Science.gov

Sample records for 2009-2010 fieldwork entry

  1. 50 CFR Table 4 (south) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Limited Entry Fixed Gear South of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Limited Entry Fixed Gear South of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 4 Table 4 (South) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST...

  2. 50 CFR Table 4 (north) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Limited Entry Fixed Gear North of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Limited Entry Fixed Gear North of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 4 Table 4 (North) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST...

  3. Recruiting Trends, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collegiate Employment Research Institute (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the recruiting trends for 2009-2010. This year's report is based on over 2,500 respondents, of which approximately 2,259 provided useable information with 1,846 including complete hiring figures used for the projections. The researchers continued their focus on fast-growth companies and expanded their efforts to ensure a…

  4. ARL Annual Salary Survey, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    The "ARL Annual Salary Survey 2009-2010" reports salary data for all professional staff working in ARL libraries. The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) represents the interests of libraries that serve major North American research institutions. Data for 10,207 professional staff members were reported this year for the 114 ARL university…

  5. Milwaukee Voucher Schools: 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure provides charted reference information for Milwaukee Voucher Schools for the 2009-2010 school year. Schools are grouped by grade level. The following is included: Name, Address, Telephone, Grades; Religion/Denomination; Enrollment; Choice Student Enrollment; Number of Teachers; School Hours; Before/After School Programs;…

  6. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

  7. Reflections on Dangerous Fieldwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peritore, N. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Stresses the danger of sociological fieldwork in Latin America for researcher and subject. Recommends that the researcher build a network of contacts for support and protection. Discusses the interpersonal relations, problems of security, and field entry techniques involved in sensitive research situations. Suggests unobtrusive methods of research…

  8. Linguistic Fieldwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Paul, Ed.; Ratliff, Martha, Ed.

    This book is a collection of original essays on the practice of linguistic fieldwork and language documentation. Twelve leading linguistics have contributed chapters about the study of languages in a natural setting. They pass on lessons learned, best practices, and discuss a wide variety of topics including the attitude of the linguistic, the…

  9. Space activities in 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagkratis, Spyros

    2011-09-01

    The global financial crisis of 2008 has created an economic environment unfavourable to public and corporate economic activity alike, which could not have left space activities unaffected. However, the effects of the crisis upon the space sector have been so far less damaging than anticipated. The following paper presents recent developments in the field of space policies, institutional budgets and commercial activity worldwide, in an effort to improve the understanding of the new trends in commercial and public space activities. It particularly explores the strategies followed by space stakeholders in different countries and regions in order to pursue their planned space programmes in view of difficult financial conditions. Finally, it highlights the differences in the outlook of space activities between established and emerging space-faring nations and attempts to explore their medium-term consequences on an international level. For this purpose, it was based on research conducted in the framework of a recent ESPI report on "Space Policies, Issues and trends in 2009/2010".

  10. 77 FR 28851 - Lightweight Thermal Paper From Germany: Notice of Amended Final Results of the 2009-2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... the 2009-2010 Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 77 FR 21082 (April 9, 2012) (Final Results). On... Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). This clarification will apply to entries of subject merchandise... Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). Cash Deposit Requirements The following antidumping...

  11. The ABCs of School Choice, 2009-2010 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the 2009-2010 edition of the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice's "ABCs of School Choice". The "ABCs of School Choice" provides the latest in up-to-date and accurate information about the many school choice success stories taking place throughout the country. Readers will find this guide an essential resource on…

  12. Specialist Schools and Academies Trust Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Specialist Schools and Academies Trust (SSAT) is an independent, not-for-profit membership organisation dedicated to raising levels of achievement in education. SSAT has a membership of over 5,500 schools and growing numbers of affiliated universities, colleges and local authorities. This 2009/2010 Annual Report shows clearly the practical …

  13. Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Division of Policy, Planning, and Research has assembled the Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book which is a compilation of statistical information pertaining to higher education in Tennessee. The 2009-2010 Fact Book contains tables and charts with data relevant to enrollment, persistence, graduation, tuition, financial aid, lottery…

  14. The 2009/2010 Caribbean drought: a case study.

    PubMed

    Peters, Everson J

    2015-10-01

    The impacts of drought in the Caribbean have not been as dramatic as in some other parts of world, but it is not exempt from the experiences of drought. As a result of the effects of a prolonged drought in 2009/2010, the agenda for the 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) paid particular attention to the issue of drought. This paper reviews the management framework for responding to drought disasters in five CARICOM countries. The paper also reports on some of the effects of the 2009/2010 drought with particular reference to Grenada and the Grenadines. During the drought in these islands there were numerous bush fires with devastating effects on agriculture, severe water shortages that impacted on the tourism industry and other social effects. It is evident that there was inadequate preparation for the event. Greater planning and investment are therefore required to reduce future impacts. PMID:25754334

  15. Annual Performance Report 2009-2010. Bureau of Indian Education. Submitted February 1, 2011. Revised Clarification, April 18, 2011. APR Template-Part B (4)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    During SY 2009-2010, the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) continued their efforts to improve the validity and reliability of data reporting. BIE data collections are dependent on school level entry (self reporting) into the Native American Student Information System (NASIS) or into the Bureau's Annual Report from the schools. In addition,…

  16. Analysis of pig movements across eastern Indonesia, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Edwina E C; Christley, Robert M; Geong, Maria; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2015-03-01

    Knowledge of live animal movement through markets and from farm-to-farm is needed to inform strategies for control of trans-boundary animal diseases (TADs) in south-east Asia, particularly due to consumer preference for fresh meat. In eastern Indonesia a TAD of principal interest for control is classical swine fever (CSF) due to its impacts on smallholder farmers. Pig movement is considered a contributor to failure of current CSF control efforts but pig movement patterns are not well understood. This study investigated movement of live pigs in West Timor, Flores and Sumba islands during 2009-2010, with the aim of informing CSF control policies for Nusa Tenggara Timor province. A market survey of 292 pig sellers and 281 pig buyers across nine live pig markets and a farmer survey across 18 villages with 289 smallholder farmers were conducted and information collected on pig movements. The data obtained was used for social network analysis (SNA) on formal (via a market) and informal (village-to-village) movements using information on trading practices, source and destination locations, and the number of pigs being moved. Both inter- and intra-island movements were identified, however inter-island movement was only observed between Flores and Sumba islands. West Timor and Sumba had highly connected networks where large numbers of villages were directly and indirectly linked through pig movement. Further for West Timor, both formal and informal pig movements linked the capital Kupang, on the eastern end of the island to the western districts bordering East Timor connecting all five districts and demonstrating that informal movement transports pigs over distances similar to formal movement on this island. Sumba had a higher potential for pigs to move to a greater number of sequential locations across the entire island. Flores was found to have a more fragmented network, with pig movements concentrated in its eastern or western regions, influenced by terrain. Markets were

  17. 2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage among College Students from 8 Universities in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehling, Katherine A.; Blocker, Jill; Ip, Edward H.; Peters, Timothy R.; Wolfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to describe the 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccine coverage of college students. Participants: A total of 4,090 college students from 8 North Carolina universities participated in a confidential, Web-based survey in October-November 2009. Methods: Associations between self-reported 2009-2010 seasonal influenza…

  18. The Progression Guidance 2009-2010: A Caution about the Achievement Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norgate, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The article welcomes the publication of the Progression Guidance 2009-2010 as an important milestone in the government's attempt to provide data to schools on how well children with special educational needs (SEN) are progressing. The materials hold the potential to enable school improvement partners, inspectors and educational psychologists to…

  19. Evaluation of the Correlated Science and Mathematics Professional Development Model, 2009-2010 Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlier, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the 2009-2010 iteration of the Correlated Science and Mathematics (CSM) professional development program which provides teachers and principals experience with integrated and effective science and mathematics teaching strategies and content. Archival CSM data was analyzed via mixed…

  20. Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning. Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning's annual report for 2009-2010. Providing quality early learning opportunities in the first five years shapes a child's learning and success for life. The window to make a difference in a child's future is small, but outcomes show that the agency is having an…

  1. Profiles of For-Profit Education Management Organizations: Twelfth Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Alex; Miron, Gary; Urschel, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    The 2009-2010 school year marked another year of relatively slow growth in the for-profit education management industry. The greatest increase in profiled companies occurred in the category of small EMOs (education management organizations) (i.e., EMOs that manage three or fewer schools). The authors believe their key finding from the 2007-2008…

  2. What We Eat In America, NHANES 2009-2010: Documentation and Data Files

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New nationwide dietary intake data were collected in What We Eat In America (WWEIA), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for the years 2009-2010 and are now available for public use. Two days of dietary intake data are included for most participants. The dietary interview dat...

  3. Annual Report: Discipline, Crime, and Violence, School Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Code of Virginia" requires school divisions statewide to submit data to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) on incidents of discipline, crime, and violence (DCV). School divisions began reporting such data in 1991. This annual report focuses primarily on DCV data submitted for school year 2009-2010, with selected comparisons to prior…

  4. 2009-2010 What We Eat In America, NHANES Tables 1-36

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Food Surveys Research Group of the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center has analyzed dietary data from the What We Eat In America (WWEIA), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010 and released 36 summary data tables for this latest 2-year survey release. The tab...

  5. Mississippi Department of Education 2011 Superintendent's Annual Report, School Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the requirements of Section 37-3-11 of the Mississippi Code of 1972, Annotated, this report contains pertinent financial, statistical and other important information at the state and local district levels. The following are presented for the 2009-2010 academic year: (1) Receipts for Public Schools; (2) Expenditures for Public…

  6. 75 FR 18413 - 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations-Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    .... According to the July 9, 2007, final rule published in the Federal Register (72 FR 37346), we went from 487... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 RIN 1018-AW49 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport...: The Fish and Wildlife Service adds two refuges to the list of areas open for hunting and/or...

  7. Geotagging Photographs in Student Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Katharine E.; France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Park, Julian R.

    2012-01-01

    This resource paper provides guidance for staff and students on the potential educational benefits, limitations and applications of geotagging photographs. It also offers practical advice for geotagging photographs in a range of fieldwork settings and reviews three free smartphone applications (apps) for geotagging photographs (Flickr, Evernote…

  8. A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramvi, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on what both psychoanalysis and anthropology have in common: the emphasis on the researcher's own experience. An ethnographic fieldwork will be used to illustrate how a psychoanalytical approach unfolds the material when studying conditions for learning from experience among teachers in two Norwegian junior high schools, and…

  9. 77 FR 34346 - Fresh Garlic from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the 2009-2010 Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...: Partial Final Results and Partial Final Rescission of the 2009-2010 Administrative Review, 77 FR 11486... FR 76375 (December 7, 2011) (Preliminary Results). On December 20, 2011, in response to Xinboda's and... Results of the 2009-2010 Administrative Review, 77 FR 17409 (March 26, 2012). At the request of Xinboda,...

  10. Galactic Cosmic-Ray Energy Spectra and Composition during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H..; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2013-01-01

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 <= Z <= 28 in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV / nucleon. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than approx. 7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than approx. 4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2sigma, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  11. PESTICIDE POISONINGS REPORTED BY FLORIDA CITRUS FIELDWORKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a 1981 survey of 1811 Florida citrus fieldworkers, 25 pesticide related poisoning incidents involving 29 fieldworkers were reported. Suspected poisonings were categorized into possible and confirmed poisonings, and from these reports it was possible to project an estimated 438...

  12. Biological Fieldwork Provision in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maw, Stephen J.; Mauchline, Alice L.; Park, Julian R.

    2011-01-01

    Fieldwork is regarded as an important component of many bioscience degree programmes. QAA benchmarks statements refer explicitly to the importance of fieldwork, although give no indication of amounts of field provision expected. Previous research has highlighted the importance of fieldwork to the learning of both subject-specific and transferable…

  13. Differentiation equivalent temperature in Lublin (2009-2010)/Zróżnicowanie temperatury ekwiwalentnej w Lublinie w latach 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobek, Mateusz

    2013-12-01

    In 2009-2010, in five points in Lublin, located in areas of different land use and built-up, measurements of air temperature and humidity were taken. Based on the data collected, the following elements were calculated: the difference in average monthly air temperature between the coldest point and the others, equivalent temperature (Tek) and Tek thermal sensations. Differences in average monthly air temperature in relation to the outskirts of Lublin were the highest at the point Dominikanie, in the built-up area of the old town. Most frequently "sultry" sensation was reported for the estate houses, at the point Ofelii. Different biothermal conditions were observed in the center of the city - Litewski square. It is characterized by a high proportion of vegetation. Green areas influenced the reduction of the biothermal stress compared to other points. The highest frequency of thermal sensation "cold", "cool" and "slightly cool" were recorded there. Measurements points located in two housing estates with high buildings close to each other were characterized by similar biothermal conditions. In these areas, comparing to other discussed areas of the city, at 12 UTC relatively often there were noticed the best biothermal conditions - "comfortable" according to equivalent temperature index

  14. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2013-06-20

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  15. Elemental GCR Observations during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum period. These data are compared with our observations from the 1997-1998 solar minimum period, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum periods differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum periods, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.

  16. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Among Gram-Negative Urinary Tract Pathogens: Global Smart Program Results, 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Bouchillon, Sam; Hoban, Daryl J; Badal, Robert; Hawser, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the rates of fluoroquinolone resistant (FQR) in gram-negative bacilli urinary tract infections (UTIs) in a global population. METHODS: The Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART) collected 1,116 FQR gram-negative urinary pathogens from hospitalized patients in 33 countries during 2009-2010. Amikacin, ertapenem, and imipenem were the most active agents tested against FQR UTI pathogens, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers. RESULTS: FQR rates vary widely country to country with a range of 6% to 75%. Regional FQR rates were 23.5% in North America, 29.4% in Europe, 33.2% in Asia, 38.7% in Latin America, and 25.5% in the South Pacific. CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest that fluoroquinolones may no longer be effective as first-line therapy for gram-negative UTI in hospitalized patients. PMID:23002406

  17. System for rapid assessment of pneumonia and influenza-related mortality-Ohio, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Loren E; Paulson, John; Fowler, Brian; Duffy, Rosemary

    2015-02-01

    Rapid mortality surveillance is critical for state emergency preparedness. To enhance timeliness during the 2009-2010 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, the Ohio Department of Health activated a drop-down menu within Ohio's Electronic Death Registration System for reporting of pneumonia- or influenza-related deaths approximately 5 days postmortem. We used International Classification of Diseases-Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes, available 2-3 months postmortem as the standard, and assessed their agreement with drop-down-menu codes for pneumonia- or influenza-related deaths. Among 56 660 Ohio deaths during September 2009-March 2010, agreement was 97.9% for pneumonia (κ = 0.85) and 99.9% for influenza (κ = 0.79). Sensitivity was 80.2% for pneumonia and 73.9% for influenza. Drop-down menu coding enhanced timeliness while maintaining high agreement with ICD-10 codes. PMID:25521902

  18. Life without Fieldwork: Some Lecturers' Perceptions of Geography and Environmental Science Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ian; Fuller, Ian; Gaskin, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Internationally, fieldwork is seen as intrinsic to geographical education. Fieldwork is here defined as any study of the environment that takes place outside the classroom. This paper extends a previous study of student perceptions of the impacts on their learning of a cancellation of fieldwork caused by an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in…

  19. Fieldwork and the International Geography Olympiad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Kevin; Berg, Kath

    2007-01-01

    Fieldwork forms a substantial part of the International Geography Olympiad (IGEO) both in terms of time and in the nature of the experience in which participants get a chance to explore the "real world" of the host country. Fieldwork offers young geographers an excellent opportunity to explore the regional and local geography of the host nation…

  20. [Recommendations for the management of influenza in pediatrics (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Marès, J; Rodrigo, C; Moreno-Pérez, D; Cilleruelo, M J; Barrio, F; Buñuel, J C; González, M P; González de Dios, J; Aparicio, M; Arístegui, J; Hernández-Sampelayo, T

    2010-02-01

    Specific action plans from various institutions, governments and scientific societies have been identified and implemented to combat the A H1N1 2009 influenza virus pandemic. This document sets out the recommendations of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics for the management of influenza in children for influenza season 2009-2010. The risk factors for influenza A H1N1 2009 in pediatric patients, the clinical course, severity and complications are similar to seasonal influenza. In most cases, the diagnosis of influenza will be based on clinical suspicion, without viral subtype differentiation. In a patient with influenza virus infection, the criteria for referral and hospital admission will be based broadly on the signs of clinical severity or complications, regardless of the causative virus. Children with influenza but with no signs of clinical severity or complications do not require antiviral treatment. Physical measures of hygiene and isolation are essential to reduce the transmissibility of the disease. The influenza vaccines in infancy, for both seasonal influenza and for influenza A H1N1 2009, should be directed primarily at patients with risk factors. PMID:20133214

  1. Seasonal consumption of Hemimysis anomala by fish in southeastern Lake Ontario, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; Gumtow, C.F.; Walsh, M.G.; Weidel, B.C.; Boscarino, B.T.; Rudstam, L. G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the seasonal occurrence of Hemimysis anomala in the diets of fish that prey on macroinvertebrates at two sites with established Hemimysis populations east of Oswego, NY, during 2009-2010. In 2009, we examined 320 stomachs from 10 species and found Hemimysis only in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rockbass (Ambloplites rupestris), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Of those species, alewife consumed Hemimysis most frequently and it represented a greater proportion of their diets. During 2009, the dry weight composition of Hemimysis in alewife diets varied seasonally between <1% in June, 5% in July, 98.5% in August, and 18.8% in September. In contrast, we examined 667 stomachs from 15 species in 2010 and observed Hemimysis in only one alewife and two rockbass stomachs. For alewife from September 2009, we found no relationship between predator size and the number of Hemimysis consumed, or between the presence of Hemimysis in fish diets and the presence of other diet taxa or diet diversity. Fish diets collected as bycatch from other assessments revealed large numbers of Hemimysis in fishes that had not previously been observed consuming Hemimysis in Lake Ontario, including cisco (Coregonus artedi) and white perch (Morone americana). Our results indicate Hemimysis consumption by nearshore fish can be high, but that it is variable across seasons and years, and may be most prevalent in fish that feed up in the water column, at or near dark, and have the ability to consume swift moving prey like Mysis diluviana or small fish.

  2. Drowsy driving - 19 states and the District of Columbia, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 2.5% of fatal motor vehicle crashes (approximately 730 in 2009) and 2.0% of all crashes with nonfatal injuries (approximately 30,000 in 2009) involve drowsy driving. However, although data collection methods make it challenging to estimate the number of crashes that involve drowsy drivers, some modeling studies have estimated that 15% to 33% of fatal crashes might involve drowsy drivers. Fatalities and injuries are more likely in motor vehicle crashes that involve drowsy driving compared with non-drowsy driving crashes. To assess the state-level self-reported prevalence of falling asleep while driving, CDC analyzed data from a set of questions about insufficient sleep administered through the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) during 2009-2010. Among 147,076 respondents in 19 states and the District of Columbia (DC),* 4.2% reported having fallen asleep while driving at least one time during the previous 30 days. Reports of falling asleep while driving were more common among adults who reported usually sleeping ≤6 hours per day, snoring, or unintentionally falling asleep during the day compared with other adults who did not report these characteristics. Drivers should avoid driving while drowsy and learn the warning signs of drowsy driving. PMID:23282860

  3. Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Peer Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Paul G.

    1986-01-01

    Independent study, fieldwork, and peer teaching are particularly well suited to helping outstanding students learn, interact collaboratively, and become contributing members of the academic community. Study options, elements of a study contract, and other components are described. (MSE)

  4. Special Education Coding Criteria 2009/2010: ECS to Grade 12 Mild/Moderate (Including Gifted and Talented) Severe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alberta Education provides programming support and funding to school authorities to develop and implement special education programming for ECS children and students in grades 1 to 12. "Special Education Coding Criteria 2009/2010" outlines criteria within specific categories to help school authorities identify those children and students who…

  5. 76 FR 62039 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of 2009-2010 Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ...: Notice of Preliminary Results of 2009-2010 Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 31938 (June 2... proceeding.\\4\\ \\3\\ See Antidumping Duties; Countervailing Duties: Final Rule, 62 FR 27296, 27393 (May 19, 1997). \\4\\ See Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68...

  6. Salaries and Wages Paid Professional and Support Personnel in Public Schools, 2009-2010. A Reference Tool for School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protheroe, Nancy; Licciardi, Christopher M.; Cooke, Willa D.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents salary and wage data collected as part of the 37th edition of the "ERS National Survey of Salaries and Wages in Public Schools, 2009-2010." The survey, conducted in fall 2008, collected data on salaries scheduled and salaries paid for 23 selected professional positions and 10 selected support positions in public school systems…

  7. Cross-Validation of easyCBM Reading Cut Scores in Oregon: 2009-2010. Technical Report #1108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Irvin, P. Shawn; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical report presents results from a cross-validation study designed to identify optimal cut scores when using easyCBM[R] reading tests in Oregon. The cross-validation study analyzes data from the 2009-2010 academic year for easyCBM[R] reading measures. A sample of approximately 2,000 students per grade, randomly split into two groups of…

  8. Costs of School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics in Maine during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This study retrospectively estimated costs for a convenience sample of school-located vaccination (SLV) clinics conducted in Maine during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Surveys were developed to capture the cost of labor including unpaid volunteers as well as supplies and materials used in SLV clinics. Six nurses from different school districts…

  9. 41st Annual Survey Report on State-Sponsored Student Financial Aid, 2009-2010 Academic Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each year, the National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs (NASSGAP) completes a survey regarding state-funded expenditures for postsecondary student financial aid. This report, the 41th annual survey, represents data from academic year 2009-10. Data highlights include: (1) In the 2009-2010 academic year, the states awarded about…

  10. Active Travel to School: Findings from the Survey of US Health Behavior in School-Aged Children, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yong; Ivey, Stephanie S.; Levy, Marian C.; Royne, Marla B.; Klesges, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whereas children's active travel to school (ATS) has confirmed benefits, only a few large national surveys of ATS exist. Methods: Using data from the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) 2009-2010 US survey, we conducted a logistic regression model to estimate the odds ratios of ATS and a linear regression model to estimate…

  11. Making the Good Even Better: Feedback from easyCBM Focus Groups, School Year 2009/2010. Technical Report # 1001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald; Lai, Cheng-Fei

    2010-01-01

    This technical report provides a summary of feedback from teachers, administrators, and support personnel who used the easyCBM progress monitoring and benchmark assessment system during school year 2009/2010. Data were gathered from semi-structured focus groups conducted during the 2010 easyCBM August Institute at the University of Oregon. Results…

  12. Madeira Extreme Floods: 2009/2010 Winter. Case study - 2nd and 20th of February

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, V.; Marques, J.; Silva, A.

    2010-09-01

    Floods are at world scale the natural disaster that affects a larger fraction of the population. It is a phenomenon that extends it's effects to the surrounding areas of the hydrographic network (basins, rivers, dams) and the coast line. Accordingly to USA FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) flood can be defined as:"A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of two or more acres of normally dry land area or of two or more properties from: Overflow of inland or tidal waters; Unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source; Mudflow; Collapse or subsidence of land along the shore of a lake or similar body of water as a result of erosion or undermining caused by waves or currents of water exceeding anticipated cyclical levels that result in a flood as defined above." A flash flood is the result of intense and long duration of continuous precipitation and can result in dead casualties (i.e. floods in mainland Portugal in 1967, 1983 and 1997). The speed and strength of the floods either localized or over large areas, results in enormous social impacts either by the loss of human lives and or the devastating damage to the landscape and human infrastructures. The winter of 2009/2010 in Madeira Island was characterized by several episodes of very intense precipitation (specially in December 2009 and February 2010) adding to a new record of accumulated precipitation since there are records in the island. In February two days are especially rainy with absolute records for the month of February (daily records since 1949): 111mm and 97mm on the 2nd and 20th respectively. The accumulated precipitation ended up with the terrible floods on the 20th of February causing the lost of dozens of human lives and hundreds of millions of Euros of losses The large precipitation occurrences either more intense precipitation in a short period or less intense precipitation during a larger period are sometimes the precursor of

  13. Firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas - United States, 2006-2007 and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    Firearm homicides and suicides are a continuing public health concern in the United States. During 2009-2010, a total of 22,571 firearm homicides and 38,126 firearm suicides occurred among U.S. residents. This includes 3,397 firearm homicides and 1,548 firearm suicides among persons aged 10-19 years; the firearm homicide rate for this age group was slightly above the all-ages rate. This report updates an earlier report that provided statistics on firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas for 2006-2007, with special emphasis on persons aged 10-19 years in recognition of the importance of early prevention efforts. Firearm homicide and suicide rates were calculated for the 50 most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) for 2009-2010 using mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Comparison statistics were recalculated for 2006-2007 to reflect revisions to MSA delineations and population estimates subsequent to the earlier report. Although the firearm homicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained above the national rate during 2009-2010, more than 75% of these MSAs showed a decreased rate from 2006-2007, largely accounting for a national decrease. The firearm homicide rate for persons aged 10-19 years exceeded the all-ages rate in many of these MSAs during 2009-2010, similar to the earlier reporting period. Conversely, although the firearm suicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained below the national rate during 2009-2010, nearly 75% of these MSAs showed an increased rate from 2006-2007, paralleling the national trend. Firearm suicide rates among persons aged 10-19 years were low compared with all-ages rates during both periods. These patterns can inform the development and monitoring of strategies directed at reducing firearm-related violence. PMID:23903593

  14. Monitoring and forecasting the 2009-2010 severe drought in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Tang, Q.; Liu, X.; Leng, G.; Li, Z.; Cui, H.

    2015-12-01

    From the fall of 2009 to the spring of 2010, an unprecedented drought swept across southwest China (SW) and led to a severe shortage in drinking water and a huge loss to regional economy. Monitoring and predicting the severe drought with several months in advance is of critical importance for such hydrological disaster assessment, preparation and mitigation. In this study, we attempted to carry out a model-based hydrological monitoring and seasonal forecasting framework, and assessed its skill in capturing the evolution of the SW drought in 2009-2010. Using the satellite-based meteorological forcings and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model, the drought conditions were assessed in a near-real-time manner based on a 62-year (1952-2013) retrospective simulation, wherein the satellite data was adjusted by a gauge-based forcing to remove systematic biases. Bias-corrected seasonal forecasting outputs from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2) was tentatively applied for a seasonal hydrologic prediction and its predictive skill was overall evaluated relative to a traditional Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) method with lead time varying from 1 to 6 months. The results show that the climate model-driven hydrologic predictability is generally limited to 1-month lead time and exhibits negligible skill improvement relative to ESP during this drought event, suggesting the initial hydrologic conditions (IHCs) play a dominant role in forecasting performance. The research highlights the value of the framework in providing accurate IHCs in a real-time manner which will greatly benefit drought early-warning.

  15. Prolonged Nightly Fasting and Breast Cancer Risk: Findings from NHANES (2009-2010)

    PubMed Central

    Marinac, Catherine R.; Natarajan, Loki; Sears, Dorothy D.; Gallo, Linda C.; Hartman, Sheri J.; Arredondo, Elva; Patterson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel line of research has emerged suggesting that daily feeding-fasting schedules that are synchronized with sleep-wake cycles have metabolic implications that are highly relevant to breast cancer. We examined associations of nighttime fasting duration with biomarkers of breast cancer risk among women in the 2009-2010 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Methods Dietary, anthropometric and HbA1c data were available for 2,212 women, and 2-hour postprandial glucose concentrations were available for 1,066 women. Nighttime fasting duration was calculated using 24-hour food records. Separate linear regression models examined associations of nighttime fasting with HbA1c and 2-hour glucose concentrations. Logistic regression modeled associations of nighttime fasting with elevated HbA1c (HbA1c ≥ 39 mmol/mol or 5.7%) and elevated 2-hour glucose (glucose ≥ 140 mg/dL). All models adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, BMI, total kcal intake, evening kcal intake, and the number of eating episodes per day. Results Each 3-hour increase in nighttime fasting (roughly one standard deviation) was associated with a 4% lower 2-hour glucose measurement (β 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-1.00; p<0.05), and a non-statistically significant decrease in HbA1c. Logistic regression models indicate that each 3-hour increase in nighttime fasting duration was associated with roughly a 20% reduced odds of elevated HbA1c (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68, 0.97; p<0.05) and non-significantly reduced odds of elevated 2-hour glucose. Conclusions A longer nighttime duration was significantly associated with improved glycemic regulation. Impact Randomized trials are needed to confirm whether prolonged nighttime fasting could improve biomarkers of glucose control, thereby reducing breast cancer risk. PMID:25896523

  16. Fieldwork in the Undergraduate Geography Programme: Challenges and Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Lindsey

    1996-01-01

    Provides a critical commentary on issues facing fieldwork in undergraduate geography programs. Issues are structured around five key themes: aims and objectives, skill acquisition, relationship to other areas of curricula, fieldwork delivery, and fieldwork management. Encourages new perspectives and approaches in geography fieldwork. (MJP)

  17. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation

  18. Retrospective study of positive physical torture cases in Cairo (2009 & 2010).

    PubMed

    Ghaleb, Sherein Salah; Elshabrawy, Ekram Mohamad; Elkaradawy, Magda Helal; Nemr Welson, Nermeen

    2014-05-01

    Torture is the most serious violation of a person's fundamental right to personal integrity and a pathological form of human interaction. In this study, the prevalence of torture in Cairo during the years 2009 & 2010 is 10.97% of the total number of cases examined at the medico legal authority of Egypt in Zenhom (11.29% in 2010 & 10.36% in 2009). The number of cases under this study is 367 (175 cases in 2009, 192 cases in 2010). Torture is more prevalent in the year 2010 than in the year 2009. The largest prevalence of torture was found in the area of south Cairo (120 cases; 32.7%) while the least was found in the area of west Cairo (50 cases; 13.6%). The victims included 336 males (91.6%) and 31 females (8.4%) with male to female ratio 10.8: 1. The most commonly affected age group in the studied victims was the age group of the third decade (171 cases; 46.6%) while the least was the age group above the sixth decade (6 cases; 1.6%). The most commonly affected site of injury was head & neck (243 cases; 66.2%) while the least was abdomen (17 cases; 4.6%). The most common type of injury was bruises (258 cases; 70.3%) while the least was electrocution (5 cases; 1.4%). Regarding the causal instrument, the most commonly used instrument was blunt object (333 cases; 90.7%) while the least was electric current (5 cases; 10%). Hitting with a stick leaving the characteristic shape of elongated abrasion & bruises was found in 35 cases (9.5%) and characteristic lesion of handcuff, which is blunt trauma wounds around wrists or ankles, was found in 68 cases (18.5%). There was one case of hair torture (0.3%) & 5 cases of sexual torture (1.5%). Permanent infirmity left in victims was positive in 24 cases (6.5%) and negative in 343 cases (93.5%) while deformity left in victims was positive in 10 cases (3%) and negative in 357 cases (97%). All permanent infirmity cases were male. Of the 24 cases of permanent infirmity, 83.3% were subjected to blunt trauma and 79.2% were injured in

  19. Algal bloom-associated disease outbreaks among users of freshwater lakes--United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Roberts, Virginia A; Backer, Lorraine; Deconno, Erin; Egan, Jessica S; Hyde, James B; Nicholas, David C; Wiegert, Eric J; Billing, Laurie M; Diorio, Mary; Mohr, Marika C; Hardy, Joan F; Wade, Timothy J; Yoder, Jonathan S; Hlavsa, Michele C

    2014-01-10

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are excessive accumulations of microscopic photosynthesizing aquatic organisms (phytoplankton) that produce biotoxins or otherwise adversely affect humans, animals, and ecosystems. HABs occur sporadically and often produce a visible algal scum on the water. This report summarizes human health data and water sampling results voluntarily reported to CDC's Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) via the National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS) and the Harmful Algal Bloom-Related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS)* for the years 2009-2010. For 2009-2010, 11 waterborne disease outbreaks associated with algal blooms were reported; these HABs all occurred in freshwater lakes. The outbreaks occurred in three states and affected at least 61 persons. Health effects included dermatologic, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and neurologic signs and symptoms. These 11 HAB-associated outbreaks represented 46% of the 24 outbreaks associated with untreated recreational water reported for 2009-2010, and 79% of the 14 freshwater HAB-associated outbreaks that have been reported to CDC since 1978. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for HAB-associated illness among patients with a history of exposure to freshwater. PMID:24402467

  20. Volume Change Rates of Southeast Alaskan Icefields from Stacked Digital Elevation Models, 2000-2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkonian, A. K.; Elliott, J.; Willis, M. J.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    We derive volume change rates (dV/dt) for the three major temperate icefields of Southeast Alaska. The Juneau, Stikine, and Glacier Bay icefields cover approximately 14,300 km2 and have recently been contributing disproportionately to sea level rise. In this study we provide estimates of volume change rates between 2000 and 2009/2010 based on near-complete spatial coverage from stacked digital elevations models (DEMs) acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). Our method applies a weighted linear regression to elevations on a pixel-by-pixel basis over each icefield, and we filter out elevations based on deviation from the first elevation (which is SRTM about 90% of the time) to exclude ASTER elevations influenced by clouds, shadow, etc. The maximum positive deviation allowed is ~5 m a-1, which comes from estimates of precipitation in this region and probably overestimates the amount of thickening actually occurring. This large positive constraint means our volume change rates are likely more representative of lower bounds on volume loss. All three icefields are losing volume - the combined rate is approximately -7.7±0.9 km3 a-1, equivalent to a mass loss rate of 6.9±0.8 Gt a-1 assuming a density of 900 kg m3 for the lost material. The area-averaged elevation change rate (dh/dt) is -0.44±0.05 m a-1 w.e., with most loss occurring at the Glacier Bay and Stikine Icefields. Juneau Icefield (~3,900 km2) has a small dV/dt, at -0.3±0.1 km3 a-1. This is due to the positive dV/dt of the Taku Glacier, the largest outlet glacier of the Juneau Icefield. Our results are consistent with previous studies that document the recent advance of Taku and its status as the glacier with the highest positive volume change rate in Alaska. The dh/dt pattern we observe elsewhere over the Juneau Icefield is similar to previous studies, with practically every outlet glacier except Taku experiencing

  1. Jovian temperature and cloud variability during the 2009-2010 fade of the South Equatorial Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, G. S.; Rogers, J. H.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; de Pater, I.; Wong, M. H.; Mousis, O.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Jacquesson, M.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2011-06-01

    Mid-infrared 7-20 μm imaging of Jupiter from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT/VISIR) demonstrate that the increased albedo of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt (SEB) during the 'fade' (whitening) event of 2009-2010 was correlated with changes to atmospheric temperature and aerosol opacity. The opacity of the tropospheric condensation cloud deck at pressures less than 800 mbar increased by 80% between May 2008 and July 2010, making the SEB (7-17°S) as opaque in the thermal infrared as the adjacent equatorial zone. After the cessation of discrete convective activity within the SEB in May 2009, a cool band of high aerosol opacity (the SEB zone at 11-15°S) was observed separating the cloud-free northern and southern SEB components. The cooling of the SEBZ (with peak-to-peak contrasts of 1.0 ± 0.5 K), as well as the increased aerosol opacity at 4.8 and 8.6 μm, preceded the visible whitening of the belt by several months. A chain of five warm, cloud-free 'brown barges' (subsiding airmasses) were observed regularly in the SEB between June 2009 and June 2010, by which time they too had been obscured by the enhanced aerosol opacity of the SEB, although the underlying warm circulation was still present in July 2010. Upper tropospheric temperatures (150-300 mbar) remained largely unchanged during the fade, but the cool SEBZ formation was detected at deeper levels ( p > 300 mbar) within the convectively-unstable region of the troposphere. The SEBZ formation caused the meridional temperature gradient of the SEB to decrease between 2008 and 2010, reducing the vertical thermal windshear on the zonal jets bounding the SEB. The southern SEB had fully faded by July 2010 and was characterised by short-wave undulations at 19-20°S. The northern SEB persisted as a narrow grey lane of cloud-free conditions throughout the fade process. The cool temperatures and enhanced aerosol opacity of the SEBZ after July 2009 are consistent with an upward flux of volatiles (e.g., ammonia-laden air

  2. Seismic evidence of magma transport in Eyjafjallajökull during 2009-2010 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjaltadottir, S.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2010-12-01

    The ice-capped central volcano Eyjafjallajökull in South-Iceland erupted in March and April 2010, after nearly 190 years of dormancy. Its last eruption occurred at the summit in 1821-23 and only two other eruptions are known during historic time in Iceland (last 1100 years). However, the volcano had shown signs of repeated magmatic activity since 1992, with the last intrusion episode occurring 10 years before the latest events. We have used relocated earthquakes recorded during 2009-2010 to track magma transport in the volcano during the recent intrusion and eruption episode. Only three major swarms were recorded in Eyjafjallajökull during the last 20 years. These occurred in 1994, 1996 and in 1999-2000. The 1996 swarm occurred at 20-25 km depth, near the Moho with no crustal uplift detected during the swarm, probably due to its great depth. However, the other two swarms occurred in the intermediate and upper crust and were accompanied by uplift centered at the southern flank caused by 4.5-6.5 km deep intrusions. The latest swarm activity began late in March 2009 when several deep earthquakes were recorded near the Moho. The swarm activity continued during June-August and was followed by a southward movement of a close GPS-station which indicated the formation of a new but small intrusion beneath the southern flank. After four quiet months the activity picked up again in late December. Similar to 1994, 1999 and 2009, the main activity was clustered approximately east of the summit at 9-11 km and 2-4 km depth. This pattern changed in late February when the seismicity partly migrated towards SSE, indicating the formation of a series of dykes at 4-9 km depth and again on 3 March with dramatic rise in intensity and the foci forming an E-W trending segment east of the main cluster. On 17 March the seismicity started to ascent towards the surface beneath the ice-cap but on 20 March the magma took a turn in the uppermost 2-3 km towards the first eruption site at the ice

  3. Fieldwork, Heritage and Engaging Landscape Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mains, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines and analyses efforts to critically engage with "heritage" through the development and responses to a series of undergraduate residential fieldwork trips held in the North Coast of Jamaica. The ways in which we read heritage through varied "texts"--specifically, material landscapes, guided heritage tours,…

  4. Prospective Teachers' View on Geography Fieldworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Cevdet; Bilgi, Merve Gorkem

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study are to examine thoroughly the components to constitute individual perceptions of prospective teachers concerning important acquisitions of geography fieldworks and to facilitate its applicability as a teaching method through their own observations and suggestions, and in this context to obtain information about the nature…

  5. Fieldwork and Cooperative Learning in Professional Ethics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loui, Michael C.

