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Sample records for 2009-2010 influenza season

  1. 2009-2010 Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Coverage among College Students from 8 Universities in North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehling, Katherine A.; Blocker, Jill; Ip, Edward H.; Peters, Timothy R.; Wolfson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to describe the 2009-2010 seasonal influenza vaccine coverage of college students. Participants: A total of 4,090 college students from 8 North Carolina universities participated in a confidential, Web-based survey in October-November 2009. Methods: Associations between self-reported 2009-2010 seasonal influenza…

  2. Neuraminidase inhibitor susceptibility profile of pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan.

    PubMed

    Dapat, Clyde; Kondo, Hiroki; Dapat, Isolde C; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Yasushi; Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2013-09-01

    Two new influenza virus neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), peramivir and laninamivir, were approved in 2010 which resulted to four NAIs that were used during the 2010-2011 influenza season in Japan. This study aims to monitor the susceptibility of influenza virus isolates in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 influenza seasons in Japan to the four NAIs using the fluorescence-based 50% inhibitory concentration (IC₅₀) method. Outliers were identified using box-and-whisker plot analysis and full NA gene sequencing was performed to determine the mutations that are associated with reduction of susceptibility to NAIs. A total of 117 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 59 A(H3N2), and 18 type B viruses were tested before NAI treatment and eight A(H1N1)pdm09 and 1 type B viruses were examined from patients after NAI treatment in the two seasons. NA inhibition assay showed type A influenza viruses were more susceptible to NAIs than type B viruses. The peramivir and laninamivir IC₅₀ values of both type A and B viruses were significantly lower than the oseltamivir and zanamivir IC₅₀ values. Among influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, the prevalence of H274Y viruses increased from 0% in the 2009-2010 season to 3% in the 2010-2011 season. These H274Y viruses were resistant to oseltamivir and peramivir with 200-300 fold increase in IC₅₀ values but remained sensitive to zanamivir and laninamivir. Other mutations in NA, such as I222T and M241I were identified among the outliers. Among influenza A(H3N2) viruses, two outliers were identified with D151G and T148I mutations, which exhibited a reduction in susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir, respectively. Among type B viruses, no outliers were identified to the four NAIs. For paired samples that were collected before and after drug treatment, three (3/11; 27.3%) H274Y viruses were identified among A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses after oseltamivir treatment but no outliers were found in the laninamivir-treatment group (n=3). Despite widespread use of

  3. [Clinical review of influenza (H1N1) 2009 detected in 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 flu season in Nara Prefecture].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Masaki; Uranishi, Yousuke; Okayama, Akiko

    2012-09-01

    This study is based on clinical information on 894 subjects diagnosed with influenza (H1N1) 2009 in Nara Prefecture from June 15, 2009, to March 4, 2010, and from July 9, 2010, to March 6, 2011. Clinical data for 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 was compared. Results showed that 43% of 2009-2010 subjects were 0-9 years old and 38% were 10-19 years old. They also showed that 25% of 2010-2011 0-9 years old, 20% 10-19 years old, 20% 20-29 years old and 16% 30-39 years old. Both seasons showed a high percentage of subjects 0-9 years old. Numbers of subjects aged 20-39 years old increased in 2010-2011. Results thus suggest that an age shift occurred in subjects, in Nara Prefecture. The most frequent symptom was fever, e.g., 38 degrees C, in 88%. Upper airway inflammation was seen in 68%, lower airway inflammation in 20% and gastroenteritis in 6%. Lower airway inflammation decreased from 20% in 2009-2010 to 7% in 2010-2011. Neuraminidase inhibitor was prescribed for 408 (46%) subjects, oseltamivir for 262 (63%), zanamivir for 120 (29%), peramivir for 10 (2.4%), and laninamivir for 12 (2.9%). Two neuraminidase inhibitors were prescribed for 11 subjects. Oseltamivir prescription rates were lower among subjects 10-19 years old, following guidelines for the use of antiinfluenza drugs. PMID:23198577

  4. Delayed norovirus epidemic in the 2009-2010 season in Japan: potential relationship with intensive hand sanitizer use for pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Inaida, S; Shobugawa, Y; Matsuno, S; Saito, R; Suzuki, H

    2016-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) epidemics normally peak in December in Japan; however, the peak in the 2009-2010 season was delayed until the fourth week of January 2010. We suspected intensive hand hygiene that was conducted for a previous pandemic influenza in 2009 as the cause of this delay. We analysed the NoV epidemic trend, based on national surveillance data, and its associations with monthly output data for hand hygiene products, including alcohol-based skin antiseptics and hand soap. The delayed peak in the NoV incidence in the 2009-2010 season had the lowest number of recorded cases of the five seasons studied (2006-2007 to 2010-2011). GII.4 was the most commonly occurring genotype. The monthly relative risk of NoV and monthly output of both alcohol-based skin antiseptics and hand soap were significantly and negatively correlated. Our findings suggest an association between hand hygiene using these products and prevention of NoV transmission. PMID:27301793

  5. Effectiveness of pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccine in preventing pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 infection in England and Scotland 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Hardelid, P; Fleming, D M; McMenamin, J; Andrews, N; Robertson, C; SebastianPillai, P; Ellis, J; Carman, W; Wreghitt, T; Watson, J M; Pebody, R G

    2011-01-01

    Following the global spread of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009, several pandemic vaccines have been rapidly developed. The United Kingdom and many other countries in the northern hemisphere implemented seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine programmes in October 2009. We present the results of a case–control study to estimate effectiveness of such vaccines in preventing confirmed pandemic influenza infection. Some 5,982 individuals with influenza-like illness seen in general practices between November 2009 and January 2010 were enrolled. Those testing positive on PCR for pandemic influenza were assigned as cases and those testing negative as controls. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as the relative reduction in odds of confirmed infection between vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals. Fourteen or more days after immunisation with the pandemic vaccine, adjusted vaccine effectiveness (VE) was 72% (95% confidence interval (CI): 21% to 90%). If protection was assumed to start after seven or more days, the adjusted VE was 71% (95% CI: 37% to 87%). Pandemic influenza vaccine was highly effective in preventing confirmed infection with pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 from one week after vaccination. No evidence of effectiveness against pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 was found for the 2009/10 trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (adjusted VE of -30% (95% CI: -89% to 11%)). PMID:21251487

  6. Effectiveness of vaccination with 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine in preventing hospitalization with laboratory confirmed influenza during the 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 seasons

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Angela; Castilla, Jesús; Godoy, Pere; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Saez, Marc; Soldevila, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Mayoral, José María; Martín, Vicente; Quintana, José María; González-Candelas, Fernando; Galán, Juan Carlos; Tamames, Sonia; Castro, Ady; Baricot, Maretva; Garín, Olatz; Pumarola, Tomas; Working Group (Spain), CIBERESP Cases and Controls in Pandemic Influenza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Since influenza predisposes to bacterial pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae, studies have suggested that pneumococcal vaccination might reduce its occurrence during pandemics. We assessed the effectiveness of pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination alone and in combination with influenza vaccination in preventing influenza hospitalization during the 2009–2010 pandemic wave and 2010–2011 influenza epidemic. Methods: We conducted a multicenter case-control study in 36 Spanish hospitals. We selected patients aged ≥ 18 y hospitalized with confirmed influenza and two hospitalized controls per case, matched according to age, date of hospitalization and province of residence. Multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. Subjects were considered vaccinated if they had received the pneumococcal or seasonal influenza vaccine > 14 d (or > 7 d for pandemic influenza vaccine) before the onset of symptoms (cases) or the onset of symptoms in matched cases (controls). Results: 1187 cases and 2328 controls were included. The adjusted estimate of effectiveness of pneumococcal vaccination in preventing influenza hospitalization was 41% (95% CI 8–62) in all patients and 43% (95% CI 2–78) in patients aged ≥ 65 y. The adjusted effectiveness of dual PPV23 and influenza vaccination was 81% (95% CI 65–90) in all patients and 76% (95% CI 46–90) in patients aged ≥ 65 y. The adjusted effectiveness of influenza vaccination alone was 58% (95% CI 38–72). Conclusions: In elderly people and adults with chronic illness, pneumococcal vaccination may reduce hospitalizations during the influenza season. In people vaccinated with both the influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, the benefit in hospitalizations avoided was greater than in those vaccinated only against influenza. PMID:23563516

  7. [Recommendations for the management of influenza in pediatrics (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Marès, J; Rodrigo, C; Moreno-Pérez, D; Cilleruelo, M J; Barrio, F; Buñuel, J C; González, M P; González de Dios, J; Aparicio, M; Arístegui, J; Hernández-Sampelayo, T

    2010-02-01

    Specific action plans from various institutions, governments and scientific societies have been identified and implemented to combat the A H1N1 2009 influenza virus pandemic. This document sets out the recommendations of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics for the management of influenza in children for influenza season 2009-2010. The risk factors for influenza A H1N1 2009 in pediatric patients, the clinical course, severity and complications are similar to seasonal influenza. In most cases, the diagnosis of influenza will be based on clinical suspicion, without viral subtype differentiation. In a patient with influenza virus infection, the criteria for referral and hospital admission will be based broadly on the signs of clinical severity or complications, regardless of the causative virus. Children with influenza but with no signs of clinical severity or complications do not require antiviral treatment. Physical measures of hygiene and isolation are essential to reduce the transmissibility of the disease. The influenza vaccines in infancy, for both seasonal influenza and for influenza A H1N1 2009, should be directed primarily at patients with risk factors. PMID:20133214

  8. Ethnicity, deprivation and mortality due to 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in England during the 2009/2010 pandemic and the first post-pandemic season.

    PubMed

    Zhao, H; Harris, R J; Ellis, J; Pebody, R G

    2015-12-01

    The relationship between risk of death following influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection and ethnicity and deprivation during the 2009/2010 pandemic period and the first post-pandemic season of 2010/2011 in England was examined. Poisson regression models were used to estimate the mortality risk, adjusted for age, gender, and place of residence. Those of non-White ethnicity experienced an increased mortality risk compared to White populations during the 2009/2010 pandemic [10·5/1000 vs. 6·0/1000 general population; adjusted risk ratio (RR) 1·84, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·39-2·54] with the highest risk in those of Pakistani ethnicity. However, no significant difference between ethnicities was observed during the following 2010/2011 season. Persons living in areas with the highest level of deprivation had a significantly higher risk of death (RR 2·08, 95% CI 1·49-2·91) compared to the lowest level for both periods. These results highlight the importance of rapid identification of groups at higher risk of severe disease in the early stages of future pandemics to enable the implementation of optimal prevention and control measures for vulnerable populations. PMID:25850904

  9. Influenza Surveillance and Incidence in a Rural Area in China during the 2009/2010 Influenza Pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Lin; Dong, Xiaochun; Kong, Mei; Gao, Lu; Dong, Xiaojing; Xu, Wenti

    2014-01-01

    Background Most influenza surveillance is based on data from urban sentinel hospitals; little is known about influenza activity in rural communities. We conducted influenza surveillance in a rural region of China with the aim of detecting influenza activity in the 2009/2010 influenza season. Methods The study was conducted from October 2009 to March 2010. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to confirm influenza cases. Over-the-counter (OTC) drug sales were daily collected in drugstores and hospitals/clinics. Space-time scan statistics were used to identify clusters of ILI in community. The incidence rate of ILI/influenza was estimated on the basis of the number of ILI/influenza cases detected by the hospitals/clinics. Results A total of 434 ILI cases (3.88% of all consultations) were reported; 64.71% of these cases were influenza A (H1N1) pdm09. The estimated incidence rate of ILI and influenza were 5.19/100 and 0.40/100, respectively. The numbers of ILI cases and OTC drug purchases in the previous 7 days were strongly correlated (Spearman rank correlation coefficient [r] = 0.620, P = 0.001). Four ILI outbreaks were detected by space-time permutation analysis. Conclusions This rural community surveillance detected influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 activity and outbreaks in the 2009/2010 influenza season and enabled estimation of the incidence rate of influenza. It also provides a scientific data for public health measures. PMID:25542003

  10. Costs of School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics in Maine during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Bo-Hyun; Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    This study retrospectively estimated costs for a convenience sample of school-located vaccination (SLV) clinics conducted in Maine during the 2009-2010 influenza season. Surveys were developed to capture the cost of labor including unpaid volunteers as well as supplies and materials used in SLV clinics. Six nurses from different school districts…

  11. System for rapid assessment of pneumonia and influenza-related mortality-Ohio, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Loren E; Paulson, John; Fowler, Brian; Duffy, Rosemary

    2015-02-01

    Rapid mortality surveillance is critical for state emergency preparedness. To enhance timeliness during the 2009-2010 influenza A H1N1 pandemic, the Ohio Department of Health activated a drop-down menu within Ohio's Electronic Death Registration System for reporting of pneumonia- or influenza-related deaths approximately 5 days postmortem. We used International Classification of Diseases-Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes, available 2-3 months postmortem as the standard, and assessed their agreement with drop-down-menu codes for pneumonia- or influenza-related deaths. Among 56 660 Ohio deaths during September 2009-March 2010, agreement was 97.9% for pneumonia (κ = 0.85) and 99.9% for influenza (κ = 0.79). Sensitivity was 80.2% for pneumonia and 73.9% for influenza. Drop-down menu coding enhanced timeliness while maintaining high agreement with ICD-10 codes. PMID:25521902

  12. Modeling Receipt of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Vaccinations among U.S. Children during the 2009-2010 Flu Season: Findings from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey

    PubMed Central

    Blackwell, Debra L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Using 32 weeks of data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey, factors associated with receipt of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccinations among U.S. children during October 2009 through February 2010 are examined. Methods Logistic models estimated receipt of first dose by January 1, 2010 for all children aged 4.5 months through 17 years and receipt of second dose by February 1, 2010 for children aged 6 months through 9 years who received a first dose, using demographic characteristics and measures of family structure, parental education, family income, access to health care, and chronic condition status. All analyses were weighted to yield nationally representative results for the U.S. child population. Results Receipt of a seasonal influenza vaccination in the 12 months prior to October 2009 as well as race/ethnicity, family structure, and various measures representing family socioeconomic status were statistically significant correlates of receipt of the first pH1N1 dose, while children’s asthma and chronic condition status were not. Conclusion In the event of future pandemics, public health officials may utilize these findings to target particular segments of the U.S. child population that may have been underserved during the 2009 influenza pandemic. PMID:25517073

  13. Effectiveness of the monovalent influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in Navarre, Spain, 2009-2010: cohort and case-control study.

    PubMed

    Castilla, Jesús; Morán, Julio; Martínez-Artola, Víctor; Fernández-Alonso, Mirian; Guevara, Marcela; Cenoz, Manuel García; Reina, Gabriel; Alvarez, Nerea; Arriazu, Maite; Elía, Fernando; Salcedo, Esther; Barricarte, Aurelio

    2011-08-11

    We defined a population-based cohort (596,755 subjects) in Navarre, Spain, using electronic records from physicians, to evaluate the effectiveness of the monovalent A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in preventing influenza in the 2009-2010 pandemic season. During the 9-week period of vaccine availability and circulation of the A(H1N1)2009 virus, 4608 cases of medically attended influenza-like illness (MA-ILI) were registered (46 per 1000 person-years). After adjustment for sociodemographic covariables, outpatient visits and major chronic conditions, vaccination was associated with a 32% (95% CI: 8-50%) reduction in the overall incidence of MA-ILI. In a test negative case-control analysis nested in the cohort, swabs from 633 patients were included, and 123 were confirmed for A(H1N1)2009 influenza. No confirmed case had received A(H1N1)2009 vaccine versus 9.6% of controls (p<0.001). The vaccine effectiveness in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza was 89% (95% CI: 36-100%) after adjusting for age, health care setting, major chronic conditions and period. Pandemic vaccine was effective in preventing MA-ILI and confirmed cases of influenza A(H1N1)2009 in the 2009-2010 season. PMID:21723358

  14. Technical Report for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators on CDC Guidance for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza during the 2009-2010 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This Technical Report includes detailed information on the reasons for the strategies presented in the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) "Guidance for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza During the 2009-2010 School Year" and suggestions on how to use them. The guidance is designed to decrease exposure to regular seasonal flu and 2009 H1N1 flu…

  15. Seasonal consumption of Hemimysis anomala by fish in southeastern Lake Ontario, 2009-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lantry, B.F.; Gumtow, C.F.; Walsh, M.G.; Weidel, B.C.; Boscarino, B.T.; Rudstam, L. G.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the seasonal occurrence of Hemimysis anomala in the diets of fish that prey on macroinvertebrates at two sites with established Hemimysis populations east of Oswego, NY, during 2009-2010. In 2009, we examined 320 stomachs from 10 species and found Hemimysis only in alewife (Alosa pseudoharengus), rockbass (Ambloplites rupestris), and yellow perch (Perca flavescens). Of those species, alewife consumed Hemimysis most frequently and it represented a greater proportion of their diets. During 2009, the dry weight composition of Hemimysis in alewife diets varied seasonally between <1% in June, 5% in July, 98.5% in August, and 18.8% in September. In contrast, we examined 667 stomachs from 15 species in 2010 and observed Hemimysis in only one alewife and two rockbass stomachs. For alewife from September 2009, we found no relationship between predator size and the number of Hemimysis consumed, or between the presence of Hemimysis in fish diets and the presence of other diet taxa or diet diversity. Fish diets collected as bycatch from other assessments revealed large numbers of Hemimysis in fishes that had not previously been observed consuming Hemimysis in Lake Ontario, including cisco (Coregonus artedi) and white perch (Morone americana). Our results indicate Hemimysis consumption by nearshore fish can be high, but that it is variable across seasons and years, and may be most prevalent in fish that feed up in the water column, at or near dark, and have the ability to consume swift moving prey like Mysis diluviana or small fish.

  16. 2010 Dry and 2009 - 2010 Wet Season Branchiopod Survey Report, Site 300

    SciTech Connect

    Dexter, W

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) requested that Condor Country Consulting, Inc. (CCCI) perform wet season surveys and manage the dry season sampling for listed branchiopods in two ponded locations within the Site 300 Experimental Test Site. Site 300 is located in Alameda and San Joaquin Counties, located between the Cities of Livermore and Tracy. The two pool locations have been identified for possible amphibian enhancement activities in support of the Compensation Plan for impacts tied to the Building 850 soil clean-up project. The Building 850 project design resulted in formal consultation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) as an amendment (File 81420-2009-F-0235) to the site-wide Biological Opinion (BO) (File 1-1-02-F-0062) in the spring of 2009 and requires mitigation for the California tiger salamander (AMCA, Ambystoma californiense) and California red-legged frog (CRLF, Rana draytonii) habitat loss. Both pools contain breeding AMCA, but do not produce metamorphs due to limited hydroperiod. The pool to the southeast (Pool BC-FS-2) is the preferred site for amphibian enhancement activities, and the wetland to northwest (Pool OA-FS-1) is the alternate location for enhancement. However, prior to enhancement, LLNL has been directed by USFWS (BO Conservation Measure 17 iii) to 'conduct USFWS protocol-level branchiopod surveys to determine whether listed brachiopod species are present within the compensation area.' CCCI conducted surveys for listed branchiopods in the 2009-2010 wet season to determine the presence of federally-listed branchiopods at the two pools (previous surveys with negative findings were performed by CCCI in 2001-2002 and 2002-2003 onsite). Surveys were conducted to partially satisfy the survey requirements of the USFWS 'Interim Survey Guidelines to Permittees for Recovery Permits under Section 10(a)(1)(A) of the Endangered Species Act for the Listed Vernal Pool Branchiopods' ('Guidelines, USFWS 1996 and BO Conservation

  17. Seroepidemiological study of pandemic influenza H1N1 following the 2009-2010 wave in Greece.

    PubMed

    Maltezou, Helena C; Katerelos, Panagiotis; Mavrouli, Maria; Lourida, Athanasia; Routsias, John G; Spanakis, Nicholas; Maragos, Antonios; Tedoma, Anastasia; Bassiakos, Yiannis; Koratzanis, Georgios; Mantagos, Stephanos; Metallidis, Simeon; Katragkou, Aspasia; Nikolaidis, Pavlos; Roilides, Emmanuel; Theodoridou, Maria; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of seroprevalence rates against 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus will assist vaccination recommendations and the preparation of the health-care system during subsequent years. This study was conducted in Greece during June-August 2010 to estimate the seroprevalence rate against pandemic H1N1 virus. Persons presenting in 29 health-care facilities across the country were studied. Seroprevalence was estimated employing a virus-free ELISA that specifically recognizes 2009 H1N1 virus antibodies in human sera. Sera collected from 2005 to April 2009 were also used to estimate pre-pandemic seroprevalence rates. A total of 954 persons were studied. The overall seroprevalence rate was 28.5% (95% confidence interval=25.6-31.3%). Age-specific rates were 34.2% in persons 0-4 years, 36.3% in persons 5-19 years, 25.0% in persons 20-39 years, 23.4% in persons 40-59 years, and 31.8% in persons ≥ 60 years. The highest rates were recorded in the Regions of Ionian Islands (67%) and Epirus (42.9%), while the lowest (8.4%) in the Region of Thessaly. Age-specific attack rates of infection during 2009-2010 were 28.8% in persons 0-4 years, 32.5% in persons 5-19 years, 14.3% in persons 20-39 years, 19.1% in persons 40-59 years, and 14.4% in persons ≥ 60 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that Region of residence and caring for children <5 years were associated with increased risk for seropositivity. Urbanity, personal and family characteristics, working in a health-care facility or in a school, history of pandemic H1N1 vaccination or history of influenza-like illness during 2009-2010 were not associated with increased risk for seropositivity. PMID:21762749

  18. Seasonal Influenza: An Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Christina; Freedman, Marian

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It also has major social and economic consequences in the form of high rates of absenteeism from school and work as well as significant treatment and hospitalization costs. In fact, annual influenza epidemics and the resulting deaths and lost days of productivity…

  19. Seasonal influenza: an overview.

    PubMed

    Li, Christina; Freedman, Marian

    2009-02-01

    Seasonal influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. It also has major social and economic consequences in the form of high rates of absenteeism from school and work as well as significant treatment and hospitalization costs. In fact, annual influenza epidemics and the resulting deaths and lost days of productivity are estimated to cost US$10.4 billion in direct medical expenses and US$16.4 billion in lost potential earnings. Given the enormous burden of seasonal influenza and the important role that school-age children play in the cycle of disease, school nurses need to be knowledgeable about all aspects of this condition, including its clinical course and how it is transmitted; the range of options for preventing and treating the disease; and steps that can be taken to improve the rates of immunization against influenza. School nurses also can help by making sure that they themselves are vaccinated in a timely manner. PMID:19197008

  20. Assessing Healthcare Utilization for Influenza-like Illness at an Emergency Department and a Student Health Service during the 2009-2010 H1N1 Pandemic.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Ruchi; Hartley, Tara A; Lindsley, William G; Fisher, Melanie A; Palmer, Jan E

    2013-01-01

    Estimates of healthcare utilization during an influenza pandemic are needed in order to plan for the allocation of staff and resources. The aim of this study was to assess the number, age, and arrival time of patients with influenza-like-illness (ILI), and associations between their symptoms during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of electronic health records from the student health service (SHS) and an emergency department (ED) in Morgantown, West Virginia, between January 2009 and December 2010. During the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, patient arrivals at SHS and ED varied over the week. SHS patients arrived early in the week and primarily in the afternoon. ED patient arrivals were more evenly distributed, with busier evenings and weekends. Those with fever were more likely to experience cough, sore throat, vomiting/nausea, chills, congestion, headache, and body-ache. These results can assist health professionals in preparing for an influenza pandemic. PMID:24847173

  1. Seasonal Influenza Epidemics and El Niños.

    PubMed

    Oluwole, Olusegun Steven Ayodele

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza epidemics occur annually during the winter in the northern and southern hemispheres, but timing of peaks and severity vary seasonally. Low humidity, which enhances survival and transmission of influenza virus, is the major risk factor. Both El Niño and La Niña phases of El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO), which determine inter-annual variation of precipitation, are putative risk factors. This study was done to determine if seasonality, timing of peak, and severity of influenza epidemics are coupled to phases of ENSO. Monthly time series of positive specimens for influenza viruses and of multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index from January 2000 to August 2015 were analyzed. Seasonality, wavelet spectra, and cross-wavelet spectra analyses were performed. Of 31 countries in the dataset, 21 were in the northern hemisphere and 10 in the southern hemisphere. The highest number of influenza cases occurred in January in the northern hemisphere, but in July in the southern hemisphere, p < 0.0001. Seasonal influenza epidemic was coupled to El Niño, while low occurrence was coupled to La Niña. The moderate La Niña of 2010-2011 was followed by weak seasonal influenza epidemic. The influenza pandemic of 2009-2010 followed the moderate El Niño of 2009-2010, which had three peaks. Spectrograms showed time-varying periodicities of 6-48 months for ENSO, 6-24 months for influenza in the northern hemisphere, and 6-12 months for influenza in the southern hemisphere. Cross spectrograms showed time-varying periodicities at 6-36 months for ENSO and influenza in both hemispheres, p < 0.0001. Phase plots showed that influenza time series lagged ENSO in both hemispheres. Severity of seasonal influenza increases during El Niño, but decreases during La Niña. Coupling of seasonality, timing, and severity of influenza epidemics to the strength and waveform of ENSO indicate that forecast models of El Niño should be integrated into

  2. Dynamics of carbonate chemistry, production, and calcification of the Florida Reef Tract (2009-2010): Evidence for seasonal dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehllehner, Nancy; Langdon, Chris; Venti, Alyson; Kadko, David

    2016-05-01

    Ocean acidification is projected to lower the Ωar of reefal waters by 0.3-0.4 units by the end of century, making it more difficult for calcifying organisms to secrete calcium carbonate while at the same time making the environment more favorable for abiotic and biotic dissolution of the reefal framework. There is great interest in being able to project the point in time when coral reefs will cross the tipping point between being net depositional to net erosional in terms of their carbonate budgets. Periodic in situ assessments of the balance between carbonate production and dissolution that spans seasonal time scales may prove useful in monitoring and formulating projections of the impact of ocean acidification on reefal carbonate production. This study represents the first broad-scale geochemical survey of the rates of net community production (NCP) and net community calcification (NCC) across the Florida Reef Tract (FRT). Surveys were performed at approximately quarterly intervals in 2009-2010 across seven onshore-offshore transects spanning the upper, middle, and lower Florida Keys. Averaged across the FRT, the rates of NCP and NCC were positive during the spring/summer at 62 ± 7 and 17 ± 2 mmol m-2 d-1, respectively, and negative during the fall/winter at -33 ± 6 and -7 ± 2 mmol m-2 d-1. The most significant finding of the study was that the northernmost reef is already net erosional (-1.1 ± 0.4 kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1) and midreefs to the south were net depositional on an annual basis (0.4 ± 0.1 kg CaCO3 m-2 yr-1) but erosional during the fall and winter. Only the two southernmost reefs were net depositional year-round. These results indicate that parts of the FRT have already crossed the tipping point for carbonate production and other parts are getting close.

  3. Clinical aspects of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 cases reported during the pandemic in Brazil, 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Érika Valeska; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe the clinical aspects of cases of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in Brazil. Methods: A descriptive study of cases reported in Sistema de Informação de Agravos de Notificação (SINAN), 2009-2010. Results: As the final classification, we obtained 53,797 (56.79%) reported cases confirmed as a new influenza virus subtype, and 40,926 (43.21%) cases discarded. Fever was the most common sign, recorded in 99.74% of the confirmed and 98.92% of the discarded cases. Among the confirmed cases, the presence of comorbidities was reported in 32.53%, and in 38.29% of the discarded cases. The case fatality rate was 4.04%; 3,267 pregnant women were confirmed positive for influenza A new viral subtype and 2,730 of them were cured. The case fatality rate of pregnant women was 6.88%. Conclusion: The findings suggested concern of the health system with pregnant women, and patients with comorbidities and quality of care may have favored a lower mortality. We recommend that, when caring for patients with severe respiratory symptoms, with comorbidities, or pregnant women, health professionals should consider the need for hospital care, as these factors make up a worse prognosis of infection by the pandemic influenza virus. PMID:26154537

  4. [Antibacterial susceptibility surveillance of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from pediatric patients in Gifu and Aichi prefectures (2009-2010)].

    PubMed

    Takakura, Mariko; Fukuda, Yoshiko; Nomura, Nobuhiko; Mitsuyama, Junichi; Yamaoka, Kazukiyo; Asano, Yuko; Sawamura, Haruki; Katsuragawa, Kouichi; Hashido, Hikonori; Matsukawa, Yoko; Matsubara, Shigenori; Oota, Hirotoshi; Watanabe, Kunitomo; Yamagishi, Yuka; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the susceptibility to antibacterial agents of 197 strains of Haemophilus influenzae isolated from pediatric patients at medical facilities in Gifu and Aichi prefectures between 2009 and 2010. Those strains were also examined for the mutations of ftsI coding for penicillin-binding protein 3, presence of bla TEM-1, serotype and beta-lactamase producing ability. Among the 197 strains, the most prevalent serotype was non-typeable (89.8%), followed by serotype b (8.1%), e (1.5%) and f (0.5%). Based on the susceptibility among the 197 strains to antibacterial agents, beta-lactamase nonproducing ampicillin-susceptible H. influenzae (BLNAS) accounted for 27.4%, beta-lactamase nonproducing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae (BLNAR) for 62.4%, beta-lactamase producing ampicillin-resistant H. influenzae (BLPAR) for 6.1% and beta-lactamase producing amoxicillin/ clavulanic acid-resistant H. influenzae (BLPACR) for 4.1%. According to PCR-based genotyping, the strains were classified into 6 categories: gBLNAS, gLow-BLNAR, gBLNAR, gBLPAR, gBLPACR-I and gBLPACR-II. The incidences of each resistant class were 17.3% for gBLNAS, 6.6% for gLow-BLNAR, 66.0% for gBLNAR, 5.6% for gBLPAR and 4.6% for gBLPACR-II. The combined incidence of gLow-BLNAR and gBLNAR was 72.6%, which was higher than that of BLNAR (62.4%). The MIC90s of antibacterial agents against the 197 strains were as follows; 0.0156 microg/mL for tosufloxacin and garenoxacin, 0.0313 microg/mL for levofloxacin and pazufloxacin, 0.0625 microg/mL for norfloxacin, 0.25 microg/mL for tazobactam/piperacillin (TAZ/PIPC) and ceftriaxone, 0.5 microg/mL for TAZ/PIPC (1:8) and cefditoren, 1 microg/mL for piperacillin, cefteram, cefotaxime, meropenem, tebipenem and minocycline, 2 microg/mL for doripenem, 4 microg/mL for cefcapene, imipenem and azithromycin, 8 microg/mL for sulbactam/ampicillin, clavulanic acid/amoxicillin (1:2, CVA/AMPC) and cefdinir, 16 microg/mL for CVA/AMPC (1:14), flomoxef and clarithromycin, 32

  5. Individual Vaccination as Nash Equilibrium in a SIR Model with Application to the 2009-2010 Influenza A (H1N1) Epidemic in France.

    PubMed

    Laguzet, Laetitia; Turinici, Gabriel

    2015-10-01

    The vaccination against ongoing epidemics is seldom compulsory but remains one of the most classical means to fight epidemic propagation. However, recent debates concerning the innocuity of vaccines and their risk with respect to the risk of the epidemic itself lead to severe vaccination campaign failures, and new mass behaviors appeared driven by individual self-interest. Prompted by this context, we analyze, in a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model, whether egocentric individuals can reach an equilibrium with the rest of the society. Using techniques from the "Mean Field Games" theory, we extend previous results and show that an equilibrium exists and characterizes completely the individual best vaccination strategy (with or without discounting). We also compare with a strategy based only on overall societal optimization and exhibit a situation with nonnegative price of anarchy. Finally, we apply the theory to the 2009-2010 Influenza A (H1N1) vaccination campaign in France and hint that a group of individuals stopped vaccinating at levels that indicated a pessimistic perception of the risk of the vaccine. PMID:26443437

  6. Pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 in hospitals and intensive care units – results from a new hospital surveillance, Germany 2009/2010

    PubMed Central

    Adlhoch, Cornelia; Wadl, Maria; Behnke, Michael; Peña Diaz, Luis Alberto; Clausmeyer, Jörg; Eckmanns, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Adlhoch et al. (2012) Pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 in hospitals and intensive care units – results from a new hospital surveillance, Germany 2009/2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(601), e162–e168. Objectives  The pandemic influenza A(H1)pdm09 (PI) was introduced to Germany in April 2009. The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) implemented a nationwide voluntary hospital sentinel surveillance for to assess the burden and severity of PI. Setting  Three modules were offered: a hospital module collected aggregated data from all hospital units on admissions and fatalities with and without PI; an intensive care module data on admissions, patient‐days, and ventilated patient‐days with and without PI; and a case‐based module retrieved clinical patient data of PI cases. A in‐patient with a PCR confirmation was defined as a PI case. Descriptive, trend, uni‐, and multivariable analysis were performed. Results  Between week 49/2009 and 13/2010, the hospitals reported 103 (0·07%) PI cases among 159 181 admissions and 59/16 728 (0·35%) PI‐related admissions in intensive care units (ICUs). The weekly average incidence decreased in hospitals by 21·5% and in ICUs by 19·2%. In ICUs, 1848/85 559 (2·2%) patient‐days were PI‐related, 94·8% of those with mechanical ventilation. Case‐based data on 43 recovered and 16 fatal PI cases were reported. Among recovered, 61% were admitted to ICUs, 51% were mechanically ventilated, and 16% received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). All fatal cases were admitted to ICUs and received mechanical ventilation, 75% ECMO. Fatal outcome was rather associated with complications than with underlying medical conditions. Conclusion  The surveillance started shortly after the PI peak, which explains the small number of PI cases. The burden of PI disease was low, but higher in ICUs with a high proportion of severe cases needing ventilation and ECMO treatment. A continuous

  7. Sociodemographic factors and clinical conditions associated to hospitalization in influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus infected patients in Spain, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    González-Candelas, Fernando; Astray, Jenaro; Alonso, Jordi; Castro, Ady; Cantón, Rafael; Galán, Juan Carlos; Garin, Olatz; Sáez, Marc; Soldevila, Nuria; Baricot, Maretva; Castilla, Jesús; Godoy, Pere; Delgado-Rodríguez, Miguel; Martín, Vicente; Mayoral, José María; Pumarola, Tomás; Quintana, José María; Tamames, Sonia; Domínguez, Angela

    2012-01-01

    The emergence and pandemic spread of a new strain of influenza A (H1N1) virus in 2009 resulted in a serious alarm in clinical and public health services all over the world. One distinguishing feature of this new influenza pandemic was the different profile of hospitalized patients compared to those from traditional seasonal influenza infections. Our goal was to analyze sociodemographic and clinical factors associated to hospitalization following infection by influenza A(H1N1) virus. We report the results of a Spanish nationwide study with laboratory confirmed infection by the new pandemic virus in a case-control design based on hospitalized patients. The main risk factors for hospitalization of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 were determined to be obesity (BMI≥40, with an odds-ratio [OR] 14.27), hematological neoplasia (OR 10.71), chronic heart disease, COPD (OR 5.16) and neurological disease, among the clinical conditions, whereas low education level and some ethnic backgrounds (Gypsies and Amerinds) were the sociodemographic variables found associated to hospitalization. The presence of any clinical condition of moderate risk almost triples the risk of hospitalization (OR 2.88) and high risk conditions raise this value markedly (OR 6.43). The risk of hospitalization increased proportionally when for two (OR 2.08) or for three or more (OR 4.86) risk factors were simultaneously present in the same patient. These findings should be considered when a new influenza virus appears in the human population. PMID:22412995

  8. Coastal ocean variability in the US Pacific Northwest region: seasonal patterns, winter circulation, and the influence of the 2009-2010 El Niño

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durski, Scott M.; Kurapov, Alexander L.; Allen, John S.; Kosro, P. Michael; Egbert, Gary D.; Shearman, R. Kipp; Barth, John A.

    2015-12-01

    A 2-km horizontal resolution ocean circulation model is developed for a large coastal region along the US Pacific Northwest (34-50N) to study how continental shelf, slope, and interior ocean variability influence each other. The model has been run for the time period September 2008-May 2011, driven by realistic surface momentum and heat fluxes obtained from an atmospheric model and lateral boundary conditions obtained from nesting in a global ocean model. The solution compares favorably to satellite measurements of sea surface temperature and sea surface height, observations of surface currents by high-frequency radars, mooring temperature time series, and glider temperature and salinity sections. The analysis is focused on the seasonal response of the coastal ocean with particular emphasis on the winter circulation patterns which have previously garnered relatively little attention. Interannual variability is examined through a comparison of the 2009-2010 winter influenced by El Niño and the winters in the preceding and following years. Strong northward winds combined with reduced surface cooling along the coast north of Cape Mendocino (40.4N) in winter 2009-2010, resulting in a vigorous downwelling season, characterized by relatively energetic northward currents and warmer ocean temperatures over the continental shelf and upper slope. An analysis of the time variability of the volume-averaged temperature and salinity in a coastal control volume (CV), that extends from 41 to 47N and offshore from the coast to the 200-m isobath, clearly shows relevant integrated characteristics of the annual cycle and the transitions between winter shelf circulation forced by northward winds and the summer circulation driven primarily by southward, upwelling-favorable winds. The analysis also reveals interesting interannual differences in these characteristics. In particular, the CV volume-average temperature remains notably warmer during January-March 2010 of the El Niño winter.

  9. CDC Guidance for State and Local Public Health Officials and School Administrators for School (K-12) Responses to Influenza during the 2009-2010 School Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides guidance to help decrease the spread of flu among students and school staff during the 2009-2010 school year. This document expands upon earlier school guidance documents by providing a menu of tools that school and health officials can choose from based on conditions in their area. It recommends actions to take this school…

  10. GFS water vapor forecast error evaluated over the 2009-2010 West Coast cool season using the MET/MODE object analyses package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, W. L.; Sukovich, E.; Tollerud, E. I.; Jensen, T.; Yuan, H.; Wick, G. A.; Bullock, R.; Hmt-Dtc Collaboration Project

    2010-12-01

    Research over the last decade and a half confirms that the vast majority of West Coast cool-season extreme precipitation events are due to the landfall of intense wind-driven streams of concentrated water vapor associated with extratropical cyclones called atmospheric rivers (ARs). Accurate prediction of the effects of ARs as they come ashore depends on accurate numeric modeling of integrated water vapor (IWV) over the Northeast Pacific (NEP). Quantifying the uncertainty in this forecast field is an important step toward understanding the causes of uncertainty in West Coast extreme event forecasts. To this end GFS (Global Forecast System) model output obtained in real time of the fields needed to calculate IWV were archived and analyzed. GFS was used because it is well known, it covers our area of interest, and the output is readily available to the community. To estimate forecast uncertainties we used an object-based method that allows quantitative comparisons of object location, size, shape, and intensity. In particular, we used MODE, the Method for Object-based Diagnostic Evaluation. MODE is an object-based verification tool from the MET (Model Evaluation Tools) package developed and supported by the Developmental Testbed Center (DTC). This package of verification tools is readily available and intended to provide the community with a common software package incorporating the latest advances in forecast verification. We describe results from two studies conducted as part of the Hydrometeorology Testbed (HMT)—DTC collaboration project. The studies are based upon Northeast Pacific (NEP) data collected during the 2009-2010 cool season. In the first study we focus on verifying GFS-analysis IWV against satellite-observed IWV throughout the NEP. Specifically, IWV GFS analysis objects are compared with 12-hour composite, satellite-derived Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) observational objects. Then we incorporate MODE object attributes related to object

  11. Influenza vaccination coverage against seasonal and pandemic influenza and their determinants in France: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Following the emergence of the influenza A(H1N1)2009 virus, the French ministry of health decided to offer free vaccination against pandemic influenza to the entire French population. Groups of people were defined and prioritised for vaccination. Methods We took a random sample of the population of mainland France and conducted a retrospective cross-sectional telephone survey to estimate vaccination coverage against seasonal and pandemic influenza and to identify determinants of these vaccinations. Results 10,091 people were included in the survey. Overall seasonal influenza vaccination coverage (IVC) remained stable in the population from the 2008-2009 season to the 2009-2010 season reaching 20.6% and 20.8% respectively. Overall pandemic IVC in the French population is estimated to be 11.1% (CI95%: 9.8 - 12.4). The highest pandemic IVC was observed in the 0-4 years age group. For individuals with health conditions associated with higher risk of influenza, pandemic IVC was estimated to be 12.2% (CI95%: 9.8 - 15.1). The main determinants associated with pandemic influenza vaccine uptake were: living in a household with a child < 5 years ORadj: 2.0 (CI95%: 1.3 - 3.1) or with two children < 5 years or more, ORadj: 2.7 (CI95%: 1.4 - 5.1), living in a household where the head of the family is university graduate (>2 years), ORadj: 2.5 (CI95%: 1.5 - 4.1), or has a higher professional and managerial occupation, ORadj: 3.0 (CI95%: 1.5 - 5.5) and being vaccinated against seasonal influenza, ORadj: 7.1 (CI95%: 5.1 - 10.0). Being an individual with higher risk for influenza was not a determinant for pandemic influenza vaccine uptake. These determinants are not the same as those for seasonal influenza vaccination. Conclusions Overall A(H1N1)2009 influenza vaccine uptake remained low, particularly among individuals with higher risk for influenza and was lower than that observed for seasonal influenza. The reasons behind people's reluctance to be vaccinated need to be

  12. Global Seasonal Influenza Epidemics and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamerius, James

    2013-04-01

    Recent evidence suggests that low specific humidity conditions facilitate the transmission of the influenza virus in temperate regions and result in annual winter epidemics. However, this relationship does not account for the epidemiology of influenza in tropical and subtropical regions where epidemics often occur during the rainy season or transmit year-round without a well-defined season. We assessed the role of specific humidity and other local climatic variables on influenza virus seasonality by modeling epidemiological and climatic information from 78 study sites sampled globally. We substantiated that there are two types of environmental conditions associated with seasonal influenza epidemics: "cold-dry" and "humid-rainy". For sites where monthly average specific humidity or temperature decreases below thresholds of approximately 11-12 g/kg and 18-21 °C during the year, influenza activity peaks during the cold-dry season (i.e., winter) when specific humidity and temperature are at minimal levels. For sites where specific humidity and temperature do not decrease below these thresholds, seasonal influenza activity is more likely to peak in months when average precipitation totals are maximal and greater than 150 mm per month. Based on these findings, we develop Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered-Susceptible (SEIRS) models forced by daily weather observations of specific humidity and precipitation that simulate the diversity of seasonal influenza signals worldwide.

  13. Selecting Viruses for the Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... which viruses are selected for use in vaccine production? The influenza viruses in the seasonal flu vaccine ... to get a good vaccine virus for vaccine production? There are a number of factors that can ...

  14. Clinical predictors of disease severity during the 2009-2010 A(HIN1) influenza virus pandemic in a paediatric population.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M N; Philpott, D C; Murray, K O; Ontiveros, A; Revell, P A; Chandramohan, L; Munoz, F M

    2015-10-01

    A novel influenza virus emerged in the United States in spring 2009, rapidly becoming a global pandemic. Children were disproportionally affected by the novel influenza A(H1N1) pandemic virus [A(H1N1)pdm]. This retrospective electronic medical record review study aimed to identify clinical predictors of disease severity of influenza A(HIN1)pdm infection in paediatric patients. Disease severity was defined on an increasing three-level scale from non-hospitalized, hospitalized, and admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). From April 2009 to June 2010, 696 children presented to Texas Children's Hospital's emergency department, 38% were hospitalized, and 17% were admitted to the ICU. Presenting symptoms associated with severe influenza were dyspnoea [odds ratio (OR) 5·82], tachycardia (OR 2·61) and fatigue (OR 1·96). Pre-existing health conditions associated with disease severity included seizure disorder (OR 4·71), obesity (OR 3·28), lung disease (OR 2·84), premature birth (OR 2·53), haematological disease (OR 2·22), and developmental delay (OR 2·20). According to model fitness tests, presenting symptoms were more likely to predict severe influenza than underlying medical conditions. However, both are important risk factors. Recognition of clinical characteristics associated with severe disease can be used for triaging case management of children during future influenza outbreaks. PMID:25640583

  15. [Database linkage for surveillance of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic in Brazil, 2009-2010].

    PubMed

    Rossetto, Erika Valeska; Luna, Expedito José de Albuquerque

    2016-07-21

    Based on database linkage, the objective of this study was to describe the epidemiological profile of notified cases and deaths from the new viral subtype of influenza during the influenza pandemic. Secondary data were used from the SINAN (Information System for Notifiable Diseases) and SIM (Mortality Information System) for the years 2009 and 2010. Linkage identified 5,973 deaths of cases notified as pandemic influenza. Of these, 2,170 (36.33%) had been classified in the SINAN as confirmed pandemic influenza, 215 (3.6%) as due to other infectious agents, and 3,340 (55.92%) as ruled out. After linkage, some cases in the SINAN database that were closed as death from influenza (n = 658) or death from other causes (n = 847) could not be located in the SIM database. Database linkage can improve the surveillance system and monitoring of morbidity and mortality. We recommend strengthening influenza surveillance in Brazil using linkage of Ministry of Health databases. PMID:27462844

  16. Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Planning Template for Primary Care Offices

    SciTech Connect

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    The Abbreviated Pandemic Influenza Plan Template for Primary Care Provider Offices is intended to assist primary care providers and office managers with preparing their offices for quickly putting a plan in place to handle an increase in patient calls and visits, whether during the 2009-2010 influenza season or future influenza seasons.

  17. Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza: Therapeutic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Memoli, Matthew J.; Morens, David M.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2008-01-01

    Influenza A viruses cause significant morbidity and mortality annually, and the threat of a pandemic underscores the need for new therapeutic strategies. Here we briefly discuss novel antiviral agents under investigation, the limitations of current antiviral therapy and stress the importance of secondary bacterial infections in seasonal and pandemic influenza. Additionally, the lack of new antibiotics available to treat increasingly drug resistant organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, pneumococci, Acinetobacter, extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing gram negative bacteria and Clostridium difficile is highlighted as an important component of influenza treatment and pandemic preparedness. Addressing these problems will require a multidisciplinary approach, which includes the development of novel antivirals and new antibiotics, as well as a better understanding of the role secondary infections play on the morbidity and mortality due to influenza infection. PMID:18598914

  18. Vaccines for seasonal and pandemic influenza.

    PubMed

    Nichol, Kristin L; Treanor, John J

    2006-11-01

    Seasonal influenza continues to have a huge annual impact in the United States, accounting for tens of millions of illnesses, hundreds of thousands of excess hospitalizations, and tens of thousands of excess deaths. Vaccination remains the mainstay for the prevention of influenza. In the United States, 2 types of influenza vaccine are currently licensed: trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine and live attenuated influenza vaccine. Both are safe and effective in the populations for which they are approved for use. Children, adults <65 years of age, and the elderly all receive substantial health benefits from vaccination. In addition, vaccination appears to be cost-effective, if not cost saving, across the age spectrum. Despite long-standing recommendations for the routine vaccination of persons in high-priority groups, US vaccination rates remain too low across all age groups. Important issues to be addressed include improving vaccine delivery to current and expanded target groups, ensuring timely availability of adequate vaccine supply, and development of even more effective vaccines. Development of a vaccine against potentially pandemic strains is an essential part of the strategy to control and prevent a pandemic outbreak. The use of existing technologies for influenza vaccine production would be the most straightforward approach, because these technologies are commercially available and licensing would be relatively simple. Approaches currently being tested include subvirion inactivated vaccines and cold-adapted, live attenuated vaccines. Preliminary results have suggested that, for some pandemic antigens, particularly H5, subvirion inactivated vaccines are poorly immunogenic, for reasons that are not clear. Data from evaluation of live pandemic vaccines are pending. Second-generation approaches designed to provide improved immune responses at lower doses have focused on adjuvants such as alum and MF59, which are currently licensed for influenza or other

  19. Recruiting Trends, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collegiate Employment Research Institute (NJ3), 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the recruiting trends for 2009-2010. This year's report is based on over 2,500 respondents, of which approximately 2,259 provided useable information with 1,846 including complete hiring figures used for the projections. The researchers continued their focus on fast-growth companies and expanded their efforts to ensure a…

  20. 'Rhyme or reason?' Saying no to mass vaccination: subjective re-interpretation in the context of the A(H1N1) influenza pandemic in Sweden 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Lundgren, Britta

    2015-12-01

    During the swine flu pandemic of 2009-2010, all Swedish citizens were recommended to be vaccinated with the influenza vaccine Pandemrix. However, a very serious and unexpected side effect emerged during the summer of 2010: more than 200 children and young adults were diagnosed with narcolepsy after vaccination. Besides the tragic outcome for these children and their families, this adverse side effect suggests future difficulties in obtaining trust in vaccination in cases of emerging pandemics, and thus there is a growing need to find ways to understand the complexities of vaccination decision processes. This article explores written responses to a questionnaire from a Swedish folk life archive as an unconventional source for analysing vaccine decisions. The aim is to investigate how laypersons responded to and re-interpreted the message about the recommended vaccination in their answers. The answers show the confusion and complex circumstances and influences in everyday life that people reflect on when making such important decisions. The issue of confusion is traced back to the initial communications about the vaccination intervention in which both autonomy and solidarity were expected from the population. Common narratives and stories about the media or 'big pharma capitalism' are entangled with private memories, accidental coincidences and serendipitous associations. It is obvious that vaccination interventions that require compliance from large groups of people need to take into account the kind of personal experience narratives that are produced by the complex interplay of the factors described by the informants. PMID:26077985

  1. Absolute Humidity and the Seasonality of Influenza (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.; Pitzer, V.; Viboud, C.; Grenfell, B.; Goldstein, E.; Lipsitch, M.

    2010-12-01

    Much of the observed wintertime increase of mortality in temperate regions is attributed to seasonal influenza. A recent re-analysis of laboratory experiments indicates that absolute humidity strongly modulates the airborne survival and transmission of the influenza virus. Here we show that the onset of increased wintertime influenza-related mortality in the United States is associated with anomalously low absolute humidity levels during the prior weeks. We then use an epidemiological model, in which observed absolute humidity conditions temper influenza transmission rates, to successfully simulate the seasonal cycle of observed influenza-related mortality. The model results indicate that direct modulation of influenza transmissibility by absolute humidity alone is sufficient to produce this observed seasonality. These findings provide epidemiological support for the hypothesis that absolute humidity drives seasonal variations of influenza transmission in temperate regions. In addition, we show that variations of the basic and effective reproductive numbers for influenza, caused by seasonal changes in absolute humidity, are consistent with the general timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks observed for 2009 A/H1N1 in temperate regions. Indeed, absolute humidity conditions correctly identify the region of the United States vulnerable to a third, wintertime wave of pandemic influenza. These findings suggest that the timing of pandemic influenza outbreaks is controlled by a combination of absolute humidity conditions, levels of susceptibility and changes in population mixing and contact rates.

  2. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination during pregnancy in preventing influenza infection in infants, England, 2013/14.

    PubMed

    Dabrera, G; Zhao, H; Andrews, N; Begum, F; Green, Hk; Ellis, J; Elias, K; Donati, M; Zambon, M; Pebody, R

    2014-01-01

    In this study we used the screening method to estimate the effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination during pregnancy in preventing influenza virus infection and influenza-related hospitalisation in infants under six months, in England in the 2013/14 season. Seasonal influenza vaccination in pregnancy was 71% (95% CI: 24–89%) effective in preventing infant influenza virus infection and 64% (95% CI: 6–86%) effective in preventing infant influenza hospitalisation, and should be recommended in pregnancy. PMID:25411687

  3. Identification of oseltamivir resistance among pandemic and seasonal influenza A (H1N1) viruses by an His275Tyr genotyping assay using the cycling probe method.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasushi; Saito, Reiko; Sato, Isamu; Zaraket, Hassan; Nishikawa, Makoto; Tamura, Tsutomu; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Takako; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors are agents used against influenza viruses; however, the emergence of drug-resistant strains is a major concern. Recently, the prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) virus increased globally and the emergence of oseltamivir-resistant pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses was reported. In this study, we developed a cycling probe real-time PCR method for the detection of oseltamivir-resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) and pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses. We designed two sets of primers and probes that were labeled with 6-carboxyfluorescein or 6-carboxy-X-rhodamine to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that correspond to a histidine and a tyrosine at position 275 in the neuraminidase protein, respectively. These SNPs confer susceptibility and resistance to oseltamivir, respectively. In the 2007-2008 season, the prevalence of oseltamivir-resistant H1N1 viruses was 0% (0/72), but in the 2008-2009 season, it increased to 100% (282/282). In the 2009-2010 season, all of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses were susceptible to oseltamivir (0/73, 0%). This method is sensitive and specific for the screening of oseltamivir-resistant influenza A (H1N1) viruses. This method is applicable to routine laboratory-based monitoring of drug resistance and patient management during antiviral therapy. PMID:21084523

  4. Barriers to pandemic influenza vaccination and uptake of seasonal influenza vaccine in the post-pandemic season in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Germany, annual vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended for certain target groups (e.g. persons aged ≥60 years, chronically ill persons, healthcare workers (HCW)). In season 2009/10, vaccination against pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, which was controversially discussed in the public, was recommended for the whole population. The objectives of this study were to assess vaccination coverage for seasonal (seasons 2008/09-2010/11) and pandemic influenza (season 2009/10), to identify predictors of and barriers to pandemic vaccine uptake and whether the controversial discussions on pandemic vaccination has had a negative impact on seasonal influenza vaccine uptake in Germany. Methods We analysed data from the ‘German Health Update’ (GEDA10) telephone survey (n=22,050) and a smaller GEDA10-follow-up survey (n=2,493), which were both representative of the general population aged ≥18 years living in Germany. Results Overall only 8.8% of the adult population in Germany received a vaccination against pandemic influenza. High socioeconomic status, having received a seasonal influenza shot in the previous season, and belonging to a target group for seasonal influenza vaccination were independently associated with the uptake of pandemic vaccines. The main reasons for not receiving a pandemic vaccination were ‘fear of side effects’ and the opinion that ‘vaccination was not necessary’. Seasonal influenza vaccine uptake in the pre-pandemic season 2008/09 was 52.8% among persons aged ≥60 years; 30.5% among HCW, and 43.3% among chronically ill persons. A decrease in vaccination coverage was observed across all target groups in the first post-pandemic season 2010/11 (50.6%, 25.8%, and 41.0% vaccination coverage, respectively). Conclusions Seasonal influenza vaccination coverage in Germany remains in all target groups below 75%, which is a declared goal of the European Union. Our results suggest that controversial public discussions about

  5. Age-specific vaccine effectiveness of seasonal 2010/2011 and pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 vaccines in preventing influenza in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Pebody, R G; Andrews, N; Fleming, D M; McMenamin, J; Cottrell, S; Smyth, B; Durnall, H; Robertson, C; Carman, W; Ellis, J; Sebastian-Pillai, P; Zambon, M; Kearns, C; Moore, C; Thomas, D Rh; Watson, J M

    2013-03-01

    An analysis was undertaken to measure age-specific vaccine effectiveness (VE) of 2010/11 trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV) and monovalent 2009 pandemic influenza vaccine (PIV) administered in 2009/2010. The test-negative case-control study design was employed based on patients consulting primary care. Overall TIV effectiveness, adjusted for age and month, against confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm 2009 infection was 56% (95% CI 42-66); age-specific adjusted VE was 87% (95% CI 45-97) in <5-year-olds and 84% (95% CI 27-97) in 5- to 14-year-olds. Adjusted VE for PIV was only 28% (95% CI -6 to 51) overall and 72% (95% CI 15-91) in <5-year-olds. For confirmed influenza B infection, TIV effectiveness was 57% (95% CI 42-68) and in 5- to 14-year-olds 75% (95% CI 32-91). TIV provided moderate protection against the main circulating strains in 2010/2011, with higher protection in children. PIV administered during the previous season provided residual protection after 1 year, particularly in the <5 years age group. PMID:22691710

  6. Seasonal Influenza Epidemics and El Niños

    PubMed Central

    Oluwole, Olusegun Steven Ayodele

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza epidemics occur annually during the winter in the northern and southern hemispheres, but timing of peaks and severity vary seasonally. Low humidity, which enhances survival and transmission of influenza virus, is the major risk factor. Both El Niño and La Niña phases of El Niño-southern oscillation (ENSO), which determine inter-annual variation of precipitation, are putative risk factors. This study was done to determine if seasonality, timing of peak, and severity of influenza epidemics are coupled to phases of ENSO. Monthly time series of positive specimens for influenza viruses and of multivariate El Niño-Southern Oscillation Index from January 2000 to August 2015 were analyzed. Seasonality, wavelet spectra, and cross-wavelet spectra analyses were performed. Of 31 countries in the dataset, 21 were in the northern hemisphere and 10 in the southern hemisphere. The highest number of influenza cases occurred in January in the northern hemisphere, but in July in the southern hemisphere, p < 0.0001. Seasonal influenza epidemic was coupled to El Niño, while low occurrence was coupled to La Niña. The moderate La Niña of 2010–2011 was followed by weak seasonal influenza epidemic. The influenza pandemic of 2009–2010 followed the moderate El Niño of 2009–2010, which had three peaks. Spectrograms showed time-varying periodicities of 6–48 months for ENSO, 6–24 months for influenza in the northern hemisphere, and 6–12 months for influenza in the southern hemisphere. Cross spectrograms showed time-varying periodicities at 6–36 months for ENSO and influenza in both hemispheres, p < 0.0001. Phase plots showed that influenza time series lagged ENSO in both hemispheres. Severity of seasonal influenza increases during El Niño, but decreases during La Niña. Coupling of seasonality, timing, and severity of influenza epidemics to the strength and waveform of ENSO indicate that forecast models of El Niño should be integrated

  7. Antigenic Distance Measurements for Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Selection

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhipeng; Zhang, Tong; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is one of the major options to counteract the effects of influenza diseases. Selection of an effective vaccine strain is the key to the success of an effective vaccination program since vaccine protection can only be achieved when the selected influenza vaccine strain matches the antigenic variants causing future outbreaks. Identification of an antigenic variant is the first step to determine whether vaccine strain needs to be updated. Antigenic distance derived from immunological assays, such as hemagglutination inhibition, is commonly used to measure the antigenic closeness between circulating strains and the current influenza vaccine strain. Thus, consensus on an explicit and robust antigenic distance measurement is critical in influenza surveillance. Based on the current seasonal influenza surveillance procedure, we propose and compare three antigenic distance measurements, including Average antigenic distance (A-distance), Mutual antigenic distance (M-distance), and Largest antigenic distance (L-distance). With the assistance of influenza antigenic cartography, our simulation results demonstrated that M-distance is a robust influenza antigenic distance measurement. Experimental results on both simulation and seasonal influenza surveillance data demonstrate that M-distance can be effectively utilized in influenza vaccine strain selection. PMID:22063385

  8. Economic benefits of inactivated influenza vaccines in the prevention of seasonal influenza in children

    PubMed Central

    Salleras, Luis; Navas, Encarna; Torner, Nuria; Prat, Andreu A.; Garrido, Patricio; Soldevila, Núria; Domínguez, Angela

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review published studies that evaluated the efficiency of inactivated influenza vaccination in preventing seasonal influenza in children. The vaccine evaluated was the influenza-inactivated vaccine in 10 studies and the virosomal inactivated vaccine in 3 studies. The results show that yearly vaccination of children with the inactivated influenza vaccine saves money from the societal and family perspectives but not from the public or private provider perspective. When vaccination does not save money, the cost-effectiveness ratios were very acceptable. It can be concluded, that inactivated influenza vaccination of children is a very efficient intervention. PMID:23295894

  9. Seasonal influenza immunization program outside general practice: An evaluation.

    PubMed

    Morrison-Griffiths, Sally; Gaulton, Liz

    2016-01-01

    With the support of our local Public Health and NHS England teams, we developed a pathway of care to provide seasonal influenza vaccination to our heroin dependent service users. 340 of the 515 service users receiving opioid substitution treatment (OST) were offered the vaccination in the 2014/15 influenza season and 205 accepted it. A further 29 service users received the vaccination elsewhere. With over 50% of those on OST prescriptions known to have a diagnosed chronic condition, such as liver or respiratory disease, this was a worthwhile health intervention in a population that is known to be "hard to reach." In addition to the potential benefit to the individuals who received the seasonal influenza vaccination, there was also an opportunity to provide health advice and information surrounding chronic disease management. Service user feedback overwhelmingly supported the provision of seasonal influenza vaccination within Drug and Alcohol services. PMID:26566596

  10. Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Grohskopf, Lisa A; Sokolow, Leslie Z; Broder, Karen R; Olsen, Sonja J; Karron, Ruth A; Jernigan, Daniel B; Bresee, Joseph S

    2016-01-01

    This report updates the 2015-16 recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the use of seasonal influenza vaccines (Grohskopf LA, Sokolow LZ, Olsen SJ, Bresee JS, Broder KR, Karron RA. Prevention and control of influenza with vaccines: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, United States, 2015-16 influenza season. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2015;64:818-25). Routine annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months who do not have contraindications. For the 2016-17 influenza season, inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) will be available in both trivalent (IIV3) and quadrivalent (IIV4) formulations. Recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV) will be available in a trivalent formulation (RIV3). In light of concerns regarding low effectiveness against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the United States during the 2013-14 and 2015-16 seasons, for the 2016-17 season, ACIP makes the interim recommendation that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV4) should not be used. Vaccine virus strains included in the 2016-17 U.S. trivalent influenza vaccines will be an A/California/7/2009 (H1N1)-like virus, an A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (H3N2)-like virus, and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus (Victoria lineage). Quadrivalent vaccines will include an additional influenza B virus strain, a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like virus (Yamagata lineage).Recommendations for use of different vaccine types and specific populations are discussed. A licensed, age-appropriate vaccine should be used. No preferential recommendation is made for one influenza vaccine product over another for persons for whom more than one licensed, recommended product is otherwise appropriate. This information is intended for vaccination providers, immunization program personnel, and public health personnel. Information in this report reflects discussions during public meetings of ACIP held on October 21, 2015; February 24, 2016; and June 22, 2016

  11. The Global Influenza Initiative recommendations for the vaccination of pregnant women against seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Macias, Alejandro E; Precioso, Alexander R; Falsey, Ann R

    2015-08-01

    There is a heavy disease burden due to seasonal influenza in pregnant women, their fetuses, and their newborns. The main aim of this study was to review and analyze current evidence on safety, immunogenicity, and clinical benefits of the inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in pregnant women. Current evidence shows that in pregnant women, the seasonal and pandemic IIVs are safe and well tolerated. After vaccination, pregnant women have protective concentrations of anti-influenza antibodies, conferring immunogenicity in newborns. The best evidence, to date, suggests that influenza vaccination confers clinical benefits in both pregnant women and their newborns. Vaccination with either the seasonal or pandemic vaccine has been shown to be cost-effective in pregnancy. There are scarce data from randomized clinical trials; fortunately, new phase 3 clinical trials are under way. In the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, data suggest that the greatest clinical benefit for infants occurs if the IIV is administered within the first weeks of availability of the vaccine, at the beginning of the influenza season, regardless of the pregnancy trimester. The optimal timing to vaccinate pregnant women who live in tropical regions is unclear. Based on evaluation of the evidence, the Global Influenza Initiative (GII) recommends that to prevent seasonal influenza morbidity and mortality in infants and their mothers, all pregnant women, regardless of trimester, should be vaccinated with the IIV. For countries where vaccination against influenza is starting or expanding, the GII recommends that pregnant women have the highest priority. PMID:26256293

  12. The Global Influenza Initiative recommendations for the vaccination of pregnant women against seasonal influenza

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Alejandro E; Precioso, Alexander R; Falsey, Ann R

    2015-01-01

    There is a heavy disease burden due to seasonal influenza in pregnant women, their fetuses, and their newborns. The main aim of this study was to review and analyze current evidence on safety, immunogenicity, and clinical benefits of the inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in pregnant women. Current evidence shows that in pregnant women, the seasonal and pandemic IIVs are safe and well tolerated. After vaccination, pregnant women have protective concentrations of anti-influenza antibodies, conferring immunogenicity in newborns. The best evidence, to date, suggests that influenza vaccination confers clinical benefits in both pregnant women and their newborns. Vaccination with either the seasonal or pandemic vaccine has been shown to be cost-effective in pregnancy. There are scarce data from randomized clinical trials; fortunately, new phase 3 clinical trials are under way. In the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, data suggest that the greatest clinical benefit for infants occurs if the IIV is administered within the first weeks of availability of the vaccine, at the beginning of the influenza season, regardless of the pregnancy trimester. The optimal timing to vaccinate pregnant women who live in tropical regions is unclear. Based on evaluation of the evidence, the Global Influenza Initiative (GII) recommends that to prevent seasonal influenza morbidity and mortality in infants and their mothers, all pregnant women, regardless of trimester, should be vaccinated with the IIV. For countries where vaccination against influenza is starting or expanding, the GII recommends that pregnant women have the highest priority. PMID:26256293

  13. Improved high-throughput virus neutralisation assay for antibody estimation against pandemic and seasonal influenza strains from 2009 to 2011.

    PubMed

    Terletskaia-Ladwig, Elena; Meier, Silvia; Enders, Martin

    2013-05-01

    An automatable focus-reduction neutralisation test (AFRNT) for detecting influenza neutralising antibodies in serum was developed. The assay used immunoperoxidase staining and automated foci counting with AID Diagnostika ViruSpot software. Human serum samples (n=108) were collected before and after vaccination with Pandemrix or Begrivac and were tested by AFRNT and a haemagglutination inhibition assay (HI) using seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccine strains from 2009 to 2011. Much attention has been given to the factors that influence detection of neutralising titre, such as viral quantification and the use of receptor destroying enzyme (RDE) for serum treatment. Foci counting enabled precise virus quantification and the development of a highly sensitive assay. Pre-treatment of the human sera with RDE significantly reduced the neutralising titres against all strains, with the exception of the seasonal H1N1 (2009/2010) strain. An HI titre of 1:40, which is associated with a 50% clinical protection against influenza, was equivalent to an AFRNT titre of 1:100-1:200. In conclusion, the AFRNT is rapid, highly sensitive, and fully automatable; therefore, this test is perfectly suitable for the high-throughput detection of influenza-neutralising antibodies. PMID:23518398

  14. Differential age susceptibility to influenza B/Victoria lineage viruses in the 2015 Australian influenza season.

    PubMed

    Barr, Ian G; Vijaykrishna, Dhanasekaran; Sullivan, Sheena G

    2016-01-01

    Influenza B viruses make up an important part of the burden from seasonal influenza globally. The 2015 season in Australia saw an unusual predominance of influenza B with a distinctive switch during the season from B/Yamagata/16/88 lineage viruses to B/Victoria/2/87 lineage viruses. We also noted significant differences in the age groups infected by the different B lineages, with B/Victoria infecting a younger population than B/Yamagata, that could not be explained by potential prior exposure. PMID:26848118

  15. Barriers Associated with Seasonal Influenza Vaccination among College Students

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Stephanie M.; Bahr, Kaitlin O.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza can spread rapidly on college campuses because of high-density living conditions and frequent social interactions. However, seasonal influenza vaccination rates on college campuses are low. The purpose of this study is to identify barriers associated with receipt of the seasonal influenza vaccination. Questionnaires were completed by a convenience sample of 383 undergraduate students in January 2014. Data were analyzed to identify barriers associated with receiving the seasonal influenza vaccine. Only 20.6% of students reported receiving the vaccine within the last 6 months. Among students who did not receive the vaccine, 47.8% believed they would get influenza from the vaccine, 41.6% believed the vaccination may have dangerous side effects, and 39.6% believed they were not at risk for contracting influenza. The majority of nonvaccinated students did not believe cost of the vaccine or access to the vaccine were barriers. Many college students are not receiving the seasonal influenza vaccine, representing an important area for improvement. Understanding potential barriers associated with receipt of this vaccine is important for identifying and creating effective public health education programs and campaigns. There is a need for enhanced vaccination education efforts among college students, particularly with respect to the safety and importance of this vaccine. PMID:27110397

  16. Barriers Associated with Seasonal Influenza Vaccination among College Students.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Stephanie M; Bahr, Kaitlin O

    2016-01-01

    Influenza can spread rapidly on college campuses because of high-density living conditions and frequent social interactions. However, seasonal influenza vaccination rates on college campuses are low. The purpose of this study is to identify barriers associated with receipt of the seasonal influenza vaccination. Questionnaires were completed by a convenience sample of 383 undergraduate students in January 2014. Data were analyzed to identify barriers associated with receiving the seasonal influenza vaccine. Only 20.6% of students reported receiving the vaccine within the last 6 months. Among students who did not receive the vaccine, 47.8% believed they would get influenza from the vaccine, 41.6% believed the vaccination may have dangerous side effects, and 39.6% believed they were not at risk for contracting influenza. The majority of nonvaccinated students did not believe cost of the vaccine or access to the vaccine were barriers. Many college students are not receiving the seasonal influenza vaccine, representing an important area for improvement. Understanding potential barriers associated with receipt of this vaccine is important for identifying and creating effective public health education programs and campaigns. There is a need for enhanced vaccination education efforts among college students, particularly with respect to the safety and importance of this vaccine. PMID:27110397

  17. Influenza Activity - United States, 2015-16 Season and Composition of the 2016-17 Influenza Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Davlin, Stacy L; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Mustaquim, Desiree; Smith, Sophie; Kramer, Natalie; Cohen, Jessica; Cummings, Charisse Nitura; Garg, Shikha; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Sessions, Wendy; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Barnes, John; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2016-01-01

    During the 2015-16 influenza season (October 4, 2015-May 21, 2016) in the United States, influenza activity* was lower and peaked later compared with the previous three seasons (2012-13, 2013-14, and 2014-15). Activity remained low from October 2015 until late December 2015 and peaked in mid-March 2016. During the most recent 18 influenza seasons (including this season), only two other seasons have peaked in March (2011-12 and 2005-06). Overall influenza activity was moderate this season, with a lower percentage of outpatient visits for influenza-like illness (ILI),(†) lower hospitalization rates, and a lower percentage of deaths attributed to pneumonia and influenza (P&I) compared with the preceding three seasons. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses predominated overall, but influenza A(H3N2) viruses were more commonly identified from October to early December, and influenza B viruses were more commonly identified from mid-April through mid-May. The majority of viruses characterized this season were antigenically similar to the reference viruses representing the recommended components of the 2015-16 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine (1). This report summarizes influenza activity in the United States during the 2015-16 influenza season (October 4, 2015-May 21, 2016)(§) and reports the vaccine virus components recommended for the 2016-17 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccines. PMID:27281364

  18. Seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine protects against 1918 Spanish influenza virus in ferrets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influenza H1N1 pandemic of 1918 was one of the worst medical disasters in human history. Recent studies have demonstrated that the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the 1918 virus and 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus, the latter now a component of the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV),...

