Science.gov

Sample records for 2009-2010 fieldwork entry

  1. Recruiting Trends, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collegiate Employment Research Institute (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the recruiting trends for 2009-2010. This year's report is based on over 2,500 respondents, of which approximately 2,259 provided useable information with 1,846 including complete hiring figures used for the projections. The researchers continued their focus on fast-growth companies and expanded their efforts to ensure a…

  2. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

  3. ARL Annual Salary Survey, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    The "ARL Annual Salary Survey 2009-2010" reports salary data for all professional staff working in ARL libraries. The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) represents the interests of libraries that serve major North American research institutions. Data for 10,207 professional staff members were reported this year for the 114 ARL university…

  4. Milwaukee Voucher Schools: 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure provides charted reference information for Milwaukee Voucher Schools for the 2009-2010 school year. Schools are grouped by grade level. The following is included: Name, Address, Telephone, Grades; Religion/Denomination; Enrollment; Choice Student Enrollment; Number of Teachers; School Hours; Before/After School Programs;…

  5. Reflections on Dangerous Fieldwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peritore, N. Patrick

    1990-01-01

    Stresses the danger of sociological fieldwork in Latin America for researcher and subject. Recommends that the researcher build a network of contacts for support and protection. Discusses the interpersonal relations, problems of security, and field entry techniques involved in sensitive research situations. Suggests unobtrusive methods of research…

  6. Space activities in 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagkratis, Spyros

    2011-09-01

    The global financial crisis of 2008 has created an economic environment unfavourable to public and corporate economic activity alike, which could not have left space activities unaffected. However, the effects of the crisis upon the space sector have been so far less damaging than anticipated. The following paper presents recent developments in the field of space policies, institutional budgets and commercial activity worldwide, in an effort to improve the understanding of the new trends in commercial and public space activities. It particularly explores the strategies followed by space stakeholders in different countries and regions in order to pursue their planned space programmes in view of difficult financial conditions. Finally, it highlights the differences in the outlook of space activities between established and emerging space-faring nations and attempts to explore their medium-term consequences on an international level. For this purpose, it was based on research conducted in the framework of a recent ESPI report on "Space Policies, Issues and trends in 2009/2010".

  7. Geomorphological Fieldwork

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thornbush, Mary J; Allen, Casey D; Fitzpatrick, Faith A.

    2014-01-01

    Geomorphological Fieldwork addresses a topic that always remains popular within the geosciences and environmental science. More specifically, the volume conveys a growing legacy of field-based learning for young geomorphologists that can be used as a student book for field-based university courses and postgraduate research requiring fieldwork or field schools. The editors have much experience of field-based learning within geomorphology and extend this to physical geography. The topics covered are relevant to basic geomorphology as well as applied approaches in environmental and cultural geomorphology. The book integrates a physical-human approach to geography, but focuses on physical geography and geomorphology from an integrated field-based geoscience perspective.

  8. 77 FR 28851 - Lightweight Thermal Paper From Germany: Notice of Amended Final Results of the 2009-2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... the 2009-2010 Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 77 FR 21082 (April 9, 2012) (Final Results). On... Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). This clarification will apply to entries of subject merchandise... Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). Cash Deposit Requirements The following antidumping...

  9. The ABCs of School Choice, 2009-2010 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the 2009-2010 edition of the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice's "ABCs of School Choice". The "ABCs of School Choice" provides the latest in up-to-date and accurate information about the many school choice success stories taking place throughout the country. Readers will find this guide an essential resource on…

  10. Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Division of Policy, Planning, and Research has assembled the Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book which is a compilation of statistical information pertaining to higher education in Tennessee. The 2009-2010 Fact Book contains tables and charts with data relevant to enrollment, persistence, graduation, tuition, financial aid, lottery…

  11. The 2009/2010 Caribbean drought: a case study.

    PubMed

    Peters, Everson J

    2015-10-01

    The impacts of drought in the Caribbean have not been as dramatic as in some other parts of world, but it is not exempt from the experiences of drought. As a result of the effects of a prolonged drought in 2009/2010, the agenda for the 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) paid particular attention to the issue of drought. This paper reviews the management framework for responding to drought disasters in five CARICOM countries. The paper also reports on some of the effects of the 2009/2010 drought with particular reference to Grenada and the Grenadines. During the drought in these islands there were numerous bush fires with devastating effects on agriculture, severe water shortages that impacted on the tourism industry and other social effects. It is evident that there was inadequate preparation for the event. Greater planning and investment are therefore required to reduce future impacts. PMID:25754334

  12. Annual Performance Report 2009-2010. Bureau of Indian Education. Submitted February 1, 2011. Revised Clarification, April 18, 2011. APR Template-Part B (4)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    During SY 2009-2010, the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) continued their efforts to improve the validity and reliability of data reporting. BIE data collections are dependent on school level entry (self reporting) into the Native American Student Information System (NASIS) or into the Bureau's Annual Report from the schools. In addition,…

  13. SMART-1 New Results from 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foing, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    We present highlights and new SMART-1 results published or obtained in 2009-2010 that are relevant for lunar science and future exploration, in relation with subsequent missions and future landers. SMART-1 is the first of ESA's Small Missions for Advanced Research and Technology [1,2,3]. Its prime objective has been achieved to demonstrate Solar Electric missions (such as Bepi-Colombo) and to test new technologies for spacecraft and instruments. The SMART-1 spacecraft was launched in 2003, as Ariane-5 auxiliary passenger, and reached on 15 March 2005 a lunar orbit 400-3000 km for a nominal science period of six months, with 1 year extension until impact on 3 September 2006. New SMART-1 lunar science and exploration results since 2009 include: - Multiangular photometry of Mare regions allowing to model scattering in planetary regoliths - The study of specific regions at different phase angles allowed to detect variations in regolith roughness - Lunar North and South polar maps and repeated high resolution images have been obtained, giving a monitoring of illumination to study potential sites relevant for future exploration. This permitted to identify SMART-1 peaks of quasi-eternal light and to derive their topography. - The SMART-1 archive observations have been used to support Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, Chang'E 1, the US Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the LCROSS impact, and to prepare subsequent landers and future human activities and lunar bases. References: [1] Foing, B. et al (2001) Earth Moon Planets, 85, 523 . [2] Racca, G.D. et al. (2002) Earth Moon Planets, 85, 379. [3] Racca, G.D. et al. (2002) PSS, 50, 1323. [4] Grande, M. et al. (2003) PSS, 51, 427. [5] Dunkin, S. et al. (2003) PSS, 51, 435. [6] Huovelin, J. et al. (2002) PSS, 50, 1345. [7] Shkuratov, Y. et al (2003) JGRE 108, E4, 1. [8] Foing, B.H. et al (2003) Adv. Space Res., 31, 2323. [9] Grande, M. et al (2007) PSS 55, 494. [10] Pinet, P. et al (2005) PSS, 53, 1309. [11] Josset J.L. et al (2006) Adv Space

  14. Analysis of pig movements across eastern Indonesia, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Edwina E C; Christley, Robert M; Geong, Maria; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2015-03-01

    Knowledge of live animal movement through markets and from farm-to-farm is needed to inform strategies for control of trans-boundary animal diseases (TADs) in south-east Asia, particularly due to consumer preference for fresh meat. In eastern Indonesia a TAD of principal interest for control is classical swine fever (CSF) due to its impacts on smallholder farmers. Pig movement is considered a contributor to failure of current CSF control efforts but pig movement patterns are not well understood. This study investigated movement of live pigs in West Timor, Flores and Sumba islands during 2009-2010, with the aim of informing CSF control policies for Nusa Tenggara Timor province. A market survey of 292 pig sellers and 281 pig buyers across nine live pig markets and a farmer survey across 18 villages with 289 smallholder farmers were conducted and information collected on pig movements. The data obtained was used for social network analysis (SNA) on formal (via a market) and informal (village-to-village) movements using information on trading practices, source and destination locations, and the number of pigs being moved. Both inter- and intra-island movements were identified, however inter-island movement was only observed between Flores and Sumba islands. West Timor and Sumba had highly connected networks where large numbers of villages were directly and indirectly linked through pig movement. Further for West Timor, both formal and informal pig movements linked the capital Kupang, on the eastern end of the island to the western districts bordering East Timor connecting all five districts and demonstrating that informal movement transports pigs over distances similar to formal movement on this island. Sumba had a higher potential for pigs to move to a greater number of sequential locations across the entire island. Flores was found to have a more fragmented network, with pig movements concentrated in its eastern or western regions, influenced by terrain. Markets were

  15. 2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage among College Students from 8 Universities in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehling, Katherine A.; Blocker, Jill; Ip, Edward H.; Peters, Timothy R.; Wolfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to describe the 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccine coverage of college students. Participants: A total of 4,090 college students from 8 North Carolina universities participated in a confidential, Web-based survey in October-November 2009. Methods: Associations between self-reported 2009-2010 seasonal influenza…

  16. Profiles of For-Profit Education Management Organizations: Twelfth Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Alex; Miron, Gary; Urschel, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    The 2009-2010 school year marked another year of relatively slow growth in the for-profit education management industry. The greatest increase in profiled companies occurred in the category of small EMOs (education management organizations) (i.e., EMOs that manage three or fewer schools). The authors believe their key finding from the 2007-2008…

  17. 2009-2010 What We Eat In America, NHANES Tables 1-36

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Food Surveys Research Group of the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center has analyzed dietary data from the What We Eat In America (WWEIA), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010 and released 36 summary data tables for this latest 2-year survey release. The tab...

  18. Bureau of Indian Education Bureau-Wide Annual Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs' Bureau-Wide Annual Report Card for 2009-2010. This report presents data tables on: (1) Enrollment; (2) Average Daily Attendance Rate, Graduation Rate and Dropout Rate; (3) Student Achievement; and (4) High Quality Teachers. [For the 2008-2009 report, see ED521175.

  19. Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning. Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning's annual report for 2009-2010. Providing quality early learning opportunities in the first five years shapes a child's learning and success for life. The window to make a difference in a child's future is small, but outcomes show that the agency is having an…

  20. Evaluation of the Correlated Science and Mathematics Professional Development Model, 2009-2010 Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlier, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the 2009-2010 iteration of the Correlated Science and Mathematics (CSM) professional development program which provides teachers and principals experience with integrated and effective science and mathematics teaching strategies and content. Archival CSM data was analyzed via mixed…

  1. Mississippi Department of Education 2011 Superintendent's Annual Report, School Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the requirements of Section 37-3-11 of the Mississippi Code of 1972, Annotated, this report contains pertinent financial, statistical and other important information at the state and local district levels. The following are presented for the 2009-2010 academic year: (1) Receipts for Public Schools; (2) Expenditures for Public…

  2. Course Information for the Graduation Program: Grade 10, 11 and 12 Courses, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Ministry of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This manual, "Course Information for the Graduation Program, Grade 10, 11, and 12 Courses: 2009-2010," was approved by the Minister of Education on July 30, 2009 for setting out graduation requirements. The manual provides information for schools about courses that students take in Grades 10, 11, and 12. It is updated annually with relevant…

  3. Annual Report: Discipline, Crime, and Violence, School Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Code of Virginia" requires school divisions statewide to submit data to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) on incidents of discipline, crime, and violence (DCV). School divisions began reporting such data in 1991. This annual report focuses primarily on DCV data submitted for school year 2009-2010, with selected comparisons to prior…

  4. 77 FR 34346 - Fresh Garlic from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the 2009-2010 Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...: Partial Final Results and Partial Final Rescission of the 2009-2010 Administrative Review, 77 FR 11486... FR 76375 (December 7, 2011) (Preliminary Results). On December 20, 2011, in response to Xinboda's and... Results of the 2009-2010 Administrative Review, 77 FR 17409 (March 26, 2012). At the request of Xinboda,...

  5. Galactic Cosmic-Ray Energy Spectra and Composition during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H..; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2013-01-01

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 <= Z <= 28 in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV / nucleon. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than approx. 7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than approx. 4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2sigma, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  6. Geotagging Photographs in Student Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Katharine E.; France, Derek; Whalley, W. Brian; Park, Julian R.

    2012-01-01

    This resource paper provides guidance for staff and students on the potential educational benefits, limitations and applications of geotagging photographs. It also offers practical advice for geotagging photographs in a range of fieldwork settings and reviews three free smartphone applications (apps) for geotagging photographs (Flickr, Evernote…

  7. A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramvi, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on what both psychoanalysis and anthropology have in common: the emphasis on the researcher's own experience. An ethnographic fieldwork will be used to illustrate how a psychoanalytical approach unfolds the material when studying conditions for learning from experience among teachers in two Norwegian junior high schools, and…

  8. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2013-06-20

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  9. Elemental GCR Observations during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum period. These data are compared with our observations from the 1997-1998 solar minimum period, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum periods differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum periods, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.

  10. Life without Fieldwork: Some Lecturers' Perceptions of Geography and Environmental Science Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ian; Fuller, Ian; Gaskin, Steve

    2006-01-01

    Internationally, fieldwork is seen as intrinsic to geographical education. Fieldwork is here defined as any study of the environment that takes place outside the classroom. This paper extends a previous study of student perceptions of the impacts on their learning of a cancellation of fieldwork caused by an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease in…

  11. Observing the other: reflections on anthropological fieldwork.

    PubMed

    Buckley, P

    1994-01-01

    Aspects of anthropological fieldwork are examined from a psychoanalytic viewpoint using two sources: (1) Malinowski's A Diary in the Strict Sense of the Term, a fieldwork journal he kept in New Guinea and the Trobriand Islands "as a means of self-analysis"; (2) the analysis of an anthropologist both before and after she returned from the field. Malinowski's Diary, written in a virtually free-associative form, illustrates how fieldwork stimulates derivatives of significant early infantile conflicts. The patient's analysis revealed the unconscious meaning of, and motivation for, fieldwork for this particular individual. Based on these data, it is postulated that during fieldwork a new, emotionally charged object relationship, with its concomitant transference responses, may be unconsciously established by the anthropologist with the alien society being studied.

  12. Relationship of environmental exposures and ankylosing spondylitis and spinal mobility: US NHAENS, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to study the relationships of different sets of urinary environmental chemical concentrations and ankylosing spondylitis in a national and population-based setting. Data were extracted from United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2009-2010. Information on demographics was obtained by household interview and ankylosing spondylitis clinical measures and urines were taken at examination. People with abnormal occiput-to-wall distance were found to have higher urinary cadmium (OR 2.17, 95 % CI 1.34-3.52, p = 0.004), antimony (OR 1.74, 95 % CI 1.15-2.62, p = 0.012), tungsten (OR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.39-2.64, p = 0.001), uranium (OR 1.49, 95 % CI 1.03-2.15, p = 0.036), and trimethylarsine oxide (OR 5.01, 95 % CI 2.34-10.71, p < 0.001) concentrations. Moreover, people who resided in older households tended to have abnormal ankylosing spondylitis clinical measures, compared to those who resided in households that were built in 1990 or after. The odds were 1.74 for households built in 1978-1989 and 1.81 for those built in 1940 or earlier.

  13. Impact of a 30% reduction in Atlantic meridional overturning during 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, H. L.; King, B. A.; McCarthy, G. D.; McDonagh, E. L.

    2014-03-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation comprises warm upper waters flowing northward, becoming colder and denser until they form deep water in the Labrador and Nordic Seas that then returns southward through the North and South Atlantic. The ocean heat transport associated with this circulation is 1.3 PW, accounting for 25% of the maximum combined atmosphere-ocean heat transport necessary to balance the earth's radiation budget. We have been monitoring the circulation at 25° N since 2004. A 30% slowdown in the circulation for 15 months during 2009-2010 reduced northward ocean heat transport across 25° N by 0.4 PW and resulted in colder upper ocean waters north of 25° N and warmer waters south of 25° N. The spatial pattern of upper ocean temperature anomalies helped push the wintertime circulation 2010-2011 into record-low negative NAO conditions with accompanying severe winter conditions over northwestern Europe. The warmer temperatures south of 25° N contributed to the high intensity hurricane season in Summer 2010.

  14. Impact of a 30% reduction in Atlantic meridional overturning during 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryden, H. L.; King, B. A.; McCarthy, G. D.; McDonagh, E. L.

    2014-08-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation comprises warm upper waters flowing northward, becoming colder and denser until they form deep water in the Labrador and Nordic Seas that then returns southward through the North and South Atlantic. The ocean heat transport associated with this circulation is 1.3 PW, accounting for 25% of the maximum combined atmosphere-ocean heat transport necessary to balance the Earth's radiation budget. We have been monitoring the circulation at 25° N since 2004. A 30% slowdown in the circulation for 14 months during 2009-2010 reduced northward ocean heat transport across 25° N by 0.4 PW and resulted in colder upper ocean waters north of 25° N and warmer waters south of 25° N. The spatial pattern of upper ocean temperature anomalies helped push the wintertime circulation 2010-2011 into record-low negative NAO (North Atlantic Oscillation) conditions with accompanying severe winter conditions over northwestern Europe. The warmer temperatures south of 25° N contributed to the high intensity hurricane season in summer 2010.

  15. Relationship of environmental exposures and ankylosing spondylitis and spinal mobility: US NHAENS, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy

    2015-01-01

    It was aimed to study the relationships of different sets of urinary environmental chemical concentrations and ankylosing spondylitis in a national and population-based setting. Data were extracted from United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, 2009-2010. Information on demographics was obtained by household interview and ankylosing spondylitis clinical measures and urines were taken at examination. People with abnormal occiput-to-wall distance were found to have higher urinary cadmium (OR 2.17, 95 % CI 1.34-3.52, p = 0.004), antimony (OR 1.74, 95 % CI 1.15-2.62, p = 0.012), tungsten (OR 1.91, 95 % CI 1.39-2.64, p = 0.001), uranium (OR 1.49, 95 % CI 1.03-2.15, p = 0.036), and trimethylarsine oxide (OR 5.01, 95 % CI 2.34-10.71, p < 0.001) concentrations. Moreover, people who resided in older households tended to have abnormal ankylosing spondylitis clinical measures, compared to those who resided in households that were built in 1990 or after. The odds were 1.74 for households built in 1978-1989 and 1.81 for those built in 1940 or earlier. PMID:25103950

  16. Seasonal consumption of Hemimysis anomala by fish in southeastern Lake Ontario, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; Gumtow, C.F.; Walsh, M.G.; Weidel, B.C.; Boscarino, B.T.; Rudstam, L. G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the seasonal occurrence of Hemimysis anomala in the diets of fish that prey on macroinvertebrates at two sites with established Hemimysis populations east of Oswego, NY, during 2009-2010. In 2009, we examined 320 stomachs from 10 species and found Hemimysis only in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rockbass (Ambloplites rupestris), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Of those species, alewife consumed Hemimysis most frequently and it represented a greater proportion of their diets. During 2009, the dry weight composition of Hemimysis in alewife diets varied seasonally between <1% in June, 5% in July, 98.5% in August, and 18.8% in September. In contrast, we examined 667 stomachs from 15 species in 2010 and observed Hemimysis in only one alewife and two rockbass stomachs. For alewife from September 2009, we found no relationship between predator size and the number of Hemimysis consumed, or between the presence of Hemimysis in fish diets and the presence of other diet taxa or diet diversity. Fish diets collected as bycatch from other assessments revealed large numbers of Hemimysis in fishes that had not previously been observed consuming Hemimysis in Lake Ontario, including cisco (Coregonus artedi) and white perch (Morone americana). Our results indicate Hemimysis consumption by nearshore fish can be high, but that it is variable across seasons and years, and may be most prevalent in fish that feed up in the water column, at or near dark, and have the ability to consume swift moving prey like Mysis diluviana or small fish.

  17. Colorado Commission on Higher Education Report to the General Assembly: Teach Colorado Grant Final Evaluation, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report is prepared pursuant to Colorado Revised Statute Section 23-3.3-901 to describe the monies allocated as part of the 2009-2010 Teach Colorado Grant Initiative and how the scholarships met the intent of the initiative. Senate Bill 08-133 established the Teach Colorado Grant Initiative (TCGI) to give financial incentives to college…

  18. 76 FR 62039 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of 2009-2010 Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ...: Notice of Preliminary Results of 2009-2010 Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 31938 (June 2... proceeding.\\4\\ \\3\\ See Antidumping Duties; Countervailing Duties: Final Rule, 62 FR 27296, 27393 (May 19, 1997). \\4\\ See Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68...

  19. US Bureau of Indian Education, Division of Performance and Accountability School Report Cards, SY 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This document presents the Indian School Report Cards for School Year 2009-2010. Data tables for each school are presented according to: (1) Enrollment; (2) Average Daily Attendance Rate, Graduation Rate and Dropout Rate; (3) Student Achievement; and (4) High Quality Teachers. [For the 2008-2009 report, see ED521186.

  20. Active Travel to School: Findings from the Survey of US Health Behavior in School-Aged Children, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yong; Ivey, Stephanie S.; Levy, Marian C.; Royne, Marla B.; Klesges, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whereas children's active travel to school (ATS) has confirmed benefits, only a few large national surveys of ATS exist. Methods: Using data from the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) 2009-2010 US survey, we conducted a logistic regression model to estimate the odds ratios of ATS and a linear regression model to estimate…

  1. Making the Good Even Better: Feedback from easyCBM Focus Groups, School Year 2009/2010. Technical Report # 1001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald; Lai, Cheng-Fei

    2010-01-01

    This technical report provides a summary of feedback from teachers, administrators, and support personnel who used the easyCBM progress monitoring and benchmark assessment system during school year 2009/2010. Data were gathered from semi-structured focus groups conducted during the 2010 easyCBM August Institute at the University of Oregon. Results…

  2. Cross-Validation of easyCBM Reading Cut Scores in Oregon: 2009-2010. Technical Report #1108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Irvin, P. Shawn; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical report presents results from a cross-validation study designed to identify optimal cut scores when using easyCBM[R] reading tests in Oregon. The cross-validation study analyzes data from the 2009-2010 academic year for easyCBM[R] reading measures. A sample of approximately 2,000 students per grade, randomly split into two groups of…

  3. Costs of School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics in Maine during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This study retrospectively estimated costs for a convenience sample of school-located vaccination (SLV) clinics conducted in Maine during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Surveys were developed to capture the cost of labor including unpaid volunteers as well as supplies and materials used in SLV clinics. Six nurses from different school districts…

  4. Salaries and Wages Paid Professional and Support Personnel in Public Schools, 2009-2010. A Reference Tool for School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protheroe, Nancy; Licciardi, Christopher M.; Cooke, Willa D.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents salary and wage data collected as part of the 37th edition of the "ERS National Survey of Salaries and Wages in Public Schools, 2009-2010." The survey, conducted in fall 2008, collected data on salaries scheduled and salaries paid for 23 selected professional positions and 10 selected support positions in public school systems…

  5. 76 FR 28419 - Persulfates From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the 2009-2010 Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... exporters that supplied that non-PRC exporter. These deposit requirements shall remain in effect until... Results of the 2009-2010 Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 13358 (March 11, 2011... accordance with sections 776(a)(2)(A) and (B) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended (``Act''), because...

  6. Polar Stratospheric Cloud formation and denitrification during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 and 2010/2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khosrawi, Farahnaz; Urban, Joachim; Pitts, Michael C.; Kirner, Oliver; Braesicke, Peter; Santee, Michelle L.; Manney, Gloria L.; Murtagh, Donal

    2015-04-01

    The sedimentation of HNO3 containing polar stratospheric cloud particles leads to a permanent removal of HNO3 from the stratosphere. The so-called denitrification is an effect that plays an important role in stratospheric ozone depletion. The Arctic winter 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 were both quite unique. The Arctic winter 2010/2011 was one of the coldest winters on record leading to the strongest depletion of ozone measured in the Arctic. Though the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was rather warm in the climatological sense it was distinguished by an exceptionally cold stratosphere from mid December 2009 to mid January 2010 leading to prolonged PSC formation and significant denitrification. Model simulations and space-borne observations are used to investigate PSC formation and denitrification during these two winters. Model simulations were performed with the atmospheric chemistry-climate model ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) and compared to observations by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations Satellite (CALIPSO) and the Odin Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (Odin/SMR) as well as with observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder on Aura (Aura/MLS). While PSCs were present during the Arctic winter 2010/2011 over nearly four months, from mid December to end of March, they were not as persistent as the ones that occurred during the shorter (one month) cold period during the Arctic winter 2009/2010. Although the PSC season during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was much shorter than in 2010/2011, denitrification during the Arctic winter 2009/2010 was similar in magnitude than during 2010/2011.

  7. Firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas - United States, 2006-2007 and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    Firearm homicides and suicides are a continuing public health concern in the United States. During 2009-2010, a total of 22,571 firearm homicides and 38,126 firearm suicides occurred among U.S. residents. This includes 3,397 firearm homicides and 1,548 firearm suicides among persons aged 10-19 years; the firearm homicide rate for this age group was slightly above the all-ages rate. This report updates an earlier report that provided statistics on firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas for 2006-2007, with special emphasis on persons aged 10-19 years in recognition of the importance of early prevention efforts. Firearm homicide and suicide rates were calculated for the 50 most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) for 2009-2010 using mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Comparison statistics were recalculated for 2006-2007 to reflect revisions to MSA delineations and population estimates subsequent to the earlier report. Although the firearm homicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained above the national rate during 2009-2010, more than 75% of these MSAs showed a decreased rate from 2006-2007, largely accounting for a national decrease. The firearm homicide rate for persons aged 10-19 years exceeded the all-ages rate in many of these MSAs during 2009-2010, similar to the earlier reporting period. Conversely, although the firearm suicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained below the national rate during 2009-2010, nearly 75% of these MSAs showed an increased rate from 2006-2007, paralleling the national trend. Firearm suicide rates among persons aged 10-19 years were low compared with all-ages rates during both periods. These patterns can inform the development and monitoring of strategies directed at reducing firearm-related violence.

  8. Madeira Extreme Floods: 2009/2010 Winter. Case study - 2nd and 20th of February

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, V.; Marques, J.; Silva, A.

    2010-09-01

    Floods are at world scale the natural disaster that affects a larger fraction of the population. It is a phenomenon that extends it's effects to the surrounding areas of the hydrographic network (basins, rivers, dams) and the coast line. Accordingly to USA FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) flood can be defined as:"A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of two or more acres of normally dry land area or of two or more properties from: Overflow of inland or tidal waters; Unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source; Mudflow; Collapse or subsidence of land along the shore of a lake or similar body of water as a result of erosion or undermining caused by waves or currents of water exceeding anticipated cyclical levels that result in a flood as defined above." A flash flood is the result of intense and long duration of continuous precipitation and can result in dead casualties (i.e. floods in mainland Portugal in 1967, 1983 and 1997). The speed and strength of the floods either localized or over large areas, results in enormous social impacts either by the loss of human lives and or the devastating damage to the landscape and human infrastructures. The winter of 2009/2010 in Madeira Island was characterized by several episodes of very intense precipitation (specially in December 2009 and February 2010) adding to a new record of accumulated precipitation since there are records in the island. In February two days are especially rainy with absolute records for the month of February (daily records since 1949): 111mm and 97mm on the 2nd and 20th respectively. The accumulated precipitation ended up with the terrible floods on the 20th of February causing the lost of dozens of human lives and hundreds of millions of Euros of losses The large precipitation occurrences either more intense precipitation in a short period or less intense precipitation during a larger period are sometimes the precursor of

  9. Monitoring and forecasting the 2009-2010 severe drought in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Tang, Q.; Liu, X.; Leng, G.; Li, Z.; Cui, H.

    2015-12-01

    From the fall of 2009 to the spring of 2010, an unprecedented drought swept across southwest China (SW) and led to a severe shortage in drinking water and a huge loss to regional economy. Monitoring and predicting the severe drought with several months in advance is of critical importance for such hydrological disaster assessment, preparation and mitigation. In this study, we attempted to carry out a model-based hydrological monitoring and seasonal forecasting framework, and assessed its skill in capturing the evolution of the SW drought in 2009-2010. Using the satellite-based meteorological forcings and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model, the drought conditions were assessed in a near-real-time manner based on a 62-year (1952-2013) retrospective simulation, wherein the satellite data was adjusted by a gauge-based forcing to remove systematic biases. Bias-corrected seasonal forecasting outputs from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2) was tentatively applied for a seasonal hydrologic prediction and its predictive skill was overall evaluated relative to a traditional Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) method with lead time varying from 1 to 6 months. The results show that the climate model-driven hydrologic predictability is generally limited to 1-month lead time and exhibits negligible skill improvement relative to ESP during this drought event, suggesting the initial hydrologic conditions (IHCs) play a dominant role in forecasting performance. The research highlights the value of the framework in providing accurate IHCs in a real-time manner which will greatly benefit drought early-warning.

  10. 2009/2010 Eurasian Cold Winter and Loss of Arctic Sea-ice over Barents/Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, T.; Kim, B.; Kim, S.

    2012-12-01

    In 2009/2010 winter, a few extreme cold events and heavy snowfall occurred over central North America, north western Europe, and East Asia exerting a severe social and economic impacts. In this study, we performed modeling experiments to examine the role of substantially reduced Arctic sea-ice over Barents/Kara Sea on the 2009/2010 cold winters. Although several previous studies investigated cause of the extreme events and emphasized the large snow-covered area over Siberia in autumn 2009, we note that the area extent of Arctic sea-ice over Barents/Kara sea in autumn 2009 was anomalously low and the possible impact from Arctic for the extreme cold events has not been presented. To investigate the influence from the Arctic, we designed three model runs using Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). Each simulation differs by the prescribed surface boundary conditions: (a) CTRL - climatological seasonal cycle of sea surface temperature (SST) and sea-ice concentration (SIC) are prescribed everywhere, (b) EXP_65N - SST and SIC inside the Arctic circle (north of 65°N) are replaced by 2009/2010 values. Elsewhere, the climatology is used, (c) EXP_BK - Same with (b) except that SIC and SST are fixed only over Barents/Kara Sea where the sea-ice area dropped significantly in 2009/2010 winter. Model results from EXP_65N and EXP_BK commonly showed a large increase of air temperature in the lower troposphere where Arctic sea-ice showed a large reduction. Also, compared with the observation, model successfully captured thickened geopotential height in the Arctic and showed downstream wave propagation toward midlatitude. From the analysis, we reveal that this large dipolar Arctic-midlatitude teleconnection pattern in the upper troposphere easily propagate upward and played a role in the weakening of polar vortex. This is also confirmed in the observation. However, the timing of excitation of upward propagating wave in EXP_65N and EXP_BK were different and thus the timing of

  11. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation

  12. Retrospective study of positive physical torture cases in Cairo (2009 & 2010).

    PubMed

    Ghaleb, Sherein Salah; Elshabrawy, Ekram Mohamad; Elkaradawy, Magda Helal; Nemr Welson, Nermeen

    2014-05-01

    Torture is the most serious violation of a person's fundamental right to personal integrity and a pathological form of human interaction. In this study, the prevalence of torture in Cairo during the years 2009 & 2010 is 10.97% of the total number of cases examined at the medico legal authority of Egypt in Zenhom (11.29% in 2010 & 10.36% in 2009). The number of cases under this study is 367 (175 cases in 2009, 192 cases in 2010). Torture is more prevalent in the year 2010 than in the year 2009. The largest prevalence of torture was found in the area of south Cairo (120 cases; 32.7%) while the least was found in the area of west Cairo (50 cases; 13.6%). The victims included 336 males (91.6%) and 31 females (8.4%) with male to female ratio 10.8: 1. The most commonly affected age group in the studied victims was the age group of the third decade (171 cases; 46.6%) while the least was the age group above the sixth decade (6 cases; 1.6%). The most commonly affected site of injury was head & neck (243 cases; 66.2%) while the least was abdomen (17 cases; 4.6%). The most common type of injury was bruises (258 cases; 70.3%) while the least was electrocution (5 cases; 1.4%). Regarding the causal instrument, the most commonly used instrument was blunt object (333 cases; 90.7%) while the least was electric current (5 cases; 10%). Hitting with a stick leaving the characteristic shape of elongated abrasion & bruises was found in 35 cases (9.5%) and characteristic lesion of handcuff, which is blunt trauma wounds around wrists or ankles, was found in 68 cases (18.5%). There was one case of hair torture (0.3%) & 5 cases of sexual torture (1.5%). Permanent infirmity left in victims was positive in 24 cases (6.5%) and negative in 343 cases (93.5%) while deformity left in victims was positive in 10 cases (3%) and negative in 357 cases (97%). All permanent infirmity cases were male. Of the 24 cases of permanent infirmity, 83.3% were subjected to blunt trauma and 79.2% were injured in

  13. Fieldwork in the Undergraduate Geography Programme: Challenges and Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Lindsey

    1996-01-01

    Provides a critical commentary on issues facing fieldwork in undergraduate geography programs. Issues are structured around five key themes: aims and objectives, skill acquisition, relationship to other areas of curricula, fieldwork delivery, and fieldwork management. Encourages new perspectives and approaches in geography fieldwork. (MJP)

  14. Prospective Teachers' View on Geography Fieldworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Cevdet; Bilgi, Merve Gorkem

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of the study are to examine thoroughly the components to constitute individual perceptions of prospective teachers concerning important acquisitions of geography fieldworks and to facilitate its applicability as a teaching method through their own observations and suggestions, and in this context to obtain information about the nature…

  15. Fieldwork: A Modular Approach. Cultural Anthropology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Peter

    Designed for use as supplementary instructional material in a cultural anthropology course, this learning module focuses on the purposes and methods of anthropological fieldwork, and provides an overview of the types of research in which anthropologists engage during their field studies. The module begins by discussing the purpose of participant…

  16. Ethics in Fieldwork Research: A Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deVoss, Gary G.; And Others

    Four ethical problems resulting from a fieldwork study of elementary education student teachers are explored. The problems include: acquiring permission to execute the study; how far to dig into personal lives to extract necessary information; the pitfalls of doing collaborative research; and how much information can be revealed without…

  17. Fieldwork, Heritage and Engaging Landscape Texts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mains, Susan P.

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines and analyses efforts to critically engage with "heritage" through the development and responses to a series of undergraduate residential fieldwork trips held in the North Coast of Jamaica. The ways in which we read heritage through varied "texts"--specifically, material landscapes, guided heritage tours,…

  18. The 2009-2010 Guerrero Slow Slip Event Monitored by InSAR, Using Time Series Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacques, G.; Pathier, E.; Lasserre, C.; Cotton, F.; Radiguet, M.; Cycle Sismique et Déformations Transitoires

    2011-12-01

    The Guerrero seismic gap is located along the Pacific coast of Mexico in a subduction zone where Cocos plate subducts under the North American plate with a 5.5 cm per year convergence rate. Along this 100 km width band located between Acapulco (East side) and Zihuatanejo (West side), no major earthquake occurred since at least 1911. In contrast, the surrounding areas of the Guerrero gap has been the location of large seismic events during the last century like the 1985 one's (Mw 8), which affected Mexico City. Considering the plate convergence rate, a 5 meters slip deficit has been estimated at this gap location since the last major earthquake (Lowry et al. 1998), making a large earthquake possible at this spot. However, the Guerrero gap was the setting of four slow slip events (SSE) with an approximately four years periodicity (1998, 2002, 2006, 2009-2010) since it was instrumented by GPS permanent network in January 1997. Slow slip events and their associated ground displacements are commonly interpreted as aseismic slips on the deeper part of the subduction plane. One of the main issues concerning that phenomenon, deals with the way that strain accumulated on the deeper part is released on the upper part of the subduction plane, which corresponds to the seismogenic zone. As a consequence, the slip distribution upon the subduction plane associated to the Guerrero SSE represents relevant information concerning the local seismic hazard. To address this issue, geodetic measurements from GPS and/or space-borne SAR differential interferometry (DInSAR) can be used to retrieve the SSE slip distribution on the subduction plane from the ground deformation measurements as it has been done for the 2006 event previously studied. In this work, we focused on the 2009-2010 SSE on Guerrero by processing DInSAR data (C band Envisat data were processed using the small baseline approach method NSBAS based upon ROI-pac) as previously done for the 2006 event but improved by adding a

  19. SEARCH FOR THE COMET ACTIVITY OF 107P/(4015) WILSON-HARRINGTON DURING THE 2009/2010 APPARITION

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Ham, Ji-Beom; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T.; Micheli, Marco; Niwa, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Matsuda, Kentaro; Urakawa, Seitaro; Yoshimoto, Katsumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Iwata, Ikuru; Ozaki, Shinobu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2011-01-10

    We present the optical observations of the Near Earth Object 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington during the 2009/2010 apparition taken in search of low-level comet activity. Our photometric and spectroscopic data were collected 28-86 days after the perihelion passage on 2009 October 22 in a wide range of solar phase angles of 39 deg. - 68 deg. A disk-integrated phase function was constructed, giving a geometric albedo of 0.055 {+-} 0.012, phase integral of q = 0.34, and Bond albedo of A{sub B} = 0.019. The photometric property shows a profile similar to low albedo asteroids and comet nuclei. No emission lines were found in our spectrum, giving a flat reflectance similar to low albedo asteroids. Although we could not find any evidence for cometary activity in our photometric and spectroscopic data, we found an upper limit of 0.001% on the fractional active area. We derived the upper limit of the optical depth of the dust trail and tail, 7 x 10{sup -10}. We conclude that 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington was completely dormant or inactive in the 2009/2010 return.

  20. Trends in Food Habits and Their Relation to Socioeconomic Status among Nordic Adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010

    PubMed Central

    Fismen, Anne-Siri; Smith, Otto Robert Frans; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Rasmussen, Mette; Pedersen Pagh, Trine; Augustine, Lilly; Ojala, Kristiina; Samdal, Oddrun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries. Methods The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Results Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002–2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002–2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006–2009/2010 for both sweet and soft

  1. Untold Stories of Fieldworkers Working Amid Adverse Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serekoane, Motsaathebe; Sharp, Carla; Skinner, Donald; Marais, Lochner

    2014-01-01

    Working in unfamiliar contexts and often alone, fieldworkers may face challenges for which their training and previous experience has not prepared them. While there is literature about the technical, ethical and moral aspects of fieldwork, there is little focusing on fieldworkers' actual experiences. Additionally, there is little constructive…

  2. Teaching Fieldwork to Educational Researchers; Furry and Bald Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleton, John

    1983-01-01

    In contrast to Bogdan's approach (outlined in a preceding article), which considers fieldwork to be a research method, this author views ethnographic fieldwork as a paradigm. His graduate course in fieldwork concentrates on interpretation and stresses the quality, quantity, and intimacy of human relationships between observers and their subjects.…

  3. A group approach to mental health fieldwork.

    PubMed

    Hengel, J L; Romeo, J L

    1995-04-01

    Fieldwork opportunities in mental health settings are limited and difficult to find. There is increased pressure for occupational therapy supervisors to accept more students although they have less time to devote to them. This article describes a group approach to training occupational therapy students that was used at one fieldwork site. The occupational therapy staff members were each responsible for specific teaching assignments that allowed them to work with a number of students simultaneously. Program development and evaluation meetings created an alternative forum for exploring ideas and practice issues and for providing guidance and supervision. This approach reduced the amount of time each therapist spent with students, provided students with several role models, and encouraged independent thinking in students.

  4. “Embedded Research” in Collaborative Fieldwork

    PubMed Central

    KLOTZBÜCHER, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    In the era of the “scientific development concept” of the Hu/Wen leadership, agents of knowledge transfer that eventually translates into policy comprise not only think tanks for policy formulation in central-state institutions but also researchers in universities supporting policy implementation at local levels. Well-established patterns of local scientific advisory frame collaborative fieldwork in Sino-Western scientific projects on local governance. However, there is a gap between our active integration into these patterns during fieldwork and our ability to clarify them as resources, reconstruct the selection of research topics and contextualize the research results within our academic discourses. Analysing site-finding, data collection, aggregation and dissemination of a research project with Chinese public health researchers on rural health service reform in Xinjiang between 2005 and 2010, I argue that fieldwork and the role performed as a scientific advisor for the political principal is the localized and daily interface where politics crosses into science. PMID:25729446

  5. Influenza epidemiology in Italy two years after the 2009-2010 pandemic: need to improve vaccination coverage.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Amicizia, Daniela; Bella, Antonino; Donatelli, Isabella; Cristina, Maria Luisa; Panatto, Donatella; Lai, Piero Luigi

    2013-03-01

    Since 2000, a sentinel surveillance of influenza, INFLUNET, exists in Italy. It is coordinated by the Ministry of Health and is divided into two parts; one of these is coordinated by the National Institute of Health (NIH), the other by the Inter-University Centre for Research on Influenza and other Transmissible Infections (CIRI-IT). The influenza surveillance system performs its activity from the 42nd week of each year (mid-October) to the 17th week of the following year (late April). Only during the pandemic season (2009/2010) did surveillance continue uninterruptedly. Sentinel physicians - about 1,200 general practitioners and independent pediatricians - send in weekly reports of cases of influenza-like illness (ILI) among their patients (over 2% of the population of Italy) to these centers.   In order to estimate the burden of pandemic and seasonal influenza, we examined the epidemiological data collected over the last 3 seasons (2009-2012). On the basis of the incidences of ILIs at different ages, we estimated that: 4,882,415; 5,519,917; and 4,660,601 cases occurred in Italy in 2009-2010, 2010-2011 and 2011-2012, respectively. Considering the ILIs, the most part of cases occurred in < 14 y old subjects and especially in 5-14 y old individuals, about 30% and 21% of cases respectively during 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons. In 2011-2012, our evaluation was of about 4.7 million of cases, and as in the previous season, the peak of cases regarded subjects < 14 y (about 29%). A/California/07/09 predominated in 2009-2010 and continued to circulate in 2010-2011. During 2010-2011 B/Brisbane/60/08 like viruses circulated and A/H3N2 influenza type was sporadically present. H3N2 (A/Perth/16/2009 and A/Victoria/361/2011) was the predominant influenza type-A virus that caused illness in the 2011-2012 season. Many strains of influenza viruses were present in the epidemiological scenario in 2009-2012. In the period 2009-2012, overall vaccination coverage was low

  6. High-risk oral human papillomavirus load in the US population, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Anil K; Graubard, Barry I; Pickard, Robert K L; Xiao, Weihong; Gillison, Maura L

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the association of demographic and behavioral factors with oral human papillomavirus (HPV) load for 18 high-risk types among 211 individuals with prevalent high-risk HPV within the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010. Factors independently associated with HPV load above the median included older age (odds ratio, 1.04 per year increase [95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.07]; P = .004) and intensity of current smoking (P for trend <.001). A marginally greater percentage of men than women had an HPV load above the median (55.7% vs 32.8%; P = .069), and HPV load increased marginally with increasing alcohol use (P for trend = .062). In conclusion, older age and current smoking are associated with a high oral load of high-risk HPV types among individuals with a prevalent infection.

