing a bisected nucleoid from the division septum.

  20. Signaling Pathways that Regulate Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Rhind, Nicholas; Russell, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Cell division requires careful orchestration of three major events: entry into mitosis, chromosomal segregation, and cytokinesis. Signaling within and between the molecules that control these events allows for their coordination via checkpoints, a specific class of signaling pathways that ensure the dependency of cell-cycle events on the successful completion of preceding events. Multiple positive- and negative-feedback loops ensure that a cell is fully committed to division and that the events occur in the proper order. Unlike other signaling pathways, which integrate external inputs to decide whether to execute a given process, signaling at cell division is largely dedicated to completing a decision made in G1 phase—to initiate and complete a round of mitotic cell division. Instead of deciding if the events of cell division will take place, these signaling pathways entrain these events to the activation of the cell-cycle kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and provide the opportunity for checkpoint proteins to arrest cell division if things go wrong. PMID:23028116

  1. Mechanics and Dynamics of Plant Cell Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumais, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    The division of eukaryotic cells involves the assembly of complex cytoskeletal structures to exert the forces required for chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. In plants, tensional forces within the cytoskeleton constrain cells to divide according to a small number of area minimizing configurations. We have shown that the probability of observing a particular division configuration increases inversely with its relative area according to an exponential probability distribution known as the Gibbs measure. The distribution is universal up to experimental accuracy with a unique constant that applies for all plants studied irrespective of the shape and size of their cells. Using a maximum entropy formulation, we were able to demonstrate that the empirically observed division rule is predicted by the dynamics of the tense cytoskeletal elements controlling the positioning of the division plane. Finally, by framing this division rule as a dynamical system, we identified a broad class of attractors that are predictive of cell patterns observed in plants. Plant cell division thus offers a remarkable example of how interactions at the molecular level can lead to strikingly complex behaviors at the cellular and multicellular levels.

  2. Antimicrobial resistance in Scandinavia after ban of antimicrobial growth promoters.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Björn; Wierup, Martin

    2006-01-01

    The banned use of antimicrobial growth promoters resulted in a considerably decreased use of antimicrobials in food animal production in Sweden (65%), Denmark (47%), Norway (40%) and Finland (27%). The current prevalence of antimicrobial resistance in animal bacterial populations is also considerably lower than in some other countries in the EU. In the swine production, no or limited effect was found in the finisher production (>25 to 30 kg). Temporary negative effects occurred during the post weaning period (7-30 kg). In Denmark, the cost of production from birth to slaughter per pig produced increased by approximately 1.0 euro with a high variability between pig producers. In the broiler production the termination had no significant negative effect on animal health and welfare or on production economy.

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Spanish field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Carvajal, A; García-Feliz, C; Osorio, J; Rubio, P

    2009-08-01

    This study is the first conducted in Spain to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility of field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. One hundred and eight isolates of the bacterium, recovered from different Spanish swine farms between 2000 and 2007, were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of erythromycin, tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, clindamycin and lincomycin were determined using a broth microdilution technique. Most of the isolates showed poor susceptibility to erythromycin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), tylosin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), clindamycin (MIC(90)>4 microg/ml) and lincomycin (MIC(90)=128 microg/ml). Reduced susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin was observed with a MIC>2 microg/ml in 17.6% and 7.41% of the B. hyodysenteriae isolates, respectively. Moreover, a survival analysis permitted the detection of an increasing trend in the MIC values for almost all the antimicrobials used in the treatment of swine dysentery when comparing recent isolates (from 2006 to 2007) with those recovered in earlier years (between 2000 and 2004).

  4. Gram-stain-based antimicrobial selection reduces cost and overuse compared with Japanese guidelines.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomohiro; Tsuha, Sanefumi; Shiiki, Soichi; Narita, Masashi

    2015-10-26

    The Gram stain has been used as an essential tool for antimicrobial stewardship in our hospital since the 1970s. The objective of this study was to clarify the difference in the targeted therapies selected based on the Gram stain and simulated empirical therapies based on the antimicrobial guidelines used in Japan. A referral-hospital-based prospective descriptive study was undertaken between May 2013 and April 2014 in Okinawa, Japan. All enrolled patients were adults who had been admitted to the Division of Infectious Diseases through the emergency room with suspected bacterial infection at one of three sites: respiratory system, urinary tract, or skin and soft tissues. The study outcomes were the types and effectiveness of the antibiotics initially selected, and their total costs. Two hundred eight patients were enrolled in the study. The median age was 80 years. A significantly narrower spectrum of antibiotics was selected based on the Gram stain than was selected based on the Japanese guidelines. The treatments based on the Gram stain and on the guidelines were estimated to be equally highly effective. The total cost of antimicrobials after Gram-stain testing was less than half the cost after the guidelines were followed. Compared with the Japanese guidelines, the Gram stain dramatically reduced the overuse of broad-spectrum antimicrobials without affecting the effectiveness of the treatment. Drug costs were reduced by half when the Gram stain was used. The Gram stain should be included in all antimicrobial stewardship programs.

  5. Novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides use different antimicrobial mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pavia, Kathryn E; Spinella, Sara A; Elmore, Donald E

    2012-03-01

    The increase in multidrug resistant bacteria has sparked an interest in the development of novel antibiotics. Antimicrobial peptides that operate by crossing the cell membrane may also have the potential to deliver drugs to intracellular targets. Buforin 2 (BF2) is an antimicrobial peptide that shares sequence identity with a fragment of histone subunit H2A and whose bactericidal mechanism depends on membrane translocation and DNA binding. Previously, novel histone-derived antimicrobial peptides (HDAPs) were designed based on properties of BF2, and DesHDAP1 and DesHDAP3 showed significant antibacterial activity. In this study, their DNA binding, permeabilization, and translocation abilities were assessed independently and compared to antibacterial activity to determine whether they share a mechanism with BF2. To investigate the importance of proline in determining the peptides' mechanisms of action, proline to alanine mutants of the novel peptides were generated. DesHDAP1, which shows significant similarities to BF2 in terms of secondary structure, translocates effectively across lipid vesicle and bacterial membranes, while the DesHDAP1 proline mutant shows reduced translocation abilities and antimicrobial potency. In contrast, both DesHDAP3 and its proline mutant translocate poorly, though the DesHDAP3 proline mutant is more potent. Our findings suggest that a proline hinge can promote membrane translocation in some peptides, but that the extent of its effect on permeabilization depends on the peptide's amphipathic properties. Our results also highlight the different antimicrobial mechanisms exhibited by histone-derived peptides and suggest that histones may serve as a source of novel antimicrobial peptides with varied properties.

  6. Ruthenium complexes as antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Fangfei; Collins, J Grant; Keene, F Richard

    2015-04-21

    One of the major advances in medical science has been the development of antimicrobials; however, a consequence of their widespread use has been the emergence of drug-resistant populations of microorganisms. There is clearly a need for the development of new antimicrobials--but more importantly, there is the need for the development of new classes of antimicrobials, rather than drugs based upon analogues of known scaffolds. Due to the success of the platinum anticancer agents, there has been considerable interest in the development of therapeutic agents based upon other transition metals--and in particular ruthenium(II/III) complexes, due to their well known interaction with DNA. There have been many studies of the anticancer properties and cellular localisation of a range of ruthenium complexes in eukaryotic cells over the last decade. However, only very recently has there been significant interest in their antimicrobial properties. This review highlights the types of ruthenium complexes that have exhibited significant antimicrobial activity and discusses the relationship between chemical structure and biological processing--including site(s) of intracellular accumulation--of the ruthenium complexes in both bacterial and eukaryotic cells.

  7. Antimicrobial resistance mechanisms among Campylobacter.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Kinga; Osek, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed.