  19. Influenza seasonality in Madagascar: the mysterious African free-runner

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Wladimir Jimenez; Guillebaud, Julia; Viboud, Cecile; Razanajatovo, Norosoa Harline; Orelle, Arnaud; Zhou, Steven Zhixiang; Randrianasolo, Laurence; Heraud, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background The seasonal drivers of influenza activity remain debated in tropical settings where epidemics are not clearly phased. Antananarivo is a particularly interesting case study because it is in Madagascar, an island situated in the tropics and with quantifiable connectivity levels to other countries. Objectives We aimed at disentangling the role of environmental forcing and population fluxes on influenza seasonality in Madagascar. Methods We compiled weekly counts of laboratory-confirmed influenza-positive specimens for the period 2002 to 2012 collected in Antananarivo, with data available from sub-Saharan countries and countries contributing most foreign travelers to Madagascar. Daily climate indicators were compiled for the study period. Results Overall, influenza activity detected in Antananarivo predated that identified in temperate Northern Hemisphere locations. This activity presented poor temporal matching with viral activity in other countries from the African continent or countries highly connected to Madagascar excepted for A(H1N1)pdm09. Influenza detection in Antananarivo was not associated with travel activity and, although it was positively correlated with all climatic variables studied, such association was weak. Conclusions The timing of influenza activity in Antananarivo is irregular, is not driven by climate, and does not align with that of countries in geographic proximity or highly connected to Madagascar. This work opens fresh questions regarding the drivers of influenza seasonality globally particularly in mid-latitude and less-connected regions to tailor vaccine strategies locally. PMID:25711873

  20. Subacute thyroiditis following seasonal influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Altay, Fatma Aybala; Güz, Galip; Altay, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    A peritoneal dialysis patient who experienced a repeating attack after a vaccination for influenza while she was being followed and treated succesfully for subacute thyroiditis (SAT) is presented. This case shows SAT as a rare condition following vaccination.. Thus, SAT should be considered as a possible outcome following influenza vaccination and flu-like syndrome. PMID:26809709

  1. Antiviral drug susceptibilities of seasonal human influenza viruses in Lebanon, 2008-09 season.

    PubMed

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Wakim, Rima; Tabet, Carelle; Medlej, Fouad; Reda, Mariam; Baranovich, Tatiana; Suzuki, Yasushi; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Dbaibo, Ghassan S; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-07-01

    The emergence of antiviral drug-resistant strains of the influenza virus in addition to the rapid spread of the recent pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus highlight the importance of surveillance of influenza in identifying new variants as they appear. In this study, genetic characteristics and antiviral susceptibility patterns of influenza samples collected in Lebanon during the 2008-09 season were investigated. Forty influenza virus samples were isolated from 89 nasopharyngeal swabs obtained from patients with influenza-like illness. Of these samples, 33 (82.5%) were A(H3N2), 3 (7.5%) were A(H1N1), and 4 (10%) were B. All the H3N2 viruses were resistant to amantadine but were sensitive to oseltamivir and zanamivir; while all the H1N1 viruses were resistant to oseltamivir (possessed H275Y mutation, N1 numbering, in their NA) but were sensitive to amantadine and zanamivir. In the case of influenza B, both Victoria and Yamagata lineages were identified (three and one isolates each, respectively) and they showed decreased susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir when compared to influenza A viruses. Influenza circulation patterns in Lebanon were very similar to those in Europe during the same season. Continued surveillance is important to fully elucidate influenza patterns in Lebanon and the Middle East in general, especially in light of the current influenza pandemic. PMID:20513088

  2. [Influenza surveillance in five consecutive seasons during post pandemic period: results from National Influenza Center, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Altaş, Ayşe Başak; Bayrakdar, Fatma; Korukluoğlu, Gülay

    2016-07-01

    Influenza surveillance provides data about the characteristics of influenza activity, types, sub-types and antigenic properties of the influenza viruses in circulation in a region. Surveillance also provides for the preparation against potential influenza pandemics with the identification of the genetic properties of viruses and the mutant strains that could pose a threat. In this study, data in the scope of national influenza surveillance carried out by National Influenza Center, Turkey for five consecutive influenza seasons between 2010-2015, following the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus pandemic, have been presented and evaluated. A total of 15.149 respiratory samples, including 8.894 sentinel and 6.255 non-sentinel specimens, during 2010-2015 influenza seasons, within the periods between September and May, were evaluated in our center. All samples were tested using real-time reverse transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) for the presence of influenza virus types and subtypes. Within the sentinel influenza surveillance, the samples that were detected negative for influenza viruses, have also been tested for the other respiratory viruses (respiratory syncytial virus, rhinoviruses, paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses) using the same technique. Further analysis, including virus isolation by cell culture inoculation and antigenic characterization by hemagglutination inhibiton test were performed for the samples found positive for influenza A and B viruses. Selected representative virus isolates have been sent to WHO reference laboratory for the sequence analysis. In the study, influenza virus positivity rates detected for all of the samples (sentinel+non-sentinel) were as follows; 34% (779/2316) in 2010-11 season; 25% (388/1554) in 2011-12; 20% (696/3541) in 2012-13; 23% (615/2678) in 2013-14; and 26% (1332/5060) in 2014-15. When all the samples were considered for influenza A and B viruses, the positivity rates for the seasons of 2010-11; 2011-12; 2012-13; 2013-14; 2014-15 were determined as

  3. Increased defibrillator therapies during influenza season in patients without influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sheldon M.; de Souza, Russell J.; Kumareswaran, Ramanan

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between influenza vaccination and implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) therapies during influenza season is not known and is described in this study. Understanding this association is important since reduction in ICD therapies during influenza season via use of influenza vaccination would benefit patients physically and psychologically. Methods Patients presenting to the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center ICD clinic between September 1st, 2011 and November 31st, 2011 were asked to complete a survey evaluating their use of the influenza vaccine. The number of patients with any ICD therapy and the total number of ICD therapies in the six months before and the three months during the 2010–2011 influenza season were determined. Poisson regression analysis was employed to assess differences in the average number of ICD therapies received during the influenza season based on vaccine status (vaccinated vs. unvaccinated). The analysis was repeated after limiting the cohort to patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35%. Results A total of 229 patients completed the survey, 78% of whom received the influenza vaccine. Four patients had more than one ICD shock during the study period. Electrical storm was rare (n=2). A trend toward more ICD therapies (unadjusted incident rate ratio (IRR)=3.2; P=0.07) and appropriate ICD shocks (unadjusted IRR=9.0; P=0.17) was noted for unvaccinated compared to vaccinated patients. This association persisted when analysis was limited to patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction ≤35% (all ICD therapies: unadjusted IRR=5.8; P=0.045; adjusted IRR=2.6; P=0.33). No patient who received the influenza vaccine, and had a reduced ejection fraction, received an approprite ICD shock during influenza season (unadjusted P<0.002). Conclusion A trend toward more ICD therapies during influenza season was observed in patients who did not receive the influenza vaccine compared to those who did. The

  4. Risk management of seasonal influenza during pregnancy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yudin, Mark H

    2014-01-01

    Influenza poses unique risks to pregnant women, who are particularly susceptible to morbidity and mortality. Historically, pregnant women have been overrepresented among patients with severe illness and complications from influenza, and have been more likely to require hospitalization and intensive care unit admission. An increased risk of adverse outcomes is also present for fetuses/neonates born to women affected by influenza during pregnancy. These risks to mothers and babies have been observed during both nonpandemic and pandemic influenza seasons. During the H1N1 influenza pandemic of 2009–2010, pregnant women were more likely to be hospitalized or admitted to intensive care units, and were at higher risk of death compared to nonpregnant adults. Vaccination remains the most effective intervention to prevent severe illness, and antiviral medications are an important adjunct to ameliorate disease when it occurs. Unfortunately, despite national guidelines recommending universal vaccination for women who are pregnant during influenza season, actual vaccination rates do not achieve desired targets among pregnant women. Pregnant women are also sometimes reluctant to use antiviral medications during pregnancy. Some of the barriers to use of vaccines and medications during pregnancy are a lack of knowledge of recommendations and of safety data. By improving knowledge and understanding of influenza and vaccination recommendations, vaccine acceptance rates among pregnant women can be improved. Currently, the appropriate use of vaccination and antiviral medications is the best line of defense against influenza and its sequelae among pregnant women, and strategies to increase acceptance are crucial. This article will review the importance of influenza in pregnancy, and discuss vaccination and antiviral medications for pregnant women. PMID:25114593

  5. ARL Annual Salary Survey, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Bland, Les, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    The "ARL Annual Salary Survey 2009-2010" reports salary data for all professional staff working in ARL libraries. The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) represents the interests of libraries that serve major North American research institutions. Data for 10,207 professional staff members were reported this year for the 114 ARL university…

  6. Milwaukee Voucher Schools: 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure provides charted reference information for Milwaukee Voucher Schools for the 2009-2010 school year. Schools are grouped by grade level. The following is included: Name, Address, Telephone, Grades; Religion/Denomination; Enrollment; Choice Student Enrollment; Number of Teachers; School Hours; Before/After School Programs;…

  7. Alabama Education Quick Facts, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This brochure presents state statistics; Alabama public schools 2009-10; Alabama State Board of Education members; financial data; public school size and enrollment, 2009-10 school year; transportation; school meals; school personnel, 2009-2010; graduation requirements; student assessment; additional enrollment; and dropouts in school year 2008-09.

  8. Forecasting the 2013-2014 influenza season using Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Hickmann, Kyle S; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y

    2015-05-01

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are applied to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed. PMID:25974758

  9. Forecasting the 2013–2014 Influenza Season Using Wikipedia

    PubMed Central

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are applied to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed. PMID:25974758

  10. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    SciTech Connect

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are applied to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.

  11. Forecasting the 2013–2014 influenza season using Wikipedia

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Priedhorsky, Reid; Generous, Nicholas; Hyman, James M.; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Salathé, Marcel

    2015-05-14

    Infectious diseases are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality around the world; thus, forecasting their impact is crucial for planning an effective response strategy. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seasonal influenza affects 5% to 20% of the U.S. population and causes major economic impacts resulting from hospitalization and absenteeism. Understanding influenza dynamics and forecasting its impact is fundamental for developing prevention and mitigation strategies. We combine modern data assimilation methods with Wikipedia access logs and CDC influenza-like illness (ILI) reports to create a weekly forecast for seasonal influenza. The methods are appliedmore » to the 2013-2014 influenza season but are sufficiently general to forecast any disease outbreak, given incidence or case count data. We adjust the initialization and parametrization of a disease model and show that this allows us to determine systematic model bias. In addition, we provide a way to determine where the model diverges from observation and evaluate forecast accuracy. Wikipedia article access logs are shown to be highly correlated with historical ILI records and allow for accurate prediction of ILI data several weeks before it becomes available. The results show that prior to the peak of the flu season, our forecasting method produced 50% and 95% credible intervals for the 2013-2014 ILI observations that contained the actual observations for most weeks in the forecast. However, since our model does not account for re-infection or multiple strains of influenza, the tail of the epidemic is not predicted well after the peak of flu season has passed.« less

  12. The Possible Impact of Vaccination for Seasonal Influenza on Emergence of Pandemic Influenza via Reassortment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Sheng; Pebody, Richard; De Angelis, Daniela; White, Peter J.; Charlett, Andre; McCauley, John W.

    2014-01-01

    Background One pathway through which pandemic influenza strains might emerge is reassortment from coinfection of different influenza A viruses. Seasonal influenza vaccines are designed to target the circulating strains, which intuitively decreases the prevalence of coinfection and the chance of pandemic emergence due to reassortment. However, individual-based analyses on 2009 pandemic influenza show that the previous seasonal vaccination may increase the risk of pandemic A(H1N1) pdm09 infection. In view of pandemic influenza preparedness, it is essential to understand the overall effect of seasonal vaccination on pandemic emergence via reassortment. Methods and Findings In a previous study we applied a population dynamics approach to investigate the effect of infection-induced cross-immunity on reducing such a pandemic risk. Here the model was extended by incorporating vaccination for seasonal influenza to assess its potential role on the pandemic emergence via reassortment and its effect in protecting humans if a pandemic does emerge. The vaccination is assumed to protect against the target strains but only partially against other strains. We find that a universal seasonal vaccine that provides full-spectrum cross-immunity substantially reduces the opportunity of pandemic emergence. However, our results show that such effectiveness depends on the strength of infection-induced cross-immunity against any novel reassortant strain. If it is weak, the vaccine that induces cross-immunity strongly against non-target resident strains but weakly against novel reassortant strains, can further depress the pandemic emergence; if it is very strong, the same kind of vaccine increases the probability of pandemic emergence. Conclusions Two types of vaccines are available: inactivated and live attenuated, only live attenuated vaccines can induce heterosubtypic immunity. Current vaccines are effective in controlling circulating strains; they cannot always help restrain pandemic

  13. Clinical symptoms cannot predict influenza infection during the 2013 influenza season in Bavaria, Germany.

    PubMed

    Campe, H; Heinzinger, S; Hartberger, C; Sing, A

    2016-04-01

    For influenza surveillance and diagnosis typical clinical symptoms are traditionally used to discriminate influenza virus infections from infections by other pathogens. During the 2013 influenza season we performed a multiplex assay for 16 different viruses in 665 swabs from patients with acute respiratory infections (ARIs) to display the variety of different pathogens causing ARI and to test the diagnostic value of both the commonly used case definitions [ARI, and influenza like illness (ILI)] as well as the clinical judgement of physicians, respectively, to achieve a laboratory-confirmed influenza diagnosis. Fourteen different viruses were identified as causing ARI/ILI. Influenza diagnosis based on clinical signs overestimated the number of laboratory-confirmed influenza cases and misclassified cases. Furthermore, ILI case definition and physicians agreed in only 287/651 (44%) cases with laboratory confirmation. Influenza case management has to be supported by laboratory confirmation to allow evidence-based decisions. Epidemiological syndromic surveillance data should be supported by laboratory confirmation for reasonable interpretation. PMID:26388141

  14. Optimal strategies of social distancing and vaccination against seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Shim, Eunha

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control strategies for controlling seasonal influenza transmission in the US are of high interest, because of the significant epidemiological and economic burden of influenza. To evaluate optimal strategies of vaccination and social distancing, we used an age-structured dynamic model of seasonal influenza. We applied optimal control theory to identify the best way of reducing morbidity and mortality at a minimal cost. In combination with the Pontryagins maximum principle, we calculated time-dependent optimal policies of vaccination and social distancing to minimize the epidemiological and economic burden associated with seasonal influenza. We computed optimal age-specific intervention strategies and analyze them under various costs of interventions and disease transmissibility. Our results show that combined strategies have a stronger impact on the reduction of the final epidemic size. Our results also suggest that the optimal vaccination can be achieved by allocating most vaccines to preschool-age children (age under five) followed by young adults (age 20-39) and school age children (age 6-19). We find that the optimal vaccination rates for all age groups are highest at the beginning of the outbreak, requiring intense effort at the early phase of an epidemic. On the other hand, optimal social distancing of clinical cases tends to last the entire duration of an outbreak, and its intensity is relatively equal for all age groups. Furthermore, with higher transmissibility of the influenza virus (i.e. higher R0), the optimal control strategy needs to include more efforts to increase vaccination rates rather than efforts to encourage social distancing. Taken together, public health agencies need to consider both the transmissibility of the virus and ways to encourage early vaccination as well as voluntary social distancing of symptomatic cases in order to determine optimal intervention strategies against seasonal influenza. PMID:24245639

  15. Revealing the True Incidence of Pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza in Finland during the First Two Seasons - An Analysis Based on a Dynamic Transmission Model.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Mikhail; Lebedev, Artem; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Auranen, Kari

    2016-03-01

    The threat of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 imposed a heavy burden on the public health system in Finland in 2009-2010. An extensive vaccination campaign was set up in the middle of the first pandemic season. However, the true number of infected individuals remains uncertain as the surveillance missed a large portion of mild infections. We constructed a transmission model to simulate the spread of influenza in the Finnish population. We used the model to analyse the two first years (2009-2011) of A(H1N1)pdm09 in Finland. Using data from the national surveillance of influenza and data on close person-to-person (social) contacts in the population, we estimated that 6% (90% credible interval 5.1 - 6.7%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 in the first pandemic season (2009/2010) and an additional 3% (2.5 - 3.5%) in the second season (2010/2011). Vaccination had a substantial impact in mitigating the second season. The dynamic approach allowed us to discover how the proportion of detected cases changed over the course of the epidemic. The role of time-varying reproduction number, capturing the effects of weather and changes in behaviour, was important in shaping the epidemic. PMID:27010206

  16. Revealing the True Incidence of Pandemic A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza in Finland during the First Two Seasons — An Analysis Based on a Dynamic Transmission Model

    PubMed Central

    Shubin, Mikhail; Lebedev, Artem; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Auranen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    The threat of the new pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 imposed a heavy burden on the public health system in Finland in 2009-2010. An extensive vaccination campaign was set up in the middle of the first pandemic season. However, the true number of infected individuals remains uncertain as the surveillance missed a large portion of mild infections. We constructed a transmission model to simulate the spread of influenza in the Finnish population. We used the model to analyse the two first years (2009-2011) of A(H1N1)pdm09 in Finland. Using data from the national surveillance of influenza and data on close person-to-person (social) contacts in the population, we estimated that 6% (90% credible interval 5.1 – 6.7%) of the population was infected with A(H1N1)pdm09 in the first pandemic season (2009/2010) and an additional 3% (2.5 – 3.5%) in the second season (2010/2011). Vaccination had a substantial impact in mitigating the second season. The dynamic approach allowed us to discover how the proportion of detected cases changed over the course of the epidemic. The role of time-varying reproduction number, capturing the effects of weather and changes in behaviour, was important in shaping the epidemic. PMID:27010206

  17. Parkinson’s disease or Parkinson symptoms following seasonal influenza

    PubMed Central

    Toovey, Stephen; Jick, Susan S.; Meier, Christoph R.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Toovey S et al. (2011) Parkinson’s disease or Parkinson symptoms following seasonal influenza. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(5), 328–333. Background  Influenza may cause neurological sequelae and has been associated with encephalitis lethargica, an entity displaying Parkinson’s disease (PD) signs and symptoms that followed the 1918 influenza pandemic. We studied the association between diagnosed influenza and idiopathic PD or Parkinson symptoms (PS) not followed by a firm PD diagnosis. Methods  We used the UK‐based General Practice Research Database to perform a case–control analysis. We identified cases who developed an incident diagnosis of PD or PS between 1994 and March 2007, and we matched four controls on age, gender, general practice, calendar time, and history in the database to each case. We calculated odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using conditional logistic regression to assess the relative risk of developing PD or PS in association with previous influenza diagnoses. Results  We identified 3976 PD cases and 18 336 PS cases. The risk of developing PD was not associated with previous influenza infections. However, PS was associated with recent influenza (last infection 0–29 days: OR 3·03, 95% CI 1·94–4·74; 30–364 days: OR 1·36, 95% CI 1·14–1·63), number of influenza episodes (1 attack: OR 1·20, 95% CI 1·12–1·28; 2 attacks: OR 1·52, 95% CI 1·28–1·81; ≥3 attacks: OR 2·00, 95% CI 1·45–2·75), and severity of preceding influenza infections (≥1 severe attack: OR 1·45, 95% CI 1·25–1·68). Conclusions  Influenza is associated with PD‐like symptoms such as tremor, particularly in the month after an infection, but not with an increased risk of developing idiopathic PD. PMID:21668692

  18. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health Care Personnel--United States, 2014-15 Influenza Season.

    PubMed

    Black, Carla L; Yue, Xin; Ball, Sarah W; Donahue, Sara M A; Izrael, David; de Perio, Marie A; Laney, A Scott; Williams, Walter W; Lindley, Megan C; Graitcer, Samuel B; Lu, Peng-jun; Bridges, Carolyn B; DiSogra, Charles; Sokolowski, John; Walker, Deborah K; Greby, Stacie M

    2015-09-18

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends annual influenza vaccination for all health care personnel (HCP) to reduce influenza-related morbidity and mortality among both HCP and their patients and to decrease absenteeism among HCP. To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among U.S. HCP for the 2014–15 influenza season, CDC conducted an opt-in Internet panel survey of 1,914 HCP during March 31–April 15, 2015. Overall, 77.3% of HCP survey participants reported receiving an influenza vaccination during the 2014–15 season, similar to the 75.2% coverage among HCP reported for the 2013–14 season. Vaccination coverage was highest among HCP working in hospitals (90.4%) and lowest among HCP working in long-term care (LTC) settings (63.9%). By occupation, coverage was highest among pharmacists (95.3%) and lowest among assistants and aides (64.4%). Influenza vaccination coverage was highest among HCP who were required by their employer to be vaccinated (96.0%). Among HCP without an employer requirement for vaccination, coverage was higher for HCP working in settings where vaccination was offered on-site at no cost for 1 day (73.6%) or multiple days (83.9%) and lowest among HCP working in settings where vaccine was neither required, promoted, nor offered on-site (44.0%). Comprehensive vaccination strategies that include making vaccine available at no cost at the workplace along with active promotion of vaccination might help increase vaccination coverage among HCP and reduce the risk for influenza to HCP and their patients. PMID:26389743

  19. Technical guidelines for the application of seasonal influenza vaccine in China (2014–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Luzhao; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Juan; Fu, Chuanxi; Qin, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Ma, Chunna; Liu, Zhaoqiu; Wang, Quanyi; Zhao, Genming; Yu, Hongjie

    2015-01-01

    Influenza, caused by the influenza virus, is a respiratory infectious disease that can severely affect human health. Influenza viruses undergo frequent antigenic changes, thus could spread quickly. Influenza causes seasonal epidemics and outbreaks in public gatherings such as schools, kindergartens, and nursing homes. Certain populations are at risk for severe illness from influenza, including pregnant women, young children, the elderly, and people in any ages with certain chronic diseases. PMID:26042462

  20. Seasonal split influenza vaccine induced IgE sensitization against influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Tetsuo; Kumagai, Takuji; Nishimura, Naoko; Ozaki, Takao; Okafuji, Teruo; Suzuki, Eitaro; Miyata, Akiko; Okada, Kenji; Ihara, Toshiaki

    2015-11-01

    Although anaphylaxis is an extremely rare vaccine-associated adverse event, it occurred in young children following administration of the 2011/12 seasonal split influenza vaccine, which contained 2-phenoxyethanol as the preservative. These children had high levels of IgE antibodies against influenza vaccine components. We herein investigated why these children were sensitized. One hundred and seventeen series of serum samples were obtained immediately before, and one month after the first and second immunizations with the HA split vaccine of 2011/12. Forty-two sequential serum samples were collected in the acute and convalescent phases (2 and 4 weeks) after natural infection with H1N1 Pdm in 2009. IgE antibodies developed following the vaccination of young children with seasonal split vaccines, whereas no significant IgE response was observed following natural infection with H1N1 Pdm 2009. The prevalence of IgE antibodies was not influenced by outbreaks of H1N1 Pdm. Repeated immunization with the HA split vaccine induced IgE sensitization against the influenza vaccine irrespective of the H1N1, H3N2, or B influenza subtypes. The reasons why anaphylaxis only occurred in recipients of the influenza vaccine containing 2-phenoxyethanol are still being investigated, and the size distribution of antigen particles may have shifted to a slightly larger size. Since the fundamental reason was IgE sensitization, current split formulation for the seasonal influenza vaccine needs to be reconsidered to prevent the induction of IgE sensitization. PMID:26188254

  1. Effectiveness of seasonal 2012/13 vaccine in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza infection in primary care in the United Kingdom: mid-season analysis 2012/13.

    PubMed

    McMenamin, J; Andrews, N; Robertson, C; Fleming, Dm; Durnall, H; von Wissmann, B; Ellis, J; Lackenby, A; Cottrell, S; Smyth, B; Zambon, M; Moore, C; Watson, Jm; Pebody, Rg

    2013-01-01

    The early experience of the United Kingdom (UK) is that influenza B has dominated the influenza 2012/13 season. Overall trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) adjusted vaccine effectiveness (VE) against all laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care was 51% (95% confidence interval (CI): 27% to 68%); TIV adjusted VE against influenza A alone or influenza B alone was 49% (95% CI: -2% to 75%) and 52% (95% CI: 23% to 70%) respectively. Vaccination remains the best protection against influenza. PMID:23399421

  2. [Influenza vaccines dispensed in community pharmacies during the 2010-2011 flu season].

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, K; Hamelinck, W

    2011-12-01

    In this article we consider the delivery of influenza vaccines in the Belgian communiy pharmacies during the influenza season 2010-2011. We compare this season with the previous influenza seasons and consider the age distribution the flu-vaccinated patients. The vaccination rate of the entire population is compared to the vaccination rate among the risk group of diabetic patients. Also the market introduction of intradermal vaccinations in investigated. PMID:22299238

  3. A surge of flu-associated adult respiratory distress syndrome in an Austrian tertiary care hospital during the 2009/2010 Influenza A H1N1v pandemic.

    PubMed

    Schellongowski, Peter; Ullrich, Roman; Hieber, Cornelia; Hetz, Hubert; Losert, Heidrun; Hermann, Maria; Hermann, Alexander; Gattringer, Klaus-Bernhard; Siersch, Viktoria; Rabitsch, Werner; Fuhrmann, Valentin; Bojic, Andja; Robak, Oliver; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Laczika, Klaus; Locker, Gottfried J; Staudinger, Thomas

    2011-04-01

    We report on 17 patients with influenza A H1N1v-associated Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome who were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) between June 11th 2009 and August 10th 2010 (f/m: 8/9; age: median 39 (IQR 29-54) years; SAPS II: 35 (29-48)). Body mass index was 26 (24-35), 24% were overweight and 29% obese. The Charlson Comorbidity Index was 1 (0-2) and all but one patient had comorbid conditions. The median time between onset of the first symptom and admission to the ICU was 5 days (range 0-14). None of the patients had received vaccination against H1N1v. Nine patients received oseltamivir, only two of them within 48 hours of symptom onset. All patients developed severe ARDS (PaO(2)/FiO(2)-Ratio 60 (55-92); lung injury score 3.8 (3.3-4.0)), were mechanically ventilated and on vasopressor support. Fourteen patients received corticosteroids, 7 patients underwent hemofiltration, and 10 patients needed extracorporeal membrane-oxygenation (ECMO; 8 patients veno-venous, 2 patients veno-arterial), three patients Interventional Lung Assist (ILA) and two patients pump driven extracorporeal low-flow CO(2)-elimination (ECCO(2)-R). Seven of 17 patients (41%) died in the ICU (4 patients due to bleeding, 3 patients due to multi-organ failure), while all other patients survived the hospital (59%). ECMO mortality was 50%. The median ICU length-of-stay was 26 (19-44) vs. 21 (17-25) days (survivors vs. nonsurvivors), days on the ventilator were 18 (14-35) vs. 20 (17-24), and ECMO duration was 10 (8-25) vs. 13 (11-16) days, respectively (all p = n.s.). Compared to a control group of 241 adult intensive care unit patients without H1N1v, length of stay in the ICU, rate of mechanical ventilation, days on the ventilator, and TISS 28 scores were significantly higher in patients with H1N1v. The ICU survival tended to be higher in control patients (79 vs. 59%; p = 0.06). Patients with H1N1v admitted to either of our ICUs were young, overproportionally obese and almost all

  4. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care in the United Kingdom: 2015/16 mid-season results.

    PubMed

    Pebody, Richard; Warburton, Fiona; Ellis, Joanna; Andrews, Nick; Potts, Alison; Cottrell, Simon; Johnston, Jillian; Reynolds, Arlene; Gunson, Rory; Thompson, Catherine; Galiano, Monica; Robertson, Chris; Mullett, David; Gallagher, Naomh; Sinnathamby, Mary; Yonova, Ivelina; Moore, Catherine; McMenamin, Jim; de Lusignan, Simon; Zambon, Maria

    2016-03-31

    In 2015/16, the influenza season in the United Kingdom was dominated by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 circulation. Virus characterisation indicated the emergence of genetic clusters, with the majority antigenically similar to the current influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine strain. Mid-season vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates show an adjusted VE of 41.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 3.0-64.7) against influenza-confirmed primary care consultations and of 49.1% (95% CI: 9.3-71.5) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. These estimates show levels of protection similar to the 2010/11 season, when this strain was first used in the seasonal vaccine. PMID:27074651

  5. Temporal association between the influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV): RSV as a predictor of seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Míguez, A; Iftimi, A; Montes, F

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiologists agree that there is a prevailing seasonality in the presentation of epidemic waves of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections and influenza. The aim of this study is to quantify the potential relationship between the activity of RSV, with respect to the influenza virus, in order to use the RSV seasonal curve as a predictor of the evolution of an influenza virus epidemic wave. Two statistical tools, logistic regression and time series, are used for predicting the evolution of influenza. Both logistic models and time series of influenza consider RSV information from previous weeks. Data consist of influenza and confirmed RSV cases reported in Comunitat Valenciana (Spain) during the period from week 40 (2010) to week 8 (2014). Binomial logistic regression models used to predict the two states of influenza wave, basal or peak, result in a rate of correct classification higher than 92% with the validation set. When a finer three-states categorization is established, basal, increasing peak and decreasing peak, the multinomial logistic model performs well in 88% of cases of the validation set. The ARMAX model fits well for influenza waves and shows good performance for short-term forecasts up to 3 weeks. The seasonal evolution of influenza virus can be predicted a minimum of 4 weeks in advance using logistic models based on RSV. It would be necessary to study more inter-pandemic seasons to establish a stronger relationship between the epidemic waves of both viruses. PMID:27165946

  6. Prevalence of influenza-like illness and seasonal and pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccination coverage among workers--United States, 2009-10 influenza season.

    PubMed

    Luckhaupt, Sara E; Calvert, Geoffrey M; Li, Jia; Sweeney, Marie; Santibanez, Tammy A

    2014-03-14

    During an influenza pandemic, information about the industry and occupation (I&O) of persons likely to be infected with influenza virus is important to guide key policy decisions regarding vaccine prioritization and exposure-control measures. Health-care personnel (HCP) might have increased opportunity for exposure to influenza infection, and they have been prioritized for influenza vaccination because of their own risk and the risk that infected HCP pose to patients. To identify other groups of workers that might be at increased risk for pandemic influenza infection, influenza-like illness (ILI) and vaccination coverage data from the 2009 National H1N1 Flu Survey (NHFS), which was conducted during October 2009 through June 2010, were analyzed. In a representative sample of 28,710 employed adults, 5.5% reported ILI symptoms in the month before the interview, and 23.7% received the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza vaccine. Among employed adults, the highest prevalence of ILI was reported by those employed in the industry groups "Real estate and rental and leasing" (10.5%) and "Accommodation and food services" (10.2%), and in the occupation groups "Food preparation and serving related" (11.0%) and "Community and social services" (8.3%). Both seasonal influenza and pH1N1 vaccination coverage were relatively low in all of these groups of workers. Adults not in the labor force (i.e., homemakers, students, retired persons, and persons unable to work) had ILI prevalence and pH1N1 vaccination coverage similar to those found in all employed adults combined; in contrast, ILI prevalence was higher and pH1N1 vaccination coverage was lower among unemployed adults (i.e., those looking for work). These results suggest that adults employed in certain industries and occupations might have increased risk for influenza infection, and that the majority of these workers did not receive seasonal or pH1N1 influenza vaccine. Unemployed adults might also be considered a high risk group

  7. Flu Near You: Crowdsourced Symptom Reporting Spanning 2 Influenza Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Smolinski, Mark S.; Baltrusaitis, Kristin; Chunara, Rumi; Olsen, Jennifer M.; Wójcik, Oktawia; Santillana, Mauricio; Nguyen, Andre; Brownstein, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We summarized Flu Near You (FNY) data from the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 influenza seasons in the United States. Methods. FNY collects limited demographic characteristic information upon registration, and prompts users each Monday to report symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI) experienced during the previous week. We calculated the descriptive statistics and rates of ILI for the 2012–2013 and 2013–2014 seasons. We compared raw and noise-filtered ILI rates with ILI rates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ILINet surveillance system. Results. More than 61 000 participants submitted at least 1 report during the 2012–2013 season, totaling 327 773 reports. Nearly 40 000 participants submitted at least 1 report during the 2013–2014 season, totaling 336 933 reports. Rates of ILI as reported by FNY tracked closely with ILINet in both timing and magnitude. Conclusions. With increased participation, FNY has the potential to serve as a viable complement to existing outpatient, hospital-based, and laboratory surveillance systems. Although many established systems have the benefits of specificity and credibility, participatory systems offer advantages in the areas of speed, sensitivity, and scalability. PMID:26270299

  8. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care in the United Kingdom: 2014/15 end of season results.

    PubMed

    Pebody, Richard; Warburton, Fiona; Andrews, Nick; Ellis, Joanna; von Wissmann, Beatrix; Robertson, Chris; Yonova, Ivelina; Cottrell, Simon; Gallagher, Naomh; Green, Helen; Thompson, Catherine; Galiano, Monica; Marques, Diogo; Gunson, Rory; Reynolds, Arlene; Moore, Catherine; Mullett, David; Pathirannehelage, Sameera; Donati, Matthew; Johnston, Jillian; de Lusignan, Simon; McMenamin, Jim; Zambon, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season in the United Kingdom (UK) was characterised by circulation of predominantly antigenically and genetically drifted influenza A(H3N2) and B viruses. A universal paediatric influenza vaccination programme using a quadrivalent live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) has recently been introduced in the UK. This study aims to measure the end-of-season influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE), including for LAIV, using the test negative case-control design. The overall adjusted VE against all influenza was 34.3% (95% confidence interval (CI) 17.8 to 47.5); for A(H3N2) 29.3% (95% CI: 8.6 to 45.3) and for B 46.3% (95% CI: 13.9 to 66.5). For those aged under 18 years, influenza A(H3N2) LAIV VE was 35% (95% CI: -29.9 to 67.5), whereas for influenza B the LAIV VE was 100% (95% CI:17.0 to 100.0). Although the VE against influenza A(H3N2) infection was low, there was still evidence of significant protection, together with moderate, significant protection against drifted circulating influenza B viruses. LAIV provided non-significant positive protection against influenza A, with significant protection against B. Further work to assess the population impact of the vaccine programme across the UK is underway. PMID:26535911

  9. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness among US Military Basic Trainees, 2005–06 Season

    PubMed Central

    Hawksworth, Anthony W.; Myers, Christopher; Irvine, Marina; Ryan, Margaret A.K.; Russell, Kevin L.

    2007-01-01

    Virtually all US military basic trainees receive seasonal influenza vaccine. Surveillance data collected from December 2005 through March 2006 were evaluated to estimate effectiveness of the influenza vaccine at 6 US military basic training centers. Vaccine effectiveness against laboratory-confirmed influenza was 92% (95% confidence interval 85%–96%). PMID:17553281

  10. [Seasonal influenza vaccination in children and adolescents. Recommendations of the CAV-AEP for the campaign].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Arístegui Fernández, J; Ruiz-Contreras, J; Alvarez García, F J; Merino Moína, M; González-Hachero, J; Corretger Rauet, J M; Hernández-Sampelayo Matos, T; Ortigosa del Castillo, L; Cilleruelo Ortega, M J; Barrio Corrales, F

    2012-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics establishes annual recommendations on influenza vaccination in childhood before the onset of influenza season. Routine influenza vaccination is particularly beneficial when the strategy is aimed at children older than 6 months of age with high-risk conditions and their home contacts. The recommendation of influenza vaccination in health workers with children is also emphasized. PMID:22154734

  11. Inter-Seasonal Influenza is Characterized by Extended Virus Transmission and Persistence

    PubMed Central

    Patterson Ross, Zoe; Komadina, Naomi; Deng, Yi-Mo; Spirason, Natalie; Kelly, Heath A.; Sullivan, Sheena G.; Barr, Ian G.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    The factors that determine the characteristic seasonality of influenza remain enigmatic. Current models predict that occurrences of influenza outside the normal surveillance season within a temperate region largely reflect the importation of viruses from the alternate hemisphere or from equatorial regions in Asia. To help reveal the drivers of seasonality we investigated the origins and evolution of influenza viruses sampled during inter-seasonal periods in Australia. To this end we conducted an expansive phylogenetic analysis of 9912, 3804, and 3941 hemagglutinnin (HA) sequences from influenza A/H1N1pdm, A/H3N2, and B, respectively, collected globally during the period 2009-2014. Of the 1475 viruses sampled from Australia, 396 (26.8% of Australian, or 2.2% of global set) were sampled outside the monitored temperate influenza surveillance season (1 May – 31 October). Notably, rather than simply reflecting short-lived importations of virus from global localities with higher influenza prevalence, we documented a variety of more complex inter-seasonal transmission patterns including “stragglers” from the preceding season and “heralds” of the forthcoming season, and which included viruses sampled from clearly temperate regions within Australia. We also provide evidence for the persistence of influenza B virus between epidemic seasons, in which transmission of a viral lineage begins in one season and continues throughout the inter-seasonal period into the following season. Strikingly, a disproportionately high number of inter-seasonal influenza transmission events occurred in tropical and subtropical regions of Australia, providing further evidence that climate plays an important role in shaping patterns of influenza seasonality. PMID:26107631

  12. Space activities in 2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagkratis, Spyros

    2011-09-01

    The global financial crisis of 2008 has created an economic environment unfavourable to public and corporate economic activity alike, which could not have left space activities unaffected. However, the effects of the crisis upon the space sector have been so far less damaging than anticipated. The following paper presents recent developments in the field of space policies, institutional budgets and commercial activity worldwide, in an effort to improve the understanding of the new trends in commercial and public space activities. It particularly explores the strategies followed by space stakeholders in different countries and regions in order to pursue their planned space programmes in view of difficult financial conditions. Finally, it highlights the differences in the outlook of space activities between established and emerging space-faring nations and attempts to explore their medium-term consequences on an international level. For this purpose, it was based on research conducted in the framework of a recent ESPI report on "Space Policies, Issues and trends in 2009/2010".

  13. Influenza vaccine effectiveness in preventing inpatient and outpatient cases in a season dominated by vaccine-matched influenza B virus

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Baz, Iván; Navascués, Ana; Pozo, Francisco; Chamorro, Judith; Albeniz, Esther; Casado, Itziar; Reina, Gabriel; Cenoz, Manuel García; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Castilla, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    Studies that have evaluated the influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) to prevent laboratory-confirmed influenza B cases are uncommon, and few have analyzed the effect in preventing hospitalized cases. We have evaluated the influenza VE in preventing outpatient and hospitalized cases with laboratory-confirmed influenza in the 2012–2013 season, which was dominated by a vaccine-matched influenza B virus. In the population covered by the Navarra Health Service, all hospitalized patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) and all ILI patients attended by a sentinel network of general practitioners were swabbed for influenza testing, and all were included in a test-negative case-control analysis. VE was calculated as (1-odds ratio)×100. Among 744 patients tested, 382 (51%) were positive for influenza virus: 70% for influenza B, 24% for A(H1N1)pdm09, and 5% for A(H3N2). The overall estimate of VE in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza was 63% (95% confidence interval (CI): 34 to 79), 55% (1 to 80) in outpatients and 74% (33 to 90) in hospitalized patients. The VE was 70% (41 to 85) against influenza B and 43% (−45 to 78) against influenza A. The VE against virus B was 87% (52 to 96) in hospitalized patients and 56% in outpatients (−5 to 81). Adjusted comparison of vaccination status between inpatient and outpatient cases with influenza B did not show statistically significant differences (odds ratio: 1.13; p = 0.878). These results suggest a high protective effect of the vaccine in the 2012–2013 season, with no differences found for the effect between outpatient and hospitalized cases. PMID:25996366

  14. Analysis of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake among Children and Adolescents with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Loh, Ching-Hui; Fang, Wen-Hui; Wu, Chia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M.; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the seasonal influenza vaccination rate and to examine its determinants for children and adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) living in the community. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to analyze the data on seasonal influenza vaccination rate among 1055 ID individuals between the ages…

  15. Comparison of clinical features and outcomes of medically attended influenza A and influenza B in a defined population over four seasons: 2004–2005 through 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Stephanie A.; Patel, Darshan C.; Kieke, Burney A.; Donahue, James G.; Vandermause, Mary F.; Shay, David K.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Irving et al. (2012) Comparison of clinical features and outcomes of medically attended influenza A and influenza B in a defined population over four seasons: 2004–2005 through 2007–2008. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 37–43. Background  There are few prospectively collected data comparing illnesses caused by different subtypes of influenza. We compared the clinical presentation and outcomes of subjects with primarily outpatient‐attended influenza A and B infections during four consecutive influenza seasons (2004–2005 through 2007–2008). Methods  Patients were prospectively enrolled and tested for influenza following an encounter for acute respiratory illness. Influenza infections were confirmed by culture or reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction; subtype was determined for a sample of influenza A isolates each season. Clinical characteristics of influenza A and B infections were compared across and within individual seasons. Results  We identified 901 cases of influenza A and 284 cases of influenza B; 98% of cases were identified through an outpatient medical encounter. Thirty‐six percent of patients with each strain had received seasonal influenza vaccine prior to illness onset. There were no consistent differences in symptoms associated with influenza A and B. Influenza A infection was associated with earlier care seeking compared with influenza B during the 2005–2006 and 2007–2008 seasons, when H3N2 was the dominant type A virus, and in a combined analysis that included all seasons. Twenty‐six (2·2%) of 1185 cases were diagnosed with radiographically confirmed pneumonia, and 59 (5%) of 1185 patients were hospitalized within 30 days of illness onset. Conclusions  Over four influenza seasons, aside from shorter intervals from illness onset to clinical encounter for infections with the A(H3N2) subtype, clinical symptoms and outcomes were similar for patients with predominantly

  16. Influenza epidemiology and influenza vaccine effectiveness during the 2014-2015 season: annual report from the Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network.

    PubMed

    Puig-Barberà, Joan; Burtseva, Elena; Yu, Hongjie; Cowling, Benjamin J; Badur, Selim; Kyncl, Jan; Sominina, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network (GIHSN) has established a prospective, active surveillance, hospital-based epidemiological study to collect epidemiological and virological data for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres over several consecutive seasons. It focuses exclusively on severe cases of influenza requiring hospitalization. A standard protocol is shared between sites allowing comparison and pooling of results. During the 2014-2015 influenza season, the GIHSN included seven coordinating sites from six countries (St. Petersburg and Moscow, Russian Federation; Prague, Czech Republic; Istanbul, Turkey; Beijing, China; Valencia, Spain; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). Here, we present the detailed epidemiological and influenza vaccine effectiveness findings for the Northern Hemisphere 2014-2015 influenza season. PMID:27556802

  17. Vaccine recommendations for children and youth for the 2015/2016 influenza season

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Dorothy L

    2015-01-01

    The Canadian Paediatric Society continues to encourage annual influenza vaccination for ALL children and youth ≥6 months of age. Recommendations from the National Advisory Committee on Immunization for the 2015/2016 influenza season include some important changes: Children and adolescents with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders were added to the list of individuals considered to be at high risk for severe influenza.Quadrivalent influenza vaccines are recommended preferentially over trivalent vaccines for use in children and youth.An adjuvanted trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is now available for use in children six to 23 months of age. PMID:26526862

  18. Effectiveness of trivalent influenza vaccine among children in two consecutive seasons in a community in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tsubasa; Ono, Yasuhiko; Maeda, Hidenori; Tsujimoto, Yoshiki; Shobugawa, Yugo; Dapat, Clyde; Hassan, Mohd Rohaizat; Yokota, Chihiro; Kondo, Hiroki; Dapat, Isolde C; Saito, Kousuke; Saito, Reiko

    2014-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is considered the single most important medical intervention for the prevention of influenza. The dose of trivalent influenza vaccine in children was increased almost double since 2011/12 season in Japan. We estimated the influenza vaccine effectiveness for children 1-11 years of age using rapid test kits in Isahaya City, involving 28,884 children-years, over two consecutive influenza seasons (2011/12 and 2012/13). Children were divided into two groups, vaccinated and unvaccinated, according to their vaccination record, which was obtained from an influenza registration program organized by the Isahaya Medical Association for all pediatric facilities in the city. There were 14,562 and 14,282 children aged from 1-11 years in the city in 2011 and 2012 respectively. In the 2011/12 season, the overall vaccine effectiveness in children from 1-11 years of age, against influenza A and B were 23% [95% confidence interval (CI): 14%-31%] and 20% [95% CI: 8%-31%], respectively. In the 2012/13 season, vaccine effectiveness against influenza A and B was 13% (95% CI: 4%-20%) and 9% (95% CI: -4%-21%), respectively. The vaccine effectiveness was estimated using the rapid diagnosis test kits. Age-stratified estimation showed that vaccine effectiveness was superior in younger children over both seasons and for both virus types. In conclusion, the trivalent influenza vaccine has a significant protective effect for children 1-11 years of age against influenza A and B infection in the 2011/12 season and against influenza A infection in the 2012/13 season in a community in Japan. PMID:24531035

  19. Influenza season in Réunion dominated by influenza B virus circulation associated with numerous cases of severe disease, France, 2014.

    PubMed

    Brottet, E; Vandroux, D; Gauzere, B A; Antok, E; Jaffar-Bandjee, M C; Michault, A; Filleul, L

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 seasonal influenza in Réunion, a French overseas territory in the southern hemisphere, was dominated by influenza B. Resulting morbidity impacted public health. Relative to the total number of all-cause consultations over the whole season, the rate of acute respiratory infection (ARI) consultations was 6.5%. Severe disease occurred in 32 laboratory-confirmed influenza cases (31.7 per 100,000 ARI consultations), 16 with influenza B. The observed disease dynamics could present a potential scenario for the next European influenza season. PMID:25306979

  20. The effectiveness of seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory confirmed influenza hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Nikki; Pierse, Nevil; Bissielo, Ange; Huang, Q Sue; Baker, Michael; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Kelly, Heath

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies report the effectiveness of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in preventing hospitalisation for influenza-confirmed respiratory infections. Using a prospective surveillance platform, this study reports the first such estimate from a well-defined ethnically diverse population in New Zealand (NZ). Methods A case test-negative study was used to estimate propensity adjusted vaccine effectiveness. Patients with a severe acute respiratory infection (SARI), defined as a patient of any age requiring hospitalization with a history of a fever or a measured temperature ≥38°C and cough and onset within the past 7 days, admitted to public hospitals in Central, South and East Auckland were eligible for inclusion in the study. Cases were SARI patients who tested positive for influenza, while non-cases (controls) were SARI patients who tested negative. Results were adjusted for the propensity to be vaccinated and the timing of the influenza season Results The propensity and season adjusted vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated as 37% (95% CI 18;51). The VE point estimate against influenza A (H1N1) was higher than for influenza B or influenza A (H3N2) but confidence intervals were wide and overlapping. Estimated VE was 51% (95% CI 28;67) in patients aged 18-64 years but only 6% (95% CI -51;42) in those aged 65 years and above. Conclusion Prospective surveillance for SARI has been successfully established in NZ . This study for the first year, the 2012 influenza season, has shown low to moderate protection by TIV against hospitalisation for laboratory-confirmed influenza. PMID:24768730

  1. Coordination Costs for School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics, Maine, 2009 H1N1 Pandemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asay, Garrett R. Beeler; Cho, Bo-Hyun; Lorick, Suchita A.; Tipton, Meredith L.; Dube, Nancy L.; Messonnier, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    School nurses played a key role in Maine's school-located influenza vaccination (SLV) clinics during the 2009-2010 pandemic season. The objective of this study was to determine, from the school district perspective, the labor hours and costs associated with outside-clinic coordination activities (OCA). The authors defined OCA as labor hours spent…

  2. Comparison of pandemic and seasonal influenza A infections in pediatric patients: were they different?

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaoyan; DeBiasi, Roberta L.; Campos, Joseph M.; Fagbuyi, Daniel B.; Jacobs, Brian R.; Singh, Nalini

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Song et al. (2012) Comparison of pandemic and seasonal influenza A infections in pediatric patients: were they different?. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 25–27. This retrospective cohort study revealed that the presence of pandemic H1N1 influenza resulted in a 77.7% increase of patient visits in the emergency department for influenza like illnesses and a 67.2% increase of hospital days in our hospital by comparing to a regular influenza season (2008–2009 season). However, median length of hospital stay was no different in either period (pandemic: 3 days versus seasonal: 4 days, P = 0.06). Except for the patients hospitalized for pandemic H1N1 influenza (n = 111) were older (median age: 4.7 years versus 1.6 years, P = 0.04) and tended to have pre‐existing asthma (21.6% versus 9.0%, P = 0.07) than those hospitalized for seasonal influenza A infections (n = 44), this study found no significant difference between the two comparison groups with regards of other clinical and epidemiological features. PMID:21668668

  3. Effectiveness of seasonal 2010/11 and pandemic influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccines in preventing influenza infection in the United Kingdom: mid-season analysis 2010/11.

    PubMed

    Pebody, R; Hardelid, P; Fleming, Dm; McMenamin, J; Andrews, N; Robertson, C; Thomas, Dr; Sebastianpillai, P; Ellis, J; Carman, W; Wreghitt, T; Zambon, M; Watson, Jm

    2011-01-01

    This study provides mid-season estimates of the effectiveness of 2010/11 trivalent influenza vaccine and previous vaccination with monovalent influenza A(H1N1)2009 vaccine in preventing confirmed influenza A(H1N1)2009 infection in the United Kingdom in the 2010/11 season. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness was 34% (95% CI: -10 - 60%) if vaccinated only with monovalent vaccine in the 2009/10 season; 46% (95% CI: 7 - 69%) if vaccinated only with trivalent influenza vaccine in the 2010/11 season and 63% (95% CI: 37 - 78%) if vaccinated in both seasons. PMID:21329644

  4. Epidemiology of Hospital Admissions with Influenza during the 2013/2014 Northern Hemisphere Influenza Season: Results from the Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Barberà, Joan; Natividad-Sancho, Angels; Trushakova, Svetlana; Sominina, Anna; Pisareva, Maria; Ciblak, Meral A.; Badur, Selim; Yu, Hongjie; Cowling, Benjamin J.; El Guerche-Séblain, Clotilde; Mira-Iglesias, Ainara; Kisteneva, Lidiya; Stolyarov, Kirill; Yurtcu, Kubra; Feng, Luzhao; López-Labrador, Xavier; Burtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Background The Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network was established in 2012 to obtain valid epidemiologic data on hospital admissions with influenza-like illness. Here we describe the epidemiology of admissions with influenza within the Northern Hemisphere sites during the 2013/2014 influenza season, identify risk factors for severe outcomes and complications, and assess the impact of different influenza viruses on clinically relevant outcomes in at-risk populations. Methods Eligible consecutive admissions were screened for inclusion at 19 hospitals in Russia, Turkey, China, and Spain using a prospective, active surveillance approach. Patients that fulfilled a common case definition were enrolled and epidemiological data were collected. Risk factors for hospitalization with laboratory-confirmed influenza were identified by multivariable logistic regression. Findings 5303 of 9507 consecutive admissions were included in the analysis. Of these, 1086 were influenza positive (534 A(H3N2), 362 A(H1N1), 130 B/Yamagata lineage, 3 B/Victoria lineage, 40 untyped A, and 18 untyped B). The risk of hospitalization with influenza (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]) was elevated for patients with cardiovascular disease (1.63 [1.33–2.02]), asthma (2.25 [1.67–3.03]), immunosuppression (2.25 [1.23–4.11]), renal disease (2.11 [1.48–3.01]), liver disease (1.94 [1.18–3.19], autoimmune disease (2.97 [1.58–5.59]), and pregnancy (3.84 [2.48–5.94]). Patients without comorbidities accounted for 60% of admissions with influenza. The need for intensive care or in-hospital death was not significantly different between patients with or without influenza. Influenza vaccination was associated with a lower risk of confirmed influenza (adjusted odds ratio = 0.61 [0.48–0.77]). Conclusions Influenza infection was detected among hospital admissions with and without known risk factors. Pregnancy and underlying comorbidity increased the risk of detecting influenza

  5. CD206+ Cell Number Differentiates Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from Seasonal Influenza A Virus in Fatal Cases

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Ramirez, Heidi G.; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C.; Barboza-Quintana, Oralia; Melo-de la Garza, Americo; Ceceñas-Falcon, Luis Angel; Rangel-Martinez, Lilia M.; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G.

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, a new influenza A (H1N1) virus affected many persons around the world. There is an urgent need for finding biomarkers to distinguish between influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza virus. We investigated these possible biomarkers in the lung of fatal cases of confirmed influenza A (H1N1)pdm09. Cytokines (inflammatory and anti-inflammatory) and cellular markers (macrophages and lymphocytes subpopulation markers) were analyzed in lung tissue from both influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza virus. High levels of IL-17, IFN-γ, and TNF-α positive cells were identical in lung tissue from the influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal cases when compared with healthy lung tissue (P < 0.05). Increased IL-4+ cells, and CD4+ and CD14+ cells were also found in high levels in both influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza virus (P < 0.05). Low levels of CD206+ cells (marker of alternatively activated macrophages marker in lung) were found in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 when compared with seasonal influenza virus (P < 0.05), and the ratio of CD206/CD14+ cells was 2.5-fold higher in seasonal and noninfluenza group compared with influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 (P < 0.05). In conclusion, CD206+ cells differentiate between influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal influenza virus in lung tissue of fatal cases. PMID:25614715

  6. Partial protection against 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) of seasonal influenza vaccination and related regional factors: Updated systematic review and meta-analyses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Jin-Yan; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Fu, Wei-Ming

    2015-01-01

    This updated systematic review and meta-analyses aims to systematically evaluate the cross-protection of seasonal influenza vaccines against the 2009 pandemic A (H1N1) influenza infection, and investigate the potential effect of the influenza strains circulating previous to the pandemic on the association between vaccine receipt and pandemic infection. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed based on the study locations and previous circulating influenza viruses. Relevant articles in English and Chinese from 2009 to October 2013 were systematically searched, and 21 eligible studies were included. For case-control studies, an insignificant 20% reduced risk for pandemic influenza infection based on combined national data (OR = 0.80; 95%CI: 0.60, 1.05) was calculated for people receiving seasonal influenza vaccination. However, for RCTs, an insignificant increase in the risk of seasonal influenza vaccines was observed (RR = 1.27; 95% CI: 0.46, 3.53). For the subgroup analysis, a significant 35% cross-protection was observed in the subgroup where influenza A outbreaks were detected before the 2009 pandemic. Moreover, the results indicated that seasonal influenza vaccination may reduce the risk of influenza-like illnesses (ILIs) (RR = 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99). Our findings partially support the hypothesis that seasonal vaccines may offer moderate cross-protection for adults against laboratory-confirmed pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection and ILIs. Further immunological studies are needed to understand the mechanism underlying these findings. PMID:25692308

  7. [Implementation of seasonal influenza and human papillomavirus vaccination recommendations in gynecological practices in Germany].

    PubMed

    Bödeker, Birte; Seefeld, Linda; Buck, Stephanie; Ommen, Oliver; Wichmann, Ole

    2016-03-01

    In Germany, seasonal influenza vaccination has been recommended for pregnant women since 2010 and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for girls since 2007. Gynecologists play an important role in the communication and vaccination of these two target groups. Moreover, seasonal influenza vaccination is also recommended for healthcare workers, as well as adults aged ≥ 60 years and individuals with underlying chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to gain first insights into the acceptance and implementation of the seasonal influenza und HPV vaccination recommendations in gynecological practices. In the context of the national influenza immunization campaign-which is jointly carried out by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA)-a questionnaire was sent together with influenza information kits to 7477 gynecologists in September 2014. Data from 1469 (20 %) gynecologists were included in the analysis. 72 % of respondents reported that they themselves received a seasonal influenza shot each year. The majority of gynecologists recommended seasonal influenza vaccination for pregnant women (93 %) and HPV vaccination for girls (97 %). The most commonly stated reasons against influenza vaccination were safety concerns. Those against HPV vaccination were effectiveness concerns. Additionally, for both vaccinations the provision of vaccine-related information to the patient was considered too time consuming.The high acceptance of seasonal influenza and HPV vaccination among gynecologists is discordant with the available vaccination coverage figures in Germany. Gynecologists must be reminded of their important role in the prevention of vaccine-preventable diseases in adolescents and adult women. Immunization and communication skills should be considered more strongly as an integral part of medical education and further training for gynecologists. PMID:26753868

  8. Prediction of Peaks of Seasonal Influenza in Military Health-Care Data

    PubMed Central

    Buczak, Anna L.; Baugher, Benjamin; Guven, Erhan; Moniz, Linda; Babin, Steven M.; Chretien, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a highly contagious disease that causes seasonal epidemics with significant morbidity and mortality. The ability to predict influenza peak several weeks in advance would allow for timely preventive public health planning and interventions to be used to mitigate these outbreaks. Because influenza may also impact the operational readiness of active duty personnel, the US military places a high priority on surveillance and preparedness for seasonal outbreaks. A method for creating models for predicting peak influenza visits per total health-care visits (ie, activity) weeks in advance has been developed using advanced data mining techniques on disparate epidemiological and environmental data. The model results are presented and compared with those of other popular data mining classifiers. By rigorously testing the model on data not used in its development, it is shown that this technique can predict the week of highest influenza activity for a specific region with overall better accuracy than other methods examined in this article. PMID:27127415

  9. Prediction of Peaks of Seasonal Influenza in Military Health-Care Data.

    PubMed

    Buczak, Anna L; Baugher, Benjamin; Guven, Erhan; Moniz, Linda; Babin, Steven M; Chretien, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a highly contagious disease that causes seasonal epidemics with significant morbidity and mortality. The ability to predict influenza peak several weeks in advance would allow for timely preventive public health planning and interventions to be used to mitigate these outbreaks. Because influenza may also impact the operational readiness of active duty personnel, the US military places a high priority on surveillance and preparedness for seasonal outbreaks. A method for creating models for predicting peak influenza visits per total health-care visits (ie, activity) weeks in advance has been developed using advanced data mining techniques on disparate epidemiological and environmental data. The model results are presented and compared with those of other popular data mining classifiers. By rigorously testing the model on data not used in its development, it is shown that this technique can predict the week of highest influenza activity for a specific region with overall better accuracy than other methods examined in this article. PMID:27127415

  10. Influenza-related deaths--available methods for estimating numbers and detecting patterns for seasonal and pandemic influenza in Europe.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, A; Ciancio, B C; Lopez Chavarrias, V; Mølbak, K; Pebody, R; Pedzinski, B; Penttinen, P; van der Sande, M; Snacken, R; Van Kerkhove, M D

    2012-01-01

    Two methodologies are used for describing and estimating influenza-related mortality: Individual-based methods, which use death certification and laboratory diagnosis and predominately determine patterns and risk factors for mortality, and population-based methods, which use statistical and modelling techniques to estimate numbers of premature deaths. The total numbers of deaths generated from the two methods cannot be compared. The former are prone to underestimation, especially when identifying influenza-related deaths in older people. The latter are cruder and have to allow for confounding factors, notably other seasonal infections and climate effects. There is no routine system estimating overall European influenza-related premature mortality, apart from a pilot system EuroMOMO. It is not possible at present to estimate the overall influenza mortality due to the 2009 influenza pandemic in Europe, and the totals based on individual deaths are a minimum estimate. However, the pattern of mortality differed considerably between the 2009 pandemic in Europe and the interpandemic period 1970 to 2008, with pandemic deaths in 2009 occurring in younger and healthier persons. Common methods should be agreed to estimate influenza-related mortality at national level in Europe, and individual surveillance should be instituted for influenza-related deaths in key groups such as pregnant women and children. PMID:22587958

  11. Influenza

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction During the autumn-winter months (influenza seasons), influenza circulates more frequently, causing a greater proportion of influenza-like illness, and sometimes serious seasonal epidemics. The incidence of infection depends on the underlying immunity of the population. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of vaccines to prevent influenza? What are the effects of antiviral chemoprophylaxis of influenza? What are the effects of antiviral medications to treat influenza? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to June 2008 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 21 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: vaccines, amantadine, oseltamivir, zanamivir, rimantadine. PMID:19445759

  12. Climatic Drivers Of Seasonal Influenza Epidemics In French Guiana, 2006–2010

    PubMed Central

    Mahamat, A.; Dussart, P.; Bouix, A.; Carvalho, L.; Eltges, F.; Matheus, S.; Miller, MA.; Quenel, P.; Viboud, C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Influenza seasonality remains poorly studied in Equatorial regions. Here we assessed the seasonal characteristics and environmental drivers of influenza epidemics in French Guiana, where influenza surveillance was established in 2006. Methods Sentinel GPs monitored weekly incidence of Influenza-like illnesses (ILI) from January 2006 through December 2010 and collected nasopharyngeal specimens from patients for virological confirmation. Times series analysis was used to investigate relationship between ILI and climatic parameters (rainfall and specific humidity). Results Based on 1,533 viruses identified during the study period, we observed marked seasonality in the circulation of influenza virus in the pre-pandemic period, followed by year-round activity in the post-pandemic period, with a peak in the rainy season. ILI incidence showed seasonal autoregressive variation based on ARIMA analysis. Multivariate dynamic regression revealed that a 1mm increase of rainfall resulted in an increase of 0.33% in ILI incidence one week later, adjusting for specific humidity (SH). Conversely, an increase of 1g/kg of SH resulted in a decrease of 11% in ILI incidence 3 weeks later, adjusting for rainfall. Conclusions Increased rainfall and low levels of specific humidity favor influenza transmission in French Guiana. PMID:23597784

  13. Effectiveness of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care in the United Kingdom: 2012/13 end of season results.