    2000-01-01

    Summarizes the importance of multidisciplinary collaboration in professional ethics, describes in detail the distinctive aspects of two University of Illinois ethics courses (Engineering Ethics and Professional Ethics), and discusses the pedagogical value of the collaborative fieldwork assignment in both courses. (EV)

  6. Untold Stories of Fieldworkers Working Amid Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serekoane, Motsaathebe; Sharp, Carla; Skinner, Donald; Marais, Lochner

    2014-01-01

    Working in unfamiliar contexts and often alone, fieldworkers may face challenges for which their training and previous experience has not prepared them. While there is literature about the technical, ethical and moral aspects of fieldwork, there is little focusing on fieldworkers' actual experiences. Additionally, there is little constructive…

  7. Library Research as Fieldwork: A Strategy for Qualitative Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassner, Barry; Corzine, Jay

    1982-01-01

    Develops Glaser and Strauss' (1967) suggestion that fieldwork techniques may be successfully adapted for content analysis research. Discusses relative advantages of literature and traditional fieldwork sites, and initial stages of doing fieldwork at literature sites; demonstrates method used through an evaluation of the hypothesis that prejudice…

  8. “Embedded Research” in Collaborative Fieldwork

    PubMed Central

    KLOTZBÜCHER, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    In the era of the “scientific development concept” of the Hu/Wen leadership, agents of knowledge transfer that eventually translates into policy comprise not only think tanks for policy formulation in central-state institutions but also researchers in universities supporting policy implementation at local levels. Well-established patterns of local scientific advisory frame collaborative fieldwork in Sino-Western scientific projects on local governance. However, there is a gap between our active integration into these patterns during fieldwork and our ability to clarify them as resources, reconstruct the selection of research topics and contextualize the research results within our academic discourses. Analysing site-finding, data collection, aggregation and dissemination of a research project with Chinese public health researchers on rural health service reform in Xinjiang between 2005 and 2010, I argue that fieldwork and the role performed as a scientific advisor for the political principal is the localized and daily interface where politics crosses into science. PMID:25729446

  9. Search for the Comet Activity of 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington during 2009/2010 Apparition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Ham, Ji-Beom; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T.; Micheli, Marco; Niwa, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Matsuda, Kentaro; Urakawa, Seitaro; Yoshimoto, Katsumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Iwata, Ikuru; Ozaki, Shinobu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    We present the optical observations of the Near Earth Object 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington during the 2009/2010 apparition taken in search of low-level comet activity. Our photometric and spectroscopic data were collected 28-86 days after the perihelion passage on 2009 October 22 in a wide range of solar phase angles of 39°-68°. A disk-integrated phase function was constructed, giving a geometric albedo of 0.055 ± 0.012, phase integral of q = 0.34, and Bond albedo of AB = 0.019. The photometric property shows a profile similar to low albedo asteroids and comet nuclei. No emission lines were found in our spectrum, giving a flat reflectance similar to low albedo asteroids. Although we could not find any evidence for cometary activity in our photometric and spectroscopic data, we found an upper limit of 0.001% on the fractional active area. We derived the upper limit of the optical depth of the dust trail and tail, 7 × 10-10. We conclude that 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington was completely dormant or inactive in the 2009/2010 return.

  10. SEARCH FOR THE COMET ACTIVITY OF 107P/(4015) WILSON-HARRINGTON DURING THE 2009/2010 APPARITION

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Ham, Ji-Beom; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T.; Micheli, Marco; Niwa, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Matsuda, Kentaro; Urakawa, Seitaro; Yoshimoto, Katsumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Iwata, Ikuru; Ozaki, Shinobu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2011-01-10

    We present the optical observations of the Near Earth Object 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington during the 2009/2010 apparition taken in search of low-level comet activity. Our photometric and spectroscopic data were collected 28-86 days after the perihelion passage on 2009 October 22 in a wide range of solar phase angles of 39 deg. - 68 deg. A disk-integrated phase function was constructed, giving a geometric albedo of 0.055 {+-} 0.012, phase integral of q = 0.34, and Bond albedo of A{sub B} = 0.019. The photometric property shows a profile similar to low albedo asteroids and comet nuclei. No emission lines were found in our spectrum, giving a flat reflectance similar to low albedo asteroids. Although we could not find any evidence for cometary activity in our photometric and spectroscopic data, we found an upper limit of 0.001% on the fractional active area. We derived the upper limit of the optical depth of the dust trail and tail, 7 x 10{sup -10}. We conclude that 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington was completely dormant or inactive in the 2009/2010 return.

  11. Trends in Food Habits and Their Relation to Socioeconomic Status among Nordic Adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010

    PubMed Central

    Fismen, Anne-Siri; Smith, Otto Robert Frans; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Rasmussen, Mette; Pedersen Pagh, Trine; Augustine, Lilly; Ojala, Kristiina; Samdal, Oddrun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries. Methods The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Results Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002–2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002–2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006–2009/2010 for both sweet and soft

  12. Bordetella parapertussis outbreak in Bisham, Pakistan in 2009-2010: fallout of the 9/11 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Javed, S; Said, F; Eqani, S A M A S; Bokhari, H

    2015-09-01

    Pertussis or whooping cough is a highly contagious community disease mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis and B. parapertussis. We report a minor outbreak of whooping cough (2009-2010) in symptomatic subjects from Bisham, near Swat, Khyber Pukhtoonkhawa province, Pakistan. Interestingly, our results show that all the culture-positive isolates (n = 21) collected from children (average age 3·46 years), were identified as B. parapertussis after routine identification tests and PCR IS481, IS1001 and IS1002. Furthermore, in the affected patients, none had received immunization with diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DTPw) vaccine. Therefore, the possibility of the re-emergence of the disease due to limitation of basic health services as a result of the political unrest due to the 9/11 situation is also examined. Moreover, we discuss the importance of vaccinating both adults and children with DTPwPaw vaccine containing both organisms for better protection. PMID:25583126

  13. Influenza Surveillance and Incidence in a Rural Area in China during the 2009/2010 Influenza Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Lin; Dong, Xiaochun; Kong, Mei; Gao, Lu; Dong, Xiaojing; Xu, Wenti

    2014-01-01

    Background Most influenza surveillance is based on data from urban sentinel hospitals; little is known about influenza activity in rural communities. We conducted influenza surveillance in a rural region of China with the aim of detecting influenza activity in the 2009/2010 influenza season. Methods The study was conducted from October 2009 to March 2010. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm influenza cases. Over-the-counter (OTC) drug sales were daily collected in drugstores and hospitals/clinics. Space-time scan statistics were used to identify clusters of ILI in community. The incidence rate of ILI/influenza was estimated on the basis of the number of ILI/influenza cases detected by the hospitals/clinics. Results A total of 434 ILI cases (3.88% of all consultations) were reported; 64.71% of these cases were influenza A (H1N1) pdm09. The estimated incidence rate of ILI and influenza were 5.19/100 and 0.40/100, respectively. The numbers of ILI cases and OTC drug purchases in the previous 7 days were strongly correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient [r] = 0.620, P = 0.001). Four ILI outbreaks were detected by space-time permutation analysis. Conclusions This rural community surveillance detected influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 activity and outbreaks in the 2009/2010 influenza season and enabled estimation of the incidence rate of influenza. It also provides a scientific data for public health measures. PMID:25542003

  14. Seroepidemiological study of pandemic influenza H1N1 following the 2009-2010 wave in Greece.

    PubMed

    Maltezou, Helena C; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Mavrouli, Maria; Lourida, Athanasia; Routsias, John G; Spanakis, Nicholas; Maragos, Antonios; Tedoma, Anastasia; Bassiakos, Yiannis; Koratzanis, Georgios; Mantagos, Stephanos; Metallidis, Simeon; Katragkou, Aspasia; Nikolaidis, Pavlos; Roilides, Emmanuel; Theodoridou, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of seroprevalence rates against 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus will assist vaccination recommendations and the preparation of the health-care system during subsequent years. This study was conducted in Greece during June-August 2010 to estimate the seroprevalence rate against pandemic H1N1 virus. Persons presenting in 29 health-care facilities across the country were studied. Seroprevalence was estimated employing a virus-free ELISA that specifically recognizes 2009 H1N1 virus antibodies in human sera. Sera collected from 2005 to April 2009 were also used to estimate pre-pandemic seroprevalence rates. A total of 954 persons were studied. The overall seroprevalence rate was 28.5% (95% confidence interval=25.6-31.3%). Age-specific rates were 34.2% in persons 0-4 years, 36.3% in persons 5-19 years, 25.0% in persons 20-39 years, 23.4% in persons 40-59 years, and 31.8% in persons ≥ 60 years. The highest rates were recorded in the Regions of Ionian Islands (67%) and Epirus (42.9%), while the lowest (8.4%) in the Region of Thessaly. Age-specific attack rates of infection during 2009-2010 were 28.8% in persons 0-4 years, 32.5% in persons 5-19 years, 14.3% in persons 20-39 years, 19.1% in persons 40-59 years, and 14.4% in persons ≥ 60 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that Region of residence and caring for children <5 years were associated with increased risk for seropositivity. Urbanity, personal and family characteristics, working in a health-care facility or in a school, history of pandemic H1N1 vaccination or history of influenza-like illness during 2009-2010 were not associated with increased risk for seropositivity. PMID:21762749

  15. Making Fieldwork Valuable: Designing fieldwork programmes to meet the needs of young geologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the culmination of many years' in designing and operating field courses for students studying Geology at post-16 level in the context of the British schooling system. Provided is a toolkit, and accompanying rationale, for the educators use when building a sustainable and manageable programme of fieldwork for young geologists. Many educators, particularly under the confines of new regulations have found the promise of increased paper work and accountability challenging and consequently field courses often play a peripheral, even non-existent role in the scheme of work for a large number of young geologists. The process of designing a suitable programme of field study must take account of the relevant stakeholders, chief among these are the views of students and staff but also those of parents, potential destination universities, exam boards and qualification accrediting groups. An audit of desired characteristics a programme of fieldwork would contain was completed using information gained through first hand research with students as well as in conversation with local universities. The results of this audit highlighted several confining factors ranging from the potential cost implications for school and parents, the extent to which content would support learning in class, and the feasibility of achieving all characteristics given limitations on staff and time. Student perceptions of the value of fieldwork were gauged through various means; group interviews were conducted during a number of academic years, field course evaluations were completed following excursions, and questionnaires were distributed at the close of the 2014-2015 academic year. Findings demonstrated that student perceptions of the benefits offered by fieldwork were several fold; chiefly students felt the inclusion of fieldwork was a very important motivator in their decision to study the subject and maintain curiosity in their studies, the belief that fieldwork acts as a

  16. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding in Timor-Leste: findings from Demographic and Health Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Vishnu; da Cruz, Jonia Lourenca Nunes Brites; Karkee, Rajendra; Lee, Andy H

    2014-04-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is known to have nutritional and health benefits. This study investigated factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding among infants aged five months or less in Timor-Leste. The latest data from the national Demographic and Health Survey 2009-2010 were analyzed by binary logistic regression. Of the 975 infants included in the study, overall 49% (95% confidence interval 45.4% to 52.7%) were exclusively breastfed. The exclusive breastfeeding prevalence declined with increasing infant age, from 68.0% at less than one month to 24.9% at five months. Increasing infant age, mothers with a paid occupation, who perceived their newborn as non-average size, and residence in the capital city Dili, were associated with a lower likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding. On the other hand, women who could decide health-related matters tended to breastfeed exclusively, which was not the case for others whose decisions were made by someone else. The results suggested the need of breastfeeding promotion programs to improve the exclusive breastfeeding rate. Antenatal counseling, peer support network, and home visits by health workers could be feasible options to promote exclusive breastfeeding given that the majority of births occur at home. PMID:24756151

  17. Assessment of dietary lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene intakes and sources in the Spanish survey of dietary intake (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Estévez-Santiago, Rocío; Beltrán-de-Miguel, Beatriz; Olmedilla-Alonso, Begoña

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the intake and major dietary sources of lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene (non-provitamin A carotenoids) in Spain using food consumption data from the Spanish National Dietary Intake Survey (2009-2010). Three-day diaries and one 24-h recall were used to collect dietary data and a software application that includes HPLC data was used. Average intake of those carotenoids was 4290.8 μg/d (67.1% total carotenoid intake), mainly from vegetables (3414.0 μg/d), followed by fruits (393.5 μg/d), oils/fats (204.0 μg/d) and eggs/egg products (170.0 μg/d). Main sources of lutein and zeaxanthin were vegetables (62.9% total diet, 1235.2 μg/person/d). Lycopene intake was 3055.6 μg/d (71.2% of non-provitamin A carotenoids), mainly from tomato and by-products (86.3%) and watermelon. Red- and orange-colored fruits and vegetables were the major contributors of non-provitamin carotenoids (3219.0 μg/person/d). Balanced diets should favor fruits and vegetables over other dietary sources (oils, eggs, processed foods) that contain components to be consumed with moderation. PMID:26903293

  18. The 2009-2010 arctic stratospheric winter - general evolution, mountain waves and predictability of an operational weather forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Nishii, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2011-12-01

    The relatively warm 2009-2010 Arctic winter was an exceptional one as the North Atlantic Oscillation index attained persistent extreme negative values. Here, selected aspects of the Arctic stratosphere during this winter inspired by the analysis of the international field experiment RECONCILE are presented. First of all, and as a kind of reference, the evolution of the polar vortex in its different phases is documented. Special emphasis is put on explaining the formation of the exceptionally cold vortex in mid winter after a sequence of stratospheric disturbances which were caused by upward propagating planetary waves. A major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) occurring near the end of January 2010 concluded the anomalous cold vortex period. Wave ice polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by spaceborne remote-sensing instruments over the Arctic during the cold period in January 2010. Here, one such case observed over Greenland is analysed in more detail and an attempt is made to correlate flow information of an operational numerical weather prediction model to the magnitude of the mountain-wave induced temperature fluctuations. Finally, it is shown that the forecasts of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system for the onset of the major SSW were very skilful and the ensemble spread was very small. However, the ensemble spread increased dramatically after the major SSW, displaying the strong non-linearity and internal variability involved in the SSW event.

  19. The 2009-2010 Arctic stratospheric winter - general evolution, mountain waves and predictability of an operational weather forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Nishii, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2012-04-01

    The relatively warm 2009-2010 Arctic winter was an exceptional one as the North Atlantic Oscillation index attained persistent extreme negative values. Here, selected aspects of the Arctic stratosphere during this winter inspired by the analysis of the international field experiment RECONCILE are presented. First of all, and as a kind of reference, the evolution of the polar vortex in its different phases is documented. Special emphasis is put on explaining the formation of the exceptionally cold vortex in mid winter after a sequence of stratospheric disturbances which were caused by upward propagating planetary waves. A major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) occurring near the end of January 2010 concluded the anomalous cold vortex period. Wave ice polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by spaceborne remote-sensing instruments over the Arctic during the cold period in January 2010. Here, one such case observed over Greenland is analysed in more detail and an attempt is made to correlate flow information of an operational numerical weather prediction model to the magnitude of the mountain-wave induced temperature fluctuations. Finally, it is shown that the forecasts of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system for the onset of the major SSW were very skilful and the ensemble spread was very small. However, the ensemble spread increased dramatically after the major SSW, displaying the strong non-linearity and internal variability involved in the SSW event.

  20. Anomalous geomagnetic variations associated with the volcanic activity of the Mayon volcano, Philippines during 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takla, E. M.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kawano, H.; Uozumi, T.; Abe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Local anomalous geomagnetic variations preceding and accompanying the volcanic eruptions had been reported by several researchers. This paper uses continuous high-resolution geomagnetic data to examine the occurrence of any anomalous geomagnetic field variations that possibly linked with the volcanic eruption of the Mayon volcano, Philippines during 2009-2010. The nearest geomagnetic observing point from the Mayon volcano is the Legazpi (LGZ) station, Philippines; which is located about 13 km South of the Mayon volcano. The amplitude range of daily variations and the amplitude of Ultra Low Frequency emissions in the Pc3 range (Pc3; 10-45 s) were examined at the LGZ station and also were compared with those from the Davao (DAV) station, Philippines as a remote reference station. Both the LGZ and DAV stations belong to the MAGDAS Network. The result of data analysis reveals significant anomalous changes in the amplitude range of daily variations and the Pc3 amplitude at the LGZ station before and during the volcanic eruption of the Mayon volcano. From the obtained results, it appears that the observed anomalous variations are dependent on the change in the underground conductivity connected with variation in the physical properties of the Earth's crust due to the activity of the Mayon volcano. Therefore, these anomalous geomagnetic variations are considered to be of a local volcanic origin.

  1. Building a Community of Learning through Early Residential Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Cathy; Larsen, Carl; Parry, Damian

    2014-01-01

    The positioning of residential fieldwork early in students' higher education is an established way of attempting to build and engage them in a community of learning. In the study reported here, the benefits of such early residential fieldwork were investigated using Krausse and Coates's seven scales of engagement. These scales consider a…

  2. The Materiality of Fieldwork: An Ontology of Feminist Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Sara M.

    2013-01-01

    Through the materiality of fieldwork at a high-achieving high-poverty high school, I discuss how the collision between practices of feminist methodology and the materiality of fieldwork forced me to rethink the "feminist" in feminist research. Using the work of Karen Barad, this material-discursive account of methodology as ontology…

  3. Enhancing Fieldwork Learning with Technology: Practitioner's Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Katharine E.; Mauchline, Alice L.; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian; France, Derek

    2013-01-01

    This research paper reports the findings from an international survey of fieldwork practitioners on their use of technology to enhance fieldwork teaching and learning. It was found that there was high information technology usage before and after time in the field, but some were also using portable devices such as smartphones and global…

  4. Relationship between Ecology Fieldwork and Student Attitudes toward Environmental Protection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzanal, R. Fernandez; Barreiro, L. M. Rodriguez; Jimenez, M. Casal

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a study of the contributions fieldwork made to Spanish secondary students' (n=67) understandings of concepts and principles of ecology. Concludes that fieldwork helps clarify ecological concepts and intervenes directly in the development of more favorable attitudes toward the defense of the ecosystem. Contains 47 references. (Author/WRM)

  5. Assessment in Fieldwork Courses: What Are We Rating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Sian

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork exists as a component of many library schools' curricula. Site supervisors, students, and the schools themselves all play a role. A final part of most fieldwork experiences involves the use of an evaluation form filled out by a site supervisor about the student. In this study, forty seven evaluation forms were collected and analyzed…

  6. Fieldwork in UK Secondary Schools: Influences and Provision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Steve

    2004-01-01

    The paper describes a national survey of biology teachers visiting Field Studies Council (FSC) centres in England and Wales. It provides data on levels of biology fieldwork at ages 11-16 (Years 7-11), and factors affecting A-level biology fieldwork provision at ages 16-19 (Years 12 and 13). The results are compared with similar data from geography…

  7. A Mobile Learning Module for High School Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Tzu-Yen; Chen, Che-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Although fieldwork is always cited as an important component of geographic education, there are many obstacles for executing high school fieldwork. Mobile electronic products are becoming popular and some schools are able to acquire these devices for mobile learning. This study attempts to provide a mobile-assisted means of guiding students…

  8. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM Primary-Level Mathematics Measures (Grades K-2), 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Saez, Leilani; Jamgochian, Elisa; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In the following technical report, we present evidence of the technical adequacy of the easyCBM[R] math measures in grades K-2. In addition to reliability information, we present criterion-related validity evidence, both concurrent and predictive, and construct validity evidence. The results represent data gathered throughout the 2009/2010 school…

  9. The Thurgood Marshall School of Law Empirical Findings: A Report of the Watson-Glaser for the 2009-2010 Test Takers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadhi, T.; Palasota, A.; Holley, D.; Rudley, D.

    2010-01-01

    The following report gives the statistical findings of the 2009-2010 Watson-Glaser test. Data is pre-existing and was given to the Evaluator by email from the Director, Center for Legal Pedagogy. Statistical analyses were run using SPSS 17 to address the following questions: 1. What are the statistical descriptors of the Watson-Glaser results of…

  10. CDC Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza during the 2009-2010 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides guidance to help decrease the spread of flu among students and school staff during the 2009-2010 school year. This document expands upon earlier school guidance documents by providing a menu of tools that school and health officials can choose from based on conditions in their area. It recommends actions to take this school…

  11. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM[R] Mathematics Measures: Grades 3-8, 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nese, Joseph F. T.; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Anderson, Daniel; Jamgochian, Elisa M.; Kamata, Akihito; Saez, Leilani; Park, Bitnara J.; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In this technical report, data are presented on the practical utility, reliability, and validity of the easyCBM[R] mathematics (2009-2010 version) measures for students in grades 3-8 within four districts in two states. Analyses include: minimum acceptable within-year growth; minimum acceptable year-end benchmark performance; internal and…

  12. Environmental chemicals mediated the effect of old housing on adult health problems: US NHANES, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Bramley, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Housing conditions affect occupants continuously, and health interventions have shown a positive association between housing investment or improvement and occupant's health. However, the sources of the housing problems were less understood. Since it was observed that lead dust and chloroanisoles released from housing (materials) as indoor pollutants affected child's health, we now aimed to examine the relationships among built year, environmental chemicals and individual health in adults in a national and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2010, including demographics, housing characteristics, self-reported health status, biomarkers and blood and urinary chemical concentrations. Adults aged 20 and above were included for statistical analysis (n = 5,793). Analysis involved chi-square test, t test, and survey-weighted general linear regression and logistic regression modelling. People who resided in older housing built before 1990 tended to report chronic bronchitis, liver problems, stroke, heart failure, diabetes, asthma and emphysema. Higher values in HDL cholesterol, blood lead and blood cadmium and having positive responses of hepatitis A, B, C and E antibodies among occupants were also observed. Furthermore, higher environmental chemical concentrations related to old housing including urinary cadmium, cobalt, platinum, mercury, 2,5-dichlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol concentrations and mono-cyclohexyl phthalate and mono-isobutyl phthalate metabolites were shown in occupants as well. Older housing (≥30 years) seemed to contribute to the amount of environmental chemicals that affected human health. Regular monitoring, upgrading and renovation of housing to remove environmental chemicals and policy to support people in deprived situations against environmental injustice would be needed. PMID:25138559

  13. Residue analyses and exposure assessment of the Irish population to nitrofuran metabolites from different food commodities in 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Radovnikovic, Anita; Conroy, Emma-Rose; Gibney, Mike; O'Mahony, John; Danaher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    An exposure assessment to nitrofuran residues was performed for three human populations (adults, teenagers and children), based on residue analyses of foods of animal origin (liver, honey, eggs and aquaculture) covering the 2-year period 2009-2010. The occurrence of nitrofuran metabolites in food on the Irish market was determined for the selected period using the data from Ireland's National Food Residue Database (NFRD) and from results obtained from the analysis of retail samples (aquaculture and honey). Laboratory analyses of residues were performed by methods validated in accordance with Commission Decision 2002/657/EC regarding performance of the analytical method and interpretation of results. Semicarbazide (SEM) was the contaminant most frequently identified and its content ranged from 0.09 to 1.27 μg kg(-1). SEM is currently used as a marker of nitrofuran abuse, but it may also occur from other sources. The presence of nitrofuran metabolite 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ) was detected in two aquaculture samples (prawns) at 1.63 and 1.14 μg kg(-1), but such a low number of positive cases did not present sufficient data for a full AOZ exposure assessment. Therefore, the evaluation of exposure was focused on SEM-containing food groups only. Exposure assessments were completed using a probabilistic approach that generated 10 iterations. The results of both the upper- and lower-bound exposure assessments demonstrate that SEM exposure for Irish adults, teenagers and children from selected food commodities are well below EFSA-estimated safe levels. PMID:24032469

  14. Dynamics of carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of the Florida Reef Tract (2009-2010): Evidence for seasonal dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehllehner, Nancy; Langdon, Chris; Venti, Alyson; Kadko, David

    2016-05-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to lower the Ωar of reefal waters by 0.3-0.4 units by the end of century, making it more difficult for calcifying organisms to secrete calcium carbonate while at the same time making the environment more favorable for abiotic and biotic dissolution of the reefal framework. There is great interest in being able to project the point in time when coral reefs will cross the tipping point between being net depositional to net erosional in terms of their carbonate budgets. Periodic in situ assessments of the balance between carbonate production and dissolution that spans seasonal time scales may prove useful in monitoring and formulating projections of the impact of ocean acidification on reefal carbonate production. This study represents the first broad-scale geochemical survey of the rates of net community production (NCP) and net community calcification (NCC) across the Florida Reef Tract (FRT). Surveys were performed at approximately quarterly intervals in 2009-2010 across seven onshore-offshore transects spanning the upper, middle, and lower Florida Keys. Averaged across the FRT, the rates of NCP and NCC were positive during the spring/summer at 62 ± 7 and 17 ± 2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively, and negative during the fall/winter at -33 ± 6 and -7 ± 2 mmol m-2 d-1. The most significant finding of the study was that the northernmost reef is already net erosional (-1.1 ± 0.4 kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1) and midreefs to the south were net depositional on an annual basis (0.4 ± 0.1 kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1) but erosional during the fall and winter. Only the two southernmost reefs were net depositional year-round. These results indicate that parts of the FRT have already crossed the tipping point for carbonate production and other parts are getting close.

  15. Fieldwork online: a GIS-based electronic learning environment for supervising fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Koko; Marra, Wouter; Baarsma, Rein; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Fieldwork comes in many forms: individual research projects in unique places, large groups of students on organized fieldtrips, and everything in between those extremes. Supervising students in often distant places can be a logistical challenge and requires a significant time investment of their supervisors. We developed an online application for remote supervision of students on fieldwork. In our fieldworkonline webapp, which is accessible through a web browser, students can upload their field data in the form of a spreadsheet with coordinates (in a system of choice) and data-fields. Field data can be any combination of quantitative or qualitative data, and can contain references to photos or other documents uploaded to the app. The student's data is converted to a map with data-points that contain all the data-fields and links to photos and documents associated with that location. Supervisors can review the data of their students and provide feedback on observations, or geo-referenced feedback on the map. Similarly, students can ask geo-referenced questions to their supervisors. Furthermore, supervisors can choose different basemaps or upload their own. Fieldwork online is a useful tool for supervising students at a distant location in the field and is most suitable for first-order feedback on students' observations, can be used to guide students to interesting locations, and allows for short discussions on phenomena observed in the field. We seek user that like to use this system, we are able to provide support and add new features if needed. The website is built and controlled using Flask, an open-source Python Framework. The maps are generated and controlled using MapServer and OpenLayers, and the database is built in PostgreSQL with PostGIS support. Fieldworkonline and all tools used to create it are open-source. Experience fieldworkonline at our demo during this session, or online at fieldworkonline.geo.uu.nl (username: EGU2016, password: Vienna).

  16. Enhancing fieldwork learning using blended learning, GIS and remote supervision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Wouter A.; Alberti, Koko; Karssenberg, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Fieldwork is an important part of education in geosciences and essential to put theoretical knowledge into an authentic context. Fieldwork as teaching tool can take place in various forms, such as field-tutorial, excursion, or supervised research. Current challenges with fieldwork in education are to incorporate state-of-the art methods for digital data collection, on-site GIS-analysis and providing high-quality feedback to large groups of students in the field. We present a case on first-year earth-sciences fieldwork with approximately 80 students in the French Alps focused on geological and geomorphological mapping. Here, students work in couples and each couple maps their own fieldwork area to reconstruct the formative history. We present several major improvements for this fieldwork using a blended-learning approach, relying on open source software only. An important enhancement to the French Alps fieldwork is improving students' preparation. In a GIS environment, students explore their fieldwork areas using existing remote sensing data, a digital elevation model and derivatives to formulate testable hypotheses before the actual fieldwork. The advantage of this is that the students already know their area when arriving in the field, have started to apply the empirical cycle prior to their field visit, and are therefore eager to investigate their own research questions. During the fieldwork, students store and analyze their field observations in the same GIS environment. This enables them to get a better overview of their own collected data, and to integrate existing data sources also used in the preparation phase. This results in a quicker and enhanced understanding by the students. To enable remote access to observational data collected by students, the students synchronize their data daily with a webserver running a web map application. Supervisors can review students' progress remotely, examine and evaluate their observations in a GIS, and provide

  17. Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Giffen, Neil R; Reasor, R. Scott; Campbell, Claire L.

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including

  18. Doing Independent Overseas Fieldwork 1: Practicalities and Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an information guide about planning independent, human and physical geography fieldwork overseas and highlights potential problems that can occur. Includes a bibliography of essential information sources and addresses. (CMK)

  19. Point of View: The Need for Fieldwork in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Casey D.

    2014-01-01

    The author makes a case for fieldwork as having a strong capacity for increasing both science and nonscience majors' abilities to learn complex concepts, with the added benefit of actively engaging minority and female students in science.

  20. The Differentiation of Bacterial Isolates Encountered in Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the advantages and disadvantages of a specific method of bacterial identification and suggests some modifications or improvements. The approach is presented as being suitable for obtaining information about the diversity of bacterial types on student fieldwork. (Author/EB)

  1. Changes in mean intake of fatty acids and intake of saturated and trans fats from potatoes: NHANES 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Storey, Maureen L; Anderson, Patricia A

    2015-05-01

    Studies have shown that higher than usual intakes of trans fatty acids (TFAs) have adverse effects on blood lipids. Because of this, in 2006 the US FDA mandated labeling of TFAs on food packages. The food and restaurant industries, including the potato industry, reformulated their foods to reduce or eliminate partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and TFAs. Before mandatory labeling, grain-based desserts, yeast breads, and French-fried potatoes (FFPs) were the top sources of TFAs in the food supply; by 2007, potato food manufacturers and quick-service restaurants had reduced or eliminated TFAs without increasing saturated fatty acids (SFAs). FFPs are no longer a source of TFAs in the food supply. This study examined energy and fatty acid intake among children aged 6-11 y, adolescents aged 12-18 y, and adults aged ≥19 y across 3 time periods by using data from the NHANES 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010. On average, intakes of total energy, total fat, SFAs, and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) decreased significantly between 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 among children and adolescents; however, the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) did not change. Among adults, intakes of total fat, SFAs, and MUFAs decreased; however, total energy and PUFA intake did not change. On the day of the 2009-2010 survey, ∼13% of children and 10% of adolescents reported consuming fried FFPs, whereas <7% of adults reported consumption of fried FFPs. Intakes of SFAs and TFAs from fried FFPs decreased significantly between 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 among children, adolescents, and adults. This study confirms that intake of TFAs from FFPs is trivial. PMID:25979511

  2. 50 CFR Table 5 (north) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 5 Table 5 (North) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES...

  3. 50 CFR Table 5 (south) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 5 Table 5 (South) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES...

  4. [Clinical review of influenza (H1N1) 2009 detected in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 flu season in Nara Prefecture].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Masaki; Uranishi, Yousuke; Okayama, Akiko

    2012-09-01

    This study is based on clinical information on 894 subjects diagnosed with influenza (H1N1) 2009 in Nara Prefecture from June 15, 2009, to March 4, 2010, and from July 9, 2010, to March 6, 2011. Clinical data for 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 was compared. Results showed that 43% of 2009-2010 subjects were 0-9 years old and 38% were 10-19 years old. They also showed that 25% of 2010-2011 0-9 years old, 20% 10-19 years old, 20% 20-29 years old and 16% 30-39 years old. Both seasons showed a high percentage of subjects 0-9 years old. Numbers of subjects aged 20-39 years old increased in 2010-2011. Results thus suggest that an age shift occurred in subjects, in Nara Prefecture. The most frequent symptom was fever, e.g., 38 degrees C, in 88%. Upper airway inflammation was seen in 68%, lower airway inflammation in 20% and gastroenteritis in 6%. Lower airway inflammation decreased from 20% in 2009-2010 to 7% in 2010-2011. Neuraminidase inhibitor was prescribed for 408 (46%) subjects, oseltamivir for 262 (63%), zanamivir for 120 (29%), peramivir for 10 (2.4%), and laninamivir for 12 (2.9%). Two neuraminidase inhibitors were prescribed for 11 subjects. Oseltamivir prescription rates were lower among subjects 10-19 years old, following guidelines for the use of antiinfluenza drugs. PMID:23198577

  5. Evaluation of chikungunya virus infection in children from India during 2009-2010: A cross sectional observational study.

    PubMed

    Raghavendhar, B Siva; Ray, Pratima; Ratagiri, Vinod H; Sharma, B S; Kabra, Sushil K; Lodha, Rakesh

    2016-06-01

    . Maximum positive cases were from KIMS center, Hubli. Seasonally, positivity varied with number of enrolled cases at KIMS and SMS. Joint pain was significantly associated with CHIKV positivity (P = 0.0156). Presence/absence of certain clinical features varied with age (P < 0.05). Sequence analysis revealed four amino acid changes. Phylogenetic analysis with partial sequences of E1 gene from KIMS (n = 12) and SMS (n = 5) showed that the study isolates clustered with Indian Ocean Lineage strains (IOL) of East, Central and South African (ECSA) type. Evaluation of chikungunya virus infection in children from India during 2009-2010 showed high proportion of CHIKV infection in Southern region of India compared to Northern region. The circulating CHIKV strains were of Indian Ocean Lineage (IOL) group within the East, Central, and South African (ECSA) genotype. However few amino acid changes were observed in E1 polypeptide with reference to African strain S-27 (AF369024). Further studies are needed to know the implications of these changes in vector-pathogen compatibility and host-pathogen interactivity. As a whole, this study highlighted the proportion of CHIKV cases, lineage of causative strain and evolutionary pattern of circulating strain in terms of amino acid changes in the structural protein. J. Med. Virol. 88:923-930, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26581026

  6. The response of the calving front of Helheim Glacier to significant warming of fjord waters, 2009-2010 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, T.; Luckman, A. J.; Scharrer, K.; Cottier, F.; Bevan, S. L.; Dye, S.; Goldsack, A.; Hughes, A. L.; James, T. D.; Selmes, N.; Valdimarsson, H.

    2010-12-01

    , and to 26 July 2010 from 18-23 m/d. Despite significant warming of the fjord waters these results do not yet show the glacier’s calving front behaving significantly differently between the two years. At the conference we will update these time-series: 2009-2010 seems to be a strong test of the hypothesis that the glacier’s calving front dynamics are controlled by the temperature of the fjord waters.

  7. A Deep Search for Biomarker Gases on Mars in 2009 - 2010: The Campaign and a Few Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Novak, R.; Radeva, Y. L.; Kaufl, H.; Smette, A.; Hartogh, P.; Encrenaz, T.

    2010-12-01

    We searched for possible biomarker gases on Mars in the 2009-2010 observing season, emphasizing nine molecules (H2_O, CH_4_, C2_H_6_, C2_H_4_, CH3_OH, H_2_CO, H2_S, and N_2_O) of fundamental astrobiological importance along with HDO and CO2_. Our search utilized Earth’s most advanced ground-based infrared spectroscopic facilities in a campaign of several dozen observing runs spanning the period 19 August 2009 to 10 June 2010. Over this interval (L_s_ = 324 - 103 degrees), the season in Mars’ Northern hemisphere progressed from mid-winter, through vernal equinox and spring, and into early summer. We used long-slit high-resolution infrared spectrometers at the Keck and NASA-IRTF observatories in Hawaii, and the European Southern Observatory in Chile (VLT, Paranal). The spectral resolving powers ranged from ~ 35,000 (NIRSPEC/Keck and CSHELL/IRTF) to ~ 90,000 (CRIRES, VLT). At the sub-Earth point, the spatial resolution in non-AO mode ranged from ~600 km (FWHM) to ~ 400 km at Keck and IRTF. Using the adaptive optics (AO) mode at Keck and at VLT, we achieved an improved resolution of ~250 km (FWHM). We mapped the planet over the Earth-facing hemisphere by orienting the slit North-South in longitude and stepping it East-West across the planet, and we acquired deep searches over restricted longitude ranges by holding the slit fixed in position and taking sequential spectra as Mars rotated under it. Spectral lines of CO2_, H_2_O, HDO, and O2_ (a^1^Δg_) are obvious, even in the raw data. In the methane region near 3.3µm, removal of terrestrial and solar spectral lines revealed multiple lines of Mars H_2_O and CO2_, from which we extracted 2-D (lat-long) maps of Martian water vapor, atmospheric surface pressure and temperature. Subtraction of these features provided highly sensitive searches for trace gases. Preliminary results of searches for CH_4_, C2_H_4_, and C2_H_6_ will be presented in this paper. Radeva et al. (this meeting) will present preliminary results for

  8. The student fieldwork experience: influencing factors and implications for learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Alan; Stokes, Alison

    2010-05-01

    Fieldwork has always been a crucial component of undergraduate geoscience degrees, yet our understanding of the learning processes that operate in a field environment is limited. Learning is a complex process, and there is increasing interest in the role played in this process by the affective domain, in particular the link between affect (emotion and attitude) and cognition (understanding). This presentation covers two UK-based studies that investigated the impact of residential geoscience fieldwork on students' affective responses (e.g. feelings, attitudes, motivations), and their subsequent learning outcomes; student affective responses are thought to be linked to the adoption of effective approaches to learning. The first study involved ~300 students from 7 UK universities undertaking residential field classes in, geography, earth and environmental sciences (GEES disciplines). Mixed-format surveys applied before and after fieldwork demonstrated significant effects in the affective domain. In general, student responses were very positive prior to fieldwork and became more positive as a result of the field experience. The data were analysed for any subgroup differences (gender, age, previous experience) but the only significant difference concerned levels of anxiety amongst some groups of students prior to fieldwork. However, post fieldwork surveys showed that the field experience mitigated these anxieties; for most it was not as bad as they thought it would be. This study demonstrated that fieldwork generated positive attitudes amongst students to their subject of study as well as development of ‘soft' interpersonal skills. The second study collected qualitative and quantitative data from 62 students at a single UK university before, during and after a nine day geologic mapping-training field course, a style of fieldwork not surveyed in the first study. As with the first study, pre-field class positive affects became strengthened, while negative feelings and

  9. Assessing Fieldwork Risk for Undergraduate Projects. Directions: JGHE Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgitt, David; Bullard, Jo

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the five steps involved in conducting risk assessment for fieldwork using two examples of typical student projects: (1) identity the hazards; (2) identify who might be harmed; (3) evaluate the risks; (4) record the findings; and (5) review the assessment periodically. Addresses expeditions and work overseas. (CMK)

  10. GROWER REPORTED PESTICIDE POISONINGS AMONG FLORIDA CITRUS FIELDWORKERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a 1981 survey of 436 Florida citrus growers, 27 pesticide related poisoning incidents were reported that were to have taken place within one year of the interview date. From these reports it is possible to estimate that there are 376 citrus fieldworker poisonings per year in F...

  11. Georgia Folklife: A Bibliography for Teachers, Art Administrators, and Fieldworkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzberg, Maggie

    This bibliography lists books, articles, and journals as well as a selection of sound recordings and videotapes to assist individuals and teachers researching the folklife of Georgia. Print resources are organized under 10 major categories including: (1) "General Folklife Studies"; (2) "Fieldwork Methodology"; (3) "Regional Folklife Studies"; (4)…

  12. Using Extension Fieldwork to Incorporate Experiential Learning into University Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Kynda; Mahon, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a strategy for incorporating experiential learning into university coursework through the use of Extension fieldwork projects. In this case, undergraduate agribusiness management students construct business plans for primary agricultural industries and proposed new industries, such as food processing. Results of the study…

  13. European Geography Higher Education Fieldwork and the Skills Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Glenda P.; Speake, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration focuses on skill acquisition as a means of improving student employability and fieldwork is considered to be a pivotal teaching method for geography students to obtain such skills. This paper presents results from a major substantive survey of European geography academics and students which investigated their perspectives…

  14. Students' Perception of Cooperative Learning in Earth Science Fieldwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempa, R. F.; Orion, Nir

    1996-01-01

    Investigates students' perceptions of selected aspects concerning the organization of and learning from fieldwork. Findings indicate that students either seek partners whom they regard as capable of making positive contributions to the fulfillment of learning tasks, or they opt for friendship groups and a large minority of students regard…

  15. Private Practice: Benefits, Barriers and Strategies of Providing Fieldwork Placements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloggett, Kym; Kim, Nancy; Cameron, Debra

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of occupational therapists enter private practice. Six practicing occupational therapists were surveyed regarding the benefits of fieldwork to occupational therapy students. Findings indicate benefits to the profession, to the clinician, and to the facility. Potential barriers were time, costs, travel, and legalities.…

  16. Learning in Authentic Contexts: Projects Integrating Spatial Technologies and Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Kuo-Hung

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, professional practice has been an issue of concern in higher education. The purpose of this study is to design students' projects to facilitate collaborative learning in authentic contexts. Ten students majoring in Management Information Systems conducted fieldwork with spatial technologies to collect data and provided information…

  17. The Future of Bioscience Fieldwork in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauchline, Alice L.; Peacock, Julie; Park, Julian R.