  8. Antimicrobial Resistance Mechanisms among Campylobacter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are recognized as the most common causative agents of bacterial gastroenteritis in the world. Humans most often become infected by ingesting contaminated food, especially undercooked chicken, but also other sources of bacteria have been described. Campylobacteriosis is normally a self-limiting disease. Antimicrobial treatment is needed only in patients with more severe disease and in those who are immunologically compromised. The most common antimicrobial agents used in the treatment of Campylobacter infections are macrolides, such as erythromycin, and fluoroquinolones, such as ciprofloxacin. Tetracyclines have been suggested as an alternative choice in the treatment of clinical campylobacteriosis but in practice are not often used. However, during the past few decades an increasing number of resistant Campylobacter isolates have developed resistance to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobials such as macrolides, aminoglycosides, and beta-lactams. Trends in antimicrobial resistance have shown a clear correlation between use of antibiotics in the veterinary medicine and animal production and resistant isolates of Campylobacter in humans. In this review, the patterns of emerging resistance to the antimicrobial agents useful in treatment of the disease are presented and the mechanisms of resistance to these drugs in Campylobacter are discussed. PMID:23865047

  9. Antimicrobial implications of vitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Dima A; Miller, Christopher WT; El-Abbassi, Adel M; Cutchins, Della C; Cutchins, Coleman; Grant, William B

    2011-01-01

    Evidence exists that vitamin D has a potential antimicrobial activity and its deficiency has deleterious effects on general well-being and longevity. Vitamin D may reduce the risk of infection through multiple mechanisms. Vitamin D boosts innate immunity by modulating production of anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) and cytokine response. Vitamin D and its analogues via these mechanisms are playing an increasing role in the management of atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, vitiligo, acne and rosacea. Vitamin D may reduce susceptibility to infection in patients with atopic dermatitis and the ability to regulate local immune and inflammatory responses offers exciting potential for understanding and treating chronic inflammatory dermatitides. Moreover, B and T cell activation as well as boosting the activity of monocytes and macrophages also contribute to a potent systemic anti-microbial effect. The direct invasion by pathogenic organisms may be minimized at sites such as the respiratory tract by enhancing clearance of invading organisms. A vitamin D replete state appears to benefit most infections, with the possible noteworthy exception of Leishmaniasis. Antibiotics remain an expensive option and misuse of these agents results in significant antibiotic resistance and contributes to escalating health care costs. Vitamin D constitutes an inexpensive prophylactic option and possibly therapeutic product either by itself or as a synergistic agent to traditional antimicrobial agents. This review outlines the specific antimicrobial properties of vitamin D in combating a wide range of organisms. We discuss the possible mechanisms by which vitamin D may have a therapeutic role in managing a variety of infections. PMID:22259647

  10. ACVIM consensus statement on therapeutic antimicrobial use in animals and antimicrobial resistance.

    PubMed

    Weese, J S; Giguère, S; Guardabassi, L; Morley, P S; Papich, M; Ricciuto, D R; Sykes, J E

    2015-01-01

    The epidemic of antimicrobial resistant infections continues to challenge, compromising animal care, complicating food animal production and posing zoonotic disease risks. While the overall role of therapeutic antimicrobial use in animals in the development AMR in animal and human pathogens is poorly defined, veterinarians must consider the impacts of antimicrobial use in animal and take steps to optimize antimicrobial use, so as to maximize the health benefits to animals while minimizing the likelihood of antimicrobial resistance and other adverse effects. This consensus statement aims to provide guidance on the therapeutic use of antimicrobials in animals, balancing the need for effective therapy with minimizing development of antimicrobial resistance in bacteria from animals and humans.

  11. Synthetic biology of antimicrobial discovery

    PubMed Central

    Zakeri, Bijan; Lu, Timothy K.

    2012-01-01

    Antibiotic discovery has a storied history. From the discovery of penicillin by Sir Alexander Fleming to the relentless quest for antibiotics by Selman Waksman, the stories have become like folklore, used to inspire future generations of scientists. However, recent discovery pipelines have run dry at a time when multidrug resistant pathogens are on the rise. Nature has proven to be a valuable reservoir of antimicrobial agents, which are primarily produced by modularized biochemical pathways. Such modularization is well suited to remodeling by an interdisciplinary approach that spans science and engineering. Herein, we discuss the biological engineering of small molecules, peptides, and non-traditional antimicrobials and provide an overview of the growing applicability of synthetic biology to antimicrobials discovery. PMID:23654251

  12. Antimicrobial Properties of Titanium Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdural, B. K.; Yurum, A.; Bakir, U.; Karakas, G.

    In the present study, nanostructured titania particles were synthesized using hydrothermal processing and their photocatalytic antimicrobial activities were characterized. Sol-gel synthesized TiO2 samples were treated with a two step hydrothermal treatment. The first stage treatment was the alkaline treatment with 10 M of NaOH for 48 h at 130°C, followed with the second step which applied with distilled water for 48 h at 200°C. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images showed that alkaline treatment yields lamellar structure particles from the sol-gel synthesized anatase. Further treatment of nanoplates with distilled water results in crystal growth and the formation of nano structured thorn like particles. The photocatalytic antimicrobial activities of samples were determined against Escherichia coli under solar irradiation for 4 h. It was observed that the samples treated under alkaline conditions have higher antimicrobial activity than the untreated samples.

  13. Antifungal proteins: More than antimicrobials?

    PubMed Central

    Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Marx, Florentine

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (AMPs) are widely distributed in nature. In higher eukaryotes, AMPs provide the host with an important defence mechanism against invading pathogens. AMPs of lower eukaryotes and prokaryotes may support successful competition for nutrients with other microorganisms of the same ecological niche. AMPs show a vast variety in structure, function, antimicrobial spectrum and mechanism of action. Most interestingly, there is growing evidence that AMPs also fulfil important biological functions other than antimicrobial activity. The present review focuses on the mechanistic function of small, cationic, cysteine-rich AMPs of mammals, insects, plants and fungi with antifungal activity and specifically aims at summarizing current knowledge concerning additional biological properties which opens novel aspects for their future use in medicine, agriculture and biotechnology. PMID:23412850

  14. Antimicrobial resistance in staphylococci in small animals.

    PubMed

    Cain, Christine L

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcal antimicrobial resistance presents an emerging challenge for both human and veterinary medical professionals. Infections associated with methicillin- and multidrug-resistant staphylococci are increasingly encountered by veterinarians and are frequently associated with empiric therapeutic failures and limited systemic antimicrobial options. This article addresses mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance in common staphylococcal pathogens and implications for clinical practice, including indications for culture and susceptibility testing, rational antimicrobial selection, and potential for zoonotic transmission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    SciTech Connect

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  16. The History of Metals and Ceramics Division

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, D.F.

    1999-01-01

    The division was formed in 1946 at the suggestion of Dr. Eugene P. Wigner to attack the problem of the distortion of graphite in the early reactors due to exposure to reactor neutrons, and the consequent radiation damage. It was called the Metallurgy Division and assembled the metallurgical and solid state physics activities of the time which were not directly related to nuclear weapons production. William A. Johnson, a Westinghouse employee, was named Division Director in 1946. In 1949 he was replaced by John H Frye Jr. when the Division consisted of 45 people. He was director during most of what is called the Reactor Project Years until 1973 and his retirement. During this period the Division evolved into three organizational areas: basic research, applied research in nuclear reactor materials, and reactor programs directly related to a specific reactor(s) being designed or built. The Division (Metals and Ceramics) consisted of 204 staff members in 1973 when James R. Weir, Jr., became Director. This was the period of the oil embargo, the formation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) by combining the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) with the Office of Coal Research, and subsequent formation of the Department of Energy (DOE). The diversification process continued when James O. Stiegler became Director in 1984, partially as a result of the pressure of legislation encouraging the national laboratories to work with U.S. industries on their problems. During that time the Division staff grew from 265 to 330. Douglas F. Craig became Director in 1992.

  17. MSTD 2007 Publications and Patents

    SciTech Connect

    King, W E

    2008-04-01

    The Materials Science and Technology Division (MSTD) supports the central scientific and technological missions of the Laboratory, and at the same time, executes world-class, fundamental research and novel technological development over a wide range of disciplines. Our organization is driven by the institutional needs in nuclear weapons stockpile science, high-energy-density science, nuclear reactor science, and energy and environment science and technology. We maintain expertise and capabilities in many diverse areas, including actinide science, electron microscopy, laser-materials interactions, materials theory, simulation and modeling, materials synthesis and processing, materials science under extreme conditions, ultrafast materials science, metallurgy, nanoscience and technology, nuclear fuels and energy security, optical materials science, and surface science. MSTD scientists play leadership roles in the scientific community in these key and emerging areas.

  18. Weapons Industry. Industry Study, Spring 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and...valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 2007 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Spring 2007...production capability to include multiple sources and surge capacity. Action is required to ensure that a qualified and technically capable workforce is

  19. Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome

    DOEpatents

    Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

    2013-08-20

    We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

  20. Antimicrobial therapy for skin infections.

    PubMed

    Hirschmann, Jan V

    2007-06-01

    The most common skin infections are caused by Staphylococcus aureus, group A streptococci (Streptococcus pyogenes), or the normal skin flora. An antistaphylococcal oral antibiotic is the preferred treatment for nonbullous and bullous impetigo, and a therapeutic agent that is effective against both S aureus and streptococci is appropriate for most cases of cellulitis. For furuncles, carbuncles, cutaneous abscesses, and inflamed epidermal cysts, the most important therapy is incision and drainage, and in most cases there is no need for antimicrobial therapy. Patients with venous ulcers and atopic eczema do not benefit from systemic antimicrobial therapy unless obvious infection is present, as indicated by clinical features such as fever, cellulitis, and lymphangitis.