  7. Bordetella parapertussis outbreak in Bisham, Pakistan in 2009-2010: fallout of the 9/11 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Javed, S; Said, F; Eqani, S A M A S; Bokhari, H

    2015-09-01

    Pertussis or whooping cough is a highly contagious community disease mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis and B. parapertussis. We report a minor outbreak of whooping cough (2009-2010) in symptomatic subjects from Bisham, near Swat, Khyber Pukhtoonkhawa province, Pakistan. Interestingly, our results show that all the culture-positive isolates (n = 21) collected from children (average age 3·46 years), were identified as B. parapertussis after routine identification tests and PCR IS481, IS1001 and IS1002. Furthermore, in the affected patients, none had received immunization with diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DTPw) vaccine. Therefore, the possibility of the re-emergence of the disease due to limitation of basic health services as a result of the political unrest due to the 9/11 situation is also examined. Moreover, we discuss the importance of vaccinating both adults and children with DTPwPaw vaccine containing both organisms for better protection.

  8. Lessons for control of heroin-associated anthrax in Europe from 2009-2010 outbreak case studies, London, UK.

    PubMed

    Abbara, Aula; Brooks, Tim; Taylor, Graham P; Nolan, Marianne; Donaldson, Hugo; Manikon, Maribel; Holmes, Alison

    2014-07-01

    Outbreaks of serious infections associated with heroin use in persons who inject drugs (PWIDs) occur intermittently and require vigilance and rapid reporting of individual cases. Here, we give a firsthand account of the cases in London during an outbreak of heroin-associated anthrax during 2009-2010 in the United Kingdom. This new manifestation of anthrax has resulted in a clinical manifestation distinct from already recognized forms. During 2012-13, additional cases of heroin-associated anthrax among PWIDs in England and other European countries were reported, suggesting that anthrax-contaminated heroin remains in circulation. Antibacterial drugs used for serious soft tissue infection are effective against anthrax, which may lead to substantial underrecognition of this novel illness. The outbreak in London provides a strong case for ongoing vigilance and the use of serologic testing in diagnosis and serologic surveillance schemes to determine and monitor the prevalence of anthrax exposure in the PWID community.

  9. Making Fieldwork Valuable: Designing fieldwork programmes to meet the needs of young geologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, Michael

    2016-04-01

    This work presents the culmination of many years' in designing and operating field courses for students studying Geology at post-16 level in the context of the British schooling system. Provided is a toolkit, and accompanying rationale, for the educators use when building a sustainable and manageable programme of fieldwork for young geologists. Many educators, particularly under the confines of new regulations have found the promise of increased paper work and accountability challenging and consequently field courses often play a peripheral, even non-existent role in the scheme of work for a large number of young geologists. The process of designing a suitable programme of field study must take account of the relevant stakeholders, chief among these are the views of students and staff but also those of parents, potential destination universities, exam boards and qualification accrediting groups. An audit of desired characteristics a programme of fieldwork would contain was completed using information gained through first hand research with students as well as in conversation with local universities. The results of this audit highlighted several confining factors ranging from the potential cost implications for school and parents, the extent to which content would support learning in class, and the feasibility of achieving all characteristics given limitations on staff and time. Student perceptions of the value of fieldwork were gauged through various means; group interviews were conducted during a number of academic years, field course evaluations were completed following excursions, and questionnaires were distributed at the close of the 2014-2015 academic year. Findings demonstrated that student perceptions of the benefits offered by fieldwork were several fold; chiefly students felt the inclusion of fieldwork was a very important motivator in their decision to study the subject and maintain curiosity in their studies, the belief that fieldwork acts as a

  10. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding in Timor-Leste: findings from Demographic and Health Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Vishnu; da Cruz, Jonia Lourenca Nunes Brites; Karkee, Rajendra; Lee, Andy H

    2014-04-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is known to have nutritional and health benefits. This study investigated factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding among infants aged five months or less in Timor-Leste. The latest data from the national Demographic and Health Survey 2009-2010 were analyzed by binary logistic regression. Of the 975 infants included in the study, overall 49% (95% confidence interval 45.4% to 52.7%) were exclusively breastfed. The exclusive breastfeeding prevalence declined with increasing infant age, from 68.0% at less than one month to 24.9% at five months. Increasing infant age, mothers with a paid occupation, who perceived their newborn as non-average size, and residence in the capital city Dili, were associated with a lower likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding. On the other hand, women who could decide health-related matters tended to breastfeed exclusively, which was not the case for others whose decisions were made by someone else. The results suggested the need of breastfeeding promotion programs to improve the exclusive breastfeeding rate. Antenatal counseling, peer support network, and home visits by health workers could be feasible options to promote exclusive breastfeeding given that the majority of births occur at home. PMID:24756151

  11. Estimation of force of infection based on different epidemiological proxies: 2009/2010 Influenza epidemic in Malta.

    PubMed

    Marmara, V; Cook, A; Kleczkowski, A

    2014-12-01

    Information about infectious disease outbreaks is often gathered indirectly, from doctor's reports and health board records. It also typically underestimates the actual number of cases, but the relationship between the observed proxies and the numbers that drive the diseases is complicated, nonlinear and potentially time- and state-dependent. We use a combination of data collection from the 2009-2010 H1N1 outbreak in Malta, compartmental modelling and Bayesian inference to explore the effect of using various sources of information (consultations, doctor's diagnose, swabbing and molecular testing) on estimation of the effective basic reproduction ratio, R(t). Different proxies and different sampling rates (daily and weekly) lead to similar behaviour of R(t) as the epidemic unfolds, although individual parameters (force of infection, length of latent and infectious period) vary. We also demonstrate that the relationship between different proxies varies as epidemic progresses, with the first period characterised by high ratio of consultations and influenza diagnoses to actual confirmed cases of H1N1. This has important consequences for modelling that is based on reconstructing influenza cases from doctor's reports.

  12. Surveillance for waterborne disease outbreaks associated with drinking water and other nonrecreational water - United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-09-01

    Despite advances in water management and sanitation, waterborne disease outbreaks continue to occur in the United States. CDC collects data on waterborne disease outbreaks submitted from all states and territories through the Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System. During 2009-2010, the most recent years for which finalized data are available, 33 drinking water-associated outbreaks were reported, comprising 1,040 cases of illness, 85 hospitalizations, and nine deaths. Legionella accounted for 58% of outbreaks and 7% of illnesses, and Campylobacter accounted for 12% of outbreaks and 78% of illnesses. The most commonly identified outbreak deficiencies in drinking water-associated outbreaks were Legionella in plumbing systems (57.6%), untreated ground water (24.2%), and distribution system deficiencies (12.1%), suggesting that efforts to identify and correct these deficiencies could prevent many outbreaks and illnesses associated with drinking water. In addition to the drinking water outbreaks, 12 outbreaks associated with other nonrecreational water were reported, comprising 234 cases of illness, 51 hospitalizations, and six deaths. Legionella accounted for 58% of these outbreaks, 42% of illnesses, 96% of hospitalizations, and all deaths. Public health, regulatory, and industry professionals can use this information to target prevention efforts against pathogens, infrastructure problems, and water sources associated with waterborne disease outbreaks.

  13. The 2009-2010 arctic stratospheric winter - general evolution, mountain waves and predictability of an operational weather forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Nishii, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2011-12-01

    The relatively warm 2009-2010 Arctic winter was an exceptional one as the North Atlantic Oscillation index attained persistent extreme negative values. Here, selected aspects of the Arctic stratosphere during this winter inspired by the analysis of the international field experiment RECONCILE are presented. First of all, and as a kind of reference, the evolution of the polar vortex in its different phases is documented. Special emphasis is put on explaining the formation of the exceptionally cold vortex in mid winter after a sequence of stratospheric disturbances which were caused by upward propagating planetary waves. A major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) occurring near the end of January 2010 concluded the anomalous cold vortex period. Wave ice polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by spaceborne remote-sensing instruments over the Arctic during the cold period in January 2010. Here, one such case observed over Greenland is analysed in more detail and an attempt is made to correlate flow information of an operational numerical weather prediction model to the magnitude of the mountain-wave induced temperature fluctuations. Finally, it is shown that the forecasts of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system for the onset of the major SSW were very skilful and the ensemble spread was very small. However, the ensemble spread increased dramatically after the major SSW, displaying the strong non-linearity and internal variability involved in the SSW event.

  14. The 2009-2010 Arctic stratospheric winter - general evolution, mountain waves and predictability of an operational weather forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Nishii, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2012-04-01

    The relatively warm 2009-2010 Arctic winter was an exceptional one as the North Atlantic Oscillation index attained persistent extreme negative values. Here, selected aspects of the Arctic stratosphere during this winter inspired by the analysis of the international field experiment RECONCILE are presented. First of all, and as a kind of reference, the evolution of the polar vortex in its different phases is documented. Special emphasis is put on explaining the formation of the exceptionally cold vortex in mid winter after a sequence of stratospheric disturbances which were caused by upward propagating planetary waves. A major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) occurring near the end of January 2010 concluded the anomalous cold vortex period. Wave ice polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by spaceborne remote-sensing instruments over the Arctic during the cold period in January 2010. Here, one such case observed over Greenland is analysed in more detail and an attempt is made to correlate flow information of an operational numerical weather prediction model to the magnitude of the mountain-wave induced temperature fluctuations. Finally, it is shown that the forecasts of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system for the onset of the major SSW were very skilful and the ensemble spread was very small. However, the ensemble spread increased dramatically after the major SSW, displaying the strong non-linearity and internal variability involved in the SSW event.

  15. Assessment of dietary lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene intakes and sources in the Spanish survey of dietary intake (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Estévez-Santiago, Rocío; Beltrán-de-Miguel, Beatriz; Olmedilla-Alonso, Begoña

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the intake and major dietary sources of lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene (non-provitamin A carotenoids) in Spain using food consumption data from the Spanish National Dietary Intake Survey (2009-2010). Three-day diaries and one 24-h recall were used to collect dietary data and a software application that includes HPLC data was used. Average intake of those carotenoids was 4290.8 μg/d (67.1% total carotenoid intake), mainly from vegetables (3414.0 μg/d), followed by fruits (393.5 μg/d), oils/fats (204.0 μg/d) and eggs/egg products (170.0 μg/d). Main sources of lutein and zeaxanthin were vegetables (62.9% total diet, 1235.2 μg/person/d). Lycopene intake was 3055.6 μg/d (71.2% of non-provitamin A carotenoids), mainly from tomato and by-products (86.3%) and watermelon. Red- and orange-colored fruits and vegetables were the major contributors of non-provitamin carotenoids (3219.0 μg/person/d). Balanced diets should favor fruits and vegetables over other dietary sources (oils, eggs, processed foods) that contain components to be consumed with moderation. PMID:26903293

  16. Pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection in pregnant and nonpregnant women in Spain (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Suárez-Varela, María Morales; González-Candelas, Fernando; Astray, Jenaro; Alonso, Jordi; Garin, Olatz; Castro, Ady; Galán, Juan C; Baricot, Maretva; Castilla, Jesús; Godoy, Pere; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Martin, Vicente; Mayoral, José M; Pumarola, Tomás; Quintana, José M; Tamames, Sonia; Llopis-González, Agustín; Dominguez, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to compare the main features of infection with pandemic influenza A virus in pregnant and nonpregnant women admitted to hospitals in Spain during the first waves of the 2009-2010 influenza pandemic. This was a prospective (November 2009 to June 2010), multicenter observational study. All cases were women of reproductive age who had not been vaccinated against seasonal or pandemic influenza A. Influenza infection was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The sociodemographic and clinical data of all cases were reviewed. A total of 219 inpatients, including 49 pregnant women and 170 nonpregnant women, were enrolled in the study upon admission to participating hospitals. The most substantially different symptoms between the groups were respiratory distress and unilobar consolidation, both of which were more frequent among nonpregnant women. Antibiotics and systemic corticosteroids were more frequently used in nonpregnant women; however, there were no differences in the rates of treatment with antivirals. Our findings indicated that the compared with nonpregnant women, pregnant women in this study did not have significantly different symptoms and were not at increased risk of complications from pandemic influenza virus infection.

  17. Surveillance of travel-associated gastrointestinal infections in Norway, 2009-2010: are they all actually imported?

    PubMed

    Guzman-Herrador, B; Vold, L; Nygard, K

    2012-10-11

    The Norwegian Surveillance System for Communicable Diseases (MSIS) includes variables related to travel for clinicians to fill when notifying travel-associated infections. We measured the completeness and validated the travel-history information for salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, giardiasis and shigellosis reported in 2009-2010. Of all 8,978 selected infections in MSIS, 8,122 (91%) were reported with place of infection of which 5,236 (65%) were notified as acquired abroad, including 5,017 with symptoms. Of these, 2,972 (59%) notifications had information on both date of arrival in Norway and date of symptom onset, so time between travel and illness onset could be assessed. Taking in account the incubation period, of the 1,435 infections reported as travel-associated and for which symptom onset occurred after return to Norway, 1,404 (98%) would have indeed been acquired abroad. We found a high level of completeness for the variable 'place of infection'. Our evaluation suggests that the validity of this information is high. However, incomplete data in the variables 'return date to Norway' and 'date of symptoms onset', only allowed assessment of the biological plausibility of being infected abroad for 59% of the cases. We encourage clinicians to report more complete travel information. High quality information on travel-associated gastrointestinal infections is crucial for understanding trends in domestic and imported cases and evaluating implemented control measures.

  18. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM Primary-Level Mathematics Measures (Grades K-2), 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Saez, Leilani; Jamgochian, Elisa; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In the following technical report, we present evidence of the technical adequacy of the easyCBM[R] math measures in grades K-2. In addition to reliability information, we present criterion-related validity evidence, both concurrent and predictive, and construct validity evidence. The results represent data gathered throughout the 2009/2010 school…

  19. Implementation of Effective Intervention: An Empirical Study to Evaluate the Efficacy of Fountas & Pinnell's Leveled Literacy Intervention System (LLI). 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ransford-Kaldon, Carolyn R.; Flynt, E. Sutton; Ross, Cristin L.; Franceschini, Louis; Zoblotsky, Todd; Huang, Ying; Gallagher, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    This report summarizes evaluation results for an efficacy study of the Leveled Literacy Intervention system (LLI) implemented in Tift County Schools (TCS) in Georgia and the Enlarged City School District of Middletown (ECSDM) in New York during the 2009-2010 school year. Developed by Fountas & Pinnell (2009) and published by Heinemann, LLI is…

  20. CDC Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza during the 2009-2010 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides guidance to help decrease the spread of flu among students and school staff during the 2009-2010 school year. This document expands upon earlier school guidance documents by providing a menu of tools that school and health officials can choose from based on conditions in their area. It recommends actions to take this school…

  1. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM[R] Mathematics Measures: Grades 3-8, 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nese, Joseph F. T.; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Anderson, Daniel; Jamgochian, Elisa M.; Kamata, Akihito; Saez, Leilani; Park, Bitnara J.; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In this technical report, data are presented on the practical utility, reliability, and validity of the easyCBM[R] mathematics (2009-2010 version) measures for students in grades 3-8 within four districts in two states. Analyses include: minimum acceptable within-year growth; minimum acceptable year-end benchmark performance; internal and…

  2. A Mobile Learning Module for High School Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Tzu-Yen; Chen, Che-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Although fieldwork is always cited as an important component of geographic education, there are many obstacles for executing high school fieldwork. Mobile electronic products are becoming popular and some schools are able to acquire these devices for mobile learning. This study attempts to provide a mobile-assisted means of guiding students…

  3. Enhancing Fieldwork Learning with Technology: Practitioner's Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Katharine E.; Mauchline, Alice L.; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian; France, Derek

    2013-01-01

    This research paper reports the findings from an international survey of fieldwork practitioners on their use of technology to enhance fieldwork teaching and learning. It was found that there was high information technology usage before and after time in the field, but some were also using portable devices such as smartphones and global…

  4. Interaction, Transference, and Subjectivity: A Psychoanalytic Approach to Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Linda Lundgaard

    2012-01-01

    Fieldwork is one of the important methods in educational, social, and organisational research. In fieldwork, the researcher takes residence for a shorter or longer period amongst the subjects and settings to be studied. The aim of this is to study the culture of people: how people seem to make sense of their lives and which moral, professional,…

  5. Assessment in Fieldwork Courses: What Are We Rating?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannon, Sian

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork exists as a component of many library schools' curricula. Site supervisors, students, and the schools themselves all play a role. A final part of most fieldwork experiences involves the use of an evaluation form filled out by a site supervisor about the student. In this study, forty seven evaluation forms were collected and analyzed…

  6. The Materiality of Fieldwork: An Ontology of Feminist Becoming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Sara M.

    2013-01-01

    Through the materiality of fieldwork at a high-achieving high-poverty high school, I discuss how the collision between practices of feminist methodology and the materiality of fieldwork forced me to rethink the "feminist" in feminist research. Using the work of Karen Barad, this material-discursive account of methodology as ontology…

  7. Residue analyses and exposure assessment of the Irish population to nitrofuran metabolites from different food commodities in 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Radovnikovic, Anita; Conroy, Emma-Rose; Gibney, Mike; O'Mahony, John; Danaher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    An exposure assessment to nitrofuran residues was performed for three human populations (adults, teenagers and children), based on residue analyses of foods of animal origin (liver, honey, eggs and aquaculture) covering the 2-year period 2009-2010. The occurrence of nitrofuran metabolites in food on the Irish market was determined for the selected period using the data from Ireland's National Food Residue Database (NFRD) and from results obtained from the analysis of retail samples (aquaculture and honey). Laboratory analyses of residues were performed by methods validated in accordance with Commission Decision 2002/657/EC regarding performance of the analytical method and interpretation of results. Semicarbazide (SEM) was the contaminant most frequently identified and its content ranged from 0.09 to 1.27 μg kg(-1). SEM is currently used as a marker of nitrofuran abuse, but it may also occur from other sources. The presence of nitrofuran metabolite 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ) was detected in two aquaculture samples (prawns) at 1.63 and 1.14 μg kg(-1), but such a low number of positive cases did not present sufficient data for a full AOZ exposure assessment. Therefore, the evaluation of exposure was focused on SEM-containing food groups only. Exposure assessments were completed using a probabilistic approach that generated 10 iterations. The results of both the upper- and lower-bound exposure assessments demonstrate that SEM exposure for Irish adults, teenagers and children from selected food commodities are well below EFSA-estimated safe levels.

  8. Dynamics of carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of the Florida Reef Tract (2009-2010): Evidence for seasonal dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehllehner, Nancy; Langdon, Chris; Venti, Alyson; Kadko, David

    2016-05-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to lower the Ωar of reefal waters by 0.3-0.4 units by the end of century, making it more difficult for calcifying organisms to secrete calcium carbonate while at the same time making the environment more favorable for abiotic and biotic dissolution of the reefal framework. There is great interest in being able to project the point in time when coral reefs will cross the tipping point between being net depositional to net erosional in terms of their carbonate budgets. Periodic in situ assessments of the balance between carbonate production and dissolution that spans seasonal time scales may prove useful in monitoring and formulating projections of the impact of ocean acidification on reefal carbonate production. This study represents the first broad-scale geochemical survey of the rates of net community production (NCP) and net community calcification (NCC) across the Florida Reef Tract (FRT). Surveys were performed at approximately quarterly intervals in 2009-2010 across seven onshore-offshore transects spanning the upper, middle, and lower Florida Keys. Averaged across the FRT, the rates of NCP and NCC were positive during the spring/summer at 62 ± 7 and 17 ± 2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively, and negative during the fall/winter at -33 ± 6 and -7 ± 2 mmol m-2 d-1. The most significant finding of the study was that the northernmost reef is already net erosional (-1.1 ± 0.4 kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1) and midreefs to the south were net depositional on an annual basis (0.4 ± 0.1 kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1) but erosional during the fall and winter. Only the two southernmost reefs were net depositional year-round. These results indicate that parts of the FRT have already crossed the tipping point for carbonate production and other parts are getting close.

  9. Environmental chemicals mediated the effect of old housing on adult health problems: US NHANES, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Bramley, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Housing conditions affect occupants continuously, and health interventions have shown a positive association between housing investment or improvement and occupant's health. However, the sources of the housing problems were less understood. Since it was observed that lead dust and chloroanisoles released from housing (materials) as indoor pollutants affected child's health, we now aimed to examine the relationships among built year, environmental chemicals and individual health in adults in a national and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2010, including demographics, housing characteristics, self-reported health status, biomarkers and blood and urinary chemical concentrations. Adults aged 20 and above were included for statistical analysis (n = 5,793). Analysis involved chi-square test, t test, and survey-weighted general linear regression and logistic regression modelling. People who resided in older housing built before 1990 tended to report chronic bronchitis, liver problems, stroke, heart failure, diabetes, asthma and emphysema. Higher values in HDL cholesterol, blood lead and blood cadmium and having positive responses of hepatitis A, B, C and E antibodies among occupants were also observed. Furthermore, higher environmental chemical concentrations related to old housing including urinary cadmium, cobalt, platinum, mercury, 2,5-dichlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol concentrations and mono-cyclohexyl phthalate and mono-isobutyl phthalate metabolites were shown in occupants as well. Older housing (≥30 years) seemed to contribute to the amount of environmental chemicals that affected human health. Regular monitoring, upgrading and renovation of housing to remove environmental chemicals and policy to support people in deprived situations against environmental injustice would be needed.

  10. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Q fever in goats on commercial dairy goat farms in the Netherlands, 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of Coxiella burnetii in dairy goat farms in the Netherlands and to identify risk factors for farm and goat seropositivity before mandatory vaccination started. We approached 334 eligible farms with more than 100 goats for serum sampling and a farm questionnaire. Per farm, median 21 goats were sampled. A farm was considered positive when at least one goat tested ELISA positive. Results In total, 2,828 goat serum samples from 123 farms were available. Farm prevalence was 43.1% (95%CI: 34.3%-51.8%). Overall goat seroprevalence was 21.4% (95%CI: 19.9%-22.9%) and among the 53 positive farms 46.6% (95%CI: 43.8%-49.3%). Multivariable logistic regression analysis included 96 farms and showed that farm location within 8 kilometres proximity from a bulk milk PCR positive farm, location in a municipality with high cattle density (≥ 100 cattle per square kilometre), controlling nuisance animals through covering airspaces, presence of cats or dogs in the goat stable, straw imported from abroad or unknown origin and a herd size above 800 goats were independent risk factors associated with Q fever on farm level. At animal level almost identical risk factors were found, with use of windbreak curtain and artificial insemination as additional risk factors. Conclusion In 2009-2010, the seroprevalence in dairy goats in the Netherlands increased on animal and farm level compared to a previous study in 2008. Risk factors suggest spread from relatively closely located bulk milk-infected small ruminant farms, next to introduction and spread from companion animals, imported straw and use of artificial insemination. In-depth studies investigating the role of artificial insemination and bedding material are needed, while simultaneously general biosecurity measures should be updated, such as avoiding companion animals and vermin entering the stables, next to advice on farm stable constructions on how to prevent introduction

  11. Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Giffen, Neil R; Reasor, R. Scott; Campbell, Claire L.

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including

  12. Enhancing fieldwork learning using blended learning, GIS and remote supervision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Wouter A.; Alberti, Koko; Karssenberg, Derek

    2015-04-01

    Fieldwork is an important part of education in geosciences and essential to put theoretical knowledge into an authentic context. Fieldwork as teaching tool can take place in various forms, such as field-tutorial, excursion, or supervised research. Current challenges with fieldwork in education are to incorporate state-of-the art methods for digital data collection, on-site GIS-analysis and providing high-quality feedback to large groups of students in the field. We present a case on first-year earth-sciences fieldwork with approximately 80 students in the French Alps focused on geological and geomorphological mapping. Here, students work in couples and each couple maps their own fieldwork area to reconstruct the formative history. We present several major improvements for this fieldwork using a blended-learning approach, relying on open source software only. An important enhancement to the French Alps fieldwork is improving students' preparation. In a GIS environment, students explore their fieldwork areas using existing remote sensing data, a digital elevation model and derivatives to formulate testable hypotheses before the actual fieldwork. The advantage of this is that the students already know their area when arriving in the field, have started to apply the empirical cycle prior to their field visit, and are therefore eager to investigate their own research questions. During the fieldwork, students store and analyze their field observations in the same GIS environment. This enables them to get a better overview of their own collected data, and to integrate existing data sources also used in the preparation phase. This results in a quicker and enhanced understanding by the students. To enable remote access to observational data collected by students, the students synchronize their data daily with a webserver running a web map application. Supervisors can review students' progress remotely, examine and evaluate their observations in a GIS, and provide

  13. Fieldwork online: a GIS-based electronic learning environment for supervising fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberti, Koko; Marra, Wouter; Baarsma, Rein; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Fieldwork comes in many forms: individual research projects in unique places, large groups of students on organized fieldtrips, and everything in between those extremes. Supervising students in often distant places can be a logistical challenge and requires a significant time investment of their supervisors. We developed an online application for remote supervision of students on fieldwork. In our fieldworkonline webapp, which is accessible through a web browser, students can upload their field data in the form of a spreadsheet with coordinates (in a system of choice) and data-fields. Field data can be any combination of quantitative or qualitative data, and can contain references to photos or other documents uploaded to the app. The student's data is converted to a map with data-points that contain all the data-fields and links to photos and documents associated with that location. Supervisors can review the data of their students and provide feedback on observations, or geo-referenced feedback on the map. Similarly, students can ask geo-referenced questions to their supervisors. Furthermore, supervisors can choose different basemaps or upload their own. Fieldwork online is a useful tool for supervising students at a distant location in the field and is most suitable for first-order feedback on students' observations, can be used to guide students to interesting locations, and allows for short discussions on phenomena observed in the field. We seek user that like to use this system, we are able to provide support and add new features if needed. The website is built and controlled using Flask, an open-source Python Framework. The maps are generated and controlled using MapServer and OpenLayers, and the database is built in PostgreSQL with PostGIS support. Fieldworkonline and all tools used to create it are open-source. Experience fieldworkonline at our demo during this session, or online at fieldworkonline.geo.uu.nl (username: EGU2016, password: Vienna).

  14. Changes in mean intake of fatty acids and intake of saturated and trans fats from potatoes: NHANES 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Storey, Maureen L; Anderson, Patricia A

    2015-05-01

    Studies have shown that higher than usual intakes of trans fatty acids (TFAs) have adverse effects on blood lipids. Because of this, in 2006 the US FDA mandated labeling of TFAs on food packages. The food and restaurant industries, including the potato industry, reformulated their foods to reduce or eliminate partially hydrogenated vegetable oils and TFAs. Before mandatory labeling, grain-based desserts, yeast breads, and French-fried potatoes (FFPs) were the top sources of TFAs in the food supply; by 2007, potato food manufacturers and quick-service restaurants had reduced or eliminated TFAs without increasing saturated fatty acids (SFAs). FFPs are no longer a source of TFAs in the food supply. This study examined energy and fatty acid intake among children aged 6-11 y, adolescents aged 12-18 y, and adults aged ≥19 y across 3 time periods by using data from the NHANES 2005-2006, 2007-2008, and 2009-2010. On average, intakes of total energy, total fat, SFAs, and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) decreased significantly between 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 among children and adolescents; however, the intake of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) did not change. Among adults, intakes of total fat, SFAs, and MUFAs decreased; however, total energy and PUFA intake did not change. On the day of the 2009-2010 survey, ∼13% of children and 10% of adolescents reported consuming fried FFPs, whereas <7% of adults reported consumption of fried FFPs. Intakes of SFAs and TFAs from fried FFPs decreased significantly between 2005-2006 and 2009-2010 among children, adolescents, and adults. This study confirms that intake of TFAs from FFPs is trivial.

  15. 50 CFR Table 5 (north) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears North of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 5 Table 5 (North) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES...

  16. 50 CFR Table 5 (south) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Open Access Gears South of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 5 Table 5 (South) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST COAST STATES...

  17. Association between monovalent influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 vaccine and pneumonia among the elderly in the 2009-2010 season in Japan: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Kyoko; Suzuki, Kanzo; Washio, Masakazu; Ohfuji, Satoko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Maeda, Akiko; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the association between monovalent influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 (H1N1pdm) vaccine and pneumonia in elderly people. Study design was a hospital-based, matched case-control study. Cases comprised patients ≥ 65 years old who had been newly diagnosed with pneumonia. For each case, 2 controls were defined as individuals with other diseases (not pneumonia) who were matched by sex, age, entry date, and the visited hospital. Study period was the interval from 1 September 2009 until 30 September 2010. Because a pandemic of influenza A (H1N1) occurred during study period, we analyzed selected subjects who had enrolled during the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic. We calculated the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for pneumonia in H1N1pdm-vaccinated subjects compared with unvaccinated subjects using a conditional logistic regression model to assess the association between H1N1pdm vaccine and pneumonia. The subjects during the period of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic were 20 cases and 40 controls. Subjects who had received H1N1pdm vaccine showed a significantly decreased OR for pneumonia (OR = 0.10, 95% CI = 0.01-0.98) compared with unvaccinated subjects. In conclusion, H1N1pdm vaccination may have prevented pneumonia among the elderly during the 2009-2010 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic in Japan.

  18. Doing Independent Overseas Fieldwork 1: Practicalities and Pitfalls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, David J.

    2000-01-01

    Provides an information guide about planning independent, human and physical geography fieldwork overseas and highlights potential problems that can occur. Includes a bibliography of essential information sources and addresses. (CMK)

  19. Point of View: The Need for Fieldwork in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Casey D.

    2014-01-01

    The author makes a case for fieldwork as having a strong capacity for increasing both science and nonscience majors' abilities to learn complex concepts, with the added benefit of actively engaging minority and female students in science.

  20. Promoting and Assessing "Deep Learning" in Geography Fieldwork: An Evaluation of Reflective Field Diaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dummer, Trevor J. B.; Cook, Ian G.; Parker, Sara L.; Barrett, Giles A.; Hull, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    Fieldwork is central to teaching and learning in geography. The assessment of student learning from fieldwork can, however, be problematic. This paper evaluates the use of reflective diaries for assessing level three undergraduate geography fieldwork. It is concluded that reflective fieldwork diaries offer an innovative and flexible approach to…

  1. Linked Extreme Weather Events during Winter 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 in the Context of Northern Hemisphere Circulation Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosart, L. F.; Archambault, H. M.; Cordeira, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Lance F. Bosart, Heather M. Archambault, and Jason M. Cordeira Department of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, University at Albany, State University of New York, Albany, New York The Northern Hemisphere (NH) planetary-scale circulation during winter 2009-2010 was characterized by an unusual combination of persistent high-latitude blocking and southward-displaced storm tracks, manifest by a strongly negative Arctic Oscillation (AO), in conjunction with a moderate El Nino event. The high-latitude blocking activity and southward-displaced storm tracks supported episodic cold-air outbreaks and enhanced storminess over parts of midlatitude eastern Asia, eastern North America, and western Europe as well as anomalous warmth over northeastern Canada and Greenland that delayed sea ice formation and ice thickening in these areas during winter 2009-2010. Although somewhat less extreme than winter 2009-2010, the first half of winter 2010-2011 was also characterized by high-latitude blocking and southward-displaced storm tracks (manifest by negative values of the AO) while the Pacific-North American (PNA), initially negative, became neutral in late December and most of January. Winter 2010-2011 was characterized by moderate La Nina conditions in contrast to moderate El Nino conditions that prevailed during winter 2009-2010. Despite the reversal of the ENSO phase from winter 2009-2010 to winter 2010-2011, high-latitude blocking activity and the associated southward-displaced storm tracks again allowed for episodic cold-air outbreaks and enhanced storminess over parts of midlatitude eastern Asia, central and eastern North America, and western Europe with delayed sea ice formation and thickening over the Davis Strait and adjacent regions during the first half of winter 2010-2011. Beginning in late January and continuing through early February 2011 the phase of the AO and the PNA reversed with the AO and PNA becoming positive and negative, respectively. This linked AO

  2. Negotiated interactive observation: Doing fieldwork in hospital settings.

    PubMed

    Wind, Gitte

    2008-08-01

    In this paper I discuss the possibilities and limitations of the ethnographer participating in the different on-going activities and events in highly specialised healthcare systems. The concept of participant observation is based on a number of assumptions, particularly that the ethnographer will become one of 'them' to be able to follow the steps belonging to the accepted ethnographic research practice of doing fieldwork. The character of fieldwork in highly specialised healthcare systems does not fit well with this assumption. I suggest that we need to rethink the concept of participant observation and I propose negotiated interactive observation as a more appropriate way to describe ethnographic fieldwork in a setting such as the hospital or the clinic.

  3. Influence of the Eurasian snow on the negative North Atlantic Oscillation in subseasonal forecasts of the cold winter 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsolini, Y. J.; Senan, R.; Vitart, F.; Balsamo, G.; Weisheimer, A.; Doblas-Reyes, F. J.

    2016-08-01

    The winter 2009/2010 was remarkably cold and snowy over North America and across Eurasia, from Europe to the Far East, coinciding with a pronounced negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). While previous studies have investigated the origin and persistence of this anomalously negative NAO phase, we have re-assessed the role that the Eurasian snowpack could have played in contributing to its maintenance. Many observational and model studies have indicated that the autumn Eurasian snow cover influences circulation patterns over high northern latitudes. To investigate that role, we have performed a suite of forecasts with the coupled ocean-atmosphere ensemble prediction system from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Pairs of 2-month ensemble forecasts with either realistic or else randomized snow initial conditions are used to demonstrate how an anomalously thick snowpack leads to an initial cooling over the continental land masses of Eurasia and, within 2 weeks, to the anomalies that are characteristic of a negative NAO. It is also associated with enhanced vertical wave propagation into the stratosphere and deceleration of the polar night jet. The latter then exerts a downward influence into the troposphere maximizing in the North Atlantic region, which establishes itself within 2 weeks. We compare the forecasted NAO index in our simulations with those from several operational forecasts of the winter 2009/2010 made at the ECWMF, and highlight the importance of relatively high horizontal resolution.

  4. Delayed norovirus epidemic in the 2009-2010 season in Japan: potential relationship with intensive hand sanitizer use for pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Inaida, S; Shobugawa, Y; Matsuno, S; Saito, R; Suzuki, H

    2016-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) epidemics normally peak in December in Japan; however, the peak in the 2009-2010 season was delayed until the fourth week of January 2010. We suspected intensive hand hygiene that was conducted for a previous pandemic influenza in 2009 as the cause of this delay. We analysed the NoV epidemic trend, based on national surveillance data, and its associations with monthly output data for hand hygiene products, including alcohol-based skin antiseptics and hand soap. The delayed peak in the NoV incidence in the 2009-2010 season had the lowest number of recorded cases of the five seasons studied (2006-2007 to 2010-2011). GII.4 was the most commonly occurring genotype. The monthly relative risk of NoV and monthly output of both alcohol-based skin antiseptics and hand soap were significantly and negatively correlated. Our findings suggest an association between hand hygiene using these products and prevention of NoV transmission. PMID:27301793

  5. The Anomalous Winter of 1783-1784: Was the Laki Eruption or an Analog of the 2009-2010 Winter to Blame?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Arrigo, Rosanne; Seager, Richard; Smerdon, Jason E.; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Cook, Edward R.

    2011-01-01

    The multi ]stage eruption of the Icelandic volcano Laki beginning in June, 1783 is speculated to have caused unusual dry fog and heat in western Europe and cold in North America during the 1783 summer, and record cold and snow the subsequent winter across the circum-North Atlantic. Despite the many indisputable impacts of the Laki eruption, however, its effect on climate, particularly during the 1783.1784 winter, may be the most poorly constrained. Here we test an alternative explanation for the unusual conditions during this time: that they were caused primarily by a combined negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and an El Nino ]Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm event. A similar combination of NAO ]ENSO phases was identified as the cause of record cold and snowy conditions during the 2009.2010 winter in Europe and eastern North America. 600-year tree-ring reconstructions of NAO and ENSO indices reveal values in the 1783.1784 winter second only to their combined severity in 2009.2010. Data sources and model simulations support our hypothesis that a combined, negative NAO ]ENSO warm phase was the dominant cause of the anomalous winter of 1783.1784, and that these events likely resulted from natural variability unconnected to Laki.

  6. The student fieldwork experience: influencing factors and implications for learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Alan; Stokes, Alison

    2010-05-01

    Fieldwork has always been a crucial component of undergraduate geoscience degrees, yet our understanding of the learning processes that operate in a field environment is limited. Learning is a complex process, and there is increasing interest in the role played in this process by the affective domain, in particular the link between affect (emotion and attitude) and cognition (understanding). This presentation covers two UK-based studies that investigated the impact of residential geoscience fieldwork on students' affective responses (e.g. feelings, attitudes, motivations), and their subsequent learning outcomes; student affective responses are thought to be linked to the adoption of effective approaches to learning. The first study involved ~300 students from 7 UK universities undertaking residential field classes in, geography, earth and environmental sciences (GEES disciplines). Mixed-format surveys applied before and after fieldwork demonstrated significant effects in the affective domain. In general, student responses were very positive prior to fieldwork and became more positive as a result of the field experience. The data were analysed for any subgroup differences (gender, age, previous experience) but the only significant difference concerned levels of anxiety amongst some groups of students prior to fieldwork. However, post fieldwork surveys showed that the field experience mitigated these anxieties; for most it was not as bad as they thought it would be. This study demonstrated that fieldwork generated positive attitudes amongst students to their subject of study as well as development of ‘soft' interpersonal skills. The second study collected qualitative and quantitative data from 62 students at a single UK university before, during and after a nine day geologic mapping-training field course, a style of fieldwork not surveyed in the first study. As with the first study, pre-field class positive affects became strengthened, while negative feelings and

  7. Preservice Teachers: Investigations in Early Fieldwork and Mathematics Efficacy Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt-Ruiz, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    In this quasi-experimental study, 127 preservice teachers from two community colleges enrolled in a mathematics for teachers two-course sequence. Control and experimental groups were used to investigate the effect that fieldwork had on efficacy beliefs. The Mathematics for Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (MATHEMATICS TEACHING EFFICACY BELIEFS…

  8. Assessing Fieldwork Risk for Undergraduate Projects. Directions: JGHE Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgitt, David; Bullard, Jo

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the five steps involved in conducting risk assessment for fieldwork using two examples of typical student projects: (1) identity the hazards; (2) identify who might be harmed; (3) evaluate the risks; (4) record the findings; and (5) review the assessment periodically. Addresses expeditions and work overseas. (CMK)

  9. European Geography Higher Education Fieldwork and the Skills Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Glenda P.; Speake, Janet

    2012-01-01

    The Bologna Declaration focuses on skill acquisition as a means of improving student employability and fieldwork is considered to be a pivotal teaching method for geography students to obtain such skills. This paper presents results from a major substantive survey of European geography academics and students which investigated their perspectives…

  10. Learning in Authentic Contexts: Projects Integrating Spatial Technologies and Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Kuo-Hung

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, professional practice has been an issue of concern in higher education. The purpose of this study is to design students' projects to facilitate collaborative learning in authentic contexts. Ten students majoring in Management Information Systems conducted fieldwork with spatial technologies to collect data and provided information…

  11. Issues and Trends in Higher Education Biology Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Debbie

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the outcomes of a two-day Higher Education focus group meeting at Blencathra Field Centre, Cumbria, in November 2003. A review of the current status of fieldwork in undergraduate courses was undertaken. The data available indicates that although the number of students enrolling in Biological Science courses has increased, in…

  12. Ethical Challenges in Participant Observation: A Reflection on Ethnographic Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jun

    2008-01-01

    In this essay I reflect on the ethical challenges of ethnographic fieldwork I personally experienced in a female gambling study. By assuming a covert research role, I was able to observe natural occurrences of female gambling activities but unable to make peace with disturbing feelings of my research concealment. By making my study overt, I was…

  13. Integrating Fieldwork into Employment Counseling for Methadone-Treatment Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankertz, Laura; Spinelli, Michael; Magura, Stephen; Bali, Priti; Madison, Elizabeth M.; Staines, Graham L.; Horowitz, Emily; Guarino, Honoria; Grandy, Audrey; Fong, Chunki; Gomez, Augustin; Dimun, Amy; Friedman, Ellen

    2005-01-01

    An innovative employment counseling model, Customized Employment Supports, was developed for methadone-treatment patients, a population with historically low employment rates. The effectiveness of a key component of the model, "vocational fieldwork," the delivery of services in the community rather than only within the clinic, was assessed through…

  14. Applying Sequential Fieldwork Skills across Two International Field Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rydant, A. L.; Shiplee, Brian A.; Smith, John P.; Middlekauff, Bryon D.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the development of a conceptual model of fieldwork practice and the creation of an associated set of skills for the geosciences. The set of eight generic and seventeen specific skills is applied in two international field courses to demonstrate the utility of such a skills-centered model across a broad range of venues,…

  15. Georgia Folklife: A Bibliography for Teachers, Art Administrators, and Fieldworkers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzberg, Maggie

    This bibliography lists books, articles, and journals as well as a selection of sound recordings and videotapes to assist individuals and teachers researching the folklife of Georgia. Print resources are organized under 10 major categories including: (1) "General Folklife Studies"; (2) "Fieldwork Methodology"; (3) "Regional Folklife Studies"; (4)…

  16. Using Extension Fieldwork to Incorporate Experiential Learning into University Coursework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Kynda; Mahon, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a strategy for incorporating experiential learning into university coursework through the use of Extension fieldwork projects. In this case, undergraduate agribusiness management students construct business plans for primary agricultural industries and proposed new industries, such as food processing. Results of the study…

  17. The Future of Bioscience Fieldwork in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauchline, Alice L.; Peacock, Julie; Park, Julian R.