    2013-01-01

    Fieldwork is an important and often enjoyable part of learning in Bioscience degree courses, however it is unclear how the recent reforms to Higher Education (HE) may impact the future funding of outdoor learning. This paper reports on the findings from a recent survey of 30 HE Bioscience practitioners from across the UK. Their current level of…

  18. Integrating Fieldwork into Employment Counseling for Methadone-Treatment Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankertz, Laura; Spinelli, Michael; Magura, Stephen; Bali, Priti; Madison, Elizabeth M.; Staines, Graham L.; Horowitz, Emily; Guarino, Honoria; Grandy, Audrey; Fong, Chunki; Gomez, Augustin; Dimun, Amy; Friedman, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    An innovative employment counseling model, Customized Employment Supports, was developed for methadone-treatment patients, a population with historically low employment rates. The effectiveness of a key component of the model, "vocational fieldwork," the delivery of services in the community rather than only within the clinic, was assessed through…

  19. Applying Sequential Fieldwork Skills across Two International Field Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydant, A. L.; Shiplee, Brian A.; Smith, John P.; Middlekauff, Bryon D.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the development of a conceptual model of fieldwork practice and the creation of an associated set of skills for the geosciences. The set of eight generic and seventeen specific skills is applied in two international field courses to demonstrate the utility of such a skills-centered model across a broad range of venues,…

  20. Training for Fieldwork in Endangered-Language Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamamoto, Akira Y.

    1999-01-01

    Academic fieldworkers in language-endangered communities must be able to undertake all aspects of linguistic work, elicit linguistic information from speakers, document naturally occurring speech data, present research results in a comprehensible manner to the community and to academia, and develop cooperative programs based on mutual trust.…

  1. European cold winter 2009-2010: How unusual in the instrumental record and how reproducible in the ARPEGE-Climat model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzeau, G.; Cattiaux, J.; Douville, H.; Ribes, A.; Saint-Martin, D.

    2011-06-01

    Boreal winter 2009-2010 made headlines for cold anomalies in many countries of the northern mid-latitudes. Northern Europe was severely hit by this harsh winter in line with a record persistence of the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In the present study, we first provide a wider perspective on how unusual this winter was by using the recent 20th Century Reanalysis. A weather regime analysis shows that the frequency of the negative NAO was unprecedented since winter 1939-1940, which is then used as a dynamical analog of winter 2009-2010 to demonstrate that the latter might have been much colder without the background global warming observed during the twentieth century. We then use an original nudging technique in ensembles of global atmospheric simulations driven by observed sea surface temperature (SST) and radiative forcings to highlight the relevance of the stratosphere for understanding if not predicting such anomalous winter seasons. Our results demonstrate that an improved representation of the lower stratosphere is necessary to reproduce not only the seasonal mean negative NAO signal, but also its intraseasonal distribution and the corresponding increased probability of cold waves over northern Europe.

  2. Assessing Healthcare Utilization for Influenza-like Illness at an Emergency Department and a Student Health Service during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ruchi; Hartley, Tara A; Lindsley, William G; Fisher, Melanie A; Palmer, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of healthcare utilization during an influenza pandemic are needed in order to plan for the allocation of staff and resources. The aim of this study was to assess the number, age, and arrival time of patients with influenza-like-illness (ILI), and associations between their symptoms during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of electronic health records from the student health service (SHS) and an emergency department (ED) in Morgantown, West Virginia, between January 2009 and December 2010. During the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, patient arrivals at SHS and ED varied over the week. SHS patients arrived early in the week and primarily in the afternoon. ED patient arrivals were more evenly distributed, with busier evenings and weekends. Those with fever were more likely to experience cough, sore throat, vomiting/nausea, chills, congestion, headache, and body-ache. These results can assist health professionals in preparing for an influenza pandemic. PMID:24847173

  3. Influence of the Eurasian snow on the negative North Atlantic Oscillation in subseasonal forecasts of the cold winter 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini, Y. J.; Senan, R.; Vitart, F.; Balsamo, G.; Weisheimer, A.; Doblas-Reyes, F. J.

    2015-11-01

    The winter 2009/2010 was remarkably cold and snowy over North America and across Eurasia, from Europe to the Far East, coinciding with a pronounced negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). While previous studies have investigated the origin and persistence of this anomalously negative NAO phase, we have re-assessed the role that the Eurasian snowpack could have played in contributing to its maintenance. Many observational and model studies have indicated that the autumn Eurasian snow cover influences circulation patterns over high northern latitudes. To investigate that role, we have performed a suite of forecasts with the coupled ocean-atmosphere ensemble prediction system from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Pairs of 2-month ensemble forecasts with either realistic or else randomized snow initial conditions are used to demonstrate how an anomalously thick snowpack leads to an initial cooling over the continental land masses of Eurasia and, within 2 weeks, to the anomalies that are characteristic of a negative NAO. It is also associated with enhanced vertical wave propagation into the stratosphere and deceleration of the polar night jet. The latter then exerts a downward influence into the troposphere maximizing in the North Atlantic region, which establishes itself within 2 weeks. We compare the forecasted NAO index in our simulations with those from several operational forecasts of the winter 2009/2010 made at the ECWMF, and highlight the importance of relatively high horizontal resolution.

  4. The anomalous winter of 1783-1784: Was the Laki eruption or an analog of the 2009-2010 winter to blame?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Seager, Richard; Smerdon, Jason E.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Cook, Edward R.

    2011-03-01

    The multi-stage eruption of the Icelandic volcano Laki beginning in June, 1783 is speculated to have caused unusual dry fog and heat in western Europe and cold in North America during the 1783 summer, and record cold and snow the subsequent winter across the circum-North Atlantic. Despite the many indisputable impacts of the Laki eruption, however, its effect on climate, particularly during the 1783-1784 winter, may be the most poorly constrained. Here we test an alternative explanation for the unusual conditions during this time: that they were caused primarily by a combined negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and an El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm event. A similar combination of NAO-ENSO phases was identified as the cause of record cold and snowy conditions during the 2009-2010 winter in Europe and eastern North America. 600-year tree-ring reconstructions of NAO and ENSO indices reveal values in the 1783-1784 winter second only to their combined severity in 2009-2010. Data sources and model simulations support our hypothesis that a combined, negative NAO-ENSO warm phase was the dominant cause of the anomalous winter of 1783-1784, and that these events likely resulted from natural variability unconnected to Laki.

  5. The Anomalous Winter of 1783-1784: Was the Laki Eruption or an Analog of the 2009-2010 Winter to Blame?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Seager, Richard; Smerdon, Jason E.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Cook, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    The multi ]stage eruption of the Icelandic volcano Laki beginning in June, 1783 is speculated to have caused unusual dry fog and heat in western Europe and cold in North America during the 1783 summer, and record cold and snow the subsequent winter across the circum-North Atlantic. Despite the many indisputable impacts of the Laki eruption, however, its effect on climate, particularly during the 1783.1784 winter, may be the most poorly constrained. Here we test an alternative explanation for the unusual conditions during this time: that they were caused primarily by a combined negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and an El Nino ]Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm event. A similar combination of NAO ]ENSO phases was identified as the cause of record cold and snowy conditions during the 2009.2010 winter in Europe and eastern North America. 600-year tree-ring reconstructions of NAO and ENSO indices reveal values in the 1783.1784 winter second only to their combined severity in 2009.2010. Data sources and model simulations support our hypothesis that a combined, negative NAO ]ENSO warm phase was the dominant cause of the anomalous winter of 1783.1784, and that these events likely resulted from natural variability unconnected to Laki.

  6. Effectiveness of the monovalent influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in Navarre, Spain, 2009-2010: cohort and case-control study.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jesús; Morán, Julio; Martínez-Artola, Víctor; Fernández-Alonso, Mirian; Guevara, Marcela; Cenoz, Manuel García; Reina, Gabriel; Alvarez, Nerea; Arriazu, Maite; Elía, Fernando; Salcedo, Esther; Barricarte, Aurelio

    2011-08-11

    We defined a population-based cohort (596,755 subjects) in Navarre, Spain, using electronic records from physicians, to evaluate the effectiveness of the monovalent A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in preventing influenza in the 2009-2010 pandemic season. During the 9-week period of vaccine availability and circulation of the A(H1N1)2009 virus, 4608 cases of medically attended influenza-like illness (MA-ILI) were registered (46 per 1000 person-years). After adjustment for sociodemographic covariables, outpatient visits and major chronic conditions, vaccination was associated with a 32% (95% CI: 8-50%) reduction in the overall incidence of MA-ILI. In a test negative case-control analysis nested in the cohort, swabs from 633 patients were included, and 123 were confirmed for A(H1N1)2009 influenza. No confirmed case had received A(H1N1)2009 vaccine versus 9.6% of controls (p<0.001). The vaccine effectiveness in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza was 89% (95% CI: 36-100%) after adjusting for age, health care setting, major chronic conditions and period. Pandemic vaccine was effective in preventing MA-ILI and confirmed cases of influenza A(H1N1)2009 in the 2009-2010 season. PMID:21723358

  7. Delayed norovirus epidemic in the 2009-2010 season in Japan: potential relationship with intensive hand sanitizer use for pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Inaida, S; Shobugawa, Y; Matsuno, S; Saito, R; Suzuki, H

    2016-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) epidemics normally peak in December in Japan; however, the peak in the 2009-2010 season was delayed until the fourth week of January 2010. We suspected intensive hand hygiene that was conducted for a previous pandemic influenza in 2009 as the cause of this delay. We analysed the NoV epidemic trend, based on national surveillance data, and its associations with monthly output data for hand hygiene products, including alcohol-based skin antiseptics and hand soap. The delayed peak in the NoV incidence in the 2009-2010 season had the lowest number of recorded cases of the five seasons studied (2006-2007 to 2010-2011). GII.4 was the most commonly occurring genotype. The monthly relative risk of NoV and monthly output of both alcohol-based skin antiseptics and hand soap were significantly and negatively correlated. Our findings suggest an association between hand hygiene using these products and prevention of NoV transmission. PMID:27301793

  8. Influence of the Eurasian snow on the negative North Atlantic Oscillation in subseasonal forecasts of the cold winter 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini, Y. J.; Senan, R.; Vitart, F.; Balsamo, G.; Weisheimer, A.; Doblas-Reyes, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    The winter 2009/2010 was remarkably cold and snowy over North America and across Eurasia, from Europe to the Far East, coinciding with a pronounced negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). While previous studies have investigated the origin and persistence of this anomalously negative NAO phase, we have re-assessed the role that the Eurasian snowpack could have played in contributing to its maintenance. Many observational and model studies have indicated that the autumn Eurasian snow cover influences circulation patterns over high northern latitudes. To investigate that role, we have performed a suite of forecasts with the coupled ocean-atmosphere ensemble prediction system from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Pairs of 2-month ensemble forecasts with either realistic or else randomized snow initial conditions are used to demonstrate how an anomalously thick snowpack leads to an initial cooling over the continental land masses of Eurasia and, within 2 weeks, to the anomalies that are characteristic of a negative NAO. It is also associated with enhanced vertical wave propagation into the stratosphere and deceleration of the polar night jet. The latter then exerts a downward influence into the troposphere maximizing in the North Atlantic region, which establishes itself within 2 weeks. We compare the forecasted NAO index in our simulations with those from several operational forecasts of the winter 2009/2010 made at the ECWMF, and highlight the importance of relatively high horizontal resolution.

  9. Objectives and Constraints in Geographical Fieldwork: Teachers' Attitudes and Perspectives in Senior High Schools in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Lin-Fang; Foskett, Nicholas H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the objectives for geographical fieldwork within senior high schools in Taiwan, and the constraints on the implementation and development of fieldwork. It introduces briefly the position of fieldwork in geography education in Taiwan, then uses a model adapted from the work of Boardman in 1974 and Smith in 1996 in England to…

  10. Using Peer Assessment of Fieldwork to Enhance Students' Practical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Mowafy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork training is a key component of several practical disciplines. In this study, students' peer assessment of fieldwork is explored as a method to improve their practical training. Peer assessment theories are first discussed. A framework for peer assessment of fieldwork is proposed, and the steps taken for preparation of students for…

  11. Chinese Junior High School Students' Perceptions of Geographic Fieldwork: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Daihu; Wang, Ziying; Xu, Di; Wang, Chuanbing; Deng, Zhengzheng

    2013-01-01

    After nearly ten years of implementation of the first junior high school geography standards, Chinese geography educators have been increasingly incorporating fieldwork into their geography teaching. This study examined student perceptions of fieldwork from an international perspective by reviewing student fieldwork reports and administering a…

  12. Developing a Research Tool to Enable Children to Voice Their Experiences and Learning through Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halocha, John

    2005-01-01

    Ongoing media coverage of the dangers of fieldwork and guidance from some teacher unions is placing fieldwork under threat in many English primary schools. Most teachers believe that fieldwork experiences are a valuable part of geographical learning, but how do children actually articulate the understanding arising from this? The research took…

  13. Observation of O3, HCl, ClO, and HOCl by ISS/JEM/SMILES inside and outside Arctic Polar Vortex during 2009-2010 Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Mitsuda, C.; Manago, N.; Imai, K.; Naito, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Shiotani, M.

    2011-12-01

    JEM/SMILES instrument has been in operation from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010 on the International Space Station. SMILES observed limb emission in the frequency region 625 and 650 GHz with 0.8 MHz sampling, and it can provide vertical profiles of O3, HCl, ClO, HOCl, HO2, BrO, HNO3, CH3CN and O3 isotopes. SMILES use 4K cooled SIS mixer which has very low noise (Tsys ~ 340 K), and SMILES L2 products should have significantly smaller random error for species such as ClO and HOCl compared to the previous measurements. This paper reports interpretation of chemistry at inside and outside Arctic polar vortex during 2009-2010 winter season based upon O3, HCl, ClO, and HOCl observation by SMILES.

  14. Scales of governance: the role of surveillance in facilitating new diplomacy during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Bell, Morag; Warren, Adam; Budd, Lucy

    2012-11-01

    The 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic has highlighted the importance of global health surveillance. Increasingly, global alerts are based on 'unexpected' 'events' detected by surveillance systems grounded in particular places. An emerging global governance literature investigates the supposedly disruptive impact of public health emergencies on mobilities in an interdependent world. Little consideration has been given to the varied scales of governance--local, national and global--that operate at different stages in the unfolding of an 'event', together with the interactions and tensions between them. By tracking the chronology of the H1N1 pandemic, this paper highlights an emergent dialogue between local and global scales. It also draws attention to moments of national autonomy across the global North and South which undermined the WHO drive for transnational cooperation. PMID:22884291

  15. Coastal ocean variability in the US Pacific Northwest region: seasonal patterns, winter circulation, and the influence of the 2009-2010 El Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durski, Scott M.; Kurapov, Alexander L.; Allen, John S.; Kosro, P. Michael; Egbert, Gary D.; Shearman, R. Kipp; Barth, John A.

    2015-12-01

    A 2-km horizontal resolution ocean circulation model is developed for a large coastal region along the US Pacific Northwest (34-50N) to study how continental shelf, slope, and interior ocean variability influence each other. The model has been run for the time period September 2008-May 2011, driven by realistic surface momentum and heat fluxes obtained from an atmospheric model and lateral boundary conditions obtained from nesting in a global ocean model. The solution compares favorably to satellite measurements of sea surface temperature and sea surface height, observations of surface currents by high-frequency radars, mooring temperature time series, and glider temperature and salinity sections. The analysis is focused on the seasonal response of the coastal ocean with particular emphasis on the winter circulation patterns which have previously garnered relatively little attention. Interannual variability is examined through a comparison of the 2009-2010 winter influenced by El Niño and the winters in the preceding and following years. Strong northward winds combined with reduced surface cooling along the coast north of Cape Mendocino (40.4N) in winter 2009-2010, resulting in a vigorous downwelling season, characterized by relatively energetic northward currents and warmer ocean temperatures over the continental shelf and upper slope. An analysis of the time variability of the volume-averaged temperature and salinity in a coastal control volume (CV), that extends from 41 to 47N and offshore from the coast to the 200-m isobath, clearly shows relevant integrated characteristics of the annual cycle and the transitions between winter shelf circulation forced by northward winds and the summer circulation driven primarily by southward, upwelling-favorable winds. The analysis also reveals interesting interannual differences in these characteristics. In particular, the CV volume-average temperature remains notably warmer during January-March 2010 of the El Niño winter.

  16. The collaborative model of fieldwork education: a blueprint for group supervision of students.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Debra J; DeIuliis, Elizabeth D

    2015-04-01

    Historically, occupational therapists have used a traditional one-to-one approach to supervision on fieldwork. Due to the impact of managed care on health-care delivery systems, a dramatic increase in the number of students needing fieldwork placement, and the advantages of group learning, the collaborative supervision model has evolved as a strong alternative to an apprenticeship supervision approach. This article builds on the available research to address barriers to model use, applying theoretical foundations of collaborative supervision to practical considerations for academic fieldwork coordinators and fieldwork educators as they prepare for participation in group supervision of occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant students on level II fieldwork. PMID:25821887

  17. Chlorine activation in the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 analyzed by combined use of JEM/SMILES and ACE-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuji, T.; Saitoh, N.; Sugita, T.; Kasai, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) equipped in the Japanese Experiment Module "KIBO" on board the International Space Station (ISS) had observed atmospheric minor constituents including ClO in the stratosphere and mesosphere from October 12, 2009 to April 21, 2010 with more than ten times the precision of other existing sensors due to its unprecedented high sensitivity with superconducting technology. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), which is on board SCISAT-1, has been observing atmospheric minor constituents in the upper troposphere and stratosphere since March 11, 2004 by solar occultation technique. We have analyzed the SMILES Level 2 (L2) V2.1.5 research products and the ACE-FTS L2 V3.0 products to discuss the relationship between temperature and stratospheric minor gases related to ozone depletion and the time variation of 'Cl partitioning' in the Arctic winter of 2009/2010. The correlation between the SMILES L2r ClO concentration and temperature on 475 K and 525 K from mid-January to early February showed that the ClO concentrations were higher than 0.5 ppbv at equivalent latitudes higher than 70° and solar zenith angles lower than 96°, where the temperatures were well lower than 200 K; the ClO concentrations and the solar zenith angles had a positive correlation in the region where the ClO concentrations were higher than 0.5 ppbv. However, some data with high ClO concentration also occurred under relatively warmer conditions where PSCs were not expected to exist. The temperature histories of those data showed that they had experienced near ice frost point of ~187 K at 2-4 days before the observations, and then the temperatures drastically increased as much as 20 degrees just before the observations. We have analyzed a time-series of 'Cl partitioning' by using ClO, HOCl, and HCl observed by SMILES and HCl and ClONO2 observed by ACE-FTS inside the polar vortex in 2009/2010. HCl

  18. NAESP 2009-2010 Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The NAESP (National Association of Elementary School Principals) Platform consists of a summary of all resolutions adopted by business meetings and, since 1974, by Delegate Assemblies. Each resolution presented for action by the Delegate Assembly carries with it a rationale for its adoption as well as the specific area and section of the Platform…

  19. Seismic velocity changes, strain rate and non-volcanic tremors during the 2009-2010 slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivet, Diane; Campillo, Michel; Radiguet, Mathilde; Zigone, Dimitri; Cruz-Atienza, Victor; Shapiro, Nikolai M.; Kostoglodov, Vladimir; Cotte, Nathalie; Cougoulat, Glenn; Walpersdorf, Andrea; Daub, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We use ambient noise cross-correlations to monitor small but reliable changes in seismic velocities and to analyse non-volcanic tremor (NVT) intensities during the slow slip event (SSE) that occurred in 2009 and 2010 in Guerrero. We test the sensitivity of the seismic velocity to strain variations in absence of strong motions. The 2009-2010 SSE presents a complex slip sequence with two subevents occurring in two different portions of the fault. From a seismic array of 59 seismometers, installed in small antennas, we detect a velocity drop with maximum amplitude at the time of the first subevent. We analyse the velocity change at different period bands and observe that the velocity perturbation associated with the SSE maximizes for periods longer than 12 s. Then a linearized inversion of the velocity change measured at different period bands is applied in order to determine the depth of the portion of the crust affected by this perturbation. No velocity change in the first 10 km is detected. Below, the velocity perturbation increases with depth, affecting the middle and lower crust. Finally, we compute the transient deformation produced by the SSE in an elastic model using the slip evolution recovered from the inversion of continuous GPS. The comparison between the velocity changes and the deformation suggests that the velocity change is correlated with the strain rate rather than with the strain. This result is similar to what was observed during the 2006 SSE in the same region and suggests a non-linear behaviour of the crust. The velocity changes can be interpreted together with other observables such as NVTs. During the 2009-2010 SSE we measure NVT activity using continuous seismic records filtered between 2 and 8 Hz. We observe a correlation between velocity changes (for period band greater than 14 s) and tremor activity whereas no correlation exists between velocity changes and seismic noise energy measured at long periods. These observations suggest that both

  20. Neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility profile of pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dapat, Clyde; Kondo, Hiroki; Dapat, Isolde C; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Yasushi; Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Two new influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), peramivir and laninamivir, were approved in 2010 which resulted to four NAIs that were used during the 2010-2011 influenza season in Japan. This study aims to monitor the susceptibility of influenza virus isolates in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan to the four NAIs using the fluorescence-based 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) method. Outliers were identified using box-and-whisker plot analysis and full NA gene sequencing was performed to determine the mutations that are associated with reduction of susceptibility to NAIs. A total of 117 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 59 A(H3N2), and 18 type B viruses were tested before NAI treatment and eight A(H1N1)pdm09 and 1 type B viruses were examined from patients after NAI treatment in the two seasons. NA inhibition assay showed type A influenza viruses were more susceptible to NAIs than type B viruses. The peramivir and laninamivir IC₅₀ values of both type A and B viruses were significantly lower than the oseltamivir and zanamivir IC₅₀ values. Among influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, the prevalence of H274Y viruses increased from 0% in the 2009-2010 season to 3% in the 2010-2011 season. These H274Y viruses were resistant to oseltamivir and peramivir with 200-300 fold increase in IC₅₀ values but remained sensitive to zanamivir and laninamivir. Other mutations in NA, such as I222T and M241I were identified among the outliers. Among influenza A(H3N2) viruses, two outliers were identified with D151G and T148I mutations, which exhibited a reduction in susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir, respectively. Among type B viruses, no outliers were identified to the four NAIs. For paired samples that were collected before and after drug treatment, three (3/11; 27.3%) H274Y viruses were identified among A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses after oseltamivir treatment but no outliers were found in the laninamivir-treatment group (n=3). Despite widespread use of

  1. Students' Perception of Biology Fieldwork: The Example of Students Undertaking a Preliminary Year at a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulder, Raymond; Scott, Graham W.; Scott, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely held among biology teachers that fieldwork is valuable, but little is heard about students' perception of fieldwork or about the reasons for their liking or disliking fieldwork. This paper uses data from students to explore the hypotheses (1) that biology students with a positive perception of fieldwork have a less positive…

  2. Individual Vaccination as Nash Equilibrium in a SIR Model with Application to the 2009-2010 Influenza A (H1N1) Epidemic in France.

    PubMed

    Laguzet, Laetitia; Turinici, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    The vaccination against ongoing epidemics is seldom compulsory but remains one of the most classical means to fight epidemic propagation. However, recent debates concerning the innocuity of vaccines and their risk with respect to the risk of the epidemic itself lead to severe vaccination campaign failures, and new mass behaviors appeared driven by individual self-interest. Prompted by this context, we analyze, in a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model, whether egocentric individuals can reach an equilibrium with the rest of the society. Using techniques from the "Mean Field Games" theory, we extend previous results and show that an equilibrium exists and characterizes completely the individual best vaccination strategy (with or without discounting). We also compare with a strategy based only on overall societal optimization and exhibit a situation with nonnegative price of anarchy. Finally, we apply the theory to the 2009-2010 Influenza A (H1N1) vaccination campaign in France and hint that a group of individuals stopped vaccinating at levels that indicated a pessimistic perception of the risk of the vaccine. PMID:26443437

  3. Clinical aspects of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases reported during the pandemic in Brazil, 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Érika Valeska; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the clinical aspects of cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Brazil. Methods: A descriptive study of cases reported in Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN), 2009-2010. Results: As the final classification, we obtained 53,797 (56.79%) reported cases confirmed as a new influenza virus subtype, and 40,926 (43.21%) cases discarded. Fever was the most common sign, recorded in 99.74% of the confirmed and 98.92% of the discarded cases. Among the confirmed cases, the presence of comorbidities was reported in 32.53%, and in 38.29% of the discarded cases. The case fatality rate was 4.04%; 3,267 pregnant women were confirmed positive for influenza A new viral subtype and 2,730 of them were cured. The case fatality rate of pregnant women was 6.88%. Conclusion: The findings suggested concern of the health system with pregnant women, and patients with comorbidities and quality of care may have favored a lower mortality. We recommend that, when caring for patients with severe respiratory symptoms, with comorbidities, or pregnant women, health professionals should consider the need for hospital care, as these factors make up a worse prognosis of infection by the pandemic influenza virus. PMID:26154537

  4. Coral-based climate records from tropical South Atlantic: 2009/2010 ENSO event in C and O isotopes from Porites corals (Rocas Atoll, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Natan S; Sial, Alcídes N; Kikuchi, Ruy K P; Ferreira, Valderez P; Ullmann, Clemens V; Frei, Robert; Cunha, Adriana M C

    2015-01-01

    Coral skeletons contain records of past environmental conditions due to their long life span and well calibrated geochemical signatures. C and O isotope records of corals are especially interesting, because they can highlight multidecadal variability of local climate conditions beyond the instrumental record, with high fidelity and sub-annual resolution. Although, in order to get an optimal geochemical signal in coral skeleton, sampling strategies must be followed. Here we report one of the first coral-based isotopic record from the Equatorial South Atlantic from two colonies of Porites astreoides from the Rocas Atoll (offshore Brazil), a new location for climate reconstruction. We present time series of isotopic variation from profiles along the corallite valley of one colony and the apex of the corallite fan of the other colony. Significant differences in the isotopic values between the two colonies are observed, yet both record the 2009/2010 El Niño event - a period of widespread coral bleaching - as anomalously negative δ18O values (up to -1 permil). δ13C is found to be measurably affected by the El Niño event in one colony, by more positive values (+0.39 ‰), and together with a bloom of endolithic algae, may indicate physiological alteration of this colony. Our findings indicate that corals from the Rocas Atoll can be used for monitoring climate oscillations in the tropical South Atlantic Ocean. PMID:26536856

  5. What can be done about home health fieldwork?

    PubMed

    Lindstrom-Hazel, D; Bush, M A

    1997-06-01

    The literature indicates that health care is moving away from institutional care and specialization to the community and home where providers need generalist competencies. As educators strive to prepare students for this environment, fieldwork experiences in the community and home are opportunities for students to develop generalist competencies. Because of the current scarcity of fieldwork sites, in general, scheduling placements is difficult. As educators seek new sites, home health settings and therapists who provide home health care as a component of their service need to be considered. Home health occupational therapy requires a practitioner to adopt a holistic perspective in order to assist clients to function optimally in their home environment. Because a large number of students work in addition to taking classes, they can be encouraged to find jobs as home health aides or chore providers as part-time employment before and during their didactic education. This work experience can help them to acculturate to the home setting. By encouraging students' participation in home health experiences, educators are helping to facilitate generalist competencies. PMID:9164615

  6. Feedback on students' clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Marianne; Mårtensson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim Feedback on clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education is regarded as vital in occupational therapy students' professional development. The nature of supervisors' feedback however, could be confirmative and/or corrective and corrective feedback could be with or without suggestions on how to improve. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of supervisors' feedback on final-year occupational therapy students' clinical reasoning skills through comparing the nature of feedback with the students' subsequent clinical reasoning ability. Method A mixed-method approach with a convergent parallel design was used combining the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. From focus groups and interviews with students, data were collected and analysed qualitatively to determine how the students experienced the feedback they received from their supervisors. By quantitatively comparing the final practical exam grades with the nature of the feedback, their fieldwork End-of-Term grades and average academic performance it became possible to merge the results for comparison and interpretation. Results Students' clinical reasoning skills seem to be improved through corrective feedback if accompanied by suggestions on how to improve, irrespective of their average academic performance. Supervisors were inclined to underrate high performing students and overrate lower performing students. Conclusions Students who obtained higher grades in the final practical examinations received more corrective feedback with suggestions on how to improve from their supervisors. Confirmative feedback alone may not be sufficient for improving the clinical reasoning skills of students. PMID:26256854

  7. Science in the Wild: Technology Needs and Opportunities in Scientific Fieldwork

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guice, Jon; Hoffower, Heidi; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Considering that much contemporary natural science involves field expeditions, fieldwork is an under-studied topic. There is also little information technology specifically designed to support scientific fieldwork, aside from portable scientific instruments. This article describes a variety of fieldwork practices in an interdisciplinary research area, proposes a framework linking types of fieldwork to types of needs in information technology, and identifies promising opportunities for technology development. Technologies that are designed to support the integration of field observations and samples with laboratory work are likely to aid nearly all research teams who conduct fieldwork. However, technologies that support highly detailed representations of field sites will likely trigger the deepest changes in work practice. By way of illustration, we present brief case studies of how fieldwork is done today and how it might be conducted with the introduction of new information technologies.

  8. Technical Report for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators on CDC Guidance for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza during the 2009-2010 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Report includes detailed information on the reasons for the strategies presented in the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) "Guidance for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza During the 2009-2010 School Year" and suggestions on how to use them. The guidance is designed to decrease exposure to regular seasonal flu and 2009 H1N1 flu…

  9. GFS water vapor forecast error evaluated over the 2009-2010 West Coast cool season using the MET/MODE object analyses package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, W. L.; Sukovich, E.; Tollerud, E. I.; Jensen, T.; Yuan, H.; Wick, G. A.; Bullock, R.; Hmt-Dtc Collaboration Project

    2010-12-01

    Research over the last decade and a half confirms that the vast majority of West Coast cool-season extreme precipitation events are due to the landfall of intense wind-driven streams of concentrated water vapor associated with extratropical cyclones called atmospheric rivers (ARs). Accurate prediction of the effects of ARs as they come ashore depends on accurate numeric modeling of integrated water vapor (IWV) over the Northeast Pacific (NEP). Quantifying the uncertainty in this forecast field is an important step toward understanding the causes of uncertainty in West Coast extreme event forecasts. To this end GFS (Global Forecast System) model output obtained in real time of the fields needed to calculate IWV were archived and analyzed. GFS was used because it is well known, it covers our area of interest, and the output is readily available to the community. To estimate forecast uncertainties we used an object-based method that allows quantitative comparisons of object location, size, shape, and intensity. In particular, we used MODE, the Method for Object-based Diagnostic Evaluation. MODE is an object-based verification tool from the MET (Model Evaluation Tools) package developed and supported by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC). This package of verification tools is readily available and intended to provide the community with a common software package incorporating the latest advances in forecast verification. We describe results from two studies conducted as part of the Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT)—DTC collaboration project. The studies are based upon Northeast Pacific (NEP) data collected during the 2009-2010 cool season. In the first study we focus on verifying GFS-analysis IWV against satellite-observed IWV throughout the NEP. Specifically, IWV GFS analysis objects are compared with 12-hour composite, satellite-derived Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) observational objects. Then we incorporate MODE object attributes related to object

  10. Alcoholic beverage consumption by adults compared to dietary guidelines: results of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Guenther, Patricia M; Ding, Eric L; Rimm, Eric B

    2013-04-01

    The 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) state that if alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation, which is defined as up to two drinks in a single day for men and one drink for women. The purpose of this analysis was to estimate the percentages of adults who, on a given day, drank more than these limits and the percentages who drank too heavily; that is, more than four drinks for men and more than three for women. Dietary intake data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2010, were analyzed. Using a computer-assisted protocol, 24-hour dietary recalls were collected from 2,740 men and 2,941 women, age 21 years and older. Results were weighted to be nationally representative. Estimated mean daily intake was 1.2 drinks for men and 0.4 for women (1 drink=14 g of ethanol). On a given day, 36% of men and 21% of women consumed alcohol. Whereas 82% of men and 89% of women did not exceed the DGA's limits, 8% of men had more than four drinks, and 3% of women had more than three, amounts defined as heavy. The percentages who drank more than the DGA's limits varied by age group and were highest among men age 31 to 50 years and women age 51 to 70 years. Excessive drinking is an important health problem and is not limited to college-age individuals. Registered dietitians and other health professionals should be aware of excessive drinking by the adult US population. Consumer education resources are available. PMID:23415501

  11. Optimal cutoffs for low skeletal muscle mass related to cardiovascular risk in adults: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yirang; Han, Byoung-Duck; Han, Kyungdo; Shin, Koh Eun; Lee, Halla; Kim, Tae Ri; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Yang Hyun; Kim, Hyunjin; Nam, Ga Eun

    2015-11-01

    The possible association between low skeletal muscle mass and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors necessitates estimation of muscle mass even in subjects with normal body mass index (BMI). This study was aimed to investigate optimal cutoffs for skeletal muscle mass reflecting CVD risk factors and to evaluate the relationship between skeletal muscle mass and CVD risk factors in the general population and in subjects with normal BMI using these cutoffs. This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010. We enrolled 5120 men and 6559 women aged ≥20 years. Skeletal muscle index (SMI) was defined as the weight-adjusted appendicular skeletal muscle mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, SMI cutoffs associated with CVD risk factors were determined. Lower SMI was significantly associated with an increased prevalence of CVD risk factors. The first cutoffs in men and women were 32 and 25%, respectively, and the second cutoffs were 30 and 23.5%. Subjects in stage I and stage II SMI categories showed increased prevalence and risk for several CVD risk factors. These tendencies persisted in the association between cardiometabolic characteristics and SMI even in subjects with normal BMI. Using cutoffs of low skeletal muscle mass reflecting CVD risk factors, lower skeletal muscle mass was associated with increased prevalence and risk of several CVD risk factors. A higher prevalence of cardiometabolic abnormalities was observed among subjects with normal BMI but low skeletal muscle mass. PMID:25862070

  12. Chronic conditions, functional difficulties, and disease burden among American Indian/Alaska Native children with special health care needs, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Mary Kay; Thierry, Judy

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of chronic conditions and functional difficulties of American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) children with special health care needs (CSHCN). We conducted bivariate and multivariable analysis of cross-sectional data on 40,202 children from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs aged birth through 17 years, including 1,051 AIAN CSHCN. The prevalence of AIAN CSHCN was 15.7 %, not significantly different from the prevalence of US white CSHCN (16.3 %). As qualifiers for special needs status among AIAN children the use of or need for prescription medication was the most frequent (70 %), compared to the lower rates of need for elevated service use (44 %) and emotional, mental, or behavioral treatment/counseling (36 %). Asthma (45 %), conduct disorder (18 %), developmental delay (27 %), and migraine headaches (16 %) were significantly more common chronic conditions among AIAN CSHCN compared to white CSHCN, as were functional difficulties with respiration (52 %), communication (42 %), anxiety/depression (57 %), and behavior (54 %). AIAN CSHCN were also more likely to have 3 or more chronic conditions (39 vs. 28 %, respectively) and 3 or more functional difficulties (70 vs. 55 %, respectively) than white CSHCN. Results indicated a greater impact on the daily activities of AIAN CSHCN compared to white CSHCN (74 vs. 63 %). Significantly greater disease burden among AIAN CSHCN suggests that care must be taken to ensure an appropriate level of coordinated care in a medical home to ameliorate the severity and complexity of their conditions. PMID:24553797

  13. Family perceptions of shared decision-making with health care providers: results of the National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Smalley, LaQuanta P; Kenney, Mary Kay; Denboba, Diana; Strickland, Bonnie

    2014-08-01

    The Maternal and Child Health Bureau recently revised its measure of family-provider shared decision-making (SDM) to better align with parents' views and the intent of SDM. We sought to assess achievements in meeting the revised measure; examine socio-demographic/health correlates; and determine the relationships between SDM and access to quality health care. We analyzed data for 40,242 children with special health care needs (CSHCN) from the 2009-2010 National Survey of CSHCN and assessed the prevalence of SDM and association with other US CSHCN socio-demographic/health characteristics using bivariate and multivariate methods. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between SDM and having a medical home and preventive medical/dental visits. Approximately 70% of families of CSHCN perceived themselves as shared decision-makers in their child's care. Families of CSHCN with greater functional limitations had twice the odds of lacking SDM than those never affected. Disparities in attainment rates were noted for families with low versus high income (61 vs. 77%), less versus more than high school education (59 vs. 73%), privately insured versus uninsured (76 vs. 57%), and minority versus white race (63 vs. 74%). CSHCN with medical homes had 6 times greater odds of perceived SDM and as much as one and a half times the odds of receiving preventive care than CSHCN without a medical home. Major differences in family SDM perceptions are associated with having a medical home, particularly when characterized by family-centered care. Populations of concern are those with more functionally limited children and increased socio-economic challenges. PMID:24052119

  14. The use of SMILES data to study ozone loss in the Arctic winter 2009/2010 and comparison with Odin/SMR data using assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, K.; Murtagh, D.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station observed ozone profiles in the stratosphere with high sensitivity. Although SMILES measurements do not cover high latitudes, the combination of data assimilation methods and an isentropic advection model allows us to use SMILES measurements to investigate the ozone loss due to the instability of the polar vortex in the northern hemisphere. We quantified the ozone depletion in the 2009/2010 Arctic polar winter. Ozone data from both SMILES and Odin/SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer) for the winter were assimilated into the Dynamical Isentropic Assimilation Model for OdiN Data (DIAMOND). DIAMOND is an off-line wind-driven transport model on isentropic surfaces. Wind data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used to drive the model. In this study, particular attention is paid to the cross isentropic transport of the tracer. The assimilated SMILES ozone fields agree with the SMR fields despite the limited latitude coverage. Ozone depletion has been derived by comparing the ozone field acquired by sequential assimilation with a passively transported ozone field initiated to 1 December 2009. Significant ozone loss was found in different periods and altitudes from using both SMILES and SMR data. The initial depletion occurred in the end of January below 500 K with a loss of 0.6-1.0 ppm (approximately 20%). The ensuing loss started from the end of February between 575 K and 650 K. Our estimation shows that 0.8 ppmv (15-20%) of O3 has been removed from the lower stratosphere by 1 April in VMR.