    PubMed

    Andrews, N; McMenamin, J; Durnall, H; Ellis, J; Lackenby, A; Robertson, C; von Wissmann, B; Cottrell, S; Smyth, B; Moore, C; Gunson, R; Zambon, M; Fleming, D; Pebody, R

    2014-01-01

    The effectiveness of the 2012/13 trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV) was assessed using a test-negative case-control study of patients consulting primary care with influenza-like illness in the United Kingdom. Strain characterisation was undertaken on selected isolates. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) against confirmed influenza A(H3N2), A(H1N1) and B virus infection, adjusted for age, sex, surveillance scheme (i.e. setting) and month of sample collection was 26% (95% confidence interval (CI): -4 to 48), 73% (95% CI: 37 to 89) and 51% (95% CI: 34 to 63) respectively. There was an indication, although not significant, that VE declined by time since vaccination for influenza A(H3N2) (VE 50% within three months, 2% after three months, p=0.25). For influenza A(H3N2) this is the second season of low VE, contributing to the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation that the 2013/14 influenza vaccine strain composition be changed to an A(H3N2) virus antigenically like cell-propagated prototype 2012/13 vaccine strain (A/Victoria/361/2011). The lower VE seen for type B is consistent with antigenic drift away from the 2012/13 vaccine strain. The majority of influenza B viruses analysed belong to the genetic clade 2 and were antigenically distinguishable from the 2012/13 vaccine virus B/Wisconsin/1/2010 clade 3. These findings supported the change to the WHO recommended influenza B vaccine component for 2013/14. PMID:25033051

  14. Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Viruses A (H1N1) during 2007–2009 Influenza Seasons, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ujike, Makoto; Shimabukuro, Kozue; Mochizuki, Kiku; Obuchi, Masatsugu; Kageyama, Tsutomu; Shirakura, Masayuki; Kishida, Noriko; Yamashita, Kazuyo; Horikawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Yumiko; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Tashiro, Masato

    2010-01-01

    To monitor oseltamivir-resistant influenza viruses A (H1N1) (ORVs) with H275Y in neuraminidase (NA) in Japan during 2 influenza seasons, we analyzed 3,216 clinical samples by NA sequencing and/or NA inhibition assay. The total frequency of ORVs was 2.6% (45/1,734) during the 2007–08 season and 99.7% (1,477/1,482) during the 2008–09 season, indicating a marked increase in ORVs in Japan during 1 influenza season. The NA gene of ORVs in the 2007–08 season fell into 2 distinct lineages by D354G substitution, whereas that of ORVs in the 2008–09 season fell into 1 lineage. NA inhibition assay and M2 sequencing showed that almost all the ORVs were sensitive to zanamivir and amantadine. The hemagglutination inhibition test showed that ORVs were antigenetically similar to the 2008–09 vaccine strain A/Brisbane/59/2007. Our data indicate that the current vaccine or zanamivir and amantadine are effective against recent ORVs, but continuous surveillance remains necessary. PMID:20507742

  15. Influenza Seasonality in the Tropics and Subtropics – When to Vaccinate?

    PubMed Central

    Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Paget, John; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Fitzner, Julia; Bhat, Niranjan; Vandemaele, Katelijn; Zhang, Wenqing

    2016-01-01

    Background The timing of the biannual WHO influenza vaccine composition selection and production cycle has been historically directed to the influenza seasonality patterns in the temperate regions of the northern and southern hemispheres. Influenza activity, however, is poorly understood in the tropics with multiple peaks and identifiable year-round activity. The evidence-base needed to take informed decisions on vaccination timing and vaccine formulation is often lacking for the tropics and subtropics. This paper aims to assess influenza seasonality in the tropics and subtropics. It explores geographical grouping of countries into vaccination zones based on optimal timing of influenza vaccination. Methods Influenza seasonality was assessed by different analytic approaches (weekly proportion of positive cases, time series analysis, etc.) using FluNet and national surveillance data. In case of discordance in the seasonality assessment, consensus was built through discussions with in-country experts. Countries with similar onset periods of their primary influenza season were grouped into geographical zones. Results The number and period of peak activity was ascertained for 70 of the 138 countries in the tropics and subtropics. Thirty-seven countries had one and seventeen countries had two distinct peaks. Countries near the equator had secondary peaks or even identifiable year-round activity. The main influenza season in most of South America and Asia started between April and June. The start of the main season varied widely in Africa (October and December in northern Africa, April and June in Southern Africa and a mixed pattern in tropical Africa). Eight “influenza vaccination zones” (two each in America and Asia, and four in Africa and Middle East) were defined with recommendations for vaccination timing and vaccine formulation. The main limitation of our study is that FluNet and national surveillance data may lack the granularity to detect sub

  16. Net Costs Due to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination — United States, 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Carias, Cristina; Reed, Carrie; Kim, Inkyu K.; Foppa, Ivo M.; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Meltzer, Martin I.; Finelli, Lyn; Swerdlow, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza causes considerable morbidity and mortality across all age groups, and influenza vaccination was recommended in 2010 for all persons aged 6 months and above. We estimated the averted costs due to influenza vaccination, taking into account the seasonal economic burden of the disease. Methods We used recently published values for averted outcomes due to influenza vaccination for influenza seasons 2005-06, 2006-07, 2007-08, and 2008-09, and age cohorts 6 months-4 years, 5-19 years, 20-64 years, and 65 years and above. Costs were calculated according to a payer and societal perspective (in 2009 US$), and took into account medical costs and productivity losses. Results When taking into account direct medical costs (payer perspective), influenza vaccination was cost saving only for the older age group (65≥) in seasons 2005-06 and 2007-08. Using the same perspective, influenza vaccination resulted in total costs of $US 1.7 billion (95%CI: $US 0.3–4.0 billion) in 2006-07 and $US 1.8 billion (95%CI: $US 0.1–4.1 billion) in 2008-09. When taking into account a societal perspective (and including the averted lost earnings due to premature death) averted deaths in the older age group influenced the results, resulting in cost savings for all ages combined in season 07-08. Discussion Influenza vaccination was cost saving in the older age group (65≥) when taking into account productivity losses and, in some seasons, when taking into account medical costs only. Averted costs vary significantly per season; however, in seasons where the averted burden of deaths is high in the older age group, averted productivity losses due to premature death tilt overall seasonal results towards savings. Indirect vaccination effects and the possibility of diminished case severity due to influenza vaccination were not considered, thus the averted burden due to influenza vaccine may be even greater than reported. PMID:26230271

  17. Other Respiratory Viruses Are Important Contributors to Adult Respiratory Hospitalizations and Mortality Even During Peak Weeks of the Influenza Season

    PubMed Central

    Gilca, Rodica; Amini, Rachid; Douville-Fradet, Monique; Charest, Hugues; Dubuque, Josée; Boulianne, Nicole; Skowronski, Danuta M.; De Serres, Gaston

    2014-01-01

    Background  During peak weeks of seasonal influenza epidemics, severe respiratory infections without laboratory confirmation are typically attributed to influenza. Methods  In this prospective study, specimens and demographic and clinical data were collected from adults admitted with respiratory symptoms to 4 hospitals during the 8–10 peak weeks of 2 influenza seasons. Specimens were systematically tested for influenza and 13 other respiratory viruses (ORVs) by using the Luminex RVP FAST assay. Results  At least 1 respiratory virus was identified in 46% (21% influenza, 25% noninfluenza; 2% coinfection) of the 286 enrolled patients in 2011–2012 and in 62% (46% influenza, 16% noninfluenza; 3% coinfection) of the 396 enrolled patients in 2012–2013. Among patients aged ≥75 years, twice as many ORVs (32%) as influenza viruses (14%) were detected in 2011–2012. During both seasons, the most frequently detected ORVs were enteroviruses/rhinoviruses (7%), respiratory syncytial virus (6%), human metapneumovirus (5%), coronaviruses (4%), and parainfluenza viruses (2%). Disease severity was similar for influenza and ORVs during both seasons. Conclusions  Although ORV contribution relative to influenza varies by age and season, during the peak weeks of certain influenza seasons, ORVs may be a more frequent cause of elderly hospitalization than influenza. PMID:25734152

  18. Virological Surveillance of Influenza Viruses during the 2008–09, 2009–10 and 2010–11 Seasons in Tunisia

    PubMed Central

    El Moussi, Awatef; Pozo, Francisco; Ben Hadj Kacem, Mohamed Ali; Ledesma, Juan; Cuevas, Maria Teresa; Casas, Inmaculada; Slim, Amine

    2013-01-01

    Background The data contribute to a better understanding of the circulation of influenza viruses especially in North-Africa. Objective The objective of this surveillance was to detect severe influenza cases, identify their epidemiological and virological characteristics and assess their impact on the healthcare system. Method We describe in this report the findings of laboratory-based surveillance of human cases of influenza virus and other respiratory viruses' infection during three seasons in Tunisia. Results The 2008–09 winter influenza season is underway in Tunisia, with co-circulation of influenza A/H3N2 (56.25%), influenza A(H1N1) (32.5%), and a few sporadic influenza B viruses (11.25%). In 2010–11 season the circulating strains are predominantly the 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (70%) and influenza B viruses (22%). And sporadic viruses were sub-typed as A/H3N2 and unsubtyped influenza A, 5% and 3%, respectively. Unlike other countries, highest prevalence of influenza B virus Yamagata-like lineage has been reported in Tunisia (76%) localised into the clade B/Bangladesh/3333/2007. In the pandemic year, influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 predominated over other influenza viruses (95%). Amino acid changes D222G and D222E were detected in the HA gene of A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in two severe cases, one fatal case and one mild case out of 50 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses studied. The most frequently reported respiratory virus other than influenza in three seasons was RSV (45.29%). Conclusion This article summarises the surveillance and epidemiology of influenza viruses and other respiratory viruses, showing how rapid improvements in influenza surveillance were feasible by connecting the existing structure in the health care system for patient records to electronic surveillance system for reporting ILI cases. PMID:24069267

  19. An innovative influenza vaccination policy: targeting last season's patients.

    PubMed

    Yamin, Dan; Gavious, Arieh; Solnik, Eyal; Davidovitch, Nadav; Balicer, Ran D; Galvani, Alison P; Pliskin, Joseph S

    2014-05-01

    Influenza vaccination is the primary approach to prevent influenza annually. WHO/CDC recommendations prioritize vaccinations mainly on the basis of age and co-morbidities, but have never considered influenza infection history of individuals for vaccination targeting. We evaluated such influenza vaccination policies through small-world contact networks simulations. Further, to verify our findings we analyzed, independently, large-scale empirical data of influenza diagnosis from the two largest Health Maintenance Organizations in Israel, together covering more than 74% of the Israeli population. These longitudinal individual-level data include about nine million cases of influenza diagnosed over a decade. Through contact network epidemiology simulations, we found that individuals previously infected with influenza have a disproportionate probability of being highly connected within networks and transmitting to others. Therefore, we showed that prioritizing those previously infected for vaccination would be more effective than a random vaccination policy in reducing infection. The effectiveness of such a policy is robust over a range of epidemiological assumptions, including cross-reactivity between influenza strains conferring partial protection as high as 55%. Empirically, our analysis of the medical records confirms that in every age group, case definition for influenza, clinical diagnosis, and year tested, patients infected in the year prior had a substantially higher risk of becoming infected in the subsequent year. Accordingly, considering individual infection history in targeting and promoting influenza vaccination is predicted to be a highly effective supplement to the current policy. Our approach can also be generalized for other infectious disease, computer viruses, or ecological networks. PMID:24851863

  20. Emergency department and 'Google flu trends' data as syndromic surveillance indicators for seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Thompson, L H; Malik, M T; Gumel, A; Strome, T; Mahmud, S M

    2014-11-01

    We evaluated syndromic indicators of influenza disease activity developed using emergency department (ED) data - total ED visits attributed to influenza-like illness (ILI) ('ED ILI volume') and percentage of visits attributed to ILI ('ED ILI percent') - and Google flu trends (GFT) data (ILI cases/100 000 physician visits). Congruity and correlation among these indicators and between these indicators and weekly count of laboratory-confirmed influenza in Manitoba was assessed graphically using linear regression models. Both ED and GFT data performed well as syndromic indicators of influenza activity, and were highly correlated with each other in real time. The strongest correlations between virological data and ED ILI volume and ED ILI percent, respectively, were 0·77 and 0·71. The strongest correlation of GFT was 0·74. Seasonal influenza activity may be effectively monitored using ED and GFT data. PMID:24480399

  1. Benefits and Effectiveness of Administering Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine With Seasonal Influenza Vaccine: An Approach for Policymakers

    PubMed Central

    Nanni, Angeline; Levine, Orin

    2012-01-01

    For the influenza pandemic of 2009–2010, countries responded to the direct threat of influenza but may have missed opportunities and strategies to limit secondary pneumococcal infections. Delivering both vaccines together can potentially increase pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) immunization rates and prevent additional hospitalizations and mortality in the elderly and other high-risk groups. We used PubMed to review the literature on the concomitant use of PPV23 with seasonal influenza vaccines. Eight of 9 clinical studies found that a concomitant program conferred clinical benefits. The 2 studies that compared the cost-effectiveness of different strategies found concomitant immunization to be more cost-effective than either vaccine given alone. Policymakers should consider a stepwise strategy to reduce the burden of secondary pneumococcal infections during seasonal and pandemic influenza outbreaks. PMID:22397339

  2. Heterosubtypic neutralizing antibodies are produced by individuals immunized with a seasonal influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Corti, Davide; Suguitan, Amorsolo L.; Pinna, Debora; Silacci, Chiara; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca M.; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Santos, Celia; Luke, Catherine J.; Torres-Velez, Fernando J.; Temperton, Nigel J.; Weiss, Robin A.; Sallusto, Federica; Subbarao, Kanta; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The target of neutralizing antibodies that protect against influenza virus infection is the viral protein HA. Genetic and antigenic variation in HA has been used to classify influenza viruses into subtypes (H1–H16). The neutralizing antibody response to influenza virus is thought to be specific for a few antigenically related isolates within a given subtype. However, while heterosubtypic antibodies capable of neutralizing multiple influenza virus subtypes have been recently isolated from phage display libraries, it is not known whether such antibodies are produced in the course of an immune response to influenza virus infection or vaccine. Here we report that, following vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine containing H1 and H3 influenza virus subtypes, some individuals produce antibodies that cross-react with H5 HA. By immortalizing IgG-expressing B cells from 4 individuals, we isolated 20 heterosubtypic mAbs that bound and neutralized viruses belonging to several HA subtypes (H1, H2, H5, H6, and H9), including the pandemic A/California/07/09 H1N1 isolate. The mAbs used different VH genes and carried a high frequency of somatic mutations. With the exception of a mAb that bound to the HA globular head, all heterosubtypic mAbs bound to acid-sensitive epitopes in the HA stem region. Four mAbs were evaluated in vivo and protected mice from challenge with influenza viruses representative of different subtypes. These findings reveal that seasonal influenza vaccination can induce polyclonal heterosubtypic neutralizing antibodies that cross-react with the swine-origin pandemic H1N1 influenza virus and with the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus. PMID:20389023

  3. Diversity of influenza-like illness etiology in Polish Armed Forces in influenza epidemic season.

    PubMed

    Kocik, Janusz; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Winnicka, Izabela; Michalski, Aleksander; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata; Kołodziej, Marcin; Joniec, Justyna; Cieślik, Piotr; Graniak, Grzegorz; Mirski, Tomasz; Gaweł, Jerzy; Bielecka-Oder, Anna; Kubiak, Leszek; Russell, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct an epidemiological and laboratory surveillance of Influenza-Like Illnesses (ILI) in Polish Armed Forces, civilian military personnel and their families in 2011/2012 epidemic season, under the United States Department of Defense-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (DoD-GEIS). ILI incidence data were analyzed in relation to age, gender, patient category as well as pathogen patterns. Multiple viral, bacterial and viral-bacterial co-infections were identified. Nose and throat swabs of active duty soldiers in the homeland country and in the NATO peacekeeping forces KFOR (Kosovo Force), as well as members of their families were tested for the presence of viral and bacterial pathogens. From October 2011 to May 2012, 416 specimens from ILI symptoms patients were collected and analyzed for the presence of viral and bacterial pathogens. Among viruses, coronavirus was the most commonly detected. In the case of bacterial infections, the most common pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25195140

  4. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, Australia, 2010.

    PubMed

    Fielding, James E; Grant, Kristina A; Garcia, Katherine; Kelly, Heath A

    2011-07-01

    To estimate effectiveness of seasonal trivalent and monovalent influenza vaccines against pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus, we conducted a test-negative case-control study in Victoria, Australia, in 2010. Patients seen for influenza-like illness by general practitioners in a sentinel surveillance network during 2010 were tested for influenza; vaccination status was recorded. Case-patients had positive PCRs for pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, and controls had negative influenza test results. Of 319 eligible patients, test results for 139 (44%) were pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus positive. Adjusted effectiveness of seasonal vaccine against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was 79% (95% confidence interval 33%-93%); effectiveness of monovalent vaccine was 47% and not statistically significant. Vaccine effectiveness was higher among adults. Despite some limitations, this study indicates that the first seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine to include the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus strain provided significant protection against laboratory-confirmed pandemic (H1N1) 2009 infection. PMID:21762570

  5. Parents' preferences for seasonal influenza vaccine for their children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shono, Aiko; Kondo, Masahide

    2014-09-01

    In Japan, trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine is the only approved influenza vaccine. It is typically administrated by hypodermic injection, and children under 13 years of age are recommended to be vaccinated two times during each winter season. Live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is administered by a thimerosal-free nasal spray. If LAIV is approved in the future in Japan, parents will have an alternative type of influenza vaccine for their children. This study investigated parents' preference for the type of seasonal influenza vaccine for their children if alternatives are available. The marginal willingness to pay for vaccine benefits was also evaluated. We conducted a discrete choice experiment, a quantitative approach that is often used in healthcare studies, in January 2013. Respondents were recruited from a registered online survey panel, and parents with at least one child under 13 years of age were offered questionnaires. This study showed that for seasonal influenza vaccines for their children, parents are more likely to value safety, including thimerosal-free vaccines and those with a lower risk of adverse events, instead of avoiding the momentary pain from an injection. If LAIV is released in Japan, the fact that it is thimerosal-free could be an advantage. However, for parents to choose LAIV, they would need to accept the slightly higher risk of minor adverse events from LAIV. PMID:25063570

  6. Seasonal influenza vaccination among Mexican migrants traveling through the Mexico-U.S. border region

    PubMed Central

    Ejebe, Ifna H.; Zhang, Xiao; Rangel, Maria Gudelia; Martinez-Donate, Ana P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mobile populations are at high risk for communicable diseases and can serve as a bridge between sending and receiving communities. The objective of this study is to determine the rates of, and factors associated with, seasonal influenza vaccination among Mexican migrants traveling through the US-Mexico border. Methods We used a 2013 cross-sectional population-based survey of adult mobile Mexican migrants traveling through the Mexico-U.S. border region (N = 2,313; weighted N = 652,500). We performed a multivariable logistic regression analysis to model the odds of receiving an influenza vaccination in the past year by sociodemographics, migration history, health status, and access to health care. Results The seasonal influenza vaccination rate in this population was 18.6%. Gender, health status, and health insurance were associated with the likelihood to receive an influenza vaccination. Conclusion Overall, the rates of seasonal influenza vaccination in circular Mexican migrants are low compared to adults in Mexico and the U.S. Efforts are needed to increase influenza vaccination among this highly mobile population, particularly in adults with chronic conditions. PMID:25514546

  7. Update: influenza activity--United States and worldwide, 2003-04 season, and composition of the 2004-05 influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    2004-07-01

    During the 2003-04 influenza season, influenza A (H1), A (H3N2), and B viruses co-circulated worldwide, and influenza A (H3N2) viruses predominated. Several Asian countries reported widespread outbreaks of avian influenza A (H5N1) among poultry. In Vietnam and Thailand, these outbreaks were associated with severe illnesses and deaths among humans. In the United States, the 2003-04 influenza season began earlier than most seasons, peaked in December, was moderately severe in terms of its impact on mortality, and was associated predominantly with influenza A (H3N2) viruses. This report 1) summarizes information collected by World Health Organization (WHO) and National Respiratory and Enteric Virus Surveillance System (NREVSS) collaborating laboratories, state and local health departments, health-care providers, vital statistics registries, and CDC and 2) describes influenza activity in the United States and worldwide during the 2003-04 influenza season and the composition of the 2004-05 influenza vaccine. PMID:15229411

  8. The ABCs of School Choice, 2009-2010 Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the 2009-2010 edition of the Friedman Foundation for Educational Choice's "ABCs of School Choice". The "ABCs of School Choice" provides the latest in up-to-date and accurate information about the many school choice success stories taking place throughout the country. Readers will find this guide an essential resource on…

  9. Specialist Schools and Academies Trust Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools Network, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Specialist Schools and Academies Trust (SSAT) is an independent, not-for-profit membership organisation dedicated to raising levels of achievement in education. SSAT has a membership of over 5,500 schools and growing numbers of affiliated universities, colleges and local authorities. This 2009/2010 Annual Report shows clearly the practical …

  10. Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Division of Policy, Planning, and Research has assembled the Tennessee Higher Education Fact Book which is a compilation of statistical information pertaining to higher education in Tennessee. The 2009-2010 Fact Book contains tables and charts with data relevant to enrollment, persistence, graduation, tuition, financial aid, lottery…

  11. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Adam K; Kristensen, Anne B; Lay, William N; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV- subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV- controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  12. HIV-dependent depletion of influenza-specific memory B cells impacts B cell responsiveness to seasonal influenza immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Adam K.; Kristensen, Anne B.; Lay, William N.; Kent, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV drives significant alterations in B cell phenotype and function that can markedly influence antibody responses to immunisation. Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) can partially reverse many aspects of B cell dysregulation, however complete normalisation of vaccine responsiveness is not always observed. Here we examine the effects of underlying HIV infection upon humoral immunity to seasonal influenza vaccines. Serological and memory B cell responses were assessed in 26 HIV+ subjects receiving ART and 30 healthy controls immunised with the 2015 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3). Frequencies and phenotypes of influenza hemagglutinin (HA)-specific B cells were assessed by flow cytometry using recombinant HA probes. Serum antibody was measured using hemagglutination inhibition assays. Serological responses to IIV3 were comparable between HIV+ and HIV− subjects. Likewise, the activation and expansion of memory B cell populations specific for vaccine-component influenza strains was observed in both cohorts, however peak frequencies were diminished in HIV+ subjects compared to uninfected controls. Lower circulating frequencies of memory B cells recognising vaccine-component and historical influenza strains were observed in HIV+ subjects at baseline, that were generally restored to levels comparable with HIV− controls post-vaccination. HIV infection is therefore associated with depletion of selected HA-specific memory B cell pools. PMID:27220898

  13. Influenza vaccination of pregnant women protects them over two consecutive influenza seasons in a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Mutsaerts, Eleonora; Madhi, Shabir A.; Cutland, Clare L.; Jones, Stephanie; Hugo, Andrea; Trenor, Siobhan; Treurnicht, Florette K.; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Weinberg, Adriana; Nunes, Marta C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: We assessed the persistence of hemagglutinin inhibition (HAI) antibodies and the vaccine efficacy (VE) of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) following vaccination of a cohort of pregnant South African women during a second influenza season. Methods: A cohort of women who participated in a randomized placebo-controlled trial on the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of IIV3 in 2011 had HAI titers measured in 2012 and were monitored for influenza illness until the end of 2012. Results: The proportion of women with HAI titers ≥1:40 was significantly greater in vaccinees (63%) compared to placebo-recipients (22%; p < 0.001). VE in 2012 was 63.8% (95% confidence interval [95%CI]: −33.7%, 90.2%); combined VE for 2011 and 2012 was 58.3% (95%CI: 0.2%, 82.6%). Conclusion: The majority of women who received IIV3 during pregnancy had HAI titers above the putative threshold for protection against influenza illness one year after vaccination and showed a trend towards protection against influenza disease. PMID:27212228

  14. Influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates in Europe in a season with three influenza type/subtypes circulating: the I-MOVE multicentre case-control study, influenza season 2012/13.

    PubMed

    Kissling, E; Valenciano, M; Buchholz, U; Larrauri, A; Cohen, J M; Nunes, B; Rogalska, J; Pitigoi, D; Paradowska-Stankiewicz, I; Reuss, A; Jiménez-Jorge, S; Daviaud, I; Guiomar, R; O'Donnell, J; Necula, G; Głuchowska, M; Moren, A

    2014-01-01

    In the fifth season of Influenza Monitoring Vaccine Effectiveness in Europe (I-MOVE), we undertook a multicentre case-control study (MCCS) in seven European Union (EU) Member States to measure 2012/13 influenza vaccine effectiveness against medically attended influenza-like illness (ILI) laboratory confirmed as influenza. The season was characterised by substantial co-circulation of influenza B, A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) viruses. Practitioners systematically selected ILI patients to swab ≤7 days of symptom onset. We compared influenza-positive by type/subtype to influenza-negative patients among those who met the EU ILI case definition. We conducted a complete case analysis using logistic regression with study as fixed effect and calculated adjusted vaccine effectiveness (AVE), controlling for potential confounders (age, sex, symptom onset week and presence of chronic conditions). We calculated AVE by type/subtype. Study sites sent 7,954 ILI/acute respiratory infection records for analysis. After applying exclusion criteria, we included 4,627 ILI patients in the analysis of VE against influenza B (1,937 cases), 3,516 for A(H1N1)pdm09 (1,068 cases) and 3,340 for influenza A(H3N2) (730 cases). AVE was 49.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 32.4 to 62.0) against influenza B, 50.4% (95% CI: 28.4 to 65.6) against A(H1N1)pdm09 and 42.2% (95% CI: 14.9 to 60.7) against A(H3N2). Our results suggest an overall low to moderate AVE against influenza B, A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2), between 42 and 50%. In this season with many co-circulating viruses, the high sample size enabled stratified AVE by type/subtype. The low estimates indicate seasonal influenza vaccines should be improved to achieve acceptable protection levels. PMID:24556348

  15. Protective Effect of Hand-Washing and Good Hygienic Habits Against Seasonal Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mingbin; Ou, Jianming; Zhang, Lijie; Shen, Xiaona; Hong, Rongtao; Ma, Huilai; Zhu, Bao-Ping; Fontaine, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous observational studies have reported protective effects of hand-washing in reducing upper respiratory infections, little is known about the associations between hand-washing and good hygienic habits and seasonal influenza infection. We conducted a case-control study to test whether the risk of influenza transmission associated with self-reported hand-washing and unhealthy hygienic habits among residents in Fujian Province, southeastern China. Laboratory confirmed seasonal influenza cases were consecutively included in the study as case-patients (n = 100). For each case, we selected 1 control person matched for age and city of residence. Telephone interview was used to collect information on hand-washing and hygienic habits. The associations were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. Compared with the poorest hand-washing score of 0 to 3, odds ratios of influenza infection decreased progressively from 0.26 to 0.029 as hand-washing score increased from 4 to the maximum of 9 (P < 0.001). Compared with the poorest hygienic habit score of 0 to 2, odds ratios of influenza infection decreased from 0.10 to 0.015 with improving score of hygienic habits (P < 0.001). Independent protective factors against influenza infection included good hygienic habits, higher hand-washing score, providing soap or hand cleaner beside the hand-washing basin, and receiving influenza vaccine. Regular hand-washing and good hygienic habits were associated with a reduced risk of influenza infection. These findings support the general recommendation for nonpharmaceutical interventions against influenza. PMID:26986125

  16. Associations between seasonal influenza and meteorological parameters in Costa Rica, Honduras and Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Soebiyanto, Radina P; Clara, Wilfrido A; Jara, Jorge; Balmaseda, Angel; Lara, Jenny; Lopez Moya, Mariel; Palekar, Rakhee; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Kiang, Richard K

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza affects a considerable proportion of the global population each year. We assessed the association between subnational influenza activity and temperature, specific humidity and rainfall in three Central America countries, i.e. Costa Rica, Honduras and Nicaragua. Using virologic data from each country's national influenza centre, rainfall from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and air temperature and specific humidity data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System, we applied logistic regression methods for each of the five sub-national locations studied. Influenza activity was represented by the weekly proportion of respiratory specimens that tested positive for influenza. The models were adjusted for the potentially confounding co-circulating respiratory viruses, seasonality and previous weeks' influenza activity. We found that influenza activity was proportionally associated (P<0.05) with specific humidity in all locations [odds ratio (OR) 1.21-1.56 per g/kg], while associations with temperature (OR 0.69-0.81 per °C) and rainfall (OR 1.01-1.06 per mm/day) were location-dependent. Among the meteorological parameters, specific humidity had the highest contribution (~3-15%) to the model in all but one location. As model validation, we estimated influenza activity for periods, in which the data was not used in training the models. The correlation coefficients between the estimates and the observed were ≤0.1 in 2 locations and between 0.6-0.86 in three others. In conclusion, our study revealed a proportional association between influenza activity and specific humidity in selected areas from the three Central America countries. PMID:26618318

  17. Socioeconomic impact of seasonal (epidemic) influenza and the role of over-the-counter medicines.

    PubMed

    Klepser, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    The substantial economic impact of influenza on society results primarily from lost work time and reduced productivity of patients and caregivers and increased use of medical resources. Additionally, since the 1980s, aging of the US population has meant rising influenza-related morbidity and mortality. According to the most current published data on this topic, in 2003 the total economic burden of influenza epidemics in the USA across all age groups was US$87.1 billion. As of February 2013, overall vaccine effectiveness for the 2012/2013 season was estimated to be 56 %. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases has concluded that more effective vaccines and vaccination strategies are needed. Moderate efficacy of the influenza vaccine, continued questions regarding the value of treatment with antivirals, and a growing self-care movement have led to increased use of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, which play a vital role in managing symptoms associated with mild to moderate influenza and provide an estimated US$102 billion in annual savings for the US healthcare system. A primary benefit to society of using OTC medicines to manage influenza is decreased use of the healthcare system, thereby mitigating the socioeconomic burden of influenza. Considering the stresses placed on the US healthcare system and the substantial productivity losses resulting from seasonal influenza as well as the growing self-care movement, OTC medicines will play an important role in the course of future influenza epidemics. PMID:25150045

  18. DNA Priming for Seasonal Influenza Vaccine: A Phase 1b Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bellamy, Abbie R.; Belshe, Robert; Bernstein, David I.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Patel, Shital M.; Renehan, Phyllis; Zajdowicz, Thad; Schwartz, Richard; Koup, Richard; Bailer, Robert T.; Yamshchikov, Galina V.; Enama, Mary E.; Sarwar, Uzma; Larkin, Brenda; Graham, Barney S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficacy of current influenza vaccines is limited in vulnerable populations. DNA vaccines can be produced rapidly, and may offer a potential strategy to improve vaccine immunogenicity, indicated by studies with H5 influenza DNA vaccine prime followed by inactivated vaccine boost. Methods Four sites enrolled healthy adults, randomized to receive 2011/12 seasonal influenza DNA vaccine prime (n=65) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (n=66) administered intramuscularly with Biojector. All subjects received the 2012/13 seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine, trivalent (IIV3) 36 weeks after the priming injection. Vaccine safety and tolerability was the primary objective and measurement of antibody response by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) was the secondary objective. Results The DNA vaccine prime-IIV3 boost regimen was safe and well tolerated. Significant differences in HAI responses between the DNA vaccine prime and the PBS prime groups were not detected in this study. Conclusion While DNA priming significantly improved the response to a conventional monovalent H5 vaccine in a previous study, it was not effective in adults using seasonal influenza strains, possibly due to pre-existing immunity to the prime, unmatched prime and boost antigens, or the lengthy 36 week boost interval. Careful optimization of the DNA prime-IIV3 boost regimen as related to antigen matching, interval between vaccinations, and pre-existing immune responses to influenza is likely to be needed in further evaluations of this vaccine strategy. In particular, testing this concept in younger age groups with less prior exposure to seasonal influenza strains may be informative. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01498718 PMID:25950433

  19. Evaluation of the Becton Dickinson Rapid Influenza Diagnostic Tests in Outpatients in Germany during Seven Influenza Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Eggers, Maren; Enders, Martin; Terletskaia-Ladwig, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Background An extensive retrospective study spanning several seasons was undertaken to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the BD rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT) in comparison with the RT-PCR assay. Methods A total of 2,179 respiratory samples were tested in parallel by in-house RT-PCR and the RIDT. During the 2003-2004, 2006-2007, 2007-2008, and 2008-2009 (n=1671) seasons, the BD Directigen Flu A+B test was used, and during the 2010-2011, 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 (n=508) seasons, the BD Directigen EZ Flu A+B test b was used. Results The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for the BD Directigen Flu A+B test calculated for types A and B together were 39%, 99%, 98%, and 56%, respectively. For the BD Directigen EZ Flu A+B test, these values were 47%, 100%, 100%, 55%, respectively. The sensitivity of the BD Directigen Flu A+B test did not differ significantly from season to season or between types A (44%) and B (37%). The sensitivity of the BD Directigen EZ Flu A+B test calculated for type A only was 59%, which was considerably higher than the sensitivity of this test for type B (23%). The sensitivity of the RIDT was approximately 40-50% in children and teenagers, but it was only 18.% in adults aged 20 years and older. The specificity of both RIDTs was very high (>99%) during all seasons. Conclusions Due to their rapid turnaround time, RIDTs can help guide decisions about the clinical management of influenza. Because of the high specificity, a positive result can be interpreted as a true positive, and antiviral therapy as well as appropriate measures to prevent the transmission of influenza can be initiated. The best sensitivity of the RIDT is achieved in children. However, even in this group, the RIDT will only recognize influenza infection in approximately half of the cases, and influenza should still be considered in patients with negative results; negative RIDT results must be confirmed by PCR. PMID:26011531

  20. The use of nonhuman primates in research on seasonal, pandemic and avian influenza, 1893-2014.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Bray, Mike

    2015-05-01

    Attempts to reproduce the features of human influenza in laboratory animals date from the early 1890s, when Richard Pfeiffer inoculated apes with bacteria recovered from influenza patients and produced a mild respiratory illness. Numerous studies employing nonhuman primates (NHPs) were performed during the 1918 pandemic and the following decade. Most used bacterial preparations to infect animals, but some sought a filterable agent for the disease. Since the viral etiology of influenza was established in the early 1930s, studies in NHPs have been supplemented by a much larger number of experiments in mice, ferrets and human volunteers. However, the emergence of a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus in 1976 and the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus in 1997 stimulated an increase in NHP research, because these agents are difficult to study in naturally infected patients and cannot be administered to human volunteers. In this paper, we review the published literature on the use of NHPs in influenza research from 1893 through the end of 2014. The first section summarizes observational studies of naturally occurring influenza-like syndromes in wild and captive primates, including serologic investigations. The second provides a chronological account of experimental infections of NHPs, beginning with Pfeiffer's study and covering all published research on seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses, including vaccine and antiviral drug testing. The third section reviews experimental infections of NHPs with avian influenza viruses that have caused disease in humans since 1997. The paper concludes with suggestions for further studies to more clearly define and optimize the role of NHPs as experimental animals for influenza research. PMID:25746173

  1. The use of nonhuman primates in research on seasonal, pandemic and avian influenza, 1893–2014

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A. Sally; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Bray, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Attempts to reproduce the features of human influenza in laboratory animals date from the early 1890s, when Richard Pfeiffer inoculated apes with bacteria recovered from influenza patients and produced a mild respiratory illness. Numerous studies employing nonhuman primates (NHPs) were performed during the 1918 pandemic and the following decade. Most used bacterial preparations to infect animals, but some sought a filterable agent for the disease. Since the viral etiology of influenza was established in the early 1930s, studies in NHPs have been supplemented by a much larger number of experiments in mice, ferrets and human volunteers. However, the emergence of a novel swine-origin H1N1 influenza virus in 1976 and the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus in 1997 stimulated an increase in NHP research, because these agents are difficult to study in naturally infected patients and cannot be administered to human volunteers. In this paper, we review the published literature on the use of NHPs in influenza research from 1893 through the end of 2014. The first section summarizes observational studies of naturally occurring influenza-like syndromes in wild and captive primates, including serologic investigations. The second provides a chronological account of experimental infections of NHPs, beginning with Pfeiffer’s study and covering all published research on seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses, including vaccine and antiviral drug testing. The third section reviews experimental infections of NHPs with avian influenza viruses that have caused disease in humans since 1997. The paper concludes with suggestions for further studies to more clearly define and optimize the role of NHPs as experimental animals for influenza research. PMID:25746173

  2. Selection of antigenically advanced variants of seasonal influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Li, Chengjun; Hatta, Masato; Burke, David F; Ping, Jihui; Zhang, Ying; Ozawa, Makoto; Taft, Andrew S; Das, Subash C; Hanson, Anthony P; Song, Jiasheng; Imai, Masaki; Wilker, Peter R; Watanabe, Tokiko; Watanabe, Shinji; Ito, Mutsumi; Iwatsuki-Horimoto, Kiyoko; Russell, Colin A; James, Sarah L; Skepner, Eugene; Maher, Eileen A; Neumann, Gabriele; Klimov, Alexander I; Kelso, Anne; McCauley, John; Wang, Dayan; Shu, Yuelong; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Xu, Xiyan; Wentworth, David E; Katz, Jacqueline M; Cox, Nancy J; Smith, Derek J; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses mutate frequently, necessitating constant updates of vaccine viruses. To establish experimental approaches that may complement the current vaccine strain selection process, we selected antigenic variants from human H1N1 and H3N2 influenza virus libraries possessing random mutations in the globular head of the haemagglutinin protein (which includes the antigenic sites) by incubating them with human and/or ferret convalescent sera to human H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. We also selected antigenic escape variants from human viruses treated with convalescent sera and from mice that had been previously immunized against human influenza viruses. Our pilot studies with past influenza viruses identified escape mutants that were antigenically similar to variants that emerged in nature, establishing the feasibility of our approach. Our studies with contemporary human influenza viruses identified escape mutants before they caused an epidemic in 2014-2015. This approach may aid in the prediction of potential antigenic escape variants and the selection of future vaccine candidates before they become widespread in nature. PMID:27572841

  3. Clinical data on Fluarix: an inactivated split seasonal influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    El Sahly, Hana M; Keitel, Wendy A

    2008-08-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual winter epidemics in temperate regions, with significant morbidity, mortality and economical impact. Fluarix is a split, trivalent, inactivated vaccine, manufactured from highly purified, egg-grown influenza viruses by GlaxoSmithKline. In 2005, Fluarix underwent accelerated approval for use in adults by the US FDA following a US-based, randomized, placebo-controlled trial that established its safety and immunogenicity in adults. The vaccine has been licensed in Europe since 1992 for all age groups. Multiple registration trials in all age groups in Europe have demonstrated that the vaccine was safe and well tolerated and of immunogenicity standards that met the requirements of the European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use. There are no published clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness or efficacy of Fluarix against influenza and its complications. Currently, Fluarix plays an important role in the diversification of the supply chain of influenza vaccine to the community. However, vaccines with improved immunogenicity in at-risk populations, such as the elderly, and with less reliance on growth in eggs, as well as the inherent demanding timelines, are needed to enhance the control of influenza. PMID:18665769

  4. Burden and characteristics of influenza A and B in Danish intensive care units during the 2009/10 and 2010/11 influenza seasons.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, S; Krause, T G; Bragstad, K; Perner, A; Mølbak, K; Glismann, S

    2013-04-01

    Influenza surveillance in Danish intensive care units (ICUs) was performed during the 2009/10 and 2010/11 influenza seasons to monitor the burden on ICUs. All 44 Danish ICUs reported aggregate data for incidence and point prevalence, and case-based demographical and clinical parameters. Additional data on microbiological testing, vaccination and death were obtained from national registers. Ninety-six patients with influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 were recorded in 2009/10; 106 with influenza A and 42 with influenza B in 2010/11. The mean age of influenza A patients was higher in 2010/11 than in 2009/10, 53 vs. 44 years (P = 0·004). No differences in other demographic and clinical parameters were detected between influenza A and B patients. In conclusion, the number of patients with severe influenza was higher in Denmark during the 2010/11 than the 2009/10 season with a shift towards older age groups in influenza A patients. Influenza B caused severe illness and needs consideration in clinical and public health policy. PMID:22793496

  5. Trends in influenza vaccination coverage rates in Germany over five seasons from 2001 to 2006

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Majbrit V; Blank, Patricia R; Szucs, Thomas D

    2007-01-01

    Background To assess influenza vaccination coverage from 2001 to 2006 in Germany, to understand drivers and barriers to vaccination and to identify vaccination intentions for season 2006/07. Methods 9,990 telephone-based household surveys from age 14 were conducted between 2001 and 2006. Essentially, the same questionnaire was used in all seasons. Results The influenza vaccination coverage rate reached 32.5% in 2005/06. In the elderly (≥60 years), the vaccination rate reached 58.9% in 2005/06. In those aged 65 years and older, it was 63.4%. Perceiving influenza as a serious illness was the most frequent reason for getting vaccinated. Thirteen percent of those vaccinated in 2005/06 indicated the threat of avian flu as a reason. The main reason for not getting vaccinated was thinking about it without putting it into practice. The major encouraging factor to vaccination was a recommendation by the family doctor. 49.6% of the respondents intend to get vaccinated against influenza in season 2006/07. Conclusion Increasing vaccination rates were observed from 2001 to 2006 in Germany. The threat of avian influenza and the extended reimbursement programs may have contributed to the recent increase. PMID:18070354

  6. A Primer on Strategies for Prevention and Control of Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Anthony E.; Merlin, Toby L.; Redd, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The United States has made considerable progress in pandemic preparedness. Limited attention, however, has been given to the challenges faced by populations that will be at increased risk of the consequences of the pandemic, including challenges caused by societal, economic, and health-related factors. This supplement to the American Journal of Public Health focuses on the challenges faced by at-risk and vulnerable populations in preparing for and responding to an influenza pandemic. Here, we provide background information for subsequent articles throughout the supplement. We summarize (1) seasonal influenza epidemiology, transmission, clinical illness, diagnosis, vaccines, and antiviral medications; (2) H5N1 avian influenza; and (3) pandemic influenza vaccines, antiviral medications, and nonpharmaceutical interventions. PMID:19797735

  7. Fluorescent Immunochromatography for Rapid and Sensitive Typing of Seasonal Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Akira; Takayama, Katsuyoshi; Nomura, Namiko; Kajiwara, Naoki; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tamura, Tsuruki; Yamada, Jitsuho; Hashimoto, Masako; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Suda, Yoshihiko; Kobayashi, Yukuharu; Kida, Hiroshi; Shibasaki, Futoshi

    2015-01-01

    Lateral flow tests also known as Immunochromatography (IC) is an antigen-detection method conducted on a nitrocellulose membrane that can be completed in less than 20 min. IC has been used as an important rapid test for clinical diagnosis and surveillance of influenza viruses, but the IC sensitivity is relatively low (approximately 60%) and the limit of detection (LOD) is as low as 10³ pfu per reaction. Recently, we reported an improved IC assay using antibodies conjugated with fluorescent beads (fluorescent immunochromatography; FLIC) for subtyping H5 influenza viruses (FLIC-H5). Although the FLIC strip must be scanned using a fluorescent reader, the sensitivity (LOD) is significantly improved over that of conventional IC methods. In addition, the antibodies which are specific against the subtypes of influenza viruses cannot be available for the detection of other subtypes when the major antigenicity will be changed. In this study, we established the use of FLIC to type seasonal influenza A and B viruses (FLIC-AB). This method has improved sensitivity to 100-fold higher than that of conventional IC methods when we used several strains of influenza viruses. In addition, FLIC-AB demonstrated the ability to detect influenza type A and influenza type B viruses from clinical samples with high sensitivity and specificity (Type A: sensitivity 98.7% (74/75), specificity 100% (54/54), Type B: sensitivity 100% (90/90), specificity 98.2% (54/55) in nasal swab samples) in comparison to the results of qRT-PCR. And furthermore, FLIC-AB performs better in the detection of early stage infection (under 13h) than other conventional IC methods. Our results provide new strategies to prevent the early-stage transmission of influenza viruses in humans during both seasonal outbreaks and pandemics. PMID:25650570

  8. The 2009/2010 Caribbean drought: a case study.

    PubMed

    Peters, Everson J

    2015-10-01

    The impacts of drought in the Caribbean have not been as dramatic as in some other parts of world, but it is not exempt from the experiences of drought. As a result of the effects of a prolonged drought in 2009/2010, the agenda for the 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) paid particular attention to the issue of drought. This paper reviews the management framework for responding to drought disasters in five CARICOM countries. The paper also reports on some of the effects of the 2009/2010 drought with particular reference to Grenada and the Grenadines. During the drought in these islands there were numerous bush fires with devastating effects on agriculture, severe water shortages that impacted on the tourism industry and other social effects. It is evident that there was inadequate preparation for the event. Greater planning and investment are therefore required to reduce future impacts. PMID:25754334

  9. Predominance of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus genetic subclade 6B.1 and influenza B/Victoria lineage viruses at the start of the 2015/16 influenza season in Europe.

    PubMed

    Broberg, Eeva; Melidou, Angeliki; Prosenc, Katarina; Bragstad, Karoline; Hungnes, Olav

    2016-03-31

    Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses predominated in the European influenza 2015/16 season. Most analysed viruses clustered in a new genetic subclade 6B.1, antigenically similar to the northern hemisphere vaccine component A/California/7/2009. The predominant influenza B lineage was Victoria compared with Yamagata in the previous season. It remains to be evaluated at the end of the season if these changes affected the effectiveness of the vaccine for the 2015/16 season. PMID:27074657

  10. Debate Regarding Oseltamivir Use for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Heath

    2016-01-01

    A debate about the market-leading influenza antiviral medication, oseltamivir, which initially focused on treatment for generally mild illness, has been expanded to question the wisdom of stockpiling for use in future influenza pandemics. Although randomized controlled trial evidence confirms that oseltamivir will reduce symptom duration by 17–25 hours among otherwise healthy adolescents and adults with community-managed disease, no randomized controlled trials have examined the effectiveness of oseltamivir against more serious outcomes. Observational studies, although criticized on methodologic grounds, suggest that oseltamivir given early can reduce the risk for death by half among persons hospitalized with confirmed infection caused by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A(H5N1) viruses. However, available randomized controlled trial data may not be able to capture the effect of oseltamivir use among hospitalized patients with severe disease. We assert that data on outpatients with relatively mild disease should not form the basis for policies on the management of more severe disease. PMID:27191818

  11. Debate Regarding Oseltamivir Use for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza.

    PubMed

    Hurt, Aeron C; Kelly, Heath

    2016-06-01

    A debate about the market-leading influenza antiviral medication, oseltamivir, which initially focused on treatment for generally mild illness, has been expanded to question the wisdom of stockpiling for use in future influenza pandemics. Although randomized controlled trial evidence confirms that oseltamivir will reduce symptom duration by 17-25 hours among otherwise healthy adolescents and adults with community-managed disease, no randomized controlled trials have examined the effectiveness of oseltamivir against more serious outcomes. Observational studies, although criticized on methodologic grounds, suggest that oseltamivir given early can reduce the risk for death by half among persons hospitalized with confirmed infection caused by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A(H5N1) viruses. However, available randomized controlled trial data may not be able to capture the effect of oseltamivir use among hospitalized patients with severe disease. We assert that data on outpatients with relatively mild disease should not form the basis for policies on the management of more severe disease. PMID:27191818

  12. Observed oseltamivir resistance in seasonal influenza viruses in Europe interpretation and potential implications.

    PubMed

    Nicoll, A; Ciancio, B; Kramarz, P

    2008-01-31

    In this weeks issue of Eurosurveillance, Zambon and colleagues describe the first findings of the European Union-funded European Surveillance Network for Vigilance Against Viral Resistance (VIRGIL) of some seasonal influenza viral isolates resistant to the antiviral drug oseltamivir in Europe. PMID:18445376

  13. Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Long Thanh; Hiromoto, Yasuaki; Pham, Vu Phong; Le, Ha Thi Hong; Nguyen, Ha Truc; Le, Vu Tri; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Saito, Takehiko

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ngo et al. (2012) Isolation of novel triple‐reassortant swine H3N2 influenza viruses possessing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes of a seasonal influenza virus in Vietnam in 2010. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 6–10. Surveillance of swine influenza viruses (SIVs) in 31 pig farms in northern and southern parts of Vietnam was conducted. Six H3N2 influenza A viruses were isolated from a pig farm in southern Vietnam. They were novel genetic reassortants between a triple–reassortant SIV and a human seasonal H3N2 virus. Their hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes were derived from a human virus circulating around 2004–2006 and the remaining genes from a triple‐reassortant SIV that originated in North America. This is the first report describing the isolation of a novel triple‐reassortant SIV in Vietnam. PMID:21668659

  14. Effectiveness of influenza vaccine against laboratory-confirmed influenza, in the late 2011–2012 season in Spain, among population targeted for vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In Spain, the influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated in the last three seasons using the observational study cycEVA conducted in the frame of the existing Spanish Influenza Sentinel Surveillance System. The objective of the study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza-like illness (ILI) among the target groups for vaccination in Spain in the 2011–2012 season. We also studied influenza VE in the early (weeks 52/2011-7/2012) and late (weeks 8-14/2012) phases of the epidemic and according to time since vaccination. Methods Medically attended patients with ILI were systematically swabbed to collect information on exposure, laboratory outcome and confounding factors. Patients belonging to target groups for vaccination and who were swabbed <8 days after symptom onset were included. Cases tested positive for influenza and controls tested negative for any influenza virus. To examine the effect of a late season, analyses were performed according to the phase of the season and according to the time between vaccination and symptoms onset. Results The overall adjusted influenza VE against A(H3N2) was 45% (95% CI, 0–69). The estimated influenza VE was 52% (95% CI, -3 to 78), 40% (95% CI, -40 to 74) and 22% (95% CI, -135 to 74) at 3.5 months, 3.5-4 months, and >4 months, respectively, since vaccination. A decrease in VE with time since vaccination was only observed in individuals aged ≥ 65 years. Regarding the phase of the season, decreasing point estimates were only observed in the early phase, whereas very low or null estimates were obtained in the late phase for the shortest time interval. Conclusions The 2011–2012 influenza vaccine showed a low-to-moderate protective effect against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza in the target groups for vaccination, in a late season and with a limited match between the vaccine and circulating strains. The

  15. Incidence of Medically Attended Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Influenza Illnesses in Children 6–59 Months Old During Four Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Melissa D.; Kieke, Burney A.; Sundaram, Maria E.; McClure, David L.; Meece, Jennifer K.; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Gasser, Robert A.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and influenza are significant causes of seasonal respiratory illness in children. The incidence of influenza and RSV hospitalization is well documented, but the incidence of medically attended, laboratory-confirmed illness has not been assessed in a well defined community cohort. Methods. Children aged 6–59 months with medically attended acute respiratory illness were prospectively enrolled during the 2006–2007 through 2009–2010 influenza seasons in a Wisconsin community cohort. Nasal swabs were tested for RSV and influenza by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The population incidence of medically attended RSV and influenza was estimated separately and standardized to weeks 40 through 18 of each season. Results. The cohort included 2800–3073 children each season. There were 2384 children enrolled with acute respiratory illness; 627 (26%) were positive for RSV and 314 (13%) for influenza. The mean age was 28 months (standard deviation [SD] = 15) for RSV-positive and 38 months (SD = 16) for influenza-positive children. Seasonal incidence (cases per 10 000) was 1718 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1602–1843) for RSV and 768 (95% CI, 696–848) for influenza. Respiratory syncytial virus incidence was highest among children 6–11 (2927) and 12–23 months old (2377). Influenza incidence was highest (850) in children 24–59 months old. The incidence of RSV was higher than influenza across all seasons and age groups. Conclusions. The incidence of medically attended RSV was highest in children 6–23 months old, and it was consistently higher than influenza. The burden of RSV remains high throughout the first 2 years of life. PMID:27419158

  16. Seasonal influenza in the United States, France, and Australia: transmission and prospects for control.

    PubMed

    Chowell, G; Miller, M A; Viboud, C

    2008-06-01

    Recurrent epidemics of influenza are observed seasonally around the world with considerable health and economic consequences. A key quantity for the control of infectious diseases is the reproduction number, which measures the transmissibility of a pathogen and determines the magnitude of public health interventions necessary to control epidemics. Here we applied a simple epidemic model to weekly indicators of influenza mortality to estimate the reproduction numbers of seasonal influenza epidemics spanning three decades in the United States, France, and Australia. We found similar distributions of reproduction number estimates in the three countries, with mean value 1.3 and important year-to-year variability (range 0.9-2.1). Estimates derived from two different mortality indicators (pneumonia and influenza excess deaths and influenza-specific deaths) were in close agreement for the United States (correlation=0.61, P60%) in healthy individuals who respond well to vaccine, in addition to periodic re-vaccination due to evolving viral antigens and waning population immunity. PMID:17634159

  17. Influenza virus surveillance in Argentina during the 2012 season: antigenic characterization, genetic analysis and antiviral susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, E; Daniels, R S; Pontoriero, A; Russo, M; Avaro, M; Czech, A; Campos, A; Periolo, N; Gregory, V; McCauley, J W; Baumeister, E G

    2016-03-01

    The activity and circulation of influenza viruses in Argentina was studied during 2012 as part of the Argentinean Surveillance for Influenza and other Respiratory Viruses, in the context of Global Influenza Surveillance. The antigenicity and molecular characteristics of haemagglutinins (HA) of circulating influenza A and B viruses were analysed to assess the emergence of virus variants. Susceptibility to oseltamivir and zanamivir was evaluated by enzymatic assay and results were backed-up by sequencing of the neuraminidase (NA) genes. During the 2012 season, influenza virus circulation in Argentina was detected from weeks 24 to 51. The HA sequences of the studied A(H1N1)pdm09 subtype viruses segregated in a different genetic group compared to those identified during the 2009 pandemic, although they were still closely related antigenically to the vaccine virus A/California/07/2009. The HA sequences of the A(H3N2) viruses analysed fell into the A/Victoria/208/2009 clade, genetic group 3C. A mixed circulation of virus variants belonging to B/Victoria and B/Yamagata lineages was detected, with B/Victoria being dominant. All viruses tested were sensitive to oseltamivir and zanamivir except one. This isolate, an A(H1N1)pdm09 virus possessing the substitution NA-N295S, showed highly reduced inhibition by oseltamivir and reduced inhibition by zanamivir. Virological and epidemiological surveillance remains critical for detection of evolving influenza viruses. PMID:26345289

  18. Parents’ Perception and their Decision on their Children's Vaccination Against Seasonal Influenza in Guangzhou

    PubMed Central

    He, Lei; Liao, Qiu-Yan; Huang, You-Qi; Feng, Shuo; Zhuang, Xiao-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Seasonal influenza epidemic occurs every year in Guangzhou, which can affect all age groups. Young children are the most susceptible targets. Parents can decide whether to vaccinate their children or not based on their own consideration in China. The aim of this study was to identify factors that are important for parental decisions on vaccinating their children against seasonal influenza based on a modified health belief model (HBM). Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Guangzhou, China. A total of 335 parents who had at least on child aged between 6 months and 3 years were recruited from women and children's hospital in Guangzhou, China. Each eligible subject was invited for a face-to-face interview based on a standardized questionnaire. Results: Uptake of seasonal influenza within the preceding 12 months among the target children who aged between 6 months and 36 months was 47.7%. Around 62.4% parents indicated as being “likely/very likely” to take their children for seasonal influenza vaccination in the next 12 months. The hierarchical logistic regression model showed that children's age (odds ratio [OR] =2.59, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.44–4.68), social norm (OR = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.06–4.06) and perceived control (OR = 2.96, 95% CI: 1.60–5.50) were significantly and positively associated with children's vaccination uptake within the preceding 12 months; children with a history of taking seasonal influenza vaccine (OR = 2.50, 95% CI: 1.31–4.76), perceived children's health status (OR = 3.36, 95% CI: 1.68–6.74), worry/anxious about their children influenza infection (OR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.19–4.48) and perceived control (OR = 3.21, 95% CI: 1.65–6.22) were positively association with parental intention to vaccinate their children in the future 12 months. However, anticipated more regret about taking children for the vaccination was associated with less likely to vaccinate children within the preceding 12 months (OR = 0

  19. Global circulation patterns of seasonal influenza viruses vary with antigenic drift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedford, Trevor; Riley, Steven; Barr, Ian G.; Broor, Shobha; Chadha, Mandeep; Cox, Nancy J.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Gunasekaran, C. Palani; Hurt, Aeron C.; Kelso, Anne; Klimov, Alexander; Lewis, Nicola S.; Li, Xiyan; McCauley, John W.; Odagiri, Takato; Potdar, Varsha; Rambaut, Andrew; Shu, Yuelong; Skepner, Eugene; Smith, Derek J.; Suchard, Marc A.; Tashiro, Masato; Wang, Dayan; Xu, Xiyan; Lemey, Philippe; Russell, Colin A.

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal patterns of emergence and circulation of new human seasonal influenza virus variants is a key scientific and public health challenge. The global circulation patterns of influenza A/H3N2 viruses are well characterized, but the patterns of A/H1N1 and B viruses have remained largely unexplored. Here we show that the global circulation patterns of A/H1N1 (up to 2009), B/Victoria, and B/Yamagata viruses differ substantially from those of A/H3N2 viruses, on the basis of analyses of 9,604 haemagglutinin sequences of human seasonal influenza viruses from 2000 to 2012. Whereas genetic variants of A/H3N2 viruses did not persist locally between epidemics and were reseeded from East and Southeast Asia, genetic variants of A/H1N1 and B viruses persisted across several seasons and exhibited complex global dynamics with East and Southeast Asia playing a limited role in disseminating new variants. The less frequent global movement of influenza A/H1N1 and B viruses coincided with slower rates of antigenic evolution, lower ages of infection, and smaller, less frequent epidemics compared to A/H3N2 viruses. Detailed epidemic models support differences in age of infection, combined with the less frequent travel of children, as probable drivers of the differences in the patterns of global circulation, suggesting a complex interaction between virus evolution, epidemiology, and human behaviour.

  20. Possible repurposing of seasonal influenza vaccine for prevention of Zika virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Veljkovic, Veljko; Paessler, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    The in silico analysis shows that the envelope glycoproteins E of Zika viruses (ZIKV) isolated in Asia, Africa and South and Central America encode highly conserved information determining their interacting profile and immunological properties. Previously it was shown that the same information is encoded in the primary structure of the hemagglutinin subunit 1 (HA1) from pdmH1N1 influenza A virus.  This similarity suggests possible repurposing of the seasonal influenza vaccine containing pdmH1N1 component for prevention of the ZIKV infection. PMID:27158449

  1. Possible repurposing of seasonal influenza vaccine for prevention of Zika virus infection.

    PubMed

    Veljkovic, Veljko; Paessler, Slobodan

    2016-01-01

    The in silico analysis shows that the envelope glycoproteins E of Zika viruses (ZIKV) isolated in Asia, Africa and South and Central America encode highly conserved information determining their interacting profile and immunological properties. Previously it was shown that the same information is encoded in the primary structure of the hemagglutinin subunit 1 (HA1) from pdmH1N1 influenza A virus.  This similarity suggests possible repurposing of the seasonal influenza vaccine containing pdmH1N1 component for prevention of the ZIKV infection. PMID:27158449

  2. Communicability of H1N1 and seasonal influenza among household contacts of cases in large families

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Ashry G.; BinSaeed, Abdulaziz A.; Al‐Habib, Hannan; Al‐Saif, Hytham

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Mohamed et al. (2011) Communicability of H1N1 and seasonal influenza among household contacts of cases in large families. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e25–e29. Background  Quantitative knowledge of the transmissibility of influenza is crucial to its prevention and control. Objectives  To quantify the transmission of influenza A (H1N1) and seasonal influenza in household contacts of patients with influenza diagnosed in a large university hospital. Patients/Methods  A prospective study was conducted between September and October 2009 in which all confirmed cases of influenza diagnosed at King Khalid University Hospital were included. All household contacts were followed by telephone calls every other day for 12 days. They were asked about the development of influenza symptoms in addition to their age and nationality. Results  Overall, 432 household contacts of 69 influenza A (H1N1) cases and 417 contacts of 91 seasonal influenza cases were included. Suspected influenza was diagnosed in 16·9% and 14·4% of household contacts of H1N1 and seasonal influenza patients, respectively. Household reproduction numbers were 1·06 (0·84–1·28) for H1N1 and 0·66 (0·51–0·81) for seasonal influenza. Children in households were more susceptible than were adults (22·2% versus 13·7%, respectively). Evidence of coughing in the index case tripled the risk of infection in households afflicted with the H1N1 influenza [relative risk (RR) = 3·28, CI = 1·24–8·69], while evidence of a runny nose doubled it (RR = 1·89, CI = 1·19–2·92). Conclusions  Communicability of influenza in households in Riyadh is comparable to that in other countries. Children are more susceptible to influenza infection. The presence of a cough or runny nose in the index cases increases the risk of infection. PMID:22118477

  3. Antigenic Drift of A/H3N2/Virus and Circulation of Influenza-Like Viruses During the 2014/2015 Influenza Season in Poland.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, K; Hallmann-Szelińska, E; Kondratiuk, K; Brydak, L B

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity rates of influenza could be greatly reduced due to vaccination. However, the virus is able to evolve through genetic mutations, which is why vaccines with updated composition are necessary every season. Their effectiveness depends on whether there is a good antigenic match between circulating viruses and vaccine strains. In Poland, the 2014/2015 influenza epidemic started in week 5 (January/February) of 2015 and continued until week 17 (April) of 2015. The influenza activity was moderate with the highest incidence of influence-like illness at week 10/2015 (March). During that season, antigenic drift of influenza virus A/H3N2/ occurred causing higher rates of A/H3N2/ infections. Among the 2416 tested specimens, 22.6 % of influenza cases were positive for A/H3N2/, while A/H1N1/pdm09 constituted 14.6 % cases. Influenza A viruses were detected in co-circulation with influenza B viruses; the latter amounted to 34.1 % of all influenza detections. Other detected causes of influenza-like illness consisted of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), being predominant, and, sporadically, human coronavirus, parainfluenza 1-3, rhinovirus, and adenovirus. Despite low vaccine effectiveness of solely one component, A/H3N2/, the vaccine could mitigate or shorten the length of influenza infection and reduce the number of severe outcomes and mortality. Thus, vaccination against influenza remains the most effective way to prevent illness and possibly fatal outcomes. PMID:26956457

  4. Epizootiology of avian influenza: effect of season on incidence in sentinel ducks and domestic turkeys in Minnesota.

    PubMed Central

    Halvorson, D A; Kelleher, C J; Senne, D A

    1985-01-01

    Sentinel ducks and domestic turkey flocks were monitored for influenza infection during a 4-year period. The onset of infection among ducks was similar each year, occurring in late July or early August. Influenza in turkeys was also shown to be seasonal, but the usual onset was 6 to 8 weeks after the detection of influenza in sentinel ducks. Possible explanations for the delayed infection in turkeys are (i) increased waterfowl activity associated with fledging and congregating in late summer and early fall; (ii) vectors transmitting virus from the waterfowl habitat to poultry farms; (iii) cooler environmental temperature, allowing prolonged virus viability; (iv) cooler surface water temperature, allowing prolonged virus viability; (v) groundwater contamination from contaminated surface water; and (vi) virus adaptation in domestic turkeys before infection is detected. We conclude that ducks are not only a natural reservoir of influenza but also have a seasonal infection that appears to be related to seasonal influenza outbreaks in domestic turkeys in Minnesota. However, only some influenza A virus isolates circulating among waterfowl at any given time appear capable of causing detectable infection in turkeys. It is speculated that the seasonal infection in migratory waterfowl may also be related to seasonal influenza infections in other species including humans. PMID:4004223

  5. Viral etiology and seasonality of influenza-like illness in Gabon, March 2010 to June 2011

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surveillance of influenza-like illness (ILI) in Central Africa began only recently, and few data are therefore available on the circulation of influenza virus and other respiratory viruses. In Gabon, a Central African country, we established a surveillance network in four major towns in order to analyze cases of ILI among patients who visited health centers between March 2010 and June 2011, and to determine the viral etiology. Methods Nasal swabs were sent for analysis to the Centre International de Recherches Médicales de Franceville, where they were screened for 17 respiratory viruses in a multiplex real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for all pathogens according the following pairs: adenovirus/parainfluenza virus 4, respiratory syncytial virus/human metapneumovirus, parainfluenza virus 1/parainfluenza virus 2, pandemic influenza virus A/seasonal influenza virus A (H1N1, H3N2)/seasonal influenza virus B, human coronaviruses 229E/OC43, human coronaviruses NL63/HKU1, rhinovirus/human parechovirus, and enterovirus/parainfluenza virus 3. Results We analyzed a total of 1041 specimens, of which 639 (61%) were positive for at least one virus. Three-quarters of the patients were children under five years old. We therefore focused on this age group, in which 68.1% of patients were positive for at least one virus. The most common viruses were adenoviruses (17.5%), followed by parainfluenza viruses (PIVs) 1–4 (16.8%), enteroviruses (EV) (14.7%), respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (13.5%), and influenza virus (11.9%). The prevalence of some viruses was subject to geographic and seasonal variations. One-third of positive samples contained more than one virus. Conclusions Like most studies in the world, the virus PIVs, EV, RSV, Influenza virus, HRV were predominant among children under five years old in Gabon. An exception is made for adenoviruses which have a high prevalence in our study. However adenoviruses can be detected in asymptomatic

  6. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccinations against laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated infections among Singapore military personnel in 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Hin Peow; Zhao, Xiahong; Pang, Junxiong; Chen, Mark I-C; Lee, Vernon J M; Ang, Li Wei; Lin, Raymond V Tzer Pin; Gao, Christine Q; Hsu, Li Yang; Cook, Alex R

    2014-01-01

    Background Limited information is available about seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) in tropical communities. Objectives Virus subtype-specific VE was determined for all military service personnel in the recruit camp and three other non-recruit camp in Singapore's Armed Forces from 1 June 2009 to 30 June 2012. Methods Consenting servicemen underwent nasal washes, which were tested with RT-PCR and subtyped. The test positive case and test negative control design was used to estimate the VE. To estimate the overall effect of the programme on new recruits, we used an ecological time series approach. Results A total of 7016 consultations were collected. The crude estimates for the VE of the triavalent vaccine against both influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza B were 84% (95% CI 78–88%, 79–86%, respectively). Vaccine efficacy against influenza A(H3N2) was markedly lower (VE 33%, 95% CI −4% to 57%). An estimated 70% (RR = 0·30; 95% CI 0·11–0·84), 39% (RR = 0·61;0·25–1·43) and 75% (RR = 0·25; 95% CI 0·11–0·50) reduction in the risk of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B infections, respectively, in the recruit camp during the post-vaccination period compared with during the pre-vaccination period was observed. Conclusions Overall, the blanket influenza vaccine programme in Singapore's Armed Forces has had a moderate to high degree of protection against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza B, but not against influenza A(H3N2). Blanket influenza vaccination is recommended for all military personnel. PMID:24828687

  7. Change in settings for early-season influenza vaccination among US adults, 2012 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah J; Gebremariam, Acham; Cowan, Anne E

    2016-12-01

    Vaccination in non-medical settings is recommended as a strategy to increase access to seasonal influenza vaccine. To evaluate change in early-season influenza vaccination setting, we analyzed data from the National Internet Flu Survey. Bivariate comparison of respondent characteristics by location of vaccination was assessed using chi-square tests. Multinomial logistic regression was performed to compare the predicted probability of being vaccinated in medical, retail, and mobile settings in 2012 vs 2013. In both 2012 and 2013, vaccination in medical settings was more likely among elderly adults, those with chronic conditions, and adults with a high school education or less. Adults 18-64 without a chronic condition had a lower probability of vaccination in the medical setting, and higher probability of vaccination in a retail or mobile setting, in 2013 compared to 2012. Adults 18-64 with a chronic condition had no change in their location of flu vaccination. Elderly adults had a lower probability of vaccination in the medical setting, and higher probability of vaccination in a retail setting, in 2013 compared to 2012. Non-medical settings continue to play an increasing role in influenza vaccination of adults, particularly for adults without a chronic condition and elderly adults. Retail and mobile settings should continue to be viewed as important mechanisms to ensure broad access to influenza vaccination. PMID:27486562

  8. Prediction, dynamics, and visualization of antigenic phenotypes of seasonal influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Neher, Richard A; Bedford, Trevor; Daniels, Rodney S; Russell, Colin A; Shraiman, Boris I

    2016-03-22

    Human seasonal influenza viruses evolve rapidly, enabling the virus population to evade immunity and reinfect previously infected individuals. Antigenic properties are largely determined by the surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA), and amino acid substitutions at exposed epitope sites in HA mediate loss of recognition by antibodies. Here, we show that antigenic differences measured through serological assay data are well described by a sum of antigenic changes along the path connecting viruses in a phylogenetic tree. This mapping onto the tree allows prediction of antigenicity from HA sequence data alone. The mapping can further be used to make predictions about the makeup of the future A(H3N2) seasonal influenza virus population, and we compare predictions between models with serological and sequence data. To make timely model output readily available, we developed a web browser-based application that visualizes antigenic data on a continuously updated phylogeny. PMID:26951657

  9. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccine in preventing influenza primary care visits and hospitalisation in Auckland, New Zealand in 2015: interim estimates.

    PubMed

    Bissielo, A; Pierse, N; Huang, Q S; Thompson, M G; Kelly, H; Mishin, V P; Turner, N

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary results for influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against acute respiratory illness with circulating laboratory-confirmed influenza viruses in New Zealand from 27 April to 26 September 2015, using a case test-negative design were 36% (95% confidence interval (CI): 11-54) for general practice encounters and 50% (95% CI: 20-68) for hospitalisations. VE against hospitalised influenza A(H3N2) illnesses was moderate at 53% (95% CI: 6-76) but improved compared with previous seasons. PMID:26767540

  10. Influenza vaccination coverage rates in five European countries during season 2006/07 and trends over six consecutive seasons

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Patricia R; Schwenkglenks, Matthias; Szucs, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    Background The objectives of the survey were to identify the level of influenza vaccination coverage in five European countries between 2001 and 2007, to understand the drivers and barriers to vaccination, to assess vaccination intentions for the winter 2007/08 as well as major encouraging factors for vaccination. Methods Between 2001 and 2007, representative household surveys were performed with telephone or mailed (France) interviews of individuals aged 14 and above. The questionnaire used in the UK, Germany, Italy, France and Spain was essentially the same in all seasons. The data were subsequently pooled. Four target groups were defined for the analysis: 1) persons aged 65 years and over; 2) persons working in the medical field; 3) chronically ill persons and 4) combined target group composed of individuals belonging to one or more of the previous groups 1, 2 or 3. Results In 2006/07, vaccination coverage was, 25.0% in UK, 27.4% in Germany, 21.8% in Spain, 24.2% in France and 24.4% in Italy. During six influenza seasons (2001–2007), vaccination coverage showed a slight positive trend in the five countries (p ≤ 0.0001). In the elderly (≥ 65 years), across all countries, no significant trend was seen; the vaccination rate decreased non-significantly from a peak of 64.2% in season 2005/06 to 61.1% in season 2006/07. The most frequent reason for getting vaccinated was a recommendation by the family doctor or nurse (51%), and this was also perceived as the major encouraging factor for vaccination (61%). The main reason for not getting vaccinated was feeling unlikely to catch the flu (36%). Conclusion In the UK, Germany and Spain, influenza vaccination coverage rates in season 2006/07 dropped slightly compared to the previous season. However, a trend of increasing vaccination coverage was observed from 2001/02 to 2006/07 across Europe. The family doctor is the major source of encouragement for individuals getting vaccinated. Efforts to overcome the barriers to

  11. The East Jakarta Project: surveillance for highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) and seasonal influenza viruses in patients seeking care for respiratory disease, Jakarta, Indonesia, October 2011-September 2012.