    2013-01-01

    Fieldwork is an important and often enjoyable part of learning in Bioscience degree courses, however it is unclear how the recent reforms to Higher Education (HE) may impact the future funding of outdoor learning. This paper reports on the findings from a recent survey of 30 HE Bioscience practitioners from across the UK. Their current level of…

  18. Private Practice: Benefits, Barriers and Strategies of Providing Fieldwork Placements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloggett, Kym; Kim, Nancy; Cameron, Debra

    2003-01-01

    An increasing number of occupational therapists enter private practice. Six practicing occupational therapists were surveyed regarding the benefits of fieldwork to occupational therapy students. Findings indicate benefits to the profession, to the clinician, and to the facility. Potential barriers were time, costs, travel, and legalities.…

  19. Scales of governance: the role of surveillance in facilitating new diplomacy during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Bell, Morag; Warren, Adam; Budd, Lucy

    2012-11-01

    The 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic has highlighted the importance of global health surveillance. Increasingly, global alerts are based on 'unexpected' 'events' detected by surveillance systems grounded in particular places. An emerging global governance literature investigates the supposedly disruptive impact of public health emergencies on mobilities in an interdependent world. Little consideration has been given to the varied scales of governance--local, national and global--that operate at different stages in the unfolding of an 'event', together with the interactions and tensions between them. By tracking the chronology of the H1N1 pandemic, this paper highlights an emergent dialogue between local and global scales. It also draws attention to moments of national autonomy across the global North and South which undermined the WHO drive for transnational cooperation. PMID:22884291

  20. Scales of governance: the role of surveillance in facilitating new diplomacy during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Bell, Morag; Warren, Adam; Budd, Lucy

    2012-11-01

    The 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic has highlighted the importance of global health surveillance. Increasingly, global alerts are based on 'unexpected' 'events' detected by surveillance systems grounded in particular places. An emerging global governance literature investigates the supposedly disruptive impact of public health emergencies on mobilities in an interdependent world. Little consideration has been given to the varied scales of governance--local, national and global--that operate at different stages in the unfolding of an 'event', together with the interactions and tensions between them. By tracking the chronology of the H1N1 pandemic, this paper highlights an emergent dialogue between local and global scales. It also draws attention to moments of national autonomy across the global North and South which undermined the WHO drive for transnational cooperation.

  1. PCR assay detects Mannheimia haemolytica in culture-negative pneumonic lung tissues of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) from outbreaks in the western USA, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Shanthalingam, Sudarvili; Goldy, Andrea; Bavananthasivam, Jegarubee; Subramaniam, Renuka; Batra, Sai Arun; Kugadas, Abirami; Raghavan, Bindu; Dassanayake, Rohana P; Jennings-Gaines, Jessica E; Killion, Halcyon J; Edwards, William H; Ramsey, Jennifer M; Anderson, Neil J; Wolff, Peregrine L; Mansfield, Kristin; Bruning, Darren; Srikumaran, Subramaniam

    2014-01-01

    Mannheimia haemolytica consistently causes severe bronchopneumonia and rapid death of bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) under experimental conditions. However, Bibersteinia trehalosi and Pasteurella multocida have been isolated from pneumonic bighorn lung tissues more frequently than M. haemolytica by culture-based methods. We hypothesized that assays more sensitive than culture would detect M. haemolytica in pneumonic lung tissues more accurately. Therefore, our first objective was to develop a PCR assay specific for M. haemolytica and use it to determine if this organism was present in the pneumonic lungs of bighorns during the 2009-2010 outbreaks in Montana, Nevada, and Washington, USA. Mannheimia haemolytica was detected by the species-specific PCR assay in 77% of archived pneumonic lung tissues that were negative by culture. Leukotoxin-negative M. haemolytica does not cause fatal pneumonia in bighorns. Therefore, our second objective was to determine if the leukotoxin gene was also present in the lung tissues as a means of determining the leukotoxicity of M. haemolytica that were present in the lungs. The leukotoxin-specific PCR assay detected leukotoxin gene in 91% of lung tissues that were negative for M. haemolytica by culture. Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, an organism associated with bighorn pneumonia, was detected in 65% of pneumonic bighorn lung tissues by PCR or culture. A PCR assessment of distribution of these pathogens in the nasopharynx of healthy bighorns from populations that did not experience an all-age die-off in the past 20 yr revealed that M. ovipneumoniae was present in 31% of the animals whereas leukotoxin-positive M. haemolytica was present in only 4%. Taken together, these results indicate that culture-based methods are not reliable for detection of M. haemolytica and that leukotoxin-positive M. haemolytica was a predominant etiologic agent of the pneumonia outbreaks of 2009-2010.

  2. Attitudes of the General Public and General Practitioners in Five Countries towards Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza Vaccines during Season 2009/2010

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Patricia R.; Bonnelye, Genevieve; Ducastel, Aurore; Szucs, Thomas D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Vaccination coverage rates for seasonal influenza are not meeting national and international targets. Here, we investigated whether the 2009/2010 A/H1N1 pandemic influenza affected the uptake of influenza vaccines. Methodology/Principal Findings In December 2009/January 2010 and April 2010, 500 randomly selected members of the general public in Germany, France, the United States, China, and Mexico were surveyed by telephone about vaccination for seasonal and A/H1N1 pandemic influenza. Also, in April 2010, 100 randomly selected general practitioners were surveyed. Adult vaccine coverage in December 2009/January 2010 for A/H1N1 pandemic and seasonal influenza were, respectively, 12% and 29% in France, 11% and 25% in Germany, 41% and 46% in the US, 13% and 30% in Mexico, and 12% and 10% in China. Adult uptake rates in April 2010 were higher in Mexico but similar or slightly lower in the other countries. Coverage rates in children were higher than in adults in the US, Mexico, and China but mostly lower in Germany and France. Germans and French viewed the threat of A/H1N1 pandemic influenza as low to moderate, whereas Mexicans, Americans, and Chinese viewed it as moderate to serious, opinions generally mirrored by general practitioners. The recommendation of a general practitioner was a common reason for receiving the pandemic vaccine, while not feeling at risk and concerns with vaccine safety and efficacy were common reasons for not being vaccinated. Inclusion of the A/H1N1 pandemic strain increased willingness to be vaccinated for seasonal influenza in the United States, Mexico, and China but not in Germany or France. Conclusions/Significance The 2009/2010 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic increased vaccine uptake rates for seasonal influenza in Mexico but had little effect in other countries. Accurate communication of health information, especially by general practitioners, is needed to improve vaccine coverage rates. PMID:23071519

  3. Coastal ocean variability in the US Pacific Northwest region: seasonal patterns, winter circulation, and the influence of the 2009-2010 El Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durski, Scott M.; Kurapov, Alexander L.; Allen, John S.; Kosro, P. Michael; Egbert, Gary D.; Shearman, R. Kipp; Barth, John A.

    2015-12-01

    A 2-km horizontal resolution ocean circulation model is developed for a large coastal region along the US Pacific Northwest (34-50N) to study how continental shelf, slope, and interior ocean variability influence each other. The model has been run for the time period September 2008-May 2011, driven by realistic surface momentum and heat fluxes obtained from an atmospheric model and lateral boundary conditions obtained from nesting in a global ocean model. The solution compares favorably to satellite measurements of sea surface temperature and sea surface height, observations of surface currents by high-frequency radars, mooring temperature time series, and glider temperature and salinity sections. The analysis is focused on the seasonal response of the coastal ocean with particular emphasis on the winter circulation patterns which have previously garnered relatively little attention. Interannual variability is examined through a comparison of the 2009-2010 winter influenced by El Niño and the winters in the preceding and following years. Strong northward winds combined with reduced surface cooling along the coast north of Cape Mendocino (40.4N) in winter 2009-2010, resulting in a vigorous downwelling season, characterized by relatively energetic northward currents and warmer ocean temperatures over the continental shelf and upper slope. An analysis of the time variability of the volume-averaged temperature and salinity in a coastal control volume (CV), that extends from 41 to 47N and offshore from the coast to the 200-m isobath, clearly shows relevant integrated characteristics of the annual cycle and the transitions between winter shelf circulation forced by northward winds and the summer circulation driven primarily by southward, upwelling-favorable winds. The analysis also reveals interesting interannual differences in these characteristics. In particular, the CV volume-average temperature remains notably warmer during January-March 2010 of the El Niño winter.

  4. Objectives and Constraints in Geographical Fieldwork: Teachers' Attitudes and Perspectives in Senior High Schools in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Lin-Fang; Foskett, Nicholas H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper considers the objectives for geographical fieldwork within senior high schools in Taiwan, and the constraints on the implementation and development of fieldwork. It introduces briefly the position of fieldwork in geography education in Taiwan, then uses a model adapted from the work of Boardman in 1974 and Smith in 1996 in England to…

  5. Using Peer Assessment of Fieldwork to Enhance Students' Practical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Mowafy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork training is a key component of several practical disciplines. In this study, students' peer assessment of fieldwork is explored as a method to improve their practical training. Peer assessment theories are first discussed. A framework for peer assessment of fieldwork is proposed, and the steps taken for preparation of students for…

  6. Chinese Junior High School Students' Perceptions of Geographic Fieldwork: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Daihu; Wang, Ziying; Xu, Di; Wang, Chuanbing; Deng, Zhengzheng

    2013-01-01

    After nearly ten years of implementation of the first junior high school geography standards, Chinese geography educators have been increasingly incorporating fieldwork into their geography teaching. This study examined student perceptions of fieldwork from an international perspective by reviewing student fieldwork reports and administering a…

  7. The collaborative model of fieldwork education: a blueprint for group supervision of students.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Debra J; DeIuliis, Elizabeth D

    2015-04-01

    Historically, occupational therapists have used a traditional one-to-one approach to supervision on fieldwork. Due to the impact of managed care on health-care delivery systems, a dramatic increase in the number of students needing fieldwork placement, and the advantages of group learning, the collaborative supervision model has evolved as a strong alternative to an apprenticeship supervision approach. This article builds on the available research to address barriers to model use, applying theoretical foundations of collaborative supervision to practical considerations for academic fieldwork coordinators and fieldwork educators as they prepare for participation in group supervision of occupational therapy and occupational therapy assistant students on level II fieldwork.

  8. Chlorine activation in the Arctic winter of 2009/2010 analyzed by combined use of JEM/SMILES and ACE-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuji, T.; Saitoh, N.; Sugita, T.; Kasai, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) equipped in the Japanese Experiment Module "KIBO" on board the International Space Station (ISS) had observed atmospheric minor constituents including ClO in the stratosphere and mesosphere from October 12, 2009 to April 21, 2010 with more than ten times the precision of other existing sensors due to its unprecedented high sensitivity with superconducting technology. The Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS), which is on board SCISAT-1, has been observing atmospheric minor constituents in the upper troposphere and stratosphere since March 11, 2004 by solar occultation technique. We have analyzed the SMILES Level 2 (L2) V2.1.5 research products and the ACE-FTS L2 V3.0 products to discuss the relationship between temperature and stratospheric minor gases related to ozone depletion and the time variation of 'Cl partitioning' in the Arctic winter of 2009/2010. The correlation between the SMILES L2r ClO concentration and temperature on 475 K and 525 K from mid-January to early February showed that the ClO concentrations were higher than 0.5 ppbv at equivalent latitudes higher than 70° and solar zenith angles lower than 96°, where the temperatures were well lower than 200 K; the ClO concentrations and the solar zenith angles had a positive correlation in the region where the ClO concentrations were higher than 0.5 ppbv. However, some data with high ClO concentration also occurred under relatively warmer conditions where PSCs were not expected to exist. The temperature histories of those data showed that they had experienced near ice frost point of ~187 K at 2-4 days before the observations, and then the temperatures drastically increased as much as 20 degrees just before the observations. We have analyzed a time-series of 'Cl partitioning' by using ClO, HOCl, and HCl observed by SMILES and HCl and ClONO2 observed by ACE-FTS inside the polar vortex in 2009/2010. HCl

  9. Neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility profile of pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dapat, Clyde; Kondo, Hiroki; Dapat, Isolde C; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Yasushi; Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Two new influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), peramivir and laninamivir, were approved in 2010 which resulted to four NAIs that were used during the 2010-2011 influenza season in Japan. This study aims to monitor the susceptibility of influenza virus isolates in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan to the four NAIs using the fluorescence-based 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) method. Outliers were identified using box-and-whisker plot analysis and full NA gene sequencing was performed to determine the mutations that are associated with reduction of susceptibility to NAIs. A total of 117 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 59 A(H3N2), and 18 type B viruses were tested before NAI treatment and eight A(H1N1)pdm09 and 1 type B viruses were examined from patients after NAI treatment in the two seasons. NA inhibition assay showed type A influenza viruses were more susceptible to NAIs than type B viruses. The peramivir and laninamivir IC₅₀ values of both type A and B viruses were significantly lower than the oseltamivir and zanamivir IC₅₀ values. Among influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, the prevalence of H274Y viruses increased from 0% in the 2009-2010 season to 3% in the 2010-2011 season. These H274Y viruses were resistant to oseltamivir and peramivir with 200-300 fold increase in IC₅₀ values but remained sensitive to zanamivir and laninamivir. Other mutations in NA, such as I222T and M241I were identified among the outliers. Among influenza A(H3N2) viruses, two outliers were identified with D151G and T148I mutations, which exhibited a reduction in susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir, respectively. Among type B viruses, no outliers were identified to the four NAIs. For paired samples that were collected before and after drug treatment, three (3/11; 27.3%) H274Y viruses were identified among A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses after oseltamivir treatment but no outliers were found in the laninamivir-treatment group (n=3). Despite widespread use of

  10. NAESP 2009-2010 Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The NAESP (National Association of Elementary School Principals) Platform consists of a summary of all resolutions adopted by business meetings and, since 1974, by Delegate Assemblies. Each resolution presented for action by the Delegate Assembly carries with it a rationale for its adoption as well as the specific area and section of the Platform…

  11. Clinical aspects of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases reported during the pandemic in Brazil, 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Érika Valeska; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the clinical aspects of cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Brazil. Methods: A descriptive study of cases reported in Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN), 2009-2010. Results: As the final classification, we obtained 53,797 (56.79%) reported cases confirmed as a new influenza virus subtype, and 40,926 (43.21%) cases discarded. Fever was the most common sign, recorded in 99.74% of the confirmed and 98.92% of the discarded cases. Among the confirmed cases, the presence of comorbidities was reported in 32.53%, and in 38.29% of the discarded cases. The case fatality rate was 4.04%; 3,267 pregnant women were confirmed positive for influenza A new viral subtype and 2,730 of them were cured. The case fatality rate of pregnant women was 6.88%. Conclusion: The findings suggested concern of the health system with pregnant women, and patients with comorbidities and quality of care may have favored a lower mortality. We recommend that, when caring for patients with severe respiratory symptoms, with comorbidities, or pregnant women, health professionals should consider the need for hospital care, as these factors make up a worse prognosis of infection by the pandemic influenza virus. PMID:26154537

  12. Coral-based climate records from tropical South Atlantic: 2009/2010 ENSO event in C and O isotopes from Porites corals (Rocas Atoll, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Natan S; Sial, Alcídes N; Kikuchi, Ruy K P; Ferreira, Valderez P; Ullmann, Clemens V; Frei, Robert; Cunha, Adriana M C

    2015-01-01

    Coral skeletons contain records of past environmental conditions due to their long life span and well calibrated geochemical signatures. C and O isotope records of corals are especially interesting, because they can highlight multidecadal variability of local climate conditions beyond the instrumental record, with high fidelity and sub-annual resolution. Although, in order to get an optimal geochemical signal in coral skeleton, sampling strategies must be followed. Here we report one of the first coral-based isotopic record from the Equatorial South Atlantic from two colonies of Porites astreoides from the Rocas Atoll (offshore Brazil), a new location for climate reconstruction. We present time series of isotopic variation from profiles along the corallite valley of one colony and the apex of the corallite fan of the other colony. Significant differences in the isotopic values between the two colonies are observed, yet both record the 2009/2010 El Niño event - a period of widespread coral bleaching - as anomalously negative δ18O values (up to -1 permil). δ13C is found to be measurably affected by the El Niño event in one colony, by more positive values (+0.39 ‰), and together with a bloom of endolithic algae, may indicate physiological alteration of this colony. Our findings indicate that corals from the Rocas Atoll can be used for monitoring climate oscillations in the tropical South Atlantic Ocean. PMID:26536856

  13. Surveillance for adverse events following receipt of pandemic 2009 H1N1 vaccine in the Post-Licensure Rapid Immunization Safety Monitoring (PRISM) System, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Yih, W Katherine; Lee, Grace M; Lieu, Tracy A; Ball, Robert; Kulldorff, Martin; Rett, Melisa; Wahl, Peter M; McMahill-Walraven, Cheryl N; Platt, Richard; Salmon, Daniel A

    2012-06-01

    The Post-Licensure Rapid Immunization Safety Monitoring (PRISM) system is a cohort-based active surveillance network initiated by the US Department of Health and Human Services to supplement preexisting and other vaccine safety monitoring systems in tracking the safety of monovalent pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine in the United States during 2009-2010. PRISM investigators conducted retrospective analysis to determine whether 2009 H1N1 vaccination was associated with increased risk of any of 14 prespecified outcomes. Five health insurance and associated companies with 38 million members and 9 state/city immunization registries contributed records on more than 2.6 million doses of 2009 H1N1 vaccine. Data on outcomes came from insurance claims. Complementary designs (self-controlled risk interval, case-centered, and current-vs.-historical comparison) were used to optimize control for confounding and statistical power. The self-controlled risk interval analysis of chart-confirmed Guillain-Barré syndrome found an elevated but not statistically significant incidence rate ratio following receipt of inactivated 2009 H1N1 vaccine (incidence rate ratio = 2.50, 95% confidence interval: 0.42, 15.0) and no cases following live attenuated 2009 H1N1 vaccine. The study did not control for infection prior to Guillain-Barré syndrome, which may have been a confounder. The risks of other health outcomes of interest were generally not significantly elevated after 2009 H1N1 vaccination.

  14. Coral-based climate records from tropical South Atlantic: 2009/2010 ENSO event in C and O isotopes from Porites corals (Rocas Atoll, Brazil).

    PubMed

    Pereira, Natan S; Sial, Alcídes N; Kikuchi, Ruy K P; Ferreira, Valderez P; Ullmann, Clemens V; Frei, Robert; Cunha, Adriana M C

    2015-01-01

    Coral skeletons contain records of past environmental conditions due to their long life span and well calibrated geochemical signatures. C and O isotope records of corals are especially interesting, because they can highlight multidecadal variability of local climate conditions beyond the instrumental record, with high fidelity and sub-annual resolution. Although, in order to get an optimal geochemical signal in coral skeleton, sampling strategies must be followed. Here we report one of the first coral-based isotopic record from the Equatorial South Atlantic from two colonies of Porites astreoides from the Rocas Atoll (offshore Brazil), a new location for climate reconstruction. We present time series of isotopic variation from profiles along the corallite valley of one colony and the apex of the corallite fan of the other colony. Significant differences in the isotopic values between the two colonies are observed, yet both record the 2009/2010 El Niño event - a period of widespread coral bleaching - as anomalously negative δ18O values (up to -1 permil). δ13C is found to be measurably affected by the El Niño event in one colony, by more positive values (+0.39 ‰), and together with a bloom of endolithic algae, may indicate physiological alteration of this colony. Our findings indicate that corals from the Rocas Atoll can be used for monitoring climate oscillations in the tropical South Atlantic Ocean.

  15. Individual Vaccination as Nash Equilibrium in a SIR Model with Application to the 2009-2010 Influenza A (H1N1) Epidemic in France.

    PubMed

    Laguzet, Laetitia; Turinici, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    The vaccination against ongoing epidemics is seldom compulsory but remains one of the most classical means to fight epidemic propagation. However, recent debates concerning the innocuity of vaccines and their risk with respect to the risk of the epidemic itself lead to severe vaccination campaign failures, and new mass behaviors appeared driven by individual self-interest. Prompted by this context, we analyze, in a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model, whether egocentric individuals can reach an equilibrium with the rest of the society. Using techniques from the "Mean Field Games" theory, we extend previous results and show that an equilibrium exists and characterizes completely the individual best vaccination strategy (with or without discounting). We also compare with a strategy based only on overall societal optimization and exhibit a situation with nonnegative price of anarchy. Finally, we apply the theory to the 2009-2010 Influenza A (H1N1) vaccination campaign in France and hint that a group of individuals stopped vaccinating at levels that indicated a pessimistic perception of the risk of the vaccine. PMID:26443437

  16. Individual Vaccination as Nash Equilibrium in a SIR Model with Application to the 2009-2010 Influenza A (H1N1) Epidemic in France.

    PubMed

    Laguzet, Laetitia; Turinici, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    The vaccination against ongoing epidemics is seldom compulsory but remains one of the most classical means to fight epidemic propagation. However, recent debates concerning the innocuity of vaccines and their risk with respect to the risk of the epidemic itself lead to severe vaccination campaign failures, and new mass behaviors appeared driven by individual self-interest. Prompted by this context, we analyze, in a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model, whether egocentric individuals can reach an equilibrium with the rest of the society. Using techniques from the "Mean Field Games" theory, we extend previous results and show that an equilibrium exists and characterizes completely the individual best vaccination strategy (with or without discounting). We also compare with a strategy based only on overall societal optimization and exhibit a situation with nonnegative price of anarchy. Finally, we apply the theory to the 2009-2010 Influenza A (H1N1) vaccination campaign in France and hint that a group of individuals stopped vaccinating at levels that indicated a pessimistic perception of the risk of the vaccine.

  17. Students' Perception of Biology Fieldwork: The Example of Students Undertaking a Preliminary Year at a UK University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goulder, Raymond; Scott, Graham W.; Scott, Lisa J.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely held among biology teachers that fieldwork is valuable, but little is heard about students' perception of fieldwork or about the reasons for their liking or disliking fieldwork. This paper uses data from students to explore the hypotheses (1) that biology students with a positive perception of fieldwork have a less positive…

  18. Technical Report for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators on CDC Guidance for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza during the 2009-2010 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Report includes detailed information on the reasons for the strategies presented in the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) "Guidance for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza During the 2009-2010 School Year" and suggestions on how to use them. The guidance is designed to decrease exposure to regular seasonal flu and 2009 H1N1 flu…

  19. Science in the Wild: Technology Needs and Opportunities in Scientific Fieldwork

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guice, Jon; Hoffower, Heidi; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Considering that much contemporary natural science involves field expeditions, fieldwork is an under-studied topic. There is also little information technology specifically designed to support scientific fieldwork, aside from portable scientific instruments. This article describes a variety of fieldwork practices in an interdisciplinary research area, proposes a framework linking types of fieldwork to types of needs in information technology, and identifies promising opportunities for technology development. Technologies that are designed to support the integration of field observations and samples with laboratory work are likely to aid nearly all research teams who conduct fieldwork. However, technologies that support highly detailed representations of field sites will likely trigger the deepest changes in work practice. By way of illustration, we present brief case studies of how fieldwork is done today and how it might be conducted with the introduction of new information technologies.

  20. Feedback on students' clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education

    PubMed Central

    de Beer, Marianne; Mårtensson, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim Feedback on clinical reasoning skills during fieldwork education is regarded as vital in occupational therapy students' professional development. The nature of supervisors' feedback however, could be confirmative and/or corrective and corrective feedback could be with or without suggestions on how to improve. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of supervisors' feedback on final-year occupational therapy students' clinical reasoning skills through comparing the nature of feedback with the students' subsequent clinical reasoning ability. Method A mixed-method approach with a convergent parallel design was used combining the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data. From focus groups and interviews with students, data were collected and analysed qualitatively to determine how the students experienced the feedback they received from their supervisors. By quantitatively comparing the final practical exam grades with the nature of the feedback, their fieldwork End-of-Term grades and average academic performance it became possible to merge the results for comparison and interpretation. Results Students' clinical reasoning skills seem to be improved through corrective feedback if accompanied by suggestions on how to improve, irrespective of their average academic performance. Supervisors were inclined to underrate high performing students and overrate lower performing students. Conclusions Students who obtained higher grades in the final practical examinations received more corrective feedback with suggestions on how to improve from their supervisors. Confirmative feedback alone may not be sufficient for improving the clinical reasoning skills of students. PMID:26256854

  1. GFS water vapor forecast error evaluated over the 2009-2010 West Coast cool season using the MET/MODE object analyses package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, W. L.; Sukovich, E.; Tollerud, E. I.; Jensen, T.; Yuan, H.; Wick, G. A.; Bullock, R.; Hmt-Dtc Collaboration Project

    2010-12-01

    Research over the last decade and a half confirms that the vast majority of West Coast cool-season extreme precipitation events are due to the landfall of intense wind-driven streams of concentrated water vapor associated with extratropical cyclones called atmospheric rivers (ARs). Accurate prediction of the effects of ARs as they come ashore depends on accurate numeric modeling of integrated water vapor (IWV) over the Northeast Pacific (NEP). Quantifying the uncertainty in this forecast field is an important step toward understanding the causes of uncertainty in West Coast extreme event forecasts. To this end GFS (Global Forecast System) model output obtained in real time of the fields needed to calculate IWV were archived and analyzed. GFS was used because it is well known, it covers our area of interest, and the output is readily available to the community. To estimate forecast uncertainties we used an object-based method that allows quantitative comparisons of object location, size, shape, and intensity. In particular, we used MODE, the Method for Object-based Diagnostic Evaluation. MODE is an object-based verification tool from the MET (Model Evaluation Tools) package developed and supported by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC). This package of verification tools is readily available and intended to provide the community with a common software package incorporating the latest advances in forecast verification. We describe results from two studies conducted as part of the Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT)—DTC collaboration project. The studies are based upon Northeast Pacific (NEP) data collected during the 2009-2010 cool season. In the first study we focus on verifying GFS-analysis IWV against satellite-observed IWV throughout the NEP. Specifically, IWV GFS analysis objects are compared with 12-hour composite, satellite-derived Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) observational objects. Then we incorporate MODE object attributes related to object

  2. Optimal cutoffs for low skeletal muscle mass related to cardiovascular risk in adults: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yirang; Han, Byoung-Duck; Han, Kyungdo; Shin, Koh Eun; Lee, Halla; Kim, Tae Ri; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Do Hoon; Kim, Yang Hyun; Kim, Hyunjin; Nam, Ga Eun

    2015-11-01

    The possible association between low skeletal muscle mass and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors necessitates estimation of muscle mass even in subjects with normal body mass index (BMI). This study was aimed to investigate optimal cutoffs for skeletal muscle mass reflecting CVD risk factors and to evaluate the relationship between skeletal muscle mass and CVD risk factors in the general population and in subjects with normal BMI using these cutoffs. This cross-sectional study analyzed data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010. We enrolled 5120 men and 6559 women aged ≥20 years. Skeletal muscle index (SMI) was defined as the weight-adjusted appendicular skeletal muscle mass measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, SMI cutoffs associated with CVD risk factors were determined. Lower SMI was significantly associated with an increased prevalence of CVD risk factors. The first cutoffs in men and women were 32 and 25%, respectively, and the second cutoffs were 30 and 23.5%. Subjects in stage I and stage II SMI categories showed increased prevalence and risk for several CVD risk factors. These tendencies persisted in the association between cardiometabolic characteristics and SMI even in subjects with normal BMI. Using cutoffs of low skeletal muscle mass reflecting CVD risk factors, lower skeletal muscle mass was associated with increased prevalence and risk of several CVD risk factors. A higher prevalence of cardiometabolic abnormalities was observed among subjects with normal BMI but low skeletal muscle mass. PMID:25862070

  3. The use of SMILES data to study ozone loss in the Arctic winter 2009/2010 and comparison with Odin/SMR data using assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, K.; Murtagh, D.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station observed ozone in the stratosphere with high precision from October 2009 to April 2010. Although SMILES measurements only cover latitudes from 38° S to 65° N, the combination of data assimilation methods and an isentropic advection model allows us to quantify the ozone depletion in the 2009/2010 Arctic polar winter by making use of the instability of the polar vortex in the northern hemisphere. Ozone data from both SMILES and Odin/SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer) for the winter were assimilated into the Dynamical Isentropic Assimilation Model for OdiN Data (DIAMOND). DIAMOND is an off-line wind-driven transport model on isentropic surfaces. Wind data from the operational analyses of the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used to drive the model. In this study, particular attention is paid to the cross isentropic transport of the tracer in order to accurately assess the ozone loss. The assimilated SMILES ozone fields agree well with the limitation of noise induced variability within the SMR fields despite the limited latitude coverage of the SMILES observations. Ozone depletion has been derived by comparing the ozone field acquired by sequential assimilation with a passively transported ozone field initialized on 1 December 2009. Significant ozone loss was found in different periods and altitudes from using both SMILES and SMR data: The initial depletion occurred at the end of January below 550 K with an accumulated loss of 0.6-1.0 ppmv (approximately 20%) by 1 April. The ensuing loss started from the end of February between 575 K and 650 K. Our estimation shows that 0.8-1.3 ppmv (20-25 %) of O3 has been removed at the 600 K isentropic level by 1 April in volume mixing ratio (VMR).

  4. The use of SMILES data to study ozone loss in the Arctic winter 2009/2010 and comparison with Odin/SMR data using assimilation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, K.; Murtagh, D.; Urban, J.; Sagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) on board the International Space Station observed ozone profiles in the stratosphere with high sensitivity. Although SMILES measurements do not cover high latitudes, the combination of data assimilation methods and an isentropic advection model allows us to use SMILES measurements to investigate the ozone loss due to the instability of the polar vortex in the northern hemisphere. We quantified the ozone depletion in the 2009/2010 Arctic polar winter. Ozone data from both SMILES and Odin/SMR (Sub-Millimetre Radiometer) for the winter were assimilated into the Dynamical Isentropic Assimilation Model for OdiN Data (DIAMOND). DIAMOND is an off-line wind-driven transport model on isentropic surfaces. Wind data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) were used to drive the model. In this study, particular attention is paid to the cross isentropic transport of the tracer. The assimilated SMILES ozone fields agree with the SMR fields despite the limited latitude coverage. Ozone depletion has been derived by comparing the ozone field acquired by sequential assimilation with a passively transported ozone field initiated to 1 December 2009. Significant ozone loss was found in different periods and altitudes from using both SMILES and SMR data. The initial depletion occurred in the end of January below 500 K with a loss of 0.6-1.0 ppm (approximately 20%). The ensuing loss started from the end of February between 575 K and 650 K. Our estimation shows that 0.8 ppmv (15-20%) of O3 has been removed from the lower stratosphere by 1 April in VMR.

  5. Family perceptions of shared decision-making with health care providers: results of the National Survey of Children With Special Health Care Needs, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Smalley, LaQuanta P; Kenney, Mary Kay; Denboba, Diana; Strickland, Bonnie

    2014-08-01

    The Maternal and Child Health Bureau recently revised its measure of family-provider shared decision-making (SDM) to better align with parents' views and the intent of SDM. We sought to assess achievements in meeting the revised measure; examine socio-demographic/health correlates; and determine the relationships between SDM and access to quality health care. We analyzed data for 40,242 children with special health care needs (CSHCN) from the 2009-2010 National Survey of CSHCN and assessed the prevalence of SDM and association with other US CSHCN socio-demographic/health characteristics using bivariate and multivariate methods. Logistic regression was used to determine associations between SDM and having a medical home and preventive medical/dental visits. Approximately 70% of families of CSHCN perceived themselves as shared decision-makers in their child's care. Families of CSHCN with greater functional limitations had twice the odds of lacking SDM than those never affected. Disparities in attainment rates were noted for families with low versus high income (61 vs. 77%), less versus more than high school education (59 vs. 73%), privately insured versus uninsured (76 vs. 57%), and minority versus white race (63 vs. 74%). CSHCN with medical homes had 6 times greater odds of perceived SDM and as much as one and a half times the odds of receiving preventive care than CSHCN without a medical home. Major differences in family SDM perceptions are associated with having a medical home, particularly when characterized by family-centered care. Populations of concern are those with more functionally limited children and increased socio-economic challenges. PMID:24052119

  6. A coordinated cross-disciplinary research initiative to address an increased incidence of narcolepsy following the 2009-2010 Pandemrix vaccination programme in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Feltelius, N; Persson, I; Ahlqvist-Rastad, J; Andersson, M; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Bergman, P; Granath, F; Adori, C; Hökfelt, T; Kühlmann-Berenzon, S; Liljeström, P; Maeurer, M; Olsson, T; Örtqvist, Å; Partinen, M; Salmonson, T; Zethelius, B

    2015-10-01

    In response to the 2009-2010 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, a mass vaccination programme with the AS03-adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1) vaccine Pandemrix was initiated in Sweden. Unexpectedly, there were a number of narcolepsy cases amongst vaccinated children and adolescents reported. In this review, we summarize the results of a joint cross-disciplinary national research effort to investigate the adverse reaction signal from the spontaneous reporting system and to better understand possible causative mechanisms. A three- to fourfold increased risk of narcolepsy in vaccinated children and adolescents was verified by epidemiological studies. Of importance, no risk increase was observed for the other neurological and autoimmune diseases studied. Genetic studies confirmed the association with the allele HLA-DQB1*06:02, which is known to be related to sporadic narcolepsy. Furthermore, a number of studies using cellular and molecular experimental models investigated possible links between influenza vaccination and narcolepsy. Serum analysis, using a peptide microarray platform, showed that individuals who received Pandemrix exhibited a different epitope reactivity pattern to neuraminidase and haemagglutinin, as compared to individuals who were infected with H1N1. Patients with narcolepsy were also found to have increased levels of interferon-gamma production in response to streptococcus-associated antigens. The chain of patient-related events and the study results emerging over time were subjected to intense nationwide media attention. The importance of transparent communication and collaboration with patient representatives to maintain public trust in vaccination programmes is also discussed in the review. Organizational challenges due to this unexpected event delayed the initiation of some of the research projects, still the main objectives of this joint, cross-disciplinary research effort were reached, and important insights were acquired for future, similar

  7. Chronic conditions, functional difficulties, and disease burden among American Indian/Alaska Native children with special health care needs, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Mary Kay; Thierry, Judy

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of chronic conditions and functional difficulties of American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) children with special health care needs (CSHCN). We conducted bivariate and multivariable analysis of cross-sectional data on 40,202 children from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs aged birth through 17 years, including 1,051 AIAN CSHCN. The prevalence of AIAN CSHCN was 15.7 %, not significantly different from the prevalence of US white CSHCN (16.3 %). As qualifiers for special needs status among AIAN children the use of or need for prescription medication was the most frequent (70 %), compared to the lower rates of need for elevated service use (44 %) and emotional, mental, or behavioral treatment/counseling (36 %). Asthma (45 %), conduct disorder (18 %), developmental delay (27 %), and migraine headaches (16 %) were significantly more common chronic conditions among AIAN CSHCN compared to white CSHCN, as were functional difficulties with respiration (52 %), communication (42 %), anxiety/depression (57 %), and behavior (54 %). AIAN CSHCN were also more likely to have 3 or more chronic conditions (39 vs. 28 %, respectively) and 3 or more functional difficulties (70 vs. 55 %, respectively) than white CSHCN. Results indicated a greater impact on the daily activities of AIAN CSHCN compared to white CSHCN (74 vs. 63 %). Significantly greater disease burden among AIAN CSHCN suggests that care must be taken to ensure an appropriate level of coordinated care in a medical home to ameliorate the severity and complexity of their conditions.

  8. Improving fieldwork by using GIS for quantitative exploration, data management and digital mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, Wouter; Alberti, Koko; van de Grint, Liesbeth; Karssenberg, Derek

    2016-04-01

    Fieldwork is an essential part of teaching geosciences. The essence of a fieldwork is to study natural phenomena in its proper context. Fieldworks dominantly utilize a learning-by-experiencing learning style and are often light on abstract thinking skills. We introduce more of the latter skills to a first-year fieldwork of several weeks by using Geographical Information Systems (GIS). We use simple techniques as the involved students had no prior experience with GIS. In our project, we introduced new tutorials prior to the fieldwork where students explored their research area using aerial photos, satellite images, an elevation model and slope-map using Google Earth and QGIS. The goal of these tutorials was to get acquainted with the area, plan the first steps of the fieldwork, and formulate hypotheses in form of a preliminary map based on quantitative data. During the actual fieldwork, half of the students processed and managed their field data using GIS, used elevation data as additional data source, and made digital geomorphological maps. This was in contrast to the other half of the students that used classic techniques with paper maps. We evaluated the learning benefits by two questionnaires (one before and one after the fieldwork), and a group interview with students that used GIS in the field. Students liked the use of Google Earth and GIS, and many indicate the added value of using quantitative maps. The hypotheses and fieldwork plans of the students were quickly superseded by insights during the fieldwork itself, but making these plans and hypotheses in advance improved the student's ability to perform empirical research. Students were very positive towards the use of GIS for their fieldwork, mainly because they experienced it as a modern and relevant technique for research and the labour market. Tech-savvy students were extra motivated and explored additional methods. There were some minor technical difficulties with using GIS during the fieldwork, but

  9. Before and after fieldwork: ingredients for an ethnography of illness.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Gilbert

    2012-04-01

    W.H.R. Rivers asked what light anthropology could throw on the emergence of medicine. But this early lead was not soon followed up. Social anthropology had first to establish itself. The new social anthropology championed holistic fieldwork in small-scale societies. Some did choose to study illness or misfortune ethnographically. Evans-Pritchard, Victor Turner and Max Marwick provided outstanding models in this field. Political change and decolonisation made some of the older assumptions about the place and aims of anthropological research less easy to sustain. Growth in the subject encouraged specialisation. Medical anthropology was one among many possible developments. But it also had to identify a distinctive focus and place in relation to medicine and other health-related social studies.

  10. National surveillance of influenza-associated encephalopathy in Japan over six years, before and during the 2009-2010 influenza pandemic.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yoshiaki; Shimada, Tomoe; Yasui, Yoshinori; Tada, Yuki; Kaku, Mitsuo; Okabe, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Influenza-associated encephalopathy (IAE) is a serious complication of influenza and is reported most frequently in Japan. This paper presents an assessment of the epidemiological characteristics of influenza A (H1N1) 2009-associated encephalopathy in comparison to seasonal IAE, based on Japanese national surveillance data of influenza-like illness (ILI) and IAE during flu seasons from 2004-2005 through 2009-2010. In each season before the pandemic, 34-55 IAE cases (mean 47.8; 95% confidence interval: 36.1-59.4) were reported, and these cases increased drastically to 331 during the 2009 pandemic (6.9-fold the previous seasons). Of the 331 IAE cases, 322 cases were reported as influenza A (H1N1) 2009-associated encephalopathy. The peaks of IAE were consistent with the peaks of the influenza epidemics and pandemics. A total of 570 cases of IAE (seasonal A, 170; seasonal B, 50; influenza A (H1N1) 2009, 322; unknown, 28) were reported over six seasons. The case fatality rate (CFR) ranged from 4.8 to 18.2% before the pandemic seasons and 3.6% in the 2009 pandemic season. The CFR of pandemic-IAE was 3.7%, which is lower than that of influenza A-/B-associated encephalopathy (12.9%, p<0.001; 14.0%, p = 0.002; respectively). The median age of IAE was 7 years during the pandemic, which is higher than that of influenza A-/B-associated encephalopathy (4, p<0.001; 4.5, p = 0.006; respectively). However, the number of pandemic-IAE cases per estimated ILI outpatients peaked in the 0-4-year age group and data both before and during the pandemic season showed a U-shape pattern. This suggests that the high incidence of influenza infection in the 0-4 year age group may lead to a high incidence of IAE in the same age group in a future influenza season. Further studies should include epidemiologic case definitions and clinical details of IAE to gain a more accurate understanding of the epidemiologic status of IAE.

  11. [UNHEALTHY FOOD INTAKE IS LINKED TO HIGHER PREVALENCE OF METABOLIC SYNDROME IN CHILEAN ADULT POPULATION: CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY IN 2009-2010 NATIONAL HEALTH SURVEY].

    PubMed

    Dussaillant, Catalina; Echeverría, Guadalupe; Villarroel, Luis; Marin, Pedro Paulo; Rigotti, Attilio

    2015-11-01

    Introducción: el síndrome metabólico (SM) es un conjunto de factores de riesgo que predisponen a padecer enfermedad cardiovascular y diabetes. Una dieta poco saludable juega un rol importante en el desarrollo de esta condición. En este estudio evaluamos la prevalencia de síndrome metabólico y su asociación con la calidad de la dieta en adultos chilenos. Métodos: se analizaron los datos de 2.561 adultos mayores de 18 años de edad incluidos en la última Encuesta Nacional de Salud (ENS 2009-2010), que contaban con información para el diagnóstico de síndrome metabólico siguiendo los criterios de ATP III-NCEP. La frecuencia de consumo de pescado, cereales integrales, frutas, verduras y lácteos fue analizada y asociada a la presencia de SM. Por medio de un índice de dieta saludable (IDS), se evaluó la calidad global de la dieta y se correlacionó con la prevalencia de este síndrome. Resultados: un menor consumo de cereales integrales se asoció a una mayor prevalencia de síndrome metabólico (OR = 1,78; 95% IC: 1,088-2,919; p = 0,022). El IDS mostró que el consumo de alimentos tiene mejor calidad en mujeres y a mayor edad y mejor nivel educacional. Un IDS < 3 puntos se asoció con un mayor riesgo de síndrome metabólico (OR IDS < 3 / IDS ≥ 3 = 3,69 95% IC:1,884- 7,225, p < 0,001). Conclusión: la población adulta chilena presenta una elevada prevalencia de síndrome metabólico asociado al consumo de una alimentación de mala calidad.