  15. The use of SMILES data to study ozone loss in the Arctic winter 2009/2010 and comparison with Odin/SMR data using assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, K.; Murtagh, D.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station observed ozone in the stratosphere with high precision from October 2009 to April 2010. Although SMILES measurements only cover latitudes from 38° S to 65° N, the combination of data assimilation methods and an isentropic advection model allows us to quantify the ozone depletion in the 2009/2010 Arctic polar winter by making use of the instability of the polar vortex in the northern hemisphere. Ozone data from both SMILES and Odin/SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer) for the winter were assimilated into the Dynamical Isentropic Assimilation Model for OdiN Data (DIAMOND). DIAMOND is an off-line wind-driven transport model on isentropic surfaces. Wind data from the operational analyses of the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used to drive the model. In this study, particular attention is paid to the cross isentropic transport of the tracer in order to accurately assess the ozone loss. The assimilated SMILES ozone fields agree well with the limitation of noise induced variability within the SMR fields despite the limited latitude coverage of the SMILES observations. Ozone depletion has been derived by comparing the ozone field acquired by sequential assimilation with a passively transported ozone field initialized on 1 December 2009. Significant ozone loss was found in different periods and altitudes from using both SMILES and SMR data: The initial depletion occurred at the end of January below 550 K with an accumulated loss of 0.6-1.0 ppmv (approximately 20%) by 1 April. The ensuing loss started from the end of February between 575 K and 650 K. Our estimation shows that 0.8-1.3 ppmv (20-25 %) of O3 has been removed at the 600 K isentropic level by 1 April in volume mixing ratio (VMR).

  16. A coordinated cross-disciplinary research initiative to address an increased incidence of narcolepsy following the 2009-2010 Pandemrix vaccination programme in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Feltelius, N; Persson, I; Ahlqvist-Rastad, J; Andersson, M; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Bergman, P; Granath, F; Adori, C; Hökfelt, T; Kühlmann-Berenzon, S; Liljeström, P; Maeurer, M; Olsson, T; Örtqvist, Å; Partinen, M; Salmonson, T; Zethelius, B

    2015-10-01

    In response to the 2009-2010 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, a mass vaccination programme with the AS03-adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1) vaccine Pandemrix was initiated in Sweden. Unexpectedly, there were a number of narcolepsy cases amongst vaccinated children and adolescents reported. In this review, we summarize the results of a joint cross-disciplinary national research effort to investigate the adverse reaction signal from the spontaneous reporting system and to better understand possible causative mechanisms. A three- to fourfold increased risk of narcolepsy in vaccinated children and adolescents was verified by epidemiological studies. Of importance, no risk increase was observed for the other neurological and autoimmune diseases studied. Genetic studies confirmed the association with the allele HLA-DQB1*06:02, which is known to be related to sporadic narcolepsy. Furthermore, a number of studies using cellular and molecular experimental models investigated possible links between influenza vaccination and narcolepsy. Serum analysis, using a peptide microarray platform, showed that individuals who received Pandemrix exhibited a different epitope reactivity pattern to neuraminidase and haemagglutinin, as compared to individuals who were infected with H1N1. Patients with narcolepsy were also found to have increased levels of interferon-gamma production in response to streptococcus-associated antigens. The chain of patient-related events and the study results emerging over time were subjected to intense nationwide media attention. The importance of transparent communication and collaboration with patient representatives to maintain public trust in vaccination programmes is also discussed in the review. Organizational challenges due to this unexpected event delayed the initiation of some of the research projects, still the main objectives of this joint, cross-disciplinary research effort were reached, and important insights were acquired for future, similar

  17. Improving fieldwork by using GIS for quantitative exploration, data management and digital mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Wouter; Alberti, Koko; van de Grint, Liesbeth; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Fieldwork is an essential part of teaching geosciences. The essence of a fieldwork is to study natural phenomena in its proper context. Fieldworks dominantly utilize a learning-by-experiencing learning style and are often light on abstract thinking skills. We introduce more of the latter skills to a first-year fieldwork of several weeks by using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). We use simple techniques as the involved students had no prior experience with GIS. In our project, we introduced new tutorials prior to the fieldwork where students explored their research area using aerial photos, satellite images, an elevation model and slope-map using Google Earth and QGIS. The goal of these tutorials was to get acquainted with the area, plan the first steps of the fieldwork, and formulate hypotheses in form of a preliminary map based on quantitative data. During the actual fieldwork, half of the students processed and managed their field data using GIS, used elevation data as additional data source, and made digital geomorphological maps. This was in contrast to the other half of the students that used classic techniques with paper maps. We evaluated the learning benefits by two questionnaires (one before and one after the fieldwork), and a group interview with students that used GIS in the field. Students liked the use of Google Earth and GIS, and many indicate the added value of using quantitative maps. The hypotheses and fieldwork plans of the students were quickly superseded by insights during the fieldwork itself, but making these plans and hypotheses in advance improved the student's ability to perform empirical research. Students were very positive towards the use of GIS for their fieldwork, mainly because they experienced it as a modern and relevant technique for research and the labour market. Tech-savvy students were extra motivated and explored additional methods. There were some minor technical difficulties with using GIS during the fieldwork, but

  18. Before and after fieldwork: ingredients for an ethnography of illness.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gilbert

    2012-04-01

    W.H.R. Rivers asked what light anthropology could throw on the emergence of medicine. But this early lead was not soon followed up. Social anthropology had first to establish itself. The new social anthropology championed holistic fieldwork in small-scale societies. Some did choose to study illness or misfortune ethnographically. Evans-Pritchard, Victor Turner and Max Marwick provided outstanding models in this field. Political change and decolonisation made some of the older assumptions about the place and aims of anthropological research less easy to sustain. Growth in the subject encouraged specialisation. Medical anthropology was one among many possible developments. But it also had to identify a distinctive focus and place in relation to medicine and other health-related social studies. PMID:22612485

  19. Facilitating International Fieldwork: The Receptive Services of New Zealand's Geography Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to provide preliminary insight into facilitating international fieldwork in New Zealand by researchers and universities who support visiting university groups. Anonymous online surveys sought views of supporting researchers (15 respondents), and supported scholars (8 respondents). The extent to which international fieldwork is…

  20. Supporting Holistic Understanding of Geographical Problems: Fieldwork and G-Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjea, Kalyani; Chang, Chew-Hung; Lim, Ee-Peng; Zhang, Jun; Theng, Yin-Leng; Go, Dion Hoe-Lian

    2008-01-01

    Fieldwork remains the mainstay in the study of geography and in the analysis of the environmental processes. However, an in-depth understanding of the environmental and geographical processes requires extensive as well as intensive fieldwork that involves time and substantial effort, both of which may pose a problem within a given curriculum time.…

  1. Combining Research-Based Student Fieldwork with Staff Research to Reinforce Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Ian C.; Mellor, Antony; Entwistle, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the relationship between teaching and research in a fieldwork context by seeking student views over 3 years across two institutions to assess the perceived value of blending staff research activity with student fieldwork. Student views were solicited using questionnaires. Despite the contrasting environments, locations and…

  2. Students' Perception of Biology Fieldwork: The example of students undertaking a preliminary year at a UK university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulder, Raymond; Scott, Graham W.; Scott, Lisa J.

    2013-06-01

    It is widely held among biology teachers that fieldwork is valuable, but little is heard about students' perception of fieldwork or about the reasons for their liking or disliking fieldwork. This paper uses data from students to explore the hypotheses (1) that biology students with a positive perception of fieldwork have a less positive perception of laboratory work and vice versa and (2) that perception of fieldwork is related to demographic/personal factors and/or to pre-university perceptions and experience of fieldwork. Numeric indices of appreciation of biology field and laboratory work (I field and I lab) were determined using questionnaire information from 54 students. I field and I lab were positively correlated and there was no evidence of polarization of views; the problem that some students have a poor perception of both needs to be addressed. Mature students had a more positive view of fieldwork than 18-20-year-olds. However, regression analysis of I field against principal components suggested that demographic/personal factors had relatively little overall influence (< 20%) on appreciation of fieldwork. Perception of fieldwork at university was related to the rank given to fieldwork when choosing a university course. However, students who had participated in pre-university fieldwork did not have a more positive perception of university fieldwork; although students who recalled a worst memory of pre-university fieldwork had a less positive perception of fieldwork at university. The seeming mixed relevance of pre-university fieldwork suggests that the relationship between perception of fieldwork undertaken at university and quality of pre-university fieldwork is an area for future research.

  3. Factors associated with non-utilisation of health service for childbirth in Timor-Leste: evidence from the 2009-2010 Demographic and Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Timor-Leste is a young developing country in Asia. Most of its infrastructure was destroyed after a long armed conflict for independence. Despite recent expansion of health facilities and investment in healthcare, maternal mortality remains high with most mothers still giving birth at home. This study investigated factors affecting the non-utilisation of health service for childbirth in the aftermath of the independence conflict. Methods The Timor-Leste Demographic and Health Survey 2009-2010 was the latest two-stage national survey, which used validated questionnaires to obtain information from 26 clusters derived from 13 districts of the country. Factors influencing non-utilisation of health facility for childbirth were investigated using univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses, accounting for the cluster sampling and sample weight of the survey. Results Of the total 5986 participants included in the study, 4472 (74.8%) did not deliver their last child at a health facility. Lack of education for the mother (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 2.04; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.56 to 2.66) and her partner (OR: 1.45; 95% CI 1.14 to 1.84), low household wealth status (OR: 5.20; 95% CI 3.93 to 6.90), and rural residence (OR: 2.83; 95% CI 2.22 to 3.66), were associated with increased likelihood of non-utilisation of health facility for childbirth. Working mothers (OR: 1.55; 95% CI 1.32 to 1.81), who had high parity (OR: 1.78; 95% CI 1.36 to 2.32) and did not attend antenatal care service (OR: 4.68; 95% CI 2.65 to 8.28) were also vulnerable for not delivering at a health facility. Conversely, the prevalence of non-utilisation of health facility for childbirth reduced with increasing number of service components received during antenatal care visits (OR: 0.72; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.80). Conclusions Only a quarter of Timorese women delivered at a health facility. In order to reduce maternal mortality, future interventions should target disadvantaged

  4. Pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 in hospitals and intensive care units – results from a new hospital surveillance, Germany 2009/2010

    PubMed Central

    Adlhoch, Cornelia; Wadl, Maria; Behnke, Michael; Peña Diaz, Luis Alberto; Clausmeyer, Jörg; Eckmanns, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Adlhoch et al. (2012) Pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 in hospitals and intensive care units – results from a new hospital surveillance, Germany 2009/2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(601), e162–e168. Objectives  The pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 (PI) was introduced to Germany in April 2009. The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) implemented a nationwide voluntary hospital sentinel surveillance for to assess the burden and severity of PI. Setting  Three modules were offered: a hospital module collected aggregated data from all hospital units on admissions and fatalities with and without PI; an intensive care module data on admissions, patient‐days, and ventilated patient‐days with and without PI; and a case‐based module retrieved clinical patient data of PI cases. A in‐patient with a PCR confirmation was defined as a PI case. Descriptive, trend, uni‐, and multivariable analysis were performed. Results  Between week 49/2009 and 13/2010, the hospitals reported 103 (0·07%) PI cases among 159 181 admissions and 59/16 728 (0·35%) PI‐related admissions in intensive care units (ICUs). The weekly average incidence decreased in hospitals by 21·5% and in ICUs by 19·2%. In ICUs, 1848/85 559 (2·2%) patient‐days were PI‐related, 94·8% of those with mechanical ventilation. Case‐based data on 43 recovered and 16 fatal PI cases were reported. Among recovered, 61% were admitted to ICUs, 51% were mechanically ventilated, and 16% received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All fatal cases were admitted to ICUs and received mechanical ventilation, 75% ECMO. Fatal outcome was rather associated with complications than with underlying medical conditions. Conclusion  The surveillance started shortly after the PI peak, which explains the small number of PI cases. The burden of PI disease was low, but higher in ICUs with a high proportion of severe cases needing ventilation and ECMO treatment. A continuous

  5. ARENA - A Collaborative Immersive Environment for Virtual Fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Whenever a geoscientific study area is not readily accessible, as is the case on the deep seafloor, it is difficult to apply traditional but effective methods of fieldwork, which often require physical presence of the observer. The Artificial Research Environment for Networked Analysis (ARENA), developed at GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel within the Cluster of Excellence "The Future Ocean", provides a backend solution to robotic research on the seafloor by means of an immersive simulation environment for marine research: A hemispherical screen of 6m diameter covering the entire lower hemisphere surrounds a group of up to four researchers at once. A variety of open source (e.g. Microsoft Research World Wide Telescope) and commercial software platforms allow the interaction with e.g. in-situ recorded video, vector maps, terrain, textured geometry, point cloud and volumetric data in four dimensions. Data can be put into a holistic, georeferenced context and viewed on scales stretching from centimeters to global. Several input devices from joysticks to gestures and vocalized commands allow interaction with the simulation, depending on individual preference. Annotations added to the dataset during the simulation session catalyze the following quantitative evaluation. Both the special simulator design, making data perception a group experience, and the ability to connect remote instances or scaled down versions of ARENA over the Internet are significant advantages over established immersive simulation environments.

  6. Experiences of occupational therapy students in the first fieldwork education: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fieldwork education is a core part of all occupational therapy curriculums around the world to enable the students meet minimum competencies required for their professional life. Student experience is a valuable source to explore the nature of fieldwork training and plan more efficient curriculums in the future. This study aimed to explore the students' experiences in the first fieldwork education. Methods: Data were collected through a focus group and series of semi-structured interviews with 16 occupational therapy students who had passed the first semester of fieldwork education at three occupational therapy departments in Iran. The interviews were transcribed line by line and analyzed according to inductive content analysis. Results: Following the analysis of the data, three main themes were identified including the importance of supervisors’ management, deficits in the current curriculum and challenges in the educational environment. Each theme included different categories to show students’ concerns and challenges in the first fieldwork education experience and their suggestions for more efficient trainings. Conclusion: The research argues that several combined key factors determine the nature and utility of occupational therapy (OT) fieldwork experiences of the students. However, further studies are needed to clarify the experiences of the supervisors, department managers and others involved in the fieldwork education. PMID:25664311

  7. Fieldwork challenges: lessons learned from a north-south public health research partnership.

    PubMed

    Casale, Marisa A J; Flicker, Sarah; Nixon, Stephanie A

    2011-09-01

    The value of collaborative international research in addressing global public health challenges is increasingly recognized. However, little has been written about lessons learned regarding fieldwork to help guide future collaborative efforts. Through a research partnership between two Northern universities, one Southern university, and a Southern faith-based organization, we evaluated a school-based HIV prevention intervention with South African adolescents. In this article, we highlight the seven key fieldwork-related challenges experienced and identify the lessons learned. The underlying theme is that of reconciling a structured and reasoned "desk" planning process with the more fluid and unpredictable reality of conducting fieldwork. This concern is particularly significant in resource-deprived environments and/or contexts that are less familiar to Northern partners. Fieldwork is unpredictable, but obstacles can be minimized through meaningful participation in both planning and field research. Sharing practical lessons from the field can prove a useful resource for both researchers and practitioners. PMID:21422255

  8. Fieldwork: man in the system of nature and priority of natural laws in human life.

    PubMed

    Tinyakova, Elena

    2007-06-01

    Fieldwork is a branch of inseparable unity of natural and humanitarian sciences; it is aimed at the cultural origin of humanity on the maximum level of its variety. Practically all natural sciences have some space determined by ethnic conscience in nature cognition: ethnodemography, ethnobotany, ethnozoology, etc. Fieldwork guides the research of human culture from the laws of nature. This kind of knowledge is useful to balance human relations with nature and avoid conflicts. Peoples should exchange their wisdom in the dialogue with nature to be more safe. Fieldwork understood as traditional culture only, explaining the variety of ethnoses on our earth, is just the narrow and diachronic level of this branch of knowledge. The cosmological knowledge, where fantasy and not exhausted in its cognition understanding the world of nature are mixed, forms the source of fieldwork and in many respects explains the direction of knowledge: the man finds himself under the open sky, he is the child of nature. Then as time went on there appeared a gradual transition--first nature was creating the man, then by and by he began turning to answer nature by his activity. Nowadays the man is actively creating nature. There are two levels of fieldwork: the ancient one which deals with the origin of ethnoses and the modern one which explores how contemporary life is determined by ethnic specific traits. Fieldwork is the core of multidisciplinary situation in man's knowledge. It is related to such humanitarian sciences: semiotics, culturology, sociology, history, philosophy, literature, linguistics. In the cycle of natural sciences fieldwork stands close to anthropology, geography, biology, demography. Fieldwork as a science has the two main levels--the "sophy" level and the logos "level". The first one discovers wisdom of human life, the second one is aimed at logical structuring of knowledge, here proceed various classifications of peoples. PMID:17847946

  9. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  10. A study of students' perceptions of the organisation and effectiveness of fieldwork in earth sciences education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Luis; Praia, Joa¨O.; Kempa, Richard

    2003-02-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary evaluation of an in-service training programme designed for practising geology/earth science teachers in Portuguese high schools and intended to enhance the effectiveness of fieldwork activities organised by them for their students. Among the points particularly stressed during the in-service training were that students should be adequately prepared for fieldwork through classroom-based activities prior to the fieldwork itself and that to arrive at the maximum educational benefit for the students, they should be involved in collaborative group-based investigation. The findings, derived from an enquiry among students following their exposure to fieldwork, revealed that in both these aspects teachers failed to put theory into practice, probably as the result of a lack of confidence to implement novel procedures. On the positive side, the students reported that they enjoyed the social interaction with other students that the fieldwork made possible and the opportunity to work independently of the teachers.

  11. Ethnicity, deprivation and mortality due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in England during the 2009/2010 pandemic and the first post-pandemic season.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Harris, R J; Ellis, J; Pebody, R G

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between risk of death following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and ethnicity and deprivation during the 2009/2010 pandemic period and the first post-pandemic season of 2010/2011 in England was examined. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the mortality risk, adjusted for age, gender, and place of residence. Those of non-White ethnicity experienced an increased mortality risk compared to White populations during the 2009/2010 pandemic [10·5/1000 vs. 6·0/1000 general population; adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1·84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·39-2·54] with the highest risk in those of Pakistani ethnicity. However, no significant difference between ethnicities was observed during the following 2010/2011 season. Persons living in areas with the highest level of deprivation had a significantly higher risk of death (RR 2·08, 95% CI 1·49-2·91) compared to the lowest level for both periods. These results highlight the importance of rapid identification of groups at higher risk of severe disease in the early stages of future pandemics to enable the implementation of optimal prevention and control measures for vulnerable populations. PMID:25850904

  12. Fieldwork I Program Evaluation of Student Learning Using Goal Attainment Scaling.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Ann; Harrison, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a program evaluation of student learning during the Level I fieldwork experience of a master of science in occupational therapy program. We sought to determine the utility of Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) as a measure of student learning. Over four semesters, from fall 2013 through fall 2014, 240 students completed goal attainment scales for an individualized learning goal for the semester. Using a quantitative pretest-posttest design, we found significant increases in levels of student learning goal attainment during Level I fieldwork. Qualitative data from exit surveys revealed high levels of satisfaction with the program, particularly related to the opportunity to learn a new way of envisioning and writing individualized goals. These findings support the use of GAS as an outcome measure of student learning during fieldwork. PMID:26539679

  13. Peer Assisted Experiential Learning (PAEL) in extending fieldwork practice in the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. W.; FitzPatrick, M.; Truscott, J.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional approaches to developing students practical (applied) skills (most especially, but not exclusively, fieldwork) make significant demands on resources, particularly staff time. Extending opportunities for experiential learning through independent (student centred) work is acknowledged, therefore, as being vital to the successful spiralling of Kolb's experiential learning cycle. This project outlines e-learning support as a means of assisting student peer groups in extending the experiential learning cycle for fieldwork. We have developed mobile support for independent fieldwork in a small, accessible and safe area north of Kingsand village, Cornwall, UK. The area is ideal for reinforcing skills in recording basic geological observations and in formulating a simple geological history based on these observations. Independent fieldwork can be undertaken throughout the academic year by small student groups (which can comprise mixed year groups). equipped with PDA's and integrated GPS units. Students are prepared for fieldwork through a dedicated website, linked to support materials in the University's unique Labplus facility. PDA's, running MSCAPE, provide automatic prompts to locations where key observations can be made and detail the nature of the activities that should be carried out at each location. The e-guide takes students from 1st principles of observation and measurement, through recording methodology and eventually links to packages for analysis and interpretation (again using support provided through Labplus). There is no limit to the number of times any particular student can carry out the fieldwork, provided they are organised into groups of three or more. The work is not assessed but links into several components of the field skills training that are formally assessed, including independent geological mapping.

  14. An epidemiological analysis of potential associations between C-reactive protein, inflammation, and prostate cancer in the male US population using the 2009 - 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Hill, Catherine; Lutfiyya, M. Nawal

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in US males, yet much remains to be learned about the role of inflammation in its etiology. We hypothesized that preexisting exposure to chronic inflammatory conditions caused by infectious agents or inflammatory diseases increase the risk of prostate cancer. Using the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we examined the relationships between demographic variables, inflammation, infection, circulating plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), and the risk of occurrence of prostate cancer in US men over 18 years of age. Using IBM SPSS, we performed bivariate and logistic regression analyses using high CRP values as the dependent variable and five study covariates including prostate cancer status. From 2009 - 2010, an estimated 5,448,373 men reported having prostate cancer of which the majority were Caucasian (70.1%) and were aged 40 years and older (62.7%). Bivariate analyses demonstrated that high CRP was not associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Greater odds of having prostate cancer were revealed for men that had inflammation related to disease (OR = 1.029, CI 1.029-1.029) and those who were not taking drugs to control inflammation (OR = 1.330, CI 1.324-1.336). Men who did not have inflammation resulting from non-infectious diseases had greater odds of not having prostate cancer (OR = 1.031, CI 1.030-1.031). Logistic regression analysis yielded that men with the highest CRP values had greater odds of having higher household incomes and lower odds of having received higher education, being aged 40 years or older, being of a race or ethnicity different from other, and of having prostate cancer. Our results show that chronic inflammation of multiple etiologies is a risk factor for prostate cancer and that CRP is not associated with this increased risk. Further research is needed to elucidate the complex interactions between inflammation and prostate cancer.

  15. Where are kids getting their empty calories? Stores, schools, and fast food restaurants each play an important role in empty calorie intake among US children in 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Poti, Jennifer M.; Slining, Meghan M.; Popkin, Barry M.; Kenan, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of empty calories, the sum of energy from added sugar and solid fat, exceeds recommendations, but little is known about where US children obtain these empty calories. The objectives of this study were to compare children's empty calorie consumption from retail food stores, schools, and fast food restaurants; to identify food groups that were top contributors of empty calories from each location; and to determine the location providing the majority of calories for these key food groups. This cross-sectional analysis used data from 3,077 US children aged 2-18 years participating in the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The empty calorie content of children's intake from stores (33%), schools (32%), and fast food restaurants (35%) was not significantly different in 2009-2010. In absolute terms, stores provided the majority of empty calorie intake (436 kcal). The top contributors of added sugar and solid fat from each location were similar: sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), grain desserts, and high-fat milk from stores; high-fat milk, grain desserts, and pizza from schools; and SSBs, dairy desserts, french fries, and pizza from fast food restaurants. Schools contributed about 20% of children's intake of high-fat milk and pizza. In conclusion, these findings support the need for continued efforts to reduce empty calorie intake among US children aimed not just at fast food restaurants, but also at stores and schools. The importance of reformed school nutrition standards was suggested, as prior to their implementation, schools resembled fast food restaurants in their contributions to empty calorie intake. PMID:24200654

  16. A Small-Scale Survey of the Views and Attitudes of Junior High School Teachers in China toward Geographical Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Daihu; Wang, Ziying; Xu, Di; Deng, Zhenzhen

    2014-01-01

    Although geographical fieldwork can be viewed as an integral component of geographical education, it fell out of favor in Chinese secondary schools in the recent past. However, the new junior high school geography standards established in 2001 stress the importance of conducting geographical fieldwork for students' learning of geography. Now…

  17. Enabling Remote Access to Fieldwork: Gaining Insight into the Pedagogic Effectiveness of "Direct" and "Remote" Field Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Alison; Collins, Trevor; Maskall, John; Lea, John; Lunt, Paul; Davies, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study considers the pedagogical effectiveness of remote access to fieldwork locations. Forty-one students from across the GEES disciplines (geography, earth and environmental sciences) undertook a fieldwork exercise, supported by two lecturers. Twenty students accessed the field site directly and the remainder accessed the site remotely using…

  18. Impacts of Lifelong Learning upon Emotional Resilience, Psychological and Mental Health: Fieldwork Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Cathie

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a fieldwork study concerning the impacts of learning upon health. In-depth biographical interviews were conducted with 145 adults about the effects of learning throughout their lives. In addition, 12 group interviews were conducted with practitioners about their perceptions of the effects of learning upon their…

  19. A Guide to Reasonable Accommodation for OT Practitioners with Disabilities: Fieldwork to Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, Shirley A., Comp.; Hanebrink, Sandy, Comp.

    This handbook provides information to occupational therapy clinicians and students with disabilities, fieldwork educators, and employers on issues of accommodation, disclosure, rights, responsibilities, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It begins with a discussion of the disability rights movement, and employment and people with…

  20. Barriers and Enablers to Clinical Fieldwork Education in Rural Public and Private Allied Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Phoebe; Stagnitti, Karen; Schoo, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to maximise rural clinical fieldwork placement to build health workforce capacity. This study investigated allied health professionals' (AHPs) experience of supervising students as part of work-integrated learning in public and private rural health settings. An anonymous postal questionnaire with 30 questions was used to…

  1. Peer Assisted Learning and Blogging: A Strategy to Promote Reflective Practice during Clinical Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Gardner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The use of peer assisted learning in clinical education is explored in this case study. Groups of undergraduate physiotherapy students were structured into communities of practice during the second half of their clinical fieldwork program. They collaborated online in an asynchronous manner, using information communications technology (blogs) and…

  2. The Importance of Direct Experience: A Philosophical Defence of Fieldwork in Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Max

    2009-01-01

    Human geography fieldwork is important. Research has shown that when students "see it for themselves" their enjoyment and understanding is enhanced. In addition it helps develop subject-specific and transferable skills, promotes 'active learning' and links theory to "real world" examples in a "spiral of learning". Stressing the socially…

  3. Fieldwork Using the Professional Development Schools Model: Developing a Social Justice Orientation and Multicultural Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Amy L.; Krell, Megan M.; Hayden, Laura A.; Gracia, Robert; Denitzio, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Practicum fieldwork was conducted in an urban high school setting using a Professional Development Schools (PDS) model, with a focus on multicultural and social justice counseling competencies (MSJCC). Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the journal responses of 16 counseling students to ascertain MSJCC development during…

  4. Telling Tales out of School: Assessing Linguistic Competence in Minority Language Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnie, Meghan P. L.; Priestly, Tom

    2004-01-01

    This paper treats methodological issues involved in assessing linguistic competence in the field, specifically in bilingual fieldwork situations. First, the various means of assessment of linguistic competence that have been described and/or used are listed and commented on. Then the authors explain the choice of assessment methods for fieldwork…

  5. Walking the Fine Line between Fieldwork Success and Failure: Advice for New Ethnographers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Peter Richard; Temple, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    While the importance of ethnographic research in developing new knowledge is widely recognised, there remains minimal detailed description and discussion of the actual practice and processes involved in completing ethnographic fieldwork. The first author's experiences and struggles as an ethnographer of a group of young men from two locations…

  6. Encouraging Reflexivity in Urban Geography Fieldwork: Study Abroad Experiences in Singapore and Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork in urban geography courses can encourage reflexivity among students regarding the cities they encounter. This article outlines how student reflexivity was encouraged within a new international field research course in Singapore and Malaysia. Drawing on examples from students' field exercises written during an intensive and…

  7. Documentation and Revitalization of the Zhuang Language and Culture of Southwestern China through Linguistic Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodomo, Adams

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines innovative strategies, methods, and techniques for the documentation and revitalization of "Zhuang" language and culture through linguistic fieldwork. Zhuang, a Tai-Kadai language spoken mainly in the rural areas of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of southwestern China, is the largest minority language in China, with…

  8. Exploring the Impact of Integrated Fieldwork, Reflective and Metacognitive Experiences on Student Environmental Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantyne, Roy; Anderson, David; Packer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Although the important role of providing fieldwork experiences for students in the natural environment is now well-established within environmental education literature, there is still little research evidence to guide teachers in their choice of effective teaching strategies. This paper presents findings from an interpretive case study designed…

  9. Using Blogging to Promote Clinical Reasoning and Metacognition in Undergraduate Physiotherapy Fieldwork Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Shuyan Melissa; Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Gardner, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the impact of using blogs on the clinical reasoning and meta-cognitive skills of undergraduate physiotherapy students in a fieldwork education program. A blog is a web based document that enables individuals to enter comments and read each others' comments in a dynamic and interactive manner. In this study,…

  10. A Potential Value of Familiarity and Experience: Can Informal Fieldwork Have a Lasting Impact upon Literacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Graham W.; Boyd, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that an informal field trip can have a lasting impact upon aspects of learning in a primary school context. Specifically, we consider the longer term impact of an informal trip to a rocky shore upon scores achieved in literacy assessments taking place five months after a relevant five months after a fieldwork. Pupils…

  11. Barriers to Biological Fieldwork: What Really Prevents Teaching Out of Doors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Graham W.; Boyd, Margaret; Scott, Lisa; Colquhoun, Derek

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a range of factors that may contribute to an unwillingness or inability of teachers to participate in the teaching of biology through fieldwork. Through a synthesis of the views of both pre-service teachers in training and primary school teachers in practice we explore the relative importance of a wide range of potential…

  12. The Experimental State of Mind in Elicitation: Illustrations from Tonal Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Kristine M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper illustrates how an "experimental state of mind", i.e. principles of experimental design, can inform hypothesis generation and testing in structured fieldwork elicitation. The application of these principles is demonstrated with case studies in toneme discovery. Pike's classic toneme discovery procedure is shown to be a special…

  13. Student Perceptions of iPads as Mobile Learning Devices for Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Katharine E.; Mauchline, Alice L.; Powell, Victoria; France, Derek; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings from six field courses about student's perceptions of iPads as mobile learning devices for fieldwork. Data were collected through surveys and focus groups. The key findings suggest that the multi-tool nature of the iPads and their portability were the main strengths. Students had some concerns over the safety of the…

  14. The Effect of Early Fieldwork on Mathematics Efficacy Beliefs for Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt-Ruiz, Heidi; Watson, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an early fieldwork experience on preservice teachers' mathematics efficacy beliefs. This quasi-experimental study included 127 preservice teachers from two community colleges who were enrolled in mathematics for teachers' two-course sequence. The Personal Mathematics Teaching Efficacy…

  15. What Is the Use of Fieldwork? Conceptions of Students and Staff in Geography and Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Alison; Magnier, Kirsty; Weaver, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores conceptions of the purpose of fieldwork held by undergraduates and academic staff in the disciplines of geography and geology. Phenomenographic analysis of written data reveals six qualitatively distinct conceptions broadly classified as "fragmented" and "cohesive". While considerable commonality in conceptions exists across…

  16. Playful and Multi-Sensory Fieldwork: Seeing, Hearing and Touching New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Geographical fieldwork is being reinvigorated through pedagogical and methodological innovations. Yet, while there are many good ideas in circulation, there is less evidence of where these ideas are taking us: what students are getting out of them, and what significance they may have for the discipline. These questions are explored through case…

  17. Competency Management and Learning Organization in a New Clinical Fieldwork Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putthinoi, Supawadee; Lersilp, Suchitporn; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2015-01-01

    As Thailand transitions into an ageing society, greater demands will be placed on healthcare systems. The concept of competency management and learning organization can be beneficial in continually expanding organizational capacity in order to create response. This study aimed to develop a new clinical fieldwork course in the community by…

  18. Improving Energy Literacy through Student-Led Fieldwork--At Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Horst, Dan; Harrison, Conor; Staddon, Sam; Wood, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    "Energy literacy" is of great interest to those researching sustainable consumption, particularly with regard to its relationship to domestic energy use. This paper reflects on the pedagogic aspects of fieldwork recently carried out by undergraduate geography students in their own homes to assess energy-related technologies and…

  19. Lessons learnt on recruitment and fieldwork from a pilot European human biomonitoring survey.

    PubMed

    Fiddicke, Ulrike; Becker, Kerstin; Schwedler, Gerda; Seiwert, Margarete; Joas, Reinhard; Joas, Anke; Biot, Pierre; Aerts, Dominique; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Dumez, Birgit; Castaño, Argelia; Esteban, Marta; Angerer, Jürgen; Koch, Holger M; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Sepai, Ovnair; Exley, Karen; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Horvat, Milena; Bloemen, Louis; Katsonouri, Andromachi; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Cerna, Milena; Krsková, Andrea; Jensen, Janne Fangel; Nielsen, Jeanette K S; Rudnai, Peter; Közepésy, Szilvia; Gutleb, Arno C; Fischer, Marc E; Ligocka, Danuta; Kamińska, Joanna; Reis, M Fátima; Namorado, Sónia; Lupsa, Ioana-Rodica; Gurzau, Anca E; Halzlová, Katarína; Mazej, Darja; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Rivas, Teresa C; Gómez, Silvia; Berglund, Marika; Larsson, Kristin; Lehmann, Andrea; Crettaz, Pierre; Dewolf, Marie-Christine; Burns, Damien; Kellegher, Anne; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2015-08-01

    Within the European Environment and Health Action Plan an initiative to establish a coherent human biomonitoring approach in Europe was started. The project COPHES (COnsortium to Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale ) developed recommendations for a harmonized conduct of a human biomonitoring (HBM) survey which came into action as the pilot study DEMOCOPHES (DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale). Seventeen European countries conducted a survey with harmonized instruments for, inter alia, recruitment, fieldwork and sampling, in autumn/winter 2011/2012. Based on the countries' experiences of conducting the pilot study, following lessons learnt were compiled: the harmonized fieldwork instruments (basic questionnaire, urine and hair sampling) turned out to be very valuable for future HBM surveys on the European scale. A school approach was favoured by most of the countries to recruit school-aged children according to the established guidelines and country specific experiences. To avoid a low participation rate, intensive communication with the involved institutions and possible participants proved to be necessary. The communication material should also include information on exclusion criteria and offered incentives. Telephone contact to the participants the day before fieldwork during the survey can prevent the forgetting of appointments and first morning urine samples. To achieve comparable results on the European scale, training of interviewers in all issues of recruitment, fieldwork and sampling through information material and training sessions is crucial. A survey involving many European countries needs time for preparation and conduct. Materials for quality control prepared for all steps of recruitment, fieldwork and sampling proved to be important to warrant reliable results. PMID:25454101

  20. Stardust Entry Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.

    2008-01-01

    An overview of the reconstruction analyses performed for the Stardust capsule entry is described. The results indicate that the actual entry was very close to the pre-entry predictions. The capsule landed 8.1 km north-northwest of the desired target at Utah Test and Training Range. Analyses of infrared video footage and radar range data (obtained from tracking stations) during the descent show that drogue parachute deployment was 4.8 s later than the pre-entry prediction, while main parachute deployment was 19.3 s earlier than the pre-set timer indicating that main deployment was actually triggered by the backup baroswitch. Reconstruction of a best estimated trajectory revealed that the aerodynamic drag experienced by the capsule during hypersonic flight was within 1% of pre-entry predications. Observations of the heatshield support the pre-entry estimates of small hypersonic angles of attack, since there was very little, if any, charring of the shoulder region or the aftbody. Through this investigation, an overall assertion can be made that all the data gathered from the Stardust capsule entry were consistent with flight performance close to nominal pre-entry predictions. Consequently, the design principles and methodologies utilized for the flight dynamics, aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics analyses have been corroborated.

  1. Entry Skills for BSNs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stull, Mary K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Continuing Education for Consensus on Entry Skills project, designed to bring the expectations of nursing service and nursing education closer on entry-level competencies of new baccalaureate graduates. Discusses teaching and collaboration skills, planning and evaluation of patient care skills, interpersonal relations/communication…

  2. Examining the Fieldwork Experience from the Site Supervisor Perspective: A Mixed-Methods Study Using Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Sian

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify feelings and behaviors of fieldwork supervisors in public libraries using Lev Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development theory as a background for design, analysis, and discussion of results. This research sought to find out how fieldwork supervisors perform initial assessments of their fieldwork students,…

  3. Project TRREE 2009-2010 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwell, Nedra

    2010-01-01

    Project TRREE (Teacher Recruitment and Retention for Educational Excellence) is a federally funded project conducted by the Kentucky Department of Education. The purpose of the project is to develop a systemic approach to increase the number of highly qualified special education teachers with a focus on recruitment of linguistically, culturally…

  4. Academic Year Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This Academic Year Report 2009-10 provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in community and technical colleges in the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel and students. Additional demographic…

  5. Legionnaires disease in Europe, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Beauté, J; Zucs, P; de Jong, B

    2013-01-01

    The surveillance of Legionnaires' disease (LD) in Europe is carried out by the European Legionnaires' Disease Surveillance Network (ELDSNet) and coordinated by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). All cases reported in 2009 and 2010 and meeting the European case definition were electronically transmitted to The European Surveillance System (TESSy) database. A total of 5,551 and 6,305 cases were reported by 29 European countries in 2009 and 2010, respectively. The age-standardised rate of all cases was 1.20 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2010, 12% higher than in 2009, which was consistent with the increasing trend observed since 2005. Most of this increase consisted of community-acquired cases reported by France, Germany and the Netherlands with dates of onset in August–September. The exceptionally hot summer of 2010 in some parts of Europe may have played a role in this increase. PMID:23515061

  6. Summary of 2009-2010 Annual Budgets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota University System, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The 2009-10 operating budget for the North Dakota University System is over $1 billion. Approximately 29 percent of operations are supported by the state general fund. The remainder of the operations of the University System are self-supporting through tuition and fees, room and board charges paid by students, and private and federal research…

  7. Your business in court: 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Reiss, John B; Hall, Christopher R; Wartman, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    During this period, FDA focused considerable effort on its transparency initiative, which is likely to continue into the coming year, as well as continuing to ramp up its enforcement activities, as we predicted last year. The scope of the agency's ability to pre-empt state laws in product liability litigation involving pharmaceutical products still is developing post-Levine, and we are likely to see new decisions in the coming year. Fraud and abuse enforcement still is a major factor facing the industry, with the added threat of personal exposure to criminal sentences, fines and debarment from participation in federal and state programs under the Responsible Corporate Officer doctrine, or under the authorities exercised by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General. Consequently, it is increasingly important that senior corporate officers ensure active oversight of an effective compliance program which should mitigate these risks. The Federal Trade Commission continues to battle consumer fraud, particularly respecting weight loss programs, and it appears to be fighting a losing battle in its effort to prevent "reverse" payments to generic manufacturers by Innovator Manufacturers to delay the introduction of generics to the market. The Securities and Exchange Commission continues to be actively enforcing the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The Supreme Court gave shareholders more leeway in bringing stockholder suits in situations where a company conceals information that, if revealed, could have a negative effect on stock prices. PMID:24505838

  8. Use of simulated patients and reflective video analysis to assess occupational therapy students' preparedness for fieldwork.