  1. 47 CFR 32.2007 - Goodwill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Goodwill. 32.2007 Section 32.2007... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2007 Goodwill. (a) This... identifiable property acquired and such amount should be identified as “goodwill”. Such amounts included...

  2. 47 CFR 32.2007 - Goodwill.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2007 Goodwill. (a) This... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Goodwill. 32.2007 Section 32.2007... identifiable property acquired and such amount should be identified as “goodwill”. Such amounts included in...

  3. 38 CFR 200.7 - Cooperating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cooperating agencies. 200.7 Section 200.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 200.7 Cooperating agencies. (a) Federal agencies...

  4. 38 CFR 200.7 - Cooperating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cooperating agencies. 200.7 Section 200.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 200.7 Cooperating agencies. (a) Federal agencies...

  5. 38 CFR 200.7 - Cooperating agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cooperating agencies. 200.7 Section 200.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief ARMED FORCES RETIREMENT HOME COMPLIANCE WITH THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT § 200.7 Cooperating agencies. (a) Federal agencies...

  6. 4 CFR 200.7 - Fees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees. 200.7 Section 200.7 Accounts RECOVERY ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY BOARD PRIVACY ACT OF 1974 § 200.7 Fees. A fee will not be charged for searching, reviewing, or making corrections to records. A fee for copying will be assessed at the same rate established...

  7. Lack of Resources Hampers Graduation Rates in Division II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suggs, Welch

    2001-01-01

    A recent report by the National Collegiate Athletic Association on graduation rates indicates that athletes in Division II schools face as many challenges completing college as do their peers in Division I. Division II institutions are further hampered by lack of resources causing Division II students less likely to graduate in general. (SLD)

  8. Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, J S; Hooper, D C

    1989-01-01

    The fluoroquinolones, a new class of potent orally absorbed antimicrobial agents, are reviewed, considering structure, mechanisms of action and resistance, spectrum, variables affecting activity in vitro, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, emergence of resistance, and tolerability. The primary bacterial target is the enzyme deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase. Bacterial resistance occurs by chromosomal mutations altering deoxyribonucleic acid gyrase and decreasing drug permeation. The drugs are bactericidal and potent in vitro against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, Haemophilus spp., and Neisseria spp., have good activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and staphylococci, and (with several exceptions) are less potent against streptococci and have fair to poor activity against anaerobic species. Potency in vitro decreases in the presence of low pH, magnesium ions, or urine but is little affected by different media, increased inoculum, or serum. The effects of the drugs in combination with a beta-lactam or aminoglycoside are often additive, occasionally synergistic, and rarely antagonistic. The agents are orally absorbed, require at most twice-daily dosing, and achieve high concentrations in urine, feces, and kidney and good concentrations in lung, bone, prostate, and other tissues. The drugs are efficacious in treatment of a variety of bacterial infections, including uncomplicated and complicated urinary tract infections, bacterial gastroenteritis, and gonorrhea, and show promise for therapy of prostatitis, respiratory tract infections, osteomyelitis, and cutaneous infections, particularly when caused by aerobic gram-negative bacilli. Fluoroquinolones have also proved to be efficacious for prophylaxis against travelers' diarrhea and infection with gram-negative bacilli in neutropenic patients. The drugs are effective in eliminating carriage of Neisseria meningitidis. Patient tolerability appears acceptable, with gastrointestinal or central nervous

  9. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    SciTech Connect

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  10. Energy Technology Division research summary -- 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    Research funded primarily by the NRC is directed toward assessing the roles of cyclic fatigue, intergranular stress corrosion cracking, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking on failures in light water reactor (LWR) piping systems, pressure vessels, and various core components. In support of the fast reactor program, the Division has responsibility for fuel-performance modeling and irradiation testing. The Division has major responsibilities in several design areas of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The Division supports the DOE in ensuring safe shipment of nuclear materials by providing extensive review of the Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARPs). Finally, in the nuclear area they are investigating the safe disposal of spent fuel and waste. In work funded by DOE`s Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, the high-temperature superconductivity program continues to be a major focal point for industrial interactions. Coatings and lubricants developed in the division`s Tribology Section are intended for use in transportation systems of the future. Continuous fiber ceramic composites are being developed for high-performance heat engines. Nondestructive testing techniques are being developed to evaluate fiber distribution and to detect flaws. A wide variety of coatings for corrosion protection of metal alloys are being studied. These can increase lifetimes significant in a wide variety of coal combustion and gasification environments.

  11. Bacterial cell division proteins as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    den Blaauwen, Tanneke; Andreu, José M; Monasterio, Octavio

    2014-08-01

    Proteins involved in bacterial cell division often do not have a counterpart in eukaryotic cells and they are essential for the survival of the bacteria. The genetic accessibility of many bacterial species in combination with the Green Fluorescence Protein revolution to study localization of proteins and the availability of crystal structures has increased our knowledge on bacterial cell division considerably in this century. Consequently, bacterial cell division proteins are more and more recognized as potential new antibiotic targets. An international effort to find small molecules that inhibit the cell division initiating protein FtsZ has yielded many compounds of which some are promising as leads for preclinical use. The essential transglycosylase activity of peptidoglycan synthases has recently become accessible to inhibitor screening. Enzymatic assays for and structural information on essential integral membrane proteins such as MraY and FtsW involved in lipid II (the peptidoglycan building block precursor) biosynthesis have put these proteins on the list of potential new targets. This review summarises and discusses the results and approaches to the development of lead compounds that inhibit bacterial cell division.

  12. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division.

    PubMed

    Roy, Madhuparna; Itoh, Kie; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson's disease-associated protein-parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1-in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of asymmetric division in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shao-Chen; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2013-08-01

    In contrast to symmetric division in mitosis, mammalian oocyte maturation is characterized by asymmetric cell division that produces a large egg and a small polar body. The asymmetry results from oocyte polarization, which includes spindle positioning, migration, and cortical reorganization, and this process is critical for fertilization and the retention of maternal components for early embryo development. Although actin dynamics are involved in this process, the molecular mechanism underlying this remained unclear until the use of confocal microscopy and live cell imaging became widespread in recent years. Information obtained through a PubMed database search of all articles published in English between 2000 and 2012 that included the phrases "oocyte, actin, spindle migration," "oocyte, actin, polar body," or "oocyte, actin, asymmetric division" was reviewed. The actin nucleation factor actin-related protein 2/3 complex and its nucleation-promoting factors, formins and Spire, and regulators such as small GTPases, partitioning-defective/protein kinase C, Fyn, microRNAs, cis-Golgi apparatus components, myosin/myosin light-chain kinase, spindle stability regulators, and spindle assembly checkpoint regulators, play critical roles in asymmetric cell division in oocytes. This review summarizes recent findings on these actin-related regulators in mammalian oocyte asymmetric division and outlines a complete signaling pathway.

  14. Homeland Security Department: FY2007 Appropriations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-10

    oil well drilling in Alaska’s National Wildlife Refuge ( ANWR ). Division D contained provisions that would have distributed the revenues from the ANWR ...After a contentious floor debate concerning the attachment of the ANWR provisions to the Defense Appropriations Bill, both Divisions C and D were

  15. Antimicrobial drugs for treating cholera.

    PubMed

    Leibovici-Weissman, Ya'ara; Neuberger, Ami; Bitterman, Roni; Sinclair, David; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Paul, Mical

    2014-06-19

    Cholera is an acute watery diarrhoea caused by infection with the bacterium Vibrio cholerae, which if severe can cause rapid dehydration and death. Effective management requires early diagnosis and rehydration using oral rehydration salts or intravenous fluids. In this review, we evaluate the additional benefits of treating cholera with antimicrobial drugs. To quantify the benefit of antimicrobial treatment for patients with cholera, and determine whether there are differences between classes of antimicrobials or dosing schedules. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); PubMed; EMBASE; African Index Medicus; LILACS; Science Citation Index; metaRegister of Controlled Trials; WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform; conference proceedings; and reference lists to March 2014. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled clinical trials in adults and children with cholera that compared: 1) any antimicrobial treatment with placebo or no treatment; 2) different antimicrobials head-to-head; or 3) different dosing schedules or different durations of treatment with the same antimicrobial. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, and extracted data from included trials. Diarrhoea duration and stool volume were defined as primary outcomes. We calculated mean difference (MD) or ratio of means (ROM) for continuous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), and pooled data using a random-effects meta-analysis. The quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. Thirty-nine trials were included in this review with 4623 participants. Antimicrobials versus placebo or no treatment Overall, antimicrobial therapy shortened the mean duration of diarrhoea by about a day and a half compared to placebo or no treatment (MD -36.77 hours, 95% CI -43.51 to -30.03, 19 trials, 1013 participants, moderate quality evidence). Antimicrobial therapy also

  16. Section III, Division 5 - Development And Future Directions

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, Dana K.; Jetter, Robert I; Nestell, James E.; Burchell, Timothy D; Sham, Sam

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides commentary on a new division under Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code. This new Division 5 has an issuance date of November 1, 2011 and is part of the 2011 Addenda to the 2010 Edition of the BPV Code. The new Division covers the rules for the design, fabrication, inspection and testing of components for high temperature nuclear reactors. Information is provided on the scope and need for Division 5, the structure of Division 5, where the rules originated, the various changes made in finalizing Division 5, and the future near-term and long-term expectations for Division 5 development.