  12. Factors associated with non-utilisation of health service for childbirth in Timor-Leste: evidence from the 2009-2010 Demographic and Health Survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Timor-Leste is a young developing country in Asia. Most of its infrastructure was destroyed after a long armed conflict for independence. Despite recent expansion of health facilities and investment in healthcare, maternal mortality remains high with most mothers still giving birth at home. This study investigated factors affecting the non-utilisation of health service for childbirth in the aftermath of the independence conflict. Methods The Timor-Leste Demographic and Health Survey 2009-2010 was the latest two-stage national survey, which used validated questionnaires to obtain information from 26 clusters derived from 13 districts of the country. Factors influencing non-utilisation of health facility for childbirth were investigated using univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses, accounting for the cluster sampling and sample weight of the survey. Results Of the total 5986 participants included in the study, 4472 (74.8%) did not deliver their last child at a health facility. Lack of education for the mother (adjusted odds ratio (OR): 2.04; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.56 to 2.66) and her partner (OR: 1.45; 95% CI 1.14 to 1.84), low household wealth status (OR: 5.20; 95% CI 3.93 to 6.90), and rural residence (OR: 2.83; 95% CI 2.22 to 3.66), were associated with increased likelihood of non-utilisation of health facility for childbirth. Working mothers (OR: 1.55; 95% CI 1.32 to 1.81), who had high parity (OR: 1.78; 95% CI 1.36 to 2.32) and did not attend antenatal care service (OR: 4.68; 95% CI 2.65 to 8.28) were also vulnerable for not delivering at a health facility. Conversely, the prevalence of non-utilisation of health facility for childbirth reduced with increasing number of service components received during antenatal care visits (OR: 0.72; 95% CI 0.64 to 0.80). Conclusions Only a quarter of Timorese women delivered at a health facility. In order to reduce maternal mortality, future interventions should target disadvantaged

  13. Age at Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Diagnosis by Race, Ethnicity, and Primary Household Language Among Children with Special Health Care Needs, United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Jo, Heejoo; Schieve, Laura A; Rice, Catherine E; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn; Tian, Lin H; Blumberg, Stephen J; Kogan, Michael D; Boyle, Coleen A

    2015-08-01

    We examined prevalence of diagnosed autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and age at diagnosis according to child's race/ethnicity and primary household language. From the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, we identified 2729 3-17-year-old US children whose parent reported a current ASD diagnosis. We compared ASD prevalence, mean diagnosis age, and percentage with later diagnoses (≥5 years) across racial/ethnic/primary household language groups: non-Hispanic-white, any language (NHW); non-Hispanic-black, any language (NHB); Hispanic-any-race, English (Hispanic-English); and Hispanic-any-race, other language (Hispanic-Other). We assessed findings by parent-reported ASD severity level and adjusted for family sociodemographics. ASD prevalence estimates were 15.3 (NHW), 10.4 (NHB), 14.1 (Hispanic-English), and 5.2 (Hispanic-Other) per 1000 children. Mean diagnosis age was comparable across racial/ethnic/language groups for 3-4-year-olds. For 5-17-year-olds, diagnosis age varied by race/ethnicity/language and also by ASD severity. In this group, NHW children with mild/moderate ASD had a significantly higher proportion (50.8 %) of later diagnoses than NHB (33.5 %) or Hispanic-Other children (18.0 %). However, NHW children with severe ASD had a comparable or lower (albeit non-significant) proportion (16.4 %) of later diagnoses than NHB (37.8 %), Hispanic-English (30.8 %), and Hispanic-Other children (12.0 %). While NHW children have comparable ASD prevalence and diagnosis age distributions as Hispanic-English children, they have both higher prevalence and proportion of later diagnoses than NHB and Hispanic-Other children. The diagnosis age findings were limited to mild/moderate cases only. Thus, the prevalence disparity might be primarily driven by under-representation (potentially under-identification) of older children with mild/moderate ASD in the two minority groups.

  14. Improving the Preparation for Fieldwork with "IT": Two Examples from Physical Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Jeff; Higgitt, Martin

    1997-01-01

    Investigates the potential roles of information technology in enhancing the preparation phase for fieldwork in geography. Examines the separate developments of; a geographical information system (GIS) to support local fieldwork activity and computer-based briefing tutorials to prepare students for residential field classes. Includes graphs, charts…

  15. Supporting Holistic Understanding of Geographical Problems: Fieldwork and G-Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatterjea, Kalyani; Chang, Chew-Hung; Lim, Ee-Peng; Zhang, Jun; Theng, Yin-Leng; Go, Dion Hoe-Lian

    2008-01-01

    Fieldwork remains the mainstay in the study of geography and in the analysis of the environmental processes. However, an in-depth understanding of the environmental and geographical processes requires extensive as well as intensive fieldwork that involves time and substantial effort, both of which may pose a problem within a given curriculum time.…

  16. Facilitating International Fieldwork: The Receptive Services of New Zealand's Geography Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to provide preliminary insight into facilitating international fieldwork in New Zealand by researchers and universities who support visiting university groups. Anonymous online surveys sought views of supporting researchers (15 respondents), and supported scholars (8 respondents). The extent to which international fieldwork is…

  17. Students' Perception of Biology Fieldwork: The example of students undertaking a preliminary year at a UK university

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulder, Raymond; Scott, Graham W.; Scott, Lisa J.

    2013-06-01

    It is widely held among biology teachers that fieldwork is valuable, but little is heard about students' perception of fieldwork or about the reasons for their liking or disliking fieldwork. This paper uses data from students to explore the hypotheses (1) that biology students with a positive perception of fieldwork have a less positive perception of laboratory work and vice versa and (2) that perception of fieldwork is related to demographic/personal factors and/or to pre-university perceptions and experience of fieldwork. Numeric indices of appreciation of biology field and laboratory work (I field and I lab) were determined using questionnaire information from 54 students. I field and I lab were positively correlated and there was no evidence of polarization of views; the problem that some students have a poor perception of both needs to be addressed. Mature students had a more positive view of fieldwork than 18-20-year-olds. However, regression analysis of I field against principal components suggested that demographic/personal factors had relatively little overall influence (< 20%) on appreciation of fieldwork. Perception of fieldwork at university was related to the rank given to fieldwork when choosing a university course. However, students who had participated in pre-university fieldwork did not have a more positive perception of university fieldwork; although students who recalled a worst memory of pre-university fieldwork had a less positive perception of fieldwork at university. The seeming mixed relevance of pre-university fieldwork suggests that the relationship between perception of fieldwork undertaken at university and quality of pre-university fieldwork is an area for future research.

  18. Experiences of occupational therapy students in the first fieldwork education: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rezaee, Mehdi; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Khankeh, Hamidreza; Hosseini, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Fieldwork education is a core part of all occupational therapy curriculums around the world to enable the students meet minimum competencies required for their professional life. Student experience is a valuable source to explore the nature of fieldwork training and plan more efficient curriculums in the future. This study aimed to explore the students' experiences in the first fieldwork education. Methods: Data were collected through a focus group and series of semi-structured interviews with 16 occupational therapy students who had passed the first semester of fieldwork education at three occupational therapy departments in Iran. The interviews were transcribed line by line and analyzed according to inductive content analysis. Results: Following the analysis of the data, three main themes were identified including the importance of supervisors’ management, deficits in the current curriculum and challenges in the educational environment. Each theme included different categories to show students’ concerns and challenges in the first fieldwork education experience and their suggestions for more efficient trainings. Conclusion: The research argues that several combined key factors determine the nature and utility of occupational therapy (OT) fieldwork experiences of the students. However, further studies are needed to clarify the experiences of the supervisors, department managers and others involved in the fieldwork education. PMID:25664311

  19. ARENA - A Collaborative Immersive Environment for Virtual Fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Whenever a geoscientific study area is not readily accessible, as is the case on the deep seafloor, it is difficult to apply traditional but effective methods of fieldwork, which often require physical presence of the observer. The Artificial Research Environment for Networked Analysis (ARENA), developed at GEOMAR | Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel within the Cluster of Excellence "The Future Ocean", provides a backend solution to robotic research on the seafloor by means of an immersive simulation environment for marine research: A hemispherical screen of 6m diameter covering the entire lower hemisphere surrounds a group of up to four researchers at once. A variety of open source (e.g. Microsoft Research World Wide Telescope) and commercial software platforms allow the interaction with e.g. in-situ recorded video, vector maps, terrain, textured geometry, point cloud and volumetric data in four dimensions. Data can be put into a holistic, georeferenced context and viewed on scales stretching from centimeters to global. Several input devices from joysticks to gestures and vocalized commands allow interaction with the simulation, depending on individual preference. Annotations added to the dataset during the simulation session catalyze the following quantitative evaluation. Both the special simulator design, making data perception a group experience, and the ability to connect remote instances or scaled down versions of ARENA over the Internet are significant advantages over established immersive simulation environments.

  20. Technology for Entry Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutts, James A.; Arnold, James; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Kolawa, Elizabeth; Munk, Michelle; Wercinski, Paul; Laub, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph describing technologies for entry probes is presented. The topics include: 1) Entry Phase; 2) Descent Phase; 3) Long duration atmospheric observations; 4) Survivability at high temperatures; and 5) Summary.

  1. Geological fieldwork in the Libyan Sahara: A multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, Guido; Whitham, Andrew; Howard, James P.; Morton, Andrew; Abutarruma, Yousef; Bergig, Khaled; Elgadry, Mohamed; Le Heron, Daniel P.; Paris, Florentin; Thusu, Bindra

    2010-05-01

    overlie these strata. Marine intervals occur in the Late Devonian, and the Carboniferous is characterised by shallow marine clastic sediments with carbonate horizons. Permian rocks are only known from subsurface drill cores and comprise continental and deltaic facies. The centre of the Murzuq Basin has been relatively well investigated by drilling and seismic profiles. The basin margins, however, lack detailed geological investigation. In comparison, the Kufra Basin is underexplored with few boreholes drilled. Our studies have focused on the eastern and northern margins of the Murzuq Basin and the northern, eastern and western margins of the Kufra Basin. The main objective of fieldwork has been to characterise the Infracambrian-Lower Palaeozoic stratigraphy, deduce the structural evolution of each study area, and to collect samples for follow-up analyses including provenance studies and biostratigraphy. In addition to outcrop-based fieldwork shallow boreholes up to 70 m depth were successfully drilled in the Early Silurian shales. The unweathered samples retrieved from two of the boreholes have been used for biostratigraphical and whole-rock geochemical investigations. The provenance study of the sandstone succession with conventional heavy mineral analysis together with U-Pb zircon dating provides, for the first time, an understanding of the ancient source areas. Because most of the Early Palaeozoic succession in southern Libya is barren of fossils, heavy mineral chemostratigraphy is moreover used as a correlation test on surface outcrops in the Kufra and Murzuq basins.

  2. Fieldwork challenges: lessons learned from a north-south public health research partnership.

    PubMed

    Casale, Marisa A J; Flicker, Sarah; Nixon, Stephanie A

    2011-09-01

    The value of collaborative international research in addressing global public health challenges is increasingly recognized. However, little has been written about lessons learned regarding fieldwork to help guide future collaborative efforts. Through a research partnership between two Northern universities, one Southern university, and a Southern faith-based organization, we evaluated a school-based HIV prevention intervention with South African adolescents. In this article, we highlight the seven key fieldwork-related challenges experienced and identify the lessons learned. The underlying theme is that of reconciling a structured and reasoned "desk" planning process with the more fluid and unpredictable reality of conducting fieldwork. This concern is particularly significant in resource-deprived environments and/or contexts that are less familiar to Northern partners. Fieldwork is unpredictable, but obstacles can be minimized through meaningful participation in both planning and field research. Sharing practical lessons from the field can prove a useful resource for both researchers and practitioners. PMID:21422255

  3. Fieldwork: man in the system of nature and priority of natural laws in human life.

    PubMed

    Tinyakova, Elena

    2007-06-01

    Fieldwork is a branch of inseparable unity of natural and humanitarian sciences; it is aimed at the cultural origin of humanity on the maximum level of its variety. Practically all natural sciences have some space determined by ethnic conscience in nature cognition: ethnodemography, ethnobotany, ethnozoology, etc. Fieldwork guides the research of human culture from the laws of nature. This kind of knowledge is useful to balance human relations with nature and avoid conflicts. Peoples should exchange their wisdom in the dialogue with nature to be more safe. Fieldwork understood as traditional culture only, explaining the variety of ethnoses on our earth, is just the narrow and diachronic level of this branch of knowledge. The cosmological knowledge, where fantasy and not exhausted in its cognition understanding the world of nature are mixed, forms the source of fieldwork and in many respects explains the direction of knowledge: the man finds himself under the open sky, he is the child of nature. Then as time went on there appeared a gradual transition--first nature was creating the man, then by and by he began turning to answer nature by his activity. Nowadays the man is actively creating nature. There are two levels of fieldwork: the ancient one which deals with the origin of ethnoses and the modern one which explores how contemporary life is determined by ethnic specific traits. Fieldwork is the core of multidisciplinary situation in man's knowledge. It is related to such humanitarian sciences: semiotics, culturology, sociology, history, philosophy, literature, linguistics. In the cycle of natural sciences fieldwork stands close to anthropology, geography, biology, demography. Fieldwork as a science has the two main levels--the "sophy" level and the logos "level". The first one discovers wisdom of human life, the second one is aimed at logical structuring of knowledge, here proceed various classifications of peoples.

  4. First results from the 2009-2010 MU radar head echo observation programme for sporadic and shower meteors: the Orionids 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, J.; Szasz, C.; Nakamura, T.; Meisel, D. D.; Ueda, M.; Fujiwara, Y.; Terasawa, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Nishimura, K.

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the capabilities of a new automated analysis scheme developed for meteor head echo observations by the Shigaraki middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan (?N, ?E). Our analysis procedure computes meteoroid range, velocity and deceleration as functions of time with unprecedented accuracy and precision. This is crucial for estimations of meteoroid mass and orbital parameters, as well as investigations into meteoroid-atmosphere interaction processes. We collected an extensive set of data (>500 h) between 2009 June and 2010 December. Here, we present initial results from data taken in 2009 October 19-21. More than 600 of about 10 000 head echoes recorded during 33 h were associated with the 1P/Halley dust of the Orionid meteor shower. These meteors constitute a very clear enhancement of meteor radiants centred around right ascension α=? and declination δ=?. Their estimated atmospheric entry velocity of 66.9 km s-1 is in good agreement with 1P/Halley dust ejected in the year 1266 BC, which, according to simulations, crossed Earth's orbit at the time of our observation. The Orionid activity within the MU radar beam reached about 50 h-1 during radiant culmination. The flux of sporadic meteors in the MU radar data, coming primarily from the direction of the Earth's apex, peaked at about 700 h-1 during the same observations.

  5. Ethnicity, deprivation and mortality due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in England during the 2009/2010 pandemic and the first post-pandemic season.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Harris, R J; Ellis, J; Pebody, R G

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between risk of death following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and ethnicity and deprivation during the 2009/2010 pandemic period and the first post-pandemic season of 2010/2011 in England was examined. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the mortality risk, adjusted for age, gender, and place of residence. Those of non-White ethnicity experienced an increased mortality risk compared to White populations during the 2009/2010 pandemic [10·5/1000 vs. 6·0/1000 general population; adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1·84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·39-2·54] with the highest risk in those of Pakistani ethnicity. However, no significant difference between ethnicities was observed during the following 2010/2011 season. Persons living in areas with the highest level of deprivation had a significantly higher risk of death (RR 2·08, 95% CI 1·49-2·91) compared to the lowest level for both periods. These results highlight the importance of rapid identification of groups at higher risk of severe disease in the early stages of future pandemics to enable the implementation of optimal prevention and control measures for vulnerable populations.

  6. Entry at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Smith, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    This is lecture to be given at the IPPW 2016, as part of the 2 day course on Short Course on Destination Venus: Science, Technology and Mission Architectures. The attached presentation material is intended to be introduction to entry aspects of Venus in-situ robotic missions. The presentation introduces the audience to the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic aspects as well as the loads, both aero and thermal, generated during entry. The course touches upon the system design aspects such as TPS design and both high and low ballistic coefficient entry system concepts that allow the science payload to be protected from the extreme entry environment and yet meet the mission objectives.

  7. A study of students' perceptions of the organisation and effectiveness of fieldwork in earth sciences education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Luis; Praia, Joa¨O.; Kempa, Richard

    2003-02-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary evaluation of an in-service training programme designed for practising geology/earth science teachers in Portuguese high schools and intended to enhance the effectiveness of fieldwork activities organised by them for their students. Among the points particularly stressed during the in-service training were that students should be adequately prepared for fieldwork through classroom-based activities prior to the fieldwork itself and that to arrive at the maximum educational benefit for the students, they should be involved in collaborative group-based investigation. The findings, derived from an enquiry among students following their exposure to fieldwork, revealed that in both these aspects teachers failed to put theory into practice, probably as the result of a lack of confidence to implement novel procedures. On the positive side, the students reported that they enjoyed the social interaction with other students that the fieldwork made possible and the opportunity to work independently of the teachers.

  8. Helping managers to manage: work schedules of field-workers in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Koblinsky, M A; Brechin, S J; Clark, S D; Hasan, M Y

    1989-01-01

    The Maternal-Child Health/Family Planning (MCH/FP) Extension Project in Bangladesh identifies and examines barriers to implementation of the national MCH/FP program, and determines strategies to overcome them. This study analyzes field-workers' ability to carry out more tasks than they do presently, and how their performance might be improved when additional field-workers are hired. In two experimental subdistricts, researchers observed the work of family welfare assistants (FWAs), the female family planning field-workers, to determine the duration and frequency of their home visits with village women and the content of their exchanges. While many factors influence the FWA's work, researchers found that the preplanned monthly work schedules could be manipulated relatively easily to improve duration and frequency of program contact with village women. With more time available to spend with women, the potential to improve the quality of services is enhanced. PMID:2772996

  9. Education projects: an opportunity for student fieldwork in global health academic programs.

    PubMed

    Fyfe, Molly V

    2012-01-01

    Universities, especially in higher-income countries, increasingly offer programs in global health. These programs provide different types of fieldwork projects, at home and abroad, including: epidemiological research, community health, and clinical electives. I illustrate how and why education projects offer distinct learning opportunities for global health program fieldwork. As University of California students, we partnered in Tanzania with students from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Science (MUHAS) to assist MUHAS faculty with a curricular project. We attended classes, clinical rounds, and community outreach sessions together, where we observed teaching, materials used, and the learning environment; and interviewed and gathered data from current students, alumni, and health professionals during a nationwide survey. We learned together about education of health professionals and health systems in our respective institutions. On the basis of this experience, I suggest some factors that contribute to the productivity of educational projects as global health fieldwork.

  10. Fieldwork I Program Evaluation of Student Learning Using Goal Attainment Scaling.

    PubMed

    Chapleau, Ann; Harrison, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a program evaluation of student learning during the Level I fieldwork experience of a master of science in occupational therapy program. We sought to determine the utility of Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS) as a measure of student learning. Over four semesters, from fall 2013 through fall 2014, 240 students completed goal attainment scales for an individualized learning goal for the semester. Using a quantitative pretest-posttest design, we found significant increases in levels of student learning goal attainment during Level I fieldwork. Qualitative data from exit surveys revealed high levels of satisfaction with the program, particularly related to the opportunity to learn a new way of envisioning and writing individualized goals. These findings support the use of GAS as an outcome measure of student learning during fieldwork.

  11. Peer Assisted Experiential Learning (PAEL) in extending fieldwork practice in the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. W.; FitzPatrick, M.; Truscott, J.

    2012-04-01

    Traditional approaches to developing students practical (applied) skills (most especially, but not exclusively, fieldwork) make significant demands on resources, particularly staff time. Extending opportunities for experiential learning through independent (student centred) work is acknowledged, therefore, as being vital to the successful spiralling of Kolb's experiential learning cycle. This project outlines e-learning support as a means of assisting student peer groups in extending the experiential learning cycle for fieldwork. We have developed mobile support for independent fieldwork in a small, accessible and safe area north of Kingsand village, Cornwall, UK. The area is ideal for reinforcing skills in recording basic geological observations and in formulating a simple geological history based on these observations. Independent fieldwork can be undertaken throughout the academic year by small student groups (which can comprise mixed year groups). equipped with PDA's and integrated GPS units. Students are prepared for fieldwork through a dedicated website, linked to support materials in the University's unique Labplus facility. PDA's, running MSCAPE, provide automatic prompts to locations where key observations can be made and detail the nature of the activities that should be carried out at each location. The e-guide takes students from 1st principles of observation and measurement, through recording methodology and eventually links to packages for analysis and interpretation (again using support provided through Labplus). There is no limit to the number of times any particular student can carry out the fieldwork, provided they are organised into groups of three or more. The work is not assessed but links into several components of the field skills training that are formally assessed, including independent geological mapping.

  12. An epidemiological analysis of potential associations between C-reactive protein, inflammation, and prostate cancer in the male US population using the 2009 - 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Hill, Catherine; Lutfiyya, M. Nawal

    2015-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in US males, yet much remains to be learned about the role of inflammation in its etiology. We hypothesized that preexisting exposure to chronic inflammatory conditions caused by infectious agents or inflammatory diseases increase the risk of prostate cancer. Using the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, we examined the relationships between demographic variables, inflammation, infection, circulating plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), and the risk of occurrence of prostate cancer in US men over 18 years of age. Using IBM SPSS, we performed bivariate and logistic regression analyses using high CRP values as the dependent variable and five study covariates including prostate cancer status. From 2009 - 2010, an estimated 5,448,373 men reported having prostate cancer of which the majority were Caucasian (70.1%) and were aged 40 years and older (62.7%). Bivariate analyses demonstrated that high CRP was not associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Greater odds of having prostate cancer were revealed for men that had inflammation related to disease (OR = 1.029, CI 1.029-1.029) and those who were not taking drugs to control inflammation (OR = 1.330, CI 1.324-1.336). Men who did not have inflammation resulting from non-infectious diseases had greater odds of not having prostate cancer (OR = 1.031, CI 1.030-1.031). Logistic regression analysis yielded that men with the highest CRP values had greater odds of having higher household incomes and lower odds of having received higher education, being aged 40 years or older, being of a race or ethnicity different from other, and of having prostate cancer. Our results show that chronic inflammation of multiple etiologies is a risk factor for prostate cancer and that CRP is not associated with this increased risk. Further research is needed to elucidate the complex interactions between inflammation and prostate cancer.

  13. Where are kids getting their empty calories? Stores, schools, and fast-food restaurants each played an important role in empty calorie intake among US children during 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Poti, Jennifer M; Slining, Meghan M; Popkin, Barry M

    2014-06-01

    Consumption of empty calories, the sum of energy from added sugar and solid fat, exceeds recommendations, but little is known about where US children obtain these empty calories. The objectives of this study were to compare children's empty calorie consumption from retail food stores, schools, and fast-food restaurants; to identify food groups that were top contributors of empty calories from each location; and to determine the location providing the majority of calories for these key food groups. This cross-sectional analysis used data from 3,077 US children aged 2 to 18 years participating in the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The empty calorie content of children's intake from stores (33%), schools (32%), and fast-food restaurants (35%) was not significantly different in 2009-2010. In absolute terms, stores provided the majority of empty calorie intake (436 kcal). The top contributors of added sugar and solid fat from each location were similar: sugar-sweetened beverages, grain desserts, and high-fat milk∗ from stores; high-fat milk, grain desserts, and pizza from schools; and sugar-sweetened beverages, dairy desserts, french fries, and pizza from fast-food restaurants. Schools contributed about 20% of children's intake of high-fat milk and pizza. These findings support the need for continued efforts to reduce empty calorie intake among US children aimed not just at fast-food restaurants, but also at stores and schools. The importance of reformed school nutrition standards was suggested, as prior to implementation of these changes, schools resembled fast-food restaurants in their contributions to empty calorie intake.

  14. Where are kids getting their empty calories? Stores, schools, and fast food restaurants each play an important role in empty calorie intake among US children in 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Poti, Jennifer M.; Slining, Meghan M.; Popkin, Barry M.; Kenan, W.R.

    2013-01-01

    Consumption of empty calories, the sum of energy from added sugar and solid fat, exceeds recommendations, but little is known about where US children obtain these empty calories. The objectives of this study were to compare children's empty calorie consumption from retail food stores, schools, and fast food restaurants; to identify food groups that were top contributors of empty calories from each location; and to determine the location providing the majority of calories for these key food groups. This cross-sectional analysis used data from 3,077 US children aged 2-18 years participating in the 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The empty calorie content of children's intake from stores (33%), schools (32%), and fast food restaurants (35%) was not significantly different in 2009-2010. In absolute terms, stores provided the majority of empty calorie intake (436 kcal). The top contributors of added sugar and solid fat from each location were similar: sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs), grain desserts, and high-fat milk from stores; high-fat milk, grain desserts, and pizza from schools; and SSBs, dairy desserts, french fries, and pizza from fast food restaurants. Schools contributed about 20% of children's intake of high-fat milk and pizza. In conclusion, these findings support the need for continued efforts to reduce empty calorie intake among US children aimed not just at fast food restaurants, but also at stores and schools. The importance of reformed school nutrition standards was suggested, as prior to their implementation, schools resembled fast food restaurants in their contributions to empty calorie intake. PMID:24200654

  15. A Small-Scale Survey of the Views and Attitudes of Junior High School Teachers in China toward Geographical Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Daihu; Wang, Ziying; Xu, Di; Deng, Zhenzhen

    2014-01-01

    Although geographical fieldwork can be viewed as an integral component of geographical education, it fell out of favor in Chinese secondary schools in the recent past. However, the new junior high school geography standards established in 2001 stress the importance of conducting geographical fieldwork for students' learning of geography. Now…

  16. Enabling Remote Access to Fieldwork: Gaining Insight into the Pedagogic Effectiveness of "Direct" and "Remote" Field Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Alison; Collins, Trevor; Maskall, John; Lea, John; Lunt, Paul; Davies, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    This study considers the pedagogical effectiveness of remote access to fieldwork locations. Forty-one students from across the GEES disciplines (geography, earth and environmental sciences) undertook a fieldwork exercise, supported by two lecturers. Twenty students accessed the field site directly and the remainder accessed the site remotely using…

  17. Playful and Multi-Sensory Fieldwork: Seeing, Hearing and Touching New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Geographical fieldwork is being reinvigorated through pedagogical and methodological innovations. Yet, while there are many good ideas in circulation, there is less evidence of where these ideas are taking us: what students are getting out of them, and what significance they may have for the discipline. These questions are explored through case…

  18. Peer Assisted Learning and Blogging: A Strategy to Promote Reflective Practice during Clinical Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Gardner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The use of peer assisted learning in clinical education is explored in this case study. Groups of undergraduate physiotherapy students were structured into communities of practice during the second half of their clinical fieldwork program. They collaborated online in an asynchronous manner, using information communications technology (blogs) and…

  19. Getting More from Getting Out: Increasing Achievement in Literacy and Science through Ecological Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Graham W.; Boyd, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the positive impact of learning through ecological fieldwork upon children's ability to write, and to write about science. Specifically we have carried out a relatively large-scale study (involving 379 children aged 9-11 years from 8 primary schools in North East England) comparing intervention classes (involved in…

  20. Student Perceptions of iPads as Mobile Learning Devices for Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welsh, Katharine E.; Mauchline, Alice L.; Powell, Victoria; France, Derek; Park, Julian R.; Whalley, W. Brian

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports findings from six field courses about student's perceptions of iPads as mobile learning devices for fieldwork. Data were collected through surveys and focus groups. The key findings suggest that the multi-tool nature of the iPads and their portability were the main strengths. Students had some concerns over the safety of the…

  1. Walking the Fine Line between Fieldwork Success and Failure: Advice for New Ethnographers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Peter Richard; Temple, Elizabeth C.

    2014-01-01

    While the importance of ethnographic research in developing new knowledge is widely recognised, there remains minimal detailed description and discussion of the actual practice and processes involved in completing ethnographic fieldwork. The first author's experiences and struggles as an ethnographer of a group of young men from two locations…

  2. Fieldwork with Infants: What Preservice Teachers Can Learn from Taking Care of Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    The literature on infant care and education indicates that infant fieldwork has distinct learning opportunities that could work as an important supplement to more traditional field placements. The following study supports these assertions by providing an in-depth look at the experiences of three preservice early childhood teachers while engaging…

  3. Documentation and Revitalization of the Zhuang Language and Culture of Southwestern China through Linguistic Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodomo, Adams

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines innovative strategies, methods, and techniques for the documentation and revitalization of "Zhuang" language and culture through linguistic fieldwork. Zhuang, a Tai-Kadai language spoken mainly in the rural areas of the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region of southwestern China, is the largest minority language in China, with…

  4. A Study of Students' Perceptions of the Organisation and Effectiveness of Fieldwork in Earth Sciences Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marques, Luis; Praia, Joao; Kempa, Richard

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a preliminary evaluation of an in-service training programme designed for practising geology/earth science teachers in Portuguese high schools and intended to enhance the effectiveness of fieldwork activities organised by them for their students. Among the points particularly stressed during the in-service…

  5. Using Blogging to Promote Clinical Reasoning and Metacognition in Undergraduate Physiotherapy Fieldwork Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Shuyan Melissa; Ladyshewsky, Richard K.; Gardner, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the impact of using blogs on the clinical reasoning and meta-cognitive skills of undergraduate physiotherapy students in a fieldwork education program. A blog is a web based document that enables individuals to enter comments and read each others' comments in a dynamic and interactive manner. In this study,…

  6. Enhancing Communicative Spaces for Fieldwork Education in an Inland Regional Australian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trede, Franziska Veronika

    2010-01-01

    The diversity of fieldwork education models and practices ranges from mandatory to voluntary, from graded to ungraded, from paid to unpaid spectrums and they vary in length from less than a week to up to one year. Colleagues who work in the same university but in different schools, faculties or campuses are often so busy working within their…

  7. The Experimental State of Mind in Elicitation: Illustrations from Tonal Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Kristine M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper illustrates how an "experimental state of mind", i.e. principles of experimental design, can inform hypothesis generation and testing in structured fieldwork elicitation. The application of these principles is demonstrated with case studies in toneme discovery. Pike's classic toneme discovery procedure is shown to be a special…

  8. Improving Energy Literacy through Student-Led Fieldwork--At Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Horst, Dan; Harrison, Conor; Staddon, Sam; Wood, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    "Energy literacy" is of great interest to those researching sustainable consumption, particularly with regard to its relationship to domestic energy use. This paper reflects on the pedagogic aspects of fieldwork recently carried out by undergraduate geography students in their own homes to assess energy-related technologies and…

  9. Encouraging Reflexivity in Urban Geography Fieldwork: Study Abroad Experiences in Singapore and Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Fieldwork in urban geography courses can encourage reflexivity among students regarding the cities they encounter. This article outlines how student reflexivity was encouraged within a new international field research course in Singapore and Malaysia. Drawing on examples from students' field exercises written during an intensive and…

  10. No Place for Women among Them? Reflections on the "Axe" of Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delamont, Sara

    2005-01-01

    "Capoeira," the Brazilian dance and martial art, is now taught in many countries outside Brazil. Reflections on a year's fieldwork on capoeira teaching in the UK are used to make educational ethnography anthropologically strange. Issues of locality, noise, uncertainty and bodily contact are explored in a reflexive way. (Contains 7 notes.)

  11. Impacts of Lifelong Learning upon Emotional Resilience, Psychological and Mental Health: Fieldwork Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Cathie

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a fieldwork study concerning the impacts of learning upon health. In-depth biographical interviews were conducted with 145 adults about the effects of learning throughout their lives. In addition, 12 group interviews were conducted with practitioners about their perceptions of the effects of learning upon their…

  12. The Importance of Direct Experience: A Philosophical Defence of Fieldwork in Human Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Max

    2009-01-01

    Human geography fieldwork is important. Research has shown that when students "see it for themselves" their enjoyment and understanding is enhanced. In addition it helps develop subject-specific and transferable skills, promotes 'active learning' and links theory to "real world" examples in a "spiral of learning". Stressing the socially…

  13. What Is the Use of Fieldwork? Conceptions of Students and Staff in Geography and Geology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Alison; Magnier, Kirsty; Weaver, Ruth

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores conceptions of the purpose of fieldwork held by undergraduates and academic staff in the disciplines of geography and geology. Phenomenographic analysis of written data reveals six qualitatively distinct conceptions broadly classified as "fragmented" and "cohesive". While considerable commonality in conceptions exists across…

  14. Barriers to Biological Fieldwork: What Really Prevents Teaching Out of Doors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Graham W.; Boyd, Margaret; Scott, Lisa; Colquhoun, Derek

    2015-01-01

    This paper considers a range of factors that may contribute to an unwillingness or inability of teachers to participate in the teaching of biology through fieldwork. Through a synthesis of the views of both pre-service teachers in training and primary school teachers in practice we explore the relative importance of a wide range of potential…

  15. Barriers and Enablers to Clinical Fieldwork Education in Rural Public and Private Allied Health Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Phoebe; Stagnitti, Karen; Schoo, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to maximise rural clinical fieldwork placement to build health workforce capacity. This study investigated allied health professionals' (AHPs) experience of supervising students as part of work-integrated learning in public and private rural health settings. An anonymous postal questionnaire with 30 questions was used to…

  16. 'Seed' Has Germinated: Staff Resources on Fieldwork, Lab Work, Computer-aided Learning and Employer Links.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chalkley, Brian; Elmes, Andrew

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the Science Education Enhancement and Development (SEED) project, providing a brief summary of the resources produced within the four main areas of SEED: (1) fieldwork; (2) laboratory work; (3) computer-aided learning and assessment; and (4) employer links. (CMK)

  17. A Potential Value of Familiarity and Experience: Can Informal Fieldwork Have a Lasting Impact upon Literacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Graham W.; Boyd, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that an informal field trip can have a lasting impact upon aspects of learning in a primary school context. Specifically, we consider the longer term impact of an informal trip to a rocky shore upon scores achieved in literacy assessments taking place five months after a relevant five months after a fieldwork. Pupils…

  18. Exploring the Impact of Integrated Fieldwork, Reflective and Metacognitive Experiences on Student Environmental Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballantyne, Roy; Anderson, David; Packer, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Although the important role of providing fieldwork experiences for students in the natural environment is now well-established within environmental education literature, there is still little research evidence to guide teachers in their choice of effective teaching strategies. This paper presents findings from an interpretive case study designed…

  19. The Effect of Early Fieldwork on Mathematics Efficacy Beliefs for Pre-Service Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt-Ruiz, Heidi; Watson, Scott B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an early fieldwork experience on preservice teachers' mathematics efficacy beliefs. This quasi-experimental study included 127 preservice teachers from two community colleges who were enrolled in mathematics for teachers' two-course sequence. The Personal Mathematics Teaching Efficacy…

  20. Competency Management and Learning Organization in a New Clinical Fieldwork Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putthinoi, Supawadee; Lersilp, Suchitporn; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2015-01-01

    As Thailand transitions into an ageing society, greater demands will be placed on healthcare systems. The concept of competency management and learning organization can be beneficial in continually expanding organizational capacity in order to create response. This study aimed to develop a new clinical fieldwork course in the community by…

  1. Fieldwork Using the Professional Development Schools Model: Developing a Social Justice Orientation and Multicultural Competency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Amy L.; Krell, Megan M.; Hayden, Laura A.; Gracia, Robert; Denitzio, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Practicum fieldwork was conducted in an urban high school setting using a Professional Development Schools (PDS) model, with a focus on multicultural and social justice counseling competencies (MSJCC). Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the journal responses of 16 counseling students to ascertain MSJCC development during…

  2. UNINTENDED BENEFITS: LEADERSHIP SKILLS AND BEHAVIORAL CHANGE AMONG GUATEMALAN FIELDWORKERS EMPLOYED IN A LONGITUDINAL HOUSEHOLD AIR POLLUTION STUDY*

    PubMed Central

    KUO, DEVINA; THOMPSON, LISA M.; LEE, AMY; ROMERO, CAROLINA; SMITH, KIRK R.

    2015-01-01

    The RESPIRE and CRECER studies measured the effects of reduced household air pollution (HAP) from wood-fired cookstoves on respiratory health in rural highland Guatemala. This article examines behavior change and leadership skill development in local community members who were hired as fieldworkers to assist with research. Fieldworkers administered household questionnaires, shared functions similar to community health workers, and bridged health resources to communities. A mixed-methods design for data collection (in-depth interviews, focus groups, impact drawings, knowledge questionnaire, and retrospective pre-test) was used. Purposive sampling included 10 fieldworkers and 13 local service providers. Fieldworkers showed an increase in knowledge, positive attitudes, and practices around HAP. They developed new technical, interpersonal, and leadership skills. Fieldworkers played a crucial role in building confianza (trust) with the community, bridging resources, and improving outside researchers’ relationships with locals. Recommendations for future researchers include inclusion of additional training courses and adoption of community participatory approaches. PMID:22192940

  3. Unintended benefits: leadership skills and behavioral change among Guatemalan fieldworkers employed in a longitudinal household air pollution study.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Devina; Thompson, Lisa M; Lee, Amy; Romero, Carolina; Smith, Kirk R

    2010-01-01

    The RESPIRE and CRECER studies measured the effects of reduced household air pollution (HAP) from wood-fired cookstoves on respiratory health in rural highland Guatemala. This article examines behavior change and leadership skill development in local community members who were hired as fieldworkers to assist with research. Fieldworkers administered household questionnaires, shared functions similar to community health workers, and bridged health resources to communities. A mixed-methods design for data collection (in-depth interviews, focus groups, impact drawings, knowledge questionnaire, and retrospective pre-test) was used. Purposive sampling included 10 fieldworkers and 13 local service providers. Fieldworkers showed an increase in knowledge, positive attitudes, and practices around HAP. They developed new technical, interpersonal, and leadership skills. Fieldworkers played a crucial role in building confianza (trust) with the community, bridging resources, and improving outside researchers' relationships with locals. Recommendations for future researchers include inclusion of additional training courses and adoption of community participatory approaches.

  4. Lessons learnt on recruitment and fieldwork from a pilot European human biomonitoring survey.

    PubMed

    Fiddicke, Ulrike; Becker, Kerstin; Schwedler, Gerda; Seiwert, Margarete; Joas, Reinhard; Joas, Anke; Biot, Pierre; Aerts, Dominique; Casteleyn, Ludwine; Dumez, Birgit; Castaño, Argelia; Esteban, Marta; Angerer, Jürgen; Koch, Holger M; Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Sepai, Ovnair; Exley, Karen; Knudsen, Lisbeth E; Horvat, Milena; Bloemen, Louis; Katsonouri, Andromachi; Hadjipanayis, Adamos; Cerna, Milena; Krsková, Andrea; Jensen, Janne Fangel; Nielsen, Jeanette K S; Rudnai, Peter; Közepésy, Szilvia; Gutleb, Arno C; Fischer, Marc E; Ligocka, Danuta; Kamińska, Joanna; Reis, M Fátima; Namorado, Sónia; Lupsa, Ioana-Rodica; Gurzau, Anca E; Halzlová, Katarína; Mazej, Darja; Tratnik, Janja Snoj; Rivas, Teresa C; Gómez, Silvia; Berglund, Marika; Larsson, Kristin; Lehmann, Andrea; Crettaz, Pierre; Dewolf, Marie-Christine; Burns, Damien; Kellegher, Anne; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2015-08-01

    Within the European Environment and Health Action Plan an initiative to establish a coherent human biomonitoring approach in Europe was started. The project COPHES (COnsortium to Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale ) developed recommendations for a harmonized conduct of a human biomonitoring (HBM) survey which came into action as the pilot study DEMOCOPHES (DEMOnstration of a study to COordinate and Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale). Seventeen European countries conducted a survey with harmonized instruments for, inter alia, recruitment, fieldwork and sampling, in autumn/winter 2011/2012. Based on the countries' experiences of conducting the pilot study, following lessons learnt were compiled: the harmonized fieldwork instruments (basic questionnaire, urine and hair sampling) turned out to be very valuable for future HBM surveys on the European scale. A school approach was favoured by most of the countries to recruit school-aged children according to the established guidelines and country specific experiences. To avoid a low participation rate, intensive communication with the involved institutions and possible participants proved to be necessary. The communication material should also include information on exclusion criteria and offered incentives. Telephone contact to the participants the day before fieldwork during the survey can prevent the forgetting of appointments and first morning urine samples. To achieve comparable results on the European scale, training of interviewers in all issues of recruitment, fieldwork and sampling through information material and training sessions is crucial. A survey involving many European countries needs time for preparation and conduct. Materials for quality control prepared for all steps of recruitment, fieldwork and sampling proved to be important to warrant reliable results. PMID:25454101

  5. NSHE 2009-2010 Distance Education Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevada System of Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report focuses on distance education within the Nevada System of Higher Education (NSHE) for the 2009-10 academic year and provides documentation of the substantial growth of distance education within all colleges and universities. From this report, one gains an understanding of significant developments throughout the state and at each…

  6. Your business in court: 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Reiss, John B; Hall, Christopher R; Wartman, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    During this period, FDA focused considerable effort on its transparency initiative, which is likely to continue into the coming year, as well as continuing to ramp up its enforcement activities, as we predicted last year. The scope of the agency's ability to pre-empt state laws in product liability litigation involving pharmaceutical products still is developing post-Levine, and we are likely to see new decisions in the coming year. Fraud and abuse enforcement still is a major factor facing the industry, with the added threat of personal exposure to criminal sentences, fines and debarment from participation in federal and state programs under the Responsible Corporate Officer doctrine, or under the authorities exercised by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General. Consequently, it is increasingly important that senior corporate officers ensure active oversight of an effective compliance program which should mitigate these risks. The Federal Trade Commission continues to battle consumer fraud, particularly respecting weight loss programs, and it appears to be fighting a losing battle in its effort to prevent "reverse" payments to generic manufacturers by Innovator Manufacturers to delay the introduction of generics to the market. The Securities and Exchange Commission continues to be actively enforcing the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The Supreme Court gave shareholders more leeway in bringing stockholder suits in situations where a company conceals information that, if revealed, could have a negative effect on stock prices.