    PubMed

    Giles, Amanda K; Carson, Nancy E; Breland, Hazel L; Coker-Bolt, Patty; Bowman, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Educators must determine whether occupational therapy students are adequately prepared for Level II fieldwork once they have successfully completed the didactic portion of their coursework. Although studies have shown that students regard the use of video cameras and simulated patient encounters as useful tools for assessing professional and clinical behaviors, little has been published in the occupational therapy literature regarding the practical application of simulated patients or reflective video analysis. We describe a model for a final Comprehensive Practical Exam that uses both simulated patients and reflective video analysis to assess student preparedness for Level II fieldwork, and we report on student perceptions of these instructional modalities. We provide recommendations for designing, implementing, and evaluating simulated patient experiences in light of existing educational theory. PMID:25397940

  9. The Necessity of Combining Geologists and Engineers for Fieldwork in the Practice of Geotechnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Michael H.

    This paper reviews the post-graduate training that can only be accomplished by having engineers and geologists working together in the field. It describes how meaningful communication and mutual appreciation of fundamental issues concerning a definition of ground and a prediction of how it will respond to engineering, and environmental, change may be established. Fieldwork suitable for achieving this and an awareness of fundamental misconceptions is also described.

  10. The role of fieldwork in rock decay research: Case studies from the fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Ronald I.; Gordon, Steven J.; Allen, Casey D.; Cerveny, Niccole; Dixon, John C.; Groom, Kaelin M.; Hall, Kevin; Harrison, Emma; Mol, Lisa; Paradise, Thomas R.; Sumner, Paul; Thompson, Tyler; Turkington, Alice V.

    2013-10-01

    Researchers exploring rock decay hail from chemistry, engineering, geography, geology, paleoclimatology, soil science, and other disciplines and use laboratory, microscopic, theoretical, and field-based strategies. We illustrate here how the tradition of fieldwork forms the core knowledge of rock decay and continues to build on the classic research of Blackwelder, Bryan, Gilbert, Jutson, King, Linton, Twidale, and von Humboldt. While development of nonfield-based investigation has contributed substantially to our understanding of processes, the wide range of environments, stone types, and climatic variability encountered raises issues of temporal and spatial scales too complex to fit into attempts at universal modeling. Although nonfield methods are immensely useful for understanding overarching processes, they can miss subtle differences in factors that ultimately shape rock surfaces. We, therefore, illustrate here how the tradition of fieldwork continues today alongside laboratory and computer-based investigations and contributes to our understanding of rock decay processes. This includes the contribution of fieldwork to the learning process of undergraduates, the calculation of activation energies of plagioclase and olivine dissolution, the high Arctic, the discovery of a new global carbon sink, the influence of plant roots, an analysis of the need for protocols, tafoni development, stone monuments, and rock coatings. These compiled vignettes argue that, despite revolutionary advances in instrumentation, rock decay research must remain firmly footed in the field.

  11. Body composition and bone density reference data for Korean children, adolescents, and young adults according to age and sex: results of the 2009-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES).

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Jae; Hong, Hyun Sook; Chung, Seung Joon; Lee, Young Ah; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2016-07-01

    We established the timing of peak bone mass acquisition and body composition maturation and provide an age- and sex-specific body composition and bone density reference database using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in Korean subjects 10-25 years of age. Reference percentiles and curves were developed for bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD) of the whole body, the lumbar spine, and the femoral neck, and for fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) of 1969 healthy participants (982 males) who participated in the 2009-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Additionally, bone mineral apparent density (BMAD), FM index, and LM index were calculated to adjust for body size. BMC and BMD at all skeletal sites as well as LM increased with age, reaching plateaus at 17-20 years of age in females and 20-23 years of age in males. The femoral neck was the first to reach a bone mass plateau, followed by the lumbar spine and then the whole body. Spine BMAD increased with age in both sexes, but femoral and whole-body BMAD remained the same over time. Females displayed a dramatic increase in FM during puberty, but the FM of males decreased until mid-puberty. These findings indicate that bone health and body composition should be monitored using a normal reference database until the late second to early third decade of life, when statural growth and somatic maturation are completed. PMID:26056024

  12. 'Rhyme or reason?' Saying no to mass vaccination: subjective re-interpretation in the context of the A(H1N1) influenza pandemic in Sweden 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Britta

    2015-12-01

    During the swine flu pandemic of 2009-2010, all Swedish citizens were recommended to be vaccinated with the influenza vaccine Pandemrix. However, a very serious and unexpected side effect emerged during the summer of 2010: more than 200 children and young adults were diagnosed with narcolepsy after vaccination. Besides the tragic outcome for these children and their families, this adverse side effect suggests future difficulties in obtaining trust in vaccination in cases of emerging pandemics, and thus there is a growing need to find ways to understand the complexities of vaccination decision processes. This article explores written responses to a questionnaire from a Swedish folk life archive as an unconventional source for analysing vaccine decisions. The aim is to investigate how laypersons responded to and re-interpreted the message about the recommended vaccination in their answers. The answers show the confusion and complex circumstances and influences in everyday life that people reflect on when making such important decisions. The issue of confusion is traced back to the initial communications about the vaccination intervention in which both autonomy and solidarity were expected from the population. Common narratives and stories about the media or 'big pharma capitalism' are entangled with private memories, accidental coincidences and serendipitous associations. It is obvious that vaccination interventions that require compliance from large groups of people need to take into account the kind of personal experience narratives that are produced by the complex interplay of the factors described by the informants. PMID:26077985

  13. 5. PORTICO AND ENTRY DETAIL, SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION. This entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. PORTICO AND ENTRY DETAIL, SOUTH (FRONT) ELEVATION. This entry replaces original twin entries to southeast and southwest rooms from portico, and was installed when south entry hall was built. - Oak Island (House), County Road 768 vicinity, Edisto Island, Charleston County, SC

  14. An application of vessel-based LiDAR to quantify coastal retreat in Southern Monterey Bay, CA during the 2008-2009 year and the 2009-2010 El Nino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, S.; Kvitek, R. G.; Smith, D. P.

    2010-12-01

    Coastal erosion has become a prominent issue in Monterey Bay, California. Areas at high risk include native coastal dunes, private and public beachfront properties, municipal sewage lines, and areas of the highway 1 corridor. Traditional airborne LiDAR has been an effective but costly method for measuring coastal topography by providing high resolution and broad coverage. In 1997 and 1998, NASA, USGS, and NOAA collaborated to conduct pre-and post-El Niño airborne LiDAR surveys of the California coastline. The anticipation of this ENSO event coupled with LiDAR technology resulted in high resolution snapshots of the coastline pre-post El Niño, with analyses yielding erosion rates on the order of nearly seven times the historical annual dune erosion average (Thornton et al 2006). Since then, there have been no further, publicly available LiDAR surveys of the Monterey Bay shoreline. The goal of this project is to apply a vessel-based LiDAR system to measure coastal geomorphology, determine the efficacy of vessel-based topographic LiDAR for mapping coastal geomorphology, and quantify the spatial distribution of coastal retreat for Southern Monterey Bay, California during the 2009-10 El Niño and the 2008-2009 normal (non- El Niño) year. The area of study was the Monterey Bay coastline from Monterey harbor, CA north to Marina State Beach at Reservation Road. Sea cliff morphology data were measured on Dec 9th and 10th, 2008, Nov 4th 2009, and on July 15, 16, and 17th 2010 through the use of a terrestrial LiDAR system mounted atop the CSUMB Seafloor Mapping Lab’s R/V VenTresca. These vessel based LiDAR data were compared using mapping and spatial analysis tools in ArcGIS to quantify the spatial distribution of coastal retreat and calculate erosion rates for the Monterey Bay shoreline during the 2009-2010 El Niño and the 2008-2009 normal year. In keeping with previous published work based on other methods, preliminary results show numerous erosional hotspots which

  15. Detecting changes in the transport of the Gulf Stream and the Atlantic overturning circulation from coastal sea level data: The extreme decline in 2009-2010 and estimated variations for 1935-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, Tal

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies reported weakening in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and in the Gulf Stream (GS), using records of about a decade (RAPID project) or two (altimeter data). Coastal sea level records are much longer, so the possibility of detecting climatic changes in ocean circulation from sea level data is intriguing and thus been examined here. First, it is shown that variations in the AMOC transport from the RAPID project since 2004 are consistent with the flow between Bermuda and the U. S. coast derived from the Oleander measurements and from sea level difference (SLDIF). Despite apparent disagreement between recent studies on the ability of data to detect weakening in the GS flow, estimated transport changes from 3 different independent data sources agree quite well with each other on the extreme decline in transport in 2009-2010. Due to eddies and meandering, the flow representing the GS part of the Oleander line is not correlated with AMOC or with the Florida Current, only the flow across the entire Oleander line from the U.S. coast to Bermuda is correlated with climatic transport changes. Second, Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) analysis shows that SLDIF can detect (with lag) the portion of the variations in the AMOC transport that are associated with the Florida Current and the wind-driven Ekman transport (SLDIF-transport correlations of ~ 0.7-0.9). The SLDIF has thus been used to estimate variations in transport since 1935 and compared with AMOC obtained from reanalysis data. The significant weakening in AMOC after ~ 2000 (~ 4.5 Sv per decade) is comparable to weakening seen in the 1960s to early 1970s. Both periods of weakening AMOC, in the 1960s and 2000s, are characterized by faster than normal sea level rise along the northeastern U.S. coast, so monitoring changes in AMOC has practical implications for coastal protection.

  16. A nudged chemistry-climate model simulation of chemical constituent distribution at northern high-latitude stratosphere observed by SMILES and MLS during the 2009/2010 stratospheric sudden warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, H.; Nakamura, T.; Miyasaka, T.; Shiotani, M.; Suzuki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) is a dramatic phenomenon of the winter stratosphere in which the distribution of chemical constituents, associated chemical tendency, and transport of chemical constituents differ significantly inside and outside of the polar vortex. In this study, the chemical constituent distributions in the major SSW of 2009/2010 were simulated by the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate 3.2-Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM) nudged toward the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts-Interim Re-Analysis data. The results were compared with Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations. In addition, ozone tendency due to ozone transport and chemical ozone loss in the high-latitude lower stratosphere before and after the SSW was analyzed for the period from 1 January 2010 to 11 February 2010. The evolution and distribution of ozone and HCl inside/outside the polar vortex associated with the vortex shift to the midlatitudes in January are quite similar between SMILES and MLS. Those of ClO are also similar, considering the difference in the local time for the measurement. Analyses of the nudged CCM run indicate that inside the polar vortex at 50 hPa, the ozone concentration increased moderately owing to partial cancelation between the large negative ozone tendency due to chemical ozone destruction and large positive ozone tendency due to horizontal ozone influx from outside of the vortex as well as downward advection. In the region of a high ozone concentration with the same area as that of the polar vortex at 50 hPa, the large increase in ozone was primarily due to a downward advection of ozone. SMILES and MLS observations, nudged CCM simulations, and ozone tendency analyses revealed a highly longitudinal dependent ozone tendency at high latitudes during the SSW.

  17. Time card entry system

    SciTech Connect

    Montierth, B.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Time Card Entry System was developed to interface with the DOE Headquarters Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure Numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills US Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two week payroll cycle using ETA. Tours of Duty (e.g. ten hour day, four day week with Friday through Sunday off), established in the ETA system, are imported into the Time Card Entry System by the Timekeepers. An individual`s Tour of Duty establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two week cycle, data is exported by the Timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA data files.

  18. Shuttle entry guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.; Graves, C. A., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    This paper describes the design of the entry guidance for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. This guidance provides the steering commands for trajectory control from initial penetration of the earth's atmosphere until the terminal area guidance is activated at an earth-relative speed of 2500 fps. At this point, the Orbiter is at a distance of about 50 nmi from the runway threshold, and at an altitude of about 80,000 ft. The entry guidance design is based on an analytic solution of the equations of motion defining the drag acceleration profile that meets the terminal criteria of the entry flight while maintaining the flight within systems and operational constraints. Guidance commands, which are based on a control law that ensures damping of oscillatory type trajectory motion, are computed to steer the Orbiter to this drag acceleration profile.

  19. Evaluating life-safety risk of fieldwork at New Zealand's active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, Natalia; Jolly, Gill; Taig, Tony; Webb, Terry

    2014-05-01

    Volcano observatories monitor active or potentially active volcanoes. Although the number and scope of remote monitoring instruments and methods continues to grow, in-person field data collection is still required for comprehensive monitoring. Fieldwork anywhere, and especially in mountainous areas, contains an element of risk. However, on volcanoes with signs of unrest, there is an additional risk of volcanic activity escalating while on site, with potentially lethal consequences. As an employer, a volcano observatory is morally and sometimes legally obligated to take reasonable measures to ensure staff safety and to minimise occupational risk. Here we present how GNS Science evaluates life-safety risk for volcanologists engaged in fieldwork on New Zealand volcanoes with signs of volcanic unrest. Our method includes several key elements: (1) an expert elicitation for how likely an eruption is within a given time frame, (2) quantification of, based on historical data when possible, given a small, moderate, or large eruption, the likelihood of exposure to near-vent processes, ballistics, or surge at various distances from the vent, and (3) estimate of fatality rate given exposure to these volcanic hazards. The final product quantifies hourly fatality risk at various distances from a volcanic vent; various thresholds of risk (for example, zones with more than 10-5 hourly fatality risk) trigger different levels of required approval to undertake work. Although an element of risk will always be present when conducting fieldwork on potentially active volcanoes, this is a first step towards providing objective guidance for go/no go decisions for volcanic monitoring.

  20. Creating Virtual Fieldwork Experiences of Geoheritage Sites as Educator Professional Development (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan-Haas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Geoheritage sites are identified as such because they include excellent examples of geologic features or processes, or they have played an important role in the development of geologic understandings. These characteristics also make them excellent sites for teaching in the field, for teaching educators about the nature of fieldwork, and for making Virtual Fieldwork Experiences (VFEs, multimedia representations of field sites). Through the NSF-funded Regional and Local Earth (ReaL) Earth Inquiry Project, we have engaged educators in these practices. The nature of geoheritage sites is anomalous -- if this were not the case, the sites would not gain recognition. Anomalous features or processes can be powerful learning tools when placed into comparison with the more mundane, and the Earth system science of sites local to schools is likely to be mundane. By comparing the mundane and the extraordinary, it is hoped we can learn more about both. The professional development (PD) in ReaL Earth Inquiry begins with a face-to-face workshop within the teachers' region at a site that is interesting from an Earth system science perspective. Though we recognize and emphasize that all sites are interesting from an ESS perspective if you know how to look, the sites typically have features worthy of geoheritage designation. PD does not end with the end of the workshop but continues with online study groups where teachers work together to complete the workshop site VFE, and transition to work on VFEs of sites local to their schools. Throughout the program, participants engage in: - mentored fieldwork that pays attention to the skills and knowledge needed to lead fieldwork; - instruction in and use of a wide range of technologies for making VFEs; - study of a coherent conceptual framework connected to the project's driving question: Why does this place look the way it does? - and, use of resources for supporting all of the above The resources include templates for making VFEs and a

  1. Entry Systems Panel deliberations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.; Rummler, Donald R.; Bersch, Charlie; Dixon, Sidney C.

    1993-01-01

    The Entry Systems Panel was chaired by Don Rummler, LaRC and Dan Rasky, ARC. As requested, each panel participant prior to the workshop prepared and delivered presentations to: (1) identify technology needs; (2) assess current programs; (3) identify technology gaps; and (4) identify highest payoff areas R&D. Participants presented background on the entry systems R&D efforts and operations experiences for the Space Shuttle Orbiter. These participants represented NASA Centers involved in research (Ames Research Center), development (Johnson Space Center) and operations (Kennedy Space Center) and the Shuttle Orbiter prime contractor. The presentations lead to the discovery of several lessons learned.

  2. Parametric Mass Modeling for Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Komar, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the parametric mass models used for the Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems Analysis study conducted by NASA in FY2009-2010. The study examined eight unique exploration class architectures that included elements such as a rigid mid-L/D aeroshell, a lifting hypersonic inflatable decelerator, a drag supersonic inflatable decelerator, a lifting supersonic inflatable decelerator implemented with a skirt, and subsonic/supersonic retro-propulsion. Parametric models used in this study relate the component mass to vehicle dimensions and mission key environmental parameters such as maximum deceleration and total heat load. The use of a parametric mass model allows the simultaneous optimization of trajectory and mass sizing parameters.

  3. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A.; Hwang, Helen; Prabhu, Dinesh; Aliaga, Jose; Marley, Mark; McGuire, Kathy; Huynh, Loc; Garcia, Joseph; Moses, Robert; Winski, Rick; Skylanskiy, Evgeniy

    2013-01-01

    The Objectives of this work are: 1) Establish a range of probe atmospheric entry environments based on the Uranus Flagship mission outlined in the Planetary Science Decadal Survey for two launch windows: Year 2021 and 2034. 2) Define Uranus entry trade space by performing parametric studies, by varying vehicle mass and size and entry Flight Path Angle (FPA). 3) Investigate various trajectory options, including direct ballistic entry and aero-capture entry. 4) Identify entry technologies that could be leveraged to enable a viable mission to Uranus that meets science objectives.

  4. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  5. Think Exit at Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Tom; Satterfield, Coy E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the "Think Exit at Entry" program that has become the guiding principle for the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). The Georgia DJJ believes that the transition process begins the day the youth enters the system and continues well after release from the institution. Literature points the need for transition planning…

  6. Double-Entry Bookkeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    Explains the principles and mechanics of double-entry bookkeeping as a part of the accounting cycle to produce a functioning set of accounting records. Suggests that libraries need to have accurate and timely information about their spending to gain financial control and protect against fraud and abuse. (LRW)

  7. 9. FIRST FLOOR, ENTRY HALL, LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARDS FRONT ENTRY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. FIRST FLOOR, ENTRY HALL, LOOKING SOUTHWEST TOWARDS FRONT ENTRY WITH OPEN DOORWAY TO WINDER STAIRWAY ON RIGHT - Open Gate Farm, House, Ridge Road, 1 mile East of Elephant Road, Perkasie, Bucks County, PA

  8. INTERIOR OF ENTRY HALLWAY AND STEEL ENTRY DOOR ON SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ENTRY HALLWAY AND STEEL ENTRY DOOR ON SOUTH SIDE, VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Telephone Exchange, Coral Sea Road north of Bismarck Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Fieldwork report on conditions in the 2014 Holuhraun volcanic eruption Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsson, Baldur; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Ingvarsson, Þorgils; Kjartansson, Vilhjálmur; Arngrímsson, Hermann; Yeo, Richard; Bergsson, Bergur; Erlendsson, Pálmi; Stefánsdóttir, Gerður; Sigurðardóttir, Guðmunda; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Gíslason, Ólafur; Hróðmarsson, Hilmar; Snorrason, Árni

    2015-04-01

    Since the start of the unrest at Bárðarbunga and the 2014 fissure eruption in Holuhraun Iceland, countless hours have been spent doing fieldwork. This presentation will focus on reporting the conditions that have been experienced by staff of the Icelandic Meteorological Office since the beginning of the unrest. The eruption is located north of Vatnajökull glacier on a floodplain. The area is very remote at an elevation of 700 meters, the nearest farm is about 100 km away. The Holuhraun site would be at risk of flooding should the eruption extend to the Vatnajökull ice-cap. The presentation will mainly focus on working conditions experienced during field installations and data gathering at different time stages of the eruption (August - present). Typical problems are mostly weather and gas related but a range of other challenges have been met. The presentation will focus on the following aspects; traveling to the field, glacier installations, working in a desert environment, the hazard of the gas plume, the effect that low temperatures has on equipment and working with helicopters. The aim of this report will be to get an open discussion about fieldwork related problems that may benefit us in the future, be it for the benefit of the presenter or the audience.

  10. Making blood 'Melanesian': fieldwork and isolating techniques in genetic epidemiology (1963-1976).

    PubMed

    Widmer, Alexandra

    2014-09-01

    'Isolated' populations did not exist unproblematically for life scientists to study. This article examines the practical and conceptual labour, and the historical contingencies that rendered populations legible as 'isolates' for population geneticists. Though a standard historiographical narrative tells us that population geneticists were moving from typological understandings of biological variation to processual ones, cultural variation was understood as vulnerable to homogenisation. I chart the importance that D. Carleton Gajdusek placed on isolates from his promotion of genetic epidemiology in WHO technical reports and at a Cold Spring Harbour symposium to his fieldwork routines and collection practices in a group of South Pacific islands. His fieldwork techniques combined social, cultural and historical knowledge of the research subjects in order to isolate biological descent using genealogies. Having isolated a population, Gajdusek incorporated biological materials derived from that population into broad categories of 'Melanesian' and 'race' to generate statements about the genetics of abnormal haemoglobins and malaria. Alongside an analysis of Gajdusek's practices, I present different narratives of descent, kinship and identities learned during my ethnographic work in Vanuatu. These alternatives show tacit decisions made pertaining to scale in the production of 'isolates'. PMID:25042975

  11. Model-guided fieldwork: practical guidelines for multidisciplinary research on wildlife ecological and epidemiological dynamics.

    PubMed

    Restif, Olivier; Hayman, David T S; Pulliam, Juliet R C; Plowright, Raina K; George, Dylan B; Luis, Angela D; Cunningham, Andrew A; Bowen, Richard A; Fooks, Anthony R; O'Shea, Thomas J; Wood, James L N; Webb, Colleen T

    2012-10-01

    Infectious disease ecology has recently raised its public profile beyond the scientific community due to the major threats that wildlife infections pose to biological conservation, animal welfare, human health and food security. As we start unravelling the full extent of emerging infectious diseases, there is an urgent need to facilitate multidisciplinary research in this area. Even though research in ecology has always had a strong theoretical component, cultural and technical hurdles often hamper direct collaboration between theoreticians and empiricists. Building upon our collective experience of multidisciplinary research and teaching in this area, we propose practical guidelines to help with effective integration among mathematical modelling, fieldwork and laboratory work. Modelling tools can be used at all steps of a field-based research programme, from the formulation of working hypotheses to field study design and data analysis. We illustrate our model-guided fieldwork framework with two case studies we have been conducting on wildlife infectious diseases: plague transmission in prairie dogs and lyssavirus dynamics in American and African bats. These demonstrate that mechanistic models, if properly integrated in research programmes, can provide a framework for holistic approaches to complex biological systems. PMID:22809422

  12. Enabling Remote Activity: Using mobile technology for remote participation in geoscience fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah; Collins, Trevor; Gaved, Mark; Bartlett, Jessica; Valentine, Chris; McCann, Lewis

    2010-05-01

    Field-based activities are regarded as essential to the development of a range of professional and personal skills within the geosciences. Students enjoy field activities, preferring these to learning with simulations (Spicer and Stratford 2001), and these improve deeper learning and understanding (Kern and Carpenter, 1984; Elkins and Elkins, 2007). However, some students find it difficult to access these field-based learning opportunities. Field sites may be remote and often require travel across uneven, challenging or potentially dangerous terrain. Mobility-impaired students are particularly limited in their opportunities to participate in field-based learning activities and, as higher education institutions have a responsibility to provide inclusive opportunities for students (UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, UK Special Education Needs and Disability Rights Act 2001), the need for inclusive fieldwork learning is being increasingly recognised. The Enabling Remote Activity (ERA) project has been investigating how mobile communications technologies might allow field learning experiences to be brought to students who would otherwise find it difficult to participate, and also to enhance activities for all participants. It uses a rapidly deployable, battery-powered wireless network to transmit video, audio, and high resolution still images to connect participants at an accessible location with participants in the field. Crucially, the system uses a transient wireless network, allowing multiple locations to be explored during a field visit, and for plans to be changed dynamically if required. Central to the concept is the requirement for independent investigative learning: students are enabled to participate actively in the learning experience and to direct the investigations, as opposed to being simply remote viewers of the experience. Two ways of using the ERA system have been investigated: remote access and collaborative groupwork. In 2006 and 2008 remote

  13. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P.; Allen, G. A.; Hwang, H. H.; Marley, M. S.; McGuire, M. K.; Garcia, J. A.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Huynh, L. C.; Moses, R. W.

    2014-07-01

    To better understand the technology requirements for Uranus atmospheric entry probe, Entry Vehicle Technology project funded an internal study with a multidisciplinary team from NASA Ames, Langley and JPL. The results of this study are communicated.

  14. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Uranus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, P.; Allen, G. A.; Hwang, H. H.; Marley, M. S.; McGuire, M. K.; Garcia, J. A.; Sklyanskiy, E.; Huynh, L. C.; Moses, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    To better understand the technology requirements for a Uranus atmospheric entry probe, an internal NASA study funded by ISPT program was conducted. The talk describes two different approaches to the planet: 1) direct ballistic entry and 2) Aerocapture.

  15. Time Card Entry System

    1996-05-07

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two weekmore » payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual''s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.« less

  16. Time Card Entry System

    SciTech Connect

    Montierth, B. S.

    1996-05-07

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two week payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual''s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.

  17. The Benefits of Residential Fieldwork for School Science: Insights from a Five-Year Initiative for Inner-City Students in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Ruth; Reiss, Michael

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable international interest in the value of residential fieldwork for school students. In the UK, pressures on curriculum time, rising costs and heightened concern over students' safety are curtailing residential experiences. Collaboration between several key fieldwork providers across the UK created an extensive programme of…

  18. Keeping Our Eyes on the Prize: The Role of Fieldwork in Preparing Social Justice School Leaders in a Public University Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Noni Mendoza; Lu, Mei-Yan; Miller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a discussion of how fieldwork can enhance the preparation of school leaders, and how this emphasis on practical, experiential learning can expose students to the wide array of challenges facing public schools. We discuss ways to transform traditional and procedural fieldwork objectives of our students to those that address…

  19. The Value of Fieldwork in Life and Environmental Sciences in the Context of Higher Education: A Case Study in Learning about Biodiversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Graham W.; Goulder, Raymond; Wheeler, Phillip; Scott, Lisa J.; Tobin, Michelle L.; Marsham, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Fieldwork is assumed by most practitioners to be an important if not essential component of a degree level education in the environmental sciences. However, there is strong evidence that as a result of a wide range of pressures (academic, financial and societal) fieldwork is in decline in the UK and elsewhere. In this paper we discuss the value of…

  20. Gaining a "Sense of Place": Students' Affective Experiences of Place Leading to Transformative Learning on International Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simm, David; Marvell, Alan

    2015-01-01

    This paper reveals the extent to which undergraduate students demonstrate transformative learning whilst on international fieldwork in Barcelona, Spain. Groups of students create a series of discrete active learning situations that allow them and their peers to engage more fully with their locale and in turn experience a deeper understanding of…

  1. What Happens in Classrooms after Earth Science Fieldwork? Supporting Student Learning Processes during Follow-Up Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmen, Kari Beate; Frøyland, Merethe

    2015-01-01

    Follow-up activities after fieldwork are recommended, yet little research has been conducted in this area. This study investigates six cases of follow-up work carried out by three teachers and their students in three upper secondary schools in Norway. The data comprises video observations of teachers and students, instructional artifacts,…

  2. Planetary entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    The final report summarizes the results from three research areas: (1) window design for the radiometric measurement of the forebody radiative heating experienced by atmospheric entry spaceraft; (2) survey of the current understanding of chemical species on selected solar system bodies and assess the importance of measurements with regard to vehicle environment and with regard to understanding of planetary atmospheres with emphasis on Venus, Mars, and Titan; and (3) measure and analyze the radiation (VUV to near-IR) from the shock heated gas cap of a blunt body in an Ames arc Jet wind-tunnel facility.

  3. Entry Systems Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.; Rummler, Donald R.; Bersch, Charlie; Dixon, Sidney C.

    1993-01-01

    As general findings, lessons learned from shuttle are: (1) bridge established between development center (JSC) Research Centers (ARC, LARC), and industry (RI, LMSC, Corning, Mansville, 3M LTV, Union Carbide, Hexcel) for shuttle TPS; (2) not all test results adequately analyzed or in hindsight, completely encompassing all failure modes; (3) gap heating effects from ground facilities not totally indicative of flight experience; (4) need to design with operations in mind (not just to cost) example: moisture intrusion of GR/EP, many other examples; (5) RSI- developed as point design for maneuvering entry vehicle of high L/D; and (6) RSI - 15 years from invention to use on flight hardware.

  4. Entry guidance and entry autopilot (STS-1 baseline)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.; Hill, O.

    1980-01-01

    Preliminary entry guidance and autopilot software formulations, for use in the Mission Control Center (MCC) entry processor, are presented. The MCC requirements are met by a definition of coordinate systems, a list of parameter definitions for the software formulations, a description of the entry guidance detailed formulation requirements, a description of the detailed autopilot formualtion requirements, a description of the targeting routine, and a set of formulation flow charts.

  5. 19 CFR 142.17 - One entry summary for multiple entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false One entry summary for multiple entries. 142.17...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.17 One entry summary... director may permit the filing of one entry summary for merchandise the subject of separate entries if:...

  6. Enabling Remote Activity: Using mobile technology for remote participation in geoscience fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah; Collins, Trevor; Gaved, Mark; Bartlett, Jessica; Valentine, Chris; McCann, Lewis

    2010-05-01

    Field-based activities are regarded as essential to the development of a range of professional and personal skills within the geosciences. Students enjoy field activities, preferring these to learning with simulations (Spicer and Stratford 2001), and these improve deeper learning and understanding (Kern and Carpenter, 1984; Elkins and Elkins, 2007). However, some students find it difficult to access these field-based learning opportunities. Field sites may be remote and often require travel across uneven, challenging or potentially dangerous terrain. Mobility-impaired students are particularly limited in their opportunities to participate in field-based learning activities and, as higher education institutions have a responsibility to provide inclusive opportunities for students (UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, UK Special Education Needs and Disability Rights Act 2001), the need for inclusive fieldwork learning is being increasingly recognised. The Enabling Remote Activity (ERA) project has been investigating how mobile communications technologies might allow field learning experiences to be brought to students who would otherwise find it difficult to participate, and also to enhance activities for all participants. It uses a rapidly deployable, battery-powered wireless network to transmit video, audio, and high resolution still images to connect participants at an accessible location with participants in the field. Crucially, the system uses a transient wireless network, allowing multiple locations to be explored during a field visit, and for plans to be changed dynamically if required. Central to the concept is the requirement for independent investigative learning: students are enabled to participate actively in the learning experience and to direct the investigations, as opposed to being simply remote viewers of the experience. Two ways of using the ERA system have been investigated: remote access and collaborative groupwork. In 2006 and 2008 remote

  7. Virtual Fieldwork and Critical Zone Observatories as Vehicles for Teaching "Three Dimensional" (NGSS) Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan-Haas, D.; Ross, R. M.; Derry, L. A.; White, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) offers a vision for K-12 science education that has important differences from common and long-standing classroom practice in many ways. NGSS's three dimensions (Scientific and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas), coupled with the recognition that it takes years to develop deep understandings of big ideas, do not mesh well with common K-12 (or K-16) teaching practices. NGSS also infuses systems and complexity into the K-12 curriculum. The Critical Zone lies between the bottom of the groundwater and the tops of the trees -- the layer of the Earth system where most life resides. Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs) are NSF-funded observatories in markedly varied ecosystems throughout the US, where interdisciplinary teams study the interplay of geological, biological, physical, and chemical sciences. The work being done in CZOs is three-dimensional science that is both deepening the scientific community's understandings of Earth systems and providing a cutting edge and highly relevant model for K-12 science education. Virtual Fieldwork Experiences (VFEs) are multi-media representations of actual field sites that are intended to mimic fieldwork by allowing for open-ended inquiry. The Paleontological Research Institution has developed tools and strategies to build VFEs of any site that use consistent formats, yet allow for inquiry to take multiple directions. Working together with CZO scientists, PRI staff are developing VFEs and accompanying curriculum materials for each CZO site. Ready-to-use VFEs act as models that teachers and students can use to create VFEs local to their schools. VFEs, like CZOs, facilitate use of interdisciplinary science to better understand the environment. A local VFE can be built up over time with contributions from students and teachers in middle school sciences, high school biology, Earth science, and environmental science -- classes where most curriculum

  8. Opportunities and Needs for Mobile-Computing Technology to Support U.S. Geological Survey Fieldwork

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Halsing, David L.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the opportunities and needs for mobile-computing technology at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), we conducted an internal, Internet-based survey of bureau scientists whose research includes fieldwork. In summer 2005, 144 survey participants answered 65 questions about fieldwork activities and conditions, technology to support field research, and postfieldwork data processing and analysis. Results suggest that some types of mobile-computing technology are already commonplace, such as digital cameras and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, whereas others are not, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and tablet-based personal computers (tablet PCs). The potential for PDA use in the USGS is high: 97 percent of respondents record field observations (primarily environmental conditions and water-quality data), and 87 percent take field samples (primarily water-quality data, water samples, and sediment/soil samples). The potential for tablet PC use in the USGS is also high: 59 percent of respondents map environmental features in the field, primarily by sketching in field notebooks, on aerial photographs, or on topographic-map sheets. Results also suggest that efficient mobile-computing-technology solutions could benefit many USGS scientists because most respondents spend at least 1 week per year in the field, conduct field sessions that are least 1 week in duration, have field crews of one to three people, and typically travel on foot about 1 mi from their field vehicles. By allowing researchers to enter data directly into digital databases while in the field, mobile-computing technology could also minimize postfieldwork data processing: 93 percent of respondents enter collected field data into their office computers, and more than 50 percent spend at least 1 week per year on postfieldwork data processing. Reducing postfieldwork data processing could free up additional time for researchers and result in cost savings for the bureau. Generally

  9. Computerized Physician Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Raman; Yen, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been promoted as an important component of patient safety, quality improvement, and modernization of medical practice. In practice, however, CPOE affects health care delivery in complex ways, with benefits as well as risks. Every implementation of CPOE is associated with both generally recognized and unique local factors that can facilitate or confound its rollout, and neurohospitalists will often be at the forefront of such rollouts. In this article, we review the literature on CPOE, beginning with definitions and proceeding to comparisons to the standard of care. We then proceed to discuss clinical decision support systems, negative aspects of CPOE, and cultural context of CPOE implementation. Before concluding, we follow the experiences of a Chief Medical Information Officer and neurohospitalist who rolled out a CPOE system at his own health care organization and managed the resulting workflow changes and setbacks. PMID:24381708

  10. Shuttle entry guidance revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mease, Kenneth D.; Kremer, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    The Shuttle entry guidance concept is reviewed which is aimed at tracking a reference drag trajectory that leads to the specified range and velocity for the initiation of the terminal energy management phase. An approximate method of constructing the domain of attraction is proposed, and its validity is ascertained by simulation. An alternative guidance law yielding global exponential tracking in the absence of control saturation is derived using a feedback linearization method. It is noted that the alternative guidance law does not improve on the stability and performance of the current guidance law, for the operating domain and control capability of the Shuttle. It is suggested that the new guidance law with a larger operating domain and increased lift-to-drag capability would be superior.

  11. The Cosmos in Portuguese Popular Tradition: A Bibliographic and Fieldwork Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Catarina

    2015-05-01

    Shepherds, farmers and fishermen knew the sky, the stars and constellations, by the same names as did their ancestors. Their observations often provided orientation clues to find their way at sea or inland, predict the weather, and to reckon time, particularly for sowing, harvesting or fishing.Also, Iberian popular tradition, in the form of talismans, prayers and recitations, testifies to former beliefs about the Moon and its malignant influence on children. This lunar determinism also found its way into popular awareness of its influence on vegetation growth, weather, tides or childbirth. Also, the Sun persisted in rural societies as an object of cult worship in the form of prayers or festivities. From the sky man also derived the various cycles, organized calendars and celebrated ritual festivities at solstices and equinoxes. Popular astronomy and meteorology were relevant topics in pioneer Portuguese ethnography between late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and valuable documents were then produced. Presently, systematic fieldwork amongst shepherds, farmers and fishermen, in defined regional areas, will contribute to an evaluation of the present stage of this knowledge about the sky and of its relation to ancient beliefs, and on how social groups have perceived and integrated it into their daily lives and cosmovision.

  12. Personal equations: reflections on the history of fieldwork, with special reference to sociocultural anthropology.

    PubMed

    Kuklick, Henrika

    2011-03-01

    In the latter part of the nineteenth century, diverse sciences grounded in natural history made a virtue of field research that somehow tested scientists' endurance; disciplinary change derived from the premise that witnesses were made reliable by character-molding trials. The turn to the field was a function of structural transformations in various quarters, including (but hardly limited to) global politics, communications systems, and scientific institutions, and it conduced to biogeographical explanations, taxonomic schemes that admitted of heterogeneity, and affective research styles. Sociocultural anthropology, which took specialized shape at the beginning of the twentieth century, shared many properties with other field sciences, but its method--participant observation-was distinctive. Critical to the method's definition were the efforts of the British experimental psychologist-anthropologist W. H. R. Rivers, who relied on notions then widespread in Europe and the United States. The discipline's future mythic hero, Bronislaw Malinowski, embraced Rivers's model. For both men, proper fieldwork meant using the researcher's body as an instrument and entailed understanding both the anthropologist's body and the research subject's body as energy systems; this symmetry facilitated a relativist perspective. Participant observation remains central to sociocultural anthropology, but the discipline's pedagogic habits contributed to loss of memory of its energetic conceptualization. PMID:21667774

  13. Methyl bromide intoxication in four field-workers during removal of soil fumigation sheets.

    PubMed

    Herzstein, J; Cullen, M R

    1990-01-01

    Methyl bromide is a highly toxic and penetrating compound used extensively as an insecticide for dry foodstuffs and as a soil fumigant (in greenhouses and fields) for the control of nematodes, fungi, and weeds. More than 300 cases of systemic poisoning and 60 fatalities attributable to methyl bromide have been reported [Alexeeff and Kilgore, 1983], resulting in substantial regulations concerning its handling, storage, application, and disposal. A recent exposure incident at a Connecticut nursery represents to our knowledge the first report of toxicity stemming from exposures in the field during removal of plastic sheets days after injection of methyl bromide into soil. Following removal of polyethylene sheets covering soil fumigated with methyl bromide, four field-workers developed fatigue and light-headedness and 3 workers noted progressive respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI), and neurologic symptoms. The acute systemic symptoms improved over several days, but later-onset neuropsychiatric symptoms persisted for several weeks. This incident stresses the need for improved worker education and strict adherence to safety precautions during all stages of methyl bromide fumigation and raises the possibility of an increased risk of toxicity associated with methyl bromide fumigation during a cool season. PMID:2305812

  14. Ethnographic research with adolescent students: situated fieldwork ethics and ethical principles governing human research.