  17. Preface: SciDAC 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keyes, David E.

    2007-09-01

    It takes a village to perform a petascale computation—domain scientists, applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computer system vendors, program managers, and support staff—and the village was assembled during 24-28 June 2007 in Boston's Westin Copley Place for the third annual Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) 2007 Conference. Over 300 registered participants networked around 76 posters, focused on achievements and challenges in 36 plenary talks, and brainstormed in two panels. In addition, with an eye to spreading the vision for simulation at the petascale and to growing the workforce, 115 participants—mostly doctoral students and post-docs complementary to the conferees—were gathered on 29 June 2007 in classrooms of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for a full day of tutorials on the use of SciDAC software. Eleven SciDAC-sponsored research groups presented their software at an introductory level, in both lecture and hands-on formats that included live runs on a local BlueGene/L. Computation has always been about garnering insight into the behavior of systems too complex to explore satisfactorily by theoretical means alone. Today, however, computation is about much more: scientists and decision makers expect quantitatively reliable predictions from simulations ranging in scale from that of the Earth's climate, down to quarks, and out to colliding black holes. Predictive simulation lies at the heart of policy choices in energy and environment affecting billions of lives and expenditures of trillions of dollars. It is also at the heart of scientific debates on the nature of matter and the origin of the universe. The petascale is barely adequate for such demands and we are barely established at the levels of resolution and throughput that this new scale of computation affords. However, no scientific agenda worldwide is pushing the petascale frontier on all its fronts as vigorously as SciDAC. The breadth of this conference

  18. Antimicrobial food packaging in meat industry.

    PubMed

    Quintavalla, Stefania; Vicini, Loredana

    2002-11-01

    Antimicrobial packaging, an active packaging concept, can be considered an extremely challenging technology that could have a significant impact on shelf-life extension and food safety of meat and meat products. Use of antimicrobial substances can control the microbial population and target specific microorganisms to provide higher safety and quality products. Many classes of antimicrobial compounds have been evaluated in film structures, both synthetic polymers and edible films: organic acids and their salts, enzymes, bacteriocins, and miscellaneous compounds such as triclosan, silver zeolites, and fungicides. The characteristics of some antimicrobial packaging systems are reviewed in this article. The regulatory status of antimicrobial packaging in EU is also examined.

  19. Antimicrobial Activity and Resistance: Influencing Factors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Xie, Shuyu; Ahmed, Saeed; Wang, Funan; Gu, Yufeng; Zhang, Chaonan; Chai, Ximan; Wu, Yalan; Cai, Jinxia; Cheng, Guyue

    2017-01-01

    Rational use of antibiotic is the key approach to improve the antibiotic performance and tackling of the antimicrobial resistance. The efficacy of antimicrobials are influenced by many factors: (1) bacterial status (susceptibility and resistance, tolerance, persistence, biofilm) and inoculum size; (2) antimicrobial concentrations [mutant selection window (MSW) and sub-inhibitory concentration]; (3) host factors (serum effect and impact on gut micro-biota). Additional understandings regarding the linkage between antimicrobial usages, bacterial status and host response offers us new insights and encourage the struggle for the designing of antimicrobial treatment regimens that reaching better clinical outcome and minimizing the emergence of resistance at the same time. PMID:28659799

  20. Division V: Commission 42: Close Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribas, Ignasi; Richards, Mercedes T.; Rucinski, Slavek; Bradstreet, David H.; Harmanec, Petr; Kaluzny, Janusz; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Niarchos, Panagiotis; Olah, Katalin; Pribulla, Theodor; Scarfe, Colin D.; Torres, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Commission 42 (C42) co-organized, together with Commission 27 (C27) and Division V (Div V) as a whole, a full day of science and business sessions that were held on 24 August 2012. The program included time slots for discussion of business matters related to Div V, C27 and C42, and two sessions of 2 hours each devoted to science talks of interest to both C42 and C27. In addition, we had a joint session between Div IV and Div V motivated by the proposal to reformulate the division structure of the IAU and the possible merger of the two divisions into a new Div G. The current report gives an account of the matters discussed during the business session of C42.

  1. Cytoskeleton assembly in Toxoplasma gondii cell division

    PubMed Central

    Anderson-White, Brooke; Beck, Josh R.; Chen, Chun-Ti; Meissner, Markus; Bradley, Peter J.; Gubbels, Marc-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Cell division across members of the protozoan parasite phylum Apicomplexa displays a surprising diversity between different species as well as between different life stages of the same parasite. In most cases, infection of a host cell by a single parasite results in the formation of a polyploid cell from which individual daughters bud in a process dependent on a final round of mitosis. Unlike other apicomplexans, Toxoplasma gondii divides by a binary process consisting of internal budding that results in only two daughter cells per round of division. Since T. gondii is experimentally accessible and displays the simplest division mode, it has manifested itself as a model for apicomplexan daughter formation. Here we review newly emerging insights in the prominent role that assembly of the cortical cytoskeletal scaffold plays in the process of daughter parasite formation. PMID:22878103

  2. Family division in China's transitional economy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feinian

    2009-03-01

    Using a longitudinal data-set (the China Health and Nutrition Survey) we explored the effect of various economic factors, including household wealth, employment sector, and involvement in a household business on the division of extended families in China's transitional economy. Results from event history analyses suggest that these economic factors act as either a dividing or a unifying force on the extended family. Household wealth reduces the risk of family division, but the effect is weaker for families in which parents have upper secondary education. In addition, an extended family is more likely to divide when married children work in the state sector. Further, the probability of family division is higher in families where daughters-in-law work in the state sector than in those with sons in this sector. Finally, involvement in a household business for married children increases family stability.

  3. Cell Division and Evolution of Biological Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivier, Nicolas; Arcenegui-Siemens, Xavier; Schliecker, Gudrun

    A tissue is a geometrical, space-filling, random cellular network; it remains in this steady state while individual cells divide. Cell division (fragmentation) is a local, elementary topological transformation which establishes statistical equilibrium of the structure. Statistical equilibrium is characterized by observable relations (Lewis, Aboav) between cell shapes, sizes and those of their neighbours, obtained through maximum entropy and topological correlation extending to nearest neighbours only, i.e. maximal randomness. For a two-dimensional tissue (epithelium), the distribution of cell shapes and that of mother and daughter cells can be obtained from elementary geometrical and physical arguments, except for an exponential factor favouring division of larger cells, and exponential and combinatorial factors encouraging a most symmetric division. The resulting distributions are very narrow, and stationarity severely restricts the range of an adjustable structural parameter

  4. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    CMT is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. It conducts R&D in 3 general areas: development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, materials chemistry of electrified interfaces and molecular sieves, and the theory of materials properties. It also operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at ANL and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1996 are presented.

  5. The centrosome and asymmetric cell division

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Asymmetric stem cell division is a mechanism widely employed by the cell to maintain tissue homeostasis, resulting in the production of one stem cell and one differentiating cell. However, asymmetric cell division is not limited to stem cells and is widely observed even in unicellular organisms as well as in cells that make up highly complex tissues. In asymmetric cell division, cells must organize their intracellular components along the axis of asymmetry (sometimes in the context of extracellular architecture). Recent studies have described cell asymmetry in many cell types and in many cases such asymmetry involves the centrosome (or spindle pole body in yeast) as the center of cytoskeleton organization. In this review, I summarize recent discoveries in cellular polarity that lead to an asymmetric outcome, with a focus on centrosome function. PMID:19458491

  6. The Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, William; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2009-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. This report includes the Division's activities during 2008.