  7. Project TRREE 2009-2010 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atwell, Nedra

    2010-01-01

    Project TRREE (Teacher Recruitment and Retention for Educational Excellence) is a federally funded project conducted by the Kentucky Department of Education. The purpose of the project is to develop a systemic approach to increase the number of highly qualified special education teachers with a focus on recruitment of linguistically, culturally…

  8. Academic Year Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board for Community and Technical Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This Academic Year Report 2009-10 provides a snapshot of funding, facilities, staffing, and enrollments in community and technical colleges in the past academic year. The report also describes key measures of student outcomes and addresses the most frequently asked questions related to expenditures, personnel and students. Additional demographic…

  9. Your business in court: 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Reiss, John B; Hall, Christopher R; Wartman, Gregory J

    2011-01-01

    During this period, FDA focused considerable effort on its transparency initiative, which is likely to continue into the coming year, as well as continuing to ramp up its enforcement activities, as we predicted last year. The scope of the agency's ability to pre-empt state laws in product liability litigation involving pharmaceutical products still is developing post-Levine, and we are likely to see new decisions in the coming year. Fraud and abuse enforcement still is a major factor facing the industry, with the added threat of personal exposure to criminal sentences, fines and debarment from participation in federal and state programs under the Responsible Corporate Officer doctrine, or under the authorities exercised by the Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General. Consequently, it is increasingly important that senior corporate officers ensure active oversight of an effective compliance program which should mitigate these risks. The Federal Trade Commission continues to battle consumer fraud, particularly respecting weight loss programs, and it appears to be fighting a losing battle in its effort to prevent "reverse" payments to generic manufacturers by Innovator Manufacturers to delay the introduction of generics to the market. The Securities and Exchange Commission continues to be actively enforcing the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act. The Supreme Court gave shareholders more leeway in bringing stockholder suits in situations where a company conceals information that, if revealed, could have a negative effect on stock prices. PMID:24505838

  10. Implementation of Guidelines for Effective Fieldwork Designs: Exploring Learning Activities, Learning Processes, and Student Engagement in the Classroom and the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmen, Kari Beate; Frøyland, Merethe

    2014-01-01

    Teachers find the implementation of fieldwork challenging. Therefore, this study investigates two teachers' implementation of theoretical guidelines for student-centered fieldwork activities, following their participation in a professional development course focusing on earth science fieldwork pedagogy. Video observation and instructional…

  11. 'Rhyme or reason?' Saying no to mass vaccination: subjective re-interpretation in the context of the A(H1N1) influenza pandemic in Sweden 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Britta

    2015-12-01

    During the swine flu pandemic of 2009-2010, all Swedish citizens were recommended to be vaccinated with the influenza vaccine Pandemrix. However, a very serious and unexpected side effect emerged during the summer of 2010: more than 200 children and young adults were diagnosed with narcolepsy after vaccination. Besides the tragic outcome for these children and their families, this adverse side effect suggests future difficulties in obtaining trust in vaccination in cases of emerging pandemics, and thus there is a growing need to find ways to understand the complexities of vaccination decision processes. This article explores written responses to a questionnaire from a Swedish folk life archive as an unconventional source for analysing vaccine decisions. The aim is to investigate how laypersons responded to and re-interpreted the message about the recommended vaccination in their answers. The answers show the confusion and complex circumstances and influences in everyday life that people reflect on when making such important decisions. The issue of confusion is traced back to the initial communications about the vaccination intervention in which both autonomy and solidarity were expected from the population. Common narratives and stories about the media or 'big pharma capitalism' are entangled with private memories, accidental coincidences and serendipitous associations. It is obvious that vaccination interventions that require compliance from large groups of people need to take into account the kind of personal experience narratives that are produced by the complex interplay of the factors described by the informants. PMID:26077985

  12. Body composition and bone density reference data for Korean children, adolescents, and young adults according to age and sex: results of the 2009-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES).

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Jae; Hong, Hyun Sook; Chung, Seung Joon; Lee, Young Ah; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2016-07-01

    We established the timing of peak bone mass acquisition and body composition maturation and provide an age- and sex-specific body composition and bone density reference database using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in Korean subjects 10-25 years of age. Reference percentiles and curves were developed for bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD) of the whole body, the lumbar spine, and the femoral neck, and for fat mass (FM) and lean mass (LM) of 1969 healthy participants (982 males) who participated in the 2009-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Additionally, bone mineral apparent density (BMAD), FM index, and LM index were calculated to adjust for body size. BMC and BMD at all skeletal sites as well as LM increased with age, reaching plateaus at 17-20 years of age in females and 20-23 years of age in males. The femoral neck was the first to reach a bone mass plateau, followed by the lumbar spine and then the whole body. Spine BMAD increased with age in both sexes, but femoral and whole-body BMAD remained the same over time. Females displayed a dramatic increase in FM during puberty, but the FM of males decreased until mid-puberty. These findings indicate that bone health and body composition should be monitored using a normal reference database until the late second to early third decade of life, when statural growth and somatic maturation are completed. PMID:26056024

  13. Further evaluation in field tests of the activity of three anthelmintics (fenbendazole, oxibendazole, and pyrantel pamoate) against the ascarid Parascaris equorum in horse foals on eight farms in Central Kentucky (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Lyons, Eugene T; Tolliver, Sharon C; Kuzmina, Tetiana A; Collins, Sandra S

    2011-10-01

    The activity of three anthelmintics (fenbendazole-FBZ; oxibendazole-OBZ; and pyrantel pamoate-PRT) was ascertained against the ascarid Parascaris equorum in horse foals on eight farms in Central Kentucky (2009-2010) in field tests. A total of 316 foals were treated, and 168 (53.2%) were passing ascarid eggs on the day of treatment. Evaluation of drug efficacy was determined qualitatively by comparing the number of foals passing ascarid eggs in their feces before and after treatment. The main purpose was to obtain data on current activity of these compounds against ascarids. Additionally, the objective was to compare these findings with those from earlier data on the efficacy of these three compounds on nematodes in foals in this geographical area. Efficacies (average) for the foals ranged for FBZ (10 mg/kg) from 50% to 100% (80%), for OBZ (10 mg/kg) from 75% to 100% (97%), and for PRT at 1× (6.6 mg base/kg) from 0% to 71% (2%) and at 2× (13.2 mg base/kg) 0% to 0% (0%). Although the efficacy varied among the drugs, combined data for all farms indicated a significant reduction of ascarid infections for FBZ (p < 0.0001) and OBZ (p < 0.0001) but not for PRT (p = 0.0953).

  14. 'Rhyme or reason?' Saying no to mass vaccination: subjective re-interpretation in the context of the A(H1N1) influenza pandemic in Sweden 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Britta

    2015-12-01

    During the swine flu pandemic of 2009-2010, all Swedish citizens were recommended to be vaccinated with the influenza vaccine Pandemrix. However, a very serious and unexpected side effect emerged during the summer of 2010: more than 200 children and young adults were diagnosed with narcolepsy after vaccination. Besides the tragic outcome for these children and their families, this adverse side effect suggests future difficulties in obtaining trust in vaccination in cases of emerging pandemics, and thus there is a growing need to find ways to understand the complexities of vaccination decision processes. This article explores written responses to a questionnaire from a Swedish folk life archive as an unconventional source for analysing vaccine decisions. The aim is to investigate how laypersons responded to and re-interpreted the message about the recommended vaccination in their answers. The answers show the confusion and complex circumstances and influences in everyday life that people reflect on when making such important decisions. The issue of confusion is traced back to the initial communications about the vaccination intervention in which both autonomy and solidarity were expected from the population. Common narratives and stories about the media or 'big pharma capitalism' are entangled with private memories, accidental coincidences and serendipitous associations. It is obvious that vaccination interventions that require compliance from large groups of people need to take into account the kind of personal experience narratives that are produced by the complex interplay of the factors described by the informants.

  15. Viral Entry into Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, Maria R.

    2010-09-01

    Successful viral infection of a healthy cell requires complex host-pathogen interactions. In this talk we focus on the dynamics specific to the HIV virus entering a eucaryotic cell. We model viral entry as a stochastic engagement of receptors and coreceptors on the cell surface. We also consider the transport of virus material to the cell nucleus by coupling microtubular motion to the concurrent biochemical transformations that render the viral material competent for nuclear entry. We discuss both mathematical and biological consequences of our model, such as the formulation of an effective integrodifferential boundary condition embodying a memory kernel and optimal timing in maximizing viral probabilities.

  16. Use of simulated patients and reflective video analysis to assess occupational therapy students' preparedness for fieldwork.

    PubMed

    Giles, Amanda K; Carson, Nancy E; Breland, Hazel L; Coker-Bolt, Patty; Bowman, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Educators must determine whether occupational therapy students are adequately prepared for Level II fieldwork once they have successfully completed the didactic portion of their coursework. Although studies have shown that students regard the use of video cameras and simulated patient encounters as useful tools for assessing professional and clinical behaviors, little has been published in the occupational therapy literature regarding the practical application of simulated patients or reflective video analysis. We describe a model for a final Comprehensive Practical Exam that uses both simulated patients and reflective video analysis to assess student preparedness for Level II fieldwork, and we report on student perceptions of these instructional modalities. We provide recommendations for designing, implementing, and evaluating simulated patient experiences in light of existing educational theory. PMID:25397940

  17. Qualitative research on dementia in ethnically diverse communities: fieldwork challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Shanley, Chris; Leone, Desiree; Santalucia, Yvonne; Adams, Jon; Ferrerosa-Rojas, Jorge Enrique; Kourouche, Fatima; Gava, Silvana; Wu, Ying

    2013-05-01

    Australia, like other ethnically diverse societies, needs to provide culturally appropriate health care to all its citizens. One way of facilitating this is to ensure that health services research adequately reflects the circumstances and needs of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities within the population. This article discusses the fieldwork phase of a qualitative research project on dementia caregiving in 4 CALD communities in south west Sydney, Australia. Rather than focusing on the study results-which have been published elsewhere-this article presents and discusses crucial fieldwork issues that arose in the conduct of the project, particularly regarding participant recruitment and facilitation of focus groups. In being transparent about some of the difficulties encountered and how these were managed, we offer suggestions for other researchers wanting to include CALD communities in a meaningful way in their research projects. PMID:23512998

  18. The Necessity of Combining Geologists and Engineers for Fieldwork in the Practice of Geotechnics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Freitas, Michael H.

    This paper reviews the post-graduate training that can only be accomplished by having engineers and geologists working together in the field. It describes how meaningful communication and mutual appreciation of fundamental issues concerning a definition of ground and a prediction of how it will respond to engineering, and environmental, change may be established. Fieldwork suitable for achieving this and an awareness of fundamental misconceptions is also described.

  19. Challenges and dilemmas: fieldwork with upland minorities in socialist Vietnam, Laos and southwest China.

    PubMed

    Turner, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The Chinese, Vietnamese and Lao spaces within the upland Southeast Asian massif, sheltering over 80 million people belonging to geographically dispersed and politically fragmented minority populations, have only recently reopened to overseas academic endeavours. Undertaking social sciences research there among ethnic minority groups is underscored by a specific set of challenges, dilemmas, and negotiations. This special issue brings together Western academics and post-fieldwork doctoral students from the realms of social anthropology and human geography, who have conducted in-depth fieldwork among ethnic minorities in upland southwest China, northern Vietnam, and southern Laos. The articles provide insights into the struggles and constraints they faced in the field, set against an understanding of the historical context of field research in these locales. In this unique context that nowadays interweaves economic liberalisation with centralised and authoritarian political structures, the authors explore how they have negotiated and manoeuvred access to ethnic minority voices in complex cultural configurations. The ethical challenges raised and methodological reflections offered will be insightful for others conducting fieldwork in the socialist margins of the Southeast Asian massif and beyond. This specific context is introduced here, followed by a critique of the literature on the core themes that contributors raise.

  20. The role of fieldwork in rock decay research: Case studies from the fringe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Ronald I.; Gordon, Steven J.; Allen, Casey D.; Cerveny, Niccole; Dixon, John C.; Groom, Kaelin M.; Hall, Kevin; Harrison, Emma; Mol, Lisa; Paradise, Thomas R.; Sumner, Paul; Thompson, Tyler; Turkington, Alice V.

    2013-10-01

    Researchers exploring rock decay hail from chemistry, engineering, geography, geology, paleoclimatology, soil science, and other disciplines and use laboratory, microscopic, theoretical, and field-based strategies. We illustrate here how the tradition of fieldwork forms the core knowledge of rock decay and continues to build on the classic research of Blackwelder, Bryan, Gilbert, Jutson, King, Linton, Twidale, and von Humboldt. While development of nonfield-based investigation has contributed substantially to our understanding of processes, the wide range of environments, stone types, and climatic variability encountered raises issues of temporal and spatial scales too complex to fit into attempts at universal modeling. Although nonfield methods are immensely useful for understanding overarching processes, they can miss subtle differences in factors that ultimately shape rock surfaces. We, therefore, illustrate here how the tradition of fieldwork continues today alongside laboratory and computer-based investigations and contributes to our understanding of rock decay processes. This includes the contribution of fieldwork to the learning process of undergraduates, the calculation of activation energies of plagioclase and olivine dissolution, the high Arctic, the discovery of a new global carbon sink, the influence of plant roots, an analysis of the need for protocols, tafoni development, stone monuments, and rock coatings. These compiled vignettes argue that, despite revolutionary advances in instrumentation, rock decay research must remain firmly footed in the field.

  1. Double-Entry Bookkeeping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Herbert

    1999-01-01

    Explains the principles and mechanics of double-entry bookkeeping as a part of the accounting cycle to produce a functioning set of accounting records. Suggests that libraries need to have accurate and timely information about their spending to gain financial control and protect against fraud and abuse. (LRW)

  2. Think Exit at Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Rourke, Tom; Satterfield, Coy E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the "Think Exit at Entry" program that has become the guiding principle for the Georgia Department of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). The Georgia DJJ believes that the transition process begins the day the youth enters the system and continues well after release from the institution. Literature points the need for transition planning…

  3. Flavivirus Entry Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yin; Shi, Pei-Yong

    2015-09-11

    Many flaviviruses are significant human pathogens that are transmitted by mosquitoes and ticks. Although effective vaccines are available for yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitic virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus, these and other flaviviruses still cause thousands of human deaths and millions of illnesses each year. No clinically approved antiviral therapy is available for flavivirus treatment. To meet this unmet medical need, industry and academia have taken multiple approaches to develop antiflavivirus therapy, among which targeting viral entry has been actively pursued in the past decade. Here we review the current knowledge of flavivirus entry and its use for small molecule drug discovery. Inhibitors of two major steps of flaviviral entry have been reported: (i) molecules that block virus-receptor interaction; (ii) compounds that prevent conformational change of viral envelope protein during virus-host membrane fusion. We also discuss the advantages and disadvantages of targeting viral entry for treatment of flavivirus infection as compared to targeting viral replication proteins. PMID:27617926

  4. Globalisation and temporary entry.

    PubMed

    Birrell, B; Healy, E

    1997-01-01

    "Beginning on 1 August 1996 the Australian Government implemented a radical deregulation of temporary entry provisions governing foreign persons working in Australia on contracts of three months to four years. The result has been a significant increase in the numbers visaed, particularly on-shore, plus evidence that the program is being exploited in ways inconsistent with the Government's objectives."

  5. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A.; Hwang, Helen; Prabhu, Dinesh; Aliaga, Jose; Marley, Mark; McGuire, Kathy; Huynh, Loc; Garcia, Joseph; Moses, Robert; Winski, Rick; Skylanskiy, Evgeniy

    2013-01-01

    The Objectives of this work are: 1) Establish a range of probe atmospheric entry environments based on the Uranus Flagship mission outlined in the Planetary Science Decadal Survey for two launch windows: Year 2021 and 2034. 2) Define Uranus entry trade space by performing parametric studies, by varying vehicle mass and size and entry Flight Path Angle (FPA). 3) Investigate various trajectory options, including direct ballistic entry and aero-capture entry. 4) Identify entry technologies that could be leveraged to enable a viable mission to Uranus that meets science objectives.

  6. INTERIOR OF ENTRY HALLWAY AND STEEL ENTRY DOOR ON SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ENTRY HALLWAY AND STEEL ENTRY DOOR ON SOUTH SIDE, VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Telephone Exchange, Coral Sea Road north of Bismarck Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  7. Parametric Mass Modeling for Mars Entry, Descent and Landing System Analysis Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Komar, D. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the parametric mass models used for the Entry, Descent, and Landing Systems Analysis study conducted by NASA in FY2009-2010. The study examined eight unique exploration class architectures that included elements such as a rigid mid-L/D aeroshell, a lifting hypersonic inflatable decelerator, a drag supersonic inflatable decelerator, a lifting supersonic inflatable decelerator implemented with a skirt, and subsonic/supersonic retro-propulsion. Parametric models used in this study relate the component mass to vehicle dimensions and mission key environmental parameters such as maximum deceleration and total heat load. The use of a parametric mass model allows the simultaneous optimization of trajectory and mass sizing parameters.

  8. Towards a middle-range theory of mental health and well-being effects of employment transitions: Findings from a qualitative study on unemployment during the 2009-2010 economic recession.

    PubMed

    Giuntoli, Gianfranco; Hughes, Skye; Karban, Kate; South, Jane

    2015-07-01

    This article builds upon previous theoretical work on job loss as a status passage to help explain how people's experiences of involuntary unemployment affected their mental well-being during the 2009-2010 economic recession. It proposes a middle-range theory that interprets employment transitions as status passages and suggests that their health and well-being effects depend on the personal and social meanings that people give to them, which are called properties of the transitions. The analyses, which used a thematic approach, are based on the findings of a qualitative study undertaken in Bradford (North England) consisting of 73 people interviewed in 16 focus groups. The study found that the participants experienced their job losses as divestment passages characterised by three main properties: experiences of reduced agency, disruption of role-based identities, for example, personal identity crises, and experiences of 'spoiled identities', for example, experiences of stigma. The proposed middle-range theory allows us to federate these findings together in a coherent framework which makes a contribution to illuminating not just the intra-personal consequences of unemployment, that is, its impact on subjective well-being and common mental health problems, but also its inter-personal consequences, that is, the hidden and often overlooked social processes that affect unemployed people's social well-being. This article discusses how the study findings and the proposed middle-range theory can help to address the theoretical weaknesses and often contradictory empirical findings from studies that use alternative frameworks, for example, deprivation models and 'incentive theory' of unemployment.

  9. High concentrations of circulating interleukin-6 and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 with low concentrations of interleukin-8 were associated with severe chikungunya fever during the 2009-2010 outbreak in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lohachanakul, Jindarat; Phuklia, Weerawat; Thannagith, Montri; Thonsakulprasert, Tipparat; Ubol, Sukathida

    2012-02-01

    The recent outbreak of Chikungunya virus in Thailand caused a rheumatic fever associated with considerable morbidity and fatalities. Thus, it is important to identify biomarker(s) of severe disease induced by this threatening arbovirus. Putative biomarkers in cases of chikungunya fever during an outbreak in the southern part of Thailand in 2009-2010 were identified. Sixty-two patients who had developed fever and myalgia, with or without arthralgia/arthritis, were enrolled and grouped into severe chikungunya fever (CHIKF) (n= 15), mild CHIKF (n= 20) and non-CHIKF (n= 27) to investigate circulating immunological mediators that might serve as markers of severity. Blood samples were taken at presentation (day 1) and 30 days later (day 30) and plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinase-1, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 and viral load were measured by ELISA. On day 1, severe CHIKF and mild CHIKF groups had viral loads of 10(8.5) and 10(8.3) of RNA copies/mL, respectively. At presentation, all CHIKF patients had circulating concentrations of IL-6 and MCP-1 higher than did non-CHIKF patients, whereas amongst the CHKF patients, the severe CHIKF patients had higher IL-6 concentrations than did mild CHIKF patients. Interestingly, severe CHIKF patients had significantly lower concentrations of circulating IL-8 than the other groups of patients, suggesting that high concentrations of IL-6 and MCP-1 with low concentrations of IL-8 may be a determinant of severe chikungunya virus infection.

  10. A nudged chemistry-climate model simulation of chemical constituent distribution at northern high-latitude stratosphere observed by SMILES and MLS during the 2009/2010 stratospheric sudden warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyoshi, H.; Nakamura, T.; Miyasaka, T.; Shiotani, M.; Suzuki, M.

    2016-02-01

    Stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) is a dramatic phenomenon of the winter stratosphere in which the distribution of chemical constituents, associated chemical tendency, and transport of chemical constituents differ significantly inside and outside of the polar vortex. In this study, the chemical constituent distributions in the major SSW of 2009/2010 were simulated by the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate 3.2-Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM) nudged toward the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts-Interim Re-Analysis data. The results were compared with Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) observations. In addition, ozone tendency due to ozone transport and chemical ozone loss in the high-latitude lower stratosphere before and after the SSW was analyzed for the period from 1 January 2010 to 11 February 2010. The evolution and distribution of ozone and HCl inside/outside the polar vortex associated with the vortex shift to the midlatitudes in January are quite similar between SMILES and MLS. Those of ClO are also similar, considering the difference in the local time for the measurement. Analyses of the nudged CCM run indicate that inside the polar vortex at 50 hPa, the ozone concentration increased moderately owing to partial cancelation between the large negative ozone tendency due to chemical ozone destruction and large positive ozone tendency due to horizontal ozone influx from outside of the vortex as well as downward advection. In the region of a high ozone concentration with the same area as that of the polar vortex at 50 hPa, the large increase in ozone was primarily due to a downward advection of ozone. SMILES and MLS observations, nudged CCM simulations, and ozone tendency analyses revealed a highly longitudinal dependent ozone tendency at high latitudes during the SSW.

  11. Supply of neuraminidase inhibitors related to reduced influenza A (H1N1) mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic: summary of an ecological study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Paula E; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Hubbard, Roderick J; Li, Jiabai; Meyer, Alison E; Stephens, Peter; Mounts, Anthony W; Rolfes, Melissa A; Penn, Charles R

    2013-09-01

    When the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic spread across the globe from April 2009 to August 2010, many WHO Member States used antiviral drugs, specifically neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) oseltamivir and zanamivir, to treat influenza patients in critical condition. Antivirals have been found to be effective in reducing severity and duration of influenza illness, and likely reduce morbidity; however, it is unclear whether NAIs used during the pandemic reduced H1N1 mortality. To assess the association between antivirals and influenza mortality, at an ecologic level, country-level data on supply of oseltamivir and zanamivir were compared to laboratory-confirmed H1N1 deaths (per 100 000 people) from July 2009 to August 2010 in 42 WHO Member States. From this analysis, it was found that each 10% increase in kilograms of oseltamivir, per 100 000 people, was associated with a 1·6% reduction in H1N1 mortality over the pandemic period [relative rate (RR) = 0·84 per log increase in oseltamivir supply]. Each 10% increase in kilogram of active zanamivir, per 100 000, was associated with a 0·3% reduction in H1N1 mortality (RR = 0·97 per log increase). While limitations exist in the inference that can be drawn from an ecologic evaluation, this analysis offers evidence of a protective relationship between antiviral drug supply and influenza mortality and supports a role for influenza antiviral use in future pandemics. This article summarises the original study described previously, which can be accessed through the following citation: Miller PE, Rambachan A, Hubbard RJ, Li J, Meyer AE, et al. (2012) Supply of Neuraminidase Inhibitors Related to Reduced Influenza A (H1N1) Mortality during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic: An Ecological Study. PLoS ONE 7(9): e43491.

  12. Poxvirus host cell entry.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Florian Ingo; Bleck, Christopher Karl Ernst; Mercer, Jason

    2012-02-01

    Poxviruses are characterized by their large size, complex composition, and cytoplasmic life cycle. They produce two types of infectious particles: mature virions (MVs) and extracellular virions (EVs). Both MVs and EVs of vaccinia virus, the model poxvirus, take advantage of host cell endocytosis for internalization: they activate macropinocytosis-the most suitable form of endocytosis for large particles. Although largely dependent on the same cellular machinery, MV and EV entry differs with regard to the mechanisms used to trigger macropinocytosis and to undergo fusion. While EVs have to shed an additional membrane to expose the fusion complex, MV fusion requires the inactivation of fusion inhibitory proteins absent in EVs. This review highlights recent advances in the understanding of poxvirus MV and EV cell entry. PMID:22440962

  13. Time Card Entry System

    1996-05-07

    The Time Card Entry System was developed for the Department of Enegy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to interface with the DOE headquarters (DOE-HQ) Electronic Time and Attendance (ETA) system for payroll. It features pop-up window pick lists for Work Breakdown Structure numbers and Hour Codes and has extensive processing that ensures that time and attendance reported by the employee fulfills U.S. Government/OMB requirements before Timekeepers process the data at the end of the two weekmore » payroll cycle using ETA. A tour of duty profile (e.g., ten hour day, four day week with Sunday, friday and Saturday off), previously established in the ETA system, is imported into the Time Card Entry System by the timekeepers. An individual''s profile establishes the basis for validation of time of day and number of hours worked per day. At the end of the two cycle, data is exported by the timekeepers from the Time Card Entry System into ETA files.« less

  14. Evaluating life-safety risk of fieldwork at New Zealand's active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deligne, Natalia; Jolly, Gill; Taig, Tony; Webb, Terry

    2014-05-01

    Volcano observatories monitor active or potentially active volcanoes. Although the number and scope of remote monitoring instruments and methods continues to grow, in-person field data collection is still required for comprehensive monitoring. Fieldwork anywhere, and especially in mountainous areas, contains an element of risk. However, on volcanoes with signs of unrest, there is an additional risk of volcanic activity escalating while on site, with potentially lethal consequences. As an employer, a volcano observatory is morally and sometimes legally obligated to take reasonable measures to ensure staff safety and to minimise occupational risk. Here we present how GNS Science evaluates life-safety risk for volcanologists engaged in fieldwork on New Zealand volcanoes with signs of volcanic unrest. Our method includes several key elements: (1) an expert elicitation for how likely an eruption is within a given time frame, (2) quantification of, based on historical data when possible, given a small, moderate, or large eruption, the likelihood of exposure to near-vent processes, ballistics, or surge at various distances from the vent, and (3) estimate of fatality rate given exposure to these volcanic hazards. The final product quantifies hourly fatality risk at various distances from a volcanic vent; various thresholds of risk (for example, zones with more than 10-5 hourly fatality risk) trigger different levels of required approval to undertake work. Although an element of risk will always be present when conducting fieldwork on potentially active volcanoes, this is a first step towards providing objective guidance for go/no go decisions for volcanic monitoring.

  15. Creating Virtual Fieldwork Experiences of Geoheritage Sites as Educator Professional Development (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan-Haas, D.

    2013-12-01

    Geoheritage sites are identified as such because they include excellent examples of geologic features or processes, or they have played an important role in the development of geologic understandings. These characteristics also make them excellent sites for teaching in the field, for teaching educators about the nature of fieldwork, and for making Virtual Fieldwork Experiences (VFEs, multimedia representations of field sites). Through the NSF-funded Regional and Local Earth (ReaL) Earth Inquiry Project, we have engaged educators in these practices. The nature of geoheritage sites is anomalous -- if this were not the case, the sites would not gain recognition. Anomalous features or processes can be powerful learning tools when placed into comparison with the more mundane, and the Earth system science of sites local to schools is likely to be mundane. By comparing the mundane and the extraordinary, it is hoped we can learn more about both. The professional development (PD) in ReaL Earth Inquiry begins with a face-to-face workshop within the teachers' region at a site that is interesting from an Earth system science perspective. Though we recognize and emphasize that all sites are interesting from an ESS perspective if you know how to look, the sites typically have features worthy of geoheritage designation. PD does not end with the end of the workshop but continues with online study groups where teachers work together to complete the workshop site VFE, and transition to work on VFEs of sites local to their schools. Throughout the program, participants engage in: - mentored fieldwork that pays attention to the skills and knowledge needed to lead fieldwork; - instruction in and use of a wide range of technologies for making VFEs; - study of a coherent conceptual framework connected to the project's driving question: Why does this place look the way it does? - and, use of resources for supporting all of the above The resources include templates for making VFEs and a

  16. Planetary entry experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, Roger A.

    1994-01-01

    The final report summarizes the results from three research areas: (1) window design for the radiometric measurement of the forebody radiative heating experienced by atmospheric entry spaceraft; (2) survey of the current understanding of chemical species on selected solar system bodies and assess the importance of measurements with regard to vehicle environment and with regard to understanding of planetary atmospheres with emphasis on Venus, Mars, and Titan; and (3) measure and analyze the radiation (VUV to near-IR) from the shock heated gas cap of a blunt body in an Ames arc Jet wind-tunnel facility.

  17. Model-guided fieldwork: practical guidelines for multidisciplinary research on wildlife ecological and epidemiological dynamics.

    PubMed

    Restif, Olivier; Hayman, David T S; Pulliam, Juliet R C; Plowright, Raina K; George, Dylan B; Luis, Angela D; Cunningham, Andrew A; Bowen, Richard A; Fooks, Anthony R; O'Shea, Thomas J; Wood, James L N; Webb, Colleen T

    2012-10-01

    Infectious disease ecology has recently raised its public profile beyond the scientific community due to the major threats that wildlife infections pose to biological conservation, animal welfare, human health and food security. As we start unravelling the full extent of emerging infectious diseases, there is an urgent need to facilitate multidisciplinary research in this area. Even though research in ecology has always had a strong theoretical component, cultural and technical hurdles often hamper direct collaboration between theoreticians and empiricists. Building upon our collective experience of multidisciplinary research and teaching in this area, we propose practical guidelines to help with effective integration among mathematical modelling, fieldwork and laboratory work. Modelling tools can be used at all steps of a field-based research programme, from the formulation of working hypotheses to field study design and data analysis. We illustrate our model-guided fieldwork framework with two case studies we have been conducting on wildlife infectious diseases: plague transmission in prairie dogs and lyssavirus dynamics in American and African bats. These demonstrate that mechanistic models, if properly integrated in research programmes, can provide a framework for holistic approaches to complex biological systems. PMID:22809422

  18. Making blood 'Melanesian': fieldwork and isolating techniques in genetic epidemiology (1963-1976).

    PubMed

    Widmer, Alexandra

    2014-09-01

    'Isolated' populations did not exist unproblematically for life scientists to study. This article examines the practical and conceptual labour, and the historical contingencies that rendered populations legible as 'isolates' for population geneticists. Though a standard historiographical narrative tells us that population geneticists were moving from typological understandings of biological variation to processual ones, cultural variation was understood as vulnerable to homogenisation. I chart the importance that D. Carleton Gajdusek placed on isolates from his promotion of genetic epidemiology in WHO technical reports and at a Cold Spring Harbour symposium to his fieldwork routines and collection practices in a group of South Pacific islands. His fieldwork techniques combined social, cultural and historical knowledge of the research subjects in order to isolate biological descent using genealogies. Having isolated a population, Gajdusek incorporated biological materials derived from that population into broad categories of 'Melanesian' and 'race' to generate statements about the genetics of abnormal haemoglobins and malaria. Alongside an analysis of Gajdusek's practices, I present different narratives of descent, kinship and identities learned during my ethnographic work in Vanuatu. These alternatives show tacit decisions made pertaining to scale in the production of 'isolates'. PMID:25042975

  19. Fieldwork report on conditions in the 2014 Holuhraun volcanic eruption Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsson, Baldur; Ófeigsson, Benedikt; Ingvarsson, Þorgils; Kjartansson, Vilhjálmur; Arngrímsson, Hermann; Yeo, Richard; Bergsson, Bergur; Erlendsson, Pálmi; Stefánsdóttir, Gerður; Sigurðardóttir, Guðmunda; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Sigurðsson, Gunnar; Ólafsson, Haraldur; Gíslason, Ólafur; Hróðmarsson, Hilmar; Snorrason, Árni

    2015-04-01

    Since the start of the unrest at Bárðarbunga and the 2014 fissure eruption in Holuhraun Iceland, countless hours have been spent doing fieldwork. This presentation will focus on reporting the conditions that have been experienced by staff of the Icelandic Meteorological Office since the beginning of the unrest. The eruption is located north of Vatnajökull glacier on a floodplain. The area is very remote at an elevation of 700 meters, the nearest farm is about 100 km away. The Holuhraun site would be at risk of flooding should the eruption extend to the Vatnajökull ice-cap. The presentation will mainly focus on working conditions experienced during field installations and data gathering at different time stages of the eruption (August - present). Typical problems are mostly weather and gas related but a range of other challenges have been met. The presentation will focus on the following aspects; traveling to the field, glacier installations, working in a desert environment, the hazard of the gas plume, the effect that low temperatures has on equipment and working with helicopters. The aim of this report will be to get an open discussion about fieldwork related problems that may benefit us in the future, be it for the benefit of the presenter or the audience.

  20. Enabling Remote Activity: Using mobile technology for remote participation in geoscience fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah; Collins, Trevor; Gaved, Mark; Bartlett, Jessica; Valentine, Chris; McCann, Lewis

    2010-05-01

    Field-based activities are regarded as essential to the development of a range of professional and personal skills within the geosciences. Students enjoy field activities, preferring these to learning with simulations (Spicer and Stratford 2001), and these improve deeper learning and understanding (Kern and Carpenter, 1984; Elkins and Elkins, 2007). However, some students find it difficult to access these field-based learning opportunities. Field sites may be remote and often require travel across uneven, challenging or potentially dangerous terrain. Mobility-impaired students are particularly limited in their opportunities to participate in field-based learning activities and, as higher education institutions have a responsibility to provide inclusive opportunities for students (UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, UK Special Education Needs and Disability Rights Act 2001), the need for inclusive fieldwork learning is being increasingly recognised. The Enabling Remote Activity (ERA) project has been investigating how mobile communications technologies might allow field learning experiences to be brought to students who would otherwise find it difficult to participate, and also to enhance activities for all participants. It uses a rapidly deployable, battery-powered wireless network to transmit video, audio, and high resolution still images to connect participants at an accessible location with participants in the field. Crucially, the system uses a transient wireless network, allowing multiple locations to be explored during a field visit, and for plans to be changed dynamically if required. Central to the concept is the requirement for independent investigative learning: students are enabled to participate actively in the learning experience and to direct the investigations, as opposed to being simply remote viewers of the experience. Two ways of using the ERA system have been investigated: remote access and collaborative groupwork. In 2006 and 2008 remote

  1. Entry charges on immigrants.

    PubMed

    Clarke, H R

    1994-01-01

    The author analyzes "the various arguments that can be advanced for imposing fees on immigrants to optimize...resident gains.... This article discusses cost recovery and emphasizes the costs of multiculturalism as a possible basis for fees. It then analyzes the effects of inelastic immigrant supplies in providing an optimal tariff motivation for monopsonistically restricting labor flows and deals with the second-best problem of devising an optimal fee policy to accompany a possibly suboptimal immigration quota. Next, attention turns to the role of priceable externalities. Externalities which are expensive to price because of transactions costs are analyzed. Finally, along with summarization of major conclusions, the author considers if, even in the economic interests of existing residents, entry rights should be sold."

  2. Computerized Physician Order Entry

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Raman; Yen, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) has been promoted as an important component of patient safety, quality improvement, and modernization of medical practice. In practice, however, CPOE affects health care delivery in complex ways, with benefits as well as risks. Every implementation of CPOE is associated with both generally recognized and unique local factors that can facilitate or confound its rollout, and neurohospitalists will often be at the forefront of such rollouts. In this article, we review the literature on CPOE, beginning with definitions and proceeding to comparisons to the standard of care. We then proceed to discuss clinical decision support systems, negative aspects of CPOE, and cultural context of CPOE implementation. Before concluding, we follow the experiences of a Chief Medical Information Officer and neurohospitalist who rolled out a CPOE system at his own health care organization and managed the resulting workflow changes and setbacks. PMID:24381708

  3. Double-Entry Expectancy Tables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wesman, Alexander G.

    1966-01-01

    Double-entry expectancy tables are used to make admissions, guidance, or employment decisions based on two predictors. Examples of their use in showing relationships between high school and college performance are explained. The advantages of double-entry expectacy tables given are: (1) relative simplicity of preparation requiring no formal…

  4. Viking entry aerodynamics and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polutchko, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the Mars entry including the mission sequence of events and associated spacecraft weights are described along with the Viking spacecraft. Test data are presented for the aerodynamic characteristics of the entry vehicle showing trimmed alpha, drag coefficient, and trimmed lift to drag ratio versus Mach number; the damping characteristics of the entry configuration; the angle of attack time history of Viking entries; stagnation heating and pressure time histories; and the aeroshell heating distribution as obtained in tests run in a shock tunnel for various gases. Flight tests which demonstrate the aerodynamic separation of the full-scale aeroshell and the flying qualities of the entry configuration in an uncontrolled mode are documented. Design values selected for the heat protection system based on the test data and analysis performed are presented.

  5. Reconstruction of the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the findings from a reconstruction analysis of the Genesis capsule entry. First, a comparison of the atmospheric properties (density and winds) encountered during the entry to the pre-entry profile is presented. The analysis that was performed on the video footage (obtained from the tracking stations at UTTR) during the descent is then described from which the Mach number at the onset of the capsule tumble was estimated following the failure of the drogue parachute deployment. Next, an assessment of the Genesis capsule aerodynamics that was extracted from the video footage is discussed, followed by a description of the capsule hypersonic attitude that must have occurred during the entry based on examination of the recovered capsule heatshield. Lastly, the entry trajectory reconstruction that was performed is presented.

  6. The Benefits of Residential Fieldwork for School Science: Insights from a Five-Year Initiative for Inner-City Students in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amos, Ruth; Reiss, Michael

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable international interest in the value of residential fieldwork for school students. In the UK, pressures on curriculum time, rising costs and heightened concern over students' safety are curtailing residential experiences. Collaboration between several key fieldwork providers across the UK created an extensive programme of…

  7. The Value of Fieldwork in Life and Environmental Sciences in the Context of Higher Education: A Case Study in Learning about Biodiversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Graham W.; Goulder, Raymond; Wheeler, Phillip; Scott, Lisa J.; Tobin, Michelle L.; Marsham, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Fieldwork is assumed by most practitioners to be an important if not essential component of a degree level education in the environmental sciences. However, there is strong evidence that as a result of a wide range of pressures (academic, financial and societal) fieldwork is in decline in the UK and elsewhere. In this paper we discuss the value of…

  8. Keeping Our Eyes on the Prize: The Role of Fieldwork in Preparing Social Justice School Leaders in a Public University Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Noni Mendoza; Lu, Mei-Yan; Miller, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a discussion of how fieldwork can enhance the preparation of school leaders, and how this emphasis on practical, experiential learning can expose students to the wide array of challenges facing public schools. We discuss ways to transform traditional and procedural fieldwork objectives of our students to those that address…

  9. Gaining a "Sense of Place": Students' Affective Experiences of Place Leading to Transformative Learning on International Fieldwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simm, David; Marvell, Alan

    2015-01-01

    This paper reveals the extent to which undergraduate students demonstrate transformative learning whilst on international fieldwork in Barcelona, Spain. Groups of students create a series of discrete active learning situations that allow them and their peers to engage more fully with their locale and in turn experience a deeper understanding of…

  10. Getting Emotional over Class Concerns: Reflecting on Fieldwork and the Pursuit of Ethical Practice by a Fledgling School Ethnographer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    This paper reflexively explores an initiatory period of ethnographic fieldwork undertaken in a UK secondary school by a first-time researcher. Concern is expressed over the tendency to memorialise early encounters, the impression being given that reflexive accounts should be "saved" for later in the academic career, when previously suppressed…

  11. What Happens in Classrooms after Earth Science Fieldwork? Supporting Student Learning Processes during Follow-Up Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remmen, Kari Beate; Frøyland, Merethe

    2015-01-01

    Follow-up activities after fieldwork are recommended, yet little research has been conducted in this area. This study investigates six cases of follow-up work carried out by three teachers and their students in three upper secondary schools in Norway. The data comprises video observations of teachers and students, instructional artifacts,…

  12. [Analysis of heavy-metal-mediated disease and development of a novel remediation system based on fieldwork and experimental research].

    PubMed

    Yajima, Ichiro; Zou, Cunchao; Li, Xiang; Nakano, Chizuru; Omata, Yasuhiro; Kumasaka, Mayuko Y

    2015-01-01

    Heavy-metal pollution occurs in various environments, including water, air and soil, and has serious effects on human health. Since heavy-metal pollution in drinking water causes various diseases including skin cancer, it has become a global problem worldwide. However, there is limited information on the mechanism of development of heavy-metal-mediated disease. We performed both fieldwork and experimental studies to elucidate the levels of heavy-metal pollution and mechanisms of development of heavy-metal-related disease and to develop a novel remediation system. Our fieldwork in Bangladesh, Vietnam and Malaysia demonstrated that drinking well water in these countries was polluted with high concentrations of several heavy metals including arsenic, barium, iron and manganese. Our experimental studies based on the data from our fieldwork demonstrated that these heavy metals caused skin cancer and hearing loss. Further experimental studies resulted in the development of a novel remediation system with which toxic heavy metals were absorbed from polluted drinking water. Implementation of both fieldwork and experimental studies is important for prediction, prevention and therapy of heavy-metal-mediated diseases.