    PubMed

    Hemmings, Annette

    2009-12-01

    This paper explores ethical dilemmas in situated fieldwork ethics concerning ethnographic studies of adolescent students. While consequentialist and deontological ethics form the basis of the ethical stances shared by ethnographers and research ethics committees, the interpretation of those principles may diverge in school-based ethnography with adolescent students because of the particular role of the adult ethnographer vis-à-vis developmentally immature adolescents not held legally responsible for many of their actions. School ethnographers attempt to build trust with adolescent participants in order to learn about their hidden cultural worlds, which may involve activities that are very harmful to the youths involved. They face many difficult and sometimes unexpected choices, including whether to intervene and how to represent events and adolescents in published findings. Scenarios with examples drawn from research conducted in public high schools are used to illustrate and explicate dilemmas in formal research and latent insider/outsider roles and relations involving harmful adolescent behaviors, advocacy, and psychological trauma. Also examined are analytical procedures used to construct interpretations leading to representations of research participants in the resulting publication. PMID:19919317

  15. One hundred years of instrumental phonetic fieldwork on North America Indian languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Joyce

    2005-04-01

    A resurgence of interest in phonetic fieldwork on generally morphologically complex North American Indian languages over the last 15 years is a continuation of a tradition started a century ago with the Earle Pliny Goddard, who collected kymographic and palatographic field-data between 1906-1927 on several Athabaskan languages: Coastal Athabaskan (Hupa and Kato), Apachean (Mescalero, Jicarilla, White Mountain, San Juan Carlos Apache), and several Athabaskan languages in Northern Canada (Cold Lake and Beaver); data that remains important for its record of segmental timing profiles and rare articulatory documentation in then largely monolingual communities. This data in combination with new work has resulted in the emergence of a body of knowledge of these typologically distinct families that often challenge notions of phonetic universality and typology. Using the Athabaskan languages as benchmark example and starting with Goddard's work, two types of emergent typological patterns will be discussed; the persistence of fine-grained timing and duration details across the widely dispersed family, and the broad variation in prosodic types that exists, both of which are unaccounted for by phonetic or phonological theories.

  16. Happiness in the neonatal intensive care unit: Merits of ethnographic fieldwork

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Research has focused on the destructive effects of distress on professionals who work in ethically complex wards such as neonatal intensive units (NICUs). This article examines the accounts of health professionals, including nurses, pediatricians and assistant nurses, of their work at a NICU in Iceland. The aim is to understand how health professionals, who work under stressful conditions in an ethically sensitive ward, can counteract the negative sides of work too such a degree that they experience happiness. The collection of data was based on the ethnographic fieldwork, and the methods used were participant observation and semi-structured interviews. The professionals evaluated their wellbeing in line with conventional definitions of happiness. Working with children and opportunities to help others, engage in social relations and experience professional pride contributed to their happiness at work. Nonetheless, they did not dismiss the difficult experiences, and when confronted with these the professionals negotiated their meanings and the goals and priorities of work. In contrast to the findings of much quantitative and survey-based research, the professionals attributed constructive meanings to stress and argued that the positive experiences at work buffered the negative ones. Research on happiness would benefit from multifaceted methodological and theoretical perspectives. Thanks to its openness to the unforeseen, controversial, contradictory, and ambiguous aspects of human life, ethnography can contribute to happiness research and research on job satisfaction. PMID:23237628

  17. 'You are HERE': Connecting the dots with airborne lidar for geomorphic fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roering, Joshua J.; Mackey, Benjamin H.; Marshall, Jill A.; Sweeney, Kristin E.; Deligne, Natalia I.; Booth, Adam M.; Handwerger, Alexander L.; Cerovski-Darriau, Corina

    2013-10-01

    The emergence of airborne lidar data for studying landscape evolution and natural hazards has revolutionized our ability to document the topographic signature of active and ancient surface processes. Notable lidar-facilitated discoveries, however, would not have been possible without the coupling of fieldwork and lidar analysis, which contradicts the ill-considered notion that high resolution remote sensing technologies will replace geomorphic field investigations. Here, we attempt to identify the primary means by which lidar has and will continue to transform how geomorphologists study landscape form and evolution: (1) lidar serves as a detailed base map for field mapping and sample collection, (2) lidar allows for rapid and accurate description of morphologic trends and patterns across broad areas, which facilitates model testing through increased accuracy and vastly increased sample sizes, and (3) lidar enables the identification of unanticipated landforms, including those with unknown origin. Finally, because the adoption of new technologies can influence cognition and perception, we also explore the notion that the ongoing use of lidar enables geomorphologists to more effectively conceptualize landforms in the field.

  18. Space assembled entry systems certification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curry, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    The approach taken to the issue, that 'How do you say you're 'good for go' if you space assemble an entry vehicle?', are: (1) shuttle orbiter thermal protection certification; (2) shuttle thermal protection system flight experience; and (3) space assembled entry system certification.

  19. The Context of Superintendent Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lytle, James H.

    2009-01-01

    The current rhetoric about accountability, making adequate yearly progress, and focusing on quality classroom instruction obfuscates the core challenge in becoming a superintendent: How does one use the entry and transition process to learn what the real challenges and issues are in a school district? Can entry be used as a time for personal and…

  20. Viking entry aerodynamics and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the Mars entry including the mission sequence of events and associated spacecraft weights are described along with the Viking spacecraft. Test data are presented for the aerodynamic characteristics of the entry vehicle showing trimmed alpha, drag coefficient, and trimmed lift to drag ratio versus Mach number; the damping characteristics of the entry configuration; the angle of attack time history of Viking entries; stagnation heating and pressure time histories; and the aeroshell heating distribution as obtained in tests run in a shock tunnel for various gases. Flight tests which demonstrate the aerodynamic separation of the full-scale aeroshell and the flying qualities of the entry configuration in an uncontrolled mode are documented. Design values selected for the heat protection system based on the test data and analysis performed are presented.

  1. Reconstruction of the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the findings from a reconstruction analysis of the Genesis capsule entry. First, a comparison of the atmospheric properties (density and winds) encountered during the entry to the pre-entry profile is presented. The analysis that was performed on the video footage (obtained from the tracking stations at UTTR) during the descent is then described from which the Mach number at the onset of the capsule tumble was estimated following the failure of the drogue parachute deployment. Next, an assessment of the Genesis capsule aerodynamics that was extracted from the video footage is discussed, followed by a description of the capsule hypersonic attitude that must have occurred during the entry based on examination of the recovered capsule heatshield. Lastly, the entry trajectory reconstruction that was performed is presented.

  2. 19 CFR 141.61 - Completion of entry and entry summary documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Completion of entry and entry summary documentation. (a) Preparation—(1) Paper entry and entry summary... 15422(a) of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (Pub. L. 110-234), for all goods entered...

  3. 19 CFR 142.13 - When entry summary must be filed at time of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... duties attached, if the entry/entry summary information and a valid scheduled statement date have been... estimated duties attached if the entry/entry summary information and a valid scheduled statement date...

  4. Using a Web-Based Resource to Prepare Students for Fieldwork: Evaluating the Dark Peak Virtual Tour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorrow, Julia

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on development of a Dark Peak website and its use to prepare first-year geography students for a one-day physical geography field course in the south Pennines. The Virtual Tour (VT) component of the website is the main focus of this paper. Pre- and post-fieldwork evaluations of the first version of the VT by 195 students are…

  5. DLMS voice data entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, P. B.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes the design, principles of operation, and performance characteristics of an Advanced Development Model of a voice recognition system (VRS) which can serve to input cartographic data to a computer. The completed system has been installed at the Defense Mapping Agency Aerospace Center (DMAAC) at St. Louis, MO, for evaluation and testing. The VRS is intended for use in entering by voice cartographic data to the Digital Landmass System (DLMS) Data Base. It was designed to satisfy the DMAAC product specifications. The software developed for the VRS includes two complete stand-alone programs. Performance tests conducted at TTI disclosed an average system word recognition accuracy of just under 99 percent for five talkers. The recognition tests were conducted by the use of tape recordings. These tape recordings were made during a previous contract involving cartographic data entry. Each person spoke approximately 536 words after uttering five training repetitions. The test results were virtually identical to those obtained during the previous contract.

  6. GOCE Re-Entry Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida, B.; Flohrer, T.; Lemmens, S.; Krag, H.

    2015-03-01

    Every year ESA, through the Space Debris Office, participates to an Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) Re-entry Test Campaign.. For the campaign of 2013, ESA’s proposal to select GOCE's re-entry was accepted. The campaign opened on the 21st October 2013 after fuel depletion of the drag-compensating ion propulsion. GOCE was expected to enter into a phase of attitude-controlled fine-pointing mode (FPM) until the attitude controllers would be unable to cope with the atmospheric torques and then the satellite would enter in a phase of fully uncontrolled flight. In this paper, we present the evolution of ESA’s daily predictions on the re-entry epoch using different sources of orbital information. The uncertainties on the spacecraft operability (i.e. the physical limits of the attitude controller) led to a non-standard re-entry scenario were different attitudes had to be considered (instead of the commonly assumed random tumbling mode case that is used whenever no information on the physical properties of a re-entering object is available). A daily assessment of the status, in coordination with the flight control team, was required and implied a continuous update on the predicted failure point of the attitude controller. This in turn imposed the need for considering an asymmetric re-entry window. These operation-bound uncertainties were simulated to predict the attitude evolution after failure at different altitudes and their effects evaluated to be taken into account for the re-entry predictions. We present ESA’s re-entry prediction activities for GOCE, internally, and within the IADC, and address specific technical aspects and challenges for re-entry predictions, which are related to the expected and occurred attitude of GOCE during the final re-entry phase.

  7. Multi-scale Geological Outcrop Visualisation: Using Gigapan and Photosynth in Fieldwork-related Geology Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimpson, Ian; Gertisser, Ralf; Montenari, Michael; O'Driscoll, Brian

    2010-05-01

    An increasing proportion of geology (and other fieldwork-related discipline) students are mobility impaired. This is partially due to the widening access agenda and the acceptance of increased numbers of students with severe medical disabilities. In the UK, the expectation of "The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Act (2001)" (SENDA) and "The Higher Education Quality Assurance Agency" (QAA) is that institutions should, wherever possible, provide alternative experiences where comparable opportunities are available which satisfy the learning outcomes. In order to provide this alternative experience, the ways in which students observe and learn from geology in the field need to be resembled closely by, for example, viewing outcrops at different scales and from different perspectives. Whilst a series of still images at different distances could be taken, students need to be able to decide where to look in detail and 'move around' the outcrop. The Gigapan project is a website and supporting software that allows high-resolution megapixel photographic images to be combined to make gigapixel panoramas which can then be explored at many scales by zooming and panning. Photosynth is a similar project where a number of different digital photographs are combined into a 3D model in which the user can move around. Here, we show examples of both projects, which have been successfully implemented in geology teaching related to a residential undergraduate field course to classic geological areas in Pembrokeshire, South Wales. In addition to providing an alternative learning experience for mobility-impaired students on the fieldtrip, these resources could also be used for non-impaired students where circumstances such as bad weather prevents the whole cohort from visiting a key exposure on a field course. They would also allow a 'virtual' visit of exposures that are inaccessible and may be a useful learning tool for preparing students for a forthcoming field course.

  8. Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

    2009-09-17

    ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

  9. ESA Venus Entry Probe Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vandenBerg, M. L.; Falkner, P.; Phipps, A.; Underwood, J. C.; Lingard, J. S.; Moorhouse, J.; Kraft, S.; Peacock, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Venus Entry Probe is one of ESA s Technology Reference Studies (TRS). The purpose of the Technology Reference Studies is to provide a focus for the development of strategically important technologies that are of likely relevance for future scientific missions. The aim of the Venus Entry Probe TRS is to study approaches for low cost in-situ exploration of Venus and other planetary bodies with a significant atmosphere. In this paper, the mission objectives and an outline of the mission concept of the Venus Entry Probe TRS are presented.

  10. Selected optimal shuttle entry computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, H. C.

    1974-01-01

    Parameterization and the Davidon-Fletcher-Powell method are used to study the characteristics of optimal shuttle entry trajectories. Two problems of thermal protective system weight minimization are considered: roll modulation and roll plus an angle-of-attack modulation. Both problems are targeted for the edges of the entry footprint. Results consistent with constraints on loads and control bounds are particularly well-behaved and strongly support 'energy' approximation results obtained for the case of symmetric flight by Kelley and Sullivan (1973). Furthermore, results indicate that optimal shuttle entry trajectories should be easy to duplicate and to analyze by using simple techniques.

  11. 27. View of entry door to vestibule to MWOC entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View of entry door to vestibule to MWOC entry door in transmitter building no. 102 (note coded key pad to left and intercom phone on left) and door to the central systems monitor room (CSMR) to right (out of sight). - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  12. Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project will test and demonstrate a deployable aeroshell concept as a viable thermal protection system for entry, descent, and landing o...

  13. The Place to Be: The Development and Implementation of an Alzheimer's Day-Care/Respite Program as a Level I Fieldwork Experience for Occupational Therapy Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benzing, Penny

    1994-01-01

    Eastern Kentucky University's The Place to Be, an Alzheimer's day-care program, provides a fieldwork placement for occupational therapy students, meaningful activities in a safe environment for persons with dementia, and respite for family caregivers. (SK)

  14. Re-entry Experiment Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 10, 2009, NASA successfully launched the Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) and proved that spacecraft can use inflatable heat shields to reduce speed and provide protection du...

  15. Orion Entry Handling Qualities Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, B.; Tiggers, M.; Strahan, A.; Gonzalez, R.; Sullivan, K.; Stephens, J. P.; Hart, J.; Law, H., III; Bilimoria, K.; Bailey, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion Command Module (CM) is a capsule designed to bring crew back from the International Space Station (ISS), the moon and beyond. The atmospheric entry portion of the flight is deigned to be flown in autopilot mode for nominal situations. However, there exists the possibility for the crew to take over manual control in off-nominal situations. In these instances, the spacecraft must meet specific handling qualities criteria. To address these criteria two separate assessments of the Orion CM s entry Handling Qualities (HQ) were conducted at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) using the Cooper-Harper scale (Cooper & Harper, 1969). These assessments were conducted in the summers of 2008 and 2010 using the Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) six degree of freedom, high fidelity Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) simulation. This paper will address the specifics of the handling qualities criteria, the vehicle configuration, the scenarios flown, the simulation background and setup, crew interfaces and displays, piloting techniques, ratings and crew comments, pre- and post-fight briefings, lessons learned and changes made to improve the overall system performance. The data collection tools, methods, data reduction and output reports will also be discussed. The objective of the 2008 entry HQ assessment was to evaluate the handling qualities of the CM during a lunar skip return. A lunar skip entry case was selected because it was considered the most demanding of all bank control scenarios. Even though skip entry is not planned to be flown manually, it was hypothesized that if a pilot could fly the harder skip entry case, then they could also fly a simpler loads managed or ballistic (constant bank rate command) entry scenario. In addition, with the evaluation set-up of multiple tasks within the entry case, handling qualities ratings collected in the evaluation could be used to assess other scenarios such as the constant bank angle

  16. Types of Unintended Consequences Related to Computerized Provider Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Emily M.; Sittig, Dean F.; Ash, Joan S.; Guappone, Kenneth P.; Dykstra, Richard H.

    2006-01-01

    Objective To identify types of clinical unintended adverse consequences resulting from computerized provider order entry (CPOE) implementation. Design An expert panel provided initial examples of adverse unintended consequences of CPOE. The authors, using qualitative methods, gathered and analyzed additional examples from five successful CPOE sites. Methods Using a card sort method, the authors developed a categorization scheme for the 79 unintended consequences initially identified and then iteratively modified the scheme to categorize 245 additional adverse consequences resulting from fieldwork. Because the focus centered on consequences requiring prevention or remedial action, the authors did not further analyze reported unintended beneficial (positive) consequences. Results Unintended adverse consequences (UACs) fell into nine major categories (in order of decreasing frequency): 1) more/new work for clinicians; 2) unfavorable workflow issues; 3) never ending system demands; 4) problems related to paper persistence; 5) untoward changes in communication patterns and practices; 6) negative emotions; 7) generation of new kinds of errors; 8) unexpected changes in the power structure; and 9) overdependence on the technology. Clinical decision support features introduced many of these unintended consequences. Conclusion Identifying and understanding the types and in some instances the causes of unintended adverse consequences associated with CPOE will enable system developers and implementers to better manage implementation and maintenance of future CPOE projects. PMID:16799128

  17. Understanding and Defining sociohydrological spaces and their boundaries: an interdisciplinary perspective from collective fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaux, Jeanne; Leduc, Christian; Ben Aïssa, Nadhira; Burte, Julien; Calvez, Roger; habaieb, Hamadi; Ogilvie, Andrew; Massuel, Sylvain; Rochette, Romain

    2014-05-01

    Focussing on the interactions between water and society, researchers from various scientific disciplines have worked together on a common case study, the Merguellil catchment in Central Tunisia. The aim was to foster interactions between wide-ranging disciplines and their associated approaches, as the segmented analysis of water resources, uses and management is known to limit the comprehensive understanding of water issues. One of the major difficulties in developing a interdisciplinary approach is defining a suitable common observation space or "territory". Research in social sciences notably showed that hydrological catchments, suited to integrated water resource management, are rarely relevant to socio-political issues (water transfers, management of interfluves, etc.). Likewise, hydrological research regularly highlights the mismatch between surface and ground water processes and boundaries. Hydrological, hydrogeological and sociological boundaries also fluctuate when considering different time frames, socio-political organisations and processes. Finally, a suitable observation space must also be coherent to the variety of local stakeholders involved in the research. The present paper addressed the question of what is a common multidisciplinary observation space? What approach can help define and identify boundaries that make sense to hydrologists, agronomists, anthropologists and local stakeholders? How do we reconcile physical limits and territories? In the first instance, we focus on the value and importance of fieldwork, crucial in anthropology, but equally important for hydrologists and agronomists. Through a mutual process of defining the limits and characteristics of our research object, relevant socio-hydrological spaces were able to emerge These were circumscribed through the physical characteristics (based upon hydrological boundaries and processes) and the human particularities (political organisation, productive activities) of the study area. The

  18. Inspired by Fieldwork: A Teacher Research Experience Energizes and Ignites a Group of Elementary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    Through involvement in authentic research experiences teachers improve their content knowledge, deepen their understanding of the research process, and rejuvenate their interest in science. These positive results of fieldwork transfer into the classroom, directly benefiting students. The ARMADA project provided me with a three week research experience aboard the Amundsen (Canadian Coast Guard science vessel) which enriched and strengthened me professionally. Guided by master and early career scientists, I took part in specific research techniques and deep scientific discourse. My immersion in ocean science was so stimulating that I was inspired to share that excitement with my students. The fascination my students showed for basic experiments and ocean related activities fueled my interest further and I began to research more deeply which led to Climate Literacy and Polar Studies as essentials in my science curriculum. Over the following years I continued to expand and refine the workshops and activities students take part in. Three years after the research experience students still love the science explorations we embark upon together. This past year a group of students became so excited about Polar Science and Climate that they authored a 36 page non fiction book for upper elementary and middle school students entitled, "Changing Poles, Changing Planet: Climate Change vs. The Earth". Seven of the authors decided to continue their science outreach work by creating an educational video focusing on the basics of climate science and what children can do to lower carbon emissions. The book and video were distributed to educators as well as scientists at the International Polar Year Science Conference in June, 2010. In August some of these students presented their work at a Sustainability festival that was organized by M-CAN a local climate action group. Two of these students (who have left my class and started 6th grade at the middle school)recently decided to form a

  19. 32 CFR 763.4 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Entry restrictions. 763.4 Section 763.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.4 Entry restrictions. (a) Entry by any person upon Kaho'olawe...

  20. 32 CFR 763.4 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Entry restrictions. 763.4 Section 763.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.4 Entry restrictions. (a) Entry by any person upon Kaho'olawe...

  1. 32 CFR 763.4 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Entry restrictions. 763.4 Section 763.4 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.4 Entry restrictions. (a) Entry by any person upon Kaho'olawe...

  2. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  3. 19 CFR 142.16 - Entry summary documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry summary documentation. 142.16 Section 142.16... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.16 Entry summary documentation. (a) Entry summary not filed at time of entry. When the entry documentation is filed before the entry...

  4. 19 CFR 142.16 - Entry summary documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry summary documentation. 142.16 Section 142.16... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.16 Entry summary documentation. (a) Entry summary not filed at time of entry. When the entry documentation is filed before the entry...

  5. Atmospheric entry heating of micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    A computer simulation of the atmospheric entry deceleration and heating of cosmic dust particles has been developed and the predicted peak temperatures are compared to the earlier closed-form mathematical solutions of Whipple (195) and Fraundorf (1980). A 20-micron diameter particle of density 1 gm/cu cm having a velocity of 10 km/s at infinity and entering the atmosphere at normal incidence reaches a peak temperature of 1159 K. The duration of the heating pulse is about 8 s but the particle remains within 100 K of the peak temperature for only 1.0 s. As the angle of incidence decreases, the peak temperature reached on entry also decreases, and the duration of the temperature pulse increases. Comparison with the Whipple amd Fraundorf models indicates that they accurately assess the entry heating for cosmic dust particles of moderate or higher densities and entry angles near normal incidence. As particle density decreases or the entry angle nears grazing incidence, they overestimate the peak temperature.

  6. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory will be the first Mars mission to attempt a guided entry with the objective of safely delivering the entry vehicle to a survivable parachute deploy state within 12.5 km of the pre-designated parachute deploy coordinates. The Entry Terminal Point Controller guidance algorithm is derived from the final phase Apollo Command Module guidance and, like Apollo, modulates the bank angle to control range based on deviations in range, altitude rate, and drag acceleration from a reference trajectory. For application to Mars landers which must make use of the tenuous Martian atmosphere, it is critical to balance the lift of the vehicle to minimize the range while still ensuring a safe deploy altitude. An overview of the process to generate optimized guidance settings is presented, discussing improvements made over the last nine years. Performance tradeoffs between ellipse size and deploy altitude will be presented, along with imposed constraints of entry acceleration and heating. Performance sensitivities to the bank reversal deadbands, heading alignment, attitude initialization error, and entry delivery errors are presented.

  7. The Value of Fieldwork in Life and Environmental Sciences in the Context of Higher Education: A Case Study in Learning About Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Graham W.; Goulder, Raymond; Wheeler, Phillip; Scott, Lisa J.; Tobin, Michelle L.; Marsham, Sara

    2012-02-01

    Fieldwork is assumed by most practitioners to be an important if not essential component of a degree level education in the environmental sciences. However, there is strong evidence that as a result of a wide range of pressures (academic, financial and societal) fieldwork is in decline in the UK and elsewhere. In this paper we discuss the value of fieldwork in a higher education context and present the results of a case study which illustrates its value to student learning and the wider student experience. We used qualitative and quantitative methods to compare the impact of two learning tasks upon the affective and cognitive domains of students. We designed two tasks. One task that included fieldwork, and required students to collect organisms from the field and make labelled drawings of them, and one task that omitted the fieldwork and simply required drawing of specimens that the students had not collected. We evaluated the students' experience through structured and semi-structured questionnaires and written exercises. Students did not perceive the two tasks as being equivalent to one another. They reported that they enjoy fieldwork and value it (in the contexts of their learning at university, life-long learning, and in relation to their career aspirations) and felt that they learn more effectively in the field. Our students were better able to construct a taxonomic list of organisms that they had collected themselves, better able to recall the structural detail of these organisms and were better able to recall the detail of an ecological sampling methodology that they had personally carried out in the field rather than one that a tutor had described to them in a classroom setting. Our case study supports the growing body of evidence that fieldwork is an important way of enhancing undergraduate learning and highlights some key areas for future research.

  8. The geothermal resource in Dominica : from the class room to the fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivia, Urity

    2014-05-01

    In Martinique and more generally in the Caribbean area, the Global warming is not only a topic you can read about in a scientific article but a true issue in the everyday life of the inhabitants. Many effects of the increase of the sea level or the erosion can be observed in the environment. For example, beaches are being destroyed, frightening buildings built on the seafront. This is not only an environmental issue but a touristic and economical one. By the way it is a problem to give a new home to these inhabitants who are now losing their houses. So, with their limited territory and their economy depending on tourism, the islands of the Lesser Antilles have a big challenge which is to find some solutions to minimize the effects of the Global warming on their populations. Anyway, anthropic activities and particularly the using of fossil fuels are named to be responsible for a big part of the climate changes. Knowing this allows us to understand that the Caribbean countries have to develop renewable energies. Guadeloupe and Dominica are two good examples of these islands, where the politicians have already decided to use sustainable energies. They use geothermal energy and hydroelectricity to provide to the families' needs. In this way, the Dominican government, with finances from The European Union, Guadeloupe and Martinique decided to explore the geothermal resource in the island and to build a plant in the area of Roseau Valley. Therefore the students and I, we have decided to study the geology of Dominica in order to find the origin of the geothermal resource and to get more information about the geothermal power plant project. Furthermore, we wanted to understand how this resource is used by the locals and to determine the impact of the presence of the future plant in the chosen sites. In the poster to come, I have chosen to introduce the "journey in Dominica" and the fieldwork that I have realized with my students of upper sixth form. The poster will focus

  9. Evolving friendships and shifting ethical dilemmas: fieldworkers' experiences in a short term community based study in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kamuya, Dorcas M; Theobald, Sally J; Munywoki, Patrick K; Koech, Dorothy; Geissler, Wenzel P; Molyneux, Sassy C

    2013-04-01

    Fieldworkers (FWs) are community members employed by research teams to support access to participants, address language barriers, and advise on culturally appropriate research conduct. The critical role that FWs play in studies, and the range of practical and ethical dilemmas associated with their involvement, is increasingly recognised. In this paper, we draw on qualitative observation and interview data collected alongside a six month basic science study which involved a team of FWs regularly visiting 47 participating households in their homes. The qualitative study documented how relationships between field workers and research participants were initiated, developed and evolved over the course of the study, the shifting dilemmas FWs faced and how they handled them. Even in this one case study, we see how the complex and evolving relationships between fieldworkers and study participants had important implications for consent processes, access to benefits and mutual understanding and trust. While the precise issues that FWs face are likely to depend on the type of research and the context in which that research is being conducted, we argue that appropriate support for field workers is a key requirement to strengthen ethical research practice and for the long term sustainability of research programmes. PMID:23433316

  10. The Lightbulb Moment - the importance of fieldwork as a link between the classroom and the real world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambridge, Helen; Barraclough, Alison

    2016-04-01

    All teachers love the light bulb moment; that moment when a student says, "Ah ha, I get it!" and makes the move from remembering to understanding. This boosts their confidence, leading to increased engagement with the subject and, in turn, increased progress and enjoyment. For many young geologists such moments occur outside the classroom when they are given the opportunity to carry out fieldwork. Understanding involves making links and investigations within the field allow students to make these essential links between actual observations and theory. All A-Level geologists at Sir William Borlase's Grammar School are given the opportunity to take part in a five day fieldtrip. This poster celebrates key 'lightbulb moments' that occurred during fieldwork to the famous Jurassic Coast, England. Students investigated the geological setting at Kimmeridge Bay where the cyclic sedimentation in the Lias helped their understanding of orbital obliquity and precession. The processes of fossilisation and preservation were examined at West Bay and in the upper Jurassic at Bowleaze Cove, which also enabled students to appreciate the incompleteness of the fossil record. Modern day processes and coastal management at Swanage allowed sixth formers to understand the non-permanent nature of landscapes and the difficulties encountered when attempting to conserve eroding areas. Therefore, the chance to get outside the classroom and study in the field is an invaluable opportunity for students to make those all important links through investigative learning and to develop a deeper understanding of the world around them.

  11. Numerical Skip-Entry Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigges, Michael; Crull, Timothy; Rea, Jeremy; Johnson, Wyatt

    2006-01-01

    This paper assesses a preliminary guidance and targeting strategy for accomplishing Skip-Entry (SE) flight during a lunar return-capsule entry flight. One of the primary benefits of flying a SE trajectory is to provide the crew with continuous Continental United States (CONUS) landing site access throughout the lunar month. Without a SE capability, the capsule must land either in water or at one of several distributed land sites in the Southern Hemisphere for a significant portion of a lunar month using a landing and recovery scenario similar to that employed during the Apollo program. With a SE trajectory, the capsule can land either in water at a site in proximity to CONUS or at one of several distributed landing sites within CONUS, thereby simplifying the operational requirements for crew retrieval and vehicle recovery, and possibly enabling a high degree of vehicle reusability. Note that a SE capability does not require that the vehicle land on land. A SE capability enables a longer-range flight than a direct-entry flight, which permits the vehicle to land at a much greater distance from the Entry Interface (EI) point. This does not exclude using this approach to push the landing point to a water location in proximity of CONUS and utilizing water or airborne recovery forces.

  12. Delayed School Entry in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997 Uganda has seen a large increase in school enrolment. Despite this increased enrolment, universal education has remained elusive. Many children enrol in school, but not at the recommended age, and they drop out before completing school. This article focuses on one of these problems--delayed school entry. What household factors are…

  13. 32 CFR 770.38 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... in Puerto Rico § 770.38 Entry restrictions. Except for duly authorized military personnel and... duties, entry upon any U.S. Navy installation or property in Puerto Rico at anytime, by any person...

  14. 32 CFR 770.39 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Naval Installations and Property in Puerto Rico... entry upon any U.S. Naval installation or property in Puerto Rico from the Commanding Officer of...

  15. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  16. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  17. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  18. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  19. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  20. Overview of entry risk predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrozinski, R.; Mendeck, G.; Cutri-Kohart, R.

    Risk to people on the ground from uncontrolled entries of spacecraft is a primary concern when analyzing end-of-life disposal options for satellites. Countries must balance this risk with the need to mitigate an exponentially growing space debris population. Currently the United States does this via guidelines that call for a satellite to be disposed of in a controlled manner if an uncontrolled entry would be too risky to people on the ground. This risk is measured by a quantity called "casualty expectation", or E , where casualty expectation is defined as the expectedc number of people suffering death or injury due to a spacecraft entry event. If Ec exceeds 1 in 10,000, U. S. guidelines state that the entry should be controlled rather than uncontrolled. Since this guideline can have serious impacts on the cost, lifetime, and even the mission and functionality of a satellite, it is critical that this quantity be estimated well, and decision makers understand all assumptions and limitations inherent in the resulting value. This paper discusses several issues regarding estimates of casualty expectation, beginning with an overview of relevant United States policies and guidelines. The equation the space industry typically uses to estimate casualty expectation is presented, along with a look at the sensitivity of the results to the typical assumptions, models, and initial condition uncertainties. Differences in these modeling issues with respect to launch failure Ec estimates are included in the discussion. An alternate quantity to assess risks due to spacecraft entries is introduced. "Probability of casualty", or Pc , is defined as the probability of one or more instances of people suffering death or injury due to a spacecraft entry event. The equation to estimate Pc is derived, where the same assumptions, modeling, and initial condition issues for Ec apply. Several examples are then given of both Ec and Pc estimate calculations. Due to the difficult issues in

  1. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing...

  2. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing...

  3. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing...

  4. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing Within... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42...

  5. 32 CFR 770.29 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Entry procedures. 770.29 Section 770.29 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY MISCELLANEOUS RULES RULES LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Installations in the State of Hawaii § 770.29 Entry procedures....

  6. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drawback entry. 191.143 Section 191.143 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry....

  7. 10 CFR 1048.3 - Unauthorized entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Unauthorized entry. 1048.3 Section 1048.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.3 Unauthorized entry. Unauthorized entry into or upon an SPR facility or real...

  8. 10 CFR 1048.3 - Unauthorized entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Unauthorized entry. 1048.3 Section 1048.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.3 Unauthorized entry. Unauthorized entry into or upon an SPR facility or real...

  9. 10 CFR 1048.3 - Unauthorized entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unauthorized entry. 1048.3 Section 1048.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.3 Unauthorized entry. Unauthorized entry into or upon an SPR facility or real...

  10. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements...

  11. 32 CFR 763.5 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Entry procedures. 763.5 Section 763.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.5 Entry procedures. (a) It is the policy of the Commander Naval...

  12. 32 CFR 763.5 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Entry procedures. 763.5 Section 763.5 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY ISLANDS UNDER NAVY JURISDICTION RULES GOVERNING PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.5 Entry procedures. (a) It is the policy of the Commander Naval...

  13. 19 CFR 18.11 - Entry; classes of goods for which entry is authorized; form used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Entry; classes of goods for which entry is authorized; form used. 18.11 Section 18.11 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... Transportation Without Appraisement § 18.11 Entry; classes of goods for which entry is authorized; form used....

  14. 19 CFR 141.64 - Review and correction of entry and entry summary documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Review and correction of entry and entry summary documentation. 141.64 Section 141.64 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Presentation of Entry Papers §...

  15. TCES. Time Card Entry System

    SciTech Connect

    Montierth, B.

    1996-05-01

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two week payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual`s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.

  16. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  17. Profiles of Nonprofit Education Management Organizations: 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miron, Gary; Urschel, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    This is the third Profiles report to examine nonprofit education management organizations (EMOs). This report is modeled after the 12 annual reports that cover for-profit EMOs. While the number of schools operated by for-profit EMOs grew rapidly in the 1990s and is now leveling off, the data contained in this report illustrate how the number of…

  18. Scholarships for New York City Students, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Visions for Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    A college education is an important investment in an individual's future. In fact, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, college graduates earn twice as much income as high school graduates over a lifetime. While the expense of attending college is significant, the benefits associated with a college degree dramatically outweigh the costs. Financial…

  19. Generalist and Specialty Physicians: Supply and Access, 2009-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard Technical Notes Other Publications Advance Data From Vital and ... Vital Statistics of the United States: 1890-1938 Technical Appendices Miscellaneous Publications National Conference on Health Statistics ...

  20. Legislative Agenda for the 111th Congress, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc of the United States, 2009

    2009-01-01

    For many decades, the six national disability advocacy organizations that endorse the legislative agenda contained in this document have recognized the vital role the federal government plays in the everyday lives of children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families. From civil rights protections to community housing, from…

  1. Parent Centers Helping Families: Outcome Data 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALLIANCE National Parent Technical Assistance Center at PACER, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This booklet highlights the important work of the more than 100 Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) and Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs) funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. The report includes data on the numbers of parents and professionals served by Parent Centers, outcomes of the…

  2. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In a more consistent and viable manner than ever before, education in Alabama is moving toward its ultimate goal of providing every student with a quality education, thereby preparing them for work, college, and life after high school. Alabama's graduation rates from 2002 to 2008 increased significantly, tripling the national average increase…

  3. The Fact Book: 2009-2010--A Statistical Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents Maryland State Department of Education's statistical information on the following areas: (1) Demographic Data; (2) Accountability Data; (3) Financial Data; (4) Special Populations; (5) Other Programs; and (6) General Information. This Fact Book contains the latest data available as of December 2, 2010.

  4. Ocular toxocariasis--United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2011-06-10

    Ocular toxocariasis (OT) is caused by the zoonotic parasites Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati, roundworms of dogs and cats. Persons become infected with Toxocara when they unintentionally ingest embryonated eggs that have been shed in the feces of infected animals. Although OT is uncommon, it most often affects young children and can cause debilitating ophthalmologic disease, including blindness. Previous studies of OT in the United States have been conducted in single institutions. This report describes the results of a web-based survey distributed to uveitis, retinal, and pediatric ophthalmology specialists nationwide to collect epidemiologic, demographic, and clinical information on patients with OT. A total of 68 patients were newly diagnosed with OT from September 2009 through September 2010. Among the 44 patients for whom demographic information was available, the median patient age was 8.5 years (range: 1-60 years), and 25 patients (57%) lived in the South at the time of diagnosis. Among 30 patients with reported clinical data, the most common symptom was vision loss, reported by 25 (83%) patients; of these, 17 (68%) suffered permanent vision loss. The results of this first national level survey demonstrate that OT transmission continues to occur in the United States, frequently affecting children and causing permanent vision loss in the majority of reported patients. Good hygiene practices, timely disposal of pet feces, and routine deworming of pets are strategies necessary to reduce OT in humans. PMID:21659981

  5. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance." which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs." provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school, including…

  6. Final report : Hanover environmental site investigation, 2009-2010.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-06-07

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected in two private lawn and garden wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Consequently, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations, under the direction of the KDHE, to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be associated with the former facility. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion (VI). Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at Hanover might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that may be associated with the former facility. The results of the comprehensive investigation at Hanover indicate that no unacceptable risk to human health currently exists from exposure to surface and subsurface soils by either ingestion, inhalation or dermal contact. No risk is associated with potential exposure to contaminated groundwater at Hanover. No drinking water wells are known to exist in Hanover, and the drinking water supply comes from RWD No.1 at Lanham, Kansas, located 6.5 mi north of Hanover. Limited potential risk was identified due to exposure to indoor air contaminated with carbon tetrachloride, but this risk has been mitigated, thereby removing this threat to human health. Radon is prevalent in the community, at concentrations exceeding the level at which the EPA recommends additional measures (testing and/or mitigation). The recommended testing and mitigation (if needed) are the responsibility of the homeowners. In the current condition in which no private wells are used for drinking water in the affected area, no unacceptable human health risk from carbon tetrachloride is associated with the identified impacted media at the Hanover site.

  7. Public Schooling in Southeastern Wisconsin: 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Jeff; Smith, Annemarie; Dickman, Anneliese; Henken, Rob

    2010-01-01

    For 24 consecutive years, the Public Policy Forum has compiled and analyzed data from southeastern Wisconsin's public school districts in order to better inform policymakers and the public about the effectiveness of the region's K-12 education system. This analysis of the 2009-10 academic year, like many of the previous reports, indicates cause…

  8. Locally acquired Dengue--Key West, Florida, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2010-05-21

    Dengue is the most common vector-borne viral disease in the world, causing an estimated 50-100 million infections and 25,000 deaths each year. During 1946-1980, no cases of dengue acquired in the continental United States were reported. Since 1980, a few locally acquired U.S. cases have been confirmed along the Texas-Mexico border, temporally associated with large outbreaks in neighboring Mexican cities. On September 1, 2009, a New York physician notified the Monroe County (Florida) Health Department (MCHD) and the Florida Department of Health (FDOH) of a suspected dengue case in a New York state resident whose only recent travel was to Key West, Florida. CDC confirmed the diagnosis, and a press release was issued to notify the public and Key West physicians of the potential risk for locally acquired dengue infections. In the next 2 weeks, two dengue infections in Key West residents without recent travel were reported and confirmed. Subsequently, enhanced and active surveillance identified 24 more Key West cases during 2009. On April 13, 2010, another Key West dengue case was reported to FDOH, bringing the total to 28. This report describes the first three dengue cases reported in 2009, briefly summarizes the 2010 case, highlights preliminary findings from the ongoing investigation, and outlines measures used to mitigate and control the outbreak. Clinicians should include dengue in the differential diagnosis of acute febrile illnesses in patients who live in or have recently traveled to subtropical areas of the United States or to the tropics. PMID:20489680

  9. Eratosthenes 2009/2010: An Old Experiment in Modern Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekeris, Victoria; Bonomo, Flavia; Bonzi, Edgardo; Garcia, Beatriz; Mattei, Guillermo; Mazzitelli, Diego; Dawson, Silvina Ponce; Fernandez de la Vega, Constanza Sanchez; Tamarit, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    We describe the projects "Eratosthenes 2009" and "Eratosthenes 2010 America," carried out during the International Year of Astronomy (2009) in Argentina and with almost all the countries in North and South America during 2010. More than 15000 students at more than 200 schools each year determined the radius of the Earth using the method that…

  10. Developments in mycotoxin analysis: an update for 2009 - 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review highlights developments in mycotoxin analysis and sampling over a period between mid-2009 and mid-2010. It covers the major mycotoxins aflatoxins, Alternaria toxins, ergot alkaloids, fumonisins, ochratoxin, patulin, trichothecenes, and zearalenone. New and improved methods for mycotoxins...