  7. Biology Division progress report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, F.C.; Cook, J.S.

    1993-10-01

    This Progress Report summarizes the research endeavors of the Biology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the Division`s major organizational units. Lists of information to convey the entire scope of the Division`s activities are compiled at the end of the report.

  8. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides...

  9. 49 CFR 173.152 - Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). 173.152 Section 173.152 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Exceptions for Division 5.1 (oxidizers) and Division 5.2 (organic peroxides). (a) General. Exceptions for.... Limited quantities of oxidizers (Division 5.1) in Packing Group II and III and organic peroxides...

  10. Secondary multidrug efflux pump mutants alter Escherichia coli biofilm growth in the presence of cationic antimicrobial compounds.

    PubMed

    Bay, Denice C; Stremick, Carol A; Slipski, Carmine J; Turner, Raymond J

    2017-04-01

    Escherichia coli possesses many secondary active multidrug resistance transporters (MDTs) that confer overlapping substrate resistance to a broad range of antimicrobials via proton and/or sodium motive force. It is uncertain whether redundant MDTs uniquely alter cell survival when cultures grow planktonically or as biofilms. In this study, the planktonic and biofilm growth and antimicrobial resistance of 13 E. coli K-12 single MDT gene deletion strains in minimal and rich media were determined. Antimicrobial tolerance to tetracycline, tobramycin and benzalkonium were also compared for each ΔMDT strain. Four E. coli MDT families were represented in this study: resistance nodulation and cell division members acrA, acrB, acrD, acrE, acrF and tolC; multidrug and toxin extruder mdtK; major facilitator superfamily emrA and emrB; and small multidrug resistance members emrE, sugE, mdtI and mdtJ. Deletions of multipartite efflux system genes acrB, acrE and tolC resulted in significant reductions in both planktonic and biofilm growth phenotypes and enhanced antimicrobial susceptibilities. The loss of remaining MDT genes produced similar or enhanced (acrD, acrE, emrA, emrB, mdtK, emrE and mdtJ) biofilm growth and antimicrobial resistance. ΔMDT strains with enhanced antimicrobial tolerance also enhanced biofilm biomass. These findings suggest that many redundant MDTs regulate biofilm formation and drug tolerance.

  11. Home Advantage in Men's and Women's Spanish First and Second Division Water Polo Leagues.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Jaime; Gómez, Miguel-Ángel; Pollard, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the home advantage in both men's and women's First and Second Division water polo leagues, to compare the results obtained according to sex of participants and the level of competition, and to test for possible differences in home advantage when considering the interaction between these two factors. The sample comprised four seasons from 2007-2008 to 2010-2011 for a total of 1942 games analyzed. The results showed the existence of home advantage in both men's and women's First and Second Divisions. After controlling for the competitive balance of each league in each season, there was a significant difference between men's and women's leagues, with higher home advantage for men's leagues (58.60% compared with 53.70% for women's leagues). There was also a significant difference between the levels of competition, with greater home advantage for the Second Division (57.95% compared with 54.35% for First Division). No significant differences in home advantage were found when considering the interaction between sex of participants and the level of competition. The results in relation to sex of participants and the level of competition are consistent with previous studies in other sports such as football or handball.

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae.

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, M; Gelfusa, V; Tarasi, A; Brandimarte, C; Serra, P

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of 10 isolates of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae to 16 antimicrobial agents were determined. Penicillin and imipenem were the most active agents, followed by piperacillin, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, pefloxacin, and clindamycin. Some resistance was observed with erythromycin, tetracycline, and chloramphenicol. Activity was poor or absent with vancomycin, teicoplanin, daptomycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, gentamicin, and netilmicin. PMID:2291674

  13. Investigational Antimicrobial Agents of 2013

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY New antimicrobial agents are always needed to counteract the resistant pathogens that continue to be selected by current therapeutic regimens. This review provides a survey of known antimicrobial agents that were currently in clinical development in the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013. Data were collected from published literature primarily from 2010 to 2012, meeting abstracts (2011 to 2012), government websites, and company websites when appropriate. Compared to what was reported in previous surveys, a surprising number of new agents are currently in company pipelines, particularly in phase 3 clinical development. Familiar antibacterial classes of the quinolones, tetracyclines, oxazolidinones, glycopeptides, and cephalosporins are represented by entities with enhanced antimicrobial or pharmacological properties. More importantly, compounds of novel chemical structures targeting bacterial pathways not previously exploited are under development. Some of the most promising compounds include novel β-lactamase inhibitor combinations that target many multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, a critical medical need. Although new antimicrobial agents will continue to be needed to address increasing antibiotic resistance, there are novel agents in development to tackle at least some of the more worrisome pathogens in the current nosocomial setting. PMID:24092856

  14. Helical Antimicrobial Sulfono- {gamma} -AApeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yaqiong; Wu, Haifan; Teng, Peng; Bai, Ge; Lin, Xiaoyang; Zuo, Xiaobing; Cao, Chuanhai; Cai, Jianfeng

    2015-06-11

    Host-defense peptides (HDPs) such as magainin 2 have emerged as potential therapeutic agents combating antibiotic resistance. Inspired by their structures and mechanism of action, herein we report the fi rst example of antimicrobial helical sulfono- γ - AApeptide foldamers. The lead molecule displays broad-spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against multi-drug-resistant Gram- positive and Gram-negative bacterial pathogens. Time-kill studies and fl uorescence microscopy suggest that sulfono- γ -AApeptides eradicate bacteria by taking a mode of action analogous to that of HDPs. Clear structure - function relationships exist in the studied sequences. Longer sequences, presumably adopting more-de fi ned helical structures, are more potent than shorter ones. Interestingly, the sequence with less helical propensity in solution could be more selective than the stronger helix-forming sequences. Moreover, this class of antimicrobial agents are resistant to proteolytic degradation. These results may lead to the development of a new class of antimicrobial foldamers combating emerging antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  15. Molecular Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Fluit, Ad C.; Visser, Maarten R.; Schmitz, Franz-Josef

    2001-01-01

    The determination of antimicrobial susceptibility of a clinical isolate, especially with increasing resistance, is often crucial for the optimal antimicrobial therapy of infected patients. Nucleic acid-based assays for the detection of resistance may offer advantages over phenotypic assays. Examples are the detection of the methicillin resistance-encoding mecA gene in staphylococci, rifampin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and the spread of resistance determinants across the globe. However, molecular assays for the detection of resistance have a number of limitations. New resistance mechanisms may be missed, and in some cases the number of different genes makes generating an assay too costly to compete with phenotypic assays. In addition, proper quality control for molecular assays poses a problem for many laboratories, and this results in questionable results at best. The development of new molecular techniques, e.g., PCR using molecular beacons and DNA chips, expands the possibilities for monitoring resistance. Although molecular techniques for the detection of antimicrobial resistance clearly are winning a place in routine diagnostics, phenotypic assays are still the method of choice for most resistance determinations. In this review, we describe the applications of molecular techniques for the detection of antimicrobial resistance and the current state of the art. PMID:11585788

  16. Antimicrobial Polymers with Metal Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Palza, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms. PMID:25607734

  17. Antimicrobial resistance: a global response.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard D.; Coast, Joanna

    2002-01-01

    Resistance to antimicrobial therapies reduces the effectiveness of these drugs, leading to increased morbidity, mortality, and health care expenditure. Because globalization increases the vulnerability of any country to diseases occurring in other countries, resistance presents a major threat to global public health, and no country acting on its own can adequately protect the health of its population against it. International collective action is therefore essential. Nevertheless, responsibility for health remains predominantly national. Consequently, there is a potentially significant disparity between the problems and solutions related to antimicrobial resistance and the institutions and mechanisms that are available to deal with them. This paper considers the capacity of national and international institutions and mechanisms to generate a collective response to antimicrobial resistance. Strategies for containing resistance are outlined, with particular reference to globally coordinated activities of countries. The adequacy of national and international responses to resistance is assessed, and the actions that international bodies could take to solve difficulties associated with present responses are highlighted. Approaches are suggested for securing international collective action for the containment of antimicrobial resistance. PMID:11953791

  18. Antimicrobial polymers with metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Palza, Humberto

    2015-01-19

    Metals, such as copper and silver, can be extremely toxic to bacteria at exceptionally low concentrations. Because of this biocidal activity, metals have been widely used as antimicrobial agents in a multitude of applications related with agriculture, healthcare, and the industry in general. Unlike other antimicrobial agents, metals are stable under conditions currently found in the industry allowing their use as additives. Today these metal based additives are found as: particles, ions absorbed/exchanged in different carriers, salts, hybrid structures, etc. One recent route to further extend the antimicrobial applications of these metals is by their incorporation as nanoparticles into polymer matrices. These polymer/metal nanocomposites can be prepared by several routes such as in situ synthesis of the nanoparticle within a hydrogel or direct addition of the metal nanofiller into a thermoplastic matrix. The objective of the present review is to show examples of polymer/metal composites designed to have antimicrobial activities, with a special focus on copper and silver metal nanoparticles and their mechanisms.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of Securidaca longipedunculata.