    PubMed

    Storms, A D; Kusriastuti, R; Misriyah, S; Praptiningsih, C Y; Amalya, M; Lafond, K E; Samaan, G; Triada, R; Iuliano, A D; Ester, M; Sidjabat, R; Chittenden, K; Vogel, R; Widdowson, M A; Mahoney, F; Uyeki, T M

    2015-12-01

    Indonesia has reported the most human infections with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) A(H5N1) virus worldwide. We implemented enhanced surveillance in four outpatient clinics and six hospitals for HPAI H5N1 and seasonal influenza viruses in East Jakarta district to assess the public health impact of influenza in Indonesia. Epidemiological and clinical data were collected from outpatients with influenza-like illness (ILI) and hospitalized patients with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI); respiratory specimens were obtained for influenza testing by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. During October 2011-September 2012, 1131/3278 specimens from ILI cases (34·5%) and 276/1787 specimens from SARI cases (15·4%) tested positive for seasonal influenza viruses. The prevalence of influenza virus infections was highest during December-May and the proportion testing positive was 76% for ILI and 36% for SARI during their respective weeks of peak activity. No HPAI H5N1 virus infections were identified, including hundreds of ILI and SARI patients with recent poultry exposures, whereas seasonal influenza was an important contributor to acute respiratory disease in East Jakarta. Overall, 668 (47%) of influenza viruses were influenza B, 384 (27%) were A(H1N1)pdm09, and 359 (25%) were H3. While additional data over multiple years are needed, our findings suggest that seasonal influenza prevention efforts, including influenza vaccination, should target the months preceding the rainy season. PMID:25912029

  12. The Reliability of Tweets as a Supplementary Method of Seasonal Influenza Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Anoshé A; Spitzberg, Brian H; An, Li; Gawron, J Mark; Gupta, Dipak K; Peddecord, K Michael; Nagel, Anna C; Allen, Christopher; Yang, Jiue-An; Lindsay, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing influenza surveillance in the United States is focused on the collection of data from sentinel physicians and hospitals; however, the compilation and distribution of reports are usually delayed by up to 2 weeks. With the popularity of social media growing, the Internet is a source for syndromic surveillance due to the availability of large amounts of data. In this study, tweets, or posts of 140 characters or less, from the website Twitter were collected and analyzed for their potential as surveillance for seasonal influenza. Objective There were three aims: (1) to improve the correlation of tweets to sentinel-provided influenza-like illness (ILI) rates by city through filtering and a machine-learning classifier, (2) to observe correlations of tweets for emergency department ILI rates by city, and (3) to explore correlations for tweets to laboratory-confirmed influenza cases in San Diego. Methods Tweets containing the keyword “flu” were collected within a 17-mile radius from 11 US cities selected for population and availability of ILI data. At the end of the collection period, 159,802 tweets were used for correlation analyses with sentinel-provided ILI and emergency department ILI rates as reported by the corresponding city or county health department. Two separate methods were used to observe correlations between tweets and ILI rates: filtering the tweets by type (non-retweets, retweets, tweets with a URL, tweets without a URL), and the use of a machine-learning classifier that determined whether a tweet was “valid”, or from a user who was likely ill with the flu. Results Correlations varied by city but general trends were observed. Non-retweets and tweets without a URL had higher and more significant (P<.05) correlations than retweets and tweets with a URL. Correlations of tweets to emergency department ILI rates were higher than the correlations observed for sentinel-provided ILI for most of the cities. The machine-learning classifier

  13. Vaccine Effectiveness Against Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Hospitalizations Among Elderly Adults During the 2010–2011 Season

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Jeffrey C.; Campitelli, Michael A.; Gubbay, Jonathan B.; Peci, Adriana; Winter, Anne-Luise; Olsha, Romy; Turner, Robert; Rosella, Laura C.; Crowcroft, Natasha S.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Although annual influenza immunization is recommended for adults aged ≥65 years due to the substantial burden of illness, the evidence base for this recommendation is weak. Prior observational studies that examined influenza vaccine effectiveness against nonspecific serious outcomes suffered from selection bias and the lack of laboratory confirmation for influenza infection. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the 2010–2011 seasonal influenza vaccine against laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations among community-dwelling elderly adults, a serious and highly specific outcome. Methods. We conducted a test-negative study of community-dwelling adults aged >65 years in Ontario, Canada. Respiratory specimens collected between 1 December 2010 and 30 April 2011 from patients admitted to acute care hospitals were tested for influenza using nucleic acid amplification techniques. Influenza vaccination was ascertained from physician billing claims through linkage to health administrative datasets. Results. Receipt of the 2010–2011 seasonal influenza vaccine was associated with a 42% (95% confidence interval, 29%–53%) reduction in laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations. Vaccine effectiveness estimates were consistent across age groups, by sex, and regardless of outcome severity, timing of testing, and when considering individuals vaccinated <7 or <14 days prior to admission as unvaccinated. Conclusions. Results of this study will better inform decision making regarding influenza vaccination of elderly adults. Similar analyses are needed annually due to antigenic drift and frequent changes in influenza vaccine composition. The linkage of routinely collected laboratory testing and health administrative data represents an efficient method for estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness that complements prospective studies. PMID:23788243

  14. Flu (Influenza)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Flu (Influenza) Overview Influenza, or flu, is a respiratory infection ... the flu and its complications every year. Seasonal Flu Seasonal flu refers to the flu outbreaks that ...

  15. Identifying Meteorological Drivers for the Seasonal Variations of Influenza Infections in a Subtropical City — Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Ka Chun; Goggins, William; Zee, Benny Chung Ying; Wang, Maggie Haitian

    2015-01-01

    Compared with temperate areas, the understanding of seasonal variations of influenza infections is lacking in subtropical and tropical regions. Insufficient information about viral activity increases the difficulty of forecasting the disease burden and thus hampers official preparation efforts. Here we identified potential meteorological factors that drove the seasonal variations in influenza infections in a subtropical city, Hong Kong. We fitted the meteorological data and influenza mortality data from 2002 to 2009 in a Susceptible-Infected-Recovered model. From the results, air temperature was a common significant driver of seasonal patterns and cold temperature was associated with an increase in transmission intensity for most of the influenza epidemics. Except 2004, the fitted models with significant meteorological factors could account for more than 10% of the variance in additional to the null model. Rainfall was also found to be a significant driver of seasonal influenza, although results were less robust. The identified meteorological indicators could alert officials to take appropriate control measures for influenza epidemics, such as enhancing vaccination activities before cold seasons. Further studies are required to fully justify the associations. PMID:25635916

  16. Timing of Influenza A(H5N1) in Poultry and Humans and Seasonal Influenza Activity Worldwide, 2004–2013

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Lizette O.; Glew, Patrick; Gross, Diane; Kasper, Matthew; Trock, Susan; Kim, Inkyu K.; Bresee, Joseph S.; Donis, Ruben; Uyeki, Timothy M.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-01-01

    Co-circulation of influenza A(H5N1) and seasonal influenza viruses among humans and animals could lead to co-infections, reassortment, and emergence of novel viruses with pandemic potential. We assessed the timing of subtype H5N1 outbreaks among poultry, human H5N1 cases, and human seasonal influenza in 8 countries that reported 97% of all human H5N1 cases and 90% of all poultry H5N1 outbreaks. In these countries, most outbreaks among poultry (7,001/11,331, 62%) and half of human cases (313/625, 50%) occurred during January–March. Human H5N1 cases occurred in 167 (45%) of 372 months during which outbreaks among poultry occurred, compared with 59 (10%) of 574 months that had no outbreaks among poultry. Human H5N1 cases also occurred in 59 (22%) of 267 months during seasonal influenza periods. To reduce risk for co-infection, surveillance and control of H5N1 should be enhanced during January–March, when H5N1 outbreaks typically occur and overlap with seasonal influenza virus circulation. PMID:25625302

  17. Critical care surveillance: insights into the impact of the 2010/11 influenza season relative to the 2009/10 pandemic season in England.

    PubMed

    Green, H K; Ellis, J; Galiano, M; Watson, J M; Pebody, R G

    2013-01-01

    In 2010/11, the influenza season in England was marked by a relative increase in impact on the population compared to that seen during the 2009/10 pandemic, with the same influenza subtype, A(H1N1)pdm09, circulating. The peaks in critical care bed occupancy in both seasons coincided with peaks in influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 activity, but onset of influenza in 2010/11 additionally coincided with notably cold weather, a comparatively smaller peak in influenza B activity and increased reports of bacterial co-infection. A bigger impact on critical care services was seen across all regions in England in 2010/11, with, compared to 2009/10, a notable age shift in critical care admissions from children to young adults. The peak of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) activity did not coincide with critical care admissions, and regression analysis suggested only a small proportion of critical care bed days might be attributed to the virus in either season. Differences in antiviral policy and improved overall vaccine uptake in 2010/11 with an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 strain containing vaccine between seasons are unlikely to explain the change in impact observed between the two seasons. The reasons behind the relative high level of severe disease in the 2010/11 winter are likely to have resulted from a combination of factors, including an age shift in infection, accumulation of susceptible individuals through waning immunity, new susceptible individuals from new births and cold weather. The importance of further development of severe influenza disease surveillance schemes for future seasons is reinforced. PMID:23787130

  18. Global circulation patterns of seasonal influenza viruses vary with antigenic drift

    PubMed Central

    Bedford, Trevor; Riley, Steven; Barr, Ian G.; Broor, Shobha; Chadha, Mandeep; Cox, Nancy J.; Daniels, Rodney S.; Gunasekaran, C. Palani; Hurt, Aeron C.; Kelso, Anne; Lewis, Nicola S.; Li, Xiyan; McCauley, John W.; Odagiri, Takato; Potdar, Varsha; Rambaut, Andrew; Shu, Yuelong; Skepner, Eugene; Smith, Derek J.; Suchard, Marc A.; Tashiro, Masato; Wang, Dayan; Xu, Xiyan; Lemey, Philippe; Russell, Colin A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatio-temporal patterns of emergence and circulation of new human seasonal influenza virus variants is a key scientific and public health challenge. The global circulation patterns of influenza A/H3N2 viruses are well-characterized1-7 but the patterns of A/H1N1 and B viruses have remained largely unexplored. Here, based on analyses of 9,604 hemagglutinin sequences of human seasonal influenza viruses from 2000–2012, we show that the global circulation patterns of A/H1N1 (up to 2009), B/Victoria, and B/Yamagata viruses differ substantially from those of A/H3N2 viruses. While genetic variants of A/H3N2 viruses did not persist locally between epidemics and were reseeded from East and Southeast (E-SE) Asia, genetic variants of A/H1N1 and B viruses persisted across multiple seasons and exhibited complex global dynamics with E-SE Asia playing a limited role in disseminating new variants. The less frequent global movement of influenza A/H1N1 and B viruses coincided with slower rates of antigenic evolution, lower ages of infection, and smaller less frequent epidemics compared to A/H3N2 viruses. Detailed epidemic models support differences in age of infection, combined with the less frequent travel of children, as likely drivers of the differences in the patterns of global circulation, suggesting a complex interaction between virus evolution, epidemiology and human behavior. PMID:26053121

  19. Seroprevalence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza and effectiveness of 2010/2011 influenza vaccine during 2010/2011 season in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Zhang, Li; Shi, Weixian; Lu, Guilan; Cui, Shujuan; Peng, Xiaomin; Zhang, Daitao; Liu, Yimeng; Liang, Huijie; Pang, Xinghuo; Wang, Quanyi

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Yang et al. (2011) Seroprevalence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza and effectiveness of 2010/2011 influenza vaccine during 2010/2011 season in Beijing, China. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(6), 381–388. Background  In the post‐pandemic period, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus was expected to circulate seasonally and was introduced into trivalent influenza vaccine during 2010/2011 season in the Northern Hemisphere. Objectives  The aim of this study was to examine the evolution of herd immunity against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in Beijing, China, during 2010/2011 season and effectiveness of the 2010/2011 trivalent vaccine. Methods  Two serological surveys were conducted before and after 2010/2011 season in Beijing. A case–control study was used to investigate vaccine effectiveness against influenza‐like illness (ILI) and lower respiratory tract infection (LRI). Results  A total of 4509 and 4543 subjects participated in the pre‐ and post‐season surveys, respectively. The standardized seroprevalence of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza increased from 22·1% pre‐season to 24·3% post‐season (P < 0·001). Significant elevation in seroprevalence appeared in the ≥60 years age‐group (P < 0·001), but not in others. The 2010/2011 trivalent vaccine contributed to the higher post‐seasonal seroprevalence in unvaccinated individuals (P = 0·024), but not in those vaccinated with monovalent pandemic vaccine (P = 0·205), as well as in those without prior immunity versus those with immunity. The adjusted effectiveness of the 2010/2011 trivalent vaccine was 79% protection against ILI (95% CI, 61–89%) and 95% against LRI (95% CI: 59–99%). Conclusions  A slight increase in herd immunity against pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza was observed in Beijing, China, during the 2010/2011 season. Prior vaccination and immunity had a suppressive impact on immune response toward this novel influenza virus

  20. Peripheral Leukocyte Migration in Ferrets in Response to Infection with Seasonal Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Music, Nedzad; Reber, Adrian J; Kim, Jin Hyang; York, Ian A

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand inflammation associated with influenza virus infection, we measured cell trafficking, via flow cytometry, to various tissues in the ferret model following infection with an A(H3N2) human seasonal influenza virus (A/Perth/16/2009). Changes in immune cells were observed in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and spleen, as well as lymph nodes associated with the site of infection or distant from the respiratory system. Nevertheless clinical symptoms were mild, with circulating leukocytes exhibiting rapid, dynamic, and profound changes in response to infection. Each of the biological compartments examined responded differently to influenza infection. Two days after infection, when infected ferrets showed peak fever, a marked, transient lymphopenia and granulocytosis were apparent in all infected animals. Both draining and distal lymph nodes demonstrated significant accumulation of T cells, B cells, and granulocytes at days 2 and 5 post-infection. CD8+ T cells significantly increased in spleen at days 2 and 5 post-infection; CD4+ T cells, B cells and granulocytes significantly increased at day 5. We interpret our findings as showing that lymphocytes exit the peripheral blood and differentially home to lymph nodes and tissues based on cell type and proximity to the site of infection. Monitoring leukocyte homing and trafficking will aid in providing a more detailed view of the inflammatory impact of influenza virus infection. PMID:27315117

  1. Peripheral Leukocyte Migration in Ferrets in Response to Infection with Seasonal Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyang; York, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand inflammation associated with influenza virus infection, we measured cell trafficking, via flow cytometry, to various tissues in the ferret model following infection with an A(H3N2) human seasonal influenza virus (A/Perth/16/2009). Changes in immune cells were observed in the blood, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and spleen, as well as lymph nodes associated with the site of infection or distant from the respiratory system. Nevertheless clinical symptoms were mild, with circulating leukocytes exhibiting rapid, dynamic, and profound changes in response to infection. Each of the biological compartments examined responded differently to influenza infection. Two days after infection, when infected ferrets showed peak fever, a marked, transient lymphopenia and granulocytosis were apparent in all infected animals. Both draining and distal lymph nodes demonstrated significant accumulation of T cells, B cells, and granulocytes at days 2 and 5 post-infection. CD8+ T cells significantly increased in spleen at days 2 and 5 post-infection; CD4+ T cells, B cells and granulocytes significantly increased at day 5. We interpret our findings as showing that lymphocytes exit the peripheral blood and differentially home to lymph nodes and tissues based on cell type and proximity to the site of infection. Monitoring leukocyte homing and trafficking will aid in providing a more detailed view of the inflammatory impact of influenza virus infection. PMID:27315117

  2. Disproportional Effects in Populations of Concern for Pandemic Influenza: Insights from Seasonal Epidemics in Wisconsin, 1967-2004

    PubMed Central

    Lofgren, Eric T; Wenger, Julia B; Fefferman, Nina H; Bina, David; Gradus, Steve; Bhattacharyya, Sanjib; Naumov, Yuri N; Gorski, Jack; Naumova, Elena N

    2010-01-01

    Background Influenza infections pose a serious burden of illness in the United States. We explored age, influenza strains, and seasonal epidemic curves in relation to influenza associated mortality. Methods The state of Wisconsin death records for the years 1967 to 2004 were analyzed for three distinct populations: children, general population, and elderly. Yearly parameters of duration, intensity, and peak timing were obtained from Annual Harmonic Regression coefficients. Results Overall, elderly had the highest rate and intensity of influenza mortality. The children and infant subpopulations showed an earlier and wider range in duration of peak timing than elderly. During A/Hong Kong/1/68 pandemic years, the elderly subpopulation showed no change in mortality rates while a sharp increase was observed for the children and infant subpopulations. In epidemic years such as 1966-1969, children and infants showed a dramatic decrease in the severity of influenza outbreaks over time. The elderly had increased baseline mortality in years (1986-1987) where predominant strain was characterized as A/Singapore/6/86. Conclusions Our findings indicate that the younger populations may have benefited from the lack of a major shift in viral strains for a number of decades. Furthermore, we demonstrate considerable heterogeneity in the spread of seasonal influenza across age categories, with implications both for the modeling of influenza seasonality, risk assessment, and effective distribution and timing of vaccine and prophylactic interventions. PMID:20836795

  3. Evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of avian influenza virus subtypes in blue-winged teal (Anas discors)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andrew M.; Poulson, Rebecca L.; González-Reiche, Ana S.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Walther, Patrick; Link, Paul; Carter, Deborah L.; Newsome, George M.; Müller, Maria L.; Berghaus, Roy D.; Perez, Daniel R.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal dynamics of influenza A viruses (IAVs) are driven by host density and population immunity. Through an analysis of subtypic data for IAVs isolated from Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors), we present evidence for seasonal patterns in the relative abundance of viral subtypes in spring and summer/autumn.

  4. Number of Sentinel Medical Institutions Needed for Estimating Prefectural Incidence in Influenza Surveillance in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shuji; Kawado, Miyuki; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Ohta, Akiko; Shigematsu, Mika; Tada, Yuki; Taniguchi, Kiyosu; Nagai, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Background The sentinel surveillance system in Japan provides estimates of nationwide influenza incidence. Although prefectural influenza incidences can be estimated using data from the current surveillance system, such estimates may be imprecise. Methods We calculated the numbers of sentinel medical institutions (SMIs) needed in the surveillance system to estimate influenza incidences in prefectures, under the assumption that the standard error rates in 75% of influenza epidemic cases are less than 10%. Epidemic cases observed in 47 prefectures during the 2007/2008, 2008/2009, and 2009/2010 seasons, respectively, were used. Results The present total number of SMIs was 6669. With respect to current standards, the increases required in prefectures ranged from 0 to 59, and the total increase required in the number of SMIs was 1668. Conclusions We used sentinel surveillance data for Japan to calculate the number of SMIs required to estimate influenza incidence in each prefecture. PMID:24584400

  5. Virological surveillance of influenza and other respiratory viruses during six consecutive seasons from 2006 to 2012 in Catalonia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Antón, A; Marcos, M A; Torner, N; Isanta, R; Camps, M; Martínez, A; Domínguez, A; Jané, M; Jiménez de Anta, M T; Pumarola, T

    2016-06-01

    Most attention is given to seasonal influenza and respiratory syncytial virus outbreaks, but the cumulative burden caused by other respiratory viruses (RV) is not widely considered. The aim of the present study is to describe the circulation of RV in the general population during six consecutive seasons from 2006 to 2012 in Catalonia, Spain. Cell culture, immunofluorescence and PCR-based assays were used for the RV laboratory-confirmation and influenza subtyping. Phylogenetic and molecular characterizations of viral haemagglutinin, partial neuraminidase and matrix 2 proteins were performed from a representative sampling of influenza viruses. A total of 6315 nasopharyngeal samples were collected, of which 64% were laboratory-confirmed, mainly as influenza A viruses and rhinoviruses. Results show the significant burden of viral aetiological agents in acute respiratory infection, particularly in the youngest cases. The study of influenza strains reveals their continuous evolution through either progressive mutations or by segment reassortments. Moreover, the predominant influenza B lineage was different from that included in the recommended vaccine in half of the studied seasons, supporting the formulation and use of a quadrivalent influenza vaccine. Regarding neuraminidase inhibitors resistance, with the exception of the 2007/08 H275Y seasonal A(H1N1) strains, no other circulating influenza strains carrying known resistance genetic markers were found. Moreover, all circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2) strains finally became genetically resistant to adamantanes. A wide knowledge of the seasonality patterns of the RV in the general population is well-appreciated, but it is a challenge due to the unpredictable circulation of RV, highlighting the value of local and global RV surveillance. PMID:26939538

  6. Effectiveness of Seasonal Influenza Vaccines against Influenza-Associated Illnesses among US Military Personnel in 2010–11: A Case-Control Approach

    PubMed Central

    Eick-Cost, Angelia A.; Tastad, Katie J.; Guerrero, Alicia C.; Johns, Matthew C.; Lee, Seung-eun; MacIntosh, Victor H.; Burke, Ronald L.; Blazes, David L.; Russell, Kevin L.; Sanchez, Jose L.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Following the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 (pH1N1) pandemic, both seasonal and pH1N1 viruses circulated in the US during the 2010–2011 influenza season; influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) may vary between live attenuated (LAIV) and trivalent inactivated (TIV) vaccines as well as by virus subtype. Materials and Methods Vaccine type and virus subtype-specific VE were determined for US military active component personnel for the period of September 1, 2010 through April 30, 2011. Laboratory-confirmed influenza-related medical encounters were compared to matched individuals with a non-respiratory illness (healthy controls), and unmatched individuals who experienced a non-influenza respiratory illness (test-negative controls). Odds ratios (OR) and VE estimates were calculated overall, by vaccine type and influenza subtype. Results A total of 603 influenza cases were identified. Overall VE was relatively low and similar regardless of whether healthy controls (VE = 26%, 95% CI: −1 to 45) or test-negative controls (VE = 29%, 95% CI: −6 to 53) were used as comparison groups. Using test-negative controls, vaccine type-specific VE was found to be higher for TIV (53%, 95% CI: 25 to 71) than for LAIV (VE = −13%, 95% CI: −77 to 27). Influenza subtype-specific analyses revealed moderate protection against A/H3 (VE = 58%, 95% CI: 21 to 78), but not against A/H1 (VE = −38%, 95% CI: −211 to 39) or B (VE = 34%, 95% CI: −122 to 80). Conclusion Overall, a low level of protection against clinically-apparent, laboratory-confirmed, influenza was found for the 2010–11 seasonal influenza vaccines. TIV immunization was associated with higher protection than LAIV, however, no protection against A/H1 was noted, despite inclusion of a pandemic influenza strain as a vaccine component for two consecutive years. Vaccine virus mismatch or lower immunogenicity may have contributed to these findings and deserve further examination in controlled

  7. Uptake and impact of vaccinating school age children against influenza during a season with circulation of drifted influenza A and B strains, England, 2014/15.

    PubMed

    Pebody, Richard G; Green, Helen K; Andrews, Nick; Boddington, Nicola L; Zhao, Hongxin; Yonova, Ivelina; Ellis, Joanna; Steinberger, Sophia; Donati, Matthew; Elliot, Alex J; Hughes, Helen E; Pathirannehelage, Sameera; Mullett, David; Smith, Gillian E; de Lusignan, Simon; Zambon, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season was the second season of roll-out of a live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) programme for healthy children in England. During this season, besides offering LAIV to all two to four year olds, several areas piloted vaccination of primary (4-11 years) and secondary (11-13 years) age children. Influenza A(H3N2) circulated, with strains genetically and antigenically distinct from the 2014/15 A(H3N2) vaccine strain, followed by a drifted B strain. We assessed the overall and indirect impact of vaccinating school age children, comparing cumulative disease incidence in targeted and non-targeted age groups in vaccine pilot to non-pilot areas. Uptake levels were 56.8% and 49.8% in primary and secondary school pilot areas respectively. In primary school age pilot areas, cumulative primary care influenza-like consultation, emergency department respiratory attendance, respiratory swab positivity, hospitalisation and excess respiratory mortality were consistently lower in targeted and non-targeted age groups, though less for adults and more severe end-points, compared with non-pilot areas. There was no significant reduction for excess all-cause mortality. Little impact was seen in secondary school age pilot only areas compared with non-pilot areas. Vaccination of healthy primary school age children resulted in population-level impact despite circulation of drifted A and B influenza strains. PMID:26537222

  8. Seasonal influenza vaccine dose distribution in 157 countries (2004-2011).

    PubMed

    Palache, Abraham; Oriol-Mathieu, Valerie; Abelin, Atika; Music, Tamara

    2014-11-12

    Globally there are an estimated 3-5 million cases of severe influenza illness every year, resulting in 250,000-500,000 deaths. At the World Health Assembly in 2003, World Health Organization (WHO) resolved to increase influenza vaccine coverage rates (VCR) for high-risk groups, particularly focusing on at least 75% of the elderly by 2010. But systematic worldwide data have not been available to assist public health authorities to monitor vaccine uptake and review progress toward vaccination coverage targets. In 2008, the International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations Influenza Vaccine Supply task force (IFPMA IVS) developed a survey methodology to assess global influenza vaccine dose distribution. The current survey results represent 2011 data and demonstrate the evolution of the absolute number distributed between 2004 and 2011 inclusive, and the evolution in the per capita doses distributed in 2008-2011. Global distribution of IFPMA IVS member doses increased approximately 86.9% between 2004 and 2011, but only approximately 12.1% between 2008 and 2011. The WHO's regions in Eastern Mediterranean (EMRO), Southeast Asian (SEARO) and Africa (AFRO) together account for about 47% of the global population, but only 3.7% of all IFPMA IVS doses distributed. While distributed doses have globally increased, they have decreased in EURO and EMRO since 2009. Dose distribution can provide a reasonable proxy of vaccine utilization. Based on the dose distribution, we conclude that seasonal influenza VCR in many countries remains well below the WHA's VCR targets and below the recommendations of the Council of the European Union in EURO. Inter- and intra-regional disparities in dose distribution trends call into question the impact of current vaccine recommendations at achieving coverage targets. Additional policy measures, particularly those that influence patients adherence to vaccination programs, such as reimbursement, healthcare provider knowledge

  9. Vaccine effectiveness of 2011/12 trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine in preventing laboratory-confirmed influenza in primary care in the United Kingdom: evidence of waning intra-seasonal protection.

    PubMed

    Pebody, R G; Andrews, N; McMenamin, J; Durnall, H; Ellis, J; Thompson, C I; Robertson, C; Cottrell, S; Smyth, B; Zambon, M; Moore, C; Fleming, D M; Watson, J M

    2013-01-01

    The 2011/12 season was characterised by unusually late influenza A (H3N2) activity in the United Kingdom (UK). We measured vaccine effectiveness (VE) of the 2011/12 trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV) in a test-negative case–control study in primary care. Overall VE against confirmed influenza A (H3N2) infection, adjusted for age, surveillance scheme and month, was 23% (95% confidence interval (CI): -10 to 47). Stratified analysis by time period gave an adjusted VE of 43% (95% CI: -34 to 75) for October 2011 to January 2012 and 17% (95% CI: -24 to 45) for February 2012 to April 2012. Stratified analysis by time since vaccination gave an adjusted VE of 53% (95% CI: 0 to 78) for those vaccinated less than three months, and 12% (95% CI: -31 to 41) for those vaccinated three months or more before onset of symptoms (test for trend: p=0.02). For confirmed influenza B infection, adjusted VE was 92% (95% CI: 38 to 99). A proportion (20.6%) of UK influenza A(H3N2) viruses circulating in 2011/12 showed reduced reactivity (fourfold difference in haemagglutination inhibition assays) to the A/Perth/16/2009 2011/12 vaccine component, with no significant change in proportion over the season. Overall TIV protection against influenza A(H3N2) infection was low, with significant intraseasonal waning. PMID:23399424

  10. Using sentinel surveillance system to monitor seasonal and novel H1N1 influenza infection in Houston, Texas: outcome analysis of 2008-2009 flu season.

    PubMed

    Khuwaja, Salma; Mgbere, Osaro; Awosika-Olumo, Adebowale; Momin, Fayaz; Ngo, Katherine

    2011-10-01

    The advent of the novel H1N1 virus prompted the Houston Department of Health and Human services (HDHHS) to use the existing sentinel surveillance system to effectively monitor the situation of novel H1N1 virus in the Houston metropolitan area. The objective of this study was to evaluate the demographic characteristics and common symptoms associated with confirmed cases of seasonal influenza and Novel H1N1 virus reported to HDHHS between October 2008 and October 2009. A total of 30 providers were randomly selected using the probability proportional to size (PPS) sampling technique to participate in a sentinel surveillance system. The system was used to effectively monitor both seasonal and novel H1N1 virus in the Houston metropolitan area. These providers collected and submitted specimens for testing at HDHHS laboratory from patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) symptoms who visited their clinics during the period, October 2008 and October 2009. These data formed the basis of the current study. Data obtained were subjected to both descriptive and inferential statistical analyses using SAS software version 9.1.3. Overall a total of 1,122 ILI cases were reported to HDHHS by sentinel providers and tested by HDHHS laboratory. Of this number 296 (67.5%) specimens tested positive for influenza A; 140 (32.0%) for influenza B, and 2 (0.46%) for influenza A/B. Two hundred and fifty-nine (59%) were confirmed cases of seasonal influenza and 179 (41%) were novel H1N1 subtype, respectively. The median ages for seasonal influenza and novel H1N1 virus were 7 and 8 years, with majority of the cases reported among children of age 5-9 years. Fever was the most common symptom reported among patients with seasonal flu and novel H1N1 virus, followed by cough. Twenty-three percent (23%) of patients who were vaccinated against seasonal flu prior to the epidemic were infected with seasonal flu virus. The sentinel surveillance system provided timely data on the circulating ILI that

  11. Household Transmission of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the Pandemic and Post-Pandemic Seasons

    PubMed Central

    Casado, Itziar; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Burgui, Rosana; Irisarri, Fátima; Arriazu, Maite; Elía, Fernando; Navascués, Ana; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Aldaz, Pablo; Castilla, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Background The transmission of influenza viruses occurs person to person and is facilitated by contacts within enclosed environments such as households. The aim of this study was to evaluate secondary attack rates and factors associated with household transmission of laboratory-confirmed influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the pandemic and post-pandemic seasons. Methods During the 2009–2010 and 2010–2011 influenza seasons, 76 sentinel physicians in Navarra, Spain, took nasopharyngeal and pharyngeal swabs from patients diagnosed with influenza-like illness. A trained nurse telephoned households of those patients who were laboratory-confirmed for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 to ask about the symptoms, risk factors and vaccination status of each household member. Results In the 405 households with a patient laboratory-confirmed for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, 977 susceptible contacts were identified; 16% of them (95% CI 14–19%) presented influenza-like illness and were considered as secondary cases. The secondary attack rate was 14% in 2009–2010 and 19% in the 2010–2011 season (p = 0.049), an increase that mainly affected persons with major chronic conditions. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the risk of being a secondary case was higher in the 2010–2011 season than in the 2009–2010 season (adjusted odds ratio: 1.72; 95% CI 1.17–2.54), and in children under 5 years, with a decreasing risk in older contacts. Influenza vaccination was associated with lesser incidence of influenza-like illness near to statistical significance (adjusted odds ratio: 0.29; 95% CI 0.08–1.03). Conclusion The secondary attack rate in households was higher in the second season than in the first pandemic season. Children had a greater risk of infection. Preventive measures should be maintained in the second pandemic season, especially in high-risk persons. PMID:25254376

  12. Transmission of Aerosolized Seasonal H1N1 Influenza A to Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    MacInnes, Heather; Zhou, Yue; Gouveia, Kristine; Cromwell, Jenna; Lowery, Kristin; Layton, R. Colby; Zubelewicz, Michael; Sampath, Rangarajan; Hofstadler, Steven; Liu, Yushi; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Koster, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Influenza virus is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, yet little quantitative understanding of transmission is available to guide evidence-based public health practice. Recent studies of influenza non-contact transmission between ferrets and guinea pigs have provided insights into the relative transmission efficiencies of pandemic and seasonal strains, but the infecting dose and subsequent contagion has not been quantified for most strains. In order to measure the aerosol infectious dose for 50% (aID50) of seronegative ferrets, seasonal influenza virus was nebulized into an exposure chamber with controlled airflow limiting inhalation to airborne particles less than 5 µm diameter. Airborne virus was collected by liquid impinger and Teflon filters during nebulization of varying doses of aerosolized virus. Since culturable virus was accurately captured on filters only up to 20 minutes, airborne viral RNA collected during 1-hour exposures was quantified by two assays, a high-throughput RT-PCR/mass spectrometry assay detecting 6 genome segments (Ibis T5000™ Biosensor system) and a standard real time RT-qPCR assay. Using the more sensitive T5000 assay, the aID50 for A/New Caledonia/20/99 (H1N1) was approximately 4 infectious virus particles under the exposure conditions used. Although seroconversion and sustained levels of viral RNA in upper airway secretions suggested established mucosal infection, viral cultures were almost always negative. Thus after inhalation, this seasonal H1N1 virus may replicate less efficiently than H3N2 virus after mucosal deposition and exhibit less contagion after aerosol exposure. PMID:21949718

  13. Environmental Conditions Affect Exhalation of H3N2 Seasonal and Variant Influenza Viruses and Respiratory Droplet Transmission in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Gustin, Kortney M.; Belser, Jessica A.; Veguilla, Vic; Zeng, Hui; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Maines, Taronna R.

    2015-01-01

    The seasonality of influenza virus infections in temperate climates and the role of environmental conditions like temperature and humidity in the transmission of influenza virus through the air are not well understood. Using ferrets housed at four different environmental conditions, we evaluated the respiratory droplet transmission of two influenza viruses (a seasonal H3N2 virus and an H3N2 variant virus, the etiologic virus of a swine to human summertime infection) and concurrently characterized the aerosol shedding profiles of infected animals. Comparisons were made among the different temperature and humidity conditions and between the two viruses to determine if the H3N2 variant virus exhibited enhanced capabilities that may have contributed to the infections occurring in the summer. We report here that although increased levels of H3N2 variant virus were found in ferret nasal wash and exhaled aerosol samples compared to the seasonal H3N2 virus, enhanced respiratory droplet transmission was not observed under any of the environmental settings. However, overall environmental conditions were shown to modulate the frequency of influenza virus transmission through the air. Transmission occurred most frequently at 23°C/30%RH, while the levels of infectious virus in aerosols exhaled by infected ferrets agree with these results. Improving our understanding of how environmental conditions affect influenza virus infectivity and transmission may reveal ways to better protect the public against influenza virus infections. PMID:25969995

  14. Epidemiology, Seasonality and Treatment of Hospitalized Adults and Adolescents with Influenza in Jingzhou, China, 2010-2012

    PubMed Central

    Klena, John; Greene, Carolyn M.; Xing, Xuesen; Huang, Jigui; Liu, Shali; Peng, Youxing; Yang, Hui; Luo, Jun; Peng, Zhibin; Liu, Linlin; Chen, Maoyi; Chen, Hui; Zhang, Yuzhi; Huang, Danqin; Guan, Xuhua; Feng, Luzhao; Zhan, Faxian; Hu, Dale J.; Varma, Jay K.; Yu, Hongjie

    2016-01-01

    Background After the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, we conducted hospital-based severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) surveillance in one central Chinese city to assess disease burden attributable to influenza among adults and adolescents. Methods We defined an adult SARI case as a hospitalized patient aged ≥ 15 years with temperature ≥38.0°C and at least one of the following: cough, sore throat, tachypnea, difficulty breathing, abnormal breath sounds on auscultation, sputum production, hemoptysis, chest pain, or chest radiograph consistent with pneumonia. For each enrolled SARI case-patient, we completed a standardized case report form, and collected a nasopharyngeal swab within 24 hours of admission. Specimens were tested for influenza viruses by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR). We analyzed data from adult SARI cases in four hospitals in Jingzhou, China from April 2010 to April 2012. Results Of 1,790 adult SARI patients enrolled, 40% were aged ≥ 65 years old. The median duration of hospitalization was 9 days. Nearly all were prescribed antibiotics during their hospitalization, less than 1% were prescribed oseltamivir, and 28% were prescribed corticosteroids. Only 0.1% reported receiving influenza vaccination in the past year. Of 1,704 samples tested, 16% were positive for influenza. Influenza activity in all age groups showed winter-spring and summer peaks. Influenza-positive patients had a longer duration from illness onset to hospitalization and a shorter duration from hospital admission to discharge or death compared to influenza negative SARI patients. Conclusions There is substantial burden of influenza-associated SARI hospitalizations in Jingzhou, China, especially among older adults. More effective promotion of annual seasonal influenza vaccination and timely oseltamivir treatment among high risk groups may improve influenza prevention and control in China. PMID:26958855

  15. Radial nerve motor palsy following seasonal influenza vaccination: a case report.

    PubMed

    Taras, John S; Donohue, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the course of a 26-year-old male who developed a dense motor palsy of the radial nerve after receiving a seasonal influenza vaccination. The palsy developed within 12 to 16 hours of inoculation and demonstrated no clinical recovery until 5 months postinjury. Electromyographic and nerve conduction studies obtained at six weeks postinjury were consistent with complete motor denervation. Sensory function was preserved. The injury was successfully treated nonoperatively with physical therapy and wrist splinting, and the palsy gradually resolved over the next several months. PMID:24641896

  16. The global transmission and control of influenza.

    PubMed

    Kenah, Eben; Chao, Dennis L; Matrajt, Laura; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Longini, Ira M

    2011-01-01

    New strains of influenza spread around the globe via the movement of infected individuals. The global dynamics of influenza are complicated by different patterns of influenza seasonality in different regions of the world. We have released an open-source stochastic mathematical model of the spread of influenza across 321 major, strategically located cities of the world. Influenza is transmitted between cities via infected airline passengers. Seasonality is simulated by increasing the transmissibility in each city at the times of the year when influenza has been observed to be most prevalent. The spatiotemporal spread of pandemic influenza can be understood through clusters of global transmission and links between them, which we identify using the epidemic percolation network (EPN) of the model. We use the model to explain the observed global pattern of spread for pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009-2010 (pandemic H1N1 2009) and to examine possible global patterns of spread for future pandemics depending on the origin of pandemic spread, time of year of emergence, and basic reproductive number (). We also use the model to investigate the effectiveness of a plausible global distribution of vaccine for various pandemic scenarios. For pandemic H1N1 2009, we show that the biggest impact of vaccination was in the temperate northern hemisphere. For pandemics starting in the temperate northern hemisphere in May or April, vaccination would have little effect in the temperate southern hemisphere and a small effect in the tropics. With the increasing interconnectedness of the world's population, we must take a global view of infectious disease transmission. Our open-source, computationally simple model can help public health officials plan for the next pandemic as well as deal with interpandemic influenza. PMID:21573121

  17. Dual resistance to adamantanes and oseltamivir among seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses: 2008-2010.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Tiffany G; Fry, Alicia M; Garten, Rebecca J; Deyde, Varough M; Shwe, Thein; Bullion, Lesley; Peebles, Patrick J; Li, Yan; Klimov, Alexander I; Gubareva, Larisa V

    2011-01-01

    Two distinct genetic clades of seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses have cocirculated in the recent seasons: clade 2B oseltamivir-resistant and adamantane-susceptible viruses, and clade 2C viruses that are resistant to adamantanes and susceptible to oseltamivir. We tested seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses collected in 2008-2010 from the United States and globally for resistance to antivirals approved by the Food and Drug Administration. We report 28 viruses with both adamantane and oseltamivir (dual) resistance from 5 countries belonging to 4 distinct genotypes. Because of limited options for antiviral treatment, emergence of dual-resistant influenza viruses poses a public health concern, and their circulation needs to be closely monitored. PMID:21148491

  18. Dual Resistance to Adamantanes and Oseltamivir Among Seasonal Influenza A(H1N1) Viruses: 2008–2010

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Tiffany G.; Fry, Alicia M.; Garten, Rebecca J.; Deyde, Varough M.; Shwe, Thein; Bullion, Lesley; Peebles, Patrick J.; Li, Yan; Klimov, Alexander I.

    2011-01-01

    Two distinct genetic clades of seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses have cocirculated in the recent seasons: clade 2B oseltamivir-resistant and adamantane-susceptible viruses, and clade 2C viruses that are resistant to adamantanes and susceptible to oseltamivir. We tested seasonal influenza A(H1N1) viruses collected in 2008-2010 from the United States and globally for resistance to antivirals approved by the Food and Drug Administration. We report 28 viruses with both adamantane and oseltamivir (dual) resistance from 5 countries belonging to 4 distinct genotypes. Because of limited options for antiviral treatment, emergence of dual-resistant influenza viruses poses a public health concern, and their circulation needs to be closely monitored. PMID:21148491

  19. Intranasal Flu Vaccine Protective against Seasonal and H5N1 Avian Influenza Infections

    PubMed Central

    Alsharifi, Mohammed; Lobigs, Mario; Koskinen, Aulikki; Regner, Matthias; Trinidad, Lee; Boyle, David B.; Müllbacher, Arno

    2009-01-01

    Background Influenza A (flu) virus causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, and current vaccines require annual updating to protect against the rapidly arising antigenic variations due to antigenic shift and drift. In fact, current subunit or split flu vaccines rely exclusively on antibody responses for protection and do not induce cytotoxic T (Tc) cell responses, which are broadly cross-reactive between virus strains. We have previously reported that γ-ray inactivated flu virus can induce cross-reactive Tc cell responses. Methodology/Principal Finding Here, we report that intranasal administration of purified γ-ray inactivated human influenza A virus preparations (γ-Flu) effectively induces heterotypic and cross-protective immunity. A single intranasal administration of γ-A/PR8[H1N1] protects mice against lethal H5N1 and other heterotypic infections. Conclusions/Significance Intranasal γ-Flu represents a unique approach for a cross-protective vaccine against both seasonal as well as possible future pandemic influenza A virus infections. PMID:19401775

  20. Hospitalised Malaysian children with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza: clinical characteristics, risk factors for severe disease and comparison with the 2002–2007 seasonal influenza

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Mia Tuang; Eg, Kah Peng; Loh, Soon Shan

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The pandemic caused by the H1N1 influenza virus in 2009 resulted in extensive morbidity and mortality worldwide. As the virus was a novel virus, there was limited data available on the clinical effects of the virus on children in Malaysia. We herein describe the clinical characteristics of children hospitalised with H1N1 influenza at a tertiary care centre. We also attempted to identify the risk factors associated with disease severity. METHODS In this retrospective study, we compared the characteristics of the children who were admitted to the University of Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, for H1N1 influenza during the pandemic with those who were admitted for seasonal influenza in 2002–2007. RESULTS Among the 77 children (aged ≤ 12 years) admitted to the centre due to H1N1 influenza from 1 July 2009–30 June 2010, nearly 60.0% were aged < 6 years and 40.3% had an underlying medical condition. The top three underlying medical conditions were bronchial asthma (14.3%), cardiac disease (10.4%) and neurological disorders (11.7%). The risk factors for severe disease were age ≤ 2 years, underlying bronchial asthma and chronic lung disease. Two of the three patients who died had an underlying medical condition. The underlying causes of the deaths were acute respiratory distress syndrome and brain stem encephalitis. CONCLUSION The clinical presentation of the children infected with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza virus did not differ significantly from that of children with seasonal influenza. However, there were more complaints of fever, cough and vomiting in the former group. PMID:26768169

  1. Protective Effect of Hand-Washing and Good Hygienic Habits Against Seasonal Influenza: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingbin; Ou, Jianming; Zhang, Lijie; Shen, Xiaona; Hong, Rongtao; Ma, Huilai; Zhu, Bao-Ping; Fontaine, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Previous observational studies have reported protective effects of hand-washing in reducing upper respiratory infections, little is known about the associations between hand-washing and good hygienic habits and seasonal influenza infection. We conducted a case-control study to test whether the risk of influenza transmission associated with self-reported hand-washing and unhealthy hygienic habits among residents in Fujian Province, southeastern China.Laboratory confirmed seasonal influenza cases were consecutively included in the study as case-patients (n = 100). For each case, we selected 1 control person matched for age and city of residence. Telephone interview was used to collect information on hand-washing and hygienic habits. The associations were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. Compared with the poorest hand-washing score of 0 to 3, odds ratios of influenza infection decreased progressively from 0.26 to 0.029 as hand-washing score increased from 4 to the maximum of 9 (P < 0.001). Compared with the poorest hygienic habit score of 0 to 2, odds ratios of influenza infection decreased from 0.10 to 0.015 with improving score of hygienic habits (P < 0.001). Independent protective factors against influenza infection included good hygienic habits, higher hand-washing score, providing soap or hand cleaner beside the hand-washing basin, and receiving influenza vaccine. Regular hand-washing and good hygienic habits were associated with a reduced risk of influenza infection. These findings support the general recommendation for nonpharmaceutical interventions against influenza. PMID:26986125

  2. Seasonal Influenza Vaccination for Children in Thailand: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meeyai, Aronrag; Praditsitthikorn, Naiyana; Kotirum, Surachai; Kulpeng, Wantanee; Putthasri, Weerasak; Cooper, Ben S.; Teerawattananon, Yot

    2015-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Routine immunization of children has the potential to reduce this mortality through both direct and indirect protection, but has not been adopted by any low- or middle-income countries. We developed a framework to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination policies in developing countries and used it to consider annual vaccination of school- and preschool-aged children with either trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) or trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) in Thailand. We also compared these approaches with a policy of expanding TIV coverage in the elderly. Methods and Findings We developed an age-structured model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of eight vaccination policies parameterized using country-level data from Thailand. For policies using LAIV, we considered five different age groups of children to vaccinate. We adopted a Bayesian evidence-synthesis framework, expressing uncertainty in parameters through probability distributions derived by fitting the model to prospectively collected laboratory-confirmed influenza data from 2005-2009, by meta-analysis of clinical trial data, and by using prior probability distributions derived from literature review and elicitation of expert opinion. We performed sensitivity analyses using alternative assumptions about prior immunity, contact patterns between age groups, the proportion of infections that are symptomatic, cost per unit vaccine, and vaccine effectiveness. Vaccination of children with LAIV was found to be highly cost-effective, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between about 2,000 and 5,000 international dollars per disability-adjusted life year averted, and was consistently preferred to TIV-based policies. These findings were robust to extensive sensitivity analyses. The optimal age group to vaccinate with LAIV, however, was sensitive both to the willingness to pay for health benefits and

  3. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  4. Transmission of influenza reflects seasonality of wild birds across the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nichola J; Ma, Eric J; Meixell, Brandt W; Lindberg, Mark S; Boyce, Walter M; Runstadler, Jonathan A

    2016-08-01

    Influenza A Viruses (IAV) in nature must overcome shifting transmission barriers caused by the mobility of their primary host, migratory wild birds, that change throughout the annual cycle. Using a phylogenetic network of viral sequences from North American wild birds (2008-2011) we demonstrate a shift from intraspecific to interspecific transmission that along with reassortment, allows IAV to achieve viral flow across successive seasons from summer to winter. Our study supports amplification of IAV during summer breeding seeded by overwintering virus persisting locally and virus introduced from a wide range of latitudes. As birds migrate from breeding sites to lower latitudes, they become involved in transmission networks with greater connectivity to other bird species, with interspecies transmission of reassortant viruses peaking during the winter. We propose that switching transmission dynamics may be a critical strategy for pathogens that infect mobile hosts inhabiting regions with strong seasonality. PMID:27324078

  5. Analysis of pig movements across eastern Indonesia, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Edwina E C; Christley, Robert M; Geong, Maria; Ward, Michael P; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L M L

    2015-03-01

    Knowledge of live animal movement through markets and from farm-to-farm is needed to inform strategies for control of trans-boundary animal diseases (TADs) in south-east Asia, particularly due to consumer preference for fresh meat. In eastern Indonesia a TAD of principal interest for control is classical swine fever (CSF) due to its impacts on smallholder farmers. Pig movement is considered a contributor to failure of current CSF control efforts but pig movement patterns are not well understood. This study investigated movement of live pigs in West Timor, Flores and Sumba islands during 2009-2010, with the aim of informing CSF control policies for Nusa Tenggara Timor province. A market survey of 292 pig sellers and 281 pig buyers across nine live pig markets and a farmer survey across 18 villages with 289 smallholder farmers were conducted and information collected on pig movements. The data obtained was used for social network analysis (SNA) on formal (via a market) and informal (village-to-village) movements using information on trading practices, source and destination locations, and the number of pigs being moved. Both inter- and intra-island movements were identified, however inter-island movement was only observed between Flores and Sumba islands. West Timor and Sumba had highly connected networks where large numbers of villages were directly and indirectly linked through pig movement. Further for West Timor, both formal and informal pig movements linked the capital Kupang, on the eastern end of the island to the western districts bordering East Timor connecting all five districts and demonstrating that informal movement transports pigs over distances similar to formal movement on this island. Sumba had a higher potential for pigs to move to a greater number of sequential locations across the entire island. Flores was found to have a more fragmented network, with pig movements concentrated in its eastern or western regions, influenced by terrain. Markets were

  6. Factors Influencing Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Uptake in Emergency Medical Services Workers: A Concept Mapping Approach.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Dipti P; Baker, Elizabeth A; Zelicoff, Alan P; Elliott, Michael B

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal influenza has serious impacts on morbidity and mortality and has a significant economic toll through lost workforce time and strains on the health system. Health workers, particularly emergency medical services (EMS) workers have the potential to transmit influenza to those in their care, yet little is known of the factors that influence EMS workers' decisions regarding seasonal influenza vaccination (SIV) uptake, a key factor in reducing potential for transmitting disease. This study utilizes a modified Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model as a guiding framework to explore the factors that influence SIV uptake in EMS workers. Concept mapping, which consists of six-stages (preparation, generation, structuring, representation, interpretation, and utilization) that use quantitative and qualitative approaches, was used to identify participants' perspectives towards SIV. This study identified nine EMS-conceptualized factors that influence EMS workers' vaccination intent and behavior. The EMS-conceptualized factors align with the modified TPB model and suggest the need to consider community-wide approaches that were not initially conceptualized in the model. Additionally, the expansion of non-pharmaceutical measures went above and beyond original conceptualization. Overall, this study demonstrates the need to develop customized interventions such as messages highlighting the importance of EMS workers receiving SIV as the optimum solution. EMS workers who do not intend to receive the SIV should be provided with accurate information on the SIV to dispel misconceptions. Finally, EMS workers should also receive interventions which promote voluntary vaccination, encouraging them to be proactive in the health decisions they make for themselves. PMID:26721630

  7. Intensive care unit surveillance of influenza infection in France: the 2009/10 pandemic and the three subsequent seasons.

    PubMed

    Bonmarin, Isabelle; Belchior, Emmanuel; Bergounioux, Jean; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Mégarbane, Bruno; Chappert, Jean Loup; Hubert, Bruno; Le Strat, Yann; Lévy-Bruhl, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    During the 2009/10 pandemic, a national surveillance system for severe influenza cases was set up in France. We present results from the system's first four years. All severe influenza cases admitted to intensive care units (ICU) were reported to the Institut de Veille Sanitaire using a standardised form: data on demographics, immunisation and virological status, risk factors, severity (e.g. acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) onset, mechanical ventilation, extracorporeal life support) and outcome. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify factors associated with ARDS and death. The number of confirmed influenza cases varied from 1,210 in 2009/10 to 321 in 2011/12. Most ICU patients were infected with A(H1N1)pdm09, except during the 2011/12 winter season when A(H3N2)-related infections predominated. Patients' characteristics varied according to the predominant strain. Based on multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with death were age ≥ 65 years, patients with any of the usual recommended indications for vaccination and clinical severity. ARDS occurred more frequently in patients who were middle-aged (36-55 years), pregnant, obese, or infected with A(H1N1)pdm09. Female sex and influenza vaccination were protective. These data confirm the persistent virulence of A(H1N1)pdm09 after the pandemic and the heterogeneity of influenza seasons, and reinforce the need for surveillance of severe influenza cases. PMID:26607262

  8. [Evaluation of sentinel influenza surveillance of the last two seasons: 2013-2014 and 2014-2015].

    PubMed

    Meşe, Sevim; Asar, Serkan; Tulunoğlu, Merve; Uyanık, Aysun; Yenen, Osman Şadi; Ağaçfidan, Ali; Badur, Selim

    2016-07-01

    Flu caused by influenza viruses, is a serious public health problem all over the world with its high morbidity and mortality. Therefore World Health Organization (WHO) regularly collects the results of national influenza surveillance, evaluates the results and shares them on international portal. Thus, it provides the possibility of rapid prevention and preparation of countries that needs to be taken on the fight against the epidemic flu. Starting from 2004-2005 season until today the current flu activity in our country is also followed in accordance with sentinel surveillance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of sentinel surveillance data obtained by National Influenza Reference Laboratory in Istanbul University Faculty of Medicine, in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 seasons. For this purpose, nasal/nasopharyngeal swab samples taken from the patients diagnosed as influenza-like illness by the volunteer family physicians in Izmir, Istanbul, Antalya, Edirne and Bursa were included in the study. A total of 1240 samples were delivered to our laboratory in three days, in Virocult® transport culture medium according to cold chain rules. All the samples were studied by real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) according to the protocols of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In our study, the positivity rates of influenza viruses in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 seasons were detected as 31.4% (202/641) and 44.4% (289/650), respectively. In 2013-2014 season, influenza A(H3N2) virus was the predominant type with a rate of 93.1% (188/202), and the rest was influenza B virus (14/202; 6.9%). In 2014-2015 season, influenza B virus has been dominated with a rate of 60.2% (174/289), and the rates of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A(H3N2) were 30.4% (88/289) and 9.3% (27/289), respectively. The flu season in 2013-2014 has started at 48th week and peaked at 52nd week, while it was started later in the second week in 2014-2015 season and peaked at 10th-13

  9. Severe coinfection with seasonal influenza A (H3N2) virus and Staphylococcus aureus--Maryland, February-March 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-04-27

    On March 5, 2012, the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DHMH) and the Calvert County Health Department were notified of three deaths following respiratory illness among members of a Maryland family. One family member (patient A) experienced upper-respiratory symptoms and died unexpectedly at home. Two others (patients B and C) sought medical care for fever, shortness of breath, and cough productive of bloody sputum and died during their hospitalizations. All three family members had confirmed infection with seasonal influenza A (H3N2) virus. Patients B and C had confirmed coinfection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which manifested in both patients as MRSA pneumonia and bacteremia. DHMH and the Calvert County Health Department, in collaboration with the District of Columbia Department of Health, local hospitals, and CDC, conducted an investigation to determine the cause of the illnesses and identify additional related cases. Three additional family members with influenza were identified, two of whom were confirmed to have influenza A (H3N2) and required hospitalization, but neither was coinfected with MRSA, and both recovered. Influenza vaccination remains the best method for preventing complications from influenza; when influenza infection is suspected, treatment with influenza antiviral agents is recommended in certain cases. In addition, when high clinical suspicion for serious S. aureus coinfection exists, empiric coverage with antibiotics, including those with activity against methicillin-resistant strains, should be instituted. PMID:22534762

  10. No effect of 2008/09 seasonal influenza vaccination on the risk of pandemic H1N1 2009 influenza infection in England.

    PubMed

    Pebody, Richard; Andrews, Nick; Waight, Pauline; Malkani, Rashmi; McCartney, Christine; Ellis, Joanna; Miller, Elizabeth

    2011-03-21

    This study reports effectiveness of trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) against confirmed pandemic influenza infection in England using a retrospective test-negative case-control study. Cases and controls were frequency matched by age, swabbing-week and region. On univariable and multivariable analysis adjusted for underlying clinical risk factors, cases were no more or less likely than controls to be vaccinated with 2008-09 or 2007-08 season TIV. Adjusted vaccine effectiveness for the former was -6% (-43% to 22%). Vaccine effectiveness did not differ significantly by age-group or hospitalisation status. There was no evidence prior vaccination with TIV significantly altered subsequent risk of pandemic influenza H1N1 2009 infection. PMID:21292008

  11. 2011–12 Seasonal Influenza Vaccines Effectiveness against Confirmed A(H3N2) Influenza Hospitalisation: Pooled Analysis from a European Network of Hospitals. A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Rondy, Marc; Puig-Barbera, Joan; Launay, Odile; Duval, Xavier; Castilla, Jesús; Guevara, Marcela; Costanzo, Simona; de Gaetano Donati, Katleen; Moren, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccination strategies aim at protecting high-risk population from severe outcomes. Estimating the effectiveness of seasonal vaccines against influenza related hospitalisation is important to guide these strategies. Large sample size is needed to have precise estimate of influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against severe outcomes. We assessed the feasibility of measuring seasonal IVE against hospitalisation with laboratory confirmed influenza through a network of 21 hospitals in the European Union. Methods We conducted a multicentre study in France (seven hospitals), Italy (one hospital), and Navarra (four hospitals) and Valencia (nine hospitals) regions in Spain. All ≥18 years hospitalised patients presenting an influenza-like illness within seven days were swabbed. Cases were patients RT-PCR positive for influenza A (H3N2); controls were patients negative for any influenza virus. Using logistic regression with study site as a fixed effect we calculated IVE adjusted for potential confounders. We restricted the analyses to those swabbed within four days. Results We included, 375 A(H3N2) cases and 770 controls. The overall adjusted IVE was 24.9% (95%CI–1.8;44.6). Among the target group for vaccination (N = 1058) the adjusted IVE was 28.8% (95%CI:2.8;47.9); it was respectively 36.8% (95%CI:−48.8; 73.1), 42.6% (95%CI:−16.5;71.7), 17.8%(95%CI:−40.8; 52.1) and 37.5% (95%CI:−22.8;68.2) in the age groups 18–64, 65–74, 75–84 and more than 84 years. Discussion Estimation of IVE based on the pooling of data obtained through a European network of hospitals was feasible. Our results suggest a low IVE against hospitalised confirmed influenza in 2011–12. The low IVE may be explained by a poor immune response in the high-risk population, imperfect match between vaccine and circulating strain or waning immunity due to a late season. Increased sample size within this network would allow more precise estimates and stratification of the

  12. Live attenuated influenza vaccine strains elicit a greater innate immune response than antigenically-matched seasonal influenza viruses during infection of human nasal epithelial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Fischer, William A; Chason, Kelly D; Brighton, Missy; Jaspers, Ilona

    2014-03-26

    Influenza viruses are global pathogens that infect approximately 10-20% of the world's population each year. Vaccines, including the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV), are the best defense against influenza infections. The LAIV is a novel vaccine that actively replicates in the human nasal epithelium and elicits both mucosal and systemic protective immune responses. The differences in replication and innate immune responses following infection of human nasal epithelium with influenza seasonal wild type (WT) and LAIV viruses remain unknown. Using a model of primary differentiated human nasal epithelial cell (hNECs) cultures, we compared influenza WT and antigenically-matched cold adapted (CA) LAIV virus replication and the subsequent innate immune response including host cellular pattern recognition protein expression, host innate immune gene expression, secreted pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and intracellular viral RNA levels. Growth curves comparing virus replication between WT and LAIV strains revealed significantly less infectious virus production during LAIV compared with WT infection. Despite this disparity in infectious virus production the LAIV strains elicited a more robust innate immune response with increased expression of RIG-I, TLR-3, IFNβ, STAT-1, IRF-7, MxA, and IP-10. There were no differences in cytotoxicity between hNEC cultures infected with WT and LAIV strains as measured by basolateral levels of LDH. Elevated levels of intracellular viral RNA during LAIV as compared with WT virus infection of hNEC cultures at 33°C may explain the augmented innate immune response via the up-regulation of pattern recognition receptors and down-stream type I IFN expression. Taken together our results suggest that the decreased replication of LAIV strains in human nasal epithelial cells is associated with a robust innate immune response that differs from infection with seasonal influenza viruses, limits LAIV shedding and plays a role in the silent

  13. Detection of influenza vaccine effectiveness among nursery school children: Lesson from a season with cocirculating respiratory syncytial virus

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Keiko; Fujieda, Megumi; Miki, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Wakaba; Ohfuji, Satoko; Maeda, Akiko; Kase, Tetsuo; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    In the winter influenza epidemic season, patients with respiratory illnesses including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections increase among young children. Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against influenza-like illness (ILI) using a technique to identify outbreaks of RSV infection and to distinguish those patients from ILI patients. The study subjects were 101 children aged 12 to 84 months attending nursery school. We classified the cases into 6 levels based on the definitions of ILI for outcomes. We established observation periods according to information obtained from regional surveillance and rapid diagnostic tests among children. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) for each case classification were obtained using a logistic regression model for each observation period. For the entire observation period, ORs for cases with fever plus respiratory symptoms were reduced marginally significantly. For the local influenza epidemic period, only the OR for the most serious cases was significantly decreased (0.20 [95%CI: 0.04-0.94]). During the influenza outbreak among the nursery school children, multivariate ORs for fever plus respiratory symptoms decreased significantly (≥ 38.0°C plus ≥ one symptoms: 0.23 [0.06-0.91), ≥ 38.0°C plus ≥ 2 symptoms: 0.21 [0.05-0.85], ≥ 39.0°C plus ≥ one symptoms: 0.18 [0.04-0.93] and ≥ 39.0°C plus ≥ 2 symptoms: 0.16 [0.03-0.87]). These results suggest that confining observation to the peak influenza epidemic period and adoption of a strict case classification system can minimize outcome misclassification when evaluating the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against ILI, even if influenza and RSV cocirculate in the same season. PMID:25714791

  14. Detection of influenza vaccine effectiveness among nursery school children: Lesson from a season with cocirculating respiratory syncytial virus.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Keiko; Fujieda, Megumi; Miki, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Wakaba; Ohfuji, Satoko; Maeda, Akiko; Kase, Tetsuo; Hirota, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    In the winter influenza epidemic season, patients with respiratory illnesses including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections increase among young children. Therefore, we evaluated the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against influenza-like illness (ILI) using a technique to identify outbreaks of RSV infection and to distinguish those patients from ILI patients. The study subjects were 101 children aged 12 to 84 months attending nursery school. We classified the cases into 6 levels based on the definitions of ILI for outcomes. We established observation periods according to information obtained from regional surveillance and rapid diagnostic tests among children. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) for each case classification were obtained using a logistic regression model for each observation period. For the entire observation period, ORs for cases with fever plus respiratory symptoms were reduced marginally significantly. For the local influenza epidemic period, only the OR for the most serious cases was significantly decreased (0.20 [95%CI: 0.04-0.94]). During the influenza outbreak among the nursery school children, multivariate ORs for fever plus respiratory symptoms decreased significantly (≥ 38.0°C plus ≥ one symptoms: 0.23 [0.06-0.91), ≥ 38.0°C plus ≥ 2 symptoms: 0.21 [0.05-0.85], ≥ 39.0°C plus ≥ one symptoms: 0.18 [0.04-0.93] and ≥ 39.0°C plus ≥ 2 symptoms: 0.16 [0.03-0.87]). These results suggest that confining observation to the peak influenza epidemic period and adoption of a strict case classification system can minimize outcome misclassification when evaluating the effectiveness of influenza vaccine against ILI, even if influenza and RSV cocirculate in the same season. PMID:25714791

  15. Influenza evolution and H3N2 vaccine effectiveness, with application to the 2014/2015 season.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi; Deem, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    Influenza A is a serious disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality, and vaccines against the seasonal influenza disease are of variable effectiveness. In this article, we discuss the use of the pepitope method to predict the dominant influenza strain and the expected vaccine effectiveness in the coming flu season. We illustrate how the effectiveness of the 2014/2015 A/Texas/50/2012 [clade 3C.1] vaccine against the A/California/02/2014 [clade 3C.3a] strain that emerged in the population can be estimated via pepitope In addition, we show by a multidimensional scaling analysis of data collected through 2014, the emergence of a new A/New Mexico/11/2014-like cluster [clade 3C.2a] that is immunologically distinct from the A/California/02/2014-like strains. PMID:27313229

  16. Influenza evolution and H3N2 vaccine effectiveness, with application to the 2014/2015 season

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xi; Deem, Michael W.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A is a serious disease that causes significant morbidity and mortality, and vaccines against the seasonal influenza disease are of variable effectiveness. In this article, we discuss the use of the pepitope method to predict the dominant influenza strain and the expected vaccine effectiveness in the coming flu season. We illustrate how the effectiveness of the 2014/2015 A/Texas/50/2012 [clade 3C.1] vaccine against the A/California/02/2014 [clade 3C.3a] strain that emerged in the population can be estimated via pepitope. In addition, we show by a multidimensional scaling analysis of data collected through 2014, the emergence of a new A/New Mexico/11/2014-like cluster [clade 3C.2a] that is immunologically distinct from the A/California/02/2014-like strains. PMID:27313229

  17. The immunogenicity of the intradermal injection of seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine containing influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in COPD patients soon after a pandemic.

    PubMed

    Chuaychoo, Benjamas; Kositanont, Uraiwan; Rittayamai, Nuttapol; Niyomthong, Parichat; Songserm, Thaweesak; Maranetra, Khun Nanta; Rattanasaengloet, Kanokwan; Nana, Arth

    2016-07-01

    The antibody responses of a reduced-dose intradermal seasonal influenza vaccination have never been studied in COPD patients soon after a pandemic. A total of 149 COPD patients (60 y of age or older) were randomized to receive trivalent influenza vaccine (Sanofi-Pasteur, France) either 9 µg of hemagglutinin (HA) per strain split into 2-site intradermal (ID) injections via the Mantoux technique or one intramuscular (IM) injection of 15 µg of HA per strain. The geometric mean titers, seroconversion factors, seroconversion rates and seroprotection rates for influenza A(H3N2) and B administered through the ID injection (n = 75) were similar to those obtained with the IM injection (n = 74) 4 weeks post-vaccination. The antibody responses for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 administered through the ID injection were lower than those obtained with the IM injection, but all of these responses met the 3 criteria proposed by the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP) for annual re-licensure. The seroprotection rates 4 weeks post-vaccination for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 were 64.0% (95%CI 52.7-74.0%) in the ID group vs. 78.4% (95% CI 67.6-86.3%) in the IM group (p = 0.053). Influenza-related acute respiratory illness (ARI), diagnosed as a 4-fold rise in HI titers with a convalescent titer > 1:40, and/or the RT-PCR between the ID group (5.3%) and the IM group (8.1%) were not significantly different. The reduced-dose intradermal influenza vaccine may expand vaccine coverage in cases of vaccine shortage. PMID:27153158

  18. Neuraminidase-Inhibiting Antibody Is a Correlate of Cross-Protection against Lethal H5N1 Influenza Virus in Ferrets Immunized with Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lorena E.; Barr, Ian G.; Gilbertson, Brad; Lowther, Sue; Kachurin, Anatoly; Kachurina, Olga; Klippel, Jessica; Bodle, Jesse; Pearse, Martin; Middleton, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    In preparing for the threat of a pandemic of avian H5N1 influenza virus, we need to consider the significant delay (4 to 6 months) necessary to produce a strain-matched vaccine. As some degree of cross-reactivity between seasonal influenza vaccines and H5N1 virus has been reported, this was further explored in the ferret model to determine the targets of protective immunity. Ferrets were vaccinated with two intramuscular inoculations of trivalent inactivated split influenza vaccine or subcomponent vaccines, with and without adjuvant, and later challenged with a lethal dose of A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) influenza virus. We confirmed that vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine afforded partial protection against lethal H5N1 challenge and showed that use of either AlPO4 or Iscomatrix adjuvant with the vaccine resulted in complete protection against disease and death. The protection was due exclusively to the H1N1 vaccine component, and although the hemagglutinin contributed to protection, the dominant protective response was targeted toward the neuraminidase (NA) and correlated with sialic acid cleavage-inhibiting antibody titers. Purified heterologous NA formulated with Iscomatrix adjuvant was also protective. These results suggest that adjuvanted seasonal trivalent vaccine could be used as an interim measure to decrease morbidity and mortality from H5N1 prior to the availability of a specific vaccine. The data also highlight that an inducer of cross-protective immunity is the NA, a protein whose levels are not normally monitored in vaccines and whose capacity to induce immunity in recipients is not normally assessed. PMID:23283953

  19. Comparing Deaths from Influenza H1N1 and Seasonal Influenza A: Main Sociodemographic and Clinical Differences between the Most Prevalent 2009 Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Juan Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Background. During the 2009 spring epidemic outbreak in Mexico, an important research and policy question faced was related to the differences in clinical profile and population characteristics of those affected by the new H1N1 virus compared with the seasonal virus. Methods and Findings. Data from clinical files from all influenza A deaths in Mexico between April 10 and July 13, 2009 were analyzed to describe differences in clinical and socioeconomic profile between H1N1 and non-H1N1 cases. A total of 324 influenza A mortality cases were studied of which 239 presented rt-PCR confirmation for H1N1 virus and 85 for seasonal influenza A. From the differences of means and multivariate logistic regression, it was found that H1N1 deaths occurred in younger and less educated people, and among those who engage in activities where there is increased contact with other unknown persons (OR 4.52, 95% CI 1.56–13.14). Clinical symptoms were similar except for dyspnea, headache, and chest pain that were less frequently found among H1N1 cases. Conclusions. Findings suggest that age, education, and occupation are factors that may be useful to identify risk for H1N1 among influenza cases, and also that patients with early dyspnea, headache, and chest pain are more likely to be non-H1N1 cases. PMID:23346393

  20. Effectiveness and knowledge, attitudes and practices of seasonal influenza vaccine in primary healthcare settings in South Africa, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    McAnerney, Johanna M; Walaza, Sibongile; Cohen, Adam L; Tempia, Stefano; Buys, Amelia; Venter, Marietjie; Blumberg, Lucille; Duque, Jazmin; Cohen, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) and coverage data for sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. Using a test-negative case–control design, we estimated influenza VE annually among individuals with influenza-like illness presenting to an outpatient sentinel surveillance programme in South Africa from 2010 to 2013. A knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) influenza vaccine survey of programme clinicians was conducted in 2013. Sample In total, 9420 patients were enrolled in surveillance of whom 5344 (56.7%) were included in the VE analysis: 2678 (50.1%) were classified as controls (influenza test-negative) and 2666 (49.9%) as cases (influenza test-positive). Results Mean annual influenza vaccine coverage among controls was 4.5% for the four years. Annual VE estimates adjusted for age, underlying medical conditions and seasonality for 2010-2013 were 54.2% (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.4–78.6%), 57.1% (95% CI: 15.5–78.2%), 38.4% (95% CI: −71.7–78.1%) and 87.2% (95% CI: 67.2–95.0%), respectively. The KAP survey showed that >90% of clinicians were familiar with the indications for and the benefits of influenza vaccination. Conclusions Our study showed that the vaccine was significantly protective in 2010, 2011 and 2013, but not in 2012 when the circulating A(H3N2) strain showed genetic drift. Vaccine coverage was low despite good clinician knowledge of vaccination indications. Further studies are needed to investigate the reason for the low uptake of influenza vaccine. PMID:25677874

  1. Influenza.

    PubMed

    Labella, Angelena M; Merel, Susan E

    2013-07-01

    Influenza is a common virus whose ability to change its genetic makeup allows for disease of pandemic proportion. This article summarizes the different strains of influenza circulating in the United States for the past century, the diagnosis and treatment of influenza, as well as the different ways to prevent disease. This information will be of value to clinicians caring for patients both in the hospital and in the community. PMID:23809717

  2. Influenza vaccine effectiveness in Italy: Age, subtype-specific and vaccine type estimates 2014/15 season.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Caterina; Bella, Antonino; Alfonsi, Valeria; Puzelli, Simona; Palmieri, Anna Pina; Chironna, Maria; Pariani, Elena; Piatti, Alessandra; Tiberti, Donatella; Ghisetti, Valeria; Rangoni, Roberto; Colucci, Maria Eugenia; Affanni, Paola; Germinario, Cinzia; Castrucci, Maria Rita

    2016-06-01

    The 2014/15 influenza season in Europe was characterised by the circulation of influenza A(H3N2) viruses with an antigenic and genetic mismatch from the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012(H3N2) recommended for the Northern hemisphere for the 2014/15 season. Italy, differently from other EU countries where most of the subtyped influenza A viruses were H3N2, experienced a 2014/15 season characterized by an extended circulation of two influenza viruses: A(H1N1)pdm09 and A(H3N2), that both contributed substantially to morbidity. Within the context of the existing National sentinel influenza surveillance system (InfluNet) a test-negative case-control study was established in order to produce vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates. The point estimates VE were adjusted by age group (<5; 5-15; 15-64; 65+ years), the presence of at least one chronic condition, target group for vaccination and need help for walking or bathing. In Italy, adjusted estimates of the 2014/15 seasonal influenza VE against medically attended influenza-like illness (ILI) laboratory-confirmed as influenza for all age groups were 6.0% (95%CI: -36.5 to 35.2%), 43.6% (95%CI: -3.7 to 69.3%), -84.5% (95%CI: (-190.4 to -17.2%) and 50.7% (95% CI: -2.5 to 76.3%) against any influenza virus, A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B, respectively. These results suggest evidence of good VE against A(H1N1)pdm09 and B viruses in Italy and evidence of lack of VE against A(H3N2) virus due to antigenic and genetic mismatch between circulating A(H3N2) and the respective 2014/15 vaccine strain. PMID:27154392

  3. The community impact of the 2009 influenza pandemic in the WHO European Region: a comparison with historical seasonal data from 28 countries

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The world has recently experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century that lasted 14 months from June 2009 to August 2010. This study aimed to compare the timing, geographic spread and community impact during the winter wave of influenza pandemic A (H1N1) 2009 to historical influenza seasons in countries of the WHO European region. Methods We assessed the timing of pandemic by comparing the median peak of influenza activity in countries of the region during the last seven influenza seasons. The peaks of influenza activity were selected by two independent researchers using predefined rules. The geographic spread was assessed by correlating the peak week of influenza activity in included countries against the longitude and latitude of the central point in each country. To assess the community impact of pandemic influenza, we constructed linear regression models to compare the total and age-specific influenza-like-illness (ILI) or acute respiratory infection (ARI) rates reported by the countries in the pandemic season to those observed in the previous six influenza seasons. Results We found that the influenza activity reached its peak during the pandemic, on average, 10.5 weeks (95% CI 6.4-14.2) earlier than during the previous 6 seasons in the Region, and there was a west to east spread of pandemic A(H1N1) influenza virus in the western part of the Region. A regression analysis showed that the total ILI or ARI rates were not higher than historical rates in 19 of the 28 countries. However, in countries with age-specific data, there were significantly higher consultation rates in the 0-4 and/or 5-14 age groups in 11 of the 20 countries. Conclusions Using routine influenza surveillance data, we found that pandemic influenza had several differential features compared to historical seasons in the region. It arrived earlier, caused significantly higher number of outpatient consultations in children in most countries and followed west to east spread

  4. Monitoring and forecasting the 2009-2010 severe drought in Southwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Tang, Q.; Liu, X.; Leng, G.; Li, Z.; Cui, H.