  11. Intervention for College Attendance Program: 2009-2010 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Nancy; Ayodele, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    This report provides information on the outcomes of the Intervention for College Attendance Program, a program of competitive grants awarded to postsecondary institutions, professional organizations and community-based organizations. Funded programs focus on increasing the access and success of groups traditionally underrepresented in higher…

  12. Blind Childrens Center Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blind Childrens Center, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Blind Childrens Center provides the ideal environment to educate young students. This year, Second Grade was added with a combined First/Second Grade class. Next year, the center will have a dedicated First Grade and Second Grade which will require a full new classroom. This paper presents the accomplishments and activities achieved by the…

  13. Viral entry mechanisms: the increasing diversity of paramyxovirus entry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Popa, Andreea; Chang, Andres; Masante, Cyril; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2009-01-01

    The paramyxovirus family contains established human pathogens such as measles virus and human respiratory syncytial virus, and emerging pathogens including the Hendra and Nipah viruses and the recently identified human metapneumovirus. Two major envelope glycoproteins, the attachment protein and the fusion protein, promote the processes of viral attachment and virus-cell membrane fusion required for entry. While common mechanisms of fusion protein proteolytic activation and the mechanism of membrane fusion promotion have been shown in recent years, considerable diversity exists in the family related to receptor binding and the potential mechanisms of fusion triggering. PMID:19878307

  14. Bridging the Gap between University Supervisors and Hispanic Students' Interpretation of English Language Development Teaching Practices during Intern Teacher Fieldwork Supervision in Inner-City Middle Schools of Los Angeles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2006-01-01

    Efforts at improving fieldwork supervision during internship have largely focused on the role of university supervisors and intern teachers. Thus students' perceptions of the instructional practices are not systematically collected, analyzed and discussed in such a way that insights from students' perceptions can inform fieldwork supervision. This…

  15. Identifying Unique Ethical Challenges of Indigenous Field-Workers: A Commentary on Alexander and Richman's "Ethical Dilemmas in Evaluations Using Indigenous Research Workers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nick L.

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with nonindigenous workers, to what extent do unique ethical problems arise when indigenous field-workers participate in field studies? Three aspects of study design and operation are considered: data integrity issues, risk issues, and protection issues. Although many of the data quality issues that arise with the use of indigenous…

  16. Service-Learning: Programs for the Aging. A Guide to Practicum and Fieldwork Experiences in Health, Fitness, Dance, and Leisure Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beland, Robert M.

    This guide presents an outline for establishing a service-learning program for college level students preparing for a career in working with older adults. The following procedures are described for developing practicums and fieldwork programs: 1) establishing program goals, 2) program staffing, 3) selection of service-learning sites, 4) developing…

  17. Atmospheric Entry Experiments at IRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auweter-Kurtz, M.; Endlich, P.; Herdrich, G.; Kurtz, H.; Laux, T.; Löhle, S.; Nazina, N.; Pidan, S.

    2002-01-01

    Entering the atmosphere of celestial bodies, spacecrafts encounter gases at velocities of several km/s, thereby being subjected to great heat loads. The thermal protection systems and the environment (plasma) have to be investigated by means of computational and ground facility based simulations. For more than a decade, plasma wind tunnels at IRS have been used for the investigation of TPS materials. Nevertheless, ground tests and computer simulations cannot re- place space flights completely. Particularly, entry mission phases encounter challenging problems, such as hypersonic aerothermodynamics. Concerning the TPS, radiation-cooled materials used for reuseable spacecrafts and ablator tech- nologies are of importance. Besides the mentioned technologies, there is the goal to manage guidance navigation, con- trol, landing technology and inflatable technologies such as ballutes that aim to keep vehicles in the atmosphere without landing. The requirement to save mass and energy for planned interplanetary missions such as Mars Society Balloon Mission, Mars Sample Return Mission, Mars Express or Venus Sample Return mission led to the need for manoeuvres like aerocapture, aero-breaking and hyperbolic entries. All three are characterized by very high kinetic vehicle energies to be dissipated by the manoeuvre. In this field flight data are rare. The importance of these manoeuvres and the need to increase the knowledge of required TPS designs and behavior during such mission phases point out the need of flight experiments. As result of the experience within the plasma diagnostic tool development and the plasma wind tunnel data base, flight experiments like the PYrometric RE-entry EXperiment PYREX were developed, fully qualified and successfully flown. Flight experiments such as the entry spectrometer RESPECT and PYREX on HOPE-X are in the conceptual phase. To increase knowledge in the scope of atmospheric manoeuvres and entries, data bases have to be created combining both

  18. Atlas F entry aerothermic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of obtaining heat transfer data on an expended Atlas F booster launch vehicle was investigated in the altitude range of 300,000 to 200,000 feet during entry conditions, with a velocity in the range of 20,000 to 25,000 feet per second, and through a range of vehicle attitudes of plus or minus 90 degrees. These data are desired for correlation with turbulent heat transfer and boundary layer transition data obtained from wind tunnel test facilities. The data would also be valuable in assessing rarified gas and surface catalicity effects in a real gas environment.

  19. Optimal firm growth under the threat of entry

    PubMed Central

    Kort, Peter M.; Wrzaczek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The paper studies the incumbent-entrant problem in a fully dynamic setting. We find that under an open-loop information structure the incumbent anticipates entry by overinvesting, whereas in the Markov perfect equilibrium the incumbent slightly underinvests in the period before the entry. The entry cost level where entry accommodation passes into entry deterrence is lower in the Markov perfect equilibrium. Further we find that the incumbent’s capital stock level needed to deter entry is hump shaped as a function of the entry time, whereas the corresponding entry cost, where the entrant is indifferent between entry and non-entry, is U-shaped. PMID:26435573

  20. Regulatory strategies and market entry

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, M.V.

    1988-01-01

    This paper discusses the intertwining influence of regulation, the pursuit of social goals, and market entry. The authors focus on the California natural gas distribution system, showing how the California Public Utilies Commission increasingly exercised its authority to set rates so as to meet social goals. Among these goals were lower fuel oil use, lower residential rates, and greater small power production. However, by calling on large users to pay substantially above their costs to subsidize these programs, the system was left open to cream-skimming entry. When a major new market for natural gas in the Kern County oil fields arose, several groups applied to the Federanl Energy Regulatory Commission to build an interstate gas pipeline - Califronia's first- dedicated to serving those customers. The proposals are being considered because of past pricing trends, because of the desire to avoid state regulatory oversight of their operations, and because they can be used to evade federal price regulations on natural gas. However, from a societal economic standpoint, all of the pipelines would be exceedingly expensive. The case demonstrates the unexpected and often the perverse consequences of pursuing social goals within a regulatory framework.

  1. Preventing re-entry to foster care.

    PubMed

    Carnochan, Sarah; Rizik-Baer, Daniel; Austin, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Re-entry to foster care generally refers to circumstances in which children who have been discharged from foster care to be reunified with their family of origin, adopted, or provided kinship guardianship are returned to foster care. In the context of the federal performance measurement system, re-entry refers specifically to a return to foster care following an unsuccessful reunification. The federal Children and Family Services Review measures re-entry to foster care with a single indicator, called the permanency of reunification indicator, one of four indicators comprising the reunification composite measure. This review focuses on research related to the re-entry indicator, including the characteristics of children, caregivers and families, as well as case and child welfare services that are associated with a higher or lower risk of re-entry to foster care. Promising post-reunification services designed to prevent re-entry to foster care are described. PMID:23705650

  2. Risk Assessment for Destructive Re-Entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lips, T.; Koppenwallner, G.; Bianchi, L.; Klinkrad, H.

    2009-03-01

    From 2007 to 2008, Hypersonic Technology Göttingen (HTG) worked on a study called Risk Assessment for Destructive Re-entry (RADR). The main purposes of this study were to identify and to quantify the inherent uncertainties of re-entry analysis tools, and to provide possible risk mitigation measures. For these purposes, three basic risk scenarios were specified: a 1-ton-class satellite without propulsion for uncontrolled re-entry, a 6-ton-class satellite with propulsion and the capability to perform a controlled re-entry, and a 1-ton-class launcher upper stage re-entering uncontrolled. Based on the identified uncertainty parameters, variation analyses were conducted for these scenarios with the two ESA tools for re-entry analysis SCARAB (Spacecraft Atmospheric Reentry and Aerothermal Breakup) and SESAM (Spacecraft Entry Survival Analysis Module). This paper describes the major results of the RADR study.

  3. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  4. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  5. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  6. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  7. 32 CFR 770.57 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Portsmouth, NH 03801, Attention: Security Manager (Code 1700). For groups, foreign citizens, and news media... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Entry Regulations for Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth,...

  8. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  9. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  10. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  11. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  12. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  13. Shuttle Entry Air Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. M., III

    1978-01-01

    The SEADS system (Shuttle Entry Air Data System) is being developed to provide research quality hypersonic (M greater than 3.5) air data. SEADS will accomplish this through the instrumentation of the orbiter's baseline nose cap. The SEADS development program consists of (1) the design and testing program required to define a reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) nose cap penetration concept which will not degrade nose cap performance, (2) the definition of analytical techniques and design criteria for array definition and flight data analysis, (3) the verification of these analytical techniques and array criteria through a comprehensive wind-tunnel test program, (4) the demonstration of the system concept through detailed testing, and (5) the analyses and tests required to flight-certify the SEADS system.

  14. 19 CFR 10.31 - Entry; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for sale or sale on approval. (b) The port director, if he is satisfied as to the importer's identity... entry as to identity and quantity and for the purpose of accepting the entry under the applicable..., HTSUS, motion-picture advertising films entered under subheading 9813.00.25, HTSUS, and...

  15. Specification of the Model 3 Entry Lexicon.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode, Mary

    The Model 3 communication skills lexicon consists of three lists of words developed by the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) for use in communication skills instruction in K-6. This report documents the procedures followed in compiling the entry lexicon, the first component of the Model 3 communication skills lexicon. The entry lexicon is…

  16. 47 CFR 90.713 - Entry criteria.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Entry criteria. 90.713 Section 90.713 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 220-222 MHz Band § 90.713 Entry criteria. (a) As set forth in...

  17. Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Entry Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, David A.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft will enter the Martian atmosphere directly from the interplanetary trajectory, at a relatively high velocity. The design of the nominal entry trajectory, and the accurate determination of potential trajectory dispersions, is necessary for the development of the Pathfinder Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) System.

  18. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27 National... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan...

  19. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27 National... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan...

  20. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27 National... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan...

  1. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27 National... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan...

  2. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27 National... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan...

  3. 19 CFR 147.11 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) TRADE FAIRS Procedure for Importation § 147.11 Entry. (a) Made in name of fair operator. All entries of articles for a fair shall be made at the port in the name of the fair operator which shall be deemed for... exhibition purposes under the Trade Fair Act of 1959. Mark Number Package and contents Quality Invoice...

  4. 19 CFR 147.11 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) TRADE FAIRS Procedure for Importation § 147.11 Entry. (a) Made in name of fair operator. All entries of articles for a fair shall be made at the port in the name of the fair operator which shall be deemed for... exhibition purposes under the Trade Fair Act of 1959. Mark Number Package and contents Quality Invoice...

  5. Space X First Entry Sample Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicological assessment of one sample collected on May 26, 2012 and returned to earth on May 31, 2012 was analyzed for pollutants that had offgassed into the Dragon capsule by the time of first entry operations performed by the ISS crew. The components identified in the first-entry sample and their contributions to the total T-value are shown.

  6. 19 CFR 163.3 - Entry records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry records. 163.3 Section 163.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.3 Entry records. Any person described in § 163.2(a) with reference to...

  7. 19 CFR 163.3 - Entry records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry records. 163.3 Section 163.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.3 Entry records. Any person described in § 163.2(a) with reference to...

  8. Orion Entry Display Feeder and Interactions with the Entry Monitor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Darren; Bernatovich, Mike; Gillespie, Ellen; Kadwa, Binaifer; Matthews, Dave; Penny, Wes; Zak, Tim; Grant, Mike; Bihari, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is designed to return astronauts to a landing within 10 km of the intended landing target from low Earth orbit, lunar direct-entry, and lunar skip-entry trajectories. Al pile the landing is nominally controlled autonomously, the crew can fly precision entries manually in the event of an anomaly. The onboard entry displays will be used by the crew to monitor and manually fly the entry, descent, and landing, while the Entry Monitor System (EMS) will be used to monitor the health and status of the onboard guidance and the trajectory. The entry displays are driven by the entry display feeder, part of the Entry Monitor System (EMS). The entry re-targeting module, also part of the EMS, provides all the data required to generate the capability footprint of the vehicle at any point in the trajectory, which is shown on the Primary Flight Display (PFD). It also provides caution and warning data and recommends the safest possible re-designated landing site when the nominal landing site is no longer within the capability of the vehicle. The PFD and the EMS allow the crew to manually fly an entry trajectory profile from entry interface until parachute deploy having the flexibility to manually steer the vehicle to a selected landing site that best satisfies the priorities of the crew. The entry display feeder provides data from the ENIS and other components of the GNC flight software to the displays at the proper rate and in the proper units. It also performs calculations that are specific to the entry displays and which are not made in any other component of the flight software. In some instances, it performs calculations identical to those performed by the onboard primary guidance algorithm to protect against a guidance system failure. These functions and the interactions between the entry display feeder and the other components of the EMS are described.

  9. 19 CFR 141.91 - Entry without required invoice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry without required invoice. 141.91 Section 141... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.91 Entry without required invoice. If a required invoice is not available in proper form at the time the entry or entry summary documentation...

  10. 19 CFR 141.54 - Separate entries for consolidated shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Separate entries for consolidated shipments. 141... Entry § 141.54 Separate entries for consolidated shipments. When separate entries for consolidated... ultimate consignees who desire to make separate entries shall deposit with the port director evidence...

  11. 19 CFR 143.35 - Procedure for electronic entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure for electronic entry summary. 143.35...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.35 Procedure for electronic entry summary. In order to obtain entry summary processing electronically, the...

  12. 19 CFR 143.35 - Procedure for electronic entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure for electronic entry summary. 143.35...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.35 Procedure for electronic entry summary. In order to obtain entry summary processing electronically, the...

  13. 19 CFR 143.35 - Procedure for electronic entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure for electronic entry summary. 143.35...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.35 Procedure for electronic entry summary. In order to obtain entry summary processing electronically, the...

  14. 19 CFR 143.35 - Procedure for electronic entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedure for electronic entry summary. 143.35...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.35 Procedure for electronic entry summary. In order to obtain entry summary processing electronically, the...

  15. 19 CFR 143.35 - Procedure for electronic entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Procedure for electronic entry summary. 143.35...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.35 Procedure for electronic entry summary. In order to obtain entry summary processing electronically, the...

  16. 19 CFR 142.11 - Entry summary form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry summary form. 142.11 Section 142.11 Customs... (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.11 Entry summary form. (a) Customs Form 7501. The entry summary shall be on Customs Form 7501 unless a different form is prescribed elsewhere in...

  17. 19 CFR 142.11 - Entry summary form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry summary form. 142.11 Section 142.11 Customs... (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Summary Documentation § 142.11 Entry summary form. (a) Customs Form 7501. The entry summary shall be on Customs Form 7501 unless a different form is prescribed elsewhere in...

  18. Abort-once-around entry corridor analysis program document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyle, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    The abort once around entry target corridor analysis program (ABECAP) was studied. The allowable range of flight path angles at entry interface for acceptable entry trajectories from a shuttle abort once around (AOA) situation was established. The solutions thus determined may be shown as corridor plots of entry interface flight path angle versus range from entry interface (EI) to the target.

  19. 19 CFR 142.3 - Entry documentation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry documentation required. 142.3 Section 142.3... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Documentation § 142.3 Entry documentation required. (a) Contents. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the entry documentation required to secure...

  20. Thermal Soak Analysis of Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Sepka, Steven A.; Aliaga, Jose F.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle project is developing an integrated tool called Multi Mission System Analysis for Planetary Entry Descent and Landing that will provide key technology solutions including mass sizing, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and thermal and structural analysis for any given sample return mission. Thermal soak analysis and temperature predictions of various components including the payload container of the entry vehicle are part of the solution that this tool will offer to mission designers. The present paper focuses on the thermal soak analysis of an entry vehicle design based on the Mars Sample Return entry vehicle geometry and discusses a technical approach to develop parametric models for thermal soak analysis that will be integrated into the tool.

  1. TIME - MAKING THE BEST OF IT! A Fieldwork Study Outlining Time in Endoscopy Facilities for Short-Term Stay

    PubMed Central

    Bundgaard, Karin; Sørensen, Erik E.; Delmar, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This paper focus on nursing and time in endoscopy facilities for short-term stay aiming to explore aspects of time in this setting and how expectations from the healthcare organisation, patients and nurses are expressed and met when managing nursing time. Background: Former research primarily focuses on the subject of time in the understanding of duration where having more time is closely associated with the ability to deliver better quality nursing care. The main concern is the nurses’ increased number of tasks and the decreased length of time at their disposal. However, few studies describe nursing when time is sparse, and the possibility of providing individualised nursing within a very short span of time. Design: Inspired by practical ethnographic principles, a fieldwork study was performed in high technology endoscopy clinics during 2008-2010. Methods: Data triangulation included participant observation, participant reports and patients and nurses semi-structured interviews. Results/Findings: The issue of time was an interwoven part of life in the productive endoscopy units. The understanding of time related to the main category: ‘Time - making the best of it’, and the sub categories “Responsibility of time”, “Information and preparation”, and “Time wasters”. Conclusion: The study underlines the possibility of combining the health care systems, patients and the nurses’ perspectives on and expectations of how to spend nursing time in endoscopy settings. In successful patient pathways nursing maximize patient outcome, support the goals of the healthcare organisations, is reliable, assure, tangible, empathic and responsive, and is individually tailored to the patient’s needs. The study contributes by underlining the importance of discussing not how to get more time in clinical practice but instead how to spend the time in the best way possible. PMID:27347251

  2. Mapping erosion-sensitive areas after wildfires using fieldwork, remote sensing, and geographic information systems techniques on a regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PéRez-Cabello, F.; de La Riva FernáNdez, J.; Montorio LloveríA, R.; GarcíA-MartíN, A.

    2006-12-01

    Alterations in the hydrological cycle following wildfire due to the loss of ground cover vegetation and changes in soil properties have been documented in many studies. Nevertheless, the rapid process of vegetation recovery reduces such negative effects. Vegetation cover before fire, fire severity, and geophysical properties are important factors that control spatial discontinuities involved in the vegetation-covering process. The objective of this study was to estimate the probability of high erosion in order to map erosion-sensitive areas after fire. The analysis was carried out in different plant communities burnt by summer wildfires in the pre-Pyrenean area (Spain). Three-year Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images have been used for mapping wildfire areas and severity levels. Conversion to spectral reflectance has been applied for radiometric correction by normalizing topographic and atmospheric effects. Likewise, other physical variables have also been incorporated into the geographic information system (GIS): vegetation types, parent material, illumination, slope, aspect, and precipitation. The dependent variable has been characterized by means of fieldwork and a photointerpretation process based on high-resolution digital aerial orthophotographs taken 11-12 years after the fire. Different logistic regression models have been used for mapping the probability of erosion. Results indicate that prefire normalized difference vegetation index values and aspect are the most important variables for estimating erosion-sensitive areas after fire (Nagelkerke r2 = 0.66; Kappa values = 0.65). Finally, the use of nonparametric models with environmental digital information based on GIS can facilitate the management of burnt areas.

  3. LABORATORY VOICE DATA ENTRY SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    PRAISSMAN,J.L.SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2003-04-01

    We have assembled a system using a personal computer workstation equipped with standard office software, an audio system, speech recognition software and an inexpensive radio-based wireless microphone that permits laboratory workers to enter or modify data while performing other work. Speech recognition permits users to enter data while their hands are holding equipment or they are otherwise unable to operate a keyboard. The wireless microphone allows unencumbered movement around the laboratory without a ''tether'' that might interfere with equipment or experimental procedures. To evaluate the potential of voice data entry in a laboratory environment, we developed a prototype relational database that records the disposal of radionuclides and/or hazardous chemicals Current regulations in our laboratory require that each such item being discarded must be inventoried and documents must be prepared that summarize the contents of each container used for disposal. Using voice commands, the user enters items into the database as each is discarded. Subsequently, the program prepares the required documentation.

  4. Computerized provider order entry systems.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems are designed to replace a hospital's paper-based ordering system. They allow users to electronically write the full range of orders, maintain an online medication administration record, and review changes made to an order by successive personnel. They also offer safety alerts that are triggered when an unsafe order (such as for a duplicate drug therapy) is entered, as well as clinical decision support to guide caregivers to less expensive alternatives or to choices that better fit established hospital protocols. CPOE systems can, when correctly configured, markedly increase efficiency and improve patient safety and patient care. However, facilities need to recognize that currently available CPOE systems require a tremendous amount of time and effort to be spent in customization before their safety and clinical support features can be effectively implemented. What's more, even after they've been customized, the systems may still allow certain unsafe orders to be entered. Thus, CPOE systems are not currently a quick or easy remedy for medical errors. ECRI's Evaluation of CPOE systems--conducted in collaboration with the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP)--discusses these and other related issues. It also examines and compares CPOE systems from three suppliers: Eclipsys Corp., IDX Systems Corp., and Siemens Medical Solutions Health Services Corp. Our testing focuses primarily on the systems' interfacing capabilities, patient safeguards, and ease of use. PMID:11696968

  5. Retrovirus Entry by Endocytosis and Cathepsin Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Yoshinao; Hayashi, Hideki; Matsuyama, Toshifumi; Sato, Hironori; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Retroviruses include infectious agents inducing severe diseases in humans and animals. In addition, retroviruses are widely used as tools to transfer genes of interest to target cells. Understanding the entry mechanism of retroviruses contributes to developments of novel therapeutic approaches against retrovirus-induced diseases and efficient exploitation of retroviral vectors. Entry of enveloped viruses into host cell cytoplasm is achieved by fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes at either the cell surface or intracellular vesicles. Many animal retroviruses enter host cells through endosomes and require endosome acidification. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus entry requires cathepsin proteases activated by the endosome acidification. CD4-dependent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is thought to occur via endosomes, but endosome acidification is not necessary for the entry whereas entry of CD4-independent HIVs, which are thought to be prototypes of CD4-dependent viruses, is low pH dependent. There are several controversial results on the retroviral entry pathways. Because endocytosis and endosome acidification are complicatedly controlled by cellular mechanisms, the retrovirus entry pathways may be different in different cell lines. PMID:23304142

  6. Modeling late entry bias in survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Masaaki; Eguchi, Shinto

    2005-06-01

    In a failure time analysis, we sometimes observe additional study subjects who enter during the study period. These late entries are treated as left-truncated data in the statistical literature. However, with real data, there is a substantial possibility that the delayed entries may have extremely different hazards compared to the other standard subjects. We focus on a situation in which such entry bias might arise in the analysis of survival data. The purpose of the present article is to develop an appropriate methodology for making inference about data including late entries. We construct a model that includes parameters for the effect of delayed entry bias having no specification for the distribution of entry time. We also discuss likelihood inference based on this model and derive the asymptotic behavior of estimates. A simulation study is conducted for a finite sample size in order to compare the analysis results using our method with those using the standard method, where independence between entry time and failure time is assumed. We apply this method to mortality analysis among atomic bomb survivors defined in a geographical study region. PMID:16011705

  7. Entry Guidance for the Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1999-01-01

    The X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator is a half-scale prototype developed to test the key technologies needed for a full-scale single-stage reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The X-33 is a suborbital vehicle that will be launched vertically, and land horizontally. The goals of this research were to develop an alternate entry guidance scheme for the X-33 in parallel to the actual X-33 entry guidance algorithms, provide comparative and complementary study, and identify potential new ways to improve entry guidance performance. Toward these goals, the nominal entry trajectory is defined by a piecewise linear drag-acceleration-versus-energy profile, which is in turn obtained by the solution of a semi-analytical parameter optimization problem. The closed-loop guidance is accomplished by tracking the nominal drag profile with primarily bank-angle modulation on-board. The bank-angle is commanded by a single full-envelope nonlinear trajectory control law. Near the end of the entry flight, the guidance logic is switched to heading control in order to meet strict conditions at the terminal area energy management interface. Two methods, one on ground-track control and the other on heading control, were proposed and examined for this phase of entry guidance where lateral control is emphasized. Trajectory dispersion studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the entry guidance algorithms against a number of uncertainties including those in propulsion system, atmospheric properties, winds, aerodynamics, and propellant loading. Finally, a new trajectory-regulation method is introduced at the end as a promising precision entry guidance method. The guidance principle is very different and preliminary application in X-33 entry guidance simulation showed high precision that is difficult to achieve by existing methods.

  8. Archaeoastronomical Fieldwork in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawaski, Mike J.; Malville, J.

    2006-09-01

    During June-July 2005, sets of 14 horizon photographs were obtained at 10 major monumental sites of the Inca as identified in Hemming and Ranney (1982) . The photographs were combined to yield complete 360o panoramas at each of the sites. To calibrate the panoramas a Wild T-2 theodolite was used to obtain 5 pairs of altitude/azimuth measurements of the Sun at each site. The standard deviation of multiple determinations of true north was typically 0.25'to 0.5'. As a check on the sun sights, a line-of-sight azimuth was also established with GPS measurements at each site. Agreement between these baselines and the sun sights are satisfactory. We find evidence of June solstice and/or Pleiades orientations at Llactapata, Sayhuite, and Ollantaytambo; cardinal orientation at Vilcashuman; June solstice established by horizon towers above Urubamba; and both zenith and anti-zenith solar alignments at the tower of Muyuc Marca of Sacsayhuman. Terracing, walls, and water features at Ollantaytambo suggest interest in both June and December solstices. The statistical significance of these orientations is evaluated. A permit was issued by the office of the Institute Cultura National in Cusco for field work at all of these sites. This work was undertook as partial fulfillment of the requirement for a MA degree in Earth Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado. Funding was provided by Sigma Xi and The University of Northern Colorado. Hemming, J. and E. Ranney. 1982. Monuments of the Inca, Boston: Little, Brown

  9. Physical security workshop summary: entry control

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, M.J.

    1982-01-01

    Entry control hardware has been used extensively in the past to assist security forces in separating the authorized from the unauthorized at the plant perimeter. As more attention is being focused on the insider threat, these entry control elements are being used to extend the security inspectors' presence into the plant by compartmentalizing access and monitoring vital components. This paper summarizes the experiences expressed by the participants at the March 16 to 19, 1982 INMM Physical Protection Workshop in utilizing access control and contraband detection hardware for plant wide entry control applications.

  10. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmospheres for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions.

  11. Advances in spacecraft atmospheric entry guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito Manrique, Joel

    In order to advance entry guidance technology two different research areas have been explored with the objective of increasing the reachable landing area and the landing accuracy for future Mars missions. Currently only the northern hemisphere of Mars is available for landing due to its low elevation. Only low elevation landing sites have the necessary atmospheric density to allow landing using current Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology. In order to reach most of the Ancient Highlands, the majority of the southern hemisphere, advanced EDL technology is needed in multiple fields, including entry guidance. The first research area is the definition and applications of reachable and controllable sets for entry. The definition of the reachable and controllable sets provides a framework for the study of the capabilities of an entry vehicle in a given planet. Reachable and controllable sets can be used to comprehensively characterize the envelope of trajectories that a vehicle can fly, the sites it can reach and the entry states that can be accommodated. The sets can also be used for the evaluation of trajectory planning algorithms and to assist in the selection of the entry or landing sites. In essence, the reachable and controllable sets offer a powerful vehicle and trajectory analysis and design framework that allows for better mission design choices. In order to illustrate the use of the sets, they are computed for a representative Mars mission using two different vehicle configurations. The sets characterize the impact of the vehicle configuration on the entry capability. Furthermore, the sets are used to find the best skip-entry trajectory for a return from the Moon mission, highlighting the utility of the sets in atmospheric maneuvers other than entry. The second research area is the development of the components of an entry guidance algorithm that allow high elevation landing and provide as well high landing accuracy. The approach taken follows the

  12. Texting while driving: is speech-based text entry less risky than handheld text entry?

    PubMed

    He, J; Chaparro, A; Nguyen, B; Burge, R J; Crandall, J; Chaparro, B; Ni, R; Cao, S

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that using a cell phone to talk or text while maneuvering a vehicle impairs driving performance. However, few published studies directly compare the distracting effects of texting using a hands-free (i.e., speech-based interface) versus handheld cell phone, which is an important issue for legislation, automotive interface design and driving safety training. This study compared the effect of speech-based versus handheld text entries on simulated driving performance by asking participants to perform a car following task while controlling the duration of a secondary text-entry task. Results showed that both speech-based and handheld text entries impaired driving performance relative to the drive-only condition by causing more variation in speed and lane position. Handheld text entry also increased the brake response time and increased variation in headway distance. Text entry using a speech-based cell phone was less detrimental to driving performance than handheld text entry. Nevertheless, the speech-based text entry task still significantly impaired driving compared to the drive-only condition. These results suggest that speech-based text entry disrupts driving, but reduces the level of performance interference compared to text entry with a handheld device. In addition, the difference in the distraction effect caused by speech-based and handheld text entry is not simply due to the difference in task duration. PMID:25089769

  13. Aerocapture Inflatable Decelerator for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reza, Sajjad; Hund, Richard; Kustas, Frank; Willcockson, William; Songer, Jarvis; Brown, Glen

    2007-01-01

    Forward Attached Inflatable Decelerators, more commonly known as inflatable aeroshells, provide an effective, cost efficient means of decelerating spacecrafts by using atmospheric drag for aerocapture or planetary entry instead of conventional liquid propulsion deceleration systems. Entry into planetary atmospheres results in significant heating and aerodynamic pressures which stress aeroshell systems to their useful limits. Incorporation of lightweight inflatable decelerator surfaces with increased surface-area footprints provides the opportunity to reduce heat flux and induced temperatures, while increasing the payload mass fraction. Furthermore, inflatable aeroshell decelerators provide the needed deceleration at considerably higher altitudes and Mach numbers when compared with conventional rigid aeroshell entry systems. Inflatable aeroshells also provide for stowage in a compact space, with subsequent deployment of a large-area, lightweight heatshield to survive entry heating. Use of a deployable heatshield decelerator enables an increase in the spacecraft payload mass fraction and may eliminate the need for a spacecraft backshell.

  14. Generic aerocapture atmospheric entry study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An atmospheric entry study to fine a generic aerocapture vehicle capable of missions to Mars, Saturn, and Uranus is reported. A single external geometry was developed through atmospheric entry simulations. Aerocapture is a system design concept which uses an aerodynamically controlled atmospheric entry to provide the necessary velocity depletion to capture payloads into planetary orbit. Design concepts are presented which provide the control accuracy required while giving thermal protection for the mission payload. The system design concepts consist of the following elements: (1) an extendable biconic aerodynamic configuration with lift to drag ratio between 1.0 and 2.0; (2) roll control system concepts to control aerodynamic lift and disturbance torques; (3) aeroshell design concepts capable of meeting dynamic pressure loads during aerocapture; and (4) entry thermal protection system design concepts to meet thermodynamic loads during aerocapture.

  15. Multiscale perspectives of virus entry via endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Most viruses take advantage of endocytic pathways to gain entry into host cells and initiate infections. Understanding of virus entry via endocytosis is critically important for the design of antiviral strategies. Virus entry via endocytosis is a complex process involving hundreds of cellular proteins. The entire process is dictated by events occurring at multiple time and length scales. In this review, we discuss and evaluate the available means to investigate virus endocytic entry, from both experimental and theoretical/numerical modeling fronts, and highlight the importance of multiscale features. The complexity of the process requires investigations at a systems biology level, which involves the combination of different experimental approaches, the collaboration of experimentalists and theorists across different disciplines, and the development of novel multiscale models. PMID:23734580

  16. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed. PMID:27161240

  17. Submerged Entry Nozzles that Resist Clogging

    SciTech Connect

    2001-04-01

    Development Of Submerged Entry Nozzles (SENs) Can Incrase Yields, Improve Product Quality, And Increase Productivity In Continuous Casting Of Steel, A Process Used For The Production Of 95% Of Steel In The U.S.

  18. Entry, Descent, and Landing Operations Analysis for the Genesis Re-Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Lyons, Dan T.

    2005-01-01

    On September 8, 2004, the Genesis spacecraft returned to Earth after spending 29 months about the sun-Earth libration point collecting solar wind particles. Four hours prior to Earth arrival, the entry capsule containing the samples was released for entry and subsequent landing at the Utah Test and Training Range. This paper provides an overview of the entry, descent, and landing trajectory analysis that was performed during the Mission Operations Phase leading up to final approach to Earth. The operations effort accurately delivered the entry capsule to the desired landing site. The final landing location was 8.3 km from the target, and was well within the allowable landing area. Preliminary reconstruction analyses indicate that the actual entry trajectory was very close to the pre-entry prediction.

  19. Detection and characterization of usability problems in structured data entry interfaces in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Walji, Muhammad F; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Tran, Duong; Kookal, Krishna K; Nguyen, Vickie; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; White, Joel M; Vaderhobli, Ram; Ramoni, Rachel; Stark, Paul C; Kimmes, Nicole S.; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta E.; Patel, Vimla L

    2012-01-01

    Background Poor usability is one of the major barriers for optimally using electronic health records (EHRs). Dentists are increasingly adopting EHRs, and are using structured data entry interfaces to enter data such that the data can be easily retrieved and exchanged. Until recently, dentists have lacked a standardized terminology to consistently represent oral health diagnoses. Objectives In this study we evaluated the usability of a widely used EHR interface that allow the entry of diagnostic terms, using multi-faceted methods to identify problems and work with the vendor to correct them using an iterative design method. Methods Fieldwork was undertaken at two clinical sites, and dental students as subjects participated in user testing (n=32), interviews (n=36) and observations (n=24). Results User testing revealed that only 22–41% of users were able to successfully complete a simple task of entering one diagnosis, while no user was able to complete a more complex task. We identified and characterized 24 high-level usability problems reducing efficiency and causing user errors. Interface-related problems included unexpected approaches for displaying diagnosis, lack of visibility, and inconsistent use of UI widgets. Terminology related issues included missing and mis-categorized concepts. Work domain issues involved both absent and superfluous functions. In collaboration with the vendor, each usability problem was prioritized and a timeline set to resolve the concerns. Discussion Mixed methods evaluations identified a number of critical usability issues relating to the user interface, underlying terminology of the work domain. The usability challenges were found to prevent most users from successfully completing the tasks. Our further work we will determine if changes to the interface, terminology and work domain do result in improved usability. PMID:22749840

  20. The Unintended Consequences of Computerized Provider Order Entry: Findings From a Mixed Methods Exploration*

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.; Dykstra, Richard; Campbell, Emily; Guappone, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the foci, activities, methods, and results of a four-year research project identifying the unintended consequences of computerized provider order entry (CPOE). Methods Using a mixed methods approach, we identified and categorized into nine types 380 examples of the unintended consequences of CPOE gleaned from fieldwork data and a conference of experts. We then conducted a national survey in the U.S.A. to discover how hospitals with varying levels of infusion, a measure of CPOE sophistication, recognize and deal with unintended consequences. The research team, with assistance from experts, identified strategies for managing the nine types of unintended adverse consequences and developed and disseminated tools for CPOE implementers to help in addressing these consequences. Results Hospitals reported that levels of infusion are quite high and that these types of unintended consequences are common. Strategies for avoiding or managing the unintended consequences are similar to best practices for CPOE success published in the literature. Conclusion Development of a taxonomy of types of unintended adverse consequences of CPOE using qualitative methods allowed us to craft a national survey and discover how widespread these consequences are. Using mixed methods, we were able to structure an approach for addressing the skillful management of unintended consequences as well. PMID:18786852

  1. Transmission strategies for atmospheric entry probes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butman, S.

    1972-01-01

    In this article we shall be concerned with the question of how to maximize the expected data return when the channel capacity cannot be predicted in advance. An example of this type is a planetary entry probe to Venus or Jupiter, whose atmospheric transmission characteristics are not yet fully known. And even if they were known, these transmission characteristics would be subject to unpredictable changes due to planet weather and/or entry trajectory.

  2. Entry/Exit Port testing, test report

    SciTech Connect

    Winkelman, R.H.

    1993-05-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module I (WRAP-1) facility must have the ability to allow 55-gallon drums to enter and exit glovebox enclosures. An Entry/Exit Port (Appendix 1, Figure 1), designed by United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C), is one method chosen for drum transfer. The Entry/Exit Port is to be used for entry of 55-gallon drums into both process entry gloveboxes, exit of 55-gallon drum waste pucks from the low-level waste (LLW) glovebox, and loadout of waste from the restricted waste management glovebox. The Entry/Exit Port relies on capture velocity air flow and a neoprene seal to provide alpha confinement when the Port is in the open and closed positions, respectively. Since the glovebox is in a slight vacuum, air flow is directed into the glovebox through the space between the overpack drum and glovebox floor. The air flow is to direct any airborne contamination into the glovebox. A neoprene seal is used to seal the Port door to the glovebox floor, thus maintaining confinement in the closed position. Entry/Exit Port testing took place February 17, 1993, through April 14, 1993, in the 305 building of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Testing was performed in accordance with the Entry/Exit Port Testing Test Plan, document number WHC-SD-WO26-TP-005. A prototype Entry/Exit Port built at the Hanford Site was tested using fluorescent paint pigment and smoke candles as simulant contaminants. This test report is an interim test report. Further developmental testing is required to test modifications made to the Port as the original design of the Port did not provide complete confinement during all stages of operation.

  3. Trace metals adhered to urban sediments. Results from fieldwork in Poços de Caldas, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidoro, Jorge; Silveira, Alexandre; Júnior, José; Poleto, Cristiano; de Lima, João; Gonçalves, Flávio; Alvarenga, Lívia

    2016-04-01

    The urbanization process has consequences such as the introduction of new sources of pollution and changes in the natural environment, like increase of impervious areas that accumulate pollutants between rainfall events. The pollution caused by the washing of accumulated sediment on the gutters, ultimately carried to water bodies through the stormwater drainage system, stands out in this process. This study aimed to quantify and characterize the sediments accumulated in the gutters of roads in an urban area of Poços de Caldas (MG), Brazil. Fieldwork took place during the period of 21.05.2013 to 27.08.2013. Main goal was to investigate the process of accumulation of dry sediments on impervious surfaces and find how this process relates with the urban occupation. More specific goals were to quantify the average mass and characterize the granulometric distribution of accumulated sediments, and identify the occurrence of trace metals Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Cu and Pb in the fraction of sediments with diameter smaller or equal to 63μm. The samples were weighed to find the aggregate mass and then sieved through meshes of 63μm, 125μm, 250μm, 600μm, 1180μm, and 2000μm for the granulometric analysis. Samples of the sediment fraction smaller than 63μm of diameter were subjected to analysis by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) for the identification of trace metals. We found that the aggregate mass of accumulated sediments varies in time and space and is particularly influenced by the land use of the sampling areas. Areas under construction produced more sediments than built areas or areas without construction. This study may serve as an input for creating diffuse pollution control and mitigation strategies towards the reduction of accumulated pollutants in the urban environment of Poços de Caldas. Pb and Zn shown the highest concentrations. The heavy metal concentration decreases after wet

  4. Models of radon entry: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Gadgil, A.J.

    1991-08-01

    This paper reviews existing models of radon entry into houses. The primary mechanism of radon entry in houses with high indoor concentrations is, in most cases, convective entry of radon bearing soil-gas from the surrounding soil. The driving force for this convective entry is the small indoor-outdoor pressure difference arising from the stack effect and other causes. Entry points for the soil-gas generally are the cracks or gaps in the building substructure, or though other parts of the building shell in direct contact with the soil, although entry may also occur by flow though permeable concrete or cinder block walls of the substructure. Models using analytical solutions to idealized geometrical configurations with simplified boundary conditions obtain analytical tractability of equations to be solved at the cost of severe approximations; their strength is in the insights they offer with their solutions. Models based on lumped parameters attempt to characterize the significant physical behavioral characteristics of the soil-gas and radon flow. When realistic approximations are desired for the boundary conditions and terms in the governing equations, numerical models must be used; these are usually based on finite difference or finite element solutions to the governing equations. Limited data are now available for experimental verification of model predictions. The models are briefly reviewed and their strengths and limitations are discussed.