    PubMed

    Ajali, U; Chukwurah, B K C

    2004-11-01

    The folk herbal uses of Securidaca longipedunculata in the treatment of diarrhea, boils, gonorrhea, and cough prompted phytochemical analyses and antimicrobial activity screening of extracts of the root. Some flavonoids isolated showed activity against many micro-organisms. These flavonoids were isolated using chromatographic methods.

  20. An Antimicrobial Susceptibility Management System

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, James J.; O'Donnell, Edward D.

    1981-01-01

    A computerized system is described which is used to store, manipulate and retrieve antimicrobial susceptibility data in the clinical microbiology lab. Features include facilitated input of susceptibility data, rapid generation of reports, realtime access to data, and enhanced retrieval of information for Infection Control.

  1. ANTIMICROBIAL EFFECT OF INTRACANAL SUBSTANCES

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Cláudia de Moura; dos Santos, Silvana Soléo Ferreira; Jorge, Antônio Olavo Cardoso; Lage-Marques, José Luiz

    2007-01-01

    In some situations, endodontic infections do not respond to therapeutic protocol. In these cases, it is suggested the administration of an alternative intracanal medication that presents a wide spectrum of action and has an in-depth effect on the root canal system. The purpose of this study was to assess the antimicrobial action of ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and polyethylene glycol and natrosol vehicles with different associations and concentrations. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by using the agar dilution method. The culture media (Müller-Hinton agar) were prepared containing antimicrobial agents at multiple two-fold dilutions of 0.25 to 16 µg/mL, and with the vehicles at the concentrations of 50, 45, 40, 35, 30 and 25%. Twenty-three microbial strains were selected for the study. Metronidazole was not capable of eliminating any of the tested microorganisms. The association of ciprofloxacin with metronidazole resulted in a reduction of the MIC. The vehicle polyethylene glycol inhibited the growth of 100% of the tested strains, while natrosol inhibited 18% of the strains. Ciprofloxacin formulations with polyethylene glycol presented better effects than those of formulations to which metronidazole was added. It was possible to conclude that ciprofloxacin presented antimicrobial action against all tested bacterial strains, and its association with metronidazole was synergic. The vehicle polyethylene glycol showed antimicrobial effect and the ciprofloxacin/polyethylene glycol association was the most effective combination for reducing the tested bacteria and yeasts. PMID:19089178

  2. Antimicrobial activity of Bryum argenteum.

    PubMed

    Sabovljevic, Aneta; Sokovic, Marina; Sabovljevic, Marko; Grubisic, Dragoljub

    2006-02-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Bryum argenteum ethanol extracts was evaluated by microdilution method against four bacterial (Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Micrococcus luteus and Staphilococcus aureus) and four fungal species (Aspergillus niger, Penicillium ochrochloron, Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophyes). All the investigated ethanol extracts have been proved to be active against all bacteria and fungi tested.

  3. Moonlet Wakes in Saturn's Cassini Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Showalter, M. R.

    1997-07-01

    We have detected several features with wavelike characteristics in the Voyager Radio Science (RSS) earth occultation data and Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultation data of Saturn's Cassini Division. We identified these structures using a non-linear autoregressive power spectral algorithm called Burg. This method is powerful for detecting short sections of quasiperiodic structure. We successfully used this same technique to identify six previously unseen Pan wakes in the Voyager PPS and Voyager RSS occultation data (Horn, Showalter and Russell, 1996, {/it Icarus} {/bf 124}, 663). Applying the Burg technique to the RSS data we find a number of wavelike structures in the Cassini Division. We see three distinct features that look like moonlet wakes. Two are Cassini Division features detected by Marouf and Tyler (1986, {/it Nature} {/bf 323}, 120) in the Voyager RSS data. Flynn and Cuzzi (1989, {/it Icarus} {/bf 82}, 180) determined that these features were azimuthally symmetric in the Voyager images and were most likely not moonlet wakes. The third wavelike structure resembles an outer moonlet wake. If it is a wake it may correspond to a previously undetected moonlet located in a Cassini Division gap between 118,929 km and 118,966 km. We see at least one wavelike feature in the PPS data. This feature falls close to the outer edge of the Huygens gap in the Cassini Division. It is consistent with an outer moonlet wake. If it is a wake it may correspond to a previously undetected moonlet inside the Huygens gap. Several other wavelike features in the Cassini Division resemble moonlet wakes. We plan to pursue these structures further in the future. This work was performed at JPL/Caltech under contract with NASA.

  4. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Madhuparna Itoh, Kie Iijima, Miho Sesaki, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson’s disease-associated protein—parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1—in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. -- Highlights: •A Drp1-mediated mechanism accounts for ∼95% of mitochondrial division. •Parkin controls the connectivity of mitochondria via a mechanism that is independent of Drp1. •In the absence of Drp1, connected mitochondria transiently depolarize. •The transient depolarization is independent of calcium signaling and uncoupling protein 2.

  5. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S.

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  6. Quantum internet using code division multiple access.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-xi; Ozdemir, Sahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

  7. Quantum internet using code division multiple access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Xi; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-07-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels.

  8. Website for the Space Science Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schilling, James; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Space Science Division at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to research in astrophysics, exobiology, advanced life support technologies, and planetary science. These research programs are structured around Astrobiology (the study of life in the universe and the chemical and physical forces and adaptions that influence life's origin, evolution, and destiny), and address some of the most fundamental questions pursued by science. These questions examine the origin of life and our place in the universe. Ames is recognized as a world leader in Astrobiology. In pursuing our mission in Astrobiology, Space Science Division scientists perform pioneering basic research and technology development.

  9. Division XII: Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samus, N. N.; Yamaoka, H.; Gilmore, A. C.; Aksnes, K.; Green, D. W. E.; Marsden, B. G.; Nakano, S.; Lara, Martin; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Sphar, T.; Ticha, J.; Williams, G.

    2015-08-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during the Beijing General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Friday, August 24, 2012. The meeting was attended by five C6 members (N. N. Samus; D. W. E. Green; S. Nakano; J. Ticha; and H. Yamaoka). Also present was Prof. F. Genova as a representative of the IAU Division B. She told the audience about the current restructuring of IAU Commissions and Divisions and consequences for the future of C6.

  10. Quantum internet using code division multiple access

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Liu, Yu-xi; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Wu, Re-Bing; Gao, Feifei; Wang, Xiang-Bin; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    A crucial open problem inS large-scale quantum networks is how to efficiently transmit quantum data among many pairs of users via a common data-transmission medium. We propose a solution by developing a quantum code division multiple access (q-CDMA) approach in which quantum information is chaotically encoded to spread its spectral content, and then decoded via chaos synchronization to separate different sender-receiver pairs. In comparison to other existing approaches, such as frequency division multiple access (FDMA), the proposed q-CDMA can greatly increase the information rates per channel used, especially for very noisy quantum channels. PMID:23860488

  11. Combating Antimicrobial Resistance in Foodborne Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Lai, Edward P C; Iqbal, Zafar; Avis, Tyler J

    2016-02-01

    This review addresses an important public health hazard affecting food safety. Antimicrobial agents are used in foods to reduce or eliminate microorganisms that cause disease. Many traditional organic compounds, novel synthetic organic agents, natural products, peptides, and proteins have been extensively studied for their effectiveness as antimicrobial agents against foodborne Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli, Listeria spp. and Salmonella. However, antimicrobial resistance can develop in microorganisms, enhancing their ability to withstand the inhibiting or killing action of antimicrobial agents. Knowledge gaps still exist with regard to the actual chemical and microbiological mechanisms that must be identified to facilitate the search for new antimicrobial agents. Technical implementation of antimicrobial active packing films and coatings against target microorganisms must also be improved for extended product shelf life. Recent advances in antimicrobial susceptibility testing can provide researchers with new momentum to pursue their quest for a resistance panacea.