    2015-12-01

    From the fall of 2009 to the spring of 2010, an unprecedented drought swept across southwest China (SW) and led to a severe shortage in drinking water and a huge loss to regional economy. Monitoring and predicting the severe drought with several months in advance is of critical importance for such hydrological disaster assessment, preparation and mitigation. In this study, we attempted to carry out a model-based hydrological monitoring and seasonal forecasting framework, and assessed its skill in capturing the evolution of the SW drought in 2009-2010. Using the satellite-based meteorological forcings and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model, the drought conditions were assessed in a near-real-time manner based on a 62-year (1952-2013) retrospective simulation, wherein the satellite data was adjusted by a gauge-based forcing to remove systematic biases. Bias-corrected seasonal forecasting outputs from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System Version 2 (CFSv2) was tentatively applied for a seasonal hydrologic prediction and its predictive skill was overall evaluated relative to a traditional Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) method with lead time varying from 1 to 6 months. The results show that the climate model-driven hydrologic predictability is generally limited to 1-month lead time and exhibits negligible skill improvement relative to ESP during this drought event, suggesting the initial hydrologic conditions (IHCs) play a dominant role in forecasting performance. The research highlights the value of the framework in providing accurate IHCs in a real-time manner which will greatly benefit drought early-warning.

  5. Programme to vaccinate poultry workers against seasonal influenza: options for delivery in the East of England.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, R; Reacher, M; Cosford, P

    2011-02-01

    Avian influenza A (H5N1) has spread to the UK causing outbreaks in commercial poultry. Vaccination of poultry workers with seasonal influenza has been advised to prevent a viral mutation that could facilitate human-to-human transmission, causing a new pandemic strain. This project aimed to determine delivery options and costs of a vaccination programme targeted at poultry workers. Data from the Great Britain Poultry Register were used to understand the distribution of the target population. A stakeholders group in the East of England (EoE) discussed delivery options. An options appraisal is used to prioritize these options. There are over 10,000 poultry workers distributed throughout the EoE. Five delivery options were considered (industry's occupational health services, via general practitioners as a Directed or Locally Enhanced Services, via other community healthcare providers and a commercial provider). Delivery is likely to cost between £35,414 and £182,899 (or £10.18-£48.93 per person vaccinated) in the EoE, depending on delivery mechanism, target threshold and level of uptake. Delivering through a commercial provider was the preferred option. Whichever way the programme is delivered it should be cost-neutral to the Primary Care Trust (PCT). Otherwise PCTs may see themselves having to prioritize between vaccinating poultry workers against other pressing programmes. PMID:19968846

  6. Intrinsic defects in B cell response to seasonal influenza vaccination in elderly humans

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Landin, Ana Marie; Phillips, Mitch; Lechner, Suzanne C.; Ryan, John G.; Blomberg, Bonnie B.

    2010-01-01

    We have evaluated the serum response to seasonal influenza vaccination in subjects of different ages and associated this with the specific B cell response to the vaccine in vitro. Although the serum response has previously been shown to decrease with age, this has largely been associated to decreased T cell functions. Our results show that in response to the vaccine, the specific response of B cells in vitro, as measured by AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), the in vivo serum HI (hemagglutination inhibition) response, and the in vivo generation of switch memory B cells are decreased with age, as evaluated in the same subjects. This is the first report to demonstrate that intrinsic B cell defects with age contribute to reduced antibody responses to the influenza vaccine. The level of AID in response to CpG before vaccination can also predict the robustness of the vaccine response. These results could contribute to developing more effective vaccines to protect the elderly as well as identifying those most at risk. PMID:20974306

  7. Human Phase 1 trial of low-dose inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David L; Sajkov, Dimitar; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Wilks, Samuel H; Aban, Malet; Barr, Ian G; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-07-19

    Influenza vaccines are usually non-adjuvanted but addition of adjuvant may improve immunogenicity and permit dose-sparing, critical for vaccine supply in the event of an influenza pandemic. The aim of this first-in-man study was to determine the effect of delta inulin adjuvant on the safety and immunogenicity of a reduced dose seasonal influenza vaccine. Healthy male and female adults aged 18-65years were recruited to participate in a randomized controlled study to compare the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a reduced-dose 2007 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant (LTIV+Adj) when compared to a full-dose of the standard TIV vaccine which does not contain an adjuvant. LTIV+Adj provided equivalent immunogenicity to standard TIV vaccine as assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays against each vaccine strain as well as against a number of heterosubtypic strains. HI responses were sustained at 3months post-immunisation in both groups. Antibody landscapes against a large panel of H3N2 influenza viruses showed distinct age effects whereby subjects over 40years old had a bimodal baseline HI distribution pattern, with the highest HI titers against the very oldest H3N2 isolates and with a second HI peak against influenza isolates from the last 5-10years. By contrast, subjects >40years had a unimodal baseline HI distribution with peak recognition of H3N2 isolates from approximately 20years ago. The reduced dose TIV vaccine containing Advax adjuvant was well tolerated and no safety issues were identified. Hence, delta inulin may be a useful adjuvant for use in seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12607000599471. PMID:27342914

  8. Economics of Employer-Sponsored Workplace Vaccination to Prevent Pandemic and Seasonal Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bruce Y.; Bailey, Rachel R.; Wiringa, Ann E.; Afriyie, Abena; Wateska, Angela R.; Smith, Kenneth J.; Zimmerman, Richard K.

    2010-01-01

    Employers may be loath to fund vaccination programs without understanding the economic consequences. We developed a decision analytic computational simulation model including dynamic transmission elements that determined the cost-benefit of employer-sponsored workplace vaccination from the employer's perspective. Implementing such programs was relatively inexpensive (<$35/vaccinated employee) and, in many cases, cost saving across diverse occupational groups in all seasonal influenza scenarios. Such programs were cost-saving for a 20% serologic attack rate pandemic scenario (−$15 to −$995) per vaccinated employee) and a 30% serologic attack rate pandemic scenario (range −$39 to −$1,494 per vaccinated employee) across all age and major occupational groups. PMID:20620168

  9. Epidemiological features of influenza in Canadian adult intensive care unit patients.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G; Abdesselam, K; Pelude, L; Fernandes, R; Mitchell, R; McGeer, A; Frenette, C; Suh, K N; Wong, A; Katz, K; Wilkinson, K; Mersereau, T; Gravel, D

    2016-03-01

    To identify predictive factors and mortality of patients with influenza admitted to intensive care units (ICU) we carried out a prospective cohort study of patients hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza in adult ICUs in a network of Canadian hospitals between 2006 and 2012. There were 626 influenza-positive patients admitted to ICUs over the six influenza seasons, representing 17·9% of hospitalized influenza patients, 3·1/10,000 hospital admissions. Variability occurred in admission rate and proportion of hospital influenza patients who were admitted to ICUs (proportion range by year: 11·7-29·4%; 21·3% in the 2009-2010 pandemic). In logistic regression models ICU patients were younger during the pandemic and post-pandemic period, and more likely to be obese than hospital non-ICU patients. Influenza B accounted for 14·2% of all ICU cases and had a similar ICU admission rate as influenza A. Influenza-related mortality was 17·8% in ICU patients compared to 2·0% in non-ICU patients. PMID:26384310

  10. Reassessing Google Flu Trends Data for Detection of Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza: A Comparative Epidemiological Study at Three Geographic Scales

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Donald R.; Konty, Kevin J.; Paladini, Marc; Viboud, Cecile; Simonsen, Lone

    2013-01-01

    The goal of influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance is to determine the timing, location and magnitude of outbreaks by monitoring the frequency and progression of clinical case incidence. Advances in computational and information technology have allowed for automated collection of higher volumes of electronic data and more timely analyses than previously possible. Novel surveillance systems, including those based on internet search query data like Google Flu Trends (GFT), are being used as surrogates for clinically-based reporting of influenza-like-illness (ILI). We investigated the reliability of GFT during the last decade (2003 to 2013), and compared weekly public health surveillance with search query data to characterize the timing and intensity of seasonal and pandemic influenza at the national (United States), regional (Mid-Atlantic) and local (New York City) levels. We identified substantial flaws in the original and updated GFT models at all three geographic scales, including completely missing the first wave of the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic, and greatly overestimating the intensity of the A/H3N2 epidemic during the 2012/2013 season. These results were obtained for both the original (2008) and the updated (2009) GFT algorithms. The performance of both models was problematic, perhaps because of changes in internet search behavior and differences in the seasonality, geographical heterogeneity and age-distribution of the epidemics between the periods of GFT model-fitting and prospective use. We conclude that GFT data may not provide reliable surveillance for seasonal or pandemic influenza and should be interpreted with caution until the algorithm can be improved and evaluated. Current internet search query data are no substitute for timely local clinical and laboratory surveillance, or national surveillance based on local data collection. New generation surveillance systems such as GFT should incorporate the use of near-real time electronic health data

  11. Reassessing Google Flu Trends data for detection of seasonal and pandemic influenza: a comparative epidemiological study at three geographic scales.

    PubMed

    Olson, Donald R; Konty, Kevin J; Paladini, Marc; Viboud, Cecile; Simonsen, Lone

    2013-01-01

    The goal of influenza-like illness (ILI) surveillance is to determine the timing, location and magnitude of outbreaks by monitoring the frequency and progression of clinical case incidence. Advances in computational and information technology have allowed for automated collection of higher volumes of electronic data and more timely analyses than previously possible. Novel surveillance systems, including those based on internet search query data like Google Flu Trends (GFT), are being used as surrogates for clinically-based reporting of influenza-like-illness (ILI). We investigated the reliability of GFT during the last decade (2003 to 2013), and compared weekly public health surveillance with search query data to characterize the timing and intensity of seasonal and pandemic influenza at the national (United States), regional (Mid-Atlantic) and local (New York City) levels. We identified substantial flaws in the original and updated GFT models at all three geographic scales, including completely missing the first wave of the 2009 influenza A/H1N1 pandemic, and greatly overestimating the intensity of the A/H3N2 epidemic during the 2012/2013 season. These results were obtained for both the original (2008) and the updated (2009) GFT algorithms. The performance of both models was problematic, perhaps because of changes in internet search behavior and differences in the seasonality, geographical heterogeneity and age-distribution of the epidemics between the periods of GFT model-fitting and prospective use. We conclude that GFT data may not provide reliable surveillance for seasonal or pandemic influenza and should be interpreted with caution until the algorithm can be improved and evaluated. Current internet search query data are no substitute for timely local clinical and laboratory surveillance, or national surveillance based on local data collection. New generation surveillance systems such as GFT should incorporate the use of near-real time electronic health data

  12. First-year results of the Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network: 2012–2013 Northern hemisphere influenza season

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network (GIHSN) was developed to improve understanding of severe influenza infection, as represented by hospitalized cases. The GIHSN is composed of coordinating sites, mainly affiliated with health authorities, each of which supervises and compiles data from one to seven hospitals. This report describes the distribution of influenza viruses A(H1N1), A(H3N2), B/Victoria, and B/Yamagata resulting in hospitalization during 2012–2013, the network’s first year. Methods In 2012–2013, the GIHSN included 21 hospitals (five in Spain, five in France, four in the Russian Federation, and seven in Turkey). All hospitals used a reference protocol and core questionnaire to collect data, and data were consolidated at five coordinating sites. Influenza infection was confirmed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Hospitalized patients admitted within 7 days of onset of influenza-like illness were included in the analysis. Results Of 5034 patients included with polymerase chain reaction results, 1545 (30.7%) were positive for influenza. Influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and both B lineages co-circulated, although distributions varied greatly between coordinating sites and over time. All age groups were affected. A(H1N1) was the most common influenza strain isolated among hospitalized adults 18–64 years of age at four of five coordinating sites, whereas A(H3N2) and B viruses were isolated more often than A(H1N1) in adults ≥65 years of age at all five coordinating sites. A total of 16 deaths and 20 intensive care unit admissions were recorded among patients with influenza. Conclusions Influenza strains resulting in hospitalization varied greatly between coordinating sites and over time. These first-year results of the GIHSN are relevant, useful, and timely. Due to its broad regional representativeness and sustainable framework, this growing network should contribute substantially to understanding the

  13. Administration Time Between Seasonal Live-Attenuated Influenza Vaccine and Trivalent Influenza Vaccine During the “Stop Flu at School” Campaign— Hawaii, 2009

    PubMed Central

    He, Hua H.; Park, Sarah Y.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We determined whether the administration time differed between seasonal intranasal live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) and seasonal injectable trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) during Hawaii's 2009 school-located influenza vaccination clinics. This information is useful for public health response and allows further investigation into possible differences between the two vaccines. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in 15 public schools to determine mean times to administer LAIV and TIV to students. We performed group analyses to control for various clinic characteristics and conducted a stratified, weighted analysis. Results A total of 4,701 students were enrolled in the study, and administration time was obtained for 3,869 (82%) students (1,492 [39%] LAIV and 2,377 [61%] TIV). The mean administration time for LAIV was 62 seconds and for TIV was 90 seconds, a difference of 28 seconds (p<0.01). This finding remained significant in the stratified analysis. Conclusions Although results indicated that both LAIV and TIV can be administered rapidly among school-aged populations, LAIV was faster to administer. This finding, in addition to the greater immunogenicity of LAIV compared with TIV among children, may be an important consideration for public health administrators in planning school-located mass vaccination clinics and encouraging patient acceptance of this vaccine. PMID:24791020

  14. Sequential Infection in Ferrets with Antigenically Distinct Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses Boosts Hemagglutinin Stalk-Specific Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; Carter, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Broadly reactive antibodies targeting the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) stalk region are elicited following sequential infection or vaccination with influenza viruses belonging to divergent subtypes and/or expressing antigenically distinct HA globular head domains. Here, we demonstrate, through the use of novel chimeric HA proteins and competitive binding assays, that sequential infection of ferrets with antigenically distinct seasonal H1N1 (sH1N1) influenza virus isolates induced an HA stalk-specific antibody response. Additionally, stalk-specific antibody titers were boosted following sequential infection with antigenically distinct sH1N1 isolates in spite of preexisting, cross-reactive, HA-specific antibody titers. Despite a decline in stalk-specific serum antibody titers, sequential sH1N1 influenza virus-infected ferrets were protected from challenge with a novel H1N1 influenza virus (A/California/07/2009), and these ferrets poorly transmitted the virus to naive contacts. Collectively, these findings indicate that HA stalk-specific antibodies are commonly elicited in ferrets following sequential infection with antigenically distinct sH1N1 influenza virus isolates lacking HA receptor-binding site cross-reactivity and can protect ferrets against a pathogenic novel H1N1 virus. IMPORTANCE The influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) is a major target of the humoral immune response following infection and/or seasonal vaccination. While antibodies targeting the receptor-binding pocket of HA possess strong neutralization capacities, these antibodies are largely strain specific and do not confer protection against antigenic drift variant or novel HA subtype-expressing viruses. In contrast, antibodies targeting the conserved stalk region of HA exhibit broader reactivity among viruses within and among influenza virus subtypes. Here, we show that sequential infection of ferrets with antigenically distinct seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses boosts the antibody responses

  15. Influenza antiviral susceptibility monitoring activities in relation to national antiviral stockpiles in Europe during the winter 2006/2007 season.

    PubMed

    Meijer, A; Lackenby, A; Hay, A; Zambon, M

    2007-04-01

    Due to the influenza pandemic threat, many countries are stockpiling antivirals in the hope of limiting the impact of a future pandemic virus. Since resistance to antiviral drugs would probably significantly alter the effectiveness of antivirals, surveillance programmes to monitor the emergence of resistance are of considerable importance. During the 2006/2007 influenza season, an inventory was conducted by the European Surveillance Network for Vigilance against Viral Resistance (VIRGIL) in collaboration with the European Influenza Surveillance Scheme (EISS) to evaluate antiviral susceptibility testing by the National Influenza Reference Laboratories (NIRL) in relation to the national antiviral stockpile in 30 European countries that are members of EISS. All countries except Ukraine had a stockpile of the neuraminidase inhibitor (NAI) oseltamivir. Additionally, four countries had a stockpile of the NAI zanamivir and three of the M2 ion channel inhibitor rimantadine. Of 29 countries with a NAI stockpile, six countries' NIRLs could determine virus susceptibility by 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) and in 13 countries it could be done by sequencing. Only in one of the three countries with a rimantadine stockpile could the NIRL determine virus susceptibility, by sequencing only. However, including the 18 countries that had plans to introduce or extend antiviral susceptibility testing, the NIRLs of 21 of the 29 countries with a stockpile would be capable of susceptibility testing appropriate to the stockpiled drug by the end of the 2007/2008 influenza season. Although most European countries in this study have stockpiles of influenza antivirals, susceptibility surveillance capability by the NIRLs appropriate to the stockpiled antivirals is limited. PMID:17991386

  16. Seasonal influenza vaccination predicts pandemic H1N1 vaccination uptake among healthcare workers in three countries.

    PubMed

    Chor, Josette S Y; Pada, Surinder K; Stephenson, Iain; Goggins, William B; Tambyah, Paul A; Clarke, Tristan William; Medina, Mariejo; Lee, Nelson; Leung, Ting Fun; Ngai, Karry L K; Law, Shu Kei; Rainer, Timothy H; Griffiths, Sian; Chan, Paul K S

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the common barriers and facilitators for acceptance of pandemic influenza vaccination across different countries. This study utilized a standardized, anonymous, self-completed questionnaire-based survey recording the demographics and professional practice, previous experience and perceived risk and severity of influenza, infection control practices, information of H1N1 vaccination, acceptance of the H1N1 vaccination and reasons of their choices and opinions on mandatory vaccination. Hospital-based doctors, nurses and allied healthcare workers in Hong Kong (HK), Singapore (SG) and Leicester, United Kingdom (UK) were recruited. A total of 6318 (HK: 5743, SG: 300, UK: 275) questionnaires were distributed, with response rates of 27.1% (HK), 94.7% (SG) and 94.5% (UK). The uptake rates for monovalent 2009 pandemic H1N1 vaccine were 13.5% (HK), 36.2% (SG) and 41.3% (UK). The single common factor associated with vaccine acceptance across all sites was having seasonal influenza vaccination in 2009. In UK and HK, overestimation of side effect reduced vaccination acceptance; and fear of side effect was a significant barrier in all sites. In HK, healthcare workers with more patient contact were more reluctant to accept vaccination. Drivers for vaccination in UK and HK were concern about catching the infection and following advice from health authority. Only a small proportion of respondents agreed with mandatory pandemic influenza vaccination (HK: 25% and UK: 42%), except in Singapore where 75.3% were in agreement. Few respondents (<5%) chose scientific publications as their primary source of information, but this group was more likely to receive vaccination. The acceptance of pandemic vaccine among healthcare workers was poor (13-41% of respondents). Breaking barriers to accept seasonal influenza vaccination should be part of the influenza pandemic preparedness plan. Mandatory vaccination even during pandemic is likely to arouse

  17. Natural T Cell–mediated Protection against Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza. Results of the Flu Watch Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lili; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Fragaszy, Ellen B.; Bermingham, Alison; Copas, Andrew; Dukes, Oliver; Millett, Elizabeth R. C.; Nazareth, Irwin; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S.; Watson, John M.; Zambon, Maria; Johnson, Anne M.; McMichael, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: A high proportion of influenza infections are asymptomatic. Animal and human challenge studies and observational studies suggest T cells protect against disease among those infected, but the impact of T-cell immunity at the population level is unknown. Objectives: To investigate whether naturally preexisting T-cell responses targeting highly conserved internal influenza proteins could provide cross-protective immunity against pandemic and seasonal influenza. Methods: We quantified influenza A(H3N2) virus–specific T cells in a population cohort during seasonal and pandemic periods between 2006 and 2010. Follow-up included paired serology, symptom reporting, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) investigation of symptomatic cases. Measurements and Main Results: A total of 1,414 unvaccinated individuals had baseline T-cell measurements (1,703 participant observation sets). T-cell responses to A(H3N2) virus nucleoprotein (NP) dominated and strongly cross-reacted with A(H1N1)pdm09 NP (P < 0.001) in participants lacking antibody to A(H1N1)pdm09. Comparison of paired preseason and post-season sera (1,431 sets) showed 205 (14%) had evidence of infection based on fourfold influenza antibody titer rises. The presence of NP-specific T cells before exposure to virus correlated with less symptomatic, PCR-positive influenza A (overall adjusted odds ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.11–0.68; P = 0.005, during pandemic [P = 0.047] and seasonal [P = 0.049] periods). Protection was independent of baseline antibodies. Influenza-specific T-cell responses were detected in 43%, indicating a substantial population impact. Conclusions: Naturally occurring cross-protective T-cell immunity protects against symptomatic PCR-confirmed disease in those with evidence of infection and helps to explain why many infections do not cause symptoms. Vaccines stimulating T cells may provide important cross-protective immunity. PMID:25844934

  18. 75 FR 35497 - Updated Guidance: Prevention Strategies for Seasonal Influenza in Healthcare Settings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-22

    ... guidance and the Interim Guidance on Infection Control Measures for 2009 H1N1 Influenza in Healthcare... for 2009 H1N1 Influenza in Healthcare Settings, Including Protection of Healthcare Personnel. At the time it was posted, uncertainties existed regarding the novel H1N1 influenza strain, and the...

  19. A randomized, controlled trial comparing traditional herbal medicine and neuraminidase inhibitors in the treatment of seasonal influenza.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Shigeki; Kashiwagi, Kenichiro; Ajisaka, Kazuhiko; Masui, Shinta; Takeoka, Hiroaki; Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2012-08-01

    The herbal medicine, maoto, has been traditionally prescribed to patients with influenza in Japan. To better understand the efficacy of maoto for the treatment of influenza, a randomized trial was conducted for comparison with oseltamivir or zanamivir. Adult patients with influenza symptoms, including fever, positive for quick diagnostic kit for influenza within 48 h of fever onset were assessed for enrollment. The data of 28 patients randomly assigned to maoto (n = 10), oseltamivir (n = 8), or zanamivir (n = 10) were analyzed for the duration of fever (>37.5°C) and total symptom score from symptom cards recorded by the patient. Viral isolation and serum cytokine measurements were also done on days 1, 3, and 5. Maoto granules, a commercial medical dosage form, are made from four plants: Ephedra Herb, Apricot Kernel, Cinnamon Bark, and Glycyrrhiza Root. Median durations of fever of patients assigned maoto, oseltamivir, or zanamivir were 29, 46, or 27 h, respectively, significantly different for maoto and oseltamivir. No significant between-group differences were found in total symptom score among three groups. Viral persistent rates and serum cytokine levels (IFN-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α) during the study period showed no differences among three groups. The administration of oral maoto granules to healthy adults with seasonal influenza was well tolerated and associated with equivalent clinical and virological efficacy to neuraminidase inhibitors. PMID:22350323

  20. Exhaled Aerosol Transmission of Pandemic and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses in the Ferret

    PubMed Central

    Koster, Frederick; Gouveia, Kristine; Zhou, Yue; Lowery, Kristin; Russell, Robert; MacInnes, Heather; Pollock, Zemmie; Layton, R. Colby; Cromwell, Jennifer; Toleno, Denise; Pyle, John; Zubelewicz, Michael; Harrod, Kevin; Sampath, Rangarajan; Hofstadler, Steven; Gao, Peng; Liu, Yushi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Person-to-person transmission of influenza viruses occurs by contact (direct and fomites) and non-contact (droplet and small particle aerosol) routes, but the quantitative dynamics and relative contributions of these routes are incompletely understood. The transmissibility of influenza strains estimated from secondary attack rates in closed human populations is confounded by large variations in population susceptibilities. An experimental method to phenotype strains for transmissibility in an animal model could provide relative efficiencies of transmission. We developed an experimental method to detect exhaled viral aerosol transmission between unanesthetized infected and susceptible ferrets, measured aerosol particle size and number, and quantified the viral genomic RNA in the exhaled aerosol. During brief 3-hour exposures to exhaled viral aerosols in airflow-controlled chambers, three strains of pandemic 2009 H1N1 strains were frequently transmitted to susceptible ferrets. In contrast one seasonal H1N1 strain was not transmitted in spite of higher levels of viral RNA in the exhaled aerosol. Among three pandemic strains, the two strains causing weight loss and illness in the intranasally infected ‘donor’ ferrets were transmitted less efficiently from the donor than the strain causing no detectable illness, suggesting that the mucosal inflammatory response may attenuate viable exhaled virus. Although exhaled viral RNA remained constant, transmission efficiency diminished from day 1 to day 5 after donor infection. Thus, aerosol transmission between ferrets may be dependent on at least four characteristics of virus-host relationships including the level of exhaled virus, infectious particle size, mucosal inflammation, and viral replication efficiency in susceptible mucosa. PMID:22509254

  1. Seasonal influenza vaccination delivery through community pharmacists in England: evaluation of the London pilot

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Katherine; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Watson, Conall; Baguelin, Marc; Choga, Lethiwe; Patel, Anika; Raj, Thara; Jit, Mark; Griffiths, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and cost of the pan-London pharmacy initiative, a programme that allows administration of seasonal influenza vaccination to eligible patients at pharmacies. Design We analysed 2013–2015 data on vaccination uptake in pharmacies via the Sonar reporting system, and the total vaccination uptake via 2011–2015 ImmForm general practitioner (GP) reporting system data. We conducted an online survey of London pharmacists who participate in the programme to assess time use data, vaccine choice, investment costs and opinions about the programme. We conducted an online survey of London GPs to assess vaccine choice of vaccine and opinions about the pharmacy vaccine delivery programme. Setting All London boroughs. Participants London-based GPs, and pharmacies that currently offer seasonal flu vaccination. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures Comparison of annual vaccine uptake in London across risk groups from years before pharmacy vaccination introduction to after pharmacy vaccination introduction. Completeness of vaccine uptake reporting data. Cost to the National Health Service (NHS) of flu vaccine delivery at pharmacies with that at GPs. Cost to pharmacists of flu delivery. Opinions of pharmacists and GPs regarding the flu vaccine pharmacy initiative. Results No significant change in the uptake of seasonal vaccination in any of the risk groups as a result of the pharmacy initiative. While on average a pharmacy-administered flu vaccine dose costs the NHS up to £2.35 less than a dose administered at a GP, a comparison of the 2 recording systems suggests there is substantial loss of data. Conclusions Flu vaccine delivery through pharmacies shows potential for improving convenience for vaccine recipients. However, there is no evidence that vaccination uptake increases and the use of 2 separate recording systems leads to time-consuming data entry and missing vaccine record data. PMID:26883237

  2. Age as a Determinant for Dissemination of Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza: An Open Cohort Study of Influenza Outbreaks in Östergötland County, Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Timpka, Toomas; Eriksson, Olle; Spreco, Armin; Gursky, Elin A.; Strömgren, Magnus; Holm, Einar; Ekberg, Joakim; Dahlström, Örjan; Valter, Lars; Eriksson, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of the occurrence and comparative timing of influenza infections in different age groups is important for developing community response and disease control measures. This study uses data from a Scandinavian county (population 427.000) to investigate whether age was a determinant for being diagnosed with influenza 2005–2010 and to examine if age was associated with case timing during outbreaks. Aggregated demographic data were collected from Statistics Sweden, while influenza case data were collected from a county-wide electronic health record system. A logistic regression analysis was used to explore whether case risk was associated with age and outbreak. An analysis of variance was used to explore whether day for diagnosis was also associated to age and outbreak. The clinical case data were validated against case data from microbiological laboratories during one control year. The proportion of cases from the age groups 10–19 (p<0.001) and 20–29 years old (p<0.01) were found to be larger during the A pH1N1 outbreak in 2009 than during the seasonal outbreaks. An interaction between age and outbreak was observed (p<0.001) indicating a difference in age effects between circulating virus types; this interaction persisted for seasonal outbreaks only (p<0.001). The outbreaks also differed regarding when the age groups received their diagnosis (p<0.001). A post-hoc analysis showed a tendency for the young age groups, in particular the group 10–19 year olds, led outbreaks with influenza type A H1 circulating, while A H3N2 outbreaks displayed little variations in timing. The validation analysis showed a strong correlation (r = 0.625;p<0.001) between the recorded numbers of clinically and microbiologically defined influenza cases. Our findings demonstrate the complexity of age effects underlying the emergence of local influenza outbreaks. Disentangling these effects on the causal pathways will require an integrated information infrastructure for

  3. Deaths averted by influenza vaccination in the U.S. during the seasons 2005/06 through 2013/14☆

    PubMed Central

    Foppa, Ivo M.; Cheng, Po-Yung; Reynolds, Sue B.; Shay, David K.; Carias, Cristina; Bresee, Joseph S.; Kim, Inkyu K.; Gambhir, Manoj; Fry, Alicia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Excess mortality due to seasonal influenza is substantial, yet quantitative estimates of the benefit of annual vaccination programs on influenza-associated mortality are lacking. Methods We estimated the numbers of deaths averted by vaccination in four age groups (0.5 to 4, 5 to 19, 20 to 64 and ≥65 yrs.) for the nine influenza seasons from 2005/6 through 2013/14. These estimates were obtained using a Monte Carlo approach applied to weekly U.S. age group-specific estimates of influenza-associated excess mortality, monthly vaccination coverage estimates and summary seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates to obtain estimates of the number of deaths averted by vaccination. The estimates are conservative as they do not include indirect vaccination effects. Results From August, 2005 through June, 2014, we estimated that 40,127 (95% confidence interval [CI] 25,694 to 59,210) deaths were averted by influenza vaccination. We found that of all studied seasons the most deaths were averted by influenza vaccination during the 2012/13 season (9398; 95% CI 2,386 to 19,897) and the fewest during the 2009/10 pandemic (222; 95% CI 79 to 347). Of all influenza-associated deaths averted, 88.9% (95% CI 83 to 92.5%) were in people ≥65 yrs. old. Conclusions The estimated number of deaths averted by the US annual influenza vaccination program is considerable, especially among elderly adults and even when vaccine effectiveness is modest, such as in the 2012/13 season. As indirect effects (“herd immunity”) of vaccination are ignored, these estimates represent lower bound estimates and are thus conservative given valid excess mortality estimates PMID:25812842

  4. Pandemic vaccination strategies and influenza severe outcomes during the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic and the post-pandemic influenza season: the Nordic experience.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Julita Gil; Aavitsland, Preben; Englund, Hélène; Gudlaugsson, Ólafur; Hauge, Siri Helene; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Sigmundsdóttir, Guðrún; Tegnell, Anders; Virtanen, Mikko; Krause, Tyra Grove

    2016-04-21

    During the 2009/10 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, the five Nordic countries adopted different approaches to pandemic vaccination. We compared pandemic vaccination strategies and severe influenza outcomes, in seasons 2009/10 and 2010/11 in these countries with similar influenza surveillance systems. We calculated the cumulative pandemic vaccination coverage in 2009/10 and cumulative incidence rates of laboratory confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 infections, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions and deaths in 2009/10 and 2010/11. We estimated incidence risk ratios (IRR) in a Poisson regression model to compare those indicators between Denmark and the other countries. The vaccination coverage was lower in Denmark (6.1%) compared with Finland (48.2%), Iceland (44.1%), Norway (41.3%) and Sweden (60.0%). In 2009/10 Denmark had a similar cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 ICU admissions and deaths compared with the other countries. In 2010/11 Denmark had a significantly higher cumulative incidence of A(H1N1)pdm09 ICU admissions (IRR: 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9-3.0) and deaths (IRR: 8.3; 95% CI: 5.1-13.5). Compared with Denmark, the other countries had higher pandemic vaccination coverage and experienced less A(H1N1)pdm09-related severe outcomes in 2010/11. Pandemic vaccination may have had an impact on severe influenza outcomes in the post-pandemic season. Surveillance of severe outcomes may be used to compare the impact of influenza between seasons and support different vaccination strategies. PMID:27123691

  5. Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness in the community (SIVE): protocol for a cohort study exploiting a unique national linked data set

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Colin; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Robertson, Chris; McMenamin, Jim; Ritchie, Lewis; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Seasonal influenza vaccination is recommended for all individuals aged 65 years and over and in individuals younger than 65 years with comorbidities. There is good evidence of vaccine effectiveness (VE) in young healthy individuals but less robust evidence for effectiveness in the populations targeted for influenza vaccination. Undertaking a randomised controlled trial to assess VE is now impractical due to the presence of national vaccination programmes. Quasi-experimental designs offer the potential to advance the evidence base in such scenarios, and the authors have therefore been commissioned to undertake a naturalistic national evaluation of seasonal influenza VE by using data derived from linkage of a number of Scottish health databases. The aim of this study is to examine the effectiveness of the seasonal influenza vaccination in the Scottish population. Methods and analysis A cohort study design will be used pooling data over nine seasons. A primary care database covering 4% of the Scottish population for the period 2000–2009 has been linked to the national database of hospital admissions and the death register and is being linked to the Health Protection Scotland virology database. The primary outcome is VE measured in terms of rate of hospital admissions due to respiratory illness. Multivariable regression will be used to produce estimates of VE adjusted for confounders. The major challenge of this approach is addressing the strong effect of confounding due to vaccinated individuals being systematically different from unvaccinated individuals. Analyses using propensity scores and instrumental variables will be undertaken, and the effect of an unknown confounder will be modelled in a sensitivity analysis to assess the robustness of the estimates. Ethics and dissemination The West of Scotland Research Ethics Committee has classified this project as surveillance. The study findings will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and

  6. Seasonal Oscillation of Human Infection with Influenza A/H5N1 in Egypt and Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Eleanor J.; Morse, Stephen S.

    2011-01-01

    As of June 22, 2011, influenza A/H5N1 has caused a reported 329 deaths and 562 cases in humans, typically attributed to contact with infected poultry. Influenza H5N1 has been described as seasonal. Although several studies have evaluated environmental risk factors for H5N1 in poultry, none have considered seasonality of H5N1 in humans. In addition, temperature and humidity are suspected to drive influenza in temperate regions, but drivers in the tropics are unknown, for H5N1 as well as other influenza viruses. An analysis was conducted to determine whether human H5N1 cases occur seasonally in association with changes in temperature, precipitation and humidity. Data analyzed were H5N1 human cases in Indonesia (n = 135) and Egypt (n = 50), from January 1, 2005 (Indonesia) or 2006 (Egypt) through May 1, 2008 obtained from WHO case reports, and average daily weather conditions obtained from NOAA's National Climatic Data Center. Fourier time series analysis was used to determine seasonality of cases and associations between weather conditions and human H5N1 incidence. Human H5N1 cases in Indonesia occurred with a period of 1.67 years/cycle (p<0.05) and in Egypt, a period of 1.18 years/cycle (p≅0.10). Human H5N1 incidence in Egypt, but not Indonesia, was strongly associated with meteorological variables (κ2≥0.94) and peaked in Egypt when precipitation was low, and temperature, absolute humidity and relative humidity were moderate compared to the average daily conditions in Egypt. Weather conditions coinciding with peak human H5N1 incidence in Egypt suggest that human infection may be occurring primarily via droplet transmission from close contact with infected poultry. PMID:21909409

  7. Feasibility of integrating a clinical decision support tool into an existing computerized physician order entry system to increase seasonal influenza vaccination in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Venkat, Arvind; Chan-Tompkins, Noreen H; Hegde, Gajanan G; Chuirazzi, David M; Hunter, Roger; Szczesiul, Jillian M

    2010-08-23

    While emergency department (ED) seasonal influenza vaccination programs are feasible, reported implementation barriers include added staffing requirements to identify eligible patients and getting busy ED personnel to order and provide vaccination. We present a prospective, observational trial of integrating a clinical decision support tool into an existing ED computerized physician order entry (CPOE) system to increase ED seasonal influenza vaccination without added staffing resources, the operational barriers identified to program implementation, the revenue generated and data on opportunities for future quality improvement. Compared to the comparable pre-protocol period, ED influenza vaccination rose by 17.5% with a resultant profit margin of 34.5%. PMID:20620167

  8. [Pandemic influenza A(H1N1): the experience of the Spanish Laboratories of Influenza Network (ReLEG)].

    PubMed

    Cuevas González-Nicolás, María Teresa; Ledesma Moreno, Juan; Pozo Sánchez, Francisco; Casas Flecha, Inmaculada; Pérez-Breña, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    There are three types of influenza viruses: A, B, C. These viruses evolves constantly due to two main characteristics: the first one is the lack of the correction ability of the viral polymerase which causes the accumulation of single nucleotide mutations in the viral genes introduced by an error-prone viral RNA polymerase, (antigenic shift). The second one is the nature of their genome, formed by eight segments, which allows the interchange of genes between two different viral strains (antigenic drift). This viral plasticity, has allowed to the influenza A viruses to infect new host species and to cause infections with a pandemic characteristics. The Spanish influenza surveillance system, SVGE (its Spanish acronym), arises as a response to the possibility of facing a pandemic situation, especially after the transmission of avian influenza viruses to humans. This surveillance system is formed by sixteen physician and paediatrics network, nineteen epidemiological services coordinated by the National Epidemiological Centre (CNE) and eighteen laboratories , the Spanish Laboratories of Influenza network (ReLEG), coordinated by the National Centre of Microbiology. The aim of this article is to show the action of the ReLEG, in the pandemic caused by the influenza virus A(H1N1) during the season 2009-2010. The main objective of this network is the surveillance of the circulating viruses by means of their detection and their subsequent antigenic and genetic characterization, including the detection of resistance mutations against the main drugs, such as Oseltamivir. PMID:21203714

  9. Use of two rapid influenza diagnostic tests, QuickNavi-Flu and QuickVue Influenza A+B, for rapid detection of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 viruses in Japanese pediatric outpatients over two consecutive seasons.

    PubMed

    Hara, Michimaru; Takao, Shinichi; Shimazu, Yukie

    2013-02-01

    A prospective study of outpatient children conducted during 2 consecutive seasons (2009 and 2011) of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus determined the sensitivity of a chromatographic immunoassay test; real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was the standard, and the test was 87.2% (117 patients in 2009) and 97.4% (114 patients in 2011) sensitive. PMID:23141387

  10. Supplementation of Elderly Japanese Men and Women with Fucoidan from Seaweed Increases Immune Responses to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination12

    PubMed Central

    Negishi, Hirokuni; Mori, Mari; Mori, Hideki; Yamori, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    The elderly are known to have an inadequate immune response to influenza vaccine. Mekabu fucoidan (MF), a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from seaweed, was previously shown to have an immunomodulatory effect. We therefore investigated antibody production after influenza vaccination in elderly Japanese men and women with and without oral MF intake. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study was conducted with 70 volunteers >60 y of age. They were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups, consuming either MF (300 mg/d) or placebo for 4 wk, and then given a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine. Serum was sampled at 5 and 20 wk after vaccination to measure the hemagglutination inhibition titer and natural killer cell activity. The MF group had higher antibody titers against all 3 strains contained in the seasonal influenza virus vaccine than the placebo group. Titers against the B/Brisbane/60/2008 (B) strain increased substantially more in the MF group than in the placebo group over the product consumption period. The immune response against B antigen met the European Union Licensure criteria regarding the geometric mean titer ratio in the MF group (2.4), but not in the placebo group (1.7). In the MF group, natural killer cell activity tended to increase from baseline 9 wk after MF intake (P = 0.08). However, in the placebo group no substantial increase was noted at 9 wk, and the activity decreased substantially from 9 to 24 wk. In the immunocompromised elderly, MF intake increased antibody production after vaccination, possibly preventing influenza epidemics. PMID:24005608

  11. Is getting influenza vaccine coverage data out during mid-season feasible? Evidence from a national survey of U.S. adults.

    PubMed

    Harris, Katherine M; Maurer, Jurgen; Lurie, Nicole

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrated the feasibility of collecting and disseminating mid-season estimates of influenza vaccine coverage. We surveyed a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (n = 3972) via the Internet about use of influenza vaccination as of mid-November 2008. Findings were presented on 10 December 2008 to the media and the public health community during National Influenza Vaccine Week through a webinar sponsored by the National Foundation for Infectious Disease. Survey results suggested that just under 40% of adults with a specific vaccine indication had been vaccinated by mid-November and that 16% still intended to be vaccinated. Among those with the intention to be vaccinated, factors related to time and convenience were cited as reasons for not yet being vaccinated. If reported annually, national-level estimates of mid-season vaccine use could provide a benchmark against which to measure progress of strategies deployed at mid-season to improve influenza vaccination coverage. PMID:19588550

  12. Juveniles and migrants as drivers for seasonal epizootics of avian influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Jacintha G.B.; Hoye, Bethany J.; Verhagen, Josanne H.; Nolet, Bart A.; Fouchier, Ron A.M.; Klaassen, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Similar to other infectious diseases, the prevalence of low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) has been seen to exhibit marked seasonal variation. However, mechanisms driving this variation in wild birds have yet to be tested. We investigated the validity of three previously suggested drivers for the seasonal dynamics in LPAIV infections in wild birds: (1) host density, (2) immunologically-naïve young, and (3) increased susceptibility in migrants.To address these questions, we sampled a key LPAIV host species, the mallard Anas platyrhynchos, on a small spatial scale, comprehensively throughout a complete annual cycle, measuring both current and past infection (i.e. viral and seroprevalence respectively).We demonstrate a minor peak in LPAIV prevalence in summer, a dominant peak in autumn, during which half of the sampled population was infected, and no infections in spring. Seroprevalence of antibodies to a conserved gene-segment of AIV peaked in winter and again in spring.The summer peak of LPAIV prevalence coincided with the entrance of unfledged naïve young in the population. Moreover, juveniles were more likely to be infected, shed higher quantities of virus, and were less likely to have detectable antibodies to AIV than adult birds. The arrival of migratory birds, as identified by stable hydrogen isotope analysis, appeared to drive the autumn peak in LPAIV infection, with both temporal coincidence and higher infection prevalence in migrants. Remarkably, seroprevalence in migrants was substantially lower than viral prevalence throughout autumn migration, further indicating that each wave of migrants amplified local AIV circulation. Finally, while host abundance increased throughout autumn, it peaked in winter, showing no direct correspondence with either of the LPAIV infection peaks.At an epidemiologically-relevant spatial scale, we provide strong evidence for the role of migratory birds as key drivers for seasonal epizootics of LPAIV

  13. H5N1 Vaccine-Specific B Cell Responses in Ferrets Primed with Live Attenuated Seasonal Influenza Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qi; Zhou, Helen; Kulkarni, Deepali; Subbarao, Kanta; Kemble, George; Jin, Hong

    2009-01-01

    Background Live attenuated influenza H5N1 vaccines have been produced and evaluated in mice and ferrets that were never exposed to influenza A virus infection (Suguitan et al., Plos Medicine, e360:1541, 2006). However, the preexisting influenza heterosubtypic immunity on live attenuated H5N1 vaccine induced immune response has not been evaluated. Methodology and Principal Findings Primary and recall B cell responses to live attenuated H5N1 vaccine viruses were examined using a sensitive antigen-specific B cell ELISpot assay to investigate the effect of preexisting heterosubtypic influenza immunity on the development of H5N1-specific B cell immune responses in ferrets. Live attenuated H5N1 A/Hong Kong/213/03 and A/Vietnam/1203/04 vaccine viruses induced measurable H5-specific IgM and IgG secreting B cells after intranasal vaccination. However, H5-specific IgG secreting cells were detected significantly earlier and at a greater frequency after H5N1 inoculation in ferrets previously primed with trivalent live attenuated influenza (H1N1, H3N2 and B) vaccine. Priming studies further revealed that the more rapid B cell responses to H5 resulted from cross-reactive B cell immunity to the hemagglutinin H1 protein. Moreover, vaccination with the H1N1 vaccine virus was able to induce protective responses capable of limiting replication of the H5N1 vaccine virus to a level comparable with prior vaccination with the H5N1 vaccine virus without affecting H5N1 vaccine virus induced antibody response. Conclusion The findings indicate that previous vaccination with seasonal influenza vaccine may accelerate onset of immunity by an H5N1 ca vaccine and the heterosubtypic immunity may be beneficial for pandemic preparedness. PMID:19209231

  14. Influenza

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The term "influenza" originally referred to epidemics of acute, rapidly spreading catarrhal fevers of humans caused by viruses in the family Orthomyxoviridae. Today, orthomyxoviruses are recognized as the cause of significant numbers of natural infections and disease, usually of the upper respirato...

  15. Evaluation of New Canal Point Clones: 2009-2010 Harvest Season

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thirty replicated experiments were conducted on 11 farms (representing 4 muck and 3 sand soils) to evaluate 27 new Canal Point (CP) and 41 new Canal Point and Clewiston (CPCL) clones of sugarcane from the CP 05, CP 04, CP 03, CP 02, CPCL 05, CPCL 02, CPCL 01, CPCL 00, CPCL 99, and CPCL 95 series. Ex...

  16. Summary of the 2009-2010 Season at the Mars Desert Research Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, J. V.; Westenberg, A.

    2011-03-01

    The Mars Desert Research Station in Hanksville, Utah is the most accessible, cost-effective martian analog station available. Each year the station is host to dozens of research projects from disciplines including biology, engineering, geology, hydrology, and psychology.

  17. Immunogenicity and Efficacy of A/H1N1pdm Vaccine Among Subjects With Severe Motor and Intellectual Disability in the 2010/11 Influenza Season

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Megumi; Hanaoka, Tomoyuki; Maeda, Kazuhiro; Kase, Tetsuo; Ohfuji, Satoko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio

    2016-01-01

    Background While the immunogenicity and effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccines among subjects with severe motor and intellectual disability (SMID) are known to be diminished, the efficacy of the A/H1N1pdm vaccine has not been evaluated. Methods We prospectively evaluated 103 subjects with SMID (mean age, 41.7 years) who received trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine during the 2010/11 influenza season. The hemagglutination inhibition (HI) antibody titer was measured in serum samples collected pre-vaccination (S0), post-vaccination (S1), and end-of-season (S2) to evaluate subjects’ immunogenicity capacity. Vaccine efficacy was assessed based on antibody efficacy and achievement proportion. Results The proportions of seroprotection and seroconversion, and the geometric mean titer (GMT) ratio (GMT at S1/GMT at S0) for A/H1N1pdm were 46.0%, 16.0%, and 1.8, respectively—values which did not meet the European Medicines Evaluation Agency criteria. The achievement proportion was 26%. During follow-up, 11 of 43 subjects with acute respiratory illness were diagnosed with type A influenza according to a rapid influenza diagnostic test (RIDT), and A/H1N1pdm strains were isolated from the throat swabs of 5 of those 11 subjects. When either or both RIDT-diagnosed influenza or serologically diagnosed influenza (HI titer at S2/HI titer at S1 ≥2) were defined as probable influenza, subjects with A/H1N1pdm seroprotection were found to have a lower incidence of probable influenza (odds ratio, 0.31; antibody efficacy, 69%; vaccine efficacy, 18%). Conclusions In the present seasonal assessment, antibody efficacy was moderate against A/H1N1pdm among SMID subjects, but vaccine efficacy was low due to the reduced immunogenicity of SMID subjects. PMID:26780860

  18. Factors associated with vaccination for hepatitis B, pertussis, seasonal and pandemic influenza among French general practitioners: a 2010 survey.

    PubMed

    Pulcini, Céline; Massin, Sophie; Launay, Odile; Verger, Pierre

    2013-08-20

    Our objectives were to describe the vaccine coverage (VC(1)) for some occupational vaccines (hepatitis B, pertussis, seasonal and pandemic influenza) among French General Practitioners (GPs(2)) and to study the factors associated with being vaccinated for each of these four diseases. We surveyed a representative national sample of 1431 self-employed GPs in France. Self-reported VC was 76.9% for 2009/10 seasonal influenza, 73.0% for hepatitis B, 63.9% for pertussis and 60.8% for A/H1N1 pandemic influenza. The factors associated with reporting being vaccinated were quite different from one vaccine to another. For some or all four vaccines, we found a significant positive association (p<0.05) with the following factors in the multivariate analysis: GP's male gender, high volume of activity, no particular mode of exercise (e.g. homoeopathy), no use of Internet at the practice, Continuing Medical Education sessions, discussing the benefits and risks of vaccination with the patients and performing prevention investigations for oneself (lipid profile). Being vaccinated for one vaccine also increased the VC for some or all three other studied vaccines. All these findings argue for public health campaigns using messages adapted to each vaccine. PMID:23806242

  19. The Health Literacy of Hong Kong Chinese Parents with Preschool Children in Seasonal Influenza Prevention: A Multiple Case Study at Household Level

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Health literacy influences individual and family health behaviour, health services use, and ultimately health outcomes and health care costs. In Hong Kong, people are at risk of seasonal influenza infection twice a year for three-month periods. Seasonal influenza is significantly associated with an increased number of hospitalized children. There is no research that provides an understanding of parents’ health knowledge and their access to health information concerning seasonal influenza, nor their capacity to effectively manage influenza episodes in household. Such knowledge provides valuable insight into enhancing parents’ health literacy to effectively communicate health messages to their children and support healthy behaviour development through role modelling. Methods A multiple case study was employed to gain a multifaceted understanding of parents’ health literacy regarding seasonal influenza prevention. Purposive intensity sampling was adopted to recruit twenty Hong Kong Chinese parents with a healthy three-to-five year old preschool child from three kindergartens. A content analysis was employed to categorize, tabulate and combine data to address the propositions of the study. Comprehensive comparisons were made across cases to reveal the commonalities and differences. Results Four major themes were identified: inadequate parents' knowledge and reported skills and practices related to seasonal influenza prevention; parental knowledge seeking and exchange practices through social connection; parents’ approaches to health information and limited enabling environments including shortage of health resources and uneven resource allocation for health promotion. Conclusions The findings recommend that community health professionals can play a critical role in increasing parents’ functional, interactive and critical health literacy; important elements when planning and implementing seasonal influenza health promotion. PMID:26624284

  20. The Progression Guidance 2009-2010: A Caution about the Achievement Targets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norgate, Roger

    2011-01-01

    The article welcomes the publication of the Progression Guidance 2009-2010 as an important milestone in the government's attempt to provide data to schools on how well children with special educational needs (SEN) are progressing. The materials hold the potential to enable school improvement partners, inspectors and educational psychologists to…

  1. Evaluation of the Correlated Science and Mathematics Professional Development Model, 2009-2010 Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morlier, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the 2009-2010 iteration of the Correlated Science and Mathematics (CSM) professional development program which provides teachers and principals experience with integrated and effective science and mathematics teaching strategies and content. Archival CSM data was analyzed via mixed…

  2. Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning. Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the Pennsylvania Office of Child Development and Early Learning's annual report for 2009-2010. Providing quality early learning opportunities in the first five years shapes a child's learning and success for life. The window to make a difference in a child's future is small, but outcomes show that the agency is having an…

  3. Profiles of For-Profit Education Management Organizations: Twelfth Annual Report, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Alex; Miron, Gary; Urschel, Jessica L.

    2010-01-01

    The 2009-2010 school year marked another year of relatively slow growth in the for-profit education management industry. The greatest increase in profiled companies occurred in the category of small EMOs (education management organizations) (i.e., EMOs that manage three or fewer schools). The authors believe their key finding from the 2007-2008…

  4. What We Eat In America, NHANES 2009-2010: Documentation and Data Files

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New nationwide dietary intake data were collected in What We Eat In America (WWEIA), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) for the years 2009-2010 and are now available for public use. Two days of dietary intake data are included for most participants. The dietary interview dat...

  5. Annual Report: Discipline, Crime, and Violence, School Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virginia Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The "Code of Virginia" requires school divisions statewide to submit data to the Virginia Department of Education (VDOE) on incidents of discipline, crime, and violence (DCV). School divisions began reporting such data in 1991. This annual report focuses primarily on DCV data submitted for school year 2009-2010, with selected comparisons to prior…

  6. 2009-2010 What We Eat In America, NHANES Tables 1-36

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Food Surveys Research Group of the Beltsville Human Nutrition Research Center has analyzed dietary data from the What We Eat In America (WWEIA), National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009-2010 and released 36 summary data tables for this latest 2-year survey release. The tab...

  7. Mississippi Department of Education 2011 Superintendent's Annual Report, School Year 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Department of Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with the requirements of Section 37-3-11 of the Mississippi Code of 1972, Annotated, this report contains pertinent financial, statistical and other important information at the state and local district levels. The following are presented for the 2009-2010 academic year: (1) Receipts for Public Schools; (2) Expenditures for Public…

  8. 75 FR 18413 - 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations-Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    .... According to the July 9, 2007, final rule published in the Federal Register (72 FR 37346), we went from 487... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 RIN 1018-AW49 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport...: The Fish and Wildlife Service adds two refuges to the list of areas open for hunting and/or...

  9. Genetic and Antigenic Typing of Seasonal Influenza Virus Breakthrough Cases from a 2008-2009 Vaccine Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Durviaux, Serge; Treanor, John; Beran, Jiri; Duval, Xavier; Esen, Meral; Feldman, Gregory; Frey, Sharon E.; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; McElhaney, Janet E.; Nowakowski, Andrzej; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo M.; van Essen, Gerrit A.; Oostvogels, Lidia; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Estimations of the effectiveness of vaccines against seasonal influenza virus are guided by comparisons of the antigenicities between influenza virus isolates from clinical breakthrough cases with strains included in a vaccine. This study examined whether the prediction of antigenicity using a sequence analysis of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene-encoded HA1 domain is a simpler alternative to using the conventional hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay, which requires influenza virus culturing. Specimens were taken from breakthrough cases that occurred in a trivalent influenza virus vaccine efficacy trial involving >43,000 participants during the 2008-2009 season. A total of 498 influenza viruses were successfully subtyped as A(H3N2) (380 viruses), A(H1N1) (29 viruses), B(Yamagata) (23 viruses), and B(Victoria) (66 viruses) from 603 PCR- or culture-confirmed specimens. Unlike the B strains, most A(H3N2) (377 viruses) and all A(H1N1) viruses were classified as homologous to the respective vaccine strains based on their HA1 domain nucleic acid sequence. HI titers relative to the respective vaccine strains and PCR subtyping were determined for 48% (182/380) of A(H3N2) and 86% (25/29) of A(H1N1) viruses. Eighty-four percent of the A(H3N2) and A(H1N1) viruses classified as homologous by sequence were matched to the respective vaccine strains by HI testing. However, these homologous A(H3N2) and A(H1N1) viruses displayed a wide range of relative HI titers. Therefore, although PCR is a sensitive diagnostic method for confirming influenza virus cases, HA1 sequence analysis appeared to be of limited value in accurately predicting antigenicity; hence, it may be inappropriate to classify clinical specimens as homologous or heterologous to the vaccine strain for estimating vaccine efficacy in a prospective clinical trial. PMID:24371255

  10. Demographic, socio-economic and geographic determinants of seasonal influenza vaccine uptake in rural western Kenya, 2011.

    PubMed

    Otieno, Nancy A; Nyawanda, Bryan O; Audi, Allan; Emukule, Gideon; Lebo, Emmaculate; Bigogo, Godfrey; Ochola, Rachel; Muthoka, Phillip; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Shay, David K; Burton, Deron C; Breiman, Robert F; Katz, Mark A; Mott, Joshua A

    2014-11-20

    Influenza-associated acute lower respiratory infections cause a considerable burden of disease in rural and urban sub-Saharan Africa communities with the greatest burden among children. Currently, vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza infection and accompanying morbidities. We examined geographic, socio-economic and demographic factors that contributed to acceptance of childhood seasonal influenza vaccination among children living in a population-based morbidity surveillance system in rural western Kenya, where influenza vaccine was offered free-of-charge to children 6 months-10 years old from April to June, 2011. We evaluated associations between maternal and household demographic variables, socio-economic status, and distance from home to vaccination clinics with family vaccination status. 7249 children from 3735 households were eligible for vaccination. Of these, 2675 (36.9%) were fully vaccinated, 506 (7.0%) were partially vaccinated and 4068 (56.1%) were not vaccinated. Children living in households located >5km radius from the vaccination facilities were significantly less likely to be vaccinated (aOR=0.70; 95% CI 0.54-0.91; p=0.007). Children with mothers aged 25-34 and 35-44 years were more likely to be vaccinated than children with mothers less than 25 years of age (aOR=1.36; 95% CI 1.15-1.62; p<0.001; and aOR=1.35; 95% CI 1.10-1.64; p=0.003, respectively). Finally, children aged 2-5 years and >5 years of age (aOR=1.38; 95% CI 1.20-1.59; p<0.001; and aOR=1.41; 95% CI 1.23-1.63; p<0.001, respectively) and who had a sibling hospitalized within the past year (aOR=1.73; 95% CI 1.40-2.14; p<0.001) were more likely to be vaccinated. Shorter distance from the vaccination center, older maternal and child age, household administrator's occupation that did not require them to be away from the home, and having a sibling hospitalized during the past year were associated with increased likelihood of vaccination against influenza in western Kenya. These

  11. Seasonal Influenza Vaccination Is the Strongest Correlate of Cross-Reactive Antibody Responses in Migratory Bird Handlers

    PubMed Central

    Oshansky, Christine M.; Wong, Sook-San; Jeevan, Trushar; Smallwood, Heather S.; Webby, Richard J.; Shafir, Shira C.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian species are reservoirs of influenza A viruses and could harbor viruses with significant pandemic potential. We examined the antibody and cellular immune responses to influenza A viruses in field or laboratory workers with a spectrum of occupational exposure to avian species for evidence of zoonotic infections. We measured the seroprevalence and T cell responses among 95 individuals with various types and degrees of prior field or laboratory occupational exposure to wild North American avian species using whole blood samples collected in 2010. Plasma samples were tested using endpoint enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and hemagglutination (HA) inhibition (HAI) assays to subtypes H3, H4, H5, H6, H7, H8, and H12 proteins. Detectable antibodies were found against influenza HA antigens in 77% of individuals, while 65% of individuals tested had measurable T cell responses (gamma interferon [IFN-γ] enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay [ELISPOT]) to multiple HA antigens of avian origin. To begin defining the observed antibody specificities, Spearman rank correlation analysis showed that ELISA responses, which measure both head- and stalk-binding antibodies, do not predict HAI reactivities, which measure primarily head-binding antibodies. This result suggests that ELISA titers can report cross-reactivity based on the levels of non-head-binding responses. However, the strongest positive correlate of HA-specific ELISA antibody titers was receipt of seasonal influenza virus vaccination. Occupational exposure was largely uncorrelated with serological measures, with the exception of individuals exposed to poultry, who had higher levels of H7-specific antibodies than non-poultry-exposed individuals. While the cohort had antibody and T cell reactivity to a broad range of influenza viruses, only occupational exposure to poultry was associated with a significant difference in antibody levels to a specific subtype (H7). There was no evidence that T cell

  12. Evaluation of the Pan Influenza detection kit utilizing the PLEX-ID and influenza samples from the 2011 respiratory season

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Luis; Hardick, Justin; Jeng, Kevin; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2013-01-01

    A comparison study was performed between the PLEX-ID and the CDC RT-PCR method for the detection and identification of Influenza A viruses using nasopharyngeal samples (N = 75) collected between January and May 2011. Overall agreement was 89.3% (67/75 kappa = 0.57 95% CI 0.3–0.89). Positive percent agreement was 92.3% (60/65); negative percent agreement was 70% (7/10). H1N1 pdm09 identified: 42.6% (32/75) and 54.7% (41/75) by PLEX-ID and CDC RT-PCR, respectively. H3N2 identified: 29.3% (22/75) and 32% (24/75) of samples by PLEX-ID and CDC RT-PCR, respectively. Negatives identified: 16% (12/75) and 13.3% (10/75), by PLEX-ID and CDC RT-PCR respectively. For influenza viruses identified as H1N1 pdm09, Influenza A virus A/NEW YORK/15/2009(H1N1 pdm09) was the most prevalent genotype at 50% (16/32), followed by A/CALIFORNIA/05/2009(H1N1 pdm09) at 18.2% (6/32). Updated assay plates containing additional primers designed for H1N1 pdm09 HA and NA genes were utilized for this evaluation. Among H1N1 pdm09 samples, the HA gene was conserved in 96.9% (31/32) of samples. The NA gene was conserved in 96.9% (31/32). PMID:23764420

  13. Immunological persistence of a seasonal influenza vaccine in people more than 3 years old.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yunhua; Shi, Nianmin; Lu, Qiang; Yang, Liqing; Wang, Zhaoyun; Li, Li; Han, HuiXia; Zheng, Dongyi; Luo, FengJi; Zhang, Zheng; Ai, Xing

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate antibody persistence of Aleph inactivated split influenza vaccine, 3308 healthy Chinese people more than 3 years old were enrolled in a hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay before vaccination, 641 were screened by HI assay negative, 437 of which received one dose of Aleph inactivated split influenza vaccine and 204 of which received one dose of control vaccine (recombinant hepatitis B). After vaccination, the receivers were collected blood at 1st month, 3rd month, 6th month and 12th month for Aleh influenza vaccine antibody persistence assess. The antibody test were determined by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. There were significant difference in antibody geometric mean titer between experimental group and control at 1st month and 3rd month after vaccination. Influenza antibody could persist at least up to 3rd month. Because of the local spring influenza epidemic, we could not analyze the results of 6th and 12th month. Aleph influenza vaccines showed good immune persistence in healthy volunteers at least in the 3 months after vaccination. Influenza viruses are important human respiratory pathogens. Immunization is widely acknowledged to currently be the most effective method of minimizing the impact of pandemic influenza. Through we have checked many references about Influenza vaccine, the duration of protective antibody for influenza vaccines are still not available. Based on this situation and our previous work, (11) Influenza vaccine antibody duration analyze are necessary. This manuscript presents data on the persistence of Hemagglutination Inhibition (HI) immune response against the A/California/7/2009(H1N1), A/Peth/16/2009(H3N2) strain and B/Brisbane/60/2008. 641 were screened from 3302 volunteers by HI test of influenza A and confirmed enrollment based on the antibodies titer less than 1:10. After administered with one dose of Aleph influenza vaccine, blood samples were collected. 437 subjects (3-10 y: 131; 11-17 y: 110; 18-54 y: 69;

  14. Real-time safety surveillance of seasonal influenza vaccines in children, Australia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Pillsbury, Alexis; Cashman, Patrick; Leeb, Alan; Regan, Annette; Westphal, Darren; Snelling, Tom; Blyth, Christopher; Crawford, Nigel; Wood, Nicholas; Macartney, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    Increased febrile reactions in Australian children from one influenza vaccine brand in 2010 diminished confidence in influenza immunisation, highlighting the need for improved vaccine safety surveillance. AusVaxSafety, a national vaccine safety surveillance system collected adverse events in young children for 2015 influenza vaccine brands in real time through parent/carer reports via SMS/email. Weekly cumulative data on 3,340 children demonstrated low rates of fever (4.4%) and medical attendance (1.1%). Fever was more frequent with concomitant vaccination. PMID:26536867

  15. Decisional conflict and vaccine uptake: cross-sectional study of 2012/2013 influenza season in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Pavličević, Ivančica; Škrabić, Slavica; Merćep, Ana Hrvojka; Marušić, Matko; Marušić, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As scientific, media and individual opinions on the need for seasonal influenza vaccination differ, we explored patients’ decisional conflict and perceived physician and social support when making a vaccination choice. Material and methods We conducted a survey of patients with previous vaccination experience in a single family medicine office in Split, Croatia. The questionnaire included the Decisional Conflict Scale (DCS), perceived social support, and attitudes and knowledge concerning vaccination. Results Out of 203 (86%) adult patients with previous vaccination experience, 182 (40.4%) opted to vaccinate in the current season, 98 (48.3%) refused, and 22 (11.3%) were undecided. The median decisional conflict score was highest among those undecided (43.8 out of the maximum 100, interquartile range (IQR) 33.2–52.3), lowest among those opting to vaccinate (17.2, IQR 9.4–26.6), and intermediate among those who refused vaccination (25.0, IQR 17.2–39.1) (p < 0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test and post-hoc Mann-Whitney U tests). The most common self-reported reasons for vaccination were previous vaccination experience (n = 85, 42%) and media information (n = 62, 30%). Those who refused vaccination felt less satisfied with the support they received from their family physician than those who decided to vaccinate (median 6.5 (IQR 0–9) vs. 9 (IQR 5–10) on a scale from 0 to 10), respectively; p = 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Conclusions Higher decisional conflict of patients who refuse influenza vaccination and those undecided, alongside their perceived low support of the family physician in making that choice, emphasize the importance family doctors play in advising and helping patients make informed decisions about seasonal influenza vaccination. PMID:26322091

  16. Computational Identification of Antigenicity-Associated Sites in the Hemagglutinin Protein of A/H1N1 Seasonal Influenza Virus.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaowei; Li, Yuefeng; Liu, Xiaoning; Shen, Xiping; Gao, Wenlong; Li, Juansheng

    2015-01-01

    The antigenic variability of influenza viruses has always made influenza vaccine development challenging. The punctuated nature of antigenic drift of influenza virus suggests that a relatively small number of genetic changes or combinations of genetic changes may drive changes in antigenic phenotype. The present study aimed to identify antigenicity-associated sites in the hemagglutinin protein of A/H1N1 seasonal influenza virus using computational approaches. Random Forest Regression (RFR) and Support Vector Regression based on Recursive Feature Elimination (SVR-RFE) were applied to H1N1 seasonal influenza viruses and used to analyze the associations between amino acid changes in the HA1 polypeptide and antigenic variation based on hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay data. Twenty-three and twenty antigenicity-associated sites were identified by RFR and SVR-RFE, respectively, by considering the joint effects of amino acid residues on antigenic drift. Our proposed approaches were further validated with the H3N2 dataset. The prediction models developed in this study can quantitatively predict antigenic differences with high prediction accuracy based only on HA1 sequences. Application of the study results can increase understanding of H1N1 seasonal influenza virus antigenic evolution and accelerate the selection of vaccine strains. PMID:25978416

  17. Computational Identification of Antigenicity-Associated Sites in the Hemagglutinin Protein of A/H1N1 Seasonal Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoning; Shen, Xiping; Gao, Wenlong; Li, Juansheng

    2015-01-01

    The antigenic variability of influenza viruses has always made influenza vaccine development challenging. The punctuated nature of antigenic drift of influenza virus suggests that a relatively small number of genetic changes or combinations of genetic changes may drive changes in antigenic phenotype. The present study aimed to identify antigenicity-associated sites in the hemagglutinin protein of A/H1N1 seasonal influenza virus using computational approaches. Random Forest Regression (RFR) and Support Vector Regression based on Recursive Feature Elimination (SVR-RFE) were applied to H1N1 seasonal influenza viruses and used to analyze the associations between amino acid changes in the HA1 polypeptide and antigenic variation based on hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) assay data. Twenty-three and twenty antigenicity-associated sites were identified by RFR and SVR-RFE, respectively, by considering the joint effects of amino acid residues on antigenic drift. Our proposed approaches were further validated with the H3N2 dataset. The prediction models developed in this study can quantitatively predict antigenic differences with high prediction accuracy based only on HA1 sequences. Application of the study results can increase understanding of H1N1 seasonal influenza virus antigenic evolution and accelerate the selection of vaccine strains. PMID:25978416

  18. Use of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination and Its Associated Factors among Elderly People with Disabilities in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Chia; Tung, Ho-Jui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Chen, Lei-Shin; Kung, Pei-Tseng; Huang, Kuang-Hua; Chiou, Shang-Jyh; Tsai, Wen-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background Influenza immunization among elderly people with disabilities is a critical public health concern; however, few studies have examined the factors associated with vaccination rates in non-Western societies. Methods By linking the National Disability Registration System and health service claims dataset from the National Health Insurance program, this population-based study investigated the seasonal influenza vaccination rate among elderly people with disabilities in Taiwan (N = 283,172) in 2008. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to adjust for covariates. Results Nationally, only 32.7% of Taiwanese elderly people with disabilities received influenza vaccination. The strongest predictor for getting vaccinated among older Taiwanese people with disabilities was their experience of receiving an influenza vaccination in the previous year (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 6.80, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.67–6.93). Frequent OPD use (AOR = 1.85, 95% CI: 1.81–1.89) and undergoing health examinations in the previous year (AOR = 1.66, 95% CI: 1.62–1.69) also showed a moderate and significant association with receiving an influenza vaccination. Conclusions Although free influenza vaccination has been provided in Taiwan since 2001, influenza immunization rates among elderly people with disabilities remain low. Policy initiatives are required to address the identified factors for improving influenza immunization rates among elderly people with disabilities. PMID:27336627

  19. Duration of fever and other symptoms after the inhalation of laninamivir octanoate hydrate for influenza treatment; comparison among the four Japanese influenza seasons from 2011-2012 to 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Kawai, Naoki; Iwaki, Norio; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2016-09-01

    The duration of fever and other symptoms as markers of the clinical effectiveness of laninamivir octanoate hydrate (laninamivir) were investigated in the Japanese 2014-2015 influenza season and the results were compared with those of the previous three seasons, 2011-2012 to 2013-2014. From these four seasons, the data of 636 influenza A(H3N2) and 128 influenza B patients was available for analysis. No significant difference was found in their baseline characteristics. The median duration of fever for all A(H3N2) patients ranged from 32.0 to 41.0 h. The duration of fever in the 2014-2015 season was significantly shorter than that in the 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 seasons (p = 0.0204 and 0.0391, respectively), but the differences were within nine hours. The median duration of symptoms for A(H3N2) ranged from 80.0 to 89.0 h, with no significant difference among the four seasons (p = 0.2222). The median duration of fever for B patients ranged from 43.0 to 50.0 h, with no significant difference among the four seasons. The duration of the symptoms for B varied by season, but no significant difference was found among the four seasons. Over the four seasons, 44 adverse events were reported from among 921 patients, with all resolving without treatment. These results indicate the continuing effectiveness of laninamivir against influenza A(H3N2) and B, with no safety issues. It is unlikely that the clinical use of laninamivir has caused viral resistance in the currently epidemic viruses. PMID:27493024

  20. Dynamical prediction of flu seasonality driven by ambient temperature: influenza vs. common cold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Postnikov, Eugene B.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents a comparative analysis of Influenzanet data for influenza itself and common cold in the Netherlands during the last 5 years, from the point of view of modelling by linearised SIRS equations parametrically driven by the ambient temperature. It is argued that this approach allows for the forecast of common cold, but not of influenza in a strict sense. The difference in their kinetic models is discussed with reference to the clinical background.