  13. DLMS voice data entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, P. B.

    1980-06-01

    This report describes the design, principles of operation, and performance characteristics of an Advanced Development Model of a voice recognition system (VRS) which can serve to input cartographic data to a computer. The completed system has been installed at the Defense Mapping Agency Aerospace Center (DMAAC) at St. Louis, MO, for evaluation and testing. The VRS is intended for use in entering by voice cartographic data to the Digital Landmass System (DLMS) Data Base. It was designed to satisfy the DMAAC product specifications. The software developed for the VRS includes two complete stand-alone programs. Performance tests conducted at TTI disclosed an average system word recognition accuracy of just under 99 percent for five talkers. The recognition tests were conducted by the use of tape recordings. These tape recordings were made during a previous contract involving cartographic data entry. Each person spoke approximately 536 words after uttering five training repetitions. The test results were virtually identical to those obtained during the previous contract.

  14. Morals, morale and motivations in data fabrication: Medical research fieldworkers views and practices in two Sub-Saharan African contexts.

    PubMed

    Kingori, Patricia; Gerrets, René

    2016-10-01

    Data fabrication, incorrect collection strategies and poor data management, are considered detrimental to high-quality scientific research. While poor data management have been occasionally excused, fabrication constitutes a cardinal sin - scientific misconduct. Scholarly examinations of fabrication usually seek to expose and capture its prevalence and, less frequently, its consequences and causes. Most accounts centre on high-income countries, individual senior researchers and scientists who are portrayed as irrational, immoral or deceptive. We argue that such accounts contain limitations in overlooking data collected in 'the field', in low-income countries, by junior researchers and non-scientists. Furthermore, the processes and motivations for fabrication and subversive practices are under-examined. Drawing on two separate ethnographies, conducted in 2004-2009 in medical research projects in sub-Saharan Africa, this paper investigates fabrication among fieldworkers using data from observations and informal conversations, 68 interviews and 7 Focus Group Discussions involving diverse stakeholders. Based on an interpretative approach, we examined fieldworkers' accounts that fabrications were motivated by irreconcilable moral concerns, faltering morale resulting from poor management, and inadequate institutional support. To fieldworkers, data fabrication constituted a 'tool' for managing their quotidian challenges. Fabrications ranged from active to passive acts, to subvert, resist and readdress tensions deriving from employment inequalities and challenging socio-economic conditions. We show that geographical and hierarchical distance between high-ranking research actors and fieldworkers in contemporary configurations of international medical research can compartmentalise, and ultimately undermine, the relationships necessary to produce high-quality data. In focusing on fieldworkers, we argue for the inclusion of wide-ranging perspectives in examinations of data

  15. Morals, morale and motivations in data fabrication: Medical research fieldworkers views and practices in two Sub-Saharan African contexts.

    PubMed

    Kingori, Patricia; Gerrets, René

    2016-10-01

    Data fabrication, incorrect collection strategies and poor data management, are considered detrimental to high-quality scientific research. While poor data management have been occasionally excused, fabrication constitutes a cardinal sin - scientific misconduct. Scholarly examinations of fabrication usually seek to expose and capture its prevalence and, less frequently, its consequences and causes. Most accounts centre on high-income countries, individual senior researchers and scientists who are portrayed as irrational, immoral or deceptive. We argue that such accounts contain limitations in overlooking data collected in 'the field', in low-income countries, by junior researchers and non-scientists. Furthermore, the processes and motivations for fabrication and subversive practices are under-examined. Drawing on two separate ethnographies, conducted in 2004-2009 in medical research projects in sub-Saharan Africa, this paper investigates fabrication among fieldworkers using data from observations and informal conversations, 68 interviews and 7 Focus Group Discussions involving diverse stakeholders. Based on an interpretative approach, we examined fieldworkers' accounts that fabrications were motivated by irreconcilable moral concerns, faltering morale resulting from poor management, and inadequate institutional support. To fieldworkers, data fabrication constituted a 'tool' for managing their quotidian challenges. Fabrications ranged from active to passive acts, to subvert, resist and readdress tensions deriving from employment inequalities and challenging socio-economic conditions. We show that geographical and hierarchical distance between high-ranking research actors and fieldworkers in contemporary configurations of international medical research can compartmentalise, and ultimately undermine, the relationships necessary to produce high-quality data. In focusing on fieldworkers, we argue for the inclusion of wide-ranging perspectives in examinations of data

  16. ESA Venus Entry Probe Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vandenBerg, M. L.; Falkner, P.; Phipps, A.; Underwood, J. C.; Lingard, J. S.; Moorhouse, J.; Kraft, S.; Peacock, A.

    2005-01-01

    The Venus Entry Probe is one of ESA s Technology Reference Studies (TRS). The purpose of the Technology Reference Studies is to provide a focus for the development of strategically important technologies that are of likely relevance for future scientific missions. The aim of the Venus Entry Probe TRS is to study approaches for low cost in-situ exploration of Venus and other planetary bodies with a significant atmosphere. In this paper, the mission objectives and an outline of the mission concept of the Venus Entry Probe TRS are presented.

  17. 27. View of entry door to vestibule to MWOC entry ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. View of entry door to vestibule to MWOC entry door in transmitter building no. 102 (note coded key pad to left and intercom phone on left) and door to the central systems monitor room (CSMR) to right (out of sight). - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. Enabling Remote Activity: Using mobile technology for remote participation in geoscience fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sarah; Collins, Trevor; Gaved, Mark; Bartlett, Jessica; Valentine, Chris; McCann, Lewis

    2010-05-01

    Field-based activities are regarded as essential to the development of a range of professional and personal skills within the geosciences. Students enjoy field activities, preferring these to learning with simulations (Spicer and Stratford 2001), and these improve deeper learning and understanding (Kern and Carpenter, 1984; Elkins and Elkins, 2007). However, some students find it difficult to access these field-based learning opportunities. Field sites may be remote and often require travel across uneven, challenging or potentially dangerous terrain. Mobility-impaired students are particularly limited in their opportunities to participate in field-based learning activities and, as higher education institutions have a responsibility to provide inclusive opportunities for students (UK Disability Discrimination Act 1995, UK Special Education Needs and Disability Rights Act 2001), the need for inclusive fieldwork learning is being increasingly recognised. The Enabling Remote Activity (ERA) project has been investigating how mobile communications technologies might allow field learning experiences to be brought to students who would otherwise find it difficult to participate, and also to enhance activities for all participants. It uses a rapidly deployable, battery-powered wireless network to transmit video, audio, and high resolution still images to connect participants at an accessible location with participants in the field. Crucially, the system uses a transient wireless network, allowing multiple locations to be explored during a field visit, and for plans to be changed dynamically if required. Central to the concept is the requirement for independent investigative learning: students are enabled to participate actively in the learning experience and to direct the investigations, as opposed to being simply remote viewers of the experience. Two ways of using the ERA system have been investigated: remote access and collaborative groupwork. In 2006 and 2008 remote

  19. Adaptable Deployable Entry and Placement Technology (ADEPT)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Adaptable, Deployable Entry Placement Technology (ADEPT) Project will test and demonstrate a deployable aeroshell concept as a viable thermal protection system for entry, descent, and landing o...

  20. Atmospheric maneuvering during Martian entry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauber, Michael E.; Bowles, Jeffrey V.; Yang, Lily

    A comparative-advantages study is made of two different Martian atmospheric entry maneuvers, on the basis of calculation results for the case of a vehicle with a maximum L/D ratio of 2.3. Entries from a highly elliptical Martian orbit at 5 km/sec are more difficult than those from a lower altitude and speed orbit at 3.5 km/sec, due to their more stringent guidance requirements. Efforts to reduce the deceleration for the higher speed entry by lift-modulation achieved a 40-percent reduction, but at the cost of a 50-percent decrease in lateral range. The lower-speed entry's gliding trajectory is noted to encounter a far more benign atmospheric environment.

  1. Entry, Descent, Landing Animation (Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Entry, Descent, Landing animation

    This animation illustrates the path the Stardust return capsule will follow once it enters Earth's atmosphere.

  2. Re-entry Experiment Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    On August 10, 2009, NASA successfully launched the Inflatable Re-entry Vehicle Experiment (IRVE) and proved that spacecraft can use inflatable heat shields to reduce speed and provide protection du...

  3. Orion Entry Handling Qualities Assessments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bihari, B.; Tiggers, M.; Strahan, A.; Gonzalez, R.; Sullivan, K.; Stephens, J. P.; Hart, J.; Law, H., III; Bilimoria, K.; Bailey, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Orion Command Module (CM) is a capsule designed to bring crew back from the International Space Station (ISS), the moon and beyond. The atmospheric entry portion of the flight is deigned to be flown in autopilot mode for nominal situations. However, there exists the possibility for the crew to take over manual control in off-nominal situations. In these instances, the spacecraft must meet specific handling qualities criteria. To address these criteria two separate assessments of the Orion CM s entry Handling Qualities (HQ) were conducted at NASA s Johnson Space Center (JSC) using the Cooper-Harper scale (Cooper & Harper, 1969). These assessments were conducted in the summers of 2008 and 2010 using the Advanced NASA Technology Architecture for Exploration Studies (ANTARES) six degree of freedom, high fidelity Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) simulation. This paper will address the specifics of the handling qualities criteria, the vehicle configuration, the scenarios flown, the simulation background and setup, crew interfaces and displays, piloting techniques, ratings and crew comments, pre- and post-fight briefings, lessons learned and changes made to improve the overall system performance. The data collection tools, methods, data reduction and output reports will also be discussed. The objective of the 2008 entry HQ assessment was to evaluate the handling qualities of the CM during a lunar skip return. A lunar skip entry case was selected because it was considered the most demanding of all bank control scenarios. Even though skip entry is not planned to be flown manually, it was hypothesized that if a pilot could fly the harder skip entry case, then they could also fly a simpler loads managed or ballistic (constant bank rate command) entry scenario. In addition, with the evaluation set-up of multiple tasks within the entry case, handling qualities ratings collected in the evaluation could be used to assess other scenarios such as the constant bank angle

  4. Opportunities and Needs for Mobile-Computing Technology to Support U.S. Geological Survey Fieldwork

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Nathan J.; Halsing, David L.

    2006-01-01

    To assess the opportunities and needs for mobile-computing technology at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), we conducted an internal, Internet-based survey of bureau scientists whose research includes fieldwork. In summer 2005, 144 survey participants answered 65 questions about fieldwork activities and conditions, technology to support field research, and postfieldwork data processing and analysis. Results suggest that some types of mobile-computing technology are already commonplace, such as digital cameras and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers, whereas others are not, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and tablet-based personal computers (tablet PCs). The potential for PDA use in the USGS is high: 97 percent of respondents record field observations (primarily environmental conditions and water-quality data), and 87 percent take field samples (primarily water-quality data, water samples, and sediment/soil samples). The potential for tablet PC use in the USGS is also high: 59 percent of respondents map environmental features in the field, primarily by sketching in field notebooks, on aerial photographs, or on topographic-map sheets. Results also suggest that efficient mobile-computing-technology solutions could benefit many USGS scientists because most respondents spend at least 1 week per year in the field, conduct field sessions that are least 1 week in duration, have field crews of one to three people, and typically travel on foot about 1 mi from their field vehicles. By allowing researchers to enter data directly into digital databases while in the field, mobile-computing technology could also minimize postfieldwork data processing: 93 percent of respondents enter collected field data into their office computers, and more than 50 percent spend at least 1 week per year on postfieldwork data processing. Reducing postfieldwork data processing could free up additional time for researchers and result in cost savings for the bureau. Generally

  5. Virtual Fieldwork and Critical Zone Observatories as Vehicles for Teaching "Three Dimensional" (NGSS) Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan-Haas, D.; Ross, R. M.; Derry, L. A.; White, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) offers a vision for K-12 science education that has important differences from common and long-standing classroom practice in many ways. NGSS's three dimensions (Scientific and Engineering Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Disciplinary Core Ideas), coupled with the recognition that it takes years to develop deep understandings of big ideas, do not mesh well with common K-12 (or K-16) teaching practices. NGSS also infuses systems and complexity into the K-12 curriculum. The Critical Zone lies between the bottom of the groundwater and the tops of the trees -- the layer of the Earth system where most life resides. Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs) are NSF-funded observatories in markedly varied ecosystems throughout the US, where interdisciplinary teams study the interplay of geological, biological, physical, and chemical sciences. The work being done in CZOs is three-dimensional science that is both deepening the scientific community's understandings of Earth systems and providing a cutting edge and highly relevant model for K-12 science education. Virtual Fieldwork Experiences (VFEs) are multi-media representations of actual field sites that are intended to mimic fieldwork by allowing for open-ended inquiry. The Paleontological Research Institution has developed tools and strategies to build VFEs of any site that use consistent formats, yet allow for inquiry to take multiple directions. Working together with CZO scientists, PRI staff are developing VFEs and accompanying curriculum materials for each CZO site. Ready-to-use VFEs act as models that teachers and students can use to create VFEs local to their schools. VFEs, like CZOs, facilitate use of interdisciplinary science to better understand the environment. A local VFE can be built up over time with contributions from students and teachers in middle school sciences, high school biology, Earth science, and environmental science -- classes where most curriculum

  6. Happiness in the neonatal intensive care unit: merits of ethnographic fieldwork.

    PubMed

    Einarsdóttir, Jónína

    2012-12-12

    Research has focused on the destructive effects of distress on professionals who work in ethically complex wards such as neonatal intensive units (NICUs). This article examines the accounts of health professionals, including nurses, pediatricians and assistant nurses, of their work at a NICU in Iceland. The aim is to understand how health professionals, who work under stressful conditions in an ethically sensitive ward, can counteract the negative sides of work too such a degree that they experience happiness. The collection of data was based on the ethnographic fieldwork, and the methods used were participant observation and semi-structured interviews. The professionals evaluated their wellbeing in line with conventional definitions of happiness. Working with children and opportunities to help others, engage in social relations and experience professional pride contributed to their happiness at work. Nonetheless, they did not dismiss the difficult experiences, and when confronted with these the professionals negotiated their meanings and the goals and priorities of work. In contrast to the findings of much quantitative and survey-based research, the professionals attributed constructive meanings to stress and argued that the positive experiences at work buffered the negative ones. Research on happiness would benefit from multifaceted methodological and theoretical perspectives. Thanks to its openness to the unforeseen, controversial, contradictory, and ambiguous aspects of human life, ethnography can contribute to happiness research and research on job satisfaction.

  7. Happiness in the neonatal intensive care unit: Merits of ethnographic fieldwork

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Research has focused on the destructive effects of distress on professionals who work in ethically complex wards such as neonatal intensive units (NICUs). This article examines the accounts of health professionals, including nurses, pediatricians and assistant nurses, of their work at a NICU in Iceland. The aim is to understand how health professionals, who work under stressful conditions in an ethically sensitive ward, can counteract the negative sides of work too such a degree that they experience happiness. The collection of data was based on the ethnographic fieldwork, and the methods used were participant observation and semi-structured interviews. The professionals evaluated their wellbeing in line with conventional definitions of happiness. Working with children and opportunities to help others, engage in social relations and experience professional pride contributed to their happiness at work. Nonetheless, they did not dismiss the difficult experiences, and when confronted with these the professionals negotiated their meanings and the goals and priorities of work. In contrast to the findings of much quantitative and survey-based research, the professionals attributed constructive meanings to stress and argued that the positive experiences at work buffered the negative ones. Research on happiness would benefit from multifaceted methodological and theoretical perspectives. Thanks to its openness to the unforeseen, controversial, contradictory, and ambiguous aspects of human life, ethnography can contribute to happiness research and research on job satisfaction. PMID:23237628

  8. One hundred years of instrumental phonetic fieldwork on North America Indian languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonough, Joyce

    2005-04-01

    A resurgence of interest in phonetic fieldwork on generally morphologically complex North American Indian languages over the last 15 years is a continuation of a tradition started a century ago with the Earle Pliny Goddard, who collected kymographic and palatographic field-data between 1906-1927 on several Athabaskan languages: Coastal Athabaskan (Hupa and Kato), Apachean (Mescalero, Jicarilla, White Mountain, San Juan Carlos Apache), and several Athabaskan languages in Northern Canada (Cold Lake and Beaver); data that remains important for its record of segmental timing profiles and rare articulatory documentation in then largely monolingual communities. This data in combination with new work has resulted in the emergence of a body of knowledge of these typologically distinct families that often challenge notions of phonetic universality and typology. Using the Athabaskan languages as benchmark example and starting with Goddard's work, two types of emergent typological patterns will be discussed; the persistence of fine-grained timing and duration details across the widely dispersed family, and the broad variation in prosodic types that exists, both of which are unaccounted for by phonetic or phonological theories.

  9. The Cosmos in Portuguese Popular Tradition: A Bibliographic and Fieldwork Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Catarina

    2015-05-01

    Shepherds, farmers and fishermen knew the sky, the stars and constellations, by the same names as did their ancestors. Their observations often provided orientation clues to find their way at sea or inland, predict the weather, and to reckon time, particularly for sowing, harvesting or fishing.Also, Iberian popular tradition, in the form of talismans, prayers and recitations, testifies to former beliefs about the Moon and its malignant influence on children. This lunar determinism also found its way into popular awareness of its influence on vegetation growth, weather, tides or childbirth. Also, the Sun persisted in rural societies as an object of cult worship in the form of prayers or festivities. From the sky man also derived the various cycles, organized calendars and celebrated ritual festivities at solstices and equinoxes. Popular astronomy and meteorology were relevant topics in pioneer Portuguese ethnography between late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and valuable documents were then produced. Presently, systematic fieldwork amongst shepherds, farmers and fishermen, in defined regional areas, will contribute to an evaluation of the present stage of this knowledge about the sky and of its relation to ancient beliefs, and on how social groups have perceived and integrated it into their daily lives and cosmovision.

  10. Operational guidelines (version 1.0) for geological fieldwork in areas endemic for Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, Frederick S.; Bultman, Mark W.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes

    2000-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis (Valley Fever) is a disease caused by the inhalation of the arthroconidia (spores) of Coccidioides immitis, a fungus that lives in the soils of southwestern United States. Although large numbers of people are exposed to the arthroconidia and are consequently infected, very few individuals contract the more serious forms of the disease. Earth scientists working in field areas where Coccidioides immitis is endemic have an increased risk of becoming infected. Because field operations often disturb the upper surface of the ground, they may inhale large numbers of arthroconidia. This also increases their risk of developing more severe forms of the disease. Any other occupations or activities that create dusty conditions in endemic areas also have increased risk of infection. Risk management strategies can lower the incidence of infection and also reduce the numbers of arthroconidia inhaled thereby decreasing the chances of developing more serious disease. Dust control, by utilizing dust masks, and dust prevention, by limiting ground disturbing activities, are the primary weapons against infection. However, infection risk can also be lowered by conducting fields studies in the winter months; avoiding sites favorable for Coccidioides immitis growth; seeking prompt medical treatment if flu-like or respiratory illness occur during, or within a few weeks following, fieldwork; getting a coccidioidin skin test to determine susceptibility to the disease; and by educating all members of the field party about the possibilities and consequences of infection.

  11. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  12. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  13. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  14. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  15. 19 CFR 191.143 - Drawback entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK Foreign-Built Jet Aircraft Engines Processed in the United States § 191.143 Drawback entry. (a) Filing of entry. Drawback entries covering these foreign-built jet aircraft engines shall be filed on Customs Form 7551, modified to show that the entry covers jet aircraft engines processed...

  16. Demise of the checksheet: Using off-the-shelf miniature hand-held computers for remote fieldwork applications.

    PubMed

    Whiten, A; Barton, R A

    1988-06-01

    Laboratory-based researchers have increasingly reaped the benefits of entering data directly into a computer; those concerned with behaviour often using specially designed keyboards. However, many ecologists and ethologists doing fieldwork in remote places have been reluctant to abandon paper checksheets because of worries about unreliability, lack of electrical supply and sheer weight of computer equipment, adding to more general drawbacks such as the need for considerable expertise in purpose-built hardware and software. Having used commercially available hand-held computers extensively for our own fieldwork on baboons in Africa, we are confident that these worries are unfounded. As some researchers have already discovered, field computerization is not something to be distrusted, but in fact offers several important benefits. PMID:21227187

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Entry Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendeck, Gavin F.

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory will be the first Mars mission to attempt a guided entry with the objective of safely delivering the entry vehicle to a survivable parachute deploy state within 12.5 km of the pre-designated parachute deploy coordinates. The Entry Terminal Point Controller guidance algorithm is derived from the final phase Apollo Command Module guidance and, like Apollo, modulates the bank angle to control range based on deviations in range, altitude rate, and drag acceleration from a reference trajectory. For application to Mars landers which must make use of the tenuous Martian atmosphere, it is critical to balance the lift of the vehicle to minimize the range while still ensuring a safe deploy altitude. An overview of the process to generate optimized guidance settings is presented, discussing improvements made over the last nine years. Performance tradeoffs between ellipse size and deploy altitude will be presented, along with imposed constraints of entry acceleration and heating. Performance sensitivities to the bank reversal deadbands, heading alignment, attitude initialization error, and entry delivery errors are presented.

  18. Atmospheric entry heating of micrometeorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    A computer simulation of the atmospheric entry deceleration and heating of cosmic dust particles has been developed and the predicted peak temperatures are compared to the earlier closed-form mathematical solutions of Whipple (195) and Fraundorf (1980). A 20-micron diameter particle of density 1 gm/cu cm having a velocity of 10 km/s at infinity and entering the atmosphere at normal incidence reaches a peak temperature of 1159 K. The duration of the heating pulse is about 8 s but the particle remains within 100 K of the peak temperature for only 1.0 s. As the angle of incidence decreases, the peak temperature reached on entry also decreases, and the duration of the temperature pulse increases. Comparison with the Whipple amd Fraundorf models indicates that they accurately assess the entry heating for cosmic dust particles of moderate or higher densities and entry angles near normal incidence. As particle density decreases or the entry angle nears grazing incidence, they overestimate the peak temperature.

  19. Reconstruction of the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the reconstruction analyses performed for the Genesis capsule entry is described. The results indicate that the actual entry prior to the drogue deployment failure was very close to the pre-entry predictions. The capsule landed 8.3 km south of the desired target at Utah Test and Training Range. Analysis on infrared video footage (obtained from the tracking stations) during the descent estimated the onset of the capsule tumble at Mach 0.9. Frequency analysis on the infrared video data indicates that the aerodynamics generated for the Genesis capsule reasonably predicted the drag and static stability. Observations of the heatshield support the pre-entry simulation estimates of a small hypersonic angles-of-attack, since there is very little, if any, charring of the shoulder region or the aftbody. Through this investigation, an overall assertion can be made that all the data gathered from the Genesis entry is consistent with flight performance that was close to the nominal preentry prediction. Consequently, the design principles and methodologies utilized for the flight dynamics, aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics analyses have been corroborated.

  20. Using a Web-Based Resource to Prepare Students for Fieldwork: Evaluating the Dark Peak Virtual Tour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMorrow, Julia

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on development of a Dark Peak website and its use to prepare first-year geography students for a one-day physical geography field course in the south Pennines. The Virtual Tour (VT) component of the website is the main focus of this paper. Pre- and post-fieldwork evaluations of the first version of the VT by 195 students are…

  1. 19 CFR 142.17 - One entry summary for multiple entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false One entry summary for multiple entries. 142.17... for multiple entries. (a) Requirements. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, the port... summary. (b) Merchandise not eligible. One entry summary shall not be used for multiple entries of...

  2. HIV: Cell Binding and Entry

    PubMed Central

    Wilen, Craig B.; Tilton, John C.; Doms, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    The first step of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication cycle—binding and entry into the host cell—plays a major role in determining viral tropism and the ability of HIV to degrade the human immune system. HIV uses a complex series of steps to deliver its genome into the host cell cytoplasm while simultaneously evading the host immune response. To infect cells, the HIV protein envelope (Env) binds to the primary cellular receptor CD4 and then to a cellular coreceptor. This sequential binding triggers fusion of the viral and host cell membranes, initiating infection. Revealing the mechanism of HIV entry has profound implications for viral tropism, transmission, pathogenesis, and therapeutic intervention. Here, we provide an overview into the mechanism of HIV entry, provide historical context to key discoveries, discuss recent advances, and speculate on future directions in the field. PMID:22908191

  3. Multi-scale Geological Outcrop Visualisation: Using Gigapan and Photosynth in Fieldwork-related Geology Teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimpson, Ian; Gertisser, Ralf; Montenari, Michael; O'Driscoll, Brian

    2010-05-01

    An increasing proportion of geology (and other fieldwork-related discipline) students are mobility impaired. This is partially due to the widening access agenda and the acceptance of increased numbers of students with severe medical disabilities. In the UK, the expectation of "The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Act (2001)" (SENDA) and "The Higher Education Quality Assurance Agency" (QAA) is that institutions should, wherever possible, provide alternative experiences where comparable opportunities are available which satisfy the learning outcomes. In order to provide this alternative experience, the ways in which students observe and learn from geology in the field need to be resembled closely by, for example, viewing outcrops at different scales and from different perspectives. Whilst a series of still images at different distances could be taken, students need to be able to decide where to look in detail and 'move around' the outcrop. The Gigapan project is a website and supporting software that allows high-resolution megapixel photographic images to be combined to make gigapixel panoramas which can then be explored at many scales by zooming and panning. Photosynth is a similar project where a number of different digital photographs are combined into a 3D model in which the user can move around. Here, we show examples of both projects, which have been successfully implemented in geology teaching related to a residential undergraduate field course to classic geological areas in Pembrokeshire, South Wales. In addition to providing an alternative learning experience for mobility-impaired students on the fieldtrip, these resources could also be used for non-impaired students where circumstances such as bad weather prevents the whole cohort from visiting a key exposure on a field course. They would also allow a 'virtual' visit of exposures that are inaccessible and may be a useful learning tool for preparing students for a forthcoming field course.

  4. Removing Arsenic from Contaminated Drinking Water in Rural Bangladesh: Recent Fieldwork Results and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Kowolik, Kristin; Addy, Susan E.A.

    2009-09-17

    ARUBA (Arsenic Removal Using Bottom Ash) has proven effective at removing high concentrations of arsenic from drinking water in Bangladesh. During fieldwork in four sub-districts of the country, ARUBA reduced arsenic levels ranging from 200 to 900 ppb to below the Bangladesh standard of 50 ppb. The technology is cost-effective because the substrate--bottom ash from coal fired power plants--is a waste material readily available in South Asia. In comparison to similar technologies, ARUBA uses less media for arsenic removal due to its high surface area to volume ratio. Hence, less waste is produced. A number of experiments were conducted in Bangladesh to determine the effectiveness of various water treatment protocols. It was found that (1) ARUBA removes more than half of the arsenic from water within five minutes of treatment, (2) ARUBA, that has settled at the bottom of a treatment vessel, continues to remove arsenic for 2-3 days, (3) ARUBA's arsenic removal efficiency can be improved through sequential partial dosing (adding a given amount of ARUBA in fractions versus all at once), and (4) allowing water to first stand for two to three days followed by treatment with ARUBA produced final arsenic levels ten times lower than treating water directly out of the well. Our findings imply a number of tradeoffs between ARUBA's effective arsenic removal capacity, treatment system costs, and waste output. These tradeoffs, some a function of arsenic-related policies in Bangladesh (e.g., waste disposal regulations), must be considered when designing an arsenic removal system. We propose that the most attractive option is to use ARUBA in communityscale water treatment centers, installed as public-private partnerships, in Bangladeshi villages.

  5. Numerical Skip-Entry Guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigges, Michael; Crull, Timothy; Rea, Jeremy; Johnson, Wyatt

    2006-01-01

    This paper assesses a preliminary guidance and targeting strategy for accomplishing Skip-Entry (SE) flight during a lunar return-capsule entry flight. One of the primary benefits of flying a SE trajectory is to provide the crew with continuous Continental United States (CONUS) landing site access throughout the lunar month. Without a SE capability, the capsule must land either in water or at one of several distributed land sites in the Southern Hemisphere for a significant portion of a lunar month using a landing and recovery scenario similar to that employed during the Apollo program. With a SE trajectory, the capsule can land either in water at a site in proximity to CONUS or at one of several distributed landing sites within CONUS, thereby simplifying the operational requirements for crew retrieval and vehicle recovery, and possibly enabling a high degree of vehicle reusability. Note that a SE capability does not require that the vehicle land on land. A SE capability enables a longer-range flight than a direct-entry flight, which permits the vehicle to land at a much greater distance from the Entry Interface (EI) point. This does not exclude using this approach to push the landing point to a water location in proximity of CONUS and utilizing water or airborne recovery forces.

  6. Delayed School Entry in Uganda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyi, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997 Uganda has seen a large increase in school enrolment. Despite this increased enrolment, universal education has remained elusive. Many children enrol in school, but not at the recommended age, and they drop out before completing school. This article focuses on one of these problems--delayed school entry. What household factors are…

  7. Components of Visual Prior Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Keith A.; Bavelier, Daphne

    2003-01-01

    The prior entry hypothesis contends that attention accelerates sensory processing, shortening the time to perception. Typical observations supporting the hypothesis may be explained equally well by response biases, changes in decision criteria, or sensory facilitation. In a series of experiments conducted to discriminate among the potential…

  8. Poxvirus entry and membrane fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, Bernard . E-mail: bmoss@nih.gov

    2006-01-05

    The study of poxvirus entry and membrane fusion has been invigorated by new biochemical and microscopic findings that lead to the following conclusions: (1) the surface of the mature virion (MV), whether isolated from an infected cell or by disruption of the membrane wrapper of an extracellular virion, is comprised of a single lipid membrane embedded with non-glycosylated viral proteins; (2) the MV membrane fuses with the cell membrane, allowing the core to enter the cytoplasm and initiate gene expression; (3) fusion is mediated by a newly recognized group of viral protein components of the MV membrane, which are conserved in all members of the poxvirus family; (4) the latter MV entry/fusion proteins are required for cell to cell spread necessitating the disruption of the membrane wrapper of extracellular virions prior to fusion; and furthermore (5) the same group of MV entry/fusion proteins are required for virus-induced cell-cell fusion. Future research priorities include delineation of the roles of individual entry/fusion proteins and identification of cell receptors.

  9. Cell entry of enveloped viruses.

    PubMed

    Cosset, François-Loic; Lavillette, Dimitri

    2011-01-01

    Enveloped viruses penetrate their cell targets following the merging of their membrane with that of the cell. This fusion process is catalyzed by one or several viral glycoproteins incorporated on the membrane of the virus. These envelope glycoproteins (EnvGP) evolved in order to combine two features. First, they acquired a domain to bind to a specific cellular protein, named "receptor." Second, they developed, with the help of cellular proteins, a function of finely controlled fusion to optimize the replication and preserve the integrity of the cell, specific to the genus of the virus. Following the activation of the EnvGP either by binding to their receptors and/or sometimes the acid pH of the endosomes, many changes of conformation permit ultimately the action of a specific hydrophobic domain, the fusion peptide, which destabilizes the cell membrane and leads to the opening of the lipidic membrane. The comprehension of these mechanisms is essential to develop medicines of the therapeutic class of entry inhibitor like enfuvirtide (Fuzeon) against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In this chapter, we will summarize the different envelope glycoprotein structures that viruses develop to achieve membrane fusion and the entry of the virus. We will describe the different entry pathways and cellular proteins that viruses have subverted to allow infection of the cell and the receptors that are used. Finally, we will illustrate more precisely the recent discoveries that have been made within the field of the entry process, with a focus on the use of pseudoparticles. These pseudoparticles are suitable for high-throughput screenings that help in the development of natural or artificial inhibitors as new therapeutics of the class of entry inhibitors.

  10. Understanding and Defining sociohydrological spaces and their boundaries: an interdisciplinary perspective from collective fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaux, Jeanne; Leduc, Christian; Ben Aïssa, Nadhira; Burte, Julien; Calvez, Roger; habaieb, Hamadi; Ogilvie, Andrew; Massuel, Sylvain; Rochette, Romain

    2014-05-01

    Focussing on the interactions between water and society, researchers from various scientific disciplines have worked together on a common case study, the Merguellil catchment in Central Tunisia. The aim was to foster interactions between wide-ranging disciplines and their associated approaches, as the segmented analysis of water resources, uses and management is known to limit the comprehensive understanding of water issues. One of the major difficulties in developing a interdisciplinary approach is defining a suitable common observation space or "territory". Research in social sciences notably showed that hydrological catchments, suited to integrated water resource management, are rarely relevant to socio-political issues (water transfers, management of interfluves, etc.). Likewise, hydrological research regularly highlights the mismatch between surface and ground water processes and boundaries. Hydrological, hydrogeological and sociological boundaries also fluctuate when considering different time frames, socio-political organisations and processes. Finally, a suitable observation space must also be coherent to the variety of local stakeholders involved in the research. The present paper addressed the question of what is a common multidisciplinary observation space? What approach can help define and identify boundaries that make sense to hydrologists, agronomists, anthropologists and local stakeholders? How do we reconcile physical limits and territories? In the first instance, we focus on the value and importance of fieldwork, crucial in anthropology, but equally important for hydrologists and agronomists. Through a mutual process of defining the limits and characteristics of our research object, relevant socio-hydrological spaces were able to emerge These were circumscribed through the physical characteristics (based upon hydrological boundaries and processes) and the human particularities (political organisation, productive activities) of the study area. The

  11. Inspired by Fieldwork: A Teacher Research Experience Energizes and Ignites a Group of Elementary Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munroe, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    Through involvement in authentic research experiences teachers improve their content knowledge, deepen their understanding of the research process, and rejuvenate their interest in science. These positive results of fieldwork transfer into the classroom, directly benefiting students. The ARMADA project provided me with a three week research experience aboard the Amundsen (Canadian Coast Guard science vessel) which enriched and strengthened me professionally. Guided by master and early career scientists, I took part in specific research techniques and deep scientific discourse. My immersion in ocean science was so stimulating that I was inspired to share that excitement with my students. The fascination my students showed for basic experiments and ocean related activities fueled my interest further and I began to research more deeply which led to Climate Literacy and Polar Studies as essentials in my science curriculum. Over the following years I continued to expand and refine the workshops and activities students take part in. Three years after the research experience students still love the science explorations we embark upon together. This past year a group of students became so excited about Polar Science and Climate that they authored a 36 page non fiction book for upper elementary and middle school students entitled, "Changing Poles, Changing Planet: Climate Change vs. The Earth". Seven of the authors decided to continue their science outreach work by creating an educational video focusing on the basics of climate science and what children can do to lower carbon emissions. The book and video were distributed to educators as well as scientists at the International Polar Year Science Conference in June, 2010. In August some of these students presented their work at a Sustainability festival that was organized by M-CAN a local climate action group. Two of these students (who have left my class and started 6th grade at the middle school)recently decided to form a

  12. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  13. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  14. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  15. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  16. 32 CFR 770.18 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor... the United States in the performance of their official duties, entry upon Naval Submarine Base,...

  17. 10 CFR 1048.3 - Unauthorized entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Unauthorized entry. 1048.3 Section 1048.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.3 Unauthorized entry. Unauthorized entry into or upon an SPR facility or real...

  18. 10 CFR 1048.3 - Unauthorized entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Unauthorized entry. 1048.3 Section 1048.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.3 Unauthorized entry. Unauthorized entry into or upon an SPR facility or real...

  19. 10 CFR 1048.3 - Unauthorized entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Unauthorized entry. 1048.3 Section 1048.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) TRESPASSING ON STRATEGIC PETROLEUM RESERVE FACILITIES AND OTHER PROPERTY § 1048.3 Unauthorized entry. Unauthorized entry into or upon an SPR facility or real...

  20. 32 CFR 809a.3 - Unauthorized entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENTRY POLICY, CIVIL DISTURBANCE INTERVENTION AND DISASTER ASSISTANCE Installation Entry Policy § 809a.3... by the commander of a military installation or facility, which includes the parameters for authorized entry to or exit from a military installation, is legally enforceable against all persons whether or...

  1. 32 CFR 809a.3 - Unauthorized entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENTRY POLICY, CIVIL DISTURBANCE INTERVENTION AND DISASTER ASSISTANCE Installation Entry Policy § 809a.3... by the commander of a military installation or facility, which includes the parameters for authorized entry to or exit from a military installation, is legally enforceable against all persons whether or...

  2. 19 CFR 159.7 - Rewarehouse entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Rewarehouse entries. 159.7 Section 159.7 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) LIQUIDATION OF DUTIES General Provisions § 159.7 Rewarehouse entries. The liquidation of the original warehouse entry shall be...

  3. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing...

  4. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing...

  5. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing...

  6. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing...

  7. 19 CFR 122.42 - Aircraft entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Aircraft entry. 122.42 Section 122.42 Customs... AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Aircraft Entry and Entry Documents; Electronic Manifest Requirements for Passengers, Crew Members, and Non-Crew Members Onboard Commercial Aircraft Arriving In, Continuing...

  8. Prevalence of genitalia malformation in Iranian children: findings of a nationwide screening survey at school entry

    PubMed Central

    Armanian, Amir-Mohammad; Kelishadi, Roya; Ardalan, Gelayol; Taslimi, Mahnaz; Taheri, Majzoubeh; Motlagh, Mohammad-Esmaeil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ambiguous genitalia is a hereditary disorder that usually requires early attention and detection. The discovery of ambiguous genitalia in a neonate is situation that could be difficult to manage, not only because of complications such as salt-losing, but also due to the importance of sex determination before psychological gender could be established. Awareness of the prevalence of ambiguous genitalia can affect the attitude and consideration of physicians and related medical personnel about disease in different communities. So in this study, the prevalence of ambiguous genitalia and undescended testes (UDT) in Iran was reported. Materials and Methods: This national study was conducted in 2009-2010 as part of the routine screening examinations at school entry in Iran. The physical examinations were performed for students at entry to three school levels by physicians and medical personnel. Execution and conduction of this program was the duty of the University of Medical Sciences in each province. Results: On average, the prevalence of ambiguous genitalia was 0.04% at national level (0.03%, 0.05%, and 0.03% at 6, 12, and 15 year olds, respectively). The prevalence of ambiguous genitalia was not significantly different according to age group and living area. The average of UDT) prevalence in the whole country was 0.13%. The prevalence of UDT was higher at elementary school level than in the other two levels. Conclusion: Although the prevalence of genitalia abnormalities was not high in the school students in Iran, given the importance of the issue and in order to find the ambiguous genitalia or UDT, medical examinations and parental notification should be taken seriously at an earlier age. PMID:24627844

  9. Planetary-Entry Gas Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.

    A review of planetary-entry gas dynamics is presented. Evolution of a blunt-body flowfield from a free molecular flow environment to a continuum environment is described. Simulations of near-wake flow phenomena, important for defining aerobrake payload environments, are also discussed. Some topics to be highlighted include aerodynamic coefficient predictions with emphasis on high-temperature gas effects; surface heating and temperature predictions for thermal protection system (TPS) design in a high-temperature, thermochemical nonequilibrium environment; and thermochemical models required for numerical flow simulation. Recent applications involving atmospheric entry into Jupiter (Galileo), Mars (Pathfinder and Global Surveyor), and a planned mission in which dust from the tail of a comet will be returned to Earth (Stardust) will provide context for this discussion.

  10. The Value of Fieldwork in Life and Environmental Sciences in the Context of Higher Education: A Case Study in Learning About Biodiversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Graham W.; Goulder, Raymond; Wheeler, Phillip; Scott, Lisa J.; Tobin, Michelle L.; Marsham, Sara

    2012-02-01

    Fieldwork is assumed by most practitioners to be an important if not essential component of a degree level education in the environmental sciences. However, there is strong evidence that as a result of a wide range of pressures (academic, financial and societal) fieldwork is in decline in the UK and elsewhere. In this paper we discuss the value of fieldwork in a higher education context and present the results of a case study which illustrates its value to student learning and the wider student experience. We used qualitative and quantitative methods to compare the impact of two learning tasks upon the affective and cognitive domains of students. We designed two tasks. One task that included fieldwork, and required students to collect organisms from the field and make labelled drawings of them, and one task that omitted the fieldwork and simply required drawing of specimens that the students had not collected. We evaluated the students' experience through structured and semi-structured questionnaires and written exercises. Students did not perceive the two tasks as being equivalent to one another. They reported that they enjoy fieldwork and value it (in the contexts of their learning at university, life-long learning, and in relation to their career aspirations) and felt that they learn more effectively in the field. Our students were better able to construct a taxonomic list of organisms that they had collected themselves, better able to recall the structural detail of these organisms and were better able to recall the detail of an ecological sampling methodology that they had personally carried out in the field rather than one that a tutor had described to them in a classroom setting. Our case study supports the growing body of evidence that fieldwork is an important way of enhancing undergraduate learning and highlights some key areas for future research.