  5. Orion Capsule Handling Qualities for Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigges, Michael A.; Bihari, Brian D.; Stephens, John-Paul; Vos, Gordon A.; Bilimoria, Karl D.; Mueller, Eric R.; Law, Howard G.; Johnson, Wyatt; Bailey, Randall E.; Jackson, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Two piloted simulations were conducted at NASA's Johnson Space Center using the Cooper-Harper scale to study the handling qualities of the Orion Command Module capsule during atmospheric entry flight. The simulations were conducted using high fidelity 6-DOF simulators for Lunar Return Skip Entry and International Space Station Return Direct Entry flight using bank angle steering commands generated by either the Primary (PredGuid) or Backup (PLM) guidance algorithms. For both evaluations, manual control of bank angle began after descending through Entry Interface into the atmosphere until drogue chutes deployment. Pilots were able to use defined bank management and reversal criteria to accurately track the bank angle commands, and stay within flight performance metrics of landing accuracy, g-loads, and propellant consumption, suggesting that the pilotability of Orion under manual control is both achievable and provides adequate trajectory performance with acceptable levels of pilot effort. Another significant result of these analyses is the applicability of flying a complex entry task under high speed entry flight conditions relevant to the next generation Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle return from Mars and Near Earth Objects.

  6. Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pernet, Olivier; Pohl, Christine; Ainouze, Michelle; Kweder, Hasan; Buckland, Robin

    2009-12-20

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic biosafety level 4 paramyxovirus that emerged recently in Asia with high mortality in man. NiV is a member, with Hendra virus (HeV), of the Henipavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family. Although NiV entry, like that of other paramyxoviruses, is believed to occur via pH-independent fusion with the host cell's plasma membrane we present evidence that entry can occur by an endocytic pathway. The NiV receptor ephrinB2 has receptor kinase activity and we find that ephrinB2's cytoplasmic domain is required for entry but is dispensable for post-entry viral spread. The mutation of a single tyrosine residue (Y304F) in ephrinB2's cytoplasmic tail abrogates NiV entry. Moreover, our results show that NiV entry is inhibited by constructions and drugs specific for the endocytic pathway of macropinocytosis. Our findings could potentially permit the rapid development of novel low-cost antiviral treatments not only for NiV but also HeV.

  7. Planetary/DOD entry technology flight experiments. Volume 2: Planetary entry flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, H. E.; Krieger, R. J.; Mcneilly, W. R.; Vetter, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The technical feasibility of launching a high speed, earth entry vehicle from the space shuttle to advance technology for the exploration of the outer planets' atmospheres was established. Disciplines of thermodynamics, orbital mechanics, aerodynamics propulsion, structures, design, electronics and system integration focused on the goal of producing outer planet environments on a probe shaped vehicle during an earth entry. Major aspects of analysis and vehicle design studied include: planetary environments, earth entry environment capability, mission maneuvers, capabilities of shuttle upper stages, a comparison of earth entry planetary environments, experiment design and vehicle design.

  8. 19 CFR 141.53 - Procedure for separate entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure for separate entries. 141.53 Section 141....53 Procedure for separate entries. When separate entries for one consignment are made in accordance... simultaneously when practicable. (b) A separate consignee's declaration shall be filed for each entry. (c)...

  9. 19 CFR 141.52 - Separate entries for different portions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Separate entries for different portions. 141.52... Entry § 141.52 Separate entries for different portions. If the port director is satisfied that there... conduct of Customs business, separate entries may be made for different portions of all...

  10. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  11. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  12. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  13. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  14. 50 CFR 660.334 - Limited entry permits-endorsements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Groundfish Fisheries § 660.334 Limited entry permits-endorsements. (a) “A” endorsement. A limited entry permit with an “A” endorsement entitles the holder to participate in the limited entry fishery for all groundfish species with the type(s) of limited entry gear specified in the endorsement, except for...

  15. 19 CFR 143.21 - Merchandise eligible for informal entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Merchandise eligible for informal entry. 143.21 Section 143.21 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Informal Entry § 143.21 Merchandise eligible for informal entry. The following types...

  16. 19 CFR 143.21 - Merchandise eligible for informal entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Merchandise eligible for informal entry. 143.21 Section 143.21 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Informal Entry § 143.21 Merchandise eligible for informal entry. The following types...

  17. 19 CFR 143.21 - Merchandise eligible for informal entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Merchandise eligible for informal entry. 143.21 Section 143.21 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Informal Entry § 143.21 Merchandise eligible for informal entry. The following types...

  18. 19 CFR 142.3 - Entry documentation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry documentation required. 142.3 Section 142.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Documentation § 142.3 Entry documentation required. (a) Contents. Except as provided in paragraph (b)...

  19. 19 CFR 143.11 - Merchandise eligible for appraisement entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Merchandise eligible for appraisement entry. 143.11 Section 143.11 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Appraisement Entry § 143.11 Merchandise eligible for appraisement entry. (a)...

  20. 19 CFR 142.44 - Entry number range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry number range. 142.44 Section 142.44 Customs... (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.44 Entry number range. After an application for Line Release has received final approval, filers must provide the port director, in writing, with a range of entry...

  1. 19 CFR 142.44 - Entry number range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Entry number range. 142.44 Section 142.44 Customs... (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.44 Entry number range. After an application for Line Release has received final approval, filers must provide the port director, in writing, with a range of entry...

  2. Utilizing mobile technology in GIS education: A case study of using iPad and iBooks in fieldwork and location based exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yi-Ting

    The advancement of mobile computing technology has provided diverse way for education. Combination of mobile devices and GIS tools has become a trend in many geospatial technology applications (i.e., Google Maps application on smartphones). This research aims to develop an iBook prototype (a GIS textbook) for GIS education on Apple iPads and to evaluate the effectiveness of adopting the GIS iBook in classes and fieldwork exercises. We conducted the evaluation tests in two GIS courses (GEOG104 and GEOG381) in Fall 2014 at San Diego State University. There are two main research questions in this study: (1) How to assess and evaluate the effectiveness of location-based learning exercises (from iBook) and fieldwork exercises for first-time GIS students? (2) What were major technical challenges and opportunities to utilize mobile device and mobile technology in GIS education? The procedures of developing and evaluating the prototype of the GIS iBook include creating two new chapters (chapter three: Wander the World through Remote Sensing Data and chapter four: Internet and Mobile GIS), interviewing five educators from high schools and community colleges, and improving the contents of the GIS iBook after the interview. There were 31 students who tested the GIS iBook and did a fieldwork exercise with iPads. The 31 students were required to finish five questionnaires after the exercise to express their user experiences and thoughts about the GIS iBook. Based on the result of questionnaires, most students preferred to take GIS classes with the free GIS iBook and thought fieldwork exercise can help their learning. The students also performed better in knowledge oriented survey after reading the GIS iBook. This research also adopts the SWOT analysis method to evaluate the prototype of the GIS iBook. The result of the SWOT analysis indicates that utilizing mobile device in GIS education does have a great potential value in enhancing student's understanding. The strengths of

  3. 19 CFR 10.112 - Filing free entry documents or reduced duty documents after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Filing free entry documents or reduced duty documents after entry. 10.112 Section 10.112 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A...

  4. 19 CFR 10.112 - Filing free entry documents or reduced duty documents after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Filing free entry documents or reduced duty documents after entry. 10.112 Section 10.112 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A...

  5. 19 CFR 10.112 - Filing free entry documents or reduced duty documents after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Filing free entry documents or reduced duty documents after entry. 10.112 Section 10.112 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A...

  6. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Venus Missions: 45 Sphere-Cone Rigid Aeroshells and Ballistic Entries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Hwang, Helen H.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Moses, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study considers direct ballistic entries into the atmosphere of Venus using a 45deg sphere-cone rigid aeroshell, a legacy shape that has been used successfully in the past in the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe Mission. For a number of entry mass and heatshield diameter combinations (i.e., various ballistic coefficients) and entry velocities, the trajectory space in terms of entry flight path angles between skip out and -30deg is explored with a 3DoF trajectory code, TRAJ. From these trajectories, the viable entry flight path angle space is determined through the use of mechanical and thermal performance limits on the thermal protection material and science payload; the thermal protection material of choice is entry-grade carbon phenolic, for which a material thermal response model is available. For mechanical performance, a 200 g limit is placed on the peak deceleration load experienced by the science instruments, and 10 bar is assumed as the pressure limit for entry-grade carbon-phenolic material. For thermal performance, inflection points in the total heat load distribution are used as cut off criteria. Analysis of the results shows the existence of a range of critical ballistic coefficients beyond which the steepest possible entries are determined by the pressure limit of the material rather than the deceleration load limit.

  7. 19 CFR 18.11 - Entry; classes of goods for which entry is authorized; form used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reloading of the stock may be done under Customs supervision. (e) Entries for immediate transportation... without appraisement covering textiles and textile products subject to section 204, Agricultural Act of... approximate correctness of the value and quantity stated in the entry (e.g. Detailed quantity description,...

  8. 19 CFR 18.11 - Entry; classes of goods for which entry is authorized; form used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... reloading of the stock may be done under Customs supervision. (e) Entries for immediate transportation... without appraisement covering textiles and textile products subject to section 204, Agricultural Act of... approximate correctness of the value and quantity stated in the entry (e.g. Detailed quantity description,...

  9. 75 FR 82241 - Technical Correction: Completion of Entry and Entry Summary-Declaration of Value

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 49939) implementing the Act's first sale declaration requirement that for a... Correction: Completion of Entry and Entry Summary-- Declaration of Value AGENCY: Customs and Border... indicate on the CBP Form 7501 the manner by which the declared transaction value on imported...

  10. 76 FR 82315 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Entry/Immediate Delivery Application and Simplified Entry

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... collection was previously published in the Federal Register (76 FR 66740) on October 27, 2011, allowing for a... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency Information Collection Activities: Entry/Immediate Delivery Application and Simplified Entry AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department...

  11. 76 FR 8294 - Technical Correction: Completion of Entry and Entry Summary-Declaration of Value; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY U. S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 141 RIN 1515-AD61 (Formerly 1505-AB96) Technical Correction: Completion of Entry and Entry Summary-- Declaration of Value; Correction AGENCY: Customs...

  12. Hybrid Entry Ship: A Conceptual Entry-Descent and Surveillance Platform for Venus Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mr.; Saroha, Mr.; Priyadarshi, Mr.; Limaye, Mr.

    2015-04-01

    A hybrid entry ship concept which will enter from low Venus orbit. It will undergo series of changes in its configuration to meet an optimal entry-descent and surveillance sequence. It houses payloads upto 300 kg. Available power to payload is 250W.

  13. 76 FR 66875 - Informal Entry Limit and Removal of a Formal Entry Requirement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... quotas under the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing, CBP no longer needs to require formal entries for... for these articles due to the elimination of absolute quotas and visa requirements for textile..., which requires the use of a formal entry and visa or export license for certain shipments of textile...

  14. Entry control system for large populations

    SciTech Connect

    Merillat, P.D.

    1982-01-01

    An Entry Control System has been developed which is appropriate for use at an installation with a large population requiring access over a large area. This is accomplished by centralizing the data base management and enrollment functions and decentralizing the guard-assisted, positive personnel identification and access functions. Current information pertaining to all enrollees is maintained through user-friendly enrollment stations. These stations may be used to enroll individuals, alter their area access authorizations, change expiration dates, and other similar functions. An audit trail of data base alterations is provided to the System Manager. Decentrailized systems exist at each area to which access is controlled. The central system provides these systems with the necessary entry control information to allow them to operate microprocessor-driven entry control devices. The system is comprised of commercially available entry control components and is structured such that it will be able to incorporate improved devices as technology porogresses. Currently, access is granted to individuals who possess a valid credential, have current access authorization, can supply a memorized personal identification number, and whose physical hand dimensions match their profile obtained during enrollment. The entry control devices report misuses as security violations to a Guard Alarm Display and Assessment System.

  15. Thermal Analysis Methods For Earth Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amundsen, Ruth M.; Dec, John A.; Lindell, Michael C.

    2000-01-01

    Thermal analysis of a vehicle designed to return samples from another planet, such as the Earth Entry vehicle for the Mars Sample Return mission, presents several unique challenges. The Earth Entry Vehicle (EEV) must contain Martian material samples after they have been collected and protect them from the high heating rates of entry into the Earth's atmosphere. This requirement necessitates inclusion of detailed thermal analysis early in the design of the vehicle. This paper will describe the challenges and solutions for a preliminary thermal analysis of an Earth Entry Vehicle. The aeroheating on the vehicle during entry would be the main driver for the thermal behavior, and is a complex function of time, spatial position on the vehicle, vehicle temperature, and trajectory parameters. Thus, the thermal analysis must be closely tied to the aeroheating analysis in order to make accurate predictions. Also, the thermal analysis must account for the material response of the ablative thermal protection system (TPS). For the exo-atmospheric portion of the mission, the thermal analysis must include the orbital radiation fluxes on the surfaces. The thermal behavior must also be used to predict the structural response of the vehicle (the thermal stress and strains) and whether they remain within the capability of the materials. Thus, the thermal analysis requires ties to the three-dimensional geometry, the aeroheating analysis, the material response analysis, the orbital analysis, and the structural analysis. The goal of this paper is to describe to what degree that has been achieved.

  16. Feasibility study of low angle planetary entry. [probe design for Jovian entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a Jovian entry by a probe originally designed for Saturn and Uranus entries is examined. An entry probe is described which is capable of release near an outer planet's sphere of influence and descent to a predetermined target entry point in the planet's atmosphere. The probe is designed so as to survive the trapped particle radiation belts and an entry heating pulse. Data is gathered and relayed to an overflying spacecraft bus during descent. Probe variations for two similar missions are described. In the first flyby of Jupiter by a Pioneer spacecraft launched during the 1979 opportunity is examined parametrically. In the second mission an orbiter based on Pioneer and launched in 1980 is defined in specific terms. The differences rest in the science payloads and directly affected wiring and electronics packages.

  17. Shuttle program. MCC Level C formulation requirements: Entry guidance and entry autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.; Hill, O.

    1980-01-01

    A set of preliminary entry guidance and autopilot software formulations is presented for use in the Mission Control Center (MCC) entry processor. These software formulations meet all level B requirements. Revision 2 incorporates the modifications required to functionally simulate optimal TAEM targeting capability (OTT). Implementation of this logic in the MCC must be coordinated with flight software OTT implementation and MCC TAEM guidance OTT. The entry guidance logic is based on the Orbiter avionics entry guidance software. This MCC requirements document contains a definition of coordinate systems, a list of parameter definitions for the software formulations, a description of the entry guidance detailed formulation requirements, a description of the detailed autopilot formulation requirements, a description of the targeting routine, and a set of formulation flow charts.

  18. MCC level C formulation requirements. Entry guidance and entry autopilot, optional TAEM targeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The level C software formulations requirements for the entry guidance and the simplified autopilot to be used by the Mission Control Center (MCC) entry processor are presented. The modifications required to functionally simulate optional Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) targeting capability (OTT) are incorporated. Implementation of this logic in the MCC must be coordinated with flight software OTT implementation and MCC TAEM guidance OTT. The entry guidance logic is based on the orbiter avionics entry guidance software. Descriptions of the entry guidance detailed formulation requirements, the detailed autopilot formulation requirements, and the targeting routine are given. Also included are a definition of coordinate systems, a list of parameter definitions for the software formulations, and a set of formulation flow charts.

  19. Evaluation of Mars Entry Reconstructured Trajectories Based on Hypothetical 'Quick-Look' Entry Navigation Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pastor, P. Rick; Bishop, Robert H.; Striepe, Scott A.

    2000-01-01

    A first order simulation analysis of the navigation accuracy expected from various Navigation Quick-Look data sets is performed. Here quick-look navigation data are observations obtained by hypothetical telemetried data transmitted on the fly during a Mars probe's atmospheric entry. In this simulation study, navigation data consists of 3-axis accelerometer sensor and attitude information data. Three entry vehicle guidance types are studied: I. a Maneuvering entry vehicle (as with Mars 01 guidance where angle of attack and bank angle are controlled); II. Zero angle-of-attack controlled entry vehicle (as with Mars 98); and III. Ballistic, or spin stabilized entry vehicle (as with Mars Pathfinder);. For each type, sensitivity to progressively under sampled navigation data and inclusion of sensor errors are characterized. Attempts to mitigate the reconstructed trajectory errors, including smoothing, interpolation and changing integrator characteristics are also studied.

  20. Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Baumann, Jean-Pierre; Herdrich, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE) concept describes a high-performing Cubesat system which includes a propulsion module and miniaturized technologies capable of surviving atmospheric entry heating, while reliably transmitting scientific and engineering data. The Micro Return Capsule 2 (MIRKA2) is CAPE’s first planetary entry probe flight prototype. Within this context, this paper summarizes CAPE’s configuration and typical operational scenario. It also summarizes MIRKA2’s design and basic aerodynamic characteristics, and discusses potential challenges drawn from the experience of missions such as Stardust and MUSES-C. CAPE not only opens the door to new planetary mission capabilities, it also offers relatively low-cost opportunities especially suitable to university participation.

  1. Earth Entry Vehicle for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Braun, R. D.; Hughes. S. J.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    The driving requirement for design of a Mars Sample return mission is assuring containment of the returned samples. The impact of this requirement on developmental costs, mass allocation, and design approach of the Earth Entry Vehicle is significant. A simple Earth entry vehicle is described which can meet these requirements and safely transport the Mars Sample Return mission's sample through the Earth's atmosphere to a recoverable location on the surface. Detailed analysis and test are combined with probabilistic risk assessment to design this entirely passive concept that circumvents the potential failure modes of a parachute terminal descent system. The design also possesses features that mitigate other risks during the entry, descent, landing and recovery phases. The results of a full-scale drop test are summarized.

  2. Shuttle entry technology payloads. [for aerothermodynamic research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siemers, P. M., III

    1975-01-01

    The flight frequency of the Space Transportation System (STS) coupled with its large payload-carrying capability will provide an unprecedented opportunity for conducting aerothermodynamic/entry technology research. This STS research opportunity can be characterized into two distinct categories: (1) that research which will utilize the STS orbiter as the test vehicle, and (2) that research which will utilize a vehicle launched from the orbiter for entry. To date, on-going studies have defined experiments as well as the support systems required for the shuttle launched research program. The proposed Entry Technology Program will provide a flight data base from which accurate correlations can be performed relative to ground test and analysis data. These correlations will result in optimized designs for future flight systems.

  3. Entry and Landing Probe for Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, J. P.; Cuzzi, J. N.; Butts, A. J.; Carroll, P. C.

    1981-01-01

    Results of a recent study of entry and landing probes for the exploration of Titan are presented. The probes considered were based on a wide range of exploration mission possibilities. They included: an atmospheric science probe, an intermediate atmospheric and limited surface science probe, and a larger atmospheric and expanded surface science probe. Because of lower gravity on Titan and its atmospheric characteristics, the entry environment is less severe than that of Mars. However, the large uncertainties in the current definition of the atmosphere and the uncertainties in Titan's surface characteristics have required tradeoffs of various combinations of entry and descent shapes and hard lander configurations. Results show that all probe classes are feasible without major developments.

  4. Low Froude number water entry cavity dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kominiarczuk, Jakub K.

    2005-11-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the projectile and the water entry cavity in low Froude number water impact where both kinetic and gravitational potential energy play a role. An experimental investigation is conducted where the impact and cavity development of billiard balls hitting a calm water surface at Froude number of O(10) are captured using high speed video camera at 1000 to 2000 frames per second. The phenomena associated with water entry at low impact speeds are complex as gravity, cavity pressure, flow separation, and splash generation significantly influence the cavity shape, surface closure and pinch off. For comparison, an existing analytical theory for the dynamics of water entry cavities for very high speeds is generalized and extended to low Froude number regime. In particular, this closed-form solution now accounts for effects of gravity and flow separation around the projectile. The comparison between the analytic solution and experimental results is excellent.

  5. [Methodology and fieldwork logistics of a multilevel research study on the influence of neigbourdhood's characteristics on natives and Ecuadorian's mental health in Spain].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Del Arco, Débora; Llácer Gil de Ramales, Alicia; Valero, Julia Del Amo; García-Fulgueiras, Ana; García-Pina, Rocío; García-Ortuzar, Visitación; Rodríguez-Arenas, M Angeles; Mazarrasa Alvear, Lucía; Ibáñez-Rojo, Vicente; Díaz del Peral, Domingo; Jarrín Vera, Inmaculada; Fernández Liria, Alberto; Zunzunegui Pastor, María Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The methodological design, characteristics and fieldwork stage of a multilevel research study on the impact of the environmental characteristics on mental health in an autochthonous and immigrant population are described in this paper. Individual data were obtained using a core questionnaire 40 minutes length from home interviews of Spanish and Ecuadorian adults from September 2006 to January 2007. A random sample of 1186 people aged 18-55, with equal distribution of gender and nationality was obtained from Civil Registers of 33 areas (municipalities or neighbourhoods) of Madrid, Alicante, Almeria and Murcia, chosen by ethnic density and socioeconomic criteria. Previously, a pilot study was carried out. Socioeconomic indicators of neighbourhoods and selected communities were obtained from Municipal Registers and other secondary sources. Finally, 1144 people were interviewed (96%). Each person was contacted at home at two different times. The global response rate was 61%, higher among Ecuadorians (69%), who presented more problems of localisation (34%). Analyzing methods and fieldwork process the conclusion is that sample strategies for this type of population studies should be evaluated using feasibility criteria given time and money constraints, against the need to obtain representative samples of the target populations. There were serious shortcomings in the availability of social integration indicators at the neighbourhood level. PMID:19893878

  6. RTLS entry ranging analysis. [space shuttle reentry trajectory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crull, T. J.

    1975-01-01

    Definition of the ranging capability of a mission 3A return-to-launch-site entry is reported. The limits on downrange and crossrange are established at the initiation of RTLS entry so that terminal area energy management interface conditions were achieved satisfactorily. The downrange and crossrange limits were defined for both nominal RTLS entry conditions and a composite set of dispersed RTLS entry conditions. The results indicate a wide range of acceptable downrange and crossrange positions are available at RTLS entry initiation for nominal conditions. This is greatly reduced when dispersions are considered. For dispersed RTLS entry conditions, an 18 nautical mile range of acceptable downranges is available at zero crossrange.

  7. Food Distribution. The Supermarket Entry Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This guide is designed to assist the coordinator of the Marketing and Distributive Education Cooperative Education Program in improving and expanding the instructional activities needed to prepare individuals to function in the food industry's entry-level jobs. The instructional material provides information about what is expected of a student…

  8. 46 CFR 197.482 - Logbook entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.482 Logbook entries. (a) The person-in-charge shall insure that the following information is recorded in the logbook for each commercial diving... underwater and surface conditions (weather, visibility, temperatures, and currents). (3) Name of the...

  9. 46 CFR 197.482 - Logbook entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.482 Logbook entries. (a) The person-in-charge shall insure that the following information is recorded in the logbook for each commercial diving... underwater and surface conditions (weather, visibility, temperatures, and currents). (3) Name of the...

  10. Simplified modeling for infiltration and radon entry

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.H.

    1992-08-01

    Air leakage in the envelopes of residential buildings is the primary mechanism for provided ventilation to those buildings. For radon the same mechanisms that drive the ventilation, drive the radon entry This paper attempts to provide a simplified physical model that can be used to understand the interactions between the building leakage distribution, the forces that drive infiltration and ventilation, and indoor radon concentrations, Combining both ventilation and entry modeling together allows an estimation of Radon concentration and exposure to be made and demonstrates how changes in the envelope or ventilation system would affect it. This paper will develop simplified modeling approaches for estimating both ventilation rate and radon entry rate based on the air tightness of the envelope and the driving forces. These approaches will use conventional leakage values (i.e. effective leakage area ) to quantify the air tightness and include natural and mechanical driving forces. This paper will introduce a simplified parameter, the Radon Leakage Area, that quantifies the resistance to radon entry. To be practical for dwellings, modeling of the occupant exposures to indoor pollutants must be simple to use and not require unreasonable input data. This paper presents the derivation of the simplified physical model, and applies that model to representative situations to explore the tendencies to be expected under different circumstances.

  11. Entry inhibitors: New advances in HCV treatment

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xi-Jing; Zhu, Yong-Zhe; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects approximately 3% of the world's population and causes chronic liver diseases, including liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although current antiviral therapy comprising direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) can achieve a quite satisfying sustained virological response (SVR) rate, it is still limited by viral resistance, long treatment duration, combined adverse reactions, and high costs. Moreover, the currently marketed antivirals fail to prevent graft reinfections in HCV patients who receive liver transplantations, probably due to the cell-to-cell transmission of the virus, which is also one of the main reasons behind treatment failure. HCV entry is a highly orchestrated process involving initial attachment and binding, post-binding interactions with host cell factors, internalization, and fusion between the virion and the host cell membrane. Together, these processes provide multiple novel and promising targets for antiviral therapy. Most entry inhibitors target host cell components with high genetic barriers and eliminate viral infection from the very beginning of the viral life cycle. In future, the addition of entry inhibitors to a combination of treatment regimens might optimize and widen the prevention and treatment of HCV infection. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms and prospects of the current preclinical and clinical development of antiviral agents targeting HCV entry. PMID:26733381

  12. TEST CELL STUDIES OF RADON ENTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to contrast the effectiveness of slab-in-stem wall (SSW) with floating slab (FS) construction practices, to measure radon transport and entry for model testing, to develop protocols relevant to depressurized radon measurements, and to determine...

  13. 46 CFR 197.482 - Logbook entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.482 Logbook entries. (a) The person-in-charge shall insure that the following information is recorded in the logbook for each commercial diving... underwater and surface conditions (weather, visibility, temperatures, and currents). (3) Name of the...

  14. 46 CFR 197.482 - Logbook entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.482 Logbook entries. (a) The person-in-charge shall insure that the following information is recorded in the logbook for each commercial diving... underwater and surface conditions (weather, visibility, temperatures, and currents). (3) Name of the...

  15. 46 CFR 197.482 - Logbook entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Records § 197.482 Logbook entries. (a) The person-in-charge shall insure that the following information is recorded in the logbook for each commercial diving... underwater and surface conditions (weather, visibility, temperatures, and currents). (3) Name of the...

  16. Infectious Entry Pathway of Enterovirus B Species

    PubMed Central

    Marjomäki, Varpu; Turkki, Paula; Huttunen, Moona

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus B species (EV-B) are responsible for a vast number of mild and serious acute infections. They are also suspected of remaining in the body, where they cause persistent infections contributing to chronic diseases such as type I diabetes. Recent studies of the infectious entry pathway of these viruses revealed remarkable similarities, including non-clathrin entry of large endosomes originating from the plasma membrane invaginations. Many cellular factors regulating the efficient entry have recently been associated with macropinocytic uptake, such as Rac1, serine/threonine p21-activated kinase (Pak1), actin, Na/H exchanger, phospholipace C (PLC) and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Another characteristic feature is the entry of these viruses to neutral endosomes, independence of endosomal acidification and low association with acidic lysosomes. The biogenesis of neutral multivesicular bodies is crucial for their infection, at least for echovirus 1 (E1) and coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9). These pathways are triggered by the virus binding to their receptors on the plasma membrane, and they are not efficiently recycled like other cellular pathways used by circulating receptors. Therefore, the best “markers” of these pathways may be the viruses and often their receptors. A deeper understanding of this pathway and associated endosomes is crucial in elucidating the mechanisms of enterovirus uncoating and genome release from the endosomes to start efficient replication. PMID:26690201

  17. 19 CFR 10.31 - Entry; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...). Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 10.31, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Temporary Importations... importer is a resident. (g) Claim for free entry under Chapter 98, Subchapter XIII, HTSUS may be made...

  18. 19 CFR 10.31 - Entry; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Temporary Importations... of which the importer is a resident. (g) Claim for free entry under Chapter 98, Subchapter...

  19. 19 CFR 10.78 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry. 10.78 Section 10.78 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Products of American Fisheries §...

  20. 19 CFR 10.78 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry. 10.78 Section 10.78 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Products of American Fisheries §...

  1. Entry inhibitors: New advances in HCV treatment.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xi-Jing; Zhu, Yong-Zhe; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhong-Tian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection affects approximately 3% of the world's population and causes chronic liver diseases, including liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Although current antiviral therapy comprising direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) can achieve a quite satisfying sustained virological response (SVR) rate, it is still limited by viral resistance, long treatment duration, combined adverse reactions, and high costs. Moreover, the currently marketed antivirals fail to prevent graft reinfections in HCV patients who receive liver transplantations, probably due to the cell-to-cell transmission of the virus, which is also one of the main reasons behind treatment failure. HCV entry is a highly orchestrated process involving initial attachment and binding, post-binding interactions with host cell factors, internalization, and fusion between the virion and the host cell membrane. Together, these processes provide multiple novel and promising targets for antiviral therapy. Most entry inhibitors target host cell components with high genetic barriers and eliminate viral infection from the very beginning of the viral life cycle. In future, the addition of entry inhibitors to a combination of treatment regimens might optimize and widen the prevention and treatment of HCV infection. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms and prospects of the current preclinical and clinical development of antiviral agents targeting HCV entry. PMID:26733381

  2. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  3. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  4. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  5. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  6. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  7. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  8. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  9. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  10. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  11. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  12. Thinking and Reading for Entry Level Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allentown Literacy Council, PA.

    A pilot project demonstrated that cooperative training programs are effective and cost efficient for small businesses. Common entry-level reading and thinking tasks were identified in a variety of occupational areas. Five growing occupational areas were identified: industrial/machine operator; health care; food preparation; hotel/hospitality; and…

  13. Shuttle Entry Imaging Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas; Berry, Scott; Alter, Stephen; Blanchard, Robert; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Tack, Steve

    2007-01-01

    During the Columbia Accident Investigation, imaging teams supporting debris shedding analysis were hampered by poor entry image quality and the general lack of information on optical signatures associated with a nominal Shuttle entry. After the accident, recommendations were made to NASA management to develop and maintain a state-of-the-art imagery database for Shuttle engineering performance assessments and to improve entry imaging capability to support anomaly and contingency analysis during a mission. As a result, the Space Shuttle Program sponsored an observation campaign to qualitatively characterize a nominal Shuttle entry over the widest possible Mach number range. The initial objectives focused on an assessment of capability to identify/resolve debris liberated from the Shuttle during entry, characterization of potential anomalous events associated with RCS jet firings and unusual phenomenon associated with the plasma trail. The aeroheating technical community viewed the Space Shuttle Program sponsored activity as an opportunity to influence the observation objectives and incrementally demonstrate key elements of a quantitative spatially resolved temperature measurement capability over a series of flights. One long-term desire of the Shuttle engineering community is to calibrate boundary layer transition prediction methodologies that are presently part of the Shuttle damage assessment process using flight data provided by a controlled Shuttle flight experiment. Quantitative global imaging may offer a complementary method of data collection to more traditional methods such as surface thermocouples. This paper reviews the process used by the engineering community to influence data collection methods and analysis of global infrared images of the Shuttle obtained during hypersonic entry. Emphasis is placed upon airborne imaging assets sponsored by the Shuttle program during Return to Flight. Visual and IR entry imagery were obtained with available airborne

  14. 19 CFR 18.11 - Entry; classes of goods for which entry is authorized; form used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... citations affecting § 18.11, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... administered by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall be forwarded under such entries only...

  15. Analytic Guidance for the First Entry in a Skip Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Llama, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an analytic method to generate a reference drag trajectory for the first entry portion of a skip atmospheric entry. The drag reference, expressed as a polynomial function of the velocity, will meet the conditions necessary to fit the requirements of the complete entry phase. The generic method proposed to generate the drag reference profile is further simplified by thinking of the drag and the velocity as density and cumulative distribution functions respectively. With this notion it will be shown that the reference drag profile can be obtained by solving a linear algebraic system of equations. The resulting drag profile is flown using the feedback linearization method of differential geometric control as guidance law with the error dynamics of a second order homogeneous equation in the form of a damped oscillator. This approach was first proposed as a revisited version of the Space Shuttle Orbiter entry guidance. However, this paper will show that it can be used to fly the first entry in a skip entry trajectory. In doing so, the gains in the error dynamics will be changed at a certain point along the trajectory to improve the tracking performance.

  16. Local Calcium Entry and the Guidance of Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium in developing cells is illustrated. The Fucus egg, a brown algae is used to describe this phenomenom. Results of local calcium entry and forced calcium entry into the eggs are given.

  17. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  18. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  19. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  20. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  1. Stair and entry room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. Door from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Stair and entry room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. Door from entry hall leads to toilets and bathing rooms. A coat and hat rack is on each side of the door. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  2. 9 CFR 93.220 - Inspection at port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... all such poultry found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation and not to have..., or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry. Poultry refused entry, unless exported within...

  3. 9 CFR 93.220 - Inspection at port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... all such poultry found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation and not to have..., or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry. Poultry refused entry, unless exported within...

  4. In Situ Magnetohydrodynamic Energy Generation for Planetary Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. K.; Braun, R. D.

    2014-06-01

    This work aims to study the suitability of multi-pass entry trajectories for harnessing of vehicle kinetic energy through magnetohydrodynamic power generation from the high temperature entry plasma. Potential mission configurations are analyzed.

  5. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  6. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  7. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  8. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  9. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  10. 14 CFR 375.24 - Entry and clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NAVIGATION OF FOREIGN CIVIL AIRCRAFT WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Rules Generally Applicable § 375.24 Entry and clearance. All U.S. entry and clearance requirements for aircraft, passengers, crews,...

  11. 14 CFR 375.24 - Entry and clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NAVIGATION OF FOREIGN CIVIL AIRCRAFT WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Rules Generally Applicable § 375.24 Entry and clearance. All U.S. entry and clearance requirements for aircraft, passengers, crews,...

  12. 14 CFR 375.24 - Entry and clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NAVIGATION OF FOREIGN CIVIL AIRCRAFT WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Rules Generally Applicable § 375.24 Entry and clearance. All U.S. entry and clearance requirements for aircraft, passengers, crews,...

  13. 14 CFR 375.24 - Entry and clearance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS NAVIGATION OF FOREIGN CIVIL AIRCRAFT WITHIN THE UNITED STATES Rules Generally Applicable § 375.24 Entry and clearance. All U.S. entry and clearance requirements for aircraft, passengers, crews,...

  14. FRONT OBLIQUE, WITH ENTRY AND WATER FEATURE TO LEFT, TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT OBLIQUE, WITH ENTRY AND WATER FEATURE TO LEFT, TAKEN FROM ENTRY. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Makalapa, Senior Officers' Quarters Type A, 37 Makalapa Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Apollo experience report: Mission planning for Apollo entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, C. A.; Harpold, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The problems encountered and the experience gained in the entry mission plans, flight software, trajectory-monitoring procedures, and backup trajectory-control techniques of the Apollo Program should provide a foundation upon which future spacecraft programs can be developed. Descriptions of these entry activities are presented. Also, to provide additional background information needed for discussion of the Apollo entry experience, descriptions of the entry targeting for the Apollo 11 mission and the postflight analysis of the Apollo 10 mission are presented.

  16. RITD - Re-entry: Inflatable Technology Development in Russian Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilimo, J.; Harri, A.-M.; Aleksashkin, S.; Koryanov, V.; Arruego, I.; Schmidt, W.; Haukka, H.; Finchenko, V.; Martynov, M.; Ostresko, B.; Ponomarenko, A.; Kazakovtsev, V.; Martin, S.; Siili, T.

    2014-04-01

    A new generation of inflatable Entry, Descent and Landing System (EDLS) for Mars has been developed. It is used in both the initial atmospheric entry and atmospheric descent before the semi-hard impact of the penetrator into Martian surface. The EDLS applicability to Earth's atmosphere is studied by the EU/RITD [1] project. Project focuses on the analysis and tests of the transonic behaviour of this compact and light weight payload entry system at the Earth re-entry.

  17. Can We Talk through a Robot As if Face-to-Face? Long-Term Fieldwork Using Teleoperated Robot for Seniors with Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kuwamura, Kaiko; Nishio, Shuichi; Sato, Shinichi

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a case study on fieldwork in a group home for the elderly with dementia using a teleoperated robot called Telenoid. We compared Telenoid-mediated and face-to-face conditions with three residents with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The result indicates that two of the three residents with moderate AD showed a positive reaction to Telenoid. Both became less nervous while communicating with Telenoid from the time they were first introduced to it. Moreover, they started to use more body gestures in the face-to-face condition and more physical interactions in the Telenoid-mediated condition. In this work, we present all the results and discuss the possibilities of using Telenoid as a tool to provide opportunities for seniors to communicate over the long term. PMID:27486416

  18. The Benefits of Residential Fieldwork for School Science: Insights from a five-year initiative for inner-city students in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, Ruth; Reiss, Michael

    2012-03-01

    There is considerable international interest in the value of residential fieldwork for school students. In the UK, pressures on curriculum time, rising costs and heightened concern over students' safety are curtailing residential experiences. Collaboration between several key fieldwork providers across the UK created an extensive programme of residential courses for 11-14-year-olds in London schools from 2004 to 2008. Some 33,000 students from 849 schools took part. This paper draws on the evaluation of the programme that gathered questionnaire, interview and observational data from 2,706 participating students, 70 teachers and 869 parents/carers from 46 schools, mainly in deprived areas of the city. Our findings revealed that students' collaborative skills improved and interpersonal relationships were strengthened and taken back to school. Gains were strongest in social and affective domains, together with behavioural improvements for some students. Individual cognitive gains were revealed more convincingly during face-to-face interviews, rather than through survey items. Students from socially deprived backgrounds benefitted from exposure to learning environments which promoted authentic practical inquiry. Over the 5-year programme, combined physical adventure and real-world experiences proved to be popular with students and their teachers, and opened up opportunities for learning and doing science in ways not often accessible in urban school environments. Further programmes have been implemented in other parts of the UK as a result of the London experience, which build upon the provision of mixed curriculum-adventure course design. The popularity and apparent success of these combination courses suggest that providers need to consider the value of developing similar programmes in the future.

  19. 19 CFR 151.41 - Information on entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Information on entry summary. 151.41 Section 151... Products § 151.41 Information on entry summary. On the entry summary for petroleum or petroleum products in... of the ASTM-IP Petroleum Measurement Tables (American Edition), approved by the American Society...

  20. 19 CFR 141.57 - Single entry for split shipments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the succeeding portions arrive at the port of entry within 10 calendar days of the date of the first... notification must be made before the entry summary is filed. (d) Entry or special permit for immediate delivery... split shipment under immediate delivery, an importer of record may follow the procedure prescribed...