  1. Hemagglutination Inhibition Antibody Titers as a Correlate of Protection Against Seasonal A/H3N2 Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Anne; Beran, Jiri; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Esen, Meral; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; McElhaney, Janet E.; Oostvogels, Lidia; van Essen, Gerrit A.; Gaglani, Manjusha; Jackson, Lisa A.; Vesikari, Timo; Legrand, Catherine; Tibaldi, Fabian; Innis, Bruce L.; Dewé, Walthère

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate the relationship between hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) antibody levels to the risk of influenza disease, we conducted a correlate of protection analysis using pooled data from previously published randomized trials. Methods. Data on the occurrence of laboratory-confirmed influenza and HI levels pre- and postvaccination were analyzed from 4 datasets: 3 datasets included subjects aged <65 years who received inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) or placebo, and 1 dataset included subjects aged ≥65 years who received AS03-adjuvanted TIV (AS03-TIV) or TIV. A logistic model was used to evaluate the relationship between the postvaccination titer of A/H3N2 HI antibodies and occurrence of A/H3N2 disease. We then built a receiver-operating characteristic curve to identify a potential cutoff titer between protection and no protection. Results. The baseline odds ratio of A/H3N2 disease was higher for subjects aged ≥65 years than <65 years and higher in seasons of strong epidemic intensity than moderate or low intensity. Including age and epidemic intensity as covariates, a 4-fold increase in titer was associated with a 2-fold decrease in the risk of A/H3N2 disease. Conclusions. The modeling exercise confirmed a relationship between A/H3N2 disease and HI responses, but it did not allow an evaluation of the predictive power of the HI response. PMID:26180823

  2. Interventions to increase seasonal influenza vaccine coverage in healthcare workers: A systematic review and meta-regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Lytras, Theodore; Kopsachilis, Frixos; Mouratidou, Elisavet; Papamichail, Dimitris; Bonovas, Stefanos

    2016-03-01

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for healthcare workers (HCWs), but coverage is often low. We reviewed studies evaluating interventions to increase seasonal influenza vaccination coverage in HCWs, including a meta-regression analysis to quantify the effect of each component. Fourty-six eligible studies were identified. Domains conferring a high risk of bias were identified in most studies. Mandatory vaccination was the most effective intervention component (Risk Ratio of being unvaccinated [RRunvacc] = 0.18, 95% CI: 0.08-0.45), followed by "soft" mandates such as declination statements (RRunvacc = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.45-0.92), increased awareness (RRunvacc = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.71-0.97) and increased access (RRunvacc = 0.88, 95% CI: 0.78-1.00). For incentives the difference was not significant, while for education no effect was observed. Heterogeneity was substantial (τ(2) = 0.083). These results indicate that effective alternatives to mandatory HCWs influenza vaccination do exist, and need to be further explored in future studies. PMID:26619125

  3. Safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of Flublok in the prevention of seasonal influenza in adults

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Manon M. J.; Izikson, Ruvim; Post, Penny; Dunkle, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Flublok is the first recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) vaccine licensed by the US Food and Drugs Administration for the prevention of influenza in adults aged 18 and older. The HA proteins produced in insect cell culture using the baculovirus expression system technology are exact analogues of wild type circulating influenza virus HAs. The universal HA manufacturing process that has been successfully scaled to the 21,000L contributes to rapid delivery of a substantial number of doses. This review discusses the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety data from five pivotal clinical studies used to support licensure of trivalent Flublok for adults 18 years of age and older in the United States. The trial data demonstrate that the higher antigen content in Flublok results in improved immunogenicity. Data further suggest improved efficacy and a slightly lower local reactogenicity compared with standard inactivated influenza vaccine, despite the presence of more antigen (statistically significant). Flublok influenza vaccine can include HAs designed to mimic ‘drift’ in influenza viruses as the process of predicting antigenic drift advances and, at a minimum, could address late appearing influenza viruses. The implementation of the latter will require support from regulatory authorities. PMID:26478817

  4. Selection of an adjuvant for seasonal influenza vaccine in elderly people: modelling immunogenicity from a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improved influenza vaccines are needed to reduce influenza-associated complications in older adults. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal formulation of adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine for use in elderly people. Methods This observer-blind, randomized study assessed the optimal formulation of adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccine based on immunogenicity and safety in participants aged ≥65 years. Participants were randomized (~200 per group) to receive one dose of non-adjuvanted vaccine or one of eight formulations of vaccine formulated with a squalene and tocopherol oil-in-water emulsion-based Adjuvant System (AS03C, AS03B or AS03A, with 2.97, 5.93 and 11.86 mg tocopherol, respectively) together with the immunostimulant monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL, doses of 0, 25 or 50 mg). Hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibody responses and T-cell responses were assessed on Day 0 and 21 days post-vaccination. The ratio of HI-based geometric mean titers in adjuvanted versus non-adjuvanted vaccine groups were calculated and the lower limit of the 90% confidence interval was transformed into a desirability index (a value between 0 and 1) in an experimental domain for each vaccine strain, and plotted in relation to the AS03 and MPL dose combination in the formulation. This model was used to assess the optimal formulation based on HI antibody titers. Reactogenicity and safety were also assessed. The immunogenicity and safety analyses were used to evaluate the optimal formulation of adjuvanted vaccine. Results In the HI antibody-based model, an AS03 dose–response was evident; responses against the A/H1N1 and A/H3N2 strains were higher for all adjuvanted formulations versus non-adjuvanted vaccine, and for the AS03A-MPL25, AS03B-MPL25 and AS03B-MPL50 formulations against the B strain. Modelling using more stringent criteria (post hoc) showed a clear dose-range effect for the AS03 component against all strains, whereas MPL showed a limited effect

  5. Spanish flu, Asian flu, Hong Kong flu, and seasonal influenza in Japan under social and demographic influence: review and analysis using the two-population model.

    PubMed

    Yoshikura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    When cumulative numbers of patients (X) and deaths (Y) associated with an influenza epidemic are plotted using the log-log scale, the plots fall on an ascending straight line generally expressed as logY = k(logX - logN0). For the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic, the slope k was ~0.6 for Mexico and ~2 for other countries. The two-population model was proposed to explain this phenomenon (Yoshikura H. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2012;65:279-88; Yoshikura H. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2009;62:411-2; and Yoshikura H. Jpn J Infect Dis. 2009;62:482-4). The current article reviews and analyzes previous influenza epidemics in Japan to examine whether the two-population model is applicable to them. The slope k was found to be ~2 for the Spanish flu during 1918-1920 and the Asian flu during 1957-1958, and ~1 for the Hong Kong flu and seasonal influenza prior to 1960-1961; however, k was ~0.6 for seasonal influenza after 1960-1961. This transition of the slope k of seasonal influenza plots from ~1 to ~0.6 corresponded to the shift in influenza mortality toward the older age groups and a drastic reduction in infant mortality rates due to improvements in the standard of living during the 1950s and 1960s. All the above observations could be well explained by reconstitution of the influenza epidemic based on the two-population model. PMID:25056069

  6. Predictive factors associated with the acceptance of pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccination in health care workers and students in Tuscany, Central Italy.

    PubMed

    Bonaccorsi, Guglielmo; Lorini, Chiara; Santomauro, Francesca; Guarducci, Silvia; Pellegrino, Elettra; Puggelli, Francesco; Balli, Marta; Bonanni, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the beliefs and attitudes of Health Care Workers (HCW) to influenza and influenza vaccination can be useful in overcoming low compliance rates. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the opinion of HCW and students regarding influenza, influenza vaccine and the factors associated with vaccination compliance. A survey was conducted between October 2010 and April 2011 in the Florence metropolitan area. A questionnaire was administered to HCW in three local healthcare units and at Careggi University Teaching Hospital. Students matriculating in health degree programs at Florence University were also surveyed. The coverage with vaccination against seasonal and pandemic influenza is generally low, and it is lower in students than in HCW (12.5% vs 15% for the seasonal vaccination, 8.5% vs 18% for the pandemic vaccination). Individuals comply with vaccination offer mainly to protect themselves and their contacts. Individuals not receiving vaccination did not consider themselves at risk, had never been vaccinated before or believed that pandemic influenza was not a public health concern. Physicians had the highest compliance to vaccination and women were less frequently vaccinated than men. HCW do not appear to perceive their possible influenza infections as a risk for patients: HCW receive vaccination mainly as a form of personal protection. Low compliance to vaccination is determined by various factors and therefore requires a multi-faceted strategy of response. This should include short-term actions to overcome organizational barriers, in addition to long-term interventions to raise HCW's level of knowledge about influenza and influenza vaccination. PMID:23954990

  7. Social determinants of health and seasonal influenza vaccination in adults ≥65 years: a systematic review of qualitative and quantitative data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Vaccination against influenza is considered the most important public health intervention to prevent unnecessary hospitalizations and premature deaths related to influenza in the elderly, though there are significant inequities among global influenza vaccine resources, capacities, and policies. The objective of this study was to assess the social determinants of health preventing adults ≥65 years old from accessing and accepting seasonal influenza vaccination. Methods A systematic search was performed in January 2011 using MEDLINE, ISI – Web of Science, PsycINFO, and CINAHL (1980–2011). Reference lists of articles were also examined. Selection criteria included qualitative and quantitative studies written in English that examined social determinants of and barriers against seasonal influenza vaccination among adults≥65 years. Two authors performed the quality assessment and data extraction. Thematic analysis was the main approach for joint synthesis, using identification and juxtaposition of themes associated with vaccination. Results Overall, 58 studies were analyzed. Structural social determinants such as age, gender, marital status, education, ethnicity, socio-economic status, social and cultural values, as well as intermediary determinants including housing-place of residence, behavioral beliefs, social influences, previous vaccine experiences, perceived susceptibility, sources of information, and perceived health status influenced seasonal influenza vaccination. Healthcare system related factors including accessibility, affordability, knowledge and attitudes about vaccination, and physicians’ advice were also important determinants of vaccination. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the ability of adults ≥65 years to receive seasonal influenza vaccine is influenced by structural, intermediate, and healthcare-related social determinants which have an impact at the health system, provider, and individual levels. PMID:23617788

  8. Uptake and impact of a new live attenuated influenza vaccine programme in England: early results of a pilot in primary school-age children, 2013/14 influenza season.

    PubMed

    Pebody, R G; Green, H K; Andrews, N; Zhao, H; Boddington, N; Bawa, Z; Durnall, H; Singh, N; Sunderland, A; Letley, L; Ellis, J; Elliot, A J; Donati, M; Smith, G E; de Lusignan, S; Zambon, M

    2014-01-01

    As part of the introduction and roll-out of a universal childhood live-attenuated influenza vaccination programme, 4–11 year-olds were vaccinated in seven pilot areas in England in the 2013/14 influenza season. This paper presents the uptake and impact of the programme for a range of disease indicators. End-of-season uptake was defined as the number of children in the target population who received at least one dose of influenza vaccine. Between week 40 2013 and week 15 2014, cumulative disease incidence per 100,000 population (general practitioner consultations for influenza-like illness and laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalisations), cumulative influenza swab positivity in primary and secondary care and cumulative proportion of emergency department respiratory attendances were calculated. Indicators were compared overall and by age group between pilot and non-pilot areas. Direct impact was defined as reduction in cumulative incidence based on residence in pilot relative to non-pilot areas in 4–11 year-olds. Indirect impact was reduction between pilot and non-pilot areas in <4 year-olds and >11 year-olds. Overall vaccine uptake of 52.5% (104,792/199,475) was achieved. Although influenza activity was low, a consistent, though not statistically significant, decrease in cumulative disease incidence and influenza positivity across different indicators was seen in pilot relative to non-pilot areas in both targeted and non-targeted age groups, except in older age groups, where no difference was observed for secondary care indicators. PMID:24925457

  9. 77 FR 34346 - Fresh Garlic from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the 2009-2010 Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-11

    ...: Partial Final Results and Partial Final Rescission of the 2009-2010 Administrative Review, 77 FR 11486... FR 76375 (December 7, 2011) (Preliminary Results). On December 20, 2011, in response to Xinboda's and... Results of the 2009-2010 Administrative Review, 77 FR 17409 (March 26, 2012). At the request of Xinboda,...

  10. Adding justice to the clinical and public health ethics arguments for mandatory seasonal influenza immunisation for healthcare workers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Lisa M

    2015-08-01

    Ethical considerations from both the clinical and public health perspectives have been used to examine whether it is ethically permissible to mandate the seasonal influenza vaccine for healthcare workers (HCWs). Both frameworks have resulted in arguments for and against the requirement. Neither perspective resolves the question fully. By adding components of justice to the argument, I seek to provide a more fulsome ethical defence for requiring seasonal influenza immunisation for HCWs. Two critical components of a just society support requiring vaccination: fairness of opportunity and the obligation to follow democratically formulated rules. The fairness of opportunity is informed by Rawls' two principles of justice. The obligation to follow democratically formulated rules allows us to focus simultaneously on freedom, plurality and solidarity. Justice requires equitable participation in and benefit from cooperative schemes to gain or profit socially as individuals and as a community. And to be just, HCW immunisation exemptions should be limited to medical contraindications only. In addition to the HCWs fiduciary duty to do what is best for the patient and the public health duty to protect the community with effective and minimally intrusive interventions, HCWs are members of a just society in which all members have an obligation to participate equitably in order to partake in the benefits of membership. PMID:25687674

  11. Galactic Cosmic-Ray Energy Spectra and Composition during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Wiedenbeck, Mark E.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Israel, M. H..; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; VonRosenvinge, T. T.

    2013-01-01

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 <= Z <= 28 in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV / nucleon. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than approx. 7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than approx. 4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2sigma, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  12. Scales of governance: the role of surveillance in facilitating new diplomacy during the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic.

    PubMed

    Bell, Morag; Warren, Adam; Budd, Lucy

    2012-11-01

    The 2009-2010 H1N1 influenza pandemic has highlighted the importance of global health surveillance. Increasingly, global alerts are based on 'unexpected' 'events' detected by surveillance systems grounded in particular places. An emerging global governance literature investigates the supposedly disruptive impact of public health emergencies on mobilities in an interdependent world. Little consideration has been given to the varied scales of governance--local, national and global--that operate at different stages in the unfolding of an 'event', together with the interactions and tensions between them. By tracking the chronology of the H1N1 pandemic, this paper highlights an emergent dialogue between local and global scales. It also draws attention to moments of national autonomy across the global North and South which undermined the WHO drive for transnational cooperation. PMID:22884291

  13. Enhanced Estimates of the Influenza Vaccination Effect in Preventing Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Castilla, Jesús; Guevara, Marcela; Martínez-Baz, Iván; Ezpeleta, Carmen; Delfrade, Josu; Irisarri, Fátima; Moreno-Iribas, Conchi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mortality is a major end-point in the evaluation of influenza vaccine effectiveness. However, this effect is not well known, since most previous studies failed to show good control of biases. We aimed to estimate the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in preventing all-cause mortality in community-dwelling seniors. Since 2009, a population-based cohort study using healthcare databases has been conducted in Navarra, Spain. In 2 late influenza seasons, 2011/2012 and 2012/2013, all-cause mortality in the period January to May was compared between seniors (65 years or over) who received the trivalent influenza vaccine and those who were unvaccinated, adjusting for demographics, major chronic conditions, dependence, previous hospitalization, and pneumococcal vaccination. The cohort included 103,156 seniors in the 2011/2012 season and 105,140 in the 2012/2013 season (58% vaccinated). Seniors vaccinated in the previous season who discontinued vaccination (6% of the total) had excess mortality and were excluded to prevent frailty bias. The final analysis included 80,730 person-years and 2778 deaths. Vaccinated seniors had 16% less all-cause mortality than those unvaccinated (adjusted rate ratio [RR] = 0.84; 95% confidence interval 0.76–0.93). This association disappeared in the post-influenza period (adjusted RR = 0.96; 95% confidence interval 0.85–1.09). A similar comparison did not find an association in January to May of the 2009/2010 pandemic season (adjusted RR = 0.98; 95% confidence interval 0.84–1.14), when no effect of the seasonal vaccine was expected. On average, 1 death was prevented for every 328 seniors vaccinated: 1 for every 649 in the 65 to 74 year age group and 1 for every 251 among those aged 75 and over. These results suggest a moderate preventive effect and a high potential impact of the seasonal influenza vaccine against all-cause mortality. This reinforces the recommendation of annual influenza vaccination in seniors

  14. Difference in immune response in vaccinated and unvaccinated Swedish individuals after the 2009 influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous exposures to flu and subsequent immune responses may impact on 2009/2010 pandemic flu vaccine responses and clinical symptoms upon infection with the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza strain. Qualitative and quantitative differences in humoral and cellular immune responses associated with the flu vaccination in 2009/2010 (pandemic H1N1 vaccine) and natural infection have not yet been described in detail. We designed a longitudinal study to examine influenza- (flu-) specific immune responses and the association between pre-existing flu responses, symptoms of influenza-like illness (ILI), impact of pandemic flu infection, and pandemic flu vaccination in a cohort of 2,040 individuals in Sweden in 2009–2010. Methods Cellular flu-specific immune responses were assessed by whole-blood antigen stimulation assay, and humoral responses by a single radial hemolysis test. Results Previous seasonal flu vaccination was associated with significantly lower flu-specific IFN-γ responses (using a whole-blood assay) at study entry. Pandemic flu vaccination induced long-lived T-cell responses (measured by IFN-γ production) to influenza A strains, influenza B strains, and the matrix (M1) antigen. In contrast, individuals with pandemic flu infection (PCR positive) exhibited increased flu-specific T-cell responses shortly after onset of ILI symptoms but the immune response decreased after the flu season (spring 2010). We identified non-pandemic-flu vaccinated participants without ILI symptoms who showed an IFN-γ production profile similar to pandemic-flu infected participants, suggesting exposure without experiencing clinical symptoms. Conclusions Strong and long-lived flu-M1 specific immune responses, defined by IFN-γ production, in individuals after vaccination suggest that M1-responses may contribute to protective cellular immune responses. Silent flu infections appeared to be frequent in 2009/2010. The pandemic flu vaccine induced qualitatively and quantitatively

  15. Genetic drift of influenza A(H3N2) viruses during two consecutive seasons in 2011-2013 in Corsica, France.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Anais; Arena, Christophe; Corrias, Laura; Salez, Nicolas; de Lamballerie, Xavier Nicolas; Amoros, Jean Pierre; Blanchon, Thierry; Varesi, Laurent; Falchi, Alessandra

    2014-04-01

    The 2011-2012 and 2012-2013 post-pandemic influenza outbreaks were characterized by variability in the A(H3N2) influenza viruses, resulting in low to moderate vaccine effectiveness (VE). The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular evolution and vaccine strain match of the A(H3N2) influenza viruses, having been circulated throughout the population of the French Corsica Island in 2011-2012 and again in 2012-2013. Clinical samples from 31 patients with confirmed A(H3N2) influenza viruses were collected by general practitioners (GPs) over these two consecutive seasons. An analysis of genetic distance and antigenic drift was conducted. Based on a hemagglutinin (HA) aminoacid sequence analysis, the Corsican A(H3N2) viruses fell into the A/Victoria/208/2009 genetic clade, group 3. All influenza viruses were characterized by at least four fixed amino acid mutations which were: N145S (epitope A); Q156H and V186G (epitope B) Y219S (epitope D), with respect to the A/Perth/16/2009 (reference vaccine strain for the 2011-2012) and the A/Victoria/361/2011 (reference vaccine strain for the 2012-2013). Using the p(epitope) model, the percentages of the perfect match VE estimated against circulated strains declined within and between seasons, with estimations of <50%. Overall, these results seem to indicate an antigenic drift of the A(H3N2) influenza viruses which were circulated in Corsica. These findings highlight the importance of the continuous and careful surveillance of genetic changes in the HA domain during seasonal influenza epidemics, in order to provide information on newly emerging genetic variants. PMID:24105757

  16. Absence of cross‐reactive antibodies to influenza A (H1N1) 2009 before and after vaccination with 2009 Southern Hemisphere seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine in children aged 6 months–9 years: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    McVernon, Jodie; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Kelso, Anne; Skeljo, Maryanne; Nolan, Terry

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: McVernon et al. (2010) Absence of cross‐reactive antibodies to influenza A (H1N1) 2009 before and after vaccination with 2009 Southern Hemisphere seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine in children aged 6 months–9 years: a prospective study. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 7–11. Background  Early outbreaks of the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus predominantly involved young children, who fuelled transmission through spread in homes and schools. Seroprevalence studies conducted on stored serum collections indicated low levels of antibody to the novel strain in this age group, leading many to recommend priority immunisation of paediatric populations. Objectives  In a prospective study, we sought evidence of cross‐reactive antibodies to the pandemic virus in children who were naïve to seasonal influenza vaccines, at baseline and following two doses of the 2009 Southern Hemisphere trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV). Patients/Methods  Twenty children were recruited, with a median age of 4 years (interquartile range 3–5 years); all received two age appropriate doses of TIV. Paired sera were collected pre‐ and post‐vaccination for the assessment of vaccine immunogenicity, using haemagglutination inhibition and microneutralisation assays against vaccine‐related viruses and influenza A (H1N1) 2009. Results  Robust responses to H3N2 were observed regardless of age or pre‐vaccination titre, with 100% seroconversion. Fewer seroconverted to the seasonal H1N1 component. Only two children were weakly seropositive (HI titre 40) to the pandemic H1N1 strain at study entry, and none showed evidence of seroconversion by HI assay following TIV administration. Conclusions  Administration of 2009 Southern Hemisphere TIV did little to elicit cross‐reactive antibodies to the pandemic H1N1 virus in children, in keeping with assay results on stored sera from studies of previous seasonal vaccines. Our findings

  17. Clinical and virologic outcomes in patients with oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) infections: results from a clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Dharan, Nila J.; Fry, Alicia M.; Kieke, Burney A.; Coleman, Laura; Meece, Jennifer; Vandermause, Mary; Gubareva, Larisa V.; Klimov, Alexander I.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Dharan et al. (2011) Clinical and virologic outcomes in patients with oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) infections: results from a clinical trial. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), 153–158. Nineteen patients with oseltamivir‐resistant seasonal influenza A (H1N1) infections were randomized to receive oseltamivir or placebo. Nasopharyngeal swabs were obtained, and clinical and virologic outcomes were compared, stratified by early or late treatment. Neuraminidase inhibition assay and pyrosequencing for H275Y confirmed resistance. Twelve (63%) patients received oseltamivir; 8 (67%) received late treatment. Seven (37%) patients received placebo; 6 (86%) presented >48 hours after onset. Time to 50% decrease in symptom severity, complete symptom resolution, and first negative culture were shortest among the early treatment group. While sample size prohibits a strong conclusion, future studies should evaluate for similar trends. PMID:22118629

  18. In vitro neuraminidase inhibitory concentration (IC50) of four neuraminidase inhibitors against clinical isolates of the influenza viruses circulating in the 2010-2011 to 2014-2015 Japanese influenza seasons.

    PubMed

    Ikematsu, Hideyuki; Kawai, Naoki; Iwaki, Norio; Kashiwagi, Seizaburo

    2016-09-01

    To assess the extent of viral resistance to the four neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs), we measured their 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for influenza virus isolates from the 2014-2015 influenza season for comparison with those circulating in the 2010-2011 to 2013-2014 influenza seasons. Viral isolation was done with specimens obtained prior to treatment, and the type and subtype of influenza was determined by RT-PCR using type- and subtype-specific primers. The IC50 was determined by a neuraminidase inhibition assay using a fluorescent substrate. IC50 was measured for 200 influenza A(H3N2) and 19 influenza B in the 2014-2015 season, and no virus with highly reduced sensitivity to the four NAIs was detected. The ratios of the geometric means of the A(H3N2) IC50s of 2014-2015 to those of the 2010-2011, 2011-2012, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 seasons ranged from 0.72 to 1.05, 0.82 to 1.22, 0.69 to 1.00, and 0.70 to 1.03, respectively. The ratios of the geometric mean of the B IC50s to the previous four seasons ranged from 0.59 to 1.28, 0.66 to 1.34, 0.84 to 1.21, and 1.06 to 1.47, respectively. There was no trend in the change of the IC50s for A(H3N2) or B. Significant differences were found in some seasons, but the differences in the IC50s were all less than two fold. These results show change in the geometric mean IC50 by season but with no trend, which indicates that the influence of viral mutation on the effectiveness of these NAIs was minute for A(H3N2) and B over the past five seasons. PMID:27346379

  19. Impact of Prior Seasonal H3N2 Influenza Vaccination or Infection on Protection and Transmission of Emerging Variants of Influenza A(H3N2)v Virus in Ferrets

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Katherine V.; Pearce, Melissa B.; Katz, Jacqueline M.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza H3N2 A viruses continue to circulate in swine and occasionally infect humans, resulting in outbreaks of variant influenza H3N2 [A(H3N2)v] virus. It has been previously demonstrated in ferrets that A(H3N2)v viruses transmit as efficiently as seasonal influenza viruses, raising concern over the pandemic potential of these viruses. However, A(H3N2)v viruses have not acquired the ability to transmit efficiently among humans, which may be due in part to existing cross-reactive immunity to A(H3N2)v viruses. Although current seasonal H3N2 and A(H3N2)v viruses are antigenically distinct from one another, historical H3N2 viruses have some antigenic similarity to A(H3N2)v viruses and previous exposure to these viruses may provide a measure of immune protection sufficient to dampen A(H3N2)v virus transmission. Here, we evaluated whether prior seasonal H3N2 influenza virus vaccination or infection affects virus replication and transmission of A(H3N2)v virus in the ferret animal model. We found that the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza virus vaccine (TIV) or a monovalent vaccine prepared from an antigenically related 1992 seasonal influenza H3N2 (A/Beijing/32/1992) virus failed to substantially reduce A(H3N2)v (A/Indiana/08/2011) virus shedding and subsequent transmission to naive hosts. Conversely, ferrets primed by seasonal H3N2 virus infection displayed reduced A(H3N2)v virus shedding following challenge, which blunted transmission to naive ferrets. A higher level of specific IgG and IgA antibody titers detected among infected versus vaccinated ferrets was associated with the degree of protection offered by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. The data demonstrate in ferrets that the efficiency of A(H3N2)v transmission is disrupted by preexisting immunity induced by seasonal H3N2 virus infection. PMID:24089569

  20. Attitudes amongst Australian hospital healthcare workers towards seasonal influenza and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Seale, Holly; Leask, Julie; MacIntyre, C. Raina

    2009-01-01

    Background  Amongst healthcare workers (HCWs), compliance rates with influenza vaccination are traditionally low. Although a safe and effective vaccine is available, there is little Australian data on reasons for poor compliance, especially amongst allied health and ancillary support staff. Methods  Cross‐sectional investigation of a sample of clinical and non‐clinical HCWs from two tertiary‐referral teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia was conducted between June 4 and October 19, 2007. The self‐administered questionnaire was distributed to hospital personal from 40 different wards and departments. The main outcome measures were personal beliefs about influenza vaccination and self‐reported vaccination status. Results  Respondents (n = 1079) were categorized into four main groups by occupation: nurses (47·5%, 512/1079), physicians (26·0%, 281/1079), allied health (15·3%, 165/1079) and ancillary (11·2%, 121/1079). When asked whether they felt the influenza vaccine was safe or effective, 81% (879/1079) and 68% (733/1079), respectively, replied in the affirmative. Participants felt that it was more important to get vaccinated to protect patients (74%, 796/1079) than family (68%, 730/1079) or self‐protection (66%, 712/1079). However, only 22% (241/1079) of the HCWs who replied reported receiving the vaccine the year the survey was conducted. Conclusions  Although HCWs had an adequate level of knowledge towards influenza vaccination, only 22% of them were vaccinated. The approach to improving influenza vaccination rates amongst HCWs and to tackling misconceptions must be multifaceted, adaptable and must evolve regularly to increase coverage. PMID:20021506

  1. Isolation and characterization of pandemic H1N1 influenza viruses in pigs in Brazil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infections are endemic diseases in pork producing countries around the world. The emergence of the pandemic 2009 human H1N1 influenza A virus (pH1N1) raised questions about the occurrence of this virus in Brazilian swine populations. During a 2009-2010 swine influenza virus r...

  2. Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness in Preventing Influenza A(H3N2)-Related Hospitalizations in Adults Targeted for Vaccination by Type of Vaccine: A Hospital-Based Test-Negative Study, 2011–2012 A(H3N2) Predominant Influenza Season, Valencia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Puig-Barberà, Joan; García-de-Lomas, Juan; Díez-Domingo, Javier; Arnedo-Pena, Alberto; Ruiz-García, Montserrat; Limón-Ramírez, Ramón; Pérez-Vilar, Silvia; Micó-Esparza, José Luis; Tortajada-Girbés, Miguel; Carratalá-Munuera, Concha; Larrea-González, Rosa; Beltrán-Garrido, Juan Manuel; Otero-Reigada, Maria del Carmen; Mollar-Maseres, Joan; Correcher-Medina, Patricia; Schwarz-Chavarri, Germán; Gil-Guillén, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Background Most evidence of the effectiveness of influenza vaccines comes from studies conducted in primary care, but less is known about their effectiveness in preventing serious complications. Here, we examined the influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against hospitalization with PCR-confirmed influenza in the predominant A(H3N2) 2011–2012 influenza season. Methods A hospital-based, test-negative study was conducted in nine hospitals in Valencia, Spain. All emergency admissions with a predefined subset of symptoms were eligible. We enrolled consenting adults age 18 and over, targeted for influenza vaccination because of comorbidity, with symptoms of influenza-like-illness within seven days of admission. We estimated IVE as (1-adjusted vaccination odds ratio)*100 after accounting for major confounders, calendar time and recruitment hospital. Results The subjects included 544 positive for influenza A(H3N2) and 1,370 negative for influenza admissions. Age was an IVE modifying factor. Regardless of vaccine administration, IVE was 72% (38 to 88%) in subjects aged under 65 and 21% (−5% to 40%) in subjects aged 65 and over. By type of vaccine, the IVE of classical intramuscular split-influenza vaccine, used in subjects 18 to 64, was 68% (12% to 88%). The IVE for intradermal and virosomal influenza vaccines, used in subjects aged 65 and over, was 39% (11% to 58%) and 16% (−39% to 49%), respectively. Conclusions The split-influenza vaccine was effective in preventing influenza-associated hospitalizations in adults aged under 65. The intradermal vaccine was moderately effective in those aged 65 and over. PMID:25392931

  3. Differentiation equivalent temperature in Lublin (2009-2010)/Zróżnicowanie temperatury ekwiwalentnej w Lublinie w latach 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobek, Mateusz

    2013-12-01

    In 2009-2010, in five points in Lublin, located in areas of different land use and built-up, measurements of air temperature and humidity were taken. Based on the data collected, the following elements were calculated: the difference in average monthly air temperature between the coldest point and the others, equivalent temperature (Tek) and Tek thermal sensations. Differences in average monthly air temperature in relation to the outskirts of Lublin were the highest at the point Dominikanie, in the built-up area of the old town. Most frequently "sultry" sensation was reported for the estate houses, at the point Ofelii. Different biothermal conditions were observed in the center of the city - Litewski square. It is characterized by a high proportion of vegetation. Green areas influenced the reduction of the biothermal stress compared to other points. The highest frequency of thermal sensation "cold", "cool" and "slightly cool" were recorded there. Measurements points located in two housing estates with high buildings close to each other were characterized by similar biothermal conditions. In these areas, comparing to other discussed areas of the city, at 12 UTC relatively often there were noticed the best biothermal conditions - "comfortable" according to equivalent temperature index

  4. European cold winter 2009-2010: How unusual in the instrumental record and how reproducible in the ARPEGE-Climat model?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouzeau, G.; Cattiaux, J.; Douville, H.; Ribes, A.; Saint-Martin, D.

    2011-06-01

    Boreal winter 2009-2010 made headlines for cold anomalies in many countries of the northern mid-latitudes. Northern Europe was severely hit by this harsh winter in line with a record persistence of the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In the present study, we first provide a wider perspective on how unusual this winter was by using the recent 20th Century Reanalysis. A weather regime analysis shows that the frequency of the negative NAO was unprecedented since winter 1939-1940, which is then used as a dynamical analog of winter 2009-2010 to demonstrate that the latter might have been much colder without the background global warming observed during the twentieth century. We then use an original nudging technique in ensembles of global atmospheric simulations driven by observed sea surface temperature (SST) and radiative forcings to highlight the relevance of the stratosphere for understanding if not predicting such anomalous winter seasons. Our results demonstrate that an improved representation of the lower stratosphere is necessary to reproduce not only the seasonal mean negative NAO signal, but also its intraseasonal distribution and the corresponding increased probability of cold waves over northern Europe.

  5. GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ENERGY SPECTRA AND COMPOSITION DURING THE 2009-2010 SOLAR MINIMUM PERIOD

    SciTech Connect

    Lave, K. A.; Binns, W. R.; Israel, M. H.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.; Christian, E. R.; De Nolfo, G. A.; Von Rosenvinge, T. T.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.

    2013-06-20

    We report new measurements of the elemental energy spectra and composition of galactic cosmic rays during the 2009-2010 solar minimum period using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer. This period of time exhibited record-setting cosmic-ray intensities and very low levels of solar activity. Results are given for particles with nuclear charge 5 {<=} Z {<=} 28 in the energy range {approx}50-550 MeV nucleon{sup -1}. Several recent improvements have been made to the earlier CRIS data analysis, and therefore updates of our previous observations for the 1997-1998 solar minimum and 2001-2003 solar maximum are also given here. For most species, the reported intensities changed by less than {approx}7%, and the relative abundances changed by less than {approx}4%. Compared with the 1997-1998 solar minimum relative abundances, the 2009-2010 abundances differ by less than 2{sigma}, with a trend of fewer secondary species observed in the more recent time period. The new 2009-2010 data are also compared with results of a simple ''leaky-box'' galactic transport model combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model. We demonstrate that this model is able to give reasonable fits to the energy spectra and the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe. These results are also shown to be comparable to a GALPROP numerical model that includes the effects of diffusive reacceleration in the interstellar medium.

  6. Systems biology of immunity to MF59-adjuvanted versus nonadjuvanted trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Helder I; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth; Kazmin, Dmitri; Wang, Lili; Cortese, Mario; Bosinger, Steven E; Patel, Nirav B; Zak, Daniel E; Aderem, Alan; Dong, Tao; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Pollard, Andrew J; Pulendran, Bali; Siegrist, Claire-Anne

    2016-02-16

    The dynamics and molecular mechanisms underlying vaccine immunity in early childhood remain poorly understood. Here we applied systems approaches to investigate the innate and adaptive responses to trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) and MF59-adjuvanted TIV (ATIV) in 90 14- to 24-mo-old healthy children. MF59 enhanced the magnitude and kinetics of serum antibody titers following vaccination, and induced a greater frequency of vaccine specific, multicytokine-producing CD4(+) T cells. Compared with transcriptional responses to TIV vaccination previously reported in adults, responses to TIV in infants were markedly attenuated, limited to genes regulating antiviral and antigen presentation pathways, and observed only in a subset of vaccinees. In contrast, transcriptional responses to ATIV boost were more homogenous and robust. Interestingly, a day 1 gene signature characteristic of the innate response (antiviral IFN genes, dendritic cell, and monocyte responses) correlated with hemagglutination at day 28. These findings demonstrate that MF59 enhances the magnitude, kinetics, and consistency of the innate and adaptive response to vaccination with the seasonal influenza vaccine during early childhood, and identify potential molecular correlates of antibody responses. PMID:26755593

  7. Systems biology of immunity to MF59-adjuvanted versus nonadjuvanted trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines in early childhood

    PubMed Central

    Nakaya, Helder I.; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth; Kazmin, Dmitri; Wang, Lili; Cortese, Mario; Bosinger, Steven E.; Patel, Nirav B.; Zak, Daniel E.; Aderem, Alan; Dong, Tao; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Pollard, Andrew J.; Pulendran, Bali; Siegrist, Claire-Anne

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics and molecular mechanisms underlying vaccine immunity in early childhood remain poorly understood. Here we applied systems approaches to investigate the innate and adaptive responses to trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) and MF59-adjuvanted TIV (ATIV) in 90 14- to 24-mo-old healthy children. MF59 enhanced the magnitude and kinetics of serum antibody titers following vaccination, and induced a greater frequency of vaccine specific, multicytokine-producing CD4+ T cells. Compared with transcriptional responses to TIV vaccination previously reported in adults, responses to TIV in infants were markedly attenuated, limited to genes regulating antiviral and antigen presentation pathways, and observed only in a subset of vaccinees. In contrast, transcriptional responses to ATIV boost were more homogenous and robust. Interestingly, a day 1 gene signature characteristic of the innate response (antiviral IFN genes, dendritic cell, and monocyte responses) correlated with hemagglutination at day 28. These findings demonstrate that MF59 enhances the magnitude, kinetics, and consistency of the innate and adaptive response to vaccination with the seasonal influenza vaccine during early childhood, and identify potential molecular correlates of antibody responses. PMID:26755593

  8. Willingness of European healthcare workers to undergo vaccination against seasonal influenza: current situation and suggestions for improvement.

    PubMed

    Kassianos, George

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of vaccination against seasonal influenza in healthcare workers (HCWs) is, in general, low (vaccine coverage of 6-54%), as is awareness of its importance, and has been decreasing in most European Union (EU) countries in recent years. By virtue of their working environment, HCWs are at an increased risk of influenza infection and of subsequently transmitting the virus to vulnerable patients, in whom disease burden is significant. It could be argued that a similar or higher target vaccination rate to that recommended for older age groups and people with chronic medical conditions (75%) should be applied to HCWs, and the European Council recommends Member States to improve vaccination coverage in this population. In this context, better education of HCWs is needed to increase awareness and highlight the importance of HCW vaccination for the benefit of public health, particularly for their patients, who may be at risk of serious complications that could lead to disability or death. Secondary to these professional responsibilities, personal benefits (as well as benefits to close family and friends) should also be emphasised. Misconceptions that create barriers to vaccination need to be discussed openly and objections placed in the context of public health. PMID:25657810

  9. Willingness of European healthcare workers to undergo vaccination against seasonal influenza: current situation and suggestions for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Kassianos, George

    2015-01-01

    Uptake of vaccination against seasonal influenza in healthcare workers (HCWs) is, in general, low (vaccine coverage of 6–54%), as is awareness of its importance, and has been decreasing in most European Union (EU) countries in recent years. By virtue of their working environment, HCWs are at an increased risk of influenza infection and of subsequently transmitting the virus to vulnerable patients, in whom disease burden is significant. It could be argued that a similar or higher target vaccination rate to that recommended for older age groups and people with chronic medical conditions (75%) should be applied to HCWs, and the European Council recommends Member States to improve vaccination coverage in this population. In this context, better education of HCWs is needed to increase awareness and highlight the importance of HCW vaccination for the benefit of public health, particularly for their patients, who may be at risk of serious complications that could lead to disability or death. Secondary to these professional responsibilities, personal benefits (as well as benefits to close family and friends) should also be emphasised. Misconceptions that create barriers to vaccination need to be discussed openly and objections placed in the context of public health. PMID:25657810

  10. Young and elderly patients with type 2 diabetes have optimal B cell responses to the seasonal influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; Mendez, Nicholas V.; Landin, Ana Marie; Ryan, John G.; Blomberg, Bonnie B.

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated immune response to the seasonal influenza vaccine in young and elderly patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Immune measures included the in vivo serum response to the vaccine by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) and ELISA in 22 patients (14 young, 8 elderly) and 65 healthy age-matched controls (37 young, 28 elderly). B cell-specific biomarkers of optimal vaccine response were measured ex vivo by switched memory B cells and plasmablasts and in vitro by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in stimulated cells. Markers of systemic and B cell-intrinsic inflammation were also measured. Results show that in vivo responses, as well as B cell-specific markers identified above, decrease by age in healthy individuals but not in T2D patients. This occurred despite high levels of B cell-intrinsic inflammation (TNF-α) in T2D patients, which was surprising as we had previously demonstrated this negatively impacts B cell function. These results altogether suggest that valid protection against influenza can be achieved in T2D patients and proposed mechanisms are discussed. PMID:23711934

  11. Genetic and antigenic characterization of hemagglutinin of influenza A/H3N2 virus from the 2015 season in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Tewawong, Nipaporn; Suntronwong, Nungruthai; Vichiwattana, Preeyaporn; Vongpunsawad, Sompong; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Poovorawan, Yong

    2016-10-01

    Antigenic changes in the HA1 domain of the influenza A/H3N2 hemagglutinin (HA) present a challenge in the design of the annual influenza vaccine. We examined the genetic variability in the nucleotide and amino acid of encoding HA1 sequences of the influenza A/H3N2 virus during the 2015 influenza season in Thailand. Toward this, the HA genes of 45 influenza A/H3N2 strains were amplified and sequenced. Although a clade 3C.3a strain (A/Switzerland/9715293/2013) was chosen for the 2015 vaccine, phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that strains belonging to clade 3C.2a (96 %) instead of clade 3C.3a (4 %) were circulating that year. Sequence analysis showed that seven codons were under positive selection, five of which were located inside the antigenic epitopes. The percentages of the perfect match vaccine efficacy (VE) estimated by the P epitope model against circulating strains suggested antigenic drift of the dominant epitopes A and B, which contributed to reduced VE of the 2015 vaccine. However, the 2016 vaccine strain (A/Hong Kong/4801/2014) was closely related and well matched against the circulating strain (mean of VE = 79.3 %). These findings provide data on the antigenic drift of the influenza A/H3N2 virus circulating in Thailand and further support continual monitoring and surveillance of the antigenic changes on HA1. PMID:27146171

  12. Influenza A virus drift variants reduced the detection sensitivity of a commercial multiplex nucleic acid amplification assay in the season 2014/15.

    PubMed

    Huzly, Daniela; Korn, Klaus; Bierbaum, Sibylle; Eberle, Björn; Falcone, Valeria; Knöll, Antje; Steininger, Philipp; Panning, Marcus

    2016-09-01

    The influenza season 2014/15 was dominated by drift variants of influenza A(H3N2), which resulted in a reduced vaccine effectiveness. It was not clear if the performance of commercial nucleic-acid-based amplification (NAT) assays for the detection of influenza was affected. The purpose of this study was to perform a real-life evaluation of two commercial NAT assays. During January-April 2015, we tested a total of 665 samples from patients with influenza-like illness using the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21, a commercial multiplex kit, (cohorts 1 and 2, n = 563 patients) and the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay (cohort 3, n = 102 patients), a single-use cartridge system. An in-house influenza real-time RT-PCR (cohort 1) and the RealStar Influenza RT-PCR 1.0 Kit (cohort 2 and 3) served as reference tests. Compared to the reference assay, an overall agreement of 95.9 % (cohort 1), 95 % (cohort 2), and 98 % (cohort 3) was achieved. A total of 24 false-negative results were observed using the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit. No false-negative results occurred using the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay. The Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit and the Xpert Flu/RSV XC assay had sensitivities of 90.7 % and 100 % and specificities of 100 % and 94.1 %, respectively, compared to the RealStar 1.0 kit. Upon modification of the Fast Track Diagnostics Respiratory pathogens 21 kit, the sensitivity increased to 97.3 %. Influenza virus strains circulating during the 2014/15 season reduced the detection sensitivity of a commercial NAT assay, and continuous monitoring of test performance is therefore necessary. PMID:27316440

  13. Vaccination of poultry workers: delivery and uptake of seasonal influenza immunization.

    PubMed

    Vivancos, R; Showell, D; Keeble, B; Goh, S; Kroese, M; Lipp, A; Battersby, J

    2011-03-01

    Avian influenza is a highly infectious disease in poultry and although the risk of human infection is low, concerns exist that it could evolve into a new human strain of pandemic potential if reassortment with a human influenza virus occurs. In January 2007, the UK government introduced a programme to vaccinate poultry workers to reduce the potential of such an event. This study evaluates the delivery, uptake and costs of the programme in three counties of England. A questionnaire survey was completed by consultants in public health in all the Primary Care Trusts in Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire in May 2007. The delivery of the programme varied between Primary Care Trusts, including being delivered in some cases by clinics in primary care, by general practitioners and occupational health services in others. The uptake of vaccination was low ranging from 7% to 29% at a cost of £29 to £132 per person vaccinated. Vaccination of poultry workers as a public health measure to prevent an influenza pandemic is likely to be ineffective with the level of coverage found in this evaluation in our region. PMID:20042057

  14. [Successful Treatment of Seasonal Influenza A (H3N2) infection-related Hemophagocytic Lymphocytosis in an Elderly Man].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Shintaro; Tanaka, Akihiko; Fukuda, Yosuke; Miyata, Yoshito; Murata, Yasunori; Kishino-Oki, Yasunari; Homma, Tetsuya; Ohnishi, Tsukasa; Sagara, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    A 79-year-old man experienced severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and was receiving treatment for ischemic heart disease. Starting from dizziness and chilliness, he lost consciousness after few days. He was taken to our emergency department. On initial evaluation, he complained of dyspnea and was afebrile with a pulse rate, blood pressure, and respiratory rate of 105 beats/min, 112/98mmHg, and 28 breath/min, respectively. His respiratory sounds were clear and chest radiography did not show any abnormal shadows, but his arterial blood gas examination showed type II respiratory failure. Because the nasopharyngeal seasonal influenza A virus (IAV) test was positive, the patient was admitted with the diagnosis of acute exacerbation of COPD due to IAV. We administered peramivir, a specific anti-influenza drug, and started mechanical ventilation. Over time, he started to show signs of disseminated intravascular coagulation, such as multiple organ failure and thrombocytopenia. Subsequently, blood tests showed elevation of ferritin and soluble interleukin 2 receptor (sIL2R); microscopic examination of the peripheral blood revealed hemophagocytosis. Secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) due to IAV was diagnosed and together with corticosteroid therapy, intravenous gamma globulin was administered from the 3rd clinical day. The patint was saved with our early diagnosis and treatment of HLH and was discharged on the 92nd clinical day. Viral-induced HLH, formerly known as virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS), leads to multiple organ failure due to a cytokine storm scattered by viral-infected pathogenic inflammatory cells. It is well known that pandemic swine flu causes secondary HLH leading to poor outcomes. Currently, not much is known about HLH due to seasonal flu; particularly, IAV (H3N2)-related HLH cases are rare and reported cases showed poor outcomes as well. With an early diagnosis and minimum immunotherapy, we report herein on a

  15. Ad Hoc Influenza Vaccination During Years of Significant Antigenic Drift in a Tropical City With 2 Seasonal Peaks

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Martin C.S.; Nelson, E. Anthony S.; Leung, Czarina; Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C.W.; Choi, Kin Wing; Rainer, Timothy H.; Cheng, Frankie W.T.; Wong, Samuel Y.S.; Lai, Christopher K.C.; Lam, Bosco; Cheung, Tak Hong; Leung, Ting Fan; Chan, Paul K.S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the acceptability of an additional ad hoc influenza vaccination among the health care professionals following seasons with significant antigenic drift. Self-administered, anonymous surveys were performed by hard copy questionnaires in public hospitals, and by an on-line platform available to all healthcare professionals, from April 1st to May 31st, 2015. A total of 1290 healthcare professionals completed the questionnaires, including doctors, nurses, and allied health professionals working in both the public and private systems. Only 31.8% of participating respondents expressed an intention to receive the additional vaccine, despite that the majority of them agreed or strongly agreed that it would bring benefit to the community (88.9%), save lives (86.7%), reduce medical expenses (76.3%), satisfy public expectation (82.8%), and increase awareness of vaccination (86.1%). However, a significant proportion expressed concern that the vaccine could disturb the normal immunization schedule (45.5%); felt uncertain what to do in the next vaccination round (66.0%); perceived that the summer peak might not occur (48.2%); and believed that the summer peak might not be of the same virus (83.5%). Furthermore, 27.8% of all respondents expected that the additional vaccination could weaken the efficacy of previous vaccinations; 51.3% was concerned about side effects; and 61.3% estimated that there would be a low uptake rate. If the supply of vaccine was limited, higher priority groups were considered to include the elderly aged ≥65 years with chronic medical conditions (89.2%), the elderly living in residential care homes (87.4%), and long-stay residents of institutions for the disabled (80.7%). The strongest factors associated with accepting the additional vaccine included immunization with influenza vaccines in the past 3 years, higher perceived risk of contracting influenza, and higher perceived severity of the disease impact. The acceptability to an

  16. Matrix-M Adjuvated Seasonal Virosomal Influenza Vaccine Induces Partial Protection in Mice and Ferrets against Avian H5 and H7 Challenge.

    PubMed

    Cox, Freek; Roos, Anna; Hafkemeijer, Nicole; Baart, Matthijs; Tolboom, Jeroen; Dekking, Liesbeth; Stittelaar, Koert; Goudsmit, Jaap; Radošević, Katarina; Saeland, Eirikur

    2015-01-01

    There is a constant threat of zoonotic influenza viruses causing a pandemic outbreak in humans. It is virtually impossible to predict which virus strain will cause the next pandemic and it takes a considerable amount of time before a safe and effective vaccine will be available once a pandemic occurs. In addition, development of pandemic vaccines is hampered by the generally poor immunogenicity of avian influenza viruses in humans. An effective pre-pandemic vaccine is therefore required as a first line of defense. Broadening of the protective efficacy of current seasonal vaccines by adding an adjuvant may be a way to provide such first line of defense. Here we evaluate whether a seasonal trivalent virosomal vaccine (TVV) adjuvated with the saponin-based adjuvant Matrix-M (MM) can confer protection against avian influenza H5 and H7 virus strains in mice and ferrets. We demonstrate that mice were protected from death against challenges with H5N1 and H7N7, but that the protection was not complete as evidenced by severe clinical signs. In ferrets, protection against H7N9 was not observed. In contrast, reduced upper and lower respiratory tract viral loads and reduced lung pathology, was achieved in H5N1 challenged ferrets. Together these results suggest that, at least to some extent, Matrix-M adjuvated seasonal virosomal influenza vaccine can serve as an interim measure to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with a pandemic outbreak. PMID:26402787

  17. Matrix-M Adjuvated Seasonal Virosomal Influenza Vaccine Induces Partial Protection in Mice and Ferrets against Avian H5 and H7 Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hafkemeijer, Nicole; Baart, Matthijs; Tolboom, Jeroen; Dekking, Liesbeth; Stittelaar, Koert; Goudsmit, Jaap; Radošević, Katarina; Saeland, Eirikur

    2015-01-01

    There is a constant threat of zoonotic influenza viruses causing a pandemic outbreak in humans. It is virtually impossible to predict which virus strain will cause the next pandemic and it takes a considerable amount of time before a safe and effective vaccine will be available once a pandemic occurs. In addition, development of pandemic vaccines is hampered by the generally poor immunogenicity of avian influenza viruses in humans. An effective pre-pandemic vaccine is therefore required as a first line of defense. Broadening of the protective efficacy of current seasonal vaccines by adding an adjuvant may be a way to provide such first line of defense. Here we evaluate whether a seasonal trivalent virosomal vaccine (TVV) adjuvated with the saponin-based adjuvant Matrix-M (MM) can confer protection against avian influenza H5 and H7 virus strains in mice and ferrets. We demonstrate that mice were protected from death against challenges with H5N1 and H7N7, but that the protection was not complete as evidenced by severe clinical signs. In ferrets, protection against H7N9 was not observed. In contrast, reduced upper and lower respiratory tract viral loads and reduced lung pathology, was achieved in H5N1 challenged ferrets. Together these results suggest that, at least to some extent, Matrix-M adjuvated seasonal virosomal influenza vaccine can serve as an interim measure to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with a pandemic outbreak. PMID:26402787

  18. Serum Samples From Middle-aged Adults Vaccinated Annually with Seasonal Influenza Vaccines Cross-neutralize Some Potential Pandemic Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Alvarado-Facundo, Esmeralda; Chen, Qiong; Anderson, Christine M; Scott, Dorothy; Vassell, Russell; Weiss, Carol D

    2016-02-01

    We examined serum samples from adults ages 48-64 who received multiple seasonal influenza vaccines from 2004 to 2009 for cross-neutralizing antibodies to potential pandemic strains. Using pseudoviruses bearing various hemagglutinins (HA-pseudoviruses), we found serum neutralization titers (≥160) in 100% against A/Japan/305/1957 (H2N2), 53% against A/Hong Kong/1073/99 (H9N2), 56% against the H3N2 variant A/Indiana/08/11 (H3N2v), 11% against A/Hong Kong/G9/97 (H9N2), and 36% A/chicken/Hong Kong/SF4/01 (H6N1). None had titers >160 to A/Shanghai/2/13 (H7N9) or A/Netherlands/219/03 (H7N7). Thirty-six percent to 0% had neutralization titers to various H5N1 strains. Titers to H9, H6, and H5 HA-pseudoviruses correlated with each other, but not with H3N2v, suggesting group-specific cross-neutralization. PMID:26243315

  19. I-MOVE multicentre case-control study 2010/11 to 2014/15: Is there within-season waning of influenza type/subtype vaccine effectiveness with increasing time since vaccination?

    PubMed

    Kissling, Esther; Nunes, Baltazar; Robertson, Chris; Valenciano, Marta; Reuss, Annicka; Larrauri, Amparo; Cohen, Jean Marie; Oroszi, Beatrix; Rizzo, Caterina; Machado, Ausenda; Pitigoi, Daniela; Domegan, Lisa; Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Buchholz, Udo; Gherasim, Alin; Daviaud, Isabelle; Horváth, Judit Krisztina; Bella, Antonino; Lupulescu, Emilia; O Donnell, Joan; Korczyńska, Monika; Moren, Alain

    2016-04-21

    Since the 2008/9 influenza season, the I-MOVE multicentre case-control study measures influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically-attended influenza-like-illness (ILI) laboratory confirmed as influenza. In 2011/12, European studies reported a decline in VE against influenza A(H3N2) within the season. Using combined I-MOVE data from 2010/11 to 2014/15 we studied the effects of time since vaccination on influenza type/subtype-specific VE. We modelled influenza type/subtype-specific VE by time since vaccination using a restricted cubic spline, controlling for potential confounders (age, sex, time of onset, chronic conditions). Over 10,000 ILI cases were included in each analysis of influenza A(H3N2), A(H1N1)pdm09 and B; with 4,759, 3,152 and 3,617 influenza positive cases respectively. VE against influenza A(H3N2) reached 50.6% (95% CI: 30.0-65.1) 38 days after vaccination, declined to 0% (95% CI: -18.1-15.2) from 111 days onwards. At day 54 VE against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 reached 55.3% (95% CI: 37.9-67.9) and remained between this value and 50.3% (95% CI: 34.8-62.1) until season end. VE against influenza B declined from 70.7% (95% CI: 51.3-82.4) 44 days after vaccination to 21.4% (95% CI: -57.4-60.8) at season end. To assess if vaccination campaign strategies need revising more evidence on VE by time since vaccination is urgently needed. PMID:27124420

  20. Elemental GCR Observations during the 2009-2010 Solar Minimum Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lave, K. A.; Israel, M. H.; Binns, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Cummings, A. C.; Davis, A. J.; deNolfo, G. A.; Leske, R. A.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Stone, E. C.; vonRosenvinge, T. T.; Wiedenbeck, M. E.

    2013-01-01

    Using observations from the Cosmic Ray Isotope Spectrometer (CRIS) onboard the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), we present new measurements of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) elemental composition and energy spectra for the species B through Ni in the energy range approx. 50-550 MeV/nucleon during the record setting 2009-2010 solar minimum period. These data are compared with our observations from the 1997-1998 solar minimum period, when solar modulation in the heliosphere was somewhat higher. For these species, we find that the intensities during the 2009-2010 solar minimum were approx. 20% higher than those in the previous solar minimum, and in fact were the highest GCR intensities recorded during the space age. Relative abundances for these species during the two solar minimum periods differed by small but statistically significant amounts, which are attributed to the combination of spectral shape differences between primary and secondary GCRs in the interstellar medium and differences between the levels of solar modulation in the two solar minima. We also present the secondary-to-primary ratios B/C and (Sc+Ti+V)/Fe for both solar minimum periods, and demonstrate that these ratios are reasonably well fit by a simple "leaky-box" galactic transport model that is combined with a spherically symmetric solar modulation model.

  1. Novel Use of Flu Surveillance Data: Evaluating Potential of Sentinel Populations for Early Detection of Influenza Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Daughton, Ashlynn R; Velappan, Nileena; Abeyta, Esteban; Priedhorsky, Reid; Deshpande, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Influenza causes significant morbidity and mortality each year, with 2-8% of weekly outpatient visits around the United States for influenza-like-illness (ILI) during the peak of the season. Effective use of existing flu surveillance data allows officials to understand and predict current flu outbreaks and can contribute to reductions in influenza morbidity and mortality. Previous work used the 2009-2010 influenza season to investigate the possibility of using existing military and civilian surveillance systems to improve early detection of flu outbreaks. Results suggested that civilian surveillance could help predict outbreak trajectory in local military installations. To further test that hypothesis, we compare pairs of civilian and military outbreaks in seven locations between 2000 and 2013. We find no predictive relationship between outbreak peaks or time series of paired outbreaks. This larger study does not find evidence to support the hypothesis that civilian data can be used as sentinel surveillance for military installations. We additionally investigate the effect of modifying the ILI case definition between the standard Department of Defense definition, a more specific definition proposed in literature, and confirmed Influenza A. We find that case definition heavily impacts results. This study thus highlights the importance of careful selection of case definition, and appropriate consideration of case definition in the interpretation of results. PMID:27391232

  2. Management of Influenza-Like Illness by Homeopathic and Allopathic General Practitioners in France During the 2009–2010 Influenza Season

    PubMed Central

    Demonceaux, Antoine; Deswarte, Didier; Scimeca, Daniel; Bordet, Marie-France

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study was done to determine characteristics and management of patients in France visiting allopathic general practitioners (AGPs) and homeopathic general practitioners (HGPs) for influenza-like illness (ILI). Materials and Methods Design: This was a prospective observational study. Settings/location: It was conducted in metropolitan France during the 2009–2010 influenza season. Subjects: Sixty-five HGPs and 124 AGPs recruited a total of 461 patients with ILI. Interventions: Patients were treated for ILI by their GPs. GPs and patients completed questionnaires recording demographic characteristics and patient symptoms when patients were included in the study. Patients reported satisfaction with treatment on day 4. Prescriptions were recorded by the GPs. Outcome measures: Outcome measures were patient characteristics, demographics, and symptoms at baseline; medications prescribed by type of physician; and satisfaction with treatment by type of physician and medication. Results Most AGPs (86%), and most patients visiting them (58%) were men; whereas most HGPs (57%; p<0.0001), and most patients visiting them (56%; p=0.006) were women. Patients visiting AGPs were seen sooner after the appearance of symptoms, and they self-treated more frequently with cough suppressants or expectorants (p=0.0018). Patients visiting HGPs were seen later after the appearance of symptoms and they self-treated with homeopathic medications more frequently (p<0.0001). At enrollment, headaches (p=0.025), cough (p=0.01), muscle/joint pain (p=0.049), chills/shivering (p<0.001), and nasal discharge/congestion (p=0.002) were more common in patients visiting AGPs. Of these patients, 37.1% visiting AGPs were prescribed at least one homeopathic medication, and 59.6% of patients visiting HGPs were prescribed at least one allopathic medication. Patient satisfaction with treatment did not differ between AGPs and HGPs but was highest for patients treated with homeopathic

  3. [Influenza surveillance].