  12. Access to effective antimicrobials: a worldwide challenge.

    PubMed

    Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Matsoso, Precious; Pant, Suraj; Brower, Charles; Røttingen, John-Arne; Klugman, Keith; Davies, Sally

    2016-01-09

    Recent years have seen substantial improvements in life expectancy and access to antimicrobials, especially in low-income and lower-middle-income countries, but increasing pathogen resistance to antimicrobials threatens to roll back this progress. Resistant organisms in health-care and community settings pose a threat to survival rates from serious infections, including neonatal sepsis and health-care-associated infections, and limit the potential health benefits from surgeries, transplants, and cancer treatment. The challenge of simultaneously expanding appropriate access to antimicrobials, while restricting inappropriate access, particularly to expensive, newer generation antimicrobials, is unique in global health and requires new approaches to financing and delivering health care and a one-health perspective on the connections between pathogen transmission in animals and humans. Here, we describe the importance of effective antimicrobials. We assess the disease burden caused by limited access to antimicrobials, attributable to resistance to antimicrobials, and the potential effect of vaccines in restricting the need for antibiotics.

  13. Trends in antibiotic susceptibility of bloodstream pathogens in hospitalized patients in France, 1996 to 2007.

    PubMed

    Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Lamy, Brigitte; Pina, Patrick; Allouch, Pierre Yves

    2010-03-01

    Nationwide surveys of antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria isolated from bloodstream infections are required to fit empiric therapy to recent trends and detect emerging resistance. We report the results of a French national prospective survey based on the College of Bacteriology-Virology and Hygiene study group network performed each October during the 1996 to 2007 period, with focus on Enterobacteriaceae (7708 isolates) and Staphylococcus aureus (2271 isolates). The most relevant antimicrobial susceptibilities trends were i) a decrease in fluoroquinolones susceptibility among Enterobacteriaceae (96-90%, P < 0.0001) and Escherichia coli isolates (98-89%, P < 0.0001), respectively, ii) the slight but significant decrease in cefotaxime susceptibility among E. coli (P = 0.016), and iii) the significant increase in gentamicin susceptibility among S. aureus strains (P = 0.016). This survey reports antibiotic susceptibility of bloodstream pathogens in France. The empiric use of fluoroquinolones in severe infections should be cautiously monitored by thorough clinical and microbiologic follow-up.

  14. Structural perspectives on antimicrobial chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Leonard T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2012-01-01

    Chemokines are best known as signaling proteins in the immune system. Recently however, a large number of human chemokines have been shown to exert direct antimicrobial activity. This moonlighting activity appears to be related to the net high positive charge of these immune signaling proteins. Chemokines can be divided into distinct structural elements and some of these have been studied as isolated peptide fragments that can have their own antimicrobial activity. Such peptides often encompass the α-helical region found at the C-terminal end of the parent chemokines, which, similar to other antimicrobial peptides, adopt a well-defined membrane-bound amphipathic structure. Because of their relatively small size, intact chemokines can be studied effectively by NMR spectroscopy to examine their structures in solution. In addition, NMR relaxation experiments of intact chemokines can provide detailed information about the intrinsic dynamic behavior; such analyses have helped for example to understand the activity of TC-1, an antimicrobial variant of CXCL7/NAP-2. With chemokine dimerization and oligomerization influencing their functional properties, the use of NMR diffusion experiments can provide information about monomer-dimer equilibria in solution. Furthermore, NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments can be used to map out the interface between self-associating subunits. Moreover, the unusual case of XCL1/lymphotactin presents a chemokine that can interconvert between two distinct folds in solution, both of which have been elucidated. Finally, recent advances have allowed for the determination of the structures of chemokines in complex with glycosaminoglycans, a process that could interfere with their antimicrobial activity. Taken together, these studies highlight several different structural facets that contribute to the way in which chemokines exert their direct microbicidal actions. PMID:23293636

  15. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  16. Trends in antimicrobial resistance in equine bacterial isolates: 1999-2012.

    PubMed

    Johns, I C; Adams, E-L

    2015-03-28

    This study aimed to identify changing antimicrobial resistance patterns in isolates commonly obtained from equine clinical submissions. Laboratory records from 1999 to 2012 were searched for equine samples from which Escherichia coli or Streptococcus species was isolated. Susceptibility to enrofloxacin, ceftiofur, gentamicin, penicillin G, trimethoprim sulfamethoxazole (TMPS) and tetracyclines was noted. Isolates were divided into those identified between 1999 and 2004 (Early) and between 2007 and 2012 (Late). The proportion of isolates resistant to each antimicrobial and multiple drug-resistant (MDR) isolates (≥3 antimicrobial classes) was compared between time periods. There were 464 isolates identified (242 Early; 222 Late). A significant increase in the percentage of E coli isolates resistant to ceftiofur (7.3-22.7 per cent, P=0.002), gentamicin (28.5-53.9 per cent, P<0.001), tetracyclines (48.4-74.2 per cent, P=0.002) and MDR (26.6-49.4 per cent, P=0.007) was identified. There was a significant increase over time in the percentage of all streptococcal species resistant to enrofloxacin, ranging from 0 per cent (Early) up to 63 per cent (Late) depending on species. For Streptococcus zooepidemicus, resistance over time to tetracyclines and MDR increased. There was also a decrease in the proportion of S zooepidemicus resistant to TMPS over time. An increase in resistance over time of common equine pathogens to a number of commonly used antimicrobials supports the responsible use of antimicrobials.

  17. A well protected intruder: the effective antimicrobial defense of the invasive ladybird Harmonia axyridis.

    PubMed

    Gross, Jürgen; Eben, Astrid; Müller, Ina; Wensing, Annette

    2010-11-01

    The harlequin ladybird Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is a polyphagous predatory beetle native to Central and Eastern Asia. Since 2007 it has established all over Central Europe. In order to elucidate which defense strategy is responsible for its high resistance to diseases, we tested hemolymph as well as eleven main components of the headspace of H. axyridis for antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive (Bacillus subtilis, B. thuringiensis ssp. tenebrionis, Micrococcus luteus) and Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) and yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). While three of the volatile compounds weakly reduced the growth of microorganisms, hemolymph of adults and larvae of H. axyridis strongly inhibited the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as yeast. Furthermore, we compared the antimicrobial activity in the hemolymph of H. axyridis and Coccinella septempunctata. Antimicrobial activity in H. axyridis was about a thousand times higher compared to hemolymph from C. septempunctata. In contrast to C. septempunctata, the antimicrobial activity in H. axyridis was present without prior challenge. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the hemolymph of H. axyridis was lowest against E. coli and yeast followed by B. subtilis, and was highest against entomopathogenic B. thuringiensis ssp. tenebrionidae. Furthermore, MIC values of the hemolymph obtained from live beetles were significantly lower than from frozen insects. This suggests that the active antimicrobial compound is affected by freezing and subsequent thawing of the beetles. Potential implications of our findings for the competitive advantages of H. axyridis over C. septempunctata are discussed.

  18. [Occupational diseases in Poland, 2007].

    PubMed

    Wilczyńska, Urszula; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Szymczak, Wiesław

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to present basic statistical data on occupational diseases diagnosed in 2007. The work was based on the data compiled from "Occupational Disease Reporting Forms" received by the Central Register of Occupational Diseases in 2006. The data comprised information on nosologic units, gender and age of patients, and duration of occupational exposure to harmful agents responsible for the development of specified pathologies. These data were further classified by sectors of the national economy and voivodships. The incidence was specified in terms of the number of cases in relation to paid employees or to employed persons. In 2007, 3285 cases of occupational diseases were diagnosed. The incidence rate was 33.5 cases/100 000 paid employees. The highest incidence rates were noted for chronic voice disorders (8.1/100 000), pneumoconioses (7.1), infectious and parasitic diseases (6.8) and hearing loss (2.6). As many as 77.3% of patients affected by occupational diseases had been exposed to harmful agents for more than 20 years. In industrial sectors of the national economy, the coal mining industry showed the highest incidence rates (404.1 cases/100 000). The highest incidence rates were recorded in the Lubelskie (73.1), Silesian (68.4), Swietokrzyskie (66.5) and Małopolskie (60.7) voivodships. Compared with 2006, the number of cases of occupational diseases increased by 156 cases (5%), the incidence rate increased by 2.1%. The greatest rise was noted in infectious and parasitic diseases (by 68 cases, 11.3%) and chronic diseases of peripheral nervous system (by 50 cases, 46.3%). At the same time the number of hearing loss cases apparently decreased (by 43 cases, 14.6%).

  19. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter in broiler flocks in Japan.