  11. Highly constrained entry trajectory generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yu; Liu, Luhua; Tang, Guojian; Zheng, Wei

    2013-07-01

    An entry trajectory planning algorithm that generates flyable trajectories satisfying waypoints, no-fly zones, and other path and terminal constraints is presented. The algorithm tactically divides the entry trajectory into the initial and glide phases. In the initial phase, a nominal angle of attack and a constant bank angle are used to generate the 3-D trajectory. In the glide phase, a planner is developed based on the evolved acceleration guidance logic for entry (EAGLE). The planner is divided into a longitudinal sub-planner and a lateral sub-planner. For longitudinal planning, the drag-energy profile is represented as five piecewise linear functions of the normalized non-conventional energy to make it consistent with both the desired trajectory length and the lateral maneuverability required to meet waypoint and no-fly zone constraints. The longitudinal sub-planner determines the magnitude of the bank angle, whereas the lateral sub-planner determines the appropriate sign of the bank angle for passing waypoints, avoiding no-fly zones, and minimizing the final heading error. The longitudinal and lateral sub-planners are iteratively employed until all path and terminal constraints are satisfied. Then, a tracker is employed to follow both the reference drag acceleration and the heading angle profiles to generate a feasible closed-loop entry trajectory. The approach is tested using the Common Aero Vehicle model. Simulations demonstrate that the generated trajectories can pass the predetermined waypoints, avoid no-fly zones, and achieve the desired target conditions within allowable tolerances.

  12. Cellular receptors and HCV entry.

    PubMed

    Flint, Mike; Tscherne, Donna M

    2009-01-01

    After attachment to specific receptors on the surfaces of target cells, hepatitis C virus (HCV) particles are thought to be internalized to endosomes, where low pH induces fusion between the viral and cellular membranes, delivering the HCV genome into the cytoplasm. Here, we describe methods to study the early events in HCV infection; the interactions with cellular receptors and the mechanism of entry.

  13. 19 CFR 143.36 - Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Form of immediate delivery, entry and entry summary. (a) Electronic form of data. If Customs determines that the immediate delivery, entry or entry summary data is satisfactory under §§ 143.34 and 143.35... responsible for the accuracy of the data submitted electronically to the same extent as if the documents...

  14. 19 CFR 141.64 - Review and correction of entry and entry summary documentation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Review and correction of entry and entry summary documentation. 141.64 Section 141.64 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Presentation of Entry Papers §...

  15. Fragmentation and ablation during entry

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-09-01

    This note discusses objects that both fragment and ablate during entry, using the results of previous reports to describe the velocity, pressure, and fragmentation of entering objects. It shows that the mechanisms used there to describe the breakup of non-ablating objects during deceleration remain valid for most ablating objects. It treats coupled fragmentation and ablation during entry, building on earlier models that separately discuss the entry of objects that are hard, whose high heat of ablation permits little erosion, and those who are strong whose strength prevents fragmentation, which are discussed in ``Radiation from Hard Objects,`` ``Deceleration and Radiation of Strong, Hard, Asteroids During Atmospheric Impact,`` and ``Meteor Signature Interpretation.`` This note provides a more detailed treatment of the further breakup and separation of fragments during descent. It replaces the constraint on mass per unit area used earlier to determine the altitude and magnitude of peak power radiation with a detailed analytic solution of deceleration. Model predictions are shown to be in agreement with the key features of numerical calculations of deceleration. The model equations are solved for the altitudes of maximum radiation, which agree with numerical integrations. The model is inverted analytically to infer object size and speed from measurements of peak power and altitude to provide a complete model for the approximate inversion of meteor data.

  16. Entry decisions in the generic pharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Morton, F M

    1999-01-01

    Data on all generic drug entries in the period 1984-1994 are used to estimate which markets heterogeneous potential entrants will decide to enter. I find that organizational experience predicts entry. Firms tend to enter markets with supply and demand characteristics similar to the firm's existing drugs. Larger revenue markets, markets with more hospital sales, and products that treat chronic conditions attract more entry. The simultaneous nature of entry leads to an additional interpretation: specialization is profitable because of the severe risk to profits when a market is "overentered." However, I am unable to make any conclusions about the efficiency of entry decisions. PMID:10558596

  17. The geothermal resource in Dominica : from the class room to the fieldwork

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivia, Urity

    2014-05-01

    In Martinique and more generally in the Caribbean area, the Global warming is not only a topic you can read about in a scientific article but a true issue in the everyday life of the inhabitants. Many effects of the increase of the sea level or the erosion can be observed in the environment. For example, beaches are being destroyed, frightening buildings built on the seafront. This is not only an environmental issue but a touristic and economical one. By the way it is a problem to give a new home to these inhabitants who are now losing their houses. So, with their limited territory and their economy depending on tourism, the islands of the Lesser Antilles have a big challenge which is to find some solutions to minimize the effects of the Global warming on their populations. Anyway, anthropic activities and particularly the using of fossil fuels are named to be responsible for a big part of the climate changes. Knowing this allows us to understand that the Caribbean countries have to develop renewable energies. Guadeloupe and Dominica are two good examples of these islands, where the politicians have already decided to use sustainable energies. They use geothermal energy and hydroelectricity to provide to the families' needs. In this way, the Dominican government, with finances from The European Union, Guadeloupe and Martinique decided to explore the geothermal resource in the island and to build a plant in the area of Roseau Valley. Therefore the students and I, we have decided to study the geology of Dominica in order to find the origin of the geothermal resource and to get more information about the geothermal power plant project. Furthermore, we wanted to understand how this resource is used by the locals and to determine the impact of the presence of the future plant in the chosen sites. In the poster to come, I have chosen to introduce the "journey in Dominica" and the fieldwork that I have realized with my students of upper sixth form. The poster will focus

  18. Evolving friendships and shifting ethical dilemmas: fieldworkers' experiences in a short term community based study in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Kamuya, Dorcas M; Theobald, Sally J; Munywoki, Patrick K; Koech, Dorothy; Geissler, Wenzel P; Molyneux, Sassy C

    2013-04-01

    Fieldworkers (FWs) are community members employed by research teams to support access to participants, address language barriers, and advise on culturally appropriate research conduct. The critical role that FWs play in studies, and the range of practical and ethical dilemmas associated with their involvement, is increasingly recognised. In this paper, we draw on qualitative observation and interview data collected alongside a six month basic science study which involved a team of FWs regularly visiting 47 participating households in their homes. The qualitative study documented how relationships between field workers and research participants were initiated, developed and evolved over the course of the study, the shifting dilemmas FWs faced and how they handled them. Even in this one case study, we see how the complex and evolving relationships between fieldworkers and study participants had important implications for consent processes, access to benefits and mutual understanding and trust. While the precise issues that FWs face are likely to depend on the type of research and the context in which that research is being conducted, we argue that appropriate support for field workers is a key requirement to strengthen ethical research practice and for the long term sustainability of research programmes. PMID:23433316

  19. The Lightbulb Moment - the importance of fieldwork as a link between the classroom and the real world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambridge, Helen; Barraclough, Alison

    2016-04-01

    All teachers love the light bulb moment; that moment when a student says, "Ah ha, I get it!" and makes the move from remembering to understanding. This boosts their confidence, leading to increased engagement with the subject and, in turn, increased progress and enjoyment. For many young geologists such moments occur outside the classroom when they are given the opportunity to carry out fieldwork. Understanding involves making links and investigations within the field allow students to make these essential links between actual observations and theory. All A-Level geologists at Sir William Borlase's Grammar School are given the opportunity to take part in a five day fieldtrip. This poster celebrates key 'lightbulb moments' that occurred during fieldwork to the famous Jurassic Coast, England. Students investigated the geological setting at Kimmeridge Bay where the cyclic sedimentation in the Lias helped their understanding of orbital obliquity and precession. The processes of fossilisation and preservation were examined at West Bay and in the upper Jurassic at Bowleaze Cove, which also enabled students to appreciate the incompleteness of the fossil record. Modern day processes and coastal management at Swanage allowed sixth formers to understand the non-permanent nature of landscapes and the difficulties encountered when attempting to conserve eroding areas. Therefore, the chance to get outside the classroom and study in the field is an invaluable opportunity for students to make those all important links through investigative learning and to develop a deeper understanding of the world around them.

  20. Atlas F entry aerothermic study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of obtaining heat transfer data on an expended Atlas F booster launch vehicle was investigated in the altitude range of 300,000 to 200,000 feet during entry conditions, with a velocity in the range of 20,000 to 25,000 feet per second, and through a range of vehicle attitudes of plus or minus 90 degrees. These data are desired for correlation with turbulent heat transfer and boundary layer transition data obtained from wind tunnel test facilities. The data would also be valuable in assessing rarified gas and surface catalicity effects in a real gas environment.

  1. Optimal firm growth under the threat of entry

    PubMed Central

    Kort, Peter M.; Wrzaczek, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The paper studies the incumbent-entrant problem in a fully dynamic setting. We find that under an open-loop information structure the incumbent anticipates entry by overinvesting, whereas in the Markov perfect equilibrium the incumbent slightly underinvests in the period before the entry. The entry cost level where entry accommodation passes into entry deterrence is lower in the Markov perfect equilibrium. Further we find that the incumbent’s capital stock level needed to deter entry is hump shaped as a function of the entry time, whereas the corresponding entry cost, where the entrant is indifferent between entry and non-entry, is U-shaped. PMID:26435573

  2. Profiles of Nonprofit Education Management Organizations: 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miron, Gary; Urschel, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    This is the third Profiles report to examine nonprofit education management organizations (EMOs). This report is modeled after the 12 annual reports that cover for-profit EMOs. While the number of schools operated by for-profit EMOs grew rapidly in the 1990s and is now leveling off, the data contained in this report illustrate how the number of…

  3. Alabama's Education Report Card, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In a more consistent and viable manner than ever before, education in Alabama is moving toward its ultimate goal of providing every student with a quality education, thereby preparing them for work, college, and life after high school. Alabama's graduation rates from 2002 to 2008 increased significantly, tripling the national average increase…

  4. Detainee optometry at Camp Cropper, Iraq, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas M; Elledge, James B

    2012-06-01

    This article details the first in-depth analysis of an Optometry Service working with a large Middle Eastern detainee population composed entirely of Iraqi males. The mission of the Camp Cropper Optometry Service was to provide eye care services to the detainee population consistent with the standards of optometric care that would be provided to any U.S. military member in the same geographic area. This included providing detainees with eyeglasses, therapeutic treatment of eye disease, and referral for treatment of medical conditions and surgical care, if it was needed and available at the U.S. military facilities in the Iraq Theater. Diagnoses, services provided, and medications given to the detainees are listed in detail and demonstrate the complexity of pathology encountered in this population.

  5. Final report : Hanover environmental site investigation, 2009-2010.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-06-07

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected in two private lawn and garden wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Consequently, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations, under the direction of the KDHE, to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be associated with the former facility. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion (VI). Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at Hanover might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that may be associated with the former facility. The results of the comprehensive investigation at Hanover indicate that no unacceptable risk to human health currently exists from exposure to surface and subsurface soils by either ingestion, inhalation or dermal contact. No risk is associated with potential exposure to contaminated groundwater at Hanover. No drinking water wells are known to exist in Hanover, and the drinking water supply comes from RWD No.1 at Lanham, Kansas, located 6.5 mi north of Hanover. Limited potential risk was identified due to exposure to indoor air contaminated with carbon tetrachloride, but this risk has been mitigated, thereby removing this threat to human health. Radon is prevalent in the community, at concentrations exceeding the level at which the EPA recommends additional measures (testing and/or mitigation). The recommended testing and mitigation (if needed) are the responsibility of the homeowners. In the current condition in which no private wells are used for drinking water in the affected area, no unacceptable human health risk from carbon tetrachloride is associated with the identified impacted media at the Hanover site.

  6. Legislative Agenda for the 111th Congress, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arc of the United States, 2009

    2009-01-01

    For many decades, the six national disability advocacy organizations that endorse the legislative agenda contained in this document have recognized the vital role the federal government plays in the everyday lives of children and adults with developmental disabilities and their families. From civil rights protections to community housing, from…

  7. Developments in mycotoxin analysis: an update for 2009 - 2010

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review highlights developments in mycotoxin analysis and sampling over a period between mid-2009 and mid-2010. It covers the major mycotoxins aflatoxins, Alternaria toxins, ergot alkaloids, fumonisins, ochratoxin, patulin, trichothecenes, and zearalenone. New and improved methods for mycotoxins...

  8. Blind Childrens Center Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blind Childrens Center, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Blind Childrens Center provides the ideal environment to educate young students. This year, Second Grade was added with a combined First/Second Grade class. Next year, the center will have a dedicated First Grade and Second Grade which will require a full new classroom. This paper presents the accomplishments and activities achieved by the…

  9. Parent Centers Helping Families: Outcome Data 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ALLIANCE National Parent Technical Assistance Center at PACER, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This booklet highlights the important work of the more than 100 Parent Training and Information Centers (PTIs) and Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs) funded by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs. The report includes data on the numbers of parents and professionals served by Parent Centers, outcomes of the…

  10. Generalist and Specialty Physicians: Supply and Access, 2009-2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vital Statistics Rapid Release Quarterly Provisional Estimates Dashboard Technical Notes Other Publications Advance Data From Vital and ... Vital Statistics of the United States: 1890-1938 Technical Appendices Miscellaneous Publications National Conference on Health Statistics ...

  11. MCPS Special Education at a Glance 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery County Public Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) "Special Education at a Glance." which includes a copy of the "Guide to Planning and Assessing School-Based Special Education Programs." provides in a single document, information about the special education population at each Montgomery County (Maryland) public school, including…

  12. Eratosthenes 2009/2010: An Old Experiment in Modern Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekeris, Victoria; Bonomo, Flavia; Bonzi, Edgardo; Garcia, Beatriz; Mattei, Guillermo; Mazzitelli, Diego; Dawson, Silvina Ponce; Fernandez de la Vega, Constanza Sanchez; Tamarit, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    We describe the projects "Eratosthenes 2009" and "Eratosthenes 2010 America," carried out during the International Year of Astronomy (2009) in Argentina and with almost all the countries in North and South America during 2010. More than 15000 students at more than 200 schools each year determined the radius of the Earth using the method that…

  13. The Fact Book: 2009-2010--A Statistical Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents Maryland State Department of Education's statistical information on the following areas: (1) Demographic Data; (2) Accountability Data; (3) Financial Data; (4) Special Populations; (5) Other Programs; and (6) General Information. This Fact Book contains the latest data available as of December 2, 2010.

  14. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  15. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  16. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  17. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  18. 32 CFR 770.19 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, Silverdale... Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base, Bangor, 1100 Hunley Road, Silverdale, WA 98315. (b) Each...

  19. Meteorite Atmospheric Entry Reproduced in Plasmatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittarello, L.; McKibbin, S.; Goderis, S.; Soens, B.; Bariselli, F.; Barros Dias, B. R.; Zavalan, F. L.; Magin, T.; Claeys, Ph.

    2016-08-01

    Plasmatron facility allows experimental conditions that reproduce atmospheric entry of meteorites. Tests on basalt, as meteorite analogue, have been performed. Preliminary results have highlighted melting and evaporation effects.

  20. 19 CFR 10.112 - Filing free entry documents or reduced duty documents after entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., form, or statement required to be filed in connection with the entry is not filed at the time of the... time prior to liquidation of the entry or, if the entry was liquidated, before the liquidation becomes final. See § 113.43(c) of this chapter for satisfaction of the bond and cancellation of the bond...

  1. Identifying Unique Ethical Challenges of Indigenous Field-Workers: A Commentary on Alexander and Richman's "Ethical Dilemmas in Evaluations Using Indigenous Research Workers"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Nick L.

    2008-01-01

    In contrast with nonindigenous workers, to what extent do unique ethical problems arise when indigenous field-workers participate in field studies? Three aspects of study design and operation are considered: data integrity issues, risk issues, and protection issues. Although many of the data quality issues that arise with the use of indigenous…

  2. 46 CFR 147A.25 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... During Fumigation § 147A.25 Entry. (a) No person may enter the spaces that immediately adjoin the space that is fumigated during fumigation unless entry is for emergency purposes or the space is tested and... space that is fumigated or any adjoining spaces during fumigation unless he wears the...

  3. 46 CFR 147A.25 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... During Fumigation § 147A.25 Entry. (a) No person may enter the spaces that immediately adjoin the space that is fumigated during fumigation unless entry is for emergency purposes or the space is tested and... space that is fumigated or any adjoining spaces during fumigation unless he wears the...

  4. 46 CFR 147A.25 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... During Fumigation § 147A.25 Entry. (a) No person may enter the spaces that immediately adjoin the space that is fumigated during fumigation unless entry is for emergency purposes or the space is tested and... space that is fumigated or any adjoining spaces during fumigation unless he wears the...

  5. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan data... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27...

  6. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan data... 32 National Defense 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27...

  7. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan data... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27...

  8. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan data... 32 National Defense 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27...

  9. 27 CFR 19.306 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY ALCOHOL DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Production of Distilled Spirits Rules for Production of Spirits § 19.306 Entry. (a) Following completion of the production gauge, a proprietor must make the... proprietor may use the production gauge as the entry gauge when spirits are: (1) Deposited for storage...

  10. 32 CFR 245.27 - Data entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Data entry. 245.27 Section 245.27 National... Under ESCAT § 245.27 Data entry. Aircraft will file IFR or VFR flight plans, assigned a discrete... entered in the remarks section of the flight plan. The EATPL number will be passed with flight plan...

  11. 19 CFR 163.3 - Entry records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Entry records. 163.3 Section 163.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.3 Entry records. Any person described in § 163.2(a) with reference to...

  12. 19 CFR 163.3 - Entry records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry records. 163.3 Section 163.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.3 Entry records. Any person described in § 163.2(a) with reference to...

  13. 19 CFR 163.3 - Entry records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Entry records. 163.3 Section 163.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.3 Entry records. Any person described in § 163.2(a) with reference to...

  14. 19 CFR 163.3 - Entry records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry records. 163.3 Section 163.3 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) RECORDKEEPING § 163.3 Entry records. Any person described in § 163.2(a) with reference to...

  15. Orion Entry Display Feeder and Interactions with the Entry Monitor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Darren; Bernatovich, Mike; Gillespie, Ellen; Kadwa, Binaifer; Matthews, Dave; Penny, Wes; Zak, Tim; Grant, Mike; Bihari, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft is designed to return astronauts to a landing within 10 km of the intended landing target from low Earth orbit, lunar direct-entry, and lunar skip-entry trajectories. Al pile the landing is nominally controlled autonomously, the crew can fly precision entries manually in the event of an anomaly. The onboard entry displays will be used by the crew to monitor and manually fly the entry, descent, and landing, while the Entry Monitor System (EMS) will be used to monitor the health and status of the onboard guidance and the trajectory. The entry displays are driven by the entry display feeder, part of the Entry Monitor System (EMS). The entry re-targeting module, also part of the EMS, provides all the data required to generate the capability footprint of the vehicle at any point in the trajectory, which is shown on the Primary Flight Display (PFD). It also provides caution and warning data and recommends the safest possible re-designated landing site when the nominal landing site is no longer within the capability of the vehicle. The PFD and the EMS allow the crew to manually fly an entry trajectory profile from entry interface until parachute deploy having the flexibility to manually steer the vehicle to a selected landing site that best satisfies the priorities of the crew. The entry display feeder provides data from the ENIS and other components of the GNC flight software to the displays at the proper rate and in the proper units. It also performs calculations that are specific to the entry displays and which are not made in any other component of the flight software. In some instances, it performs calculations identical to those performed by the onboard primary guidance algorithm to protect against a guidance system failure. These functions and the interactions between the entry display feeder and the other components of the EMS are described.

  16. Thermal Soak Analysis of Earth Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Sepka, Steven A.; Aliaga, Jose F.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2012-01-01

    The Multi-Mission Earth Entry Vehicle project is developing an integrated tool called Multi Mission System Analysis for Planetary Entry Descent and Landing that will provide key technology solutions including mass sizing, aerodynamics, aerothermodynamics, and thermal and structural analysis for any given sample return mission. Thermal soak analysis and temperature predictions of various components including the payload container of the entry vehicle are part of the solution that this tool will offer to mission designers. The present paper focuses on the thermal soak analysis of an entry vehicle design based on the Mars Sample Return entry vehicle geometry and discusses a technical approach to develop parametric models for thermal soak analysis that will be integrated into the tool.

  17. 19 CFR 143.35 - Procedure for electronic entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure for electronic entry summary. 143.35...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.35 Procedure for electronic entry summary. In order to obtain entry summary processing electronically, the...

  18. 19 CFR 143.35 - Procedure for electronic entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedure for electronic entry summary. 143.35...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Electronic Entry Filing § 143.35 Procedure for electronic entry summary. In order to obtain entry summary processing electronically, the...

  19. Abort-once-around entry corridor analysis program document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyle, H. C.

    1975-01-01

    The abort once around entry target corridor analysis program (ABECAP) was studied. The allowable range of flight path angles at entry interface for acceptable entry trajectories from a shuttle abort once around (AOA) situation was established. The solutions thus determined may be shown as corridor plots of entry interface flight path angle versus range from entry interface (EI) to the target.

  20. 19 CFR 141.91 - Entry without required invoice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Entry without required invoice. 141.91 Section 141... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.91 Entry without required invoice. If a required invoice is not available in proper form at the time the entry or entry summary documentation...

  1. 19 CFR 141.91 - Entry without required invoice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry without required invoice. 141.91 Section 141... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.91 Entry without required invoice. If a required invoice is not available in proper form at the time the entry or entry summary documentation...

  2. 19 CFR 141.91 - Entry without required invoice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Entry without required invoice. 141.91 Section 141... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.91 Entry without required invoice. If a required invoice is not available in proper form at the time the entry or entry summary documentation...

  3. 19 CFR 141.91 - Entry without required invoice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Entry without required invoice. 141.91 Section 141... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Invoices § 141.91 Entry without required invoice. If a required invoice is not available in proper form at the time the entry or entry summary documentation...

  4. LABORATORY VOICE DATA ENTRY SYSTEM.

    SciTech Connect

    PRAISSMAN,J.L.SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2003-04-01

    We have assembled a system using a personal computer workstation equipped with standard office software, an audio system, speech recognition software and an inexpensive radio-based wireless microphone that permits laboratory workers to enter or modify data while performing other work. Speech recognition permits users to enter data while their hands are holding equipment or they are otherwise unable to operate a keyboard. The wireless microphone allows unencumbered movement around the laboratory without a ''tether'' that might interfere with equipment or experimental procedures. To evaluate the potential of voice data entry in a laboratory environment, we developed a prototype relational database that records the disposal of radionuclides and/or hazardous chemicals Current regulations in our laboratory require that each such item being discarded must be inventoried and documents must be prepared that summarize the contents of each container used for disposal. Using voice commands, the user enters items into the database as each is discarded. Subsequently, the program prepares the required documentation.

  5. Viral cell recognition and entry.

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    Rhinovirus infection is initiated by the recognition of a specific cell-surface receptor. The major group of rhinovirus serotypes attach to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). The attachment process initiates a series of conformational changes resulting in the loss of genomic RNA from the virion. X-ray crystallography and sequence comparisons suggested that a deep crevice or canyon is the site on the virus recognized by the cellular receptor molecule. This has now been verified by electron microscopy of human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) and HRV16 complexed with a soluble component of ICAM-1. A hydrophobic pocket underneath the canyon is the site of binding of various hydrophobic drug compounds that can inhibit attachment and uncoating. This pocket is also associated with an unidentified, possibly cellular in origin, "pocket factor." The pocket factor binding site overlaps the binding site of the receptor. It is suggested that competition between the pocket factor and receptor regulates the conformational changes required for the initiation of the entry of the genomic RNA into the cell. PMID:7849588

  6. 19 CFR 142.3 - Entry documentation required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Entry Documentation § 142.3 Entry documentation required. (a) Contents... required, a pro forma invoice or other acceptable documentation listed in that section may be submitted...

  7. Entry Guidance for the Reusable Launch Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ping

    1999-01-01

    The X-33 Advanced Technology Demonstrator is a half-scale prototype developed to test the key technologies needed for a full-scale single-stage reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The X-33 is a suborbital vehicle that will be launched vertically, and land horizontally. The goals of this research were to develop an alternate entry guidance scheme for the X-33 in parallel to the actual X-33 entry guidance algorithms, provide comparative and complementary study, and identify potential new ways to improve entry guidance performance. Toward these goals, the nominal entry trajectory is defined by a piecewise linear drag-acceleration-versus-energy profile, which is in turn obtained by the solution of a semi-analytical parameter optimization problem. The closed-loop guidance is accomplished by tracking the nominal drag profile with primarily bank-angle modulation on-board. The bank-angle is commanded by a single full-envelope nonlinear trajectory control law. Near the end of the entry flight, the guidance logic is switched to heading control in order to meet strict conditions at the terminal area energy management interface. Two methods, one on ground-track control and the other on heading control, were proposed and examined for this phase of entry guidance where lateral control is emphasized. Trajectory dispersion studies were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the entry guidance algorithms against a number of uncertainties including those in propulsion system, atmospheric properties, winds, aerodynamics, and propellant loading. Finally, a new trajectory-regulation method is introduced at the end as a promising precision entry guidance method. The guidance principle is very different and preliminary application in X-33 entry guidance simulation showed high precision that is difficult to achieve by existing methods.

  8. Advances in spacecraft atmospheric entry guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benito Manrique, Joel

    In order to advance entry guidance technology two different research areas have been explored with the objective of increasing the reachable landing area and the landing accuracy for future Mars missions. Currently only the northern hemisphere of Mars is available for landing due to its low elevation. Only low elevation landing sites have the necessary atmospheric density to allow landing using current Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology. In order to reach most of the Ancient Highlands, the majority of the southern hemisphere, advanced EDL technology is needed in multiple fields, including entry guidance. The first research area is the definition and applications of reachable and controllable sets for entry. The definition of the reachable and controllable sets provides a framework for the study of the capabilities of an entry vehicle in a given planet. Reachable and controllable sets can be used to comprehensively characterize the envelope of trajectories that a vehicle can fly, the sites it can reach and the entry states that can be accommodated. The sets can also be used for the evaluation of trajectory planning algorithms and to assist in the selection of the entry or landing sites. In essence, the reachable and controllable sets offer a powerful vehicle and trajectory analysis and design framework that allows for better mission design choices. In order to illustrate the use of the sets, they are computed for a representative Mars mission using two different vehicle configurations. The sets characterize the impact of the vehicle configuration on the entry capability. Furthermore, the sets are used to find the best skip-entry trajectory for a return from the Moon mission, highlighting the utility of the sets in atmospheric maneuvers other than entry. The second research area is the development of the components of an entry guidance algorithm that allow high elevation landing and provide as well high landing accuracy. The approach taken follows the

  9. Parachute design for Galileo Jupiter entry probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodier, R. W.; Thuss, R. C.; Terhune, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the parachute subsystem used on an atmospheric entry probe that will descend through the clouds of Jupiter. The entry probe is a part of the Galileo Project to be launched in 1985 aboard the Space Shuttle; the entry probe will encounter the planet in 1988. The parachute subsystem consists of a pilot parachute and a main parachute, and both are of conventional conical ribbon design. Key considerations in the design of the parachutes and a summary of the parachute subsystem test program, which includes two air drop tests and a systems drop test (balloon launched), are presented.

  10. Available hardware for automated entry control

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, J.P.

    1990-11-01

    Automated entry control has become an increasingly important issue at facilities where budget constraints are limiting options for manned entry control points. Three questions are immediately raised when automated entry control is considered: What hardware is available How much does it cost How effective is it in maintaining security Ongoing work at Sandia National Labs is attempting to answer these questions and establish a data base for use by facility security managers working the problem of how to maintain security on a limited budget. 14 refs.

  11. Entry, Descent, and Landing With Propulsive Deceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    The future exploration of the Solar System will require innovations in transportation and the use of entry, descent, and landing (EDL) systems at many planetary landing sites. The cost of space missions has always been prohibitive, and using the natural planetary and planet s moons atmospheres for entry, descent, and landing can reduce the cost, mass, and complexity of these missions. This paper will describe some of the EDL ideas for planetary entry and survey the overall technologies for EDL that may be attractive for future Solar System missions.

  12. Texting while driving: is speech-based text entry less risky than handheld text entry?

    PubMed

    He, J; Chaparro, A; Nguyen, B; Burge, R J; Crandall, J; Chaparro, B; Ni, R; Cao, S

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that using a cell phone to talk or text while maneuvering a vehicle impairs driving performance. However, few published studies directly compare the distracting effects of texting using a hands-free (i.e., speech-based interface) versus handheld cell phone, which is an important issue for legislation, automotive interface design and driving safety training. This study compared the effect of speech-based versus handheld text entries on simulated driving performance by asking participants to perform a car following task while controlling the duration of a secondary text-entry task. Results showed that both speech-based and handheld text entries impaired driving performance relative to the drive-only condition by causing more variation in speed and lane position. Handheld text entry also increased the brake response time and increased variation in headway distance. Text entry using a speech-based cell phone was less detrimental to driving performance than handheld text entry. Nevertheless, the speech-based text entry task still significantly impaired driving compared to the drive-only condition. These results suggest that speech-based text entry disrupts driving, but reduces the level of performance interference compared to text entry with a handheld device. In addition, the difference in the distraction effect caused by speech-based and handheld text entry is not simply due to the difference in task duration.

  13. Texting while driving: is speech-based text entry less risky than handheld text entry?

    PubMed

    He, J; Chaparro, A; Nguyen, B; Burge, R J; Crandall, J; Chaparro, B; Ni, R; Cao, S

    2014-11-01

    Research indicates that using a cell phone to talk or text while maneuvering a vehicle impairs driving performance. However, few published studies directly compare the distracting effects of texting using a hands-free (i.e., speech-based interface) versus handheld cell phone, which is an important issue for legislation, automotive interface design and driving safety training. This study compared the effect of speech-based versus handheld text entries on simulated driving performance by asking participants to perform a car following task while controlling the duration of a secondary text-entry task. Results showed that both speech-based and handheld text entries impaired driving performance relative to the drive-only condition by causing more variation in speed and lane position. Handheld text entry also increased the brake response time and increased variation in headway distance. Text entry using a speech-based cell phone was less detrimental to driving performance than handheld text entry. Nevertheless, the speech-based text entry task still significantly impaired driving compared to the drive-only condition. These results suggest that speech-based text entry disrupts driving, but reduces the level of performance interference compared to text entry with a handheld device. In addition, the difference in the distraction effect caused by speech-based and handheld text entry is not simply due to the difference in task duration. PMID:25089769

  14. Relationship between clinical fieldwork educator performance and health professional students' perceptions of their practice education learning environments.

    PubMed

    Brown, Ted; Williams, Brett; Lynch, Marty

    2013-12-01

    The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure, Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Instrument, and Clinical Learning Environment Inventory were completed by 548 undergraduate students (54.5% response rate) enrolled in eight health professional bachelor degree courses. Regression analysis was used to investigate the significant predictors of the Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Instrument with the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure and Clinical Learning Environment Inventory subscales as independent variables. The results indicated that the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure and Clinical Learning Environment Inventory Actual version subscale scores explained 44% of the total variance in the Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Instrument score. The Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure subscale Academic Self-Perception explained 1.1% of the variance in the Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Instrument score. The Clinical Learning Environment Inventory Actual subscales accounted for the following variance percentages in the Clinical Teaching Effectiveness Instrument score: personalization, 1.1%; satisfaction, 1.7%; task orientation, 5.1%; and innovation, 6.2%. Aspects of the clinical learning environment appear to be predictive of the effectiveness of the clinical teaching that students experience. Fieldwork educator performance might be a significant contributing factor toward student skill development and practitioner success.

  15. Submerged Entry Nozzles that Resist Clogging

    SciTech Connect

    2001-04-01

    Development Of Submerged Entry Nozzles (SENs) Can Incrase Yields, Improve Product Quality, And Increase Productivity In Continuous Casting Of Steel, A Process Used For The Production Of 95% Of Steel In The U.S.

  16. Multiscale perspectives of virus entry via endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Most viruses take advantage of endocytic pathways to gain entry into host cells and initiate infections. Understanding of virus entry via endocytosis is critically important for the design of antiviral strategies. Virus entry via endocytosis is a complex process involving hundreds of cellular proteins. The entire process is dictated by events occurring at multiple time and length scales. In this review, we discuss and evaluate the available means to investigate virus endocytic entry, from both experimental and theoretical/numerical modeling fronts, and highlight the importance of multiscale features. The complexity of the process requires investigations at a systems biology level, which involves the combination of different experimental approaches, the collaboration of experimentalists and theorists across different disciplines, and the development of novel multiscale models. PMID:23734580

  17. Generic aerocapture atmospheric entry study, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An atmospheric entry study to fine a generic aerocapture vehicle capable of missions to Mars, Saturn, and Uranus is reported. A single external geometry was developed through atmospheric entry simulations. Aerocapture is a system design concept which uses an aerodynamically controlled atmospheric entry to provide the necessary velocity depletion to capture payloads into planetary orbit. Design concepts are presented which provide the control accuracy required while giving thermal protection for the mission payload. The system design concepts consist of the following elements: (1) an extendable biconic aerodynamic configuration with lift to drag ratio between 1.0 and 2.0; (2) roll control system concepts to control aerodynamic lift and disturbance torques; (3) aeroshell design concepts capable of meeting dynamic pressure loads during aerocapture; and (4) entry thermal protection system design concepts to meet thermodynamic loads during aerocapture.

  18. Aerocapture Inflatable Decelerator for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reza, Sajjad; Hund, Richard; Kustas, Frank; Willcockson, William; Songer, Jarvis; Brown, Glen

    2007-01-01

    Forward Attached Inflatable Decelerators, more commonly known as inflatable aeroshells, provide an effective, cost efficient means of decelerating spacecrafts by using atmospheric drag for aerocapture or planetary entry instead of conventional liquid propulsion deceleration systems. Entry into planetary atmospheres results in significant heating and aerodynamic pressures which stress aeroshell systems to their useful limits. Incorporation of lightweight inflatable decelerator surfaces with increased surface-area footprints provides the opportunity to reduce heat flux and induced temperatures, while increasing the payload mass fraction. Furthermore, inflatable aeroshell decelerators provide the needed deceleration at considerably higher altitudes and Mach numbers when compared with conventional rigid aeroshell entry systems. Inflatable aeroshells also provide for stowage in a compact space, with subsequent deployment of a large-area, lightweight heatshield to survive entry heating. Use of a deployable heatshield decelerator enables an increase in the spacecraft payload mass fraction and may eliminate the need for a spacecraft backshell.

  19. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed.

  20. Remodeling of Calcium Entry Pathways in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Carlos; Sobradillo, Diego; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Núñez, Lucía

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+) entry pathways play important roles in control of many cellular functions, including long-term proliferation, migration and cell death. In recent years, it is becoming increasingly clear that, in some types of tumors, remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways could contribute to cancer hallmarks such as excessive proliferation, cell migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death or survival. In this chapter we briefly review findings related to remodeling of Ca(2+) entry pathways in cancer with emphasis on the mechanisms that contribute to increased store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) and store-operated currents (SOCs) in colorectal cancer cells. Finally, since SOCE appears critically involved in colon tumorogenesis, the inhibition of SOCE by aspirin and other NSAIDs and its possible contribution to colon cancer chemoprevention is reviewed. PMID:27161240

  1. Entry, Descent, and Landing Operations Analysis for the Genesis Re-Entry Capsule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Lyons, Dan T.

    2005-01-01

    On September 8, 2004, the Genesis spacecraft returned to Earth after spending 29 months about the sun-Earth libration point collecting solar wind particles. Four hours prior to Earth arrival, the entry capsule containing the samples was released for entry and subsequent landing at the Utah Test and Training Range. This paper provides an overview of the entry, descent, and landing trajectory analysis that was performed during the Mission Operations Phase leading up to final approach to Earth. The operations effort accurately delivered the entry capsule to the desired landing site. The final landing location was 8.3 km from the target, and was well within the allowable landing area. Preliminary reconstruction analyses indicate that the actual entry trajectory was very close to the pre-entry prediction.

  2. Entry into the American Labor Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein, Michael D.

    This analysis of entry into the labor force by American men between the ages of 30 and 39 was based on a set of about 1,600 retrospective life history interviews, approximately half from whites and half from blacks. At the time of entry the mean level of whites' education was higher than that of blacks and this was translated into jobs with higher…

  3. Transmission strategies for atmospheric entry probes.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butman, S.

    1972-01-01

    In this article we shall be concerned with the question of how to maximize the expected data return when the channel capacity cannot be predicted in advance. An example of this type is a planetary entry probe to Venus or Jupiter, whose atmospheric transmission characteristics are not yet fully known. And even if they were known, these transmission characteristics would be subject to unpredictable changes due to planet weather and/or entry trajectory.

  4. Nipah virus entry can occur by macropinocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pernet, Olivier; Pohl, Christine; Ainouze, Michelle; Kweder, Hasan; Buckland, Robin

    2009-12-20

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a zoonotic biosafety level 4 paramyxovirus that emerged recently in Asia with high mortality in man. NiV is a member, with Hendra virus (HeV), of the Henipavirus genus in the Paramyxoviridae family. Although NiV entry, like that of other paramyxoviruses, is believed to occur via pH-independent fusion with the host cell's plasma membrane we present evidence that entry can occur by an endocytic pathway. The NiV receptor ephrinB2 has receptor kinase activity and we find that ephrinB2's cytoplasmic domain is required for entry but is dispensable for post-entry viral spread. The mutation of a single tyrosine residue (Y304F) in ephrinB2's cytoplasmic tail abrogates NiV entry. Moreover, our results show that NiV entry is inhibited by constructions and drugs specific for the endocytic pathway of macropinocytosis. Our findings could potentially permit the rapid development of novel low-cost antiviral treatments not only for NiV but also HeV.

  5. Orion Capsule Handling Qualities for Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tigges, Michael A.; Bihari, Brian D.; Stephens, John-Paul; Vos, Gordon A.; Bilimoria, Karl D.; Mueller, Eric R.; Law, Howard G.; Johnson, Wyatt; Bailey, Randall E.; Jackson, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Two piloted simulations were conducted at NASA's Johnson Space Center using the Cooper-Harper scale to study the handling qualities of the Orion Command Module capsule during atmospheric entry flight. The simulations were conducted using high fidelity 6-DOF simulators for Lunar Return Skip Entry and International Space Station Return Direct Entry flight using bank angle steering commands generated by either the Primary (PredGuid) or Backup (PLM) guidance algorithms. For both evaluations, manual control of bank angle began after descending through Entry Interface into the atmosphere until drogue chutes deployment. Pilots were able to use defined bank management and reversal criteria to accurately track the bank angle commands, and stay within flight performance metrics of landing accuracy, g-loads, and propellant consumption, suggesting that the pilotability of Orion under manual control is both achievable and provides adequate trajectory performance with acceptable levels of pilot effort. Another significant result of these analyses is the applicability of flying a complex entry task under high speed entry flight conditions relevant to the next generation Multi Purpose Crew Vehicle return from Mars and Near Earth Objects.

  6. Trajectory Reconstruction for the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    An overview of the reconstruction analyses performed for the Genesis capsule entry is described. The results indicate that the actual entry prior to the drogue deployment failure was very close to the pre-entry predictions. The capsule landed 8.3 km south of the desired target at Utah Test and Training Range. Analysis on infrared video footage (obtained from the tracking stations) during the descent estimated the onset of the capsule tumble at Mach 0.9. Frequency analysis on the infrared video data indicates that the aerodynamics generated for the Genesis capsule reasonably predicted the drag and static stability. Observations of the heatshield support the pre-entry simulation estimates of a small hypersonic angles-of-attack, since there is very little, if any, charring of the shoulder region or the afterbody. Through this investigation, an overall assertion can be made that all the data gathered from the Genesis entry is consistent with flight performance close to the nominal pre-entry prediction. Consequently, the design principles and methodologies utilized for the flight dynamics, aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics analyses have been corroborated.

  7. Planetary/DOD entry technology flight experiments. Volume 2: Planetary entry flight experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, H. E.; Krieger, R. J.; Mcneilly, W. R.; Vetter, H. C.

    1976-01-01

    The technical feasibility of launching a high speed, earth entry vehicle from the space shuttle to advance technology for the exploration of the outer planets' atmospheres was established. Disciplines of thermodynamics, orbital mechanics, aerodynamics propulsion, structures, design, electronics and system integration focused on the goal of producing outer planet environments on a probe shaped vehicle during an earth entry. Major aspects of analysis and vehicle design studied include: planetary environments, earth entry environment capability, mission maneuvers, capabilities of shuttle upper stages, a comparison of earth entry planetary environments, experiment design and vehicle design.