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Karolina; Hallmann-Szelińska, Ewelina; Kondratiuk, Katarzyna; Brydak, Lidia B

    2016-01-01

    Influenza surveillance was established in 1947. From this moment WHO (World Health Organization) has been coordinating international cooperation, with a goal of monitoring influenza virus activity, effective diagnostic of the circulating viruses and informing society about epidemics or pandemics, as well as about emergence of new subtypes of influenza virus type A. Influenza surveillance is an important task, because it enables people to prepare themselves for battle with the virus that is constantly mutating, what leads to circulation of new and often more virulent strains of influenza in human population. As vaccination is the most effective method of fighting the virus, one of the major tasks of GISRS is developing an optimal antigenic composition of the vaccine for the current epidemic season. European Influenza Surveillance Network (EISN) has also developed over the years. EISN is running integrated epidemiological and virological influenza surveillance, to provide appropriate data to public health experts in member countries, to enable them undertaking relevant activities based on the current information about influenza activity. In close cooperation with GISRS and EISN are National Influenza Centres--national institutions designated by the Ministry of Health in each country. PMID:27117107

  4. Fluoroquinolone Resistance Among Gram-Negative Urinary Tract Pathogens: Global Smart Program Results, 2009-2010

    PubMed Central

    Bouchillon, Sam; Hoban, Daryl J; Badal, Robert; Hawser, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the rates of fluoroquinolone resistant (FQR) in gram-negative bacilli urinary tract infections (UTIs) in a global population. METHODS: The Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends (SMART) collected 1,116 FQR gram-negative urinary pathogens from hospitalized patients in 33 countries during 2009-2010. Amikacin, ertapenem, and imipenem were the most active agents tested against FQR UTI pathogens, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producers. RESULTS: FQR rates vary widely country to country with a range of 6% to 75%. Regional FQR rates were 23.5% in North America, 29.4% in Europe, 33.2% in Asia, 38.7% in Latin America, and 25.5% in the South Pacific. CONCLUSIONS: These observations suggest that fluoroquinolones may no longer be effective as first-line therapy for gram-negative UTI in hospitalized patients. PMID:23002406

  5. Potential antigenic explanation for atypical H1N1 infections among middle-aged adults during the 2013–2014 influenza season

    PubMed Central

    Linderman, Susanne L.; Chambers, Benjamin S.; Zost, Seth J.; Parkhouse, Kaela; Li, Yang; Herrmann, Christin; Ellebedy, Ali H.; Carter, Donald M.; Andrews, Sarah F.; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Huang, Min; Huang, Yunping; Strauss, Donna; Shaz, Beth H.; Hodinka, Richard L.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Ross, Ted M.; Wilson, Patrick C.; Ahmed, Rafi; Bloom, Jesse D.; Hensley, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses typically cause the most severe disease in children and elderly individuals. However, H1N1 viruses disproportionately affected middle-aged adults during the 2013–2014 influenza season. Although H1N1 viruses recently acquired several mutations in the hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein, classic serological tests used by surveillance laboratories indicate that these mutations do not change antigenic properties of the virus. Here, we show that one of these mutations is located in a region of HA targeted by antibodies elicited in many middle-aged adults. We find that over 42% of individuals born between 1965 and 1979 possess antibodies that recognize this region of HA. Our findings offer a possible antigenic explanation of why middle-aged adults were highly susceptible to H1N1 viruses during the 2013–2014 influenza season. Our data further suggest that a drifted H1N1 strain should be included in future influenza vaccines to potentially reduce morbidity and mortality in this age group. PMID:25331901

  6. A coordinated cross-disciplinary research initiative to address an increased incidence of narcolepsy following the 2009-2010 Pandemrix vaccination programme in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Feltelius, N; Persson, I; Ahlqvist-Rastad, J; Andersson, M; Arnheim-Dahlström, L; Bergman, P; Granath, F; Adori, C; Hökfelt, T; Kühlmann-Berenzon, S; Liljeström, P; Maeurer, M; Olsson, T; Örtqvist, Å; Partinen, M; Salmonson, T; Zethelius, B

    2015-10-01

    In response to the 2009-2010 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic, a mass vaccination programme with the AS03-adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1) vaccine Pandemrix was initiated in Sweden. Unexpectedly, there were a number of narcolepsy cases amongst vaccinated children and adolescents reported. In this review, we summarize the results of a joint cross-disciplinary national research effort to investigate the adverse reaction signal from the spontaneous reporting system and to better understand possible causative mechanisms. A three- to fourfold increased risk of narcolepsy in vaccinated children and adolescents was verified by epidemiological studies. Of importance, no risk increase was observed for the other neurological and autoimmune diseases studied. Genetic studies confirmed the association with the allele HLA-DQB1*06:02, which is known to be related to sporadic narcolepsy. Furthermore, a number of studies using cellular and molecular experimental models investigated possible links between influenza vaccination and narcolepsy. Serum analysis, using a peptide microarray platform, showed that individuals who received Pandemrix exhibited a different epitope reactivity pattern to neuraminidase and haemagglutinin, as compared to individuals who were infected with H1N1. Patients with narcolepsy were also found to have increased levels of interferon-gamma production in response to streptococcus-associated antigens. The chain of patient-related events and the study results emerging over time were subjected to intense nationwide media attention. The importance of transparent communication and collaboration with patient representatives to maintain public trust in vaccination programmes is also discussed in the review. Organizational challenges due to this unexpected event delayed the initiation of some of the research projects, still the main objectives of this joint, cross-disciplinary research effort were reached, and important insights were acquired for future, similar

  7. Clinical and epidemiological features of respiratory virus infections in preschool children over two consecutive influenza seasons in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Giamberardin, Heloisa I G; Homsani, Sheila; Bricks, Lucia F; Pacheco, Ana P O; Guedes, Matilde; Debur, Maria C; Raboni, Sonia M

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the results of a systematic screening for respiratory viruses in pediatric outpatients from an emergency department (ED) in southern Brazil during two consecutive influenza seasons. Children eligible for enrollment in this study were aged 24-59 months and presented with acute respiratory symptoms and fever. Naso- and oropharyngeal swabs were collected and multiplex reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was performed to identify the respiratory viruses involved. In total, 492 children were included in this study: 248 in 2010 and 244 in 2011. In 2010, 136 samples (55%) were found to be positive for at least one virus and the most frequently detected viruses were human rhinovirus (HRV) (18%), adenovirus (AdV) (13%), and human coronavirus (CoV) (5%). In 2011, 158 samples (65%) were found to be positive for at least one virus, and the most frequently detected were HRV (29%), AdV (12%), and enterovirus (9%). Further, the presence of asthma (OR, 3.17; 95% CI, 1.86-5.46) was independently associated with HRV infection, whereas fever was associated with AdV (OR, 3.86; 95% CI, 1.31-16.52) and influenza infections (OR, 3.74; 95% CI, 1.26-16.06). Ten patients (2%) were diagnosed with pneumonia, and six of these tested positive for viral infection (4 HRV, 1 RSV, and 1 AdV). Thus, this study identified the most common respiratory viruses found in preschool children in the study region and demonstrated their high frequency, highlighting the need for improved data collection, and case management in order to stimulate preventive measures against these infections. J. Med. Virol. 88:1325-1333, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773605

  8. Introducing seasonal influenza vaccine in low-income countries: an adverse events following immunization survey in the Lao People's Democratic Republic

    PubMed Central

    Phengxay, Manilay; Mirza, Sara A; Reyburn, Rita; Xeuatvongsa, Anonh; Winter, Christian; Lewis, Hannah; Olsen, Sonja J; Tsuyuoka, Reiko; Khanthamaly, Viengphone; Palomeque, Francisco S; Bresee, Joseph S; Moen, Ann C; Corwin, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Objective In 2012, Lao PDR introduced seasonal influenza vaccine in pregnant women, persons aged ≥50 years, persons with chronic diseases, and healthcare personnel. We assessed adverse events following immunization (AEFI). Methods We used a multistage randomized cluster sample design to interview vaccine recipients. Findings Between April and May 2012, 355 902 were vaccinated. Of 2089 persons interviewed, 261 (12·5%) reported one or more AEFI. The most commonly reported AEFIs were local reactions. No hospitalizations or deaths were reported; 16% sought medical care. Acceptance and awareness of vaccination were high. Conclusions Following the introduction of seasonal influenza vaccine in Lao PDR, self-reported adverse events were mild. PMID:25598475

  9. Update: Influenza Activity - United States.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sophie; Blanton, Lenee; Kniss, Krista; Mustaquim, Desiree; Steffens, Craig; Reed, Carrie; Bramley, Anna; Flannery, Brendan; Fry, Alicia M; Grohskopf, Lisa A; Bresee, Joseph; Wallis, Teresa; Garten, Rebecca; Xu, Xiyan; Elal, Anwar Isa Abd; Gubareva, Larisa; Barnes, John; Wentworth, David E; Burns, Erin; Katz, Jacqueline; Jernigan, Daniel; Brammer, Lynnette

    2015-12-11

    CDC collects, compiles, and analyzes data on influenza activity year-round in the United States. The influenza season generally begins in the fall and continues through the winter and spring months; however, the timing and severity of circulating influenza viruses can vary by geographic location and season. Influenza activity in the United States remained low through October and November in 2015. Influenza A viruses have been most frequently identified, with influenza A (H3) viruses predominating. This report summarizes U.S. influenza activity for the period October 4-November 28, 2015. PMID:26656182

  10. Systems-Level Comparison of Host-Responses Elicited by Avian H5N1 and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses in Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Suki M. Y.; Gardy, Jennifer L.; Cheung, C. Y.; Cheung, Timothy K. W.; Hui, Kenrie P. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.; Guan, Y.; Hancock, Robert E. W.; Peiris, J. S. Malik

    2009-01-01

    Human disease caused by highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 can lead to a rapidly progressive viral pneumonia leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. There is increasing evidence from clinical, animal models and in vitro data, which suggests a role for virus-induced cytokine dysregulation in contributing to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. The key target cells for the virus in the lung are the alveolar epithelium and alveolar macrophages, and we have shown that, compared to seasonal human influenza viruses, equivalent infecting doses of H5N1 viruses markedly up-regulate pro-inflammatory cytokines in both primary cell types in vitro. Whether this H5N1-induced dysregulation of host responses is driven by qualitative (i.e activation of unique host pathways in response to H5N1) or quantitative differences between seasonal influenza viruses is unclear. Here we used microarrays to analyze and compare the gene expression profiles in primary human macrophages at 1, 3, and 6 h after infection with H5N1 virus or low-pathogenic seasonal influenza A (H1N1) virus. We found that host responses to both viruses are qualitatively similar with the activation of nearly identical biological processes and pathways. However, in comparison to seasonal H1N1 virus, H5N1 infection elicits a quantitatively stronger host inflammatory response including type I interferon (IFN) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α genes. A network-based analysis suggests that the synergy between IFN-β and TNF-α results in an enhanced and sustained IFN and pro-inflammatory cytokine response at the early stage of viral infection that may contribute to the viral pathogenesis and this is of relevance to the design of novel therapeutic strategies for H5N1 induced respiratory disease. PMID:20011590

  11. Advances in influenza vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Reperant, Leslie A.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2014-01-01

    Influenza virus infections yearly cause high morbidity and mortality burdens in humans, and the development of a new influenza pandemic continues to threaten mankind as a Damoclean sword. Influenza vaccines have been produced by using egg-based virus growth and passaging techniques that were developed more than 60 years ago, following the identification of influenza A virus as an etiological agent of seasonal influenza. These vaccines aimed mainly at eliciting neutralizing antibodies targeting antigenically variable regions of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein, which requires regular updates to match circulating seasonal influenza A and B virus strains. Given the relatively limited protection induced by current seasonal influenza vaccines, a more universal influenza vaccine that would protect against more—if not all—influenza viruses is among the largest unmet medical needs of the 21st century. New insights into correlates of protection from influenza and into broad B- and T-cell protective anti-influenza immune responses offer promising avenues for innovative vaccine development as well as manufacturing strategies or platforms, leading to the development of a new generation of vaccines. These aim at the rapid and massive production of influenza vaccines that provide broad protective and long-lasting immunity. Recent advances in influenza vaccine research demonstrate the feasibility of a wide range of approaches and call for the initiation of preclinical proof-of-principle studies followed by clinical trials in humans. PMID:24991424

  12. Sequential detection of influenza epidemics by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza is a well known and common human respiratory infection, causing significant morbidity and mortality every year. Despite Influenza variability, fast and reliable outbreak detection is required for health resource planning. Clinical health records, as published by the Diagnosticat database in Catalonia, host useful data for probabilistic detection of influenza outbreaks. Methods This paper proposes a statistical method to detect influenza epidemic activity. Non-epidemic incidence rates are modeled against the exponential distribution, and the maximum likelihood estimate for the decaying factor λ is calculated. The sequential detection algorithm updates the parameter as new data becomes available. Binary epidemic detection of weekly incidence rates is assessed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov test on the absolute difference between the empirical and the cumulative density function of the estimated exponential distribution with significance level 0 ≤ α ≤ 1. Results The main advantage with respect to other approaches is the adoption of a statistically meaningful test, which provides an indicator of epidemic activity with an associated probability. The detection algorithm was initiated with parameter λ0 = 3.8617 estimated from the training sequence (corresponding to non-epidemic incidence rates of the 2008-2009 influenza season) and sequentially updated. Kolmogorov-Smirnov test detected the following weeks as epidemic for each influenza season: 50−10 (2008-2009 season), 38−50 (2009-2010 season), weeks 50−9 (2010-2011 season) and weeks 3 to 12 for the current 2011-2012 season. Conclusions Real medical data was used to assess the validity of the approach, as well as to construct a realistic statistical model of weekly influenza incidence rates in non-epidemic periods. For the tested data, the results confirmed the ability of the algorithm to detect the start and the end of epidemic periods. In general, the proposed test could be applied to other data

  13. Seasonal influenza immunisation in Europe. Overview of recommendations and vaccination coverage for three seasons: pre-pandemic (2008/09), pandemic (2009/10) and post-pandemic (2010/11).

    PubMed

    Mereckiene, J; Cotter, S; Nicoll, A; Lopalco, P; Noori, T; Weber, Jt; D'Ancona, F; Levy-Bruhl, D; Dematte, L; Giambi, C; Valentiner-Branth, P; Stankiewicz, I; Appelgren, E; O Flanagan, D

    2014-01-01

    Since 2008, annual surveys of influenza vaccination policies, practices and coverage have been undertaken in 29 European Union (EU)/ European Economic Area (EEA) countries. After 2009, this monitored the impact of European Council recommendation to increase vaccination coverage to 75% among risk groups. This paper summarises the results of three seasonal influenza seasons: 2008/09, 2009/10 and 2010/11. In 2008/09, 27/29 countries completed the survey; in 2009/10 and 2010/11, 28/29 completed it. All or almost all countries recommended vaccination of older people (defined as those aged ≥50, ≥55, ≥59, ≥60 or ≥65 years), and people aged ≥6 months with clinical risk and healthcare workers. A total of 23 countries provided vaccination coverage data for older people, but only 7 and 10 had data for the clinical risk groups and healthcare workers, respectively. The number of countries recommending vaccination for some or all pregnant women increased from 10 in 2008/09 to 22 in 2010/11. Only three countries could report coverage among pregnant women. Seasonal influenza vaccination coverage during and after the pandemic season in older people and clinical groups remained unchanged in countries with higher coverage. However, small decreases were seen in most countries during this period. The results of the surveys indicate that most EU/EEA countries recommend influenza vaccination for the main target groups; however, only a few countries have achieved the target of 75% coverage among risk groups. Coverage among healthcare workers remained low. PMID:24786262

  14. Highly Predictive Model for a Protective Immune Response to the A(H1N1)pdm2009 Influenza Strain after Seasonal Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jürchott, Karsten; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Bozzetti, Cecilia; Pohlmann, Dominika; Stervbo, Ulrik; Warth, Sarah; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Waldner, Julian; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Olek, Sven; Grützkau, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Thiel, Andreas; Neumann, Avidan Uriel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the immune response after vaccination against new influenza strains is highly important in case of an imminent influenza pandemic and for optimization of seasonal vaccination strategies in high risk population groups, especially the elderly. Models predicting the best sero-conversion response among the three strains in the seasonal vaccine were recently suggested. However, these models use a large number of variables and/or information post- vaccination. Here in an exploratory pilot study, we analyzed the baseline immune status in young (<31 years, N = 17) versus elderly (≥50 years, N = 20) donors sero-negative to the newly emerged A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus strain and correlated it with the serological response to that specific strain after seasonal influenza vaccination. Extensive multi-chromatic FACS analysis (36 lymphocyte sub-populations measured) was used to quantitatively assess the cellular immune status before vaccination. We identified CD4+ T cells, and amongst them particularly naive CD4+ T cells, as the best correlates for a successful A(H1N1)pdm09 immune response. Moreover, the number of influenza strains a donor was sero-negative to at baseline (NSSN) in addition to age, as expected, were important predictive factors. Age, NSSN and CD4+ T cell count at baseline together predicted sero-protection (HAI≥40) to A(H1N1)pdm09 with a high accuracy of 89% (p-value = 0.00002). An additional validation study (N = 43 vaccinees sero-negative to A(H1N1)pdm09) has confirmed the predictive value of age, NSSN and baseline CD4+ counts (accuracy = 85%, p-value = 0.0000004). Furthermore, the inclusion of donors at ages 31-50 had shown that the age predictive function is not linear with age but rather a sigmoid with a midpoint at about 50 years. Using these results we suggest a clinically relevant prediction model that gives the probability for non-protection to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza strain after seasonal multi-valent vaccination as a continuous

  15. Highly Predictive Model for a Protective Immune Response to the A(H1N1)pdm2009 Influenza Strain after Seasonal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Bozzetti, Cecilia; Pohlmann, Dominika; Stervbo, Ulrik; Warth, Sarah; Mälzer, Julia Nora; Waldner, Julian; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Olek, Sven; Grützkau, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the immune response after vaccination against new influenza strains is highly important in case of an imminent influenza pandemic and for optimization of seasonal vaccination strategies in high risk population groups, especially the elderly. Models predicting the best sero-conversion response among the three strains in the seasonal vaccine were recently suggested. However, these models use a large number of variables and/or information post- vaccination. Here in an exploratory pilot study, we analyzed the baseline immune status in young (<31 years, N = 17) versus elderly (≥50 years, N = 20) donors sero-negative to the newly emerged A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus strain and correlated it with the serological response to that specific strain after seasonal influenza vaccination. Extensive multi-chromatic FACS analysis (36 lymphocyte sub-populations measured) was used to quantitatively assess the cellular immune status before vaccination. We identified CD4+ T cells, and amongst them particularly naive CD4+ T cells, as the best correlates for a successful A(H1N1)pdm09 immune response. Moreover, the number of influenza strains a donor was sero-negative to at baseline (NSSN) in addition to age, as expected, were important predictive factors. Age, NSSN and CD4+ T cell count at baseline together predicted sero-protection (HAI≥40) to A(H1N1)pdm09 with a high accuracy of 89% (p-value = 0.00002). An additional validation study (N = 43 vaccinees sero-negative to A(H1N1)pdm09) has confirmed the predictive value of age, NSSN and baseline CD4+ counts (accuracy = 85%, p-value = 0.0000004). Furthermore, the inclusion of donors at ages 31–50 had shown that the age predictive function is not linear with age but rather a sigmoid with a midpoint at about 50 years. Using these results we suggest a clinically relevant prediction model that gives the probability for non-protection to A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza strain after seasonal multi-valent vaccination as a continuous

  16. Comparison of the FilmArray RP, Verigene RV+, and Prodesse ProFLU+/FAST+ Multiplex Platforms for Detection of Influenza Viruses in Clinical Samples from the 2011-2012 Influenza Season in Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Meeuws, Hanne; Van Immerseel, Andrea; Ispas, Gabriela; Schmidt, Kristiane; Houspie, Lieselot; Van Ranst, Marc; Stuyver, Lieven

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections (RTIs) are caused by a plethora of viral and bacterial pathogens. In particular, lower RTIs are a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality. Timely detection of the infecting respiratory pathogens is crucial to optimize treatment and care. In this study, three U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved molecular multiplex platforms (Prodesse ProFLU+/FAST+, FilmArray RP, and Verigene RV+) were evaluated for influenza virus detection in 171 clinical samples collected during the Belgian 2011-2012 influenza season. Sampling was done using mid-turbinate flocked swabs, and the collected samples were stored in universal transport medium. The amount of viral RNA present in the swab samples ranged between 3.07 and 8.82 log10 copies/ml. Sixty samples were concordant influenza A virus positive, and 8 samples were found to be concordant influenza B virus positive. Other respiratory viruses that were detected included human rhinovirus/enterovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus type 1, human metapneumovirus, and coronavirus NL63. Twenty-five samples yielded discordant results across the various assays which required further characterization by sequencing. The FilmArray RP and Prodesse ProFLU+/FAST+ assays were convenient to perform with regard to sensitivity, ease of use, and low percentages of invalid results. Although the limit of sensitivity is of utmost importance, many other factors should be taken into account in selecting the most convenient molecular diagnostic assay for the detection of respiratory pathogens in clinical samples. PMID:23824777

  17. Observation of O3, HCl, ClO, and HOCl by ISS/JEM/SMILES inside and outside Arctic Polar Vortex during 2009-2010 Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, M.; Mitsuda, C.; Manago, N.; Imai, K.; Naito, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Shiotani, M.

    2011-12-01

    JEM/SMILES instrument has been in operation from Oct. 12, 2009 to Apr. 21, 2010 on the International Space Station. SMILES observed limb emission in the frequency region 625 and 650 GHz with 0.8 MHz sampling, and it can provide vertical profiles of O3, HCl, ClO, HOCl, HO2, BrO, HNO3, CH3CN and O3 isotopes. SMILES use 4K cooled SIS mixer which has very low noise (Tsys ~ 340 K), and SMILES L2 products should have significantly smaller random error for species such as ClO and HOCl compared to the previous measurements. This paper reports interpretation of chemistry at inside and outside Arctic polar vortex during 2009-2010 winter season based upon O3, HCl, ClO, and HOCl observation by SMILES.

  18. TLR5-mediated sensing of gut microbiota is necessary for antibody responses to seasonal influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jason Z; Ravindran, Rajesh; Chassaing, Benoit; Carvalho, Frederic A; Maddur, Mohan S; Bower, Maureen; Hakimpour, Paul; Gill, Kiran P; Nakaya, Helder I; Yarovinsky, Felix; Sartor, R Balfour; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-09-18

    Systems biological analysis of immunity to the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in humans revealed a correlation between early expression of TLR5 and the magnitude of the antibody response. Vaccination of Trl5(-/-) mice resulted in reduced antibody titers and lower frequencies of plasma cells, demonstrating a role for TLR5 in immunity to TIV. This was due to a failure to sense host microbiota. Thus, antibody responses in germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice were impaired, but restored by oral reconstitution with a flagellated, but not aflagellated, strain of E. coli. TLR5-mediated sensing of flagellin promoted plasma cell differentiation directly and by stimulating lymph node macrophages to produce plasma cell growth factors. Finally, TLR5-mediated sensing of the microbiota also impacted antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine, but not to adjuvanted vaccines or the live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine. These results reveal an unappreciated role for gut microbiota in promoting immunity to vaccination. PMID:25220212

  19. TLR5-Mediated Sensing of Gut Microbiota Is Necessary for Antibody Responses to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Jason Z.; Ravindran, Rajesh; Chassaing, Benoit; Carvalho, Frederic A.; Maddur, Mohan S.; Bower, Maureen; Hakimpour, Paul; Gill, Kiran P.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Yarovinsky, Felix; Sartor, R. Balfour; Gewirtz, Andrew T.; Pulendran, Bali

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Systems biological analysis of immunity to the trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in humans revealed a correlation between early expression of TLR5 and the magnitude of the antibody response. Vaccination of Trl5−/− mice resulted in reduced antibody titers and lower frequencies of plasma cells, demonstrating a role for TLR5 in immunity to TIV. This was due to a failure to sense host microbiota. Thus, antibody responses in germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice were impaired, but restored by oral reconstitution with a flagellated, but not aflagellated, strain of E. coli. TLR5-mediated sensing of flagellin promoted plasma cell differentiation, directly, and by stimulating lymph node macrophages to produce plasma cell growth factors. Finally, TLR5-mediated sensing of the microbiota also impacted antibody responses to the inactivated polio vaccine, but not to adjuvanted vaccines or the live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine. These results reveal an unappreciated role for gut microbiota in promoting immunity to vaccination. PMID:25220212

  20. Comparison of the Use of H1N1 and seasonal influenza vaccinations between veterans and non-veterans in the United States, 2010

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Veterans of the U.S. armed forces tend to be older and have more chronic health problems than the general adult population, which may place them at greater risk of complications from influenza. Despite Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations, seasonal influenza vaccination rates for the general adult population remain well below the national goal of 80%. Achieving this goal would be facilitated by a clearer understanding of which factors influence vaccination. Methods Using the 2010 U.S. National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), this study estimates models of two types of vaccinations (H1N1 and seasonal flu), assesses if the correlates differ for these vaccinations, and analyses the distribution of the correlates by veteran status. Results Veterans, women, non-Hispanic whites, non-smokers, those at high risk, educated, with health insurance, and who use clinics as a usual source of care were more likely to receive both types of vaccinations. Those who were older, married, and with higher income were more likely to get vaccinated for seasonal flu, but not for H1N1. Age and number of children living in the household were found to have different effects for H1N1 compared to seasonal flu. Conclusion Veterans are more likely to get vaccinated for seasonal influenza and H1N1 compared to the general population. This might be due to Veterans having better access to care or Veterans participating in better health care practices. Future studies should examine potential differences in flu vaccination use among Veterans using Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system vs. non-VA users. PMID:24252569

  1. Influenza A viral loads in respiratory samples collected from patients infected with pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA), nasal swab (NS), and throat swab (TS) are common specimens used for diagnosis of respiratory virus infections based on the detection of viral genomes, viral antigens and viral isolation. However, there is no documented data regarding the type of specimen that yields the best result of viral detection. In this study, quantitative real time RT-PCR specific for M gene was used to determine influenza A viral loads present in NS, NPA and TS samples collected from patients infected with the 2009 pandemic H1N1, seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 viruses. Various copy numbers of RNA transcripts derived from recombinant plasmids containing complete M gene insert of each virus strain were assayed by RT-PCR. A standard curve for viral RNA quantification was constructed by plotting each Ct value against the log quantity of each standard RNA copy number. Results Copy numbers of M gene were obtained through the extrapolation of Ct values of the test samples against the corresponding standard curve. Among a total of 29 patients with severe influenza enrolled in this study (12 cases of the 2009 pandemic influenza, 5 cases of seasonal H1N1 and 12 cases of seasonal H3N2 virus), NPA was found to contain significantly highest amount of viral loads and followed in order by NS and TS specimen. Viral loads among patients infected with those viruses were comparable regarding type of specimen analyzed. Conclusion Based on M gene copy numbers, we conclude that NPA is the best specimen for detection of influenza A viruses, and followed in order by NS and TS. PMID:20403211

  2. Safety and immunogenicity of co-administered MF59-adjuvanted 2009 pandemic and plain 2009–10 seasonal influenza vaccines in rheumatoid arthritis patients on biologicals

    PubMed Central

    Milanetti, F; Germano, V; Nisini, R; Donatelli, I; Di Martino, A; Facchini, M; Ferlito, C; Cappella, A; Crialesi, D; Caporuscio, S; Biselli, R; Rossi, F; Salemi, S; D'Amelio, R

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients under immunosuppressive therapy are particularly susceptible to infections, mainly of the respiratory tract, thus vaccination may represent a strategy to reduce their incidence in this vulnerable population. In the 2009–10 influenza season, the safety and immunogenicity of co-administered non-adjuvanted seasonal and MF59-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccines were evaluated in this study in 30 RA patients under therapy with anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents or Abatacept and in 13 healthy controls (HC). Patients and HC underwent clinical and laboratory evaluation before (T0), 1 (T1) and 6 months (T2) after vaccinations. No severe adverse reactions, but a significant increase in total mild side effects in patients versus HC were observed. Both influenza vaccines fulfilled the three criteria of the Committee for Proprietary Medicinal Products (CPMP). Seroconversion rate for any viral strain in patients and HC was, respectively, 68 versus 45 for H1-A/Brisbane/59/07, 72 versus 81 for H3-A/Brisbane/10/07, 68 versus 54 for B/Brisbane/60/08 and 81 versus 54 for A/California/7/2009. A slight increase in activated interferon (IFN)-γ-, TNF-α- or interleukin (IL)-17A-secreting T cells at T1 compared to T0, followed by a reduction at T2 in both patients and HC, was registered. In conclusion, simultaneous administration of adjuvanted pandemic and non-adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines is safe and highly immunogenic. The largely overlapping results between patients and HC, in terms of antibody response and cytokine-producing T cells, may represent further evidence for vaccine safety and immunogenicity in RA patients on biologicals. PMID:24666311

  3. Safety and immunogenicity in man of a cell culture derived trivalent live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine: a Phase I dose escalating study in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Heldens, Jacco; Hulskotte, Ellen; Voeten, Theo; Breedveld, Belinda; Verweij, Pierre; van Duijnhoven, Wilbert; Rudenko, Larissa; van Damme, Pierre; van den Bosch, Han

    2014-09-01

    Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) offers the promise of inducing a variety of immune responses thereby conferring protection to circulating field strains. LAIVs are based on cold adapted and temperature sensitive phenotypes of master donor viruses (MDVs) containing the surface glycoprotein genes of seasonal influenza strains. Two types of MDV lineages have been described, the Ann Arbor lineages and the A/Leningrad/17 and B/USSR/60 lineages. Here the safety and immunogenicity of a Madin Darby Canine Kidney - cell culture based, intranasal LAIV derived from A/Leningrad/17 and B/USSR, was evaluated in healthy influenza non-naive volunteers 18-50 years of age. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled design, single escalating doses of 1×10(5), 1×10(6), or 1×10(7) tissue culture infectious dose 50% (TCID50) of vaccine containing each of the three influenza virus re-assortants recommended by the World Health Organization for the 2008-2009 season were administered intranasally. A statistically significant geometric mean increase in hemagglutination inhibition titer was reached for influenza strain A/H3N2 after immunization with all doses of LAIV. For the A/H1N1 and B strains, the GMI in HI titer did not increase for any of the doses. Virus neutralization antibody titers showed a similar response pattern. A dose-response effect could not be demonstrated for any of the strains, neither for the HI antibody nor for the VN antibody responses. No influenza like symptoms, no nasal congestions, no rhinorrhea, or other influenza related upper respiratory tract symptoms were observed. In addition, no difference in the incidence or nature of adverse events was found between vaccine and placebo treated subjects. Overall, the results indicated that the LAIV for nasal administration is immunogenic (i.e. able to provoke an immune response) and safe both from the perspective of the attenuated virus and the MDCK cell line from which it was derived, and it warrants

  4. Drowsy driving - 19 states and the District of Columbia, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 2.5% of fatal motor vehicle crashes (approximately 730 in 2009) and 2.0% of all crashes with nonfatal injuries (approximately 30,000 in 2009) involve drowsy driving. However, although data collection methods make it challenging to estimate the number of crashes that involve drowsy drivers, some modeling studies have estimated that 15% to 33% of fatal crashes might involve drowsy drivers. Fatalities and injuries are more likely in motor vehicle crashes that involve drowsy driving compared with non-drowsy driving crashes. To assess the state-level self-reported prevalence of falling asleep while driving, CDC analyzed data from a set of questions about insufficient sleep administered through the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) during 2009-2010. Among 147,076 respondents in 19 states and the District of Columbia (DC),* 4.2% reported having fallen asleep while driving at least one time during the previous 30 days. Reports of falling asleep while driving were more common among adults who reported usually sleeping ≤6 hours per day, snoring, or unintentionally falling asleep during the day compared with other adults who did not report these characteristics. Drivers should avoid driving while drowsy and learn the warning signs of drowsy driving. PMID:23282860

  5. Influenza symptoms and their impact on elderly adults: randomised trial of AS03-adjuvanted or non-adjuvanted inactivated trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    van Essen, Gerrit A; Beran, Jiri; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Durand, Christelle; Duval, Xavier; Esen, Meral; Falsey, Ann R; Feldman, Gregory; Gervais, Pierre; Innis, Bruce L; Kovac, Martina; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; McElhaney, Janet E; McNeil, Shelly; Oujaa, Mohammed; Richardus, Jan Hendrik; Ruiz-Palacios, Guillermo; Osborne, Richard H; Oostvogels, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are particularly relevant in influenza vaccine trials in the elderly where reduction in symptom severity could prevent illness-related functional impairment. Objectives To evaluate PROs in people aged ≥65 years receiving two different vaccines. Methods This was a phase III, randomised, observer-blind study (NCT00753272) of the AS03-adjuvanted inactivated trivalent split-virion influenza vaccine (AS03-TIV) versus non-adjuvanted vaccine (TIV). Using the FluiiQ questionnaire, symptom (systemic, respiratory, total) and life impact (activities, emotions, relationships) scores were computed as exploratory endpoints, with minimal important difference (MID) in influenza severity between vaccines considered post-hoc as >7%. Vaccine efficacy of AS03-TIV relative to TIV in severe influenza (hospitalisation, complication, most severe one-third of episodes based on the area under the curve for systemic symptom score) was calculated post-hoc. The main analyses (descriptive) were conducted in the according-to-protocol cohort (n = 280 AS03-TIV, n = 315 TIV) for influenza confirmed by culture or reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Results Mean systemic symptom, total symptom and impact on activities scores were lower with AS03-TIV versus TIV. Mean respiratory symptom, impact on emotions and impact on relationships scores were similar. Influenza tended to be less severe with AS03-TIV, but the MID was reached only for impact on activities (mean 9·0%). Relative vaccine efficacy in severe influenza was 29·38% (95% CI: 7·60–46·02). Conclusions AS03-TIV had advantages over TIV in impact on systemic symptoms and activities as measured by the FluiiQ in elderly people. Higher efficacy of AS03-TIV relative to TIV was shown for prevention of severe illness. PMID:24702710

  6. A Perfect Storm: Impact of Genomic Variation and Serial Vaccination on Low Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness During the 2014–2015 Season

    PubMed Central

    Skowronski, Danuta M.; Chambers, Catharine; Sabaiduc, Suzana; De Serres, Gaston; Winter, Anne-Luise; Dickinson, James A.; Krajden, Mel; Gubbay, Jonathan B.; Drews, Steven J.; Martineau, Christine; Eshaghi, Alireza; Kwindt, Trijntje L.; Bastien, Nathalie; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The 2014–2015 influenza season was distinguished by an epidemic of antigenically-drifted A(H3N2) viruses and vaccine components identical to 2013–2014. We report 2014–2015 vaccine effectiveness (VE) from Canada and explore contributing agent–host factors. Methods. VE against laboratory-confirmed influenza was derived using a test-negative design among outpatients with influenza-like illness. Sequencing identified amino acid mutations at key antigenic sites of the viral hemagglutinin protein. Results. Overall, 815/1930 (42%) patients tested influenza-positive: 590 (72%) influenza A and 226 (28%) influenza B. Most influenza A viruses with known subtype were A(H3N2) (570/577; 99%); 409/460 (89%) sequenced viruses belonged to genetic clade 3C.2a and 39/460 (8%) to clade 3C.3b. Dominant clade 3C.2a viruses bore the pivotal mutations F159Y (a cluster-transition position) and K160T (a predicted gain of glycosylation) compared to the mismatched clade 3C.1 vaccine. VE against A(H3N2) was −17% (95% confidence interval [CI], −50% to 9%) overall with clade-specific VE of −13% (95% CI, −51% to 15%) for clade 3C.2a but 52% (95% CI, −17% to 80%) for clade 3C.3b. VE against A(H3N2) was 53% (95% CI, 10% to 75%) for patients vaccinated in 2014-2015 only, significantly lower at −32% (95% CI, −75% to 0%) if also vaccinated in 2013–2014 and −54% (95% CI, −108% to −14%) if vaccinated each year since 2012–2013. VE against clade-mismatched B(Yamagata) viruses was 42% (95% CI, 10% to 62%) with less-pronounced reduction from prior vaccination compared to A(H3N2). Conclusions. Variation in the viral genome and negative effects of serial vaccination likely contributed to poor influenza vaccine performance in 2014–2015. PMID:27025838

  7. Recombinant influenza virus with a pandemic H2N2 polymerase complex has a higher adaptive potential than one with seasonal H2N2 polymerase complex.

    PubMed

    Chin, Alex W H; Yen, Hui-L; Krauss, Scott; Webby, Richard J; Poon, Leo L M

    2016-03-01

    The reassortment of influenza viral gene segments plays a key role in the genesis of pandemic strains. All of the last three pandemic viruses contained reassorted polymerase complexes with subunits derived from animal viruses, suggesting that the acquisition of a reassorted polymerase complex might have a role in generating these pandemic viruses. Here, we studied polymerase activities of the pandemic H2N2, seasonal H2N2 and pandemic H3N2 viruses. We observed that the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) of pandemic H2N2 virus has a highly robust activity. The polymerase activity of seasonal H2N2 viruses, however, was much reduced. We further identified three mutations (PB2-I114V, PB1-S261N and PA-D383N) responsible for the reduced activity. To determine the potential impact of viral polymerase activity on the viral life cycle, recombinant H3N2 viruses carrying pandemic and seasonal H2N2 vRNP were studied in cell cultures supplemented with oseltamivir carboxylate and tested for their abilities to develop adaptive or resistant mutations. It was found that the recombinant virus with pandemic H2N2 vRNP was more capable of restoring the viral fitness than the one with seasonal vRNP. These results suggest that a robust vRNP is advantageous to influenza virus to cope with a new selection pressure. PMID:26703222

  8. Vaccination coverage against 2009 seasonal influenza in chronically ill children and adults: analysis of population registries in primary care in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Rieiro, Cristina; Domínguez-Berjón, Ma Felicitas; Esteban-Vasallo, María D; Sánchez-Perruca, Luis; Astray-Mochales, Jenaro; Fornies, Domingo Iniesta; Ordoñez, Dolores Barranco; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2010-08-31

    Using electronic clinical records in primary care (ECRPC) of the entire population living in the Autonomous Community of Madrid, Spain (5,102,568 persons) as a data source, this study aimed to ascertain seasonal anti-influenza vaccination coverage in the chronically ill at-risk children (aged 6 months to 14 years) and adults (15-59 years). Of the total population aged 6 months to 59 years with a medical card in the Autonomous Community of Madrid, 10.3% (n=528,095 patients) had a chronic condition for which anti-influenza vaccination was indicated. In children with chronic conditions, coverage was 27.1% and it was particularly high among diabetics (41.1%) and particularly low in children with "other pulmonary conditions" (15.2%). In adults with chronic conditions, coverage was 22.1% and in patients with diagnosed heart failure coverage reached 39.1%; with the lowest coverage was observed in patients suffering neuromuscular diseases (12.8%). The factors associated with vaccination among children and adults suffering a chronic condition included: having been vaccinated during the previous campaign, national origin (lower among immigrants), and having more than one chronic condition. In conclusion, our study shows that vaccination coverage for 2009 seasonal influenza in children and adults with chronic conditions living in Madrid (Spain) was less than acceptable. PMID:20650340

  9. Socioeconomic Status and Other Related Factors of Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in the South Korean Adult Population Based on a Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyu-Chong; Han, Kyungdo; Kim, Jin Yong; Nam, Ga Eun; Han, Byoung-Duck; Shin, Koh-Eun; Lee, Anna; Ko, Byung Joon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the association between seasonal influenza vaccination in South Korea and socioeconomic status (SES) as well as other potential related factors. Methods The study was based on data obtained in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2011. Education level and household income were used as indicators for SES. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate SES and other demographic variables as related factors for influenza vaccination, the primary outcome. Results Higher household income was positively associated with higher vaccine uptake in the younger (19–49 years) group [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08–2.23], whereas the low-income and low-education group had increased vaccination coverage than the middle-income and middle-education group in the older (≥ 50 years) group (aOR 1.36, 95% CI 1.09–1.69). Current smokers tend to be unvaccinated in all age groups. Among individuals aged ≥ 50, older age, mild to moderate alcohol consumption, regular exercise, and having co-morbidities were positively associated with vaccination, while those who self-reported their health status as good were less likely to be vaccinated. Conclusions The relationship between SES and seasonal influenza vaccination coverage differed between the age groups throughout the adult South Korean population. Public health policies need to address these inequalities. PMID:25646847

  10. Pregnant Women and Influenza (Flu)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Medscape Podcasts Public Service Announcements (PSAs) Virus Images Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Pregnant Women & Influenza (Flu) Language: English Español Recommend on Facebook ...

  11. Comparison of serum hemagglutinin and neuraminidase inhibition antibodies after 2010-2011 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in healthcare personnel.

    PubMed

    Laguio-Vila, Maryrose R; Thompson, Mark G; Reynolds, Sue; Spencer, Sarah M; Gaglani, Manjusha; Naleway, Allison; Ball, Sarah; Bozeman, Sam; Baker, Steven; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Levine, Min; Katz, Jackie; Fry, Alicia M; Treanor, John J

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Most inactivated influenza vaccines contain purified and standardized hemagglutinin (HA) and residual neuraminidase (NA) antigens. Vaccine-associated HA antibody responses (hemagglutination inhibition [HAI]) are well described, but less is known about the immune response to the NA. Methods.  Serum of 1349 healthcare personnel (HCP) electing or declining the 2010-2011 trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine ([IIV3], containing A/California/7/2009 p(H1N1), A/Perth/16/2009 [H3N2], B/Brisbane/60/2008 strains) were tested for NA-inhibiting (NAI) antibody by a modified lectin-based assay using pseudotyped N1 and N2 influenza A viruses with an irrelevant (H5) HA. Neuraminidase-inhibiting and HAI antibody titers were evaluated approximately 30 days after vaccination and end-of-season for those with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-confirmed influenza infection. Results.  In 916 HCP (68%) receiving IIV3, a 2-fold increase in N1 and N2 NAI antibody occurred in 63.7% and 47.3%, respectively. Smaller responses occurred in HCP age >50 years and those without prior 2009-2010 IIV3 nor monovalent A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccinations. Forty-four PCR-confirmed influenza infections were observed, primarily affecting those with lower pre-exposure HAI and NAI antibodies. Higher pre-NAI titers correlated with shorter duration of illness for A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections. Conclusions.  Trivalent-inactivated influenza vaccine is modestly immunogenic for N1 and N2 antigens in HCP. Vaccines eliciting robust NA immune responses may improve efficacy and reduce influenza-associated morbidity. PMID:25884004

  12. Hampered performance of migratory swans: intra- and inter-seasonal effects of avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Hoye, Bethany J; Munster, Vincent J; Huig, Naomi; de Vries, Peter; Oosterbeek, Kees; Tijsen, Wim; Klaassen, Marcel; Fouchier, Ron A M; van Gils, Jan A

    2016-08-01

    The extent to which animal migrations shape parasite transmission networks is critically dependent on a migrant's ability to tolerate infection and migrate successfully. Yet, sub-lethal effects of parasites can be intensified through periods of increased physiological stress. Long-distance migrants may, therefore, be especially susceptible to negative effects of parasitic infection. Although a handful of studies have investigated the short-term, transmission-relevant behaviors of wild birds infected with low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV), the ecological consequences of LPAIV for the hosts themselves remain largely unknown. Here, we assessed the potential effects of naturally-acquired LPAIV infections in Bewick's swans, a long-distance migratory species that experiences relatively low incidence of LPAIV infection during early winter. We monitored both foraging and movement behavior in the winter of infection, as well as subsequent breeding behavior and inter-annual resighting probability over 3 years. Incorporating data on infection history we hypothesized that any effects would be most apparent in naïve individuals experiencing their first LPAIV infection. Indeed, significant effects of infection were only seen in birds that were infected but lacked antibodies indicative of prior infection. Swans that were infected but had survived a previous infection were indistinguishable from uninfected birds in each of the ecological performance metrics. Despite showing reduced foraging rates, individuals in the naïve-infected category had similar accumulated body stores to re-infected and uninfected individuals prior to departure on spring migration, possibly as a result of having higher scaled mass at the time of infection. And yet individuals in the naïve-infected category were unlikely to be resighted 1 year after infection, with 6 out of 7 individuals that never resighted again compared to 20 out of 63 uninfected individuals and 5 out of 12 individuals in

  13. Special Education Coding Criteria 2009/2010: ECS to Grade 12 Mild/Moderate (Including Gifted and Talented) Severe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Alberta Education provides programming support and funding to school authorities to develop and implement special education programming for ECS children and students in grades 1 to 12. "Special Education Coding Criteria 2009/2010" outlines criteria within specific categories to help school authorities identify those children and students who…

  14. 76 FR 62039 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of 2009-2010 Antidumping...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ...: Notice of Preliminary Results of 2009-2010 Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 76 FR 31938 (June 2... proceeding.\\4\\ \\3\\ See Antidumping Duties; Countervailing Duties: Final Rule, 62 FR 27296, 27393 (May 19, 1997). \\4\\ See Antidumping and Countervailing Duty Proceedings: Assessment of Antidumping Duties, 68...

  15. Salaries and Wages Paid Professional and Support Personnel in Public Schools, 2009-2010. A Reference Tool for School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protheroe, Nancy; Licciardi, Christopher M.; Cooke, Willa D.

    2010-01-01

    This report presents salary and wage data collected as part of the 37th edition of the "ERS National Survey of Salaries and Wages in Public Schools, 2009-2010." The survey, conducted in fall 2008, collected data on salaries scheduled and salaries paid for 23 selected professional positions and 10 selected support positions in public school systems…

  16. Cross-Validation of easyCBM Reading Cut Scores in Oregon: 2009-2010. Technical Report #1108

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Irvin, P. Shawn; Anderson, Daniel; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    This technical report presents results from a cross-validation study designed to identify optimal cut scores when using easyCBM[R] reading tests in Oregon. The cross-validation study analyzes data from the 2009-2010 academic year for easyCBM[R] reading measures. A sample of approximately 2,000 students per grade, randomly split into two groups of…

  17. 41st Annual Survey Report on State-Sponsored Student Financial Aid, 2009-2010 Academic Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each year, the National Association of State Student Grant and Aid Programs (NASSGAP) completes a survey regarding state-funded expenditures for postsecondary student financial aid. This report, the 41th annual survey, represents data from academic year 2009-10. Data highlights include: (1) In the 2009-2010 academic year, the states awarded about…

  18. Active Travel to School: Findings from the Survey of US Health Behavior in School-Aged Children, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yong; Ivey, Stephanie S.; Levy, Marian C.; Royne, Marla B.; Klesges, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whereas children's active travel to school (ATS) has confirmed benefits, only a few large national surveys of ATS exist. Methods: Using data from the Health Behavior in School-aged Children (HBSC) 2009-2010 US survey, we conducted a logistic regression model to estimate the odds ratios of ATS and a linear regression model to estimate…

  19. 77 FR 28851 - Lightweight Thermal Paper From Germany: Notice of Amended Final Results of the 2009-2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ... the 2009-2010 Antidumping Duty Administrative Review, 77 FR 21082 (April 9, 2012) (Final Results). On... Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). This clarification will apply to entries of subject merchandise... Antidumping Duties, 68 FR 23954 (May 6, 2003). Cash Deposit Requirements The following antidumping...

  20. Making the Good Even Better: Feedback from easyCBM Focus Groups, School Year 2009/2010. Technical Report # 1001

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald; Lai, Cheng-Fei

    2010-01-01

    This technical report provides a summary of feedback from teachers, administrators, and support personnel who used the easyCBM progress monitoring and benchmark assessment system during school year 2009/2010. Data were gathered from semi-structured focus groups conducted during the 2010 easyCBM August Institute at the University of Oregon. Results…

  1. Madeira Extreme Floods: 2009/2010 Winter. Case study - 2nd and 20th of February

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pires, V.; Marques, J.; Silva, A.

    2010-09-01

    Floods are at world scale the natural disaster that affects a larger fraction of the population. It is a phenomenon that extends it's effects to the surrounding areas of the hydrographic network (basins, rivers, dams) and the coast line. Accordingly to USA FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) flood can be defined as:"A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of two or more acres of normally dry land area or of two or more properties from: Overflow of inland or tidal waters; Unusual and rapid accumulation or runoff of surface waters from any source; Mudflow; Collapse or subsidence of land along the shore of a lake or similar body of water as a result of erosion or undermining caused by waves or currents of water exceeding anticipated cyclical levels that result in a flood as defined above." A flash flood is the result of intense and long duration of continuous precipitation and can result in dead casualties (i.e. floods in mainland Portugal in 1967, 1983 and 1997). The speed and strength of the floods either localized or over large areas, results in enormous social impacts either by the loss of human lives and or the devastating damage to the landscape and human infrastructures. The winter of 2009/2010 in Madeira Island was characterized by several episodes of very intense precipitation (specially in December 2009 and February 2010) adding to a new record of accumulated precipitation since there are records in the island. In February two days are especially rainy with absolute records for the month of February (daily records since 1949): 111mm and 97mm on the 2nd and 20th respectively. The accumulated precipitation ended up with the terrible floods on the 20th of February causing the lost of dozens of human lives and hundreds of millions of Euros of losses The large precipitation occurrences either more intense precipitation in a short period or less intense precipitation during a larger period are sometimes the precursor of

  2. Firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas - United States, 2006-2007 and 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-08-01

    Firearm homicides and suicides are a continuing public health concern in the United States. During 2009-2010, a total of 22,571 firearm homicides and 38,126 firearm suicides occurred among U.S. residents. This includes 3,397 firearm homicides and 1,548 firearm suicides among persons aged 10-19 years; the firearm homicide rate for this age group was slightly above the all-ages rate. This report updates an earlier report that provided statistics on firearm homicides and suicides in major metropolitan areas for 2006-2007, with special emphasis on persons aged 10-19 years in recognition of the importance of early prevention efforts. Firearm homicide and suicide rates were calculated for the 50 most populous U.S. metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) for 2009-2010 using mortality data from the National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) and population data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Comparison statistics were recalculated for 2006-2007 to reflect revisions to MSA delineations and population estimates subsequent to the earlier report. Although the firearm homicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained above the national rate during 2009-2010, more than 75% of these MSAs showed a decreased rate from 2006-2007, largely accounting for a national decrease. The firearm homicide rate for persons aged 10-19 years exceeded the all-ages rate in many of these MSAs during 2009-2010, similar to the earlier reporting period. Conversely, although the firearm suicide rate for large MSAs collectively remained below the national rate during 2009-2010, nearly 75% of these MSAs showed an increased rate from 2006-2007, paralleling the national trend. Firearm suicide rates among persons aged 10-19 years were low compared with all-ages rates during both periods. These patterns can inform the development and monitoring of strategies directed at reducing firearm-related violence. PMID:23903593

  3. Prolonged Nightly Fasting and Breast Cancer Risk: Findings from NHANES (2009-2010)

    PubMed Central

    Marinac, Catherine R.; Natarajan, Loki; Sears, Dorothy D.; Gallo, Linda C.; Hartman, Sheri J.; Arredondo, Elva; Patterson, Ruth E.

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel line of research has emerged suggesting that daily feeding-fasting schedules that are synchronized with sleep-wake cycles have metabolic implications that are highly relevant to breast cancer. We examined associations of nighttime fasting duration with biomarkers of breast cancer risk among women in the 2009-2010 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Methods Dietary, anthropometric and HbA1c data were available for 2,212 women, and 2-hour postprandial glucose concentrations were available for 1,066 women. Nighttime fasting duration was calculated using 24-hour food records. Separate linear regression models examined associations of nighttime fasting with HbA1c and 2-hour glucose concentrations. Logistic regression modeled associations of nighttime fasting with elevated HbA1c (HbA1c ≥ 39 mmol/mol or 5.7%) and elevated 2-hour glucose (glucose ≥ 140 mg/dL). All models adjusted for age, education, race/ethnicity, BMI, total kcal intake, evening kcal intake, and the number of eating episodes per day. Results Each 3-hour increase in nighttime fasting (roughly one standard deviation) was associated with a 4% lower 2-hour glucose measurement (β 0.96, 95% CI 0.93-1.00; p<0.05), and a non-statistically significant decrease in HbA1c. Logistic regression models indicate that each 3-hour increase in nighttime fasting duration was associated with roughly a 20% reduced odds of elevated HbA1c (OR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68, 0.97; p<0.05) and non-significantly reduced odds of elevated 2-hour glucose. Conclusions A longer nighttime duration was significantly associated with improved glycemic regulation. Impact Randomized trials are needed to confirm whether prolonged nighttime fasting could improve biomarkers of glucose control, thereby reducing breast cancer risk. PMID:25896523

  4. The Role of Human Transportation Networks in Mediating the Genetic Structure of Seasonal Influenza in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bozick, Brooke A.; Real, Leslie A.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of accounting for human mobility networks when modeling epidemics in order to accurately predict spatial dynamics. However, little is known about the impact these movement networks have on the genetic structure of pathogen populations and whether these effects are scale-dependent. We investigated how human movement along the aviation and commuter networks contributed to intra-seasonal genetic structure of influenza A epidemics in the continental United States using spatially-referenced hemagglutinin nucleotide sequences collected from 2003–2013 for both the H3N2 and H1N1 subtypes. Comparative analysis of these transportation networks revealed that the commuter network is highly spatially-organized and more heavily traveled than the aviation network, which instead is characterized by high connectivity between all state pairs. We found that genetic distance between sequences often correlated with distance based on interstate commuter network connectivity for the H1N1 subtype, and that this correlation was not as prevalent when geographic distance or aviation network connectivity distance was assessed against genetic distance. However, these patterns were not as apparent for the H3N2 subtype at the scale of the continental United States. Finally, although sequences were spatially referenced at the level of the US state of collection, a community analysis based on county to county commuter connections revealed that commuting communities did not consistently align with state geographic boundaries, emphasizing the need for the greater availability of more specific sequence location data. Our results highlight the importance of utilizing host movement data in characterizing the underlying genetic structure of pathogen populations and demonstrate a need for a greater understanding of the differential effects of host movement networks on pathogen transmission at various spatial scales. PMID:26086273

  5. Enhanced Mammalian Transmissibility of Seasonal Influenza A/H1N1 Viruses Encoding an Oseltamivir-Resistant Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Rahmat, Saad; Pica, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Between 2007 and 2009, oseltamivir resistance developed among seasonal influenza A/H1N1 (sH1N1) virus isolates at an exponential rate, without a corresponding increase in oseltamivir usage. We hypothesized that the oseltamivir-resistant neuraminidase (NA), in addition to being relatively insusceptible to the antiviral effect of oseltamivir, might confer an additional fitness advantage on these viruses by enhancing their transmission efficiency among humans. Here we demonstrate that an oseltamivir-resistant clinical isolate, an A/Brisbane/59/2007(H1N1)-like virus isolated in New York State in 2008, transmits more efficiently among guinea pigs than does a highly similar, contemporaneous oseltamivir-sensitive isolate. With reverse genetics reassortants and point mutants of the two clinical isolates, we further show that expression of the oseltamivir-resistant NA in the context of viral proteins from the oseltamivir-sensitive virus (a 7:1 reassortant) is sufficient to enhance transmissibility. In the guinea pig model, the NA is the critical determinant of transmission efficiency between oseltamivir-sensitive and -resistant Brisbane/59-like sH1N1 viruses, independent of concurrent drift mutations that occurred in other gene products. Our data suggest that the oseltamivir-resistant NA (specifically, one or both of the companion mutations, H275Y and D354G) may have allowed resistant Brisbane/59-like viruses to outtransmit sensitive isolates. These data provide in vivo evidence of an evolutionary mechanism that would explain the rapidity with which oseltamivir resistance achieved fixation among sH1N1 isolates in the human reservoir. PMID:22532693

  6. Cross-seasonal patterns of avian influenza virus in breeding and wintering migratory birds: a flyway perspective.

    PubMed

    Hill, Nichola J; Takekawa, John Y; Cardona, Carol J; Meixell, Brandt W; Ackerman, Joshua T; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Boyce, Walter M

    2012-03-01

    The spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in nature is intrinsically linked with the movements of wild birds. Wild birds are the reservoirs for the virus and their migration may facilitate the circulation of AIV between breeding and wintering areas. This cycle of dispersal has become widely accepted; however, there are few AIV studies that present cross-seasonal information. A flyway perspective is critical for understanding how wild birds contribute to the persistence of AIV over large spatial and temporal scales, with implications for how to focus surveillance efforts and identify risks to public health. This study characterized spatio-temporal infection patterns in 10,389 waterfowl at two important locations within the Pacific Flyway--breeding sites in Interior Alaska and wintering sites in California's Central Valley during 2007-2009. Among the dabbling ducks sampled, the northern shoveler (Anas clypeata) had the highest prevalence of AIV at both breeding (32.2%) and wintering (5.2%) locations. This is in contrast to surveillance studies conducted in other flyways that have identified the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and northern pintail (Anas acuta) as hosts with the highest prevalence. A higher diversity of AIV subtypes was apparent at wintering (n=42) compared with breeding sites (n=17), with evidence of mixed infections at both locations. Our study suggests that wintering sites may act as an important mixing bowl for transmission among waterfowl in a flyway, creating opportunities for the reassortment of the virus. Our findings shed light on how the dynamics of AIV infection of wild bird populations can vary between the two ends of a migratory flyway. PMID:21995264

  7. Cross-seasonal patterns of avian influenza virus in breeding and wintering migratory birds: a flyway perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, Nichola J.; Takekawa, John Y.; Cardona, Carol J.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.; Boyce, Walter M.

    2012-01-01

    The spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in nature is intrinsically linked with the movements of wild birds. Wild birds are the reservoirs for the virus and their migration may facilitate the circulation of AIV between breeding and wintering areas. This cycle of dispersal has become widely accepted; however, there are few AIV studies that present cross-seasonal information. A flyway perspective is critical for understanding how wild birds contribute to the persistence of AIV over large spatial and temporal scales, with implications for how to focus surveillance efforts and identify risks to public health. This study characterized spatio-temporal infection patterns in 10,389 waterfowl at two important locations within the Pacific Flyway--breeding sites in Interior Alaska and wintering sites in California's Central Valley during 2007-2009. Among the dabbling ducks sampled, the northern shoveler (Anas clypeata) had the highest prevalence of AIV at both breeding (32.2%) and wintering (5.2%) locations. This is in contrast to surveillance studies conducted in other flyways that have identified the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and northern pintail (Anas acuta) as hosts with the highest prevalence. A higher diversity of AIV subtypes was apparent at wintering (n=42) compared with breeding sites (n=17), with evidence of mixed infections at both locations. Our study suggests that wintering sites may act as an important mixing bowl for transmission among waterfowl in a flyway, creating opportunities for the reassortment of the virus. Our findings shed light on how the dynamics of AIV infection of wild bird populations can vary between the two ends of a migratory flyway.

  8. Seasonality of Influenza A(H7N9) Virus in China—Fitting Simple Epidemic Models to Human Cases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qianying; Lin, Zhigui; Chiu, Alice P. Y.; He, Daihai

    2016-01-01

    Background Three epidemic waves of influenza A(H7N9) (hereafter ‘H7N9’) human cases have occurred between March 2013 and July 2015 in China. However, the underlying transmission mechanism remains unclear. Our main objective is to use mathematical models to study how seasonality, secular changes and environmental transmission play a role in the spread of H7N9 in China. Methods Data on human cases and chicken cases of H7N9 infection were downloaded from the EMPRES-i Global Animal Disease Information System. We modelled on chicken-to-chicken transmission, assuming a constant ratio of 10−6 human case per chicken case, and compared the model fit with the observed human cases. We developed three different modified Susceptible-Exposed-Infectious-Recovered-Susceptible models: (i) a non-periodic transmission rate model with an environmental class, (ii) a non-periodic transmission rate model without an environmental class, and (iii) a periodic transmission rate model with an environmental class. We then estimated the key epidemiological parameters and compared the model fit using Akaike Information Criterion and Bayesian Information Criterion. Results Our results showed that a non-periodic transmission rate model with an environmental class provided the best model fit to the observed human cases in China during the study period. The estimated parameter values were within biologically plausible ranges. Conclusions This study highlighted the importance of considering secular changes and environmental transmission in the modelling of human H7N9 cases. Secular changes were most likely due to control measures such as Live Poultry Markets closures that were implemented during the initial phase of the outbreaks in China. Our results suggested that environmental transmission via viral shedding of infected chickens had contributed to the spread of H7N9 human cases in China. PMID:26963937

  9. Impact of Estrogen Therapy on Lymphocyte Homeostasis and the Response to Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in Post-Menopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Engelmann, Flora; Rivera, Andrea; Park, Byung; Messerle-Forbes, Marci; Jensen, Jeffrey T.; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    It is widely recognized that changes in levels of ovarian steroids modulate severity of autoimmune disease and immune function in young adult women. These observations suggest that the loss of ovarian steroids associated with menopause could affect the age-related decline in immune function, known as immune senescence. Therefore, in this study, we determined the impact of menopause and estrogen therapy (ET) on lymphocyte subset frequency as well as the immune response to seasonal influenza vaccine in three different groups: 1) young adult women (regular menstrual cycles, not on hormonal contraception); 2) post-menopausal (at least 2 years) women who are not receiving any form of hormone therapy (HT) and 3) post-menopausal hysterectomized women receiving ET. Although the numbers of circulating CD4 and CD20 B cells were reduced in the post-menopausal group receiving ET, we also detected a better preservation of naïve B cells, decreased CD4 T cell inflammatory cytokine production, and slightly lower circulating levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Following vaccination, young adult women generated more robust antibody and T cell responses than both post-menopausal groups. Despite similar vaccine responses between the two post-menopausal groups, we observed a direct correlation between plasma 17β estradiol (E2) levels and fold increase in IgG titers within the ET group. These findings suggest that ET affects immune homeostasis and that higher plasma E2 levels may enhance humoral responses in post-menopausal women. PMID:26859566

  10. 2009 H1N1 and Seasonal Influenza Immunization Among Pregnant Women: A Comparison of Different Sources of Immunization Information

    PubMed Central

    Specker, Bonny; Wey, Betty; Fuller, Jill; Sandoval, Marie-Noel; Durkin, Maureen; Dole, Nancy; Walter, Emmanuel B.

    2013-01-01

    Validity of prenatal immunization data from different sources has not been assessed. We evaluated prenatal 2009 H1N1 and seasonal influenza (FLU) data obtained from state immunization information systems (IIS), medical record abstraction (MRA), and participant recall using medical care logs (NCS–MCL). 2009 H1N1 and FLU data were obtained from IIS and MRA for 325 pregnant women participating in the National Children’s Study at three locations (SD/MN, NC, WI). Women recalled immunizations at first pregnancy visit and at 16–17 and 36 weeks’ gestation (NCS–MCL). The proportion of women with vaccine information obtainable from each data source was determined, and proportions immunized as determined using different data sources were compared. IIS data were available for 82 %, MRA for 97 %, and NCS–MCL for 93 % of women. No mention of either vaccine occurred in 29 % (range 4–48 %) of IIS, 40 % of MRA (25–59 %), and 59 % (43–82 %) in NCS–MCL. Best agreement between sources was 2009 H1N1 vaccine in MRA versus IIS [kappa (95 % CI) of 0.44 (0.32–0.55)], with poorest agreement for FLU in IIS versus NCS–MCL [0.11 (−0.03 to 0.25)]. IIS was the most sensitive method for identifying women receiving 2009 H1N1 vaccine (92 %); MRA was most sensitive for FLU vaccine (81 %). IIS provided the most complete and sensitive data for 2009 H1N1 immunizations and MRA the most complete and sensitive data for FLU; IIS data were available for a smaller percent of population than MRA. NCS–MCL was the least sensitive method for identifying vaccinated women. PMID:23793534

  11. Cross-Seasonal Patterns of Avian Influenza Virus in Breeding and Wintering Migratory Birds: A Flyway Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Nichola J.; Cardona, Carol J.; Meixell, Brandt W.; Ackerman, Joshua T.; Runstadler, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in nature is intrinsically linked with the movements of wild birds. Wild birds are the reservoirs for the virus and their migration may facilitate the circulation of AIV between breeding and wintering areas. This cycle of dispersal has become widely accepted; however, there are few AIV studies that present cross-seasonal information. A flyway perspective is critical for understanding how wild birds contribute to the persistence of AIV over large spatial and temporal scales, with implications for how to focus surveillance efforts and identify risks to public health. This study characterized spatio-temporal infection patterns in 10,389 waterfowl at two important locations within the Pacific Flyway—breeding sites in Interior Alaska and wintering sites in California's Central Valley during 2007–2009. Among the dabbling ducks sampled, the northern shoveler (Anas clypeata) had the highest prevalence of AIV at both breeding (32.2%) and wintering (5.2%) locations. This is in contrast to surveillance studies conducted in other flyways that have identified the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and northern pintail (Anas acuta) as hosts with the highest prevalence. A higher diversity of AIV subtypes was apparent at wintering (n=42) compared with breeding sites (n=17), with evidence of mixed infections at both locations. Our study suggests that wintering sites may act as an important mixing bowl for transmission among waterfowl in a flyway, creating opportunities for the reassortment of the virus. Our findings shed light on how the dynamics of AIV infection of wild bird populations can vary between the two ends of a migratory flyway. PMID:21995264

  12. Prior Infections With Seasonal Influenza A/H1N1 Virus Reduced the Illness Severity and Epidemic Intensity of Pandemic H1N1 Influenza in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Atmar, Robert L.; Franco, Luis M.; Quarles, John M.; Niño, Diane; Wells, Janet M.; Arden, Nancy; Cheung, Sheree; Belmont, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Background. A new influenza A/H1N1 (pH1N1) virus emerged in April 2009, proceeded to spread worldwide, and was designated as an influenza pandemic. A/H1N1 viruses had circulated in 1918–1957 and 1977–2009 and were in the annual vaccine during 1977–2009. Methods. Serum antibody to the pH1N1 and seasonal A/H1N1 viruses was measured in 579 healthy adults at enrollment (fall 2009) and after surveillance for illness (spring 2010). Subjects reporting with moderate to severe acute respiratory illness had illness and virus quantitation for 1 week; evaluations for missed illnesses were conducted over holiday periods and at the spring 2010 visit. Results. After excluding 66 subjects who received pH1N1 vaccine, 513 remained. Seventy-seven had reported with moderate to severe illnesses; 31 were infected with pH1N1 virus, and 30 with a rhinovirus. Determining etiology from clinical findings was not possible, but fever and prominent myalgias favored influenza and prominent rhinorrhea favored rhinovirus. Tests of fall and spring antibody indicated pH1N1 infection of 23% had occurred, with the rate decreasing with increasing anti-pH1N1 antibody; a similar pattern was seen for influenza-associated illness. A reducing frequency of pH1N1 infections was also seen with increasing antibody to the recent seasonal A/H1N1 virus (A/Brisbane/59/07). Preexisting antibody to pH1N1 virus, responses to a single vaccine dose, a low infection-to-illness ratio, and a short duration of illness and virus shedding among those with influenza indicated presence of considerable preexisting immunity to pH1N1 in the population. Conclusions. The 2009 A/H1N1 epidemic among healthy adults was relatively mild, most likely because of immunity from prior infections with A/H1N1 viruses. PMID:22075792

  13. Combined Administration of MF59-Adjuvanted A/H5N1 Prepandemic and Seasonal Influenza Vaccines: Long-Term Antibody Persistence and Robust Booster Responses 1 Year after a One-Dose Priming Schedule

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Pio; Caicedo, Yolanda; Sierra, Alexandra; Tilman, Sandrine; Clemens, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    Having previously demonstrated the feasibility of administering A/H5N1 and seasonal influenza vaccine antigens in an MF59-adjuvanted tetravalent formulation, we now report on long-term antibody persistence and responses to a booster dose of a combined seasonal-pandemic, tetravalent influenza vaccine in adults. The primary objective was the evaluation of responses to a booster dose of tetravalent influenza vaccine containing seasonal (A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B) and avian (A/H5N1, clade 2) influenza virus strains administered to 265 healthy 18- to 40-year-old volunteers 1 year after priming with one or two clade 1 A/H5N1 doses. Secondary objectives were assessment of reactogenicity, safety, and antibody persistence 1 year after priming with a combined seasonal-pandemic, tetravalent vaccine. Responses to seasonal strains met all European licensure criteria; seroprotection rates were 94 to 100%, 100%, and 61 to 90% for A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and B strains, respectively. Anamnestic responses were observed against homologous and heterologous A/H5N1 strains whether priming with one or two A/H5N1 doses, with a monovalent A/H5N1 vaccine, or with a tetravalent vaccine. A single dose of MF59-adjuvanted A/H5N1 vaccine given alone or as part of a fixed combination with a seasonal influenza vaccine was sufficient to prime adult subjects, resulting in robust antigen-specific and cross-reactive antibody responses to heterologous booster immunization 1 year later. These data support the feasibility of incorporating prepandemic priming into seasonal influenza vaccination programs. (This study has been registered at clinicaltrials.gov under registration no. NCT00481065.) PMID:23536690

  14. Molecular Basis for Broad Neuraminidase Immunity: Conserved Epitopes in Seasonal and Pandemic H1N1 as Well as H5N1 Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Hongquan; Gao, Jin; Xu, Kemin; Chen, Hongjun; Couzens, Laura K.; Rivers, Katie H.; Easterbrook, Judy D.; Yang, Kevin; Zhong, Lei; Rajabi, Mohsen; Ye, Jianqiang; Sultana, Ishrat; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiufan; Perez, Daniel R.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A viruses, including H1N1 and H5N1 subtypes, pose a serious threat to public health. Neuraminidase (NA)-related immunity contributes to protection against influenza virus infection. Antibodies to the N1 subtype provide protection against homologous and heterologous H1N1 as well as H5N1 virus challenge. Since neither the strain-specific nor conserved epitopes of N1 have been identified, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that exhibit different reactivity spectra with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and used these MAbs to map N1 antigenic domains. We identified 12 amino acids essential for MAb binding to the NA of a recent seasonal H1N1 virus, A/Brisbane/59/2007. Of these, residues 248, 249, 250, 341, and 343 are recognized by strain-specific group A MAbs, while residues 273, 338, and 339 are within conserved epitope(s), which allows cross-reactive group B MAbs to bind the NAs of seasonal H1N1 and the 1918 and 2009 pandemic (09pdm) H1N1 as well as H5N1 viruses. A single dose of group B MAbs administered prophylactically fully protected mice against lethal challenge with seasonal and 09pdm H1N1 viruses and resulted in significant protection against the highly pathogenic wild-type H5N1 virus. Another three N1 residues (at positions 396, 397, and 456) are essential for binding of cross-reactive group E MAbs, which differ from group B MAbs in that they do not bind 09pdm H1N1 viruses. The identification of conserved N1 epitopes reveals the molecular basis for NA-mediated immunity between H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and demonstrates the potential for developing broadly protective NA-specific antibody treatments for influenza. PMID:23785204

  15. Retrospective study of positive physical torture cases in Cairo (2009 & 2010).

    PubMed

    Ghaleb, Sherein Salah; Elshabrawy, Ekram Mohamad; Elkaradawy, Magda Helal; Nemr Welson, Nermeen

    2014-05-01

    Torture is the most serious violation of a person's fundamental right to personal integrity and a pathological form of human interaction. In this study, the prevalence of torture in Cairo during the years 2009 & 2010 is 10.97% of the total number of cases examined at the medico legal authority of Egypt in Zenhom (11.29% in 2010 & 10.36% in 2009). The number of cases under this study is 367 (175 cases in 2009, 192 cases in 2010). Torture is more prevalent in the year 2010 than in the year 2009. The largest prevalence of torture was found in the area of south Cairo (120 cases; 32.7%) while the least was found in the area of west Cairo (50 cases; 13.6%). The victims included 336 males (91.6%) and 31 females (8.4%) with male to female ratio 10.8: 1. The most commonly affected age group in the studied victims was the age group of the third decade (171 cases; 46.6%) while the least was the age group above the sixth decade (6 cases; 1.6%). The most commonly affected site of injury was head & neck (243 cases; 66.2%) while the least was abdomen (17 cases; 4.6%). The most common type of injury was bruises (258 cases; 70.3%) while the least was electrocution (5 cases; 1.4%). Regarding the causal instrument, the most commonly used instrument was blunt object (333 cases; 90.7%) while the least was electric current (5 cases; 10%). Hitting with a stick leaving the characteristic shape of elongated abrasion & bruises was found in 35 cases (9.5%) and characteristic lesion of handcuff, which is blunt trauma wounds around wrists or ankles, was found in 68 cases (18.5%). There was one case of hair torture (0.3%) & 5 cases of sexual torture (1.5%). Permanent infirmity left in victims was positive in 24 cases (6.5%) and negative in 343 cases (93.5%) while deformity left in victims was positive in 10 cases (3%) and negative in 357 cases (97%). All permanent infirmity cases were male. Of the 24 cases of permanent infirmity, 83.3% were subjected to blunt trauma and 79.2% were injured in

  16. Influenza vaccination coverage rates in Europe – covering five consecutive seasons (2001–2006) in five countries

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Majbrit V.; Blank, Patricia R.; Szucs, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Objective  To understand potential drivers and barriers to influenza vaccination in the general population. Methods  47 982 household surveys were conducted in five European countries between 2001 and 2006. Results  Overall influenza vaccination coverage increased over the years and reached 26·2% in 2005/06. Among the elderly ≥65 years, the rate increased significantly to 67·8% (2005/06). The most common reason for being vaccinated over the 5 years was the perception of influenza as a serious illness, which people want to avoid. The main reason for not getting vaccinated among those never previously vaccinated was feeling that they were unlikely to catch influenza. A recommendation by the family physician was the most encouraging factor for vaccination. PMID:19453429

  17. Strain Interactions as a Mechanism for Dominant Strain Alternation and Incidence Oscillation in Infectious Diseases: Seasonal Influenza as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Many human infectious diseases are caused by pathogens that have multiple strains and show oscillation in infection incidence and alternation of dominant strains which together are referred to as epidemic cycling. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of epidemic cycling is essential for forecasting outbreaks of epidemics and therefore important for public health planning. Current theoretical effort is mainly focused on the factors that are extrinsic to the pathogens themselves (“extrinsic factors”) such as environmental variation and seasonal change in human behaviours and susceptibility. Nevertheless, co-circulation of different strains of a pathogen was usually observed and thus strains interact with one another within concurrent infection and during sequential infection. The existence of these intrinsic factors is common and may be involved in the generation of epidemic cycling of multi-strain pathogens. Methods and Findings To explore the mechanisms that are intrinsic to the pathogens themselves (“intrinsic factors”) for epidemic cycling, we consider a multi-strain SIRS model including cross-immunity and infectivity enhancement and use seasonal influenza as an example to parameterize the model. The Kullback-Leibler information distance was calculated to measure the match between the model outputs and the typical features of seasonal flu (an outbreak duration of 11 weeks and an annual attack rate of 15%). Results show that interactions among strains can generate seasonal influenza with these characteristic features, provided that: the infectivity of a single strain within concurrent infection is enhanced 2−7 times that within a single infection; cross-immunity as a result of past infection is 0.5–0.8 and lasts 2–9 years; while other parameters are within their widely accepted ranges (such as a 2–3 day infectious period and the basic reproductive number of 1.8–3.0). Moreover, the observed alternation of the dominant strain among

  18. Modeling Seasonal Influenza Transmission and Its Association with Climate Factors in Thailand Using Time-Series and ARIMAX Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Chadsuthi, Sudarat; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Triampo, Wannapong; Modchang, Charin

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a worldwide respiratory infectious disease that easily spreads from one person to another. Previous research has found that the influenza transmission process is often associated with climate variables. In this study, we used autocorrelation and partial autocorrelation plots to determine the appropriate autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model for influenza transmission in the central and southern regions of Thailand. The relationships between reported influenza cases and the climate data, such as the amount of rainfall, average temperature, average maximum relative humidity, average minimum relative humidity, and average relative humidity, were evaluated using cross-correlation function. Based on the available data of suspected influenza cases and climate variables, the most appropriate ARIMA(X) model for each region was obtained. We found that the average temperature correlated with influenza cases in both central and southern regions, but average minimum relative humidity played an important role only in the southern region. The ARIMAX model that includes the average temperature with a 4-month lag and the minimum relative humidity with a 2-month lag is the appropriate model for the central region, whereas including the minimum relative humidity with a 4-month lag results in the best model for the southern region. PMID:26664492

  19. Post-Pandemic Seroprevalence of Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) 2009 Infection (Swine Flu) among Children <18 Years in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Wirth, Stephan; Kaiser, Petra; Huppertz, Hans-Iko; Tenenbaum, Tobias; Schroten, Horst; Streng, Andrea; Liese, Johannes; Shai, Sonu; Niehues, Tim; Girschick, Hermann; Kuscher, Ellen; Sauerbrey, Axel; Peters, Jochen; Wirsing von König, Carl Heinz; Rückinger, Simon; Hampl, Walter; Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Background We determined antibodies to the pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 virus in children to assess: the incidence of (H1N1) 2009 infections in the 2009/2010 season in Germany, the proportion of subclinical infections and to compare titers in vaccinated and infected children. Methodology/Principal Findings Eight pediatric hospitals distributed over Germany prospectively provided sera from in- or outpatients aged 1 to 17 years from April 1st to July 31st 2010. Vaccination history, recall of infections and sociodemographic factors were ascertained. Antibody titers were measured with a sensitive and specific in-house hemagglutination inhibition test (HIT) and compared to age-matched sera collected during 6 months before the onset of the pandemic in Germany. We analyzed 1420 post-pandemic and 300 pre-pandemic sera. Among unvaccinated children aged 1–4 and 5–17 years the prevalence of HI titers (≥1∶10) was 27.1% (95% CI: 23.5–31.3) and 53.5% (95% CI: 50.9–56.2) compared to 1.7% and 5.5%, respectively, for pre-pandemic sera, accounting for a serologically determined incidence of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 during the season 2009/2010 of 25,4% (95% CI : 19.3–30.5) in children aged 1–4 years and 48.0% (95% CI: 42.6–52.0) in 5–17 year old children. Of children with HI titers ≥1∶10, 25.5% (95% CI: 22.5–28.8) reported no history of any infectious disease since June 2009. Among vaccinated children, 92% (95%-CI: 87.0–96.6) of the 5–17 year old but only 47.8% (95%-CI: 33.5–66.5) of the 1–4 year old children exhibited HI titers against influenza A virus (H1N1) 2009. Conclusion Serologically determined incidence of influenza A (H1N1) 2009 infections in children indicates high infection rates with older children (5–17 years) infected twice as often as younger children. In about a quarter of the children with HI titers after the season 2009/2010 subclinical infections must be assumed. Low HI titers in young children after vaccination with the AS03

  20. A Deep Search for Biomarker Gases on Mars in 2009 - 2010: The Campaign and a Few Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumma, M. J.; Villanueva, G. L.; Novak, R.; Radeva, Y. L.; Kaufl, H.; Smette, A.; Hartogh, P.; Encrenaz, T.