    PubMed

    Haruna, M; Sasaki, Y; Murakami, M; Ikeda, A; Kusukawa, M; Tsujiyama, Y; Ito, K; Asai, T; Yamada, Y

    2012-06-01

    Campylobacter was isolated from 67 (47.2%) of 142 broiler flocks between September 2009 and February 2010. The prevalence of Campylobacter in broiler flocks was significantly lower during January and February than it was from September to December. Campylobacter colonization was more common in flocks that were not provided with a disinfected water supply, which was consistent with the findings of a previous study. The prevalence of antimicrobial drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. was investigated, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of eight antimicrobial agents were determined for 122 Campylobacter jejuni isolates and 46 Campylobacter coli isolates from broiler flocks between 2007 and 2010. In this study, 29.5% (36/122) of C. jejuni isolates and 41.3% (19/46) of C. coli isolates were resistant to enrofloxacin (ERFX), whereas all isolates were susceptible to erythromycin. Furthermore, the ERFX-resistant isolates were tested for susceptibility to other classes of antimicrobial agents, and 55.6% (20/36) of ERFX-resistant C. jejuni isolates and 47.4% (9/19) of ERFX-resistant C. coli isolates were resistant to at least one of aminobenzyl penicillin, dihydrostreptomycin and oxytetracycline. To avoid an impact of antimicrobial drug-resistant Campylobacter spp. on the efficacy of antimicrobial treatment for human campylobacteriosis, prudent use of antimicrobial agents is a requisite. The use of antimicrobial agents should be accompanied by various approaches such as prevention of Campylobacter colonization in broiler flocks with the aim of lowering the occurrence of Campylobacter infection in humans.

  20. Novel antimicrobial activities of a peptide derived from a Japanese soybean fermented food, Natto, against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis group strains.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Manabu; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Yamamoto, Soh; Kutomi, Ryosuke; Ohkoshi, Yasuo; Sato, Toyotaka; Wakui, Hideki; Itoh, Hideaki; Miyamoto, Atsushi; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2017-12-01

    We recently isolated a tumoricidal peptide from Natto, a Japanese traditional fermented food. In the present study, antimicrobial activity of the Natto peptide was examined. The peptide consisted of 45 amino acid residues, and its structure was predicted to be rich in α-helix. It excreted antimicrobial activity only against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Bacillus subtilis group (B. subtilis, Bacillus pumilus, and Bacillus licheniformis). Lesser antimicrobial activity was observed for Streptococcus species other than S. pneumoniae. Hemolysate or hemin was required for the antimicrobial activity of the peptide. The Natto peptide damages the cell membrane of B. subtilis. On the other hand, chain morphology was induced in S. pneumoniae, which is naturally diplococcus, during the early phases of the Natto peptide treatment; following that the cells were rapidly lysed. This suggested that the Natto peptide displayed a novel narrow spectrum of bactericidal activity and inhibited cell separation during cell division of S. pneumoniae.

  1. Epidemiological characteristics of cholera in Singapore, 1992-2007.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chia Siong; Ang, Li Wei; James, Lyn; Goh, Kee Tai

    2010-07-01

    We carried out an epidemiological review of cholera in Singapore to determine its trends and the factors contributing to its occurrence. Epidemiological data of all notified cases of cholera maintained by the Communicable Diseases Division, Ministry of Health, for the period 1992 to 2007 were collated and analysed. Case-control studies were carried out in outbreaks to determine the source of infection and mode of transmission. Linear patterns in age and ethnic distribution of cholera cases were assessed using chi2 test for trend. There were a total of 210 cholera cases reported between 1992 and 2007. The incidence of cholera declined from 17 cases in 1992 to 7 cases in 2007. About a quarter of the cases were imported from endemic countries in the region. Between 76% and 95% of the reported cases were local residents. Four elderly patients with comorbidities and who sought medical treatment late died, giving a case-fatality rate of 1.9%. Vibrio cholerae 01, biotype El Tor, serotype Ogawa, accounted for 83.8% of the cases. The vehicles of transmission identified in outbreaks included raw fi sh, undercooked seafood and iced drinks cross-contaminated with raw seafood. With the high standard of environmental hygiene and sanitation, a comprehensive epidemiological surveillance system and licensing and control of food establishments, cholera could not gain a foothold in Singapore despite it being situated in an endemic region. However, health education of the public on the importance of personal and food hygiene is of paramount importance in preventing foodborne outbreaks. Physicians should also maintain a high level of suspicion of cholera in patients presenting with severe gastroenteritis, especially those with a recent travel history to endemic countries.

  2. Trial NCT02095145 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Trial NCT02326805 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Clinical Trials Node | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. 2013 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Problems on Divisibility of Binomial Coefficients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osler, Thomas J.; Smoak, James

    2004-01-01

    Twelve unusual problems involving divisibility of the binomial coefficients are represented in this article. The problems are listed in "The Problems" section. All twelve problems have short solutions which are listed in "The Solutions" section. These problems could be assigned to students in any course in which the binomial theorem and Pascal's…

  7. 7 CFR 29.16 - Division.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Division. 29.16 Section 29.16 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  8. Trial NCT02063698 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. 2015 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. 2016 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. 2014 News Articles | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  12. Trial NCT01169259 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  14. King County Division of Parks and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Univ., Iowa City. Recreation Education Program.

    Presented are duplications of the responses given by the King County Division of Parks and Recreation (Seattle, Washington) as part of a project to collect, share, and compile information about, and techniques in the operation of 18 community action models for recreation services to the disabled. Model programs are categorized as consumer, client…

  15. Chemical Biodynamics Division. Annual report 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Chemical Biodynamics Division of LBL continues to conduct basic research on the dynamics of living cells and on the interaction of radiant energy with organic matter. Many aspects of this basic research are related to problems of environmental and health effects of fossil fuel combustion, solar energy conversion and chemical/ viral carcinogenesis.

  16. Keeping Children Safe: OJJDP's Child Protection Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullen, Thomas

    More than two decades of research have pointed to the connection between childhood maltreatment and delinquency. In addition, recent research confirms that harm is inflicted on children who are subjected to family and community violence. The Child Protection Division was created in an effort to bring child protection to the forefront and to…

  17. Physics Division activities report, 1986--1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This report summarizes the research activities of the Physics Division for the years 1986 and 1987. Areas of research discussed in this paper are: research on e/sup +/e/sup /minus// interactions; research on p/bar p/ interactions; experiment at TRIUMF; double beta decay; high energy astrophysics; interdisciplinary research; and advanced technology development and the SSC.

  18. Trial NCT01849250 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Kara Smigel Croker | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Kara Smigel Croker is the Communications Manager for the National Cancer Institute Division of Cancer Prevention. She coordinates and supports all aspects of communication, including media contacts, writing and editing of reports and responses, divisional websites, and social media. |

  20. Thursday's Agenda | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    TimeAgenda8:30 am - 8:50 amRegistration - Networking8:50 am - 8:55 amWelcome and Opening RemarksLeslie Ford, MDAssociate Director for Clinical ResearchDivision of Cancer Prevention, NCIEva Szabo, MD Chief, Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group |

  1. Trial NCT00917735 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Trial NCT02134925 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. Active Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  5. Trial NCT01968798 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  6. Administrative Resource Center | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Trial NCT01238172 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Trial NCT01391689 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Trial NCT02581137 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  10. Trial NCT01594502 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  11. Force Integration Doctrine and Division Staff Organization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-06

    Procedures ......................... 15 End Notes ................................... 16 q -- .- N -’ . -- - . - , - , ga’ . ’ , . . , .w...3o -Managing Change in a Division ............. 39 End Notes ................................... 43 3. THE ARMY AND CHANGE A. The Necessity For...8217; -. V AY VA~’ ’% % % . Z Tt ’ -.1 -- ~w.r~ K. A Historical Perspective- The US Army ........ 65 End Notes ................................... 69 4

  12. Trial NCT01728571 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  13. Trial NCT01793233 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  14. Trial NCT01661764 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  15. Trial NCT01141231 | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Origins of the Sexual Division of Labor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leibowitz, Lila

    An interactive, biosocial model of early hominids presents evidence that physical sex differences are not the basis for the sexual division of labor as is commonly believed. Production (the deliberate collection and distribution of food) developed among early hominids as a prerequisite for survival. Although the population appears to have had…

  17. Shizuko Sei, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Staff Directory | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  19. Annalisa Gnoleba, MSA | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Mrs. Annalisa Gnoleba is the Public Health Analyst for the Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute. In this position, Mrs. Gnoleba serves as the analyst for developing and formulating short and long range public health program goals, objectives and policies. |

  20. Early Detection Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.