  8. Detection and characterization of usability problems in structured data entry interfaces in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Walji, Muhammad F; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Tran, Duong; Kookal, Krishna K; Nguyen, Vickie; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; White, Joel M; Vaderhobli, Ram; Ramoni, Rachel; Stark, Paul C; Kimmes, Nicole S.; Schoonheim-Klein, Meta E.; Patel, Vimla L

    2012-01-01

    Background Poor usability is one of the major barriers for optimally using electronic health records (EHRs). Dentists are increasingly adopting EHRs, and are using structured data entry interfaces to enter data such that the data can be easily retrieved and exchanged. Until recently, dentists have lacked a standardized terminology to consistently represent oral health diagnoses. Objectives In this study we evaluated the usability of a widely used EHR interface that allow the entry of diagnostic terms, using multi-faceted methods to identify problems and work with the vendor to correct them using an iterative design method. Methods Fieldwork was undertaken at two clinical sites, and dental students as subjects participated in user testing (n=32), interviews (n=36) and observations (n=24). Results User testing revealed that only 22–41% of users were able to successfully complete a simple task of entering one diagnosis, while no user was able to complete a more complex task. We identified and characterized 24 high-level usability problems reducing efficiency and causing user errors. Interface-related problems included unexpected approaches for displaying diagnosis, lack of visibility, and inconsistent use of UI widgets. Terminology related issues included missing and mis-categorized concepts. Work domain issues involved both absent and superfluous functions. In collaboration with the vendor, each usability problem was prioritized and a timeline set to resolve the concerns. Discussion Mixed methods evaluations identified a number of critical usability issues relating to the user interface, underlying terminology of the work domain. The usability challenges were found to prevent most users from successfully completing the tasks. Our further work we will determine if changes to the interface, terminology and work domain do result in improved usability. PMID:22749840

  9. The Unintended Consequences of Computerized Provider Order Entry: Findings From a Mixed Methods Exploration*

    PubMed Central

    Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.; Dykstra, Richard; Campbell, Emily; Guappone, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe the foci, activities, methods, and results of a four-year research project identifying the unintended consequences of computerized provider order entry (CPOE). Methods Using a mixed methods approach, we identified and categorized into nine types 380 examples of the unintended consequences of CPOE gleaned from fieldwork data and a conference of experts. We then conducted a national survey in the U.S.A. to discover how hospitals with varying levels of infusion, a measure of CPOE sophistication, recognize and deal with unintended consequences. The research team, with assistance from experts, identified strategies for managing the nine types of unintended adverse consequences and developed and disseminated tools for CPOE implementers to help in addressing these consequences. Results Hospitals reported that levels of infusion are quite high and that these types of unintended consequences are common. Strategies for avoiding or managing the unintended consequences are similar to best practices for CPOE success published in the literature. Conclusion Development of a taxonomy of types of unintended adverse consequences of CPOE using qualitative methods allowed us to craft a national survey and discover how widespread these consequences are. Using mixed methods, we were able to structure an approach for addressing the skillful management of unintended consequences as well. PMID:18786852

  10. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  11. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  12. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  13. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  14. 7 CFR 319.24-5 - Condition of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Corn Diseases Regulations Governing Entry of Indian Corn Or Maize § 319.24-5 Condition of entry. The corn shall not be removed from the port of entry... Quarantine Programs, that the corn has been properly sterilized and released for entry without...

  15. 19 CFR 143.11 - Merchandise eligible for appraisement entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Merchandise eligible for appraisement entry. 143.11 Section 143.11 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) SPECIAL ENTRY PROCEDURES Appraisement Entry § 143.11 Merchandise eligible for appraisement entry. (a)...

  16. 30 CFR 877.13 - Entry and consent to reclaim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; and (3) The owner of the land or water resources where entry must be made to restore, reclaim, abate... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Entry and consent to reclaim. 877.13 Section... INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.13 Entry and consent to reclaim. (a)...

  17. 30 CFR 877.13 - Entry and consent to reclaim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; and (3) The owner of the land or water resources where entry must be made to restore, reclaim, abate... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Entry and consent to reclaim. 877.13 Section... INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.13 Entry and consent to reclaim. (a)...

  18. 46 CFR 109.433 - Logbook entries. 1

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Logbook entries. 1 109.433 Section 109.433 Shipping... Reports, Notifications, and Records Records § 109.433 Logbook entries. 1 1 Note: 46 U.S.C. 11301 requires that certain entries be made in an official logbook, in addition to the entries required by...

  19. 30 CFR 877.13 - Entry and consent to reclaim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; and (3) The owner of the land or water resources where entry must be made to restore, reclaim, abate... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Entry and consent to reclaim. 877.13 Section... INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.13 Entry and consent to reclaim. (a)...

  20. 7 CFR 319.8-26 - Material refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., or other expenses incidental to the safeguarding or disposal of material refused entry by the... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Material refused entry. 319.8-26 Section 319.8-26... Provisions § 319.8-26 Material refused entry. Any material refused entry for noncompliance with...

  1. 7 CFR 319.8-26 - Material refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., or other expenses incidental to the safeguarding or disposal of material refused entry by the... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Material refused entry. 319.8-26 Section 319.8-26... Provisions § 319.8-26 Material refused entry. Any material refused entry for noncompliance with...

  2. 7 CFR 319.8-26 - Material refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., or other expenses incidental to the safeguarding or disposal of material refused entry by the... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Material refused entry. 319.8-26 Section 319.8-26... Provisions § 319.8-26 Material refused entry. Any material refused entry for noncompliance with...

  3. 7 CFR 319.8-26 - Material refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., or other expenses incidental to the safeguarding or disposal of material refused entry by the... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Material refused entry. 319.8-26 Section 319.8-26... Provisions § 319.8-26 Material refused entry. Any material refused entry for noncompliance with...

  4. 19 CFR 142.44 - Entry number range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Entry number range. 142.44 Section 142.44 Customs... (CONTINUED) ENTRY PROCESS Line Release § 142.44 Entry number range. After an application for Line Release has received final approval, filers must provide the port director, in writing, with a range of entry...

  5. Mapping erosion-sensitive areas after wildfires using fieldwork, remote sensing, and geographic information systems techniques on a regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PéRez-Cabello, F.; de La Riva FernáNdez, J.; Montorio LloveríA, R.; GarcíA-MartíN, A.

    2006-12-01

    Alterations in the hydrological cycle following wildfire due to the loss of ground cover vegetation and changes in soil properties have been documented in many studies. Nevertheless, the rapid process of vegetation recovery reduces such negative effects. Vegetation cover before fire, fire severity, and geophysical properties are important factors that control spatial discontinuities involved in the vegetation-covering process. The objective of this study was to estimate the probability of high erosion in order to map erosion-sensitive areas after fire. The analysis was carried out in different plant communities burnt by summer wildfires in the pre-Pyrenean area (Spain). Three-year Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images have been used for mapping wildfire areas and severity levels. Conversion to spectral reflectance has been applied for radiometric correction by normalizing topographic and atmospheric effects. Likewise, other physical variables have also been incorporated into the geographic information system (GIS): vegetation types, parent material, illumination, slope, aspect, and precipitation. The dependent variable has been characterized by means of fieldwork and a photointerpretation process based on high-resolution digital aerial orthophotographs taken 11-12 years after the fire. Different logistic regression models have been used for mapping the probability of erosion. Results indicate that prefire normalized difference vegetation index values and aspect are the most important variables for estimating erosion-sensitive areas after fire (Nagelkerke r2 = 0.66; Kappa values = 0.65). Finally, the use of nonparametric models with environmental digital information based on GIS can facilitate the management of burnt areas.

  6. TIME - MAKING THE BEST OF IT! A Fieldwork Study Outlining Time in Endoscopy Facilities for Short-Term Stay

    PubMed Central

    Bundgaard, Karin; Sørensen, Erik E.; Delmar, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This paper focus on nursing and time in endoscopy facilities for short-term stay aiming to explore aspects of time in this setting and how expectations from the healthcare organisation, patients and nurses are expressed and met when managing nursing time. Background: Former research primarily focuses on the subject of time in the understanding of duration where having more time is closely associated with the ability to deliver better quality nursing care. The main concern is the nurses’ increased number of tasks and the decreased length of time at their disposal. However, few studies describe nursing when time is sparse, and the possibility of providing individualised nursing within a very short span of time. Design: Inspired by practical ethnographic principles, a fieldwork study was performed in high technology endoscopy clinics during 2008-2010. Methods: Data triangulation included participant observation, participant reports and patients and nurses semi-structured interviews. Results/Findings: The issue of time was an interwoven part of life in the productive endoscopy units. The understanding of time related to the main category: ‘Time - making the best of it’, and the sub categories “Responsibility of time”, “Information and preparation”, and “Time wasters”. Conclusion: The study underlines the possibility of combining the health care systems, patients and the nurses’ perspectives on and expectations of how to spend nursing time in endoscopy settings. In successful patient pathways nursing maximize patient outcome, support the goals of the healthcare organisations, is reliable, assure, tangible, empathic and responsive, and is individually tailored to the patient’s needs. The study contributes by underlining the importance of discussing not how to get more time in clinical practice but instead how to spend the time in the best way possible. PMID:27347251

  7. Atmospheric Entry Studies for Venus Missions: 45 Sphere-Cone Rigid Aeroshells and Ballistic Entries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Hwang, Helen H.; Cappuccio, Gelsomina; Moses, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study considers direct ballistic entries into the atmosphere of Venus using a 45deg sphere-cone rigid aeroshell, a legacy shape that has been used successfully in the past in the Pioneer Venus Multiprobe Mission. For a number of entry mass and heatshield diameter combinations (i.e., various ballistic coefficients) and entry velocities, the trajectory space in terms of entry flight path angles between skip out and -30deg is explored with a 3DoF trajectory code, TRAJ. From these trajectories, the viable entry flight path angle space is determined through the use of mechanical and thermal performance limits on the thermal protection material and science payload; the thermal protection material of choice is entry-grade carbon phenolic, for which a material thermal response model is available. For mechanical performance, a 200 g limit is placed on the peak deceleration load experienced by the science instruments, and 10 bar is assumed as the pressure limit for entry-grade carbon-phenolic material. For thermal performance, inflection points in the total heat load distribution are used as cut off criteria. Analysis of the results shows the existence of a range of critical ballistic coefficients beyond which the steepest possible entries are determined by the pressure limit of the material rather than the deceleration load limit.

  8. 75 FR 82241 - Technical Correction: Completion of Entry and Entry Summary-Declaration of Value

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... Correction: Completion of Entry and Entry Summary-- Declaration of Value AGENCY: Customs and Border...(g) has expired and that this regulation is no longer necessary. ] Accordingly, part 141 of the CBP... summary documentation must be completed. Within Sec. 141.61, paragraph (g) requires an importer...

  9. 76 FR 66875 - Informal Entry Limit and Removal of a Formal Entry Requirement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... the language requiring formal entry for certain articles, because with the elimination of absolute... proposes to remove language stating that formal entry is required for certain ``articles valued in excess... States (HTSUS). We propose to remove this language because CBP no longer needs to require formal...

  10. Lessons learned from planetary entry probe missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, Hasso; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kasprzak, Wayne

    Probing the atmospheres and surfaces of the planets and their moons with fast moving entry probes has been a very useful and essential technique to obtain in situ or quasi in situ scientific data (ground truth) which could not otherwise be obtained from fly by or orbiter only missions and where balloon, aircraft or lander missions are too complex and too costly. Planetary entry probe missions have been conducted successfully on Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Titan after having been first demonstrated in the Earth's atmosphere. Future planetary missions should also include more entry probe missions back to Venus and to the outer planets. The success of and science returns from past missions, the need for more and unique data, and a continuously advancing technology generate confidence that future missions will be even more successful with respect to science return and technical performance. There are, however, unique challenges associated with entry probe missions and with building instruments for an entry probe, as compared to orbiters, landers, or rovers. Conditions during atmospheric entry are extreme. There are operating time constraints due to the usually short duration of the probe descent, and the instruments experience rapid environmental changes in temperature and pressure. In addition, there are resource limitations, i.e. mass, power, size and bandwidth. Because of the protective heat shield and the high acceleration the probe experiences during entry, the ratio of payload to total probe mass is usually much smaller than in other missions. Finally, the demands on the instrument design are determined in large part by conditions (pressure, temperature, composition) unique to the particular body under study, and as a result, there is no one-size-fits-all instrument for an atmospheric probe. Many of these requirements are more easily met by miniaturizing the probe instrumentation and consequently reducing the required size of the probe. Improved heat shield

  11. 1994 entry-level athletic training salaries.

    PubMed

    Moss, C L

    1996-01-01

    In this study, I examined salaries for entry-level positions in athletic training during the year 1994. An entry-level position was defined as a position to be filled with an athletic trainer certified by the NATA, with no full-time paid employment experience. According to the "Placement Vacancy Notice" (NATA, Dallas, TX) and "BYLINE" (Athletic Trainer Services, Inc, Mt Pleasant, MI), there were 432 entry-level vacancies in hospital/clinics, college/universities, and high school settings. A total of 271 surveys (63%) were returned. Overall, beginning salaries for entry-level athletic training positions were $23,228 (+/-$3,177) for a bachelor's degree and $25,362 (+/-$3,883) for a master's degree. A stipend ($4,216 +/- $2,039) was included in 86% of the high school positions. The term of contract for high school was usually a 10-month position (10.0 +/- .9 months), hospital/clinic, 12-months (11.7 +/- .7 months), while the college/university varied from 9 to 12 months (10.5 +/- 1.2 months). Also included in the study was fringe benefit information: pension (other than Social Security), life, medical, dental, and vision insurance. Continued studies are recommended to establish salary norms and trends for entry-level positions so that athletic trainers will understand what monetary compensation to expect for their services. PMID:16558367

  12. Skip entry trajectory planning and guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, Christopher William

    A numerical predictor-corrector (NPC) method for trajectory planning and closed-loop guidance of low lift-to-drag (L/D) ratio vehicles during the skip entry phase of a lunar-return mission is presented. The strategy calls for controlling the trajectory by modulation of the magnitude of the vehicle's bank angle. The magnitude of the bank angle used in the skip phase is determined by satisfying the downrange requirement to the landing site. The problem is formulated as a nonlinear univariate root-finding problem. Full three degree of freedom (3DOF) nonlinear trajectory dynamics are included to achieve high accuracy of the landing prediction. In addition, the proposed approach automatically yields a direct entry trajectory when the downrange is such that a skip entry is no longer necessary. The same algorithm repeatedly applied on-board in every guidance cycle realizes closed-loop guidance in the skip entry phase. A number of issues are identified and addressed that are critical in closed-loop implementations. Extensive 3DOF dispersion simulations are performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach, and the results demonstrate very reliable and robust performance of the algorithm in highly stressful dispersed conditions. Comparison is made between the proposed algorithm and an earlier skip algorithm developed for the Apollo space program. It is shown that the proposed algorithm is superior to the Apollo algorithm especially when used for entries with long downranges.

  13. Shuttle program. MCC Level C formulation requirements: Entry guidance and entry autopilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.; Hill, O.

    1980-01-01

    A set of preliminary entry guidance and autopilot software formulations is presented for use in the Mission Control Center (MCC) entry processor. These software formulations meet all level B requirements. Revision 2 incorporates the modifications required to functionally simulate optimal TAEM targeting capability (OTT). Implementation of this logic in the MCC must be coordinated with flight software OTT implementation and MCC TAEM guidance OTT. The entry guidance logic is based on the Orbiter avionics entry guidance software. This MCC requirements document contains a definition of coordinate systems, a list of parameter definitions for the software formulations, a description of the entry guidance detailed formulation requirements, a description of the detailed autopilot formulation requirements, a description of the targeting routine, and a set of formulation flow charts.

  14. MCC level C formulation requirements. Entry guidance and entry autopilot, optional TAEM targeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harpold, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    The level C software formulations requirements for the entry guidance and the simplified autopilot to be used by the Mission Control Center (MCC) entry processor are presented. The modifications required to functionally simulate optional Terminal Area Energy Management (TAEM) targeting capability (OTT) are incorporated. Implementation of this logic in the MCC must be coordinated with flight software OTT implementation and MCC TAEM guidance OTT. The entry guidance logic is based on the orbiter avionics entry guidance software. Descriptions of the entry guidance detailed formulation requirements, the detailed autopilot formulation requirements, and the targeting routine are given. Also included are a definition of coordinate systems, a list of parameter definitions for the software formulations, and a set of formulation flow charts.

  15. Fieldwork Supervisor's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Rosemarie M.; And Others

    This manual, intended for community agency personnel who supervise students in undergraduate field placements, presents suggestions to aid the supervisor in providing the student with a valuable and rewarding experience which will also be of value to the agency. Issues are presented in sections reflecting the common sequence of events in a…

  16. Cognitive anthropological fieldwork.

    PubMed

    Le Guen, Olivier

    2012-07-01

    In their introduction, Beller et al. point to important issues regarding the problematic interaction of anthropology and cognitive sciences (CS). I address some of these issues in stressing first some limitations of the current state of the fields of anthropology and CS. In the second half of this article, using data from studies I have been conducting among the Yucatec Mayas (Mexico), I present some concrete cases where anthropological and CS methods and approaches are complementary. Finally, I propose some solutions to find common ground and ways to improve cross-disciplinary collaboration.

  17. Archaeoastronomical Fieldwork in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawaski, Mike J.; Malville, J.

    2006-09-01

    During June-July 2005, sets of 14 horizon photographs were obtained at 10 major monumental sites of the Inca as identified in Hemming and Ranney (1982) . The photographs were combined to yield complete 360o panoramas at each of the sites. To calibrate the panoramas a Wild T-2 theodolite was used to obtain 5 pairs of altitude/azimuth measurements of the Sun at each site. The standard deviation of multiple determinations of true north was typically 0.25'to 0.5'. As a check on the sun sights, a line-of-sight azimuth was also established with GPS measurements at each site. Agreement between these baselines and the sun sights are satisfactory. We find evidence of June solstice and/or Pleiades orientations at Llactapata, Sayhuite, and Ollantaytambo; cardinal orientation at Vilcashuman; June solstice established by horizon towers above Urubamba; and both zenith and anti-zenith solar alignments at the tower of Muyuc Marca of Sacsayhuman. Terracing, walls, and water features at Ollantaytambo suggest interest in both June and December solstices. The statistical significance of these orientations is evaluated. A permit was issued by the office of the Institute Cultura National in Cusco for field work at all of these sites. This work was undertook as partial fulfillment of the requirement for a MA degree in Earth Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado. Funding was provided by Sigma Xi and The University of Northern Colorado. Hemming, J. and E. Ranney. 1982. Monuments of the Inca, Boston: Little, Brown

  18. Earth Entry Vehicle for Mars Sample Return

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Braun, R. D.; Hughes. S. J.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2000-01-01

    The driving requirement for design of a Mars Sample return mission is assuring containment of the returned samples. The impact of this requirement on developmental costs, mass allocation, and design approach of the Earth Entry Vehicle is significant. A simple Earth entry vehicle is described which can meet these requirements and safely transport the Mars Sample Return mission's sample through the Earth's atmosphere to a recoverable location on the surface. Detailed analysis and test are combined with probabilistic risk assessment to design this entirely passive concept that circumvents the potential failure modes of a parachute terminal descent system. The design also possesses features that mitigate other risks during the entry, descent, landing and recovery phases. The results of a full-scale drop test are summarized.

  19. Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esper, Jaime; Baumann, Jean-Pierre; Herdrich, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The Cubesat Application for Planetary Entry Missions (CAPE) concept describes a high-performing Cubesat system which includes a propulsion module and miniaturized technologies capable of surviving atmospheric entry heating, while reliably transmitting scientific and engineering data. The Micro Return Capsule 2 (MIRKA2) is CAPE’s first planetary entry probe flight prototype. Within this context, this paper summarizes CAPE’s configuration and typical operational scenario. It also summarizes MIRKA2’s design and basic aerodynamic characteristics, and discusses potential challenges drawn from the experience of missions such as Stardust and MUSES-C. CAPE not only opens the door to new planetary mission capabilities, it also offers relatively low-cost opportunities especially suitable to university participation.

  20. DSMC simulations of OREX entry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Gupta, Roop N.; Price, Joseph M.

    1996-01-01

    Results of direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) solutions are presented for the Japanese Orbital Reentry Experiment (OREX) vehicle, a 50 deg half-angle spherically blunted cone with a nose radius of 1.35 m and a base diameter of 3.4 m. The flow conditions simulated are those for entry into the Earth's atmosphere at a nominal velocity of about 7.4 km/s and zero incidence. Calculations are made for the higher altitude portion of entry, encompassing the transitional flow regime (altitudes of 200 to 80 km). Comparisons with flight measured values are made for axial acceleration, surface pressure, and stagnation point heating.

  1. Project Prometheus and Future Entry Probe Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on project Prometheus and future entry probe missions is shown. The topics include: 1) What Is Project Prometheus?; 2) What Capabilities Can Project Prometheus Offer? What Mission Types Are Being Considered?; 3) Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO); 4) How Are Mission Opportunities Changing?; 5) Missions Of Interest a Year Ago; 6) Missions Now Being Considered For Further Study; 7) Galileo-Style (Conventional) Probe Delivery; 8) Galileo-Style Probe Support; 9) Conventional Delivery and Support of Multiple Probes; 10) How Entry Probe Delivery From an NEP Vehicle Is Different; and 11) Concluding Remarks.

  2. Trace metals adhered to urban sediments. Results from fieldwork in Poços de Caldas, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidoro, Jorge; Silveira, Alexandre; Júnior, José; Poleto, Cristiano; de Lima, João; Gonçalves, Flávio; Alvarenga, Lívia

    2016-04-01

    The urbanization process has consequences such as the introduction of new sources of pollution and changes in the natural environment, like increase of impervious areas that accumulate pollutants between rainfall events. The pollution caused by the washing of accumulated sediment on the gutters, ultimately carried to water bodies through the stormwater drainage system, stands out in this process. This study aimed to quantify and characterize the sediments accumulated in the gutters of roads in an urban area of Poços de Caldas (MG), Brazil. Fieldwork took place during the period of 21.05.2013 to 27.08.2013. Main goal was to investigate the process of accumulation of dry sediments on impervious surfaces and find how this process relates with the urban occupation. More specific goals were to quantify the average mass and characterize the granulometric distribution of accumulated sediments, and identify the occurrence of trace metals Zn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Cu and Pb in the fraction of sediments with diameter smaller or equal to 63μm. The samples were weighed to find the aggregate mass and then sieved through meshes of 63μm, 125μm, 250μm, 600μm, 1180μm, and 2000μm for the granulometric analysis. Samples of the sediment fraction smaller than 63μm of diameter were subjected to analysis by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) for the identification of trace metals. We found that the aggregate mass of accumulated sediments varies in time and space and is particularly influenced by the land use of the sampling areas. Areas under construction produced more sediments than built areas or areas without construction. This study may serve as an input for creating diffuse pollution control and mitigation strategies towards the reduction of accumulated pollutants in the urban environment of Poços de Caldas. Pb and Zn shown the highest concentrations. The heavy metal concentration decreases after wet

  3. Food Distribution. The Supermarket Entry Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This guide is designed to assist the coordinator of the Marketing and Distributive Education Cooperative Education Program in improving and expanding the instructional activities needed to prepare individuals to function in the food industry's entry-level jobs. The instructional material provides information about what is expected of a student…

  4. TEST CELL STUDIES OF RADON ENTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to contrast the effectiveness of slab-in-stem wall (SSW) with floating slab (FS) construction practices, to measure radon transport and entry for model testing, to develop protocols relevant to depressurized radon measurements, and to determine...

  5. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  6. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  7. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  8. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  9. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  10. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  11. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  12. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  13. 32 CFR 770.45 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton... consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his authorized representative shall, in writing, submit a request to the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, at...

  14. 32 CFR 770.44 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... LIMITING PUBLIC ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New... upon Naval Submarine Base New London, or remaining thereon by any person for any purpose without the advance consent of the Commanding Officer, Naval Submarine Base New London, or his...

  15. 40 CFR 170.112 - Entry restrictions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... (2) Entry-restricted areas in greenhouses are specified in column D in table 2 under § 170.110(c)(4... worn over a layer of clothing. If a chemical-resistant suit is substituted for coveralls, it need not be worn over a layer of clothing. (vii)(A) Gloves shall be of the type specified on the...

  16. 32 CFR 763.5 - Entry procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., and do not touch high explosives. For visitor safety, the directions of the military escorts must be... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Entry procedures. 763.5 Section 763.5 National... ordnance found. (5) Only the qualified EOD technicians shall touch, examine, remove, attempt to...

  17. Northwest Entry-Level Worker Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Thomas; Cohen, Carolyn

    A survey elicited workers' opinions in five areas: (1) essential skills, attitudes, and behaviors needed on the job by entry-level workers; (2) the purposes, content, and delivery of training needed and desired by workers; (3) productivity; (4) workplace environment; and (5) employee benefits. Information was gathered through written surveys of…

  18. Mapping Entry Vocabulary to Unfamiliar Metadata Vocabularies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Michael; Chen, Aitao; Chen, Hui-Min; Kim, Youngin; Lam, Byron; Larson, Ray; Norgard, Barbara; Purat, Jacek; Gey, Frederic

    1999-01-01

    Reports on work at the University of California, Berkeley, on the design and development of English-language indices to metadata vocabularies. Discusses the significance of unfamiliar metadata and describes the Entry Vocabulary Module which helps searchers to be more effective and increases the return on the original investment in generating…

  19. 19 CFR 147.11 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... articles for a fair shall be made at the port in the name of the fair operator which shall be deemed for... arriving at port other than port of the fair. Articles to be entered under this subpart which arrive at... to the latter port in the manner prescribed in part 18 of this chapter. (c) Form of entry....

  20. 19 CFR 147.11 - Entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... articles for a fair shall be made at the port in the name of the fair operator which shall be deemed for... arriving at port other than port of the fair. Articles to be entered under this subpart which arrive at... to the latter port in the manner prescribed in part 18 of this chapter. (c) Form of entry....

  1. Entry Level Skills Program Implementation Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute for Services to Education, Inc., Washington, DC.

    A guide to the implementation of the Entry Level Skills Program (ELSP) and a conceptual framework for evaluation research is presented. Attention is directed to strategies for the attainment of goals and management of the ELSP project, which is a developmental program for freshmen students who have not acquired the full range or level of cognitive…

  2. Fire Service Training. Forcible Entry. (Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Community Colleges, Raleigh.

    One of a set of fourteen instructional outlines for use in a course to train novice firemen, this guide covers the topic of forcible entry. Due to the nature of the subject, this part of the course is taught basically by lecture method, although practical applications by students are suggested wherever possible. The major areas of study include…

  3. Managed entry agreements for pharmaceuticals in Australia.

    PubMed

    Vitry, Agnes; Roughead, Elizabeth

    2014-09-01

    In Australia, a number of managed entry agreements have been developed to enable national coverage of new medicines. Non-outcome based agreements are usually pricing arrangements that involve price or volume rebate agreements. In February 2013, there were at least 71 special pricing arrangements in place, including 26 for medicines restricted to use in hospitals. Health outcome based agreements can be made at the individual or population level. At the individual level, there were 28 medicines funded subject to continuation rules involving documentation of adequate benefit within the individual; some of these medicines also had price agreements in place. At the population level, only one outcome-based agreement has been implemented so far, for bosentan, a medicine marketed for pulmonary hypertension. In May 2010, a memorandum of understanding signed between the Australian Government and Medicines Australia, the peak pharmaceutical industry organisation, included the possibility for industry to request consideration of a 'Managed Entry Scheme' as part of the funding submission process for medicines with high clinical needs. It includes the possibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT)-based entry scheme. Although this form of managed entry has yet not been trialed in Australia, several 2012/2013 funding recommendations included requests by the decision making committee for further evidence development.

  4. 19 CFR 128.23 - Entry requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... System (ACS). These requirements include those under the Automated Manifest System (AMS), Cargo Selectivity, Statement Processing, the Automated Broker Interface System (ABI), and enhancements of ACS. (2... Commercial System (ACS). (3) Paper entry document waiver. The port director is authorized, at the time...

  5. 19 CFR 10.31 - Entry; bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... exported to Canada or Mexico (see § 181.53 of this chapter). ... voucher of the carnet shall serve as the entry. (3) In addition to the data usually shown on a regular... intended for display or demonstration, if brought into the United States by a resident of Canada,...

  6. Infectious Entry Pathway of Enterovirus B Species

    PubMed Central

    Marjomäki, Varpu; Turkki, Paula; Huttunen, Moona

    2015-01-01

    Enterovirus B species (EV-B) are responsible for a vast number of mild and serious acute infections. They are also suspected of remaining in the body, where they cause persistent infections contributing to chronic diseases such as type I diabetes. Recent studies of the infectious entry pathway of these viruses revealed remarkable similarities, including non-clathrin entry of large endosomes originating from the plasma membrane invaginations. Many cellular factors regulating the efficient entry have recently been associated with macropinocytic uptake, such as Rac1, serine/threonine p21-activated kinase (Pak1), actin, Na/H exchanger, phospholipace C (PLC) and protein kinase Cα (PKCα). Another characteristic feature is the entry of these viruses to neutral endosomes, independence of endosomal acidification and low association with acidic lysosomes. The biogenesis of neutral multivesicular bodies is crucial for their infection, at least for echovirus 1 (E1) and coxsackievirus A9 (CVA9). These pathways are triggered by the virus binding to their receptors on the plasma membrane, and they are not efficiently recycled like other cellular pathways used by circulating receptors. Therefore, the best “markers” of these pathways may be the viruses and often their receptors. A deeper understanding of this pathway and associated endosomes is crucial in elucidating the mechanisms of enterovirus uncoating and genome release from the endosomes to start efficient replication. PMID:26690201

  7. Screening Children's Entry Characteristics in Kindergarten.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mooij, Ton

    2000-01-01

    A pilot study examined the reliability and predictive validity of a screening instrument for Dutch kindergartners. Findings indicated acceptable reliability and predictive validity. Parents could accurately screen their child's language proficiency level, pre-arithmetic level, and degree of extraversion at school entry. Teachers could predict…

  8. Shuttle Entry Imaging Using Infrared Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas; Berry, Scott; Alter, Stephen; Blanchard, Robert; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin; Tack, Steve

    2007-01-01

    During the Columbia Accident Investigation, imaging teams supporting debris shedding analysis were hampered by poor entry image quality and the general lack of information on optical signatures associated with a nominal Shuttle entry. After the accident, recommendations were made to NASA management to develop and maintain a state-of-the-art imagery database for Shuttle engineering performance assessments and to improve entry imaging capability to support anomaly and contingency analysis during a mission. As a result, the Space Shuttle Program sponsored an observation campaign to qualitatively characterize a nominal Shuttle entry over the widest possible Mach number range. The initial objectives focused on an assessment of capability to identify/resolve debris liberated from the Shuttle during entry, characterization of potential anomalous events associated with RCS jet firings and unusual phenomenon associated with the plasma trail. The aeroheating technical community viewed the Space Shuttle Program sponsored activity as an opportunity to influence the observation objectives and incrementally demonstrate key elements of a quantitative spatially resolved temperature measurement capability over a series of flights. One long-term desire of the Shuttle engineering community is to calibrate boundary layer transition prediction methodologies that are presently part of the Shuttle damage assessment process using flight data provided by a controlled Shuttle flight experiment. Quantitative global imaging may offer a complementary method of data collection to more traditional methods such as surface thermocouples. This paper reviews the process used by the engineering community to influence data collection methods and analysis of global infrared images of the Shuttle obtained during hypersonic entry. Emphasis is placed upon airborne imaging assets sponsored by the Shuttle program during Return to Flight. Visual and IR entry imagery were obtained with available airborne

  9. 19 CFR 18.11 - Entry; classes of goods for which entry is authorized; form used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... administered by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall be forwarded under such entries only upon... commodity and chief fiber content (e.g., men's cotton jeans or women's wool sweaters); Net weight of...

  10. 19 CFR 18.11 - Entry; classes of goods for which entry is authorized; form used.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... citations affecting § 18.11, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids... administered by the Bureau of Entomology and Plant Quarantine shall be forwarded under such entries only...

  11. Utilizing mobile technology in GIS education: A case study of using iPad and iBooks in fieldwork and location based exercises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yi-Ting

    The advancement of mobile computing technology has provided diverse way for education. Combination of mobile devices and GIS tools has become a trend in many geospatial technology applications (i.e., Google Maps application on smartphones). This research aims to develop an iBook prototype (a GIS textbook) for GIS education on Apple iPads and to evaluate the effectiveness of adopting the GIS iBook in classes and fieldwork exercises. We conducted the evaluation tests in two GIS courses (GEOG104 and GEOG381) in Fall 2014 at San Diego State University. There are two main research questions in this study: (1) How to assess and evaluate the effectiveness of location-based learning exercises (from iBook) and fieldwork exercises for first-time GIS students? (2) What were major technical challenges and opportunities to utilize mobile device and mobile technology in GIS education? The procedures of developing and evaluating the prototype of the GIS iBook include creating two new chapters (chapter three: Wander the World through Remote Sensing Data and chapter four: Internet and Mobile GIS), interviewing five educators from high schools and community colleges, and improving the contents of the GIS iBook after the interview. There were 31 students who tested the GIS iBook and did a fieldwork exercise with iPads. The 31 students were required to finish five questionnaires after the exercise to express their user experiences and thoughts about the GIS iBook. Based on the result of questionnaires, most students preferred to take GIS classes with the free GIS iBook and thought fieldwork exercise can help their learning. The students also performed better in knowledge oriented survey after reading the GIS iBook. This research also adopts the SWOT analysis method to evaluate the prototype of the GIS iBook. The result of the SWOT analysis indicates that utilizing mobile device in GIS education does have a great potential value in enhancing student's understanding. The strengths of

  12. Analytic Guidance for the First Entry in a Skip Atmospheric Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Llama, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an analytic method to generate a reference drag trajectory for the first entry portion of a skip atmospheric entry. The drag reference, expressed as a polynomial function of the velocity, will meet the conditions necessary to fit the requirements of the complete entry phase. The generic method proposed to generate the drag reference profile is further simplified by thinking of the drag and the velocity as density and cumulative distribution functions respectively. With this notion it will be shown that the reference drag profile can be obtained by solving a linear algebraic system of equations. The resulting drag profile is flown using the feedback linearization method of differential geometric control as guidance law with the error dynamics of a second order homogeneous equation in the form of a damped oscillator. This approach was first proposed as a revisited version of the Space Shuttle Orbiter entry guidance. However, this paper will show that it can be used to fly the first entry in a skip entry trajectory. In doing so, the gains in the error dynamics will be changed at a certain point along the trajectory to improve the tracking performance.

  13. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  14. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  15. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  16. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  17. 9 CFR 93.220 - Inspection at port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... all such poultry found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation and not to have..., or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry. Poultry refused entry, unless exported within...

  18. 9 CFR 93.220 - Inspection at port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... all such poultry found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation and not to have..., or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry. Poultry refused entry, unless exported within...

  19. 9 CFR 93.220 - Inspection at port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... all such poultry found to be free from communicable disease and fever tick infestation and not to have..., or infested with fever ticks, shall be refused entry. Poultry refused entry, unless exported within...

  20. Local Calcium Entry and the Guidance of Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, K. R.

    1983-01-01

    The role of calcium in developing cells is illustrated. The Fucus egg, a brown algae is used to describe this phenomenom. Results of local calcium entry and forced calcium entry into the eggs are given.

  1. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  2. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  3. Application of the MEDLI Suite to Future Mars Entry Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munk, M. M.

    2012-06-01

    The heatshield instrument on MSL, called MEDLI, will measure the pressure and thermal environments during entry, descent and landing. To fulfill scientific and engineering objectives, all future entry vehicles should include similar instrumentation.

  4. FRONT OBLIQUE, WITH ENTRY AND WATER FEATURE TO LEFT, TAKEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FRONT OBLIQUE, WITH ENTRY AND WATER FEATURE TO LEFT, TAKEN FROM ENTRY. VIEW FACING SOUTH. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Naval Housing Area Makalapa, Senior Officers' Quarters Type A, 37 Makalapa Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  5. 30 CFR 877.13 - Entry and consent to reclaim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.13 Entry and consent to reclaim. (a) OSM... supporting reasons that— (1) Land or water resources have been or may be adversely affected by past...

  6. 30 CFR 877.14 - Entry for emergency reclamation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INTERIOR ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.14 Entry for emergency reclamation. (a) OSM... shall make a written finding with supporting reasons that the situation qualifies as an emergency...

  7. 19 CFR 151.64 - Extra copy of entry summary.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) EXAMINATION, SAMPLING, AND TESTING OF MERCHANDISE Wool and Hair § 151.64 Extra copy of entry summary. One extra copy of the entry summary covering wool or hair subject to duty at a rate...

  8. Stair and entry room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. Door from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Stair and entry room, bunkhouse, first floor interior. Door from entry hall leads to toilets and bathing rooms. A coat and hat rack is on each side of the door. - Sespe Ranch, Bunkhouse, 2896 Telegraph Road, Fillmore, Ventura County, CA

  9. 9. INTERIOR, VIEW SHOWING MAIN STAIRWAY AND ENTRY HALL THROUGH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR, VIEW SHOWING MAIN STAIRWAY AND ENTRY HALL THROUGH ENTRY INTO PARLOR. TAKEN FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER OF PARLOR, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Farquhar House, 1601 Sandy Spring Road (Route 108), Sandy Spring, Montgomery County, MD

  10. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  11. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  12. 19 CFR 142.3a - Entry numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Format. The following format, including hyphens, must be used when showing the entry number: XXX-NNNNNNN-N XXX represents an entry filer code assigned by CBP, NNNNNNN is a unique number which is...

  13. Apollo experience report: Mission planning for Apollo entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, C. A.; Harpold, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The problems encountered and the experience gained in the entry mission plans, flight software, trajectory-monitoring procedures, and backup trajectory-control techniques of the Apollo Program should provide a foundation upon which future spacecraft programs can be developed. Descriptions of these entry activities are presented. Also, to provide additional background information needed for discussion of the Apollo entry experience, descriptions of the entry targeting for the Apollo 11 mission and the postflight analysis of the Apollo 10 mission are presented.

  14. 30 CFR 877.11 - Written consent for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Written consent for entry. 877.11 Section 877... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.11 Written consent for entry. Written consent from the... police power will be undertaken only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain written consent....

  15. 30 CFR 877.11 - Written consent for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Written consent for entry. 877.11 Section 877... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.11 Written consent for entry. Written consent from the... police power will be undertaken only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain written consent....

  16. 30 CFR 877.11 - Written consent for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Written consent for entry. 877.11 Section 877... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.11 Written consent for entry. Written consent from the... police power will be undertaken only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain written consent....

  17. 31 CFR 337.6 - Conversions to book-entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conversions to book-entry. 337.6... FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.6 Conversions to book-entry. Upon implementation of the book-entry debenture system, to be announced in advance by separate public notice, all...

  18. 31 CFR 337.6 - Conversions to book-entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Conversions to book-entry. 337.6... HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.6 Conversions to book-entry. Upon implementation of the book-entry debenture system, to be announced in advance by separate public notice, all...

  19. 31 CFR 337.6 - Conversions to book-entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conversions to book-entry. 337.6... HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.6 Conversions to book-entry. Upon implementation of the book-entry debenture system, to be announced in advance by separate public notice, all...

  20. 31 CFR 337.6 - Conversions to book-entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Conversions to book-entry. 337.6... HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.6 Conversions to book-entry. Upon implementation of the book-entry debenture system, to be announced in advance by separate public notice, all...

  1. 9 CFR 93.220 - Inspection at port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inspection at port of entry. 93.220... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Poultry Mexico 8 § 93.220 Inspection at port of entry... the United States in bond for immediate return to Mexico, shall be inspected at the port of entry,...

  2. 9 CFR 93.220 - Inspection at port of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inspection at port of entry. 93.220... FOR MEANS OF CONVEYANCE AND SHIPPING CONTAINERS Poultry Mexico 8 § 93.220 Inspection at port of entry... the United States in bond for immediate return to Mexico, shall be inspected at the port of entry,...

  3. 77 FR 5681 - Establishment of Global Entry Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... an international trusted traveler program called Global Entry. See 74 FR 59932. As described in the..., please refer to the Global Entry pilot notice published on April 11, 2008 (73 FR 19861) and the Global Entry NPRM published on November 19, 2009 (74 FR 59932). As explained in the NPRM, CBP published...

  4. 9 CFR 590.430 - Limitation on entry of material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Entry of Material into Official Egg Products Plants § 590.430 Limitation on entry of material. (a) The Administrator shall limit the entry of eggs and egg products and other materials into official plants under...

  5. 9 CFR 590.430 - Limitation on entry of material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Entry of Material into Official Egg Products Plants § 590.430 Limitation on entry of material. (a) The Administrator shall limit the entry of eggs and egg products and other materials into official plants under...

  6. 9 CFR 590.430 - Limitation on entry of material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Entry of Material into Official Egg Products Plants § 590.430 Limitation on entry of material. (a) The Administrator shall limit the entry of eggs and egg products and other materials into official plants under...

  7. 30 CFR 877.11 - Written consent for entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Written consent for entry. 877.11 Section 877... ABANDONED MINE LAND RECLAMATION RIGHTS OF ENTRY § 877.11 Written consent for entry. Written consent from the... police power will be undertaken only after reasonable efforts have been made to obtain written consent....

  8. 31 CFR 337.6 - Conversions to book-entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conversions to book-entry. 337.6... HOUSING ADMINISTRATION DEBENTURES Certificated Debentures § 337.6 Conversions to book-entry. Upon implementation of the book-entry debenture system, to be announced in advance by separate public notice, all...

  9. 30 CFR 842.13 - Right of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Right of entry. 842.13 Section 842.13 Mineral... INSPECTION AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES FEDERAL INSPECTIONS AND MONITORING § 842.13 Right of entry. (a) Each... right of entry to, upon, and through any coal exploration or surface coal mining and...

  10. 30 CFR 721.12 - Right of entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Right of entry. 721.12 Section 721.12 Mineral... REGULATIONS FEDERAL INSPECTIONS § 721.12 Right of entry. (a) Authorized representatives of the Secretary..., shall have the right of entry to, upon, or through any surface coal mining and reclamation operations...

  11. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  12. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  13. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  14. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  15. 30 CFR 75.326 - Mean entry air velocity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mean entry air velocity. 75.326 Section 75.326... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.326 Mean entry air velocity. In exhausting face ventilation systems, the mean entry air velocity shall be at least 60 feet per...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Submission of repair entries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Submission of repair entries. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping... RESPONSIBILITY IN CONNECTION WITH FOREIGN REPAIR CUSTOM'S ENTRIES Sec. 2 Submission of repair entries. At the... with the District Director of Customs as defined in 19 CFR 1.1(d) an affidavit on Custom's Form...

  17. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...

  18. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...

  19. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...

  20. 9 CFR 98.9 - Embryos refused entry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Embryos refused entry. 98.9 Section 98... EMBRYOS AND ANIMAL SEMEN Ruminant and Swine Embryos from Regions Free of Rinderpest and Foot-and-Mouth Disease; and Embryos of Horses and Asses § 98.9 Embryos refused entry. Any embryo refused entry into...