    2010-12-01

    We searched for possible biomarker gases on Mars in the 2009-2010 observing season, emphasizing nine molecules (H2_O, CH_4_, C2_H_6_, C2_H_4_, CH3_OH, H_2_CO, H2_S, and N_2_O) of fundamental astrobiological importance along with HDO and CO2_. Our search utilized Earth’s most advanced ground-based infrared spectroscopic facilities in a campaign of several dozen observing runs spanning the period 19 August 2009 to 10 June 2010. Over this interval (L_s_ = 324 - 103 degrees), the season in Mars’ Northern hemisphere progressed from mid-winter, through vernal equinox and spring, and into early summer. We used long-slit high-resolution infrared spectrometers at the Keck and NASA-IRTF observatories in Hawaii, and the European Southern Observatory in Chile (VLT, Paranal). The spectral resolving powers ranged from ~ 35,000 (NIRSPEC/Keck and CSHELL/IRTF) to ~ 90,000 (CRIRES, VLT). At the sub-Earth point, the spatial resolution in non-AO mode ranged from ~600 km (FWHM) to ~ 400 km at Keck and IRTF. Using the adaptive optics (AO) mode at Keck and at VLT, we achieved an improved resolution of ~250 km (FWHM). We mapped the planet over the Earth-facing hemisphere by orienting the slit North-South in longitude and stepping it East-West across the planet, and we acquired deep searches over restricted longitude ranges by holding the slit fixed in position and taking sequential spectra as Mars rotated under it. Spectral lines of CO2_, H_2_O, HDO, and O2_ (a^1^Δg_) are obvious, even in the raw data. In the methane region near 3.3µm, removal of terrestrial and solar spectral lines revealed multiple lines of Mars H_2_O and CO2_, from which we extracted 2-D (lat-long) maps of Martian water vapor, atmospheric surface pressure and temperature. Subtraction of these features provided highly sensitive searches for trace gases. Preliminary results of searches for CH_4_, C2_H_4_, and C2_H_6_ will be presented in this paper. Radeva et al. (this meeting) will present preliminary results for

  1. 4Flu - an individual based simulation tool to study the effects of quadrivalent vaccination on seasonal influenza in Germany

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccines contain Influenza A and B antigens and are adjusted annually to match the characteristics of circulating viruses. In Germany, Influenza B viruses belonged to the B/Yamagata lineage, but since 2001, the antigenically distinct B/Victoria lineage has been co-circulating. Trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV) contain antigens of the two A subtypes A(H3N2) and A(H1N1), yet of only one B lineage, resulting in frequent vaccine mismatches. Since 2012, the WHO has been recommending vaccine strains from both B lineages, paving the way for quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIV). Methods Using an individual-based simulation tool, we simulate the concomitant transmission of four influenza strains, and compare the effects of TIV and QIV on the infection incidence. Individuals are connected in a dynamically evolving age-dependent contact network based on the POLYMOD matrix; their age-distribution reproduces German demographic data and predictions. The model considers maternal protection, boosting of existing immunity, loss of immunity, and cross-immunizing events between the B lineages. Calibration to the observed annual infection incidence of 10.6% among young adults yielded a basic reproduction number of 1.575. Vaccinations are performed annually in October and November, whereby coverage depends on the vaccinees’ age, their risk status and previous vaccination status. New drift variants are introduced at random time points, leading to a sudden loss of protective immunity for part of the population and occasionally to reduced vaccine efficacy. Simulations run for 50 years, the first 30 of which are used for initialization. During the final 20 years, individuals receive TIV or QIV, using a mirrored simulation approach. Results Using QIV, the mean annual infection incidence can be reduced from 8,943,000 to 8,548,000, i.e. by 395,000 infections, preventing 11.2% of all Influenza B infections which still occur with TIV (95% CI: 10.7-11.8%). Using a

  2. Algal bloom-associated disease outbreaks among users of freshwater lakes--United States, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Hilborn, Elizabeth D; Roberts, Virginia A; Backer, Lorraine; Deconno, Erin; Egan, Jessica S; Hyde, James B; Nicholas, David C; Wiegert, Eric J; Billing, Laurie M; Diorio, Mary; Mohr, Marika C; Hardy, Joan F; Wade, Timothy J; Yoder, Jonathan S; Hlavsa, Michele C

    2014-01-10

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are excessive accumulations of microscopic photosynthesizing aquatic organisms (phytoplankton) that produce biotoxins or otherwise adversely affect humans, animals, and ecosystems. HABs occur sporadically and often produce a visible algal scum on the water. This report summarizes human health data and water sampling results voluntarily reported to CDC's Waterborne Disease and Outbreak Surveillance System (WBDOSS) via the National Outbreak Reporting System (NORS) and the Harmful Algal Bloom-Related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS)* for the years 2009-2010. For 2009-2010, 11 waterborne disease outbreaks associated with algal blooms were reported; these HABs all occurred in freshwater lakes. The outbreaks occurred in three states and affected at least 61 persons. Health effects included dermatologic, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and neurologic signs and symptoms. These 11 HAB-associated outbreaks represented 46% of the 24 outbreaks associated with untreated recreational water reported for 2009-2010, and 79% of the 14 freshwater HAB-associated outbreaks that have been reported to CDC since 1978. Clinicians should be aware of the potential for HAB-associated illness among patients with a history of exposure to freshwater. PMID:24402467

  3. Influenza surveillance in Europe: comparing intensity levels calculated using the moving epidemic method

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Tomás; Lozano, José E; Meerhoff, Tamara; Snacken, René; Beauté, Julien; Jorgensen, Pernille; Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Domegan, Lisa; Mossong, Joël; Nielsen, Jens; Born, Rita; Larrauri, Amparo; Brown, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although influenza-like illnesses (ILI) and acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) surveillance are well established in Europe, the comparability of intensity among countries and seasons remains an unresolved challenge. The objective is to compare the intensity of ILI and ARI in some European countries. Design and setting Weekly ILI and ARI incidence rates and proportion of primary care consultations were modeled in 28 countries for the 1996/1997–2013/2014 seasons using the moving epidemic method (MEM). We calculated the epidemic threshold and three intensity thresholds, which delimit five intensity levels: baseline, low, medium, high, and very high. The intensity of 2013/2014 season is described and compared by country. Results The lowest ILI epidemic thresholds appeared in Sweden and Estonia (below 10 cases per 100 000) and the highest in Belgium, Denmark, Hungary, Poland, Serbia, and Slovakia (above 100 per 100 000). The 2009/2010 season was the most intense, with 35% of the countries showing high or very high intensity levels. The European epidemic period in season 2013/2014 started in January 2014 in Spain, Poland, and Greece. The intensity was between low and medium and only Greece reached the high intensity level, in weeks 7 to 9/2014. Some countries remained at the baseline level throughout the entire surveillance period. Conclusions Epidemic and intensity thresholds varied by country. Influenza-like illnesses and ARI levels normalized by MEM in 2013/2014 showed that the intensity of the season in Europe was between low and medium in most of the countries. Comparing intensity among seasons or countries is essential for understanding patterns in seasonal epidemics. An automated standardized model for comparison should be implemented at national and international levels. PMID:26031655

  4. Delta Inulin Adjuvant Enhances Plasmablast Generation, Expression of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase and B-Cell Affinity Maturation in Human Subjects Receiving Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Li, Connie; Sajkov, Dimitar; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    There is a major need for new adjuvants to improve the efficacy of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccines. Advax is a novel polysaccharide adjuvant based on delta inulin that has been shown to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in animal models and human clinical trials. To better understand the mechanism for this enhancement, we sought to assess its effect on the plasmablast response in human subjects. This pilot study utilised cryopreserved 7 day post-vaccination (7dpv) peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples obtained from a subset of 25 adult subjects from the FLU006-12 trial who had been immunized intramuscularly with a standard dose of 2012 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) alone (n=9 subjects) or combined with 5mg (n=8) or 10mg (n=8) of Advax adjuvant. Subjects receiving Advax adjuvant had increased 7dpv plasmablasts, which in turn exhibited a 2-3 fold higher rate of non-silent mutations in the B-cell receptor CDR3 region associated with higher expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the major enzyme controlling BCR affinity maturation. Together, these data suggest that Advax adjuvant enhances influenza immunity in immunized subjects via multiple mechanisms including increased plasmablast generation, AID expression and CDR3 mutagenesis resulting in enhanced BCR affinity maturation and increased production of high avidity antibody. How Advax adjuvant achieves these beneficial effects on plasmablasts remains the subject of ongoing investigation. Trial Registration Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Register ACTRN12612000709842 https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362709 PMID:26177480

  5. Clinical features of influenza disease in admitted children during the first postpandemic season and risk factors for hospitalization: a multicentre Spanish experience.

    PubMed

    Launes, C; García-García, J J; Martínez-Planas, A; Moraga, F; Soldevila, N; Astigarraga, I; Arístegui, J; Korta, J; Quintana, J M; Torner, N; Domínguez, A

    2013-03-01

    The main objectives of this study were to describe the characteristics of children with influenza infection during the postpandemic outbreak, and to compare sociodemographic and clinical data between patients who required hospitalization and those managed on an outpatient basis with a matched case-control study design. This is a multicentre paediatric study in Spain that included patients aged 6 month to 18 years in whom influenza infection was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction between December 2010 and March 2011. Among the 143 admitted patients, the main reason for admission was respiratory failure (123/143). In 55 there was some previously known disease. The median age was lower in patients without comorbidity (1.8 years: interquartile range 1.0-3.0 versus 5.3 years: interquartile range 1.3-10.7); p <0.01). The lag time from onset of symptoms to starting antiviral treatment was correlated with the length of hospital stay (Rho Spearman = + 0.32; p 0.01). Twenty patients required admission to the paediatric intensive care units, all due to respiratory failure. Children with chest X-ray opacities in more than one quadrant more frequently required admission to intensive care. Having a neurological disease conferred the highest risk of requiring hospitalization (OR 17.18) in a multivariate analysis. This study concludes that influenza in the paediatric population requiring hospitalization during the postpandemic season affected mainly children with neurological or pulmonary comorbidities and children of parents with a lower educational level. Most of the influenza infections caused respiratory symptoms, although neurological manifestations were also observed. Early initiation of oseltamivir was associated with a shorter length of hospital stay. PMID:23305123

  6. Volume Change Rates of Southeast Alaskan Icefields from Stacked Digital Elevation Models, 2000-2009/2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkonian, A. K.; Elliott, J.; Willis, M. J.; Pritchard, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    We derive volume change rates (dV/dt) for the three major temperate icefields of Southeast Alaska. The Juneau, Stikine, and Glacier Bay icefields cover approximately 14,300 km2 and have recently been contributing disproportionately to sea level rise. In this study we provide estimates of volume change rates between 2000 and 2009/2010 based on near-complete spatial coverage from stacked digital elevations models (DEMs) acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER). Our method applies a weighted linear regression to elevations on a pixel-by-pixel basis over each icefield, and we filter out elevations based on deviation from the first elevation (which is SRTM about 90% of the time) to exclude ASTER elevations influenced by clouds, shadow, etc. The maximum positive deviation allowed is ~5 m a-1, which comes from estimates of precipitation in this region and probably overestimates the amount of thickening actually occurring. This large positive constraint means our volume change rates are likely more representative of lower bounds on volume loss. All three icefields are losing volume - the combined rate is approximately -7.7±0.9 km3 a-1, equivalent to a mass loss rate of 6.9±0.8 Gt a-1 assuming a density of 900 kg m3 for the lost material. The area-averaged elevation change rate (dh/dt) is -0.44±0.05 m a-1 w.e., with most loss occurring at the Glacier Bay and Stikine Icefields. Juneau Icefield (~3,900 km2) has a small dV/dt, at -0.3±0.1 km3 a-1. This is due to the positive dV/dt of the Taku Glacier, the largest outlet glacier of the Juneau Icefield. Our results are consistent with previous studies that document the recent advance of Taku and its status as the glacier with the highest positive volume change rate in Alaska. The dh/dt pattern we observe elsewhere over the Juneau Icefield is similar to previous studies, with practically every outlet glacier except Taku experiencing

  7. Jovian temperature and cloud variability during the 2009-2010 fade of the South Equatorial Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Leigh N.; Orton, G. S.; Rogers, J. H.; Simon-Miller, A. A.; de Pater, I.; Wong, M. H.; Mousis, O.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Jacquesson, M.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2011-06-01

    Mid-infrared 7-20 μm imaging of Jupiter from ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT/VISIR) demonstrate that the increased albedo of Jupiter's South Equatorial Belt (SEB) during the 'fade' (whitening) event of 2009-2010 was correlated with changes to atmospheric temperature and aerosol opacity. The opacity of the tropospheric condensation cloud deck at pressures less than 800 mbar increased by 80% between May 2008 and July 2010, making the SEB (7-17°S) as opaque in the thermal infrared as the adjacent equatorial zone. After the cessation of discrete convective activity within the SEB in May 2009, a cool band of high aerosol opacity (the SEB zone at 11-15°S) was observed separating the cloud-free northern and southern SEB components. The cooling of the SEBZ (with peak-to-peak contrasts of 1.0 ± 0.5 K), as well as the increased aerosol opacity at 4.8 and 8.6 μm, preceded the visible whitening of the belt by several months. A chain of five warm, cloud-free 'brown barges' (subsiding airmasses) were observed regularly in the SEB between June 2009 and June 2010, by which time they too had been obscured by the enhanced aerosol opacity of the SEB, although the underlying warm circulation was still present in July 2010. Upper tropospheric temperatures (150-300 mbar) remained largely unchanged during the fade, but the cool SEBZ formation was detected at deeper levels ( p > 300 mbar) within the convectively-unstable region of the troposphere. The SEBZ formation caused the meridional temperature gradient of the SEB to decrease between 2008 and 2010, reducing the vertical thermal windshear on the zonal jets bounding the SEB. The southern SEB had fully faded by July 2010 and was characterised by short-wave undulations at 19-20°S. The northern SEB persisted as a narrow grey lane of cloud-free conditions throughout the fade process. The cool temperatures and enhanced aerosol opacity of the SEBZ after July 2009 are consistent with an upward flux of volatiles (e.g., ammonia-laden air

  8. Seismic evidence of magma transport in Eyjafjallajökull during 2009-2010 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjaltadottir, S.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2010-12-01

    The ice-capped central volcano Eyjafjallajökull in South-Iceland erupted in March and April 2010, after nearly 190 years of dormancy. Its last eruption occurred at the summit in 1821-23 and only two other eruptions are known during historic time in Iceland (last 1100 years). However, the volcano had shown signs of repeated magmatic activity since 1992, with the last intrusion episode occurring 10 years before the latest events. We have used relocated earthquakes recorded during 2009-2010 to track magma transport in the volcano during the recent intrusion and eruption episode. Only three major swarms were recorded in Eyjafjallajökull during the last 20 years. These occurred in 1994, 1996 and in 1999-2000. The 1996 swarm occurred at 20-25 km depth, near the Moho with no crustal uplift detected during the swarm, probably due to its great depth. However, the other two swarms occurred in the intermediate and upper crust and were accompanied by uplift centered at the southern flank caused by 4.5-6.5 km deep intrusions. The latest swarm activity began late in March 2009 when several deep earthquakes were recorded near the Moho. The swarm activity continued during June-August and was followed by a southward movement of a close GPS-station which indicated the formation of a new but small intrusion beneath the southern flank. After four quiet months the activity picked up again in late December. Similar to 1994, 1999 and 2009, the main activity was clustered approximately east of the summit at 9-11 km and 2-4 km depth. This pattern changed in late February when the seismicity partly migrated towards SSE, indicating the formation of a series of dykes at 4-9 km depth and again on 3 March with dramatic rise in intensity and the foci forming an E-W trending segment east of the main cluster. On 17 March the seismicity started to ascent towards the surface beneath the ice-cap but on 20 March the magma took a turn in the uppermost 2-3 km towards the first eruption site at the ice

  9. The Role of Temperature and Humidity on Seasonal Influenza in Tropical Areas: Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama, 2008-2013

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soebiyanto, Radina P.; Clara, Wilfrido; Jara, Jorge; Castillo, Leticia; Sorto, Oscar Rene; Marinero, Sidia; Antinori, Maria E. Barnett de; McCracken, John P.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Kiang, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of meteorological factors on influenza transmission in the tropics is less defined than in the temperate regions. We assessed the association between influenza activity and temperature, specific humidity and rainfall in 6 study areas that included 11 departments or provinces within 3 tropical Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama. Method/ Findings: Logistic regression was used to model the weekly proportion of laboratory-confirmed influenza positive samples during 2008 to 2013 (excluding pandemic year 2009). Meteorological data was obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite and the Global Land Data Assimilation System. We found that specific humidity was positively associated with influenza activity in El Salvador (Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Interval of 1.18 (1.07-1.31) and 1.32 (1.08-1.63)) and Panama (OR = 1.44 (1.08-1.93) and 1.97 (1.34-2.93)), but negatively associated with influenza activity in Guatemala (OR = 0.72 (0.6-0.86) and 0.79 (0.69-0.91)). Temperature was negatively associated with influenza in El Salvador's west-central departments (OR = 0.80 (0.7-0.91)) whilst rainfall was positively associated with influenza in Guatemala's central departments (OR = 1.05 (1.01-1.09)) and Panama province (OR = 1.10 (1.05-1.14)). In 4 out of the 6 locations, specific humidity had the highest contribution to the model as compared to temperature and rainfall. The model performed best in estimating 2013 influenza activity in Panama and west-central El Salvador departments (correlation coefficients: 0.5-0.9). Conclusions/Significance: The findings highlighted the association between influenza activity and specific humidity in these 3 tropical countries. Positive association with humidity was found in El Salvador and Panama. Negative association was found in the more subtropical Guatemala, similar to temperate regions. Of all the study locations, Guatemala had annual mean temperature and specific

  10. The Role of Temperature and Humidity on Seasonal Influenza in Tropical Areas: Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama, 2008–2013

    PubMed Central

    Soebiyanto, Radina P.; Clara, Wilfrido; Jara, Jorge; Castillo, Leticia; Sorto, Oscar Rene; Marinero, Sidia; de Antinori, María E. Barnett; McCracken, John P.; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Kiang, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of meteorological factors on influenza transmission in the tropics is less defined than in the temperate regions. We assessed the association between influenza activity and temperature, specific humidity and rainfall in 6 study areas that included 11 departments or provinces within 3 tropical Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador and Panama. Method/Findings Logistic regression was used to model the weekly proportion of laboratory-confirmed influenza positive samples during 2008 to 2013 (excluding pandemic year 2009). Meteorological data was obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite and the Global Land Data Assimilation System. We found that specific humidity was positively associated with influenza activity in El Salvador (Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% Confidence Interval of 1.18 (1.07–1.31) and 1.32 (1.08–1.63)) and Panama (OR = 1.44 (1.08–1.93) and 1.97 (1.34–2.93)), but negatively associated with influenza activity in Guatemala (OR = 0.72 (0.6–0.86) and 0.79 (0.69–0.91)). Temperature was negatively associated with influenza in El Salvador's west-central departments (OR = 0.80 (0.7–0.91)) whilst rainfall was positively associated with influenza in Guatemala's central departments (OR = 1.05 (1.01–1.09)) and Panama province (OR = 1.10 (1.05–1.14)). In 4 out of the 6 locations, specific humidity had the highest contribution to the model as compared to temperature and rainfall. The model performed best in estimating 2013 influenza activity in Panama and west-central El Salvador departments (correlation coefficients: 0.5–0.9). Conclusions/Significance The findings highlighted the association between influenza activity and specific humidity in these 3 tropical countries. Positive association with humidity was found in El Salvador and Panama. Negative association was found in the more subtropical Guatemala, similar to temperate regions. Of all the study locations, Guatemala had

  11. Determinants of adherence to seasonal influenza vaccination among healthcare workers from an Italian region: results from a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Durando, P; Dini, G; Barberis, I; Bagnasco, A M; Iudici, R; Zanini, M; Martini, M; Toletone, A; Paganino, C; Massa, E; Sasso, L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Notwithstanding decades of efforts to increase the uptake of seasonal influenza (flu) vaccination among European healthcare workers (HCWs), the immunisation rates are still unsatisfactory. In order to understand the reasons for the low adherence to flu vaccination, a study was carried out among HCWs of two healthcare organisations in Liguria, a region in northwest Italy. Methods A cross-sectional study based on anonymous self-administered web questionnaires was carried out between October 2013 and February 2014. Through univariate and multivariate regression analysis, the study investigated the association between demographic and professional characteristics, knowledge, beliefs and attitudes of the study participants and (i) the seasonal flu vaccination uptake in the 2013/2014 season and (ii) the self-reported number of flu vaccination uptakes in the six consecutive seasons from 2008/2009 to 2013/2014. Results A total of 830 HCWs completed the survey. Factors statistically associated with flu vaccination uptake in the 2013/2014 season were: being a medical doctor and agreeing with the statements ‘flu vaccine is safe’, ‘HCWs have a higher risk of getting flu’ and ‘HCWs should receive flu vaccination every year’. A barrier to vaccination was the belief that pharmaceutical companies influence decisions about vaccination strategies. Discussion All the above-mentioned factors, except the last one, were (significantly) associated with the number of flu vaccination uptakes self-reported by the respondents between season 2008/2009 and season 2013/2014. Other significantly associated factors appeared to be level of education, being affected by at least one chronic disease, and agreeing with mandatory flu vaccination in healthcare settings. Conclusions This survey allows us to better understand the determinants of adherence to vaccination as a fundamental preventive strategy against flu among Italian HCWs. These findings should be used to improve and

  12. Evaluation of chikungunya virus infection in children from India during 2009-2010: A cross sectional observational study.

    PubMed

    Raghavendhar, B Siva; Ray, Pratima; Ratagiri, Vinod H; Sharma, B S; Kabra, Sushil K; Lodha, Rakesh

    2016-06-01

    . Maximum positive cases were from KIMS center, Hubli. Seasonally, positivity varied with number of enrolled cases at KIMS and SMS. Joint pain was significantly associated with CHIKV positivity (P = 0.0156). Presence/absence of certain clinical features varied with age (P < 0.05). Sequence analysis revealed four amino acid changes. Phylogenetic analysis with partial sequences of E1 gene from KIMS (n = 12) and SMS (n = 5) showed that the study isolates clustered with Indian Ocean Lineage strains (IOL) of East, Central and South African (ECSA) type. Evaluation of chikungunya virus infection in children from India during 2009-2010 showed high proportion of CHIKV infection in Southern region of India compared to Northern region. The circulating CHIKV strains were of Indian Ocean Lineage (IOL) group within the East, Central, and South African (ECSA) genotype. However few amino acid changes were observed in E1 polypeptide with reference to African strain S-27 (AF369024). Further studies are needed to know the implications of these changes in vector-pathogen compatibility and host-pathogen interactivity. As a whole, this study highlighted the proportion of CHIKV cases, lineage of causative strain and evolutionary pattern of circulating strain in terms of amino acid changes in the structural protein. J. Med. Virol. 88:923-930, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26581026

  13. Safety and Upper Respiratory Pharmacokinetics of the Hemagglutinin Stalk-Binding Antibody VIS410 Support Treatment and Prophylaxis Based on Population Modeling of Seasonal Influenza A Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Wollacott, Andrew M.; Boni, Maciej F.; Szretter, Kristy J.; Sloan, Susan E.; Yousofshahi, Mona; Viswanathan, Karthik; Bedard, Sylvain; Hay, Catherine A.; Smith, Patrick F.; Shriver, Zachary; Trevejo, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza is a major public health concern in vulnerable populations. Here we investigated the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody (VIS410) against Influenza A in a Phase 1 clinical trial. Based on these results and preclinical data, we implemented a mathematical modeling approach to investigate whether VIS410 could be used prophylactically to lessen the burden of a seasonal influenza epidemic and to protect at-risk groups from associated complications. Methods Using a single-ascending dose study (n = 41) at dose levels from 2 mg/kg–50 mg/kg we evaluated the safety as well as the serum and upper respiratory pharmacokinetics of a broadly-neutralizing antibody (VIS410) against influenza A (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02045472). Our primary endpoints were safety and tolerability of VIS410 compared to placebo. We developed an epidemic microsimulation model testing the ability of VIS410 to mitigate attack rates and severe disease in at risk-populations. Findings VIS410 was found to be generally safe and well-tolerated at all dose levels, from 2–50 mg/kg. Overall, 27 of 41 subjects (65.9%) reported a total of 67 treatment emergent adverse events (TEAEs). TEAEs were reported by 20 of 30 subjects (66.7%) who received VIS410 and by 7 of 11 subjects (63.6%) who received placebo. 14 of 16 TEAEs related to study drug were considered mild (Grade 1) and 2 were moderate (Grade 2). Two subjects (1 subject who received 30 mg/kg VIS410 and 1 subject who received placebo) experienced serious AEs (Grade 3 or 4 TEAEs) that were not related to study drug. VIS410 exposure was approximately dose-proportional with a mean half-life of 12.9 days. Mean VIS410 Cmax levels in the upper respiratory tract were 20.0 and 25.3 μg/ml at the 30 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg doses, respectively, with corresponding serum Cmax levels of 980.5 and 1316 μg/mL. Using these pharmacokinetic data, a microsimulation model showed

  14. Comparable Fitness and Transmissibility between Oseltamivir-Resistant Pandemic 2009 and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses with the H275Y Neuraminidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Diana D. Y.; Choy, Ka-Tim; Chan, Renee W. Y.; Sia, Sin Fun; Chiu, Hsin-Ping; Cheung, Peter P. H.; Chan, Michael C. W.

    2012-01-01

    Limited antiviral compounds are available for the control of influenza, and the emergence of resistant variants would further narrow the options for defense. The H275Y neuraminidase (NA) mutation, which confers resistance to oseltamivir carboxylate, has been identified among the seasonal H1N1 and 2009 pandemic influenza viruses; however, those H275Y resistant variants demonstrated distinct epidemiological outcomes in humans. Specifically, dominance of the H275Y variant over the oseltamivir-sensitive viruses was only reported for a seasonal H1N1 variant during 2008-2009. Here, we systematically analyze the effect of the H275Y NA mutation on viral fitness and transmissibility of A(H1N1)pdm09 and seasonal H1N1 influenza viruses. The NA genes from A(H1N1)pdm09 A/California/04/09 (CA04), seasonal H1N1 A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NewCal), and A/Brisbane/59/2007 (Brisbane) were individually introduced into the genetic background of CA04. The H275Y mutation led to reduced NA enzyme activity, an increased Km for 3′-sialylactose or 6′-sialylactose, and decreased infectivity in mucin-secreting human airway epithelial cells compared to the oseltamivir-sensitive wild-type counterparts. Attenuated pathogenicity in both RG-CA04NA-H275Y and RG-CA04 × BrisbaneNA-H275Y viruses was observed in ferrets compared to RG-CA04 virus, although the transmissibility was minimally affected. In parallel experiments using recombinant Brisbane viruses differing by hemagglutinin and NA, comparable direct contact and respiratory droplet transmissibilities were observed among RG-NewCalHA,NA, RG-NewCalHA,NA-H275Y, RG-BrisbaneHA,NA-H275Y, and RG-NewCalHA × BrisbaneNA-H275Y viruses. Our results demonstrate that, despite the H275Y mutation leading to a minor reduction in viral fitness, the transmission potentials of three different antigenic strains carrying this mutation were comparable in the naïve ferret model. PMID:22811535

  15. Seasonal Influenza Questions & Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States . Why is there a week-long lag between the data and when it’s ... surveillance data collection is based on a reporting week that starts on Sunday and ends on Saturday ...

  16. Mucosal administration of raccoonpox virus expressing highly pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza neuraminidase is highly protective against H5N1 and seasonal influenza virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Kamlangdee, Attapon; Osorio, Jorge E

    2015-09-22

    We previously generated recombinant poxviruses expressing influenza antigens and studied their efficacy as potential highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) vaccines in mice. While both modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) and raccoon poxvirus (RCN) expressing hemagglutinin (HA) provided strong protection when administered by parenteral routes, only RCN-neuraminidase (NA) showed promise as a mucosal vaccine. In the present study we evaluated the efficacy of RCN-NA constructs by both intradermal (ID) and intranasal (IN) routes. Surprisingly, while RCN-NA completely protected mice when administered by the IN route, it failed to protect mice when administered by the ID route. After challenge, significantly less virus induced pathology was observed in the lungs of mice vaccinated with RCN-NA by the IN route as compared to the ID route. Furthermore, IN administration of RCN-NA elicited neutralizing antibodies detected in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples. We also determined the role of cellular immune responses in protection elicited by RCN-NA by depleting CD4 and CD8 T cells prior to challenge. Finally, we demonstrated for the first time that antibodies against NA can block viral entry in addition to viral spread in vitro. These studies demonstrate the importance of mucosal administration of RCN viral vectors for eliciting protective immune responses against the NA antigen. PMID:26271828

  17. Effect of Antihelminthic Treatment on Vaccine Immunogenicity to a Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in Primary School Children in Gabon: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Sina; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Berberich, Stefan; Bache, Emmanuel; Fernandes, José F.; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Massinga Loembe, Marguerite; Engleitner, Thomas; Lell, Bertrand; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G.; Esen, Meral

    2015-01-01

    Background Helminth infections are a major public health problem, especially in the tropics. Infected individuals have an altered immune response with evidence that antibody response to vaccination is impaired. Hence, treatment of helminth infections before vaccination may be a simple intervention to improve vaccine immunogenicity. In the present study we investigated whether a single-dose antihelminthic treatment influences antibody responses to a seasonal influenza vaccine in primary school children living in Gabon, Central Africa. Methods In this placebo-controlled double-blind trial conducted in Gabon the effect of a single-dose antihelminthic treatment with 400 mg albendazole versus a placebo one month prior to immunization with a seasonal influenza vaccine was investigated. Antiviral antibody titers against all three vaccine strains were assessed by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test at baseline (Day 0; vaccination) and four weeks (Day 28) as well as 12 weeks (Day 84) following vaccination. Vaccine-specific memory B-cell response was measured at Day 0 and Day 84 by vaccine-specific Enzyme-linked Immunospot (ELISpot) assay. The trial is registered with the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry (PACTR) (PACTR201303000434188). Results 98 school children aged 6–10 years were randomly allocated to receive either antihelminthic treatment or placebo and were vaccinated one month after the treatment. The prevalence of helminths at baseline was 21%. Vaccine-specific HI titers against at least one of the three vaccine strains increased at Day 28 and Day 84 in all participants. HI titers against both influenza A strains as well as memory B-cell response were modestly higher in the antihelminthic treated group compared to the placebo group but the difference was not statistically significant. Total but not specific IgA was elevated in the antihelminthic treated group compared to the control group at Day 28. Conclusion In our setting antihelminthic treatment had no

  18. Rapid spread of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses with a new set of specific mutations in the internal genes in the beginning of 2015/2016 epidemic season in Moscow and Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation).

    PubMed

    Komissarov, Andrey; Fadeev, Artem; Sergeeva, Maria; Petrov, Sergey; Sintsova, Kseniya; Egorova, Anna; Pisareva, Maria; Buzitskaya, Zhanna; Musaeva, Tamila; Danilenko, Daria; Konovalova, Nadezhda; Petrova, Polina; Stolyarov, Kirill; Smorodintseva, Elizaveta; Burtseva, Elena; Krasnoslobodtsev, Kirill; Kirillova, Elena; Karpova, Lyudmila; Eropkin, Mikhail; Sominina, Anna; Grudinin, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    A dramatic increase of influenza activity in Russia since week 3 of 2016 significantly differs from previous seasons in terms of the incidence of influenza and acute respiratory infection (ARI) and in number of lethal cases. We performed antigenic analysis of 108 and whole-genome sequencing of 77 influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses from Moscow and Saint Petersburg. Most of the viruses were antigenically related to the vaccine strain. Whole-genome analysis revealed a composition of specific mutations in the internal genes (D2E and M83I in NEP, E125D in NS1, M105T in NP, Q208K in M1, and N204S in PA-X) that probably emerged before the beginning of 2015/2016 epidemic season. PMID:26992820

  19. Influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    2016-02-01

    In a randomised, double-blind trial in pregnant women, a seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine without a lipid adjuvant and covering strain A/H1N1v was partially effective: the incidence of influenza in the mothers and their infants was about 1.8% with the vaccine versus 3.6% with placebo. No noteworthy adverse reactions were reported. PMID:27042735

  20. Molecular genetic analysis of the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus from lethal and recovered cases in Russia from 2009 to 2014: Deletions in the nucleoprotein.

    PubMed

    Yatsyshina, Svetlana; Renteeva, Anna; Deviatkin, Andrei; Vorobyeva, Nadezhda; Minenko, Angrey; Valdokhina, Anna; Elkina, Mariya; Kuleshov, Konstantin; Shipulin, German

    2015-08-01

    Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus caused about 2000 laboratory confirmed lethal cases in Russia during 2009-2010 and 1302, 135 and 29 cases in the 2010-2011, 2012-2013 and 2013-2014 seasons respectively. The on average short duration (7.8±5 days) of lethal cases of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infections in Russia suggests primary viral rather than secondary bacterial pneumonia. Hemorrhagic syndrome was recorded in 36.6% of patients. An examination of 221 lung samples from lethal influenza cases for the presence of bacterial DNA that could cause pneumonia did not reveal bacterial superinfections in 86% of cases. Molecular-genetic analyses of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses from lethal and recovered cases were performed. Amino acids G and N at position 222 of the influenza virus hemagglutinin, which increase the affinity for the lower respiratory tract receptors, were detected more often in the lungs of patients who died than in respiratory swabs collected from recovered patients (p<0.0001 and p=0.007). Viruses harboring various mutations (222D/G/N/S) was significantly associated with lung samples compared with respiratory swabs from recovered patients (p<0.0001). Amino acid 222E, which increases the affinity for upper respiratory tract receptors, was found more frequently in recovered patients than in patients with lethal disease (27% versus 3%, p=0.005). Phylogenetic analysis identified an isolated cluster of viruses in the 2009-2010 season that harbored amino acid 222E, which could explain the high transmissibility of the virus at the beginning of the pandemic. Bayesian skyline plot implied a decline in the effective population size of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses in Russia from 2010-2011 to 2011-2012, followed by an increase in 2012-2013; this trend was accompanied by the increased genetic diversity of the hemagglutinin antigenic sites. Mutations of viral RNA leading to oseltamivir resistance were found in 2.8% of tested patients during only 2010-2011 season. Deletions

  1. Inducing Herd Immunity against Seasonal Influenza in Long-Term Care Facilities through Employee Vaccination Coverage: A Transmission Dynamics Model

    PubMed Central

    Wendelboe, Aaron M.; Grafe, Carl; McCumber, Micah; Anderson, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Vaccinating healthcare workers (HCWs) in long-term care facilities (LTCFs) may effectively induce herd immunity and protect residents against influenza-related morbidity and mortality. We used influenza surveillance data from all LTCFs in New Mexico to validate a transmission dynamics model developed to investigate herd immunity induction. Material and Methods. We adjusted a previously published transmission dynamics model and used surveillance data from an active system among 76 LTCFs in New Mexico during 2006-2007 for model validation. We used a deterministic compartmental model with a stochastic component for transmission between residents and HCWs in each facility in order to simulate the random variation expected in such populations. Results. When outbreaks were defined as a dichotomous variable, our model predicted that herd immunity could be induced. When defined as an attack rate, the model demonstrated a curvilinear trend, but insufficiently strong to induce herd immunity. The model was sensitive to changes in the contact parameter β but was robust to changes in the visitor contact probability. Conclusions. These results further elucidate previous studies' findings that herd immunity may not be induced by vaccinating HCWs in LTCFs; however, increased influenza vaccination coverage among HCWs reduces the probability of influenza infection among residents. PMID:26101542

  2. Long Term Immune Responses to Pandemic Influenza A/H1N1 Infection in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Baluch, Aliyah; Humar, Atul; Egli, Adrian; Gubbay, Jonathan; Lisboa, Luiz; Wilson, Leticia; Kumar, Deepali

    2011-01-01

    In solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients it is unknown if natural infection with influenza confers protection from re-infection with the same strain during the next influenza season. The purpose of this study was to determine if infection with pandemic influenza A/H1N1 (pH1N1) resulted in a long-term immunologic response. Transplant recipients with microbiologically proven pH1N1 infection in 2009/2010 underwent humoral and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) testing for pH1N1 just prior to the next influenza season. Concurrent testing for A/Brisbane/59/2007 was done to rule-out cross-reacting antibody. We enrolled 22 adult transplant patients after pH1N1 infection. Follow up testing was done at a median of 7.4 months (range 5.8–15.4) after infection. After excluding those with cross-reactive antibody, 7/19 (36.8%) patients were seroprotected. Detectable pH1N1-specific CD4+ and CD8+ interferon-γ producing T-cells were found in 11/22 (50%) and 8/22 (36.4%) patients respectively. Humoral immunity had a significant correlation with a CD4 response. This is the first study in transplant patients to evaluate long-term humoral and cellular response after natural influenza infection. We show that a substantial proportion of SOT recipients with previous pH1N1 infection lack long-term humoral and cellular immune responses to pH1N1. These patients most likely are at risk for re-infection. PMID:22194870

  3. Safety, immunogenicity and cross-reactivity of a Northern hemisphere 2013-2014 seasonal trivalent inactivated split influenza virus vaccine, Anflu®.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yonggang; Hu, Yuansheng; Meng, Fanya; Du, Wenjun; Li, Wei; Song, Yufei; Ji, Xiaoci; Huo, Liqun; Fu, Zhenping; Yin, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    Anflu® is a seasonal trivalent inactivated split-virion influenza vaccine manufactured by Sinovac Biotech Co., Ltd. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the safety of Anflu® (2013-14 formulation: H1N1, H3N2 and BYAM) in infants and adults and its immunogenicity and cross-reactivity against mismatched influenza B lineage and avian influenza A(H7N9) viruses (hereafter BVIC and H7N9, respectively) in adults. In this phase IV open label trial, infants 6-35 months old (n=61) each received two injections with 28 days apart; adults 18-60 yrs old (n=60) and elderly >60 yrs old (n=61) each received one injection. Information of adverse events was collected through safety observation and follow-up visits. Pre- and post-immune blood samples (day 0 and 21) were collected from subjects ≥18 yrs old to detect hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers and calculate seroprotection rates (SPRs) and seroconversion rates (SCRs). The overall adverse reaction incidence was 1.6% (3/182), and no serious adverse event was reported during the study period. For subjects ≥18 yrs old, the SCRs, SPRs, and the geometric mean titers (GMTs) met the European criteria for all three strains. In addition, the point estimations of SCR, SPR and GMT for BVIC also met the European criteria. Six subjects were seroconverted against H7N9; however the serological results did not meet the European criteria. In conclusion, the results showed a satisfactory safety and immunogenicity profile of Anflu® and cross-reactivity against BVIC, but did not demonstrate cross-reactivity against H7N9 (Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02269852). PMID:26934750

  4. Episodic nucleotide substitutions in seasonal influenza virus H3N2 can be explained by stochastic genealogical process without positive selection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kangchon; Kim, Yuseob

    2015-03-01

    Nucleotide substitutions in the HA1 domain of seasonal influenza virus H3N2 occur in temporal clusters, which was interpreted as a result of recurrent selective sweeps underlying antigenic drift. However, classical theory by Watterson suggests that episodic substitutions are mainly due to stochastic genealogy combined with unique genetic structure of influenza virus: High mutation rate over a nonrecombining viral segment. This explains why even larger variance in the number of allelic fixations per year is observed in nonantigenic gene segments of H3N2 than in antigenic (hemagglutinin and neuraminidase) segments. Using simulation, we confirm that allelic substitutions at nonrecombining segments with high mutation rate become temporally clustered without selection. We conclude that temporal clustering of fixations, as it is primarily caused by inherent randomness in genealogical process at linked sites, cannot be used as an evidence of positive selection in the H3N2 population. This effect of linkage and high mutation rate should be carefully considered in analyzing the genomic patterns of allelic substitutions in asexually reproducing systems in general. PMID:25492497

  5. A new antigenic variant of human influenza A (H3N2) virus isolated from airport and community surveillance in Taiwan in early 2009.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ji-Rong; Lin, Chao-Hua; Chen, Chun-Jung; Liu, Jian-Liang; Huang, Yuan-Pin; Kuo, Chuan-Yi; Yao, Ching-Yuan; Hsu, Li-Ching; Lo, Je; Ho, Yu-Lin; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2010-07-01

    A new variant of influenza A H3N2 virus emerged in January 2009 and became the dominant strain in Taiwan in April 2009. The variant was also detected in imported cases from various regions, including East and Southeast Asia and North America, indicating that it has circulated globally. Compared to the 2009-2010 vaccine strain, A/Brisbane/10/2007, the hemagglutinin gene of this variant exhibited five substitutions, E62K, N144K, K158N, K173Q and N189K, which are located in the antigenic sites E, A, B, D and B respectively, and it was antigenically distinct from A/Brisbane/10/2007 with more than eight-fold titer reduction in the hemagglutination inhibition reaction. The A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus recommended by World Health Organization for use in the 2010 southern hemisphere and 2010-2011 northern influenza seasons exhibited the same substitutions like this new variant. In addition to regional or community influenza surveillance, the imported cases or airport fever screening surveillance may be a good resource to monitor the evolution of the virus and benefit the real-time information of global influenza circulation. PMID:20347893

  6. Concentrations and size distributions of airborne influenza A viruses measured indoors at a health centre, a day-care centre and on aeroplanes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wan; Elankumaran, Subbiah; Marr, Linsey C

    2011-08-01

    The relative importance of the aerosol transmission route for influenza remains contentious. To determine the potential for influenza to spread via the aerosol route, we measured the size distribution of airborne influenza A viruses. We collected size-segregated aerosol samples during the 2009-2010 flu season in a health centre, a day-care facility and onboard aeroplanes. Filter extracts were analysed using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Half of the 16 samples were positive, and their total virus concentrations ranged from 5800 to 37,000 genome copies m(-3). On average, 64 per cent of the viral genome copies were associated with fine particles smaller than 2.5 µm, which can remain suspended for hours. Modelling of virus concentrations indoors suggested a source strength of 1.6±1.2×10(5) genome copies m(-3) air h(-1) and a deposition flux onto surfaces of 13±7 genome copies m(-2) h(-1) by Brownian motion. Over 1 hour, the inhalation dose was estimated to be 30±18 median tissue culture infectious dose (TCID50), adequate to induce infection. These results provide quantitative support for the idea that the aerosol route could be an important mode of influenza transmission. PMID:21300628

  7. Search for the Comet Activity of 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington during 2009/2010 Apparition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Ham, Ji-Beom; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T.; Micheli, Marco; Niwa, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Matsuda, Kentaro; Urakawa, Seitaro; Yoshimoto, Katsumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Iwata, Ikuru; Ozaki, Shinobu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    We present the optical observations of the Near Earth Object 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington during the 2009/2010 apparition taken in search of low-level comet activity. Our photometric and spectroscopic data were collected 28-86 days after the perihelion passage on 2009 October 22 in a wide range of solar phase angles of 39°-68°. A disk-integrated phase function was constructed, giving a geometric albedo of 0.055 ± 0.012, phase integral of q = 0.34, and Bond albedo of AB = 0.019. The photometric property shows a profile similar to low albedo asteroids and comet nuclei. No emission lines were found in our spectrum, giving a flat reflectance similar to low albedo asteroids. Although we could not find any evidence for cometary activity in our photometric and spectroscopic data, we found an upper limit of 0.001% on the fractional active area. We derived the upper limit of the optical depth of the dust trail and tail, 7 × 10-10. We conclude that 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington was completely dormant or inactive in the 2009/2010 return.

  8. SEARCH FOR THE COMET ACTIVITY OF 107P/(4015) WILSON-HARRINGTON DURING THE 2009/2010 APPARITION

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiguro, Masateru; Ham, Ji-Beom; Tholen, David J.; Elliott, Garrett T.; Micheli, Marco; Niwa, Takahiro; Sakamoto, Makoto; Matsuda, Kentaro; Urakawa, Seitaro; Yoshimoto, Katsumi; Sarugaku, Yuki; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Iwata, Ikuru; Ozaki, Shinobu; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2011-01-10

    We present the optical observations of the Near Earth Object 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington during the 2009/2010 apparition taken in search of low-level comet activity. Our photometric and spectroscopic data were collected 28-86 days after the perihelion passage on 2009 October 22 in a wide range of solar phase angles of 39 deg. - 68 deg. A disk-integrated phase function was constructed, giving a geometric albedo of 0.055 {+-} 0.012, phase integral of q = 0.34, and Bond albedo of A{sub B} = 0.019. The photometric property shows a profile similar to low albedo asteroids and comet nuclei. No emission lines were found in our spectrum, giving a flat reflectance similar to low albedo asteroids. Although we could not find any evidence for cometary activity in our photometric and spectroscopic data, we found an upper limit of 0.001% on the fractional active area. We derived the upper limit of the optical depth of the dust trail and tail, 7 x 10{sup -10}. We conclude that 107P/(4015) Wilson-Harrington was completely dormant or inactive in the 2009/2010 return.

  9. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit Button Past Newsletters Key Facts about Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) in Pigs Language: English Español ...

  10. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Making a Candidate Vaccine Virus Related Links Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English Españ ...

  11. Trends in Food Habits and Their Relation to Socioeconomic Status among Nordic Adolescents 2001/2002-2009/2010

    PubMed Central

    Fismen, Anne-Siri; Smith, Otto Robert Frans; Torsheim, Torbjørn; Rasmussen, Mette; Pedersen Pagh, Trine; Augustine, Lilly; Ojala, Kristiina; Samdal, Oddrun

    2016-01-01

    Background In the Nordic countries, substantial policy and intervention efforts have been made to increase adolescents' consumption of fruit and vegetables and to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks. Some initiatives have been formulated in a Nordic collaboration and implemented at national level. In recent years, social inequalities in food habits have been attracted particular governmental interest and several initiatives addressing the socioeconomic gradient in food habits have been highlighted. However, few internationally published studies have evaluated how trends in adolescents' food habits develop in the context of Nordic nutrition policy, or have compared differences between the Nordic countries. Methods The study was based on Danish, Finnish, Norwegian and Swedish cross-sectional data from the international Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study, collected via three nationally representative and comparable questionnaire surveys in 2001/2002, 2005/2006 and 2009/2010. Food habits were identified by students' consumption of fruit, vegetables, sweets and sugar sweetened soft drink. Socioeconomic status (SES) was measured with the Family Affluence Scale (FAS). Multilevel logistic regression was used to analyze the data. Results Trends in fruit consumption developed differently across countries, characterized by an increase in Denmark and Norway and more stable trends in Sweden and Finland. Vegetable consumption increased particularly in Denmark and to a lesser extent in Norway, whereas Sweden and Finland displayed stable trends. Decreased trends were observed for sweet and soft drink consumption and were similar in Norway, Sweden and Finland. Sweet consumption decreased across all survey years, whereas soft drink consumption decreased between 2001/2002–2005/2006 and was stable thereafter. Denmark displayed an increase between 2001/2002–2005/2006 followed by a similar decrease between 2005/2006–2009/2010 for both sweet and soft

  12. Evaluating the Effects of the Kingston Fly Ash Release on Fish Reproduction: Spring 2009 - 2010 Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Adams, Marshall; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    the ability of individuals within a population to reproduce. Reproduction is thus generally considered to be the most critical life function affected by environmental contamination. From a regulatory perspective, the issue of potential contaminant-related effects on fish reproduction from the Kingston fly ash spill has particular significance because the growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life is a specific classified use of the affected river systems. To address the potential effects of fly ash from the Kingston spill on the reproductive health of exposed fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA that include: (1) a combined field study of metal bioaccumulation in ovaries and other fish tissues (Adams and others 2012) and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill (the current report); (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (Greeley and others 2012); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence (unpublished); and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers (unpublished). The current report focuses on the reproductive condition of adult female fish in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers influenced by the fly ash spill at the beginning of the spring 2009 breeding season - the first breeding season immediately following the fly ash release - and during the subsequent spring 2010 breeding season. Data generated from this and related reproductive/early life stage studies provide direct input to ecological risk assessment efforts and complement and support other phases of the overall

  13. Ad Hoc Influenza Vaccination During Years of Significant Antigenic Drift in a Tropical City With 2 Seasonal Peaks: A Cross-Sectional Survey Among Health Care Practitioners.

    PubMed

    Wong, Martin C S; Nelson, E Anthony S; Leung, Czarina; Lee, Nelson; Chan, Martin C W; Choi, Kin Wing; Rainer, Timothy H; Cheng, Frankie W T; Wong, Samuel Y S; Lai, Christopher K C; Lam, Bosco; Cheung, Tak Hong; Leung, Ting Fan; Chan, Paul K S

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated the acceptability of an additional ad hoc influenza vaccination among the health care professionals following seasons with significant antigenic drift.Self-administered, anonymous surveys were performed by hard copy questionnaires in public hospitals, and by an on-line platform available to all healthcare professionals, from April 1st to May 31st, 2015. A total of 1290 healthcare professionals completed the questionnaires, including doctors, nurses, and allied health professionals working in both the public and private systems.Only 31.8% of participating respondents expressed an intention to receive the additional vaccine, despite that the majority of them agreed or strongly agreed that it would bring benefit to the community (88.9%), save lives (86.7%), reduce medical expenses (76.3%), satisfy public expectation (82.8%), and increase awareness of vaccination (86.1%). However, a significant proportion expressed concern that the vaccine could disturb the normal immunization schedule (45.5%); felt uncertain what to do in the next vaccination round (66.0%); perceived that the summer peak might not occur (48.2%); and believed that the summer peak might not be of the same virus (83.5%). Furthermore, 27.8% of all respondents expected that the additional vaccination could weaken the efficacy of previous vaccinations; 51.3% was concerned about side effects; and 61.3% estimated that there would be a low uptake rate. If the supply of vaccine was limited, higher priority groups were considered to include the elderly aged ≥65 years with chronic medical conditions (89.2%), the elderly living in residential care homes (87.4%), and long-stay residents of institutions for the disabled (80.7%). The strongest factors associated with accepting the additional vaccine included immunization with influenza vaccines in the past 3 years, higher perceived risk of contracting influenza, and higher perceived severity of the disease impact.The acceptability to an additional ad

  14. Cooperative observation data center for planets: starting with the Mars 2009-2010 observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakakushi, T.; Okyudo, M.; Tomita, A.

    2009-12-01

    We propose in this paper a plan to construct a planetary image data center on the internet, which links professional researchers and amateur observers all over the world. Such data archive projects have worked, at least for Mars. Since 2003, one of the authors (T. N.) have started a project to summarize Mars observations using such cooperative network observation data archives and to publish the summary as professional research papers (Nakakushi et al., 2004, 2005, and 2008). Planetary atmosphere varies in various timescales, which requires temporarily continuous observations. Cooperative observation which amateur observers join can keep the observation continuous and sustainable, so that it can be a strong weapon to reveal planetary climate and meteorology. For outer planets, in particular, we don't know synoptic "seasonal" variations because of their long periods of revolution. We need steady and persistent effort to accumulate observations. That is why we need amateur observers' high-level observation techniques. To do so, we also needs systems to provide (and reproduce) data for users in an appropriate manner. We start from Mars with our own new date archive website, because we have much experience in terms of Mars. Next, we will expand the system for all the planets. Roughly said, there will be 3 steps to expand the project to all the planets: (1) to construct our own Mars cooperative observation data center, (2) to link it with professional studies, (3) to construct cooperative observation data center for all planets. And 4 problems to tackle: (1) to develop web interfaces for users to submit data, (2) to develop interfaces for managers, (3) to secure finances, (4) to secure professional researchers. 2009 and 2010 are a good apparition for Mars observation. We manage the Mars image data website, find problems and solutions in detail, and search for ways to expand it to all the planet and to enable sustainable management.

  15. Influenza vaccines: an Asia-Pacific perspective.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Lance C

    2013-11-01

    This article provides an overview of some aspects of seasonal, pre-pandemic and pandemic influenza vaccines and initiatives aimed to increase influenza vaccine use within the Asia-Pacific region. Expanding the use of influenza vaccines in the Asia-Pacific region faces many challenges. Despite the recent regional history for the emergence of novel viruses, SARS, the H5N1 and H7N9, and the generation of and global seeding of seasonal influenza viruses and initiatives by WHO and other organisations to expand influenza awareness, the use of seasonal influenza vaccines remains low. The improvement in current vaccine technologies with the licensing of quadrivalent, live-attenuated, cell culture-based, adjuvanted and the first recombinant influenza vaccine is an important step. The development of novel influenza vaccines able to provide improved protection and with improved manufacturing capacity is also advancing rapidly. However, of ongoing concern are seasonal influenza impact and the low use of seasonal influenza vaccines in the Asia-Pacific region. Improved influenza control strategies and their implementation in the region are needed. Initiatives by the World Health Organization (WHO), and specifically the Western Pacific Regional Office of WHO, are focusing on consistent vaccine policies and guidelines in countries in the region. The Asian-Pacific Alliance for the Control of Influenza (APACI) is contributing through the coordination of influenza advocacy initiates. PMID:24215381

  16. Quadrivalent influenza vaccine: a new opportunity to reduce the influenza burden.

    PubMed

    Tisa, V; Barberis, I; Faccio, V; Paganino, C; Trucchi, C; Martini, M; Ansaldi, F

    2016-01-01

    Influenza illness is caused by influenza A and influenza B strains. Although influenza A viruses are perceived to carry greater risk because they account for the majority of influenza cases in most seasons and have been responsible for influenza pandemics, influenza B viruses also impose a substantial public health burden, particularly among children and at-risk subjects. Furthermore, since the 2001-2002 influenza season, both influenza B lineages, B/Victoria-like viruses and B/Yamagata-like viruses have co-circulated in Europe. The conventional trivalent influenza vaccines have shown a limited ability to induce effective protection when major or minor mismatches between the influenza B vaccine component and circulating strains occur. For this reason, the inclusion of a second B strain in influenza vaccines may help to overcome the well-known difficulties of predicting the circulating B lineage and choosing the influenza B vaccine component. Two quadrivalent influenza vaccines, a live-attenuated quadrivalent influenza vaccine (Q/LAIV) and a split inactivated quadrivalent influenza vaccine (I/QIV), were first licensed in the US in 2012. Since their introduction, models simulating the inclusion of QIV in influenza immunization programs have demonstrated the substantial health benefits, in terms of reducing the number of influenza cases, their complications and mortality. In the near future, evaluations from simulation models should be confirmed by effectiveness studies in the field, and more costeffectiveness analyses should be conducted in order to verify the expected benefits. PMID:27346937

  17. Bordetella parapertussis outbreak in Bisham, Pakistan in 2009-2010: fallout of the 9/11 syndrome.

    PubMed

    Javed, S; Said, F; Eqani, S A M A S; Bokhari, H

    2015-09-01

    Pertussis or whooping cough is a highly contagious community disease mainly caused by Bordetella pertussis and B. parapertussis. We report a minor outbreak of whooping cough (2009-2010) in symptomatic subjects from Bisham, near Swat, Khyber Pukhtoonkhawa province, Pakistan. Interestingly, our results show that all the culture-positive isolates (n = 21) collected from children (average age 3·46 years), were identified as B. parapertussis after routine identification tests and PCR IS481, IS1001 and IS1002. Furthermore, in the affected patients, none had received immunization with diphtheria-pertussis-tetanus (DTPw) vaccine. Therefore, the possibility of the re-emergence of the disease due to limitation of basic health services as a result of the political unrest due to the 9/11 situation is also examined. Moreover, we discuss the importance of vaccinating both adults and children with DTPwPaw vaccine containing both organisms for better protection. PMID:25583126

  18. An environmental risk assessment for oseltamivir (Tamiflu) for sewage works and surface waters under seasonal-influenza- and pandemic-use conditions.

    PubMed

    Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2009-09-01

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, anti-viral medications such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) are expected to be used in high amounts over a duration of several weeks. Oseltamivir has been predicted to reach high concentrations in surface waters and sewage works. New oseltamivir environmental fate and toxicity studies permit an environmental risk assessment (ERA) under seasonal- and pandemic-use scenarios. The environmental fate data for sewage works (no removal), surface waters (no significant degradation), and water/sediment systems (>50% primary degradation in 100 days) were used for the derivation of new predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) for western Europe and the River Lee catchment in the UK. Existing worst-case PECs for western Europe, the River Lee catchment in the UK and the Lower Colorado basin in the USA under pandemic conditions (< or =98.1 microg/L for surface waters, < or =348 microg/L for sewage works) were also considered for the ERA. PECs were compared with predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) based on new chronic ecotoxicity data (no observed effect concentration for algae, daphnia, and fish > or =1 mg/L). Based on all PEC/PNEC risk ratios, no significant risk is evident to surface waters or sewage works during both regular seasonal-use and high pandemic-use of oseltamivir. PMID:19560203

  19. Reconstruction of the Evolutionary Dynamics of the A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza Virus in Italy during the Pandemic and Post-Pandemic Phases

    PubMed Central

    Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Lai, Alessia; Gabanelli, Elena; Ranghiero, Alberto; Ebranati, Erika; Amendola, Antonella; Campanini, Giulia; Rovida, Francesca; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Galli, Massimo; Baldanti, Fausto; Zanetti, Alessandro Remo

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reconstruct the evolutionary dynamics of the A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus in Italy during two epidemic seasons (2009/2010 and 2010/2011) in the light of the forces driving the evolution of the virus. Nearly six thousands respiratory specimens were collected from patients with influenza-like illness within the framework of the Italian Influenza Surveillance Network, and the A(H1N1)pdm09 hemagglutinin (HA) gene was amplified and directly sequenced from 227 of these. Phylodynamic and phylogeographical analyses were made using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, and codon-specific positive selection acting on the HA coding sequence was evaluated. The global and local phylogenetic analyses showed that all of the Italian sequences sampled in the post-pandemic (2010/2011) season grouped into at least four highly significant Italian clades, whereas those of the pandemic season (2009/2010) were interspersed with isolates from other countries at the tree root. The time of the most recent common ancestor of the strains circulating in the pandemic season in Italy was estimated to be between the spring and summer of 2009, whereas the Italian clades of the post-pandemic season originated in the spring of 2010 and showed radiation in the summer/autumn of the same year; this was confirmed by a Bayesian skyline plot showing the biphasic growth of the effective number of infections. The local phylogeography analysis showed that the first season of infection originated in Northern Italian localities with high density populations, whereas the second involved less densely populated localities, in line with a gravity-like model of geographical dispersion. Two HA sites, codons 97 and 222, were under positive selection. In conclusion, the A(H1N1)pdm09 virus was introduced into Italy in the spring of 2009 by means of multiple importations. This was followed by repeated founder effects in the post-pandemic period that originated specific Italian clades

  20. Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting-Based Analysis Reveals an Asymmetric Induction of Interferon-Stimulated Genes in Response to Seasonal Influenza A Virus

    PubMed Central

    von Recum-Knepper, Jessica; Sadewasser, Anne; Weinheimer, Viola K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Influenza A virus (IAV) infection provokes an antiviral response involving the expression of type I and III interferons (IFN) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in infected cell cultures. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the IFN reaction are incompletely understood, as previous studies investigated mainly the population responses of virus-infected cultures, although substantial cell-to-cell variability has been documented. We devised a fluorescence-activated cell sorting-based assay to simultaneously quantify expression of viral antigens and ISGs, such as ISG15, MxA, and IFIT1, in IAV-infected cell cultures at the single-cell level. This approach revealed that seasonal IAV triggers an unexpected asymmetric response, as the major cell populations expressed either viral antigen or ISG, but rarely both. Further investigations identified a role of the viral NS1 protein in blocking ISG expression in infected cells, which surprisingly did not reduce paracrine IFN signaling to noninfected cells. Interestingly, viral ISG control was impaired in cultures infected with avian-origin IAV, including the H7N9 virus from eastern China. This phenotype was traced back to polymorphic NS1 amino acids known to be important for stable binding of the polyadenylation factor CPSF30 and concomitant suppression of host cell gene expression. Most significantly, mutation of two amino acids within the CPSF30 attachment site of NS1 from seasonal IAV diminished the strict control of ISG expression in infected cells and substantially attenuated virus replication. In conclusion, our approach revealed an asymmetric, NS1-dependent ISG induction in cultures infected with seasonal IAV, which appears to be essential for efficient virus propagation. IMPORTANCE Interferons are expressed by infected cells in response to IAV infection and play important roles in the antiviral immune response by inducing hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Unlike many previous studies, we

  1. Harmonizing influenza primary-care surveillance in the United Kingdom: piloting two methods to assess the timing and intensity of the seasonal epidemic across several general practice-based surveillance schemes.

    PubMed

    Green, H K; Charlett, A; Moran-Gilad, J; Fleming, D; Durnall, H; Thomas, D Rh; Cottrell, S; Smyth, B; Kearns, C; Reynolds, A J; Smith, G E; Elliot, A J; Ellis, J; Zambon, M; Watson, J M; McMenamin, J; Pebody, R G

    2015-01-01

    General Practitioner consultation rates for influenza-like illness (ILI) are monitored through several geographically distinct schemes in the UK, providing early warning to government and health services of community circulation and intensity of activity each winter. Following on from the 2009 pandemic, there has been a harmonization initiative to allow comparison across the distinct existing surveillance schemes each season. The moving epidemic method (MEM), proposed by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control for standardizing reporting of ILI rates, was piloted in 2011/12 and 2012/13 along with the previously proposed UK method of empirical percentiles. The MEM resulted in thresholds that were lower than traditional thresholds but more appropriate as indicators of the start of influenza virus circulation. The intensity of the influenza season assessed with the MEM was similar to that reported through the percentile approach. The MEM pre-epidemic threshold has now been adopted for reporting by each country of the UK. Further work will continue to assess intensity of activity and apply standardized methods to other influenza-related data sources. PMID:25023603

  2. Epidemiological and virological characteristics of influenza B: results of the Global Influenza B Study

    PubMed Central

    Caini, Saverio; Huang, Q Sue; Ciblak, Meral A; Kusznierz, Gabriela; Owen, Rhonda; Wangchuk, Sonam; Henriques, Cláudio M P; Njouom, Richard; Fasce, Rodrigo A; Yu, Hongjie; Feng, Luzhao; Zambon, Maria; Clara, Alexey W; Kosasih, Herman; Puzelli, Simona; Kadjo, Herve A; Emukule, Gideon; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Ang, Li Wei; Venter, Marietjie; Mironenko, Alla; Brammer, Lynnette; Mai, Le Thi Quynh; Schellevis, François; Plotkin, Stanley; Paget, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Literature on influenza focuses on influenza A, despite influenza B having a large public health impact. The Global Influenza B Study aims to collect information on global epidemiology and burden of disease of influenza B since 2000. Methods Twenty-six countries in the Southern (n = 5) and Northern (n = 7) hemispheres and intertropical belt (n = 14) provided virological and epidemiological data. We calculated the proportion of influenza cases due to type B and Victoria and Yamagata lineages in each country and season; tested the correlation between proportion of influenza B and maximum weekly influenza-like illness (ILI) rate during the same season; determined the frequency of vaccine mismatches; and described the age distribution of cases by virus type. Results The database included 935 673 influenza cases (2000–2013). Overall median proportion of influenza B was 22·6%, with no statistically significant differences across seasons. During seasons where influenza B was dominant or co-circulated (>20% of total detections), Victoria and Yamagata lineages predominated during 64% and 36% of seasons, respectively, and a vaccine mismatch was observed in ≈25% of seasons. Proportion of influenza B was inversely correlated with maximum ILI rate in the same season in the Northern and (with borderline significance) Southern hemispheres. Patients infected with influenza B were usually younger (5–17 years) than patients infected with influenza A. Conclusion Influenza B is a common disease with some epidemiological differences from influenza A. This should be considered when optimizing control/prevention strategies in different regions and reducing the global burden of disease due to influenza. PMID:26256290

  3. Inulin-Type β2-1 Fructans have Some Effect on the Antibody Response to Seasonal Influenza Vaccination in Healthy Middle-Aged Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lomax, Amy R.; Cheung, Lydia V. Y.; Noakes, Paul S.; Miles, Elizabeth A.; Calder, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    β2-1 fructans are prebiotics and, as such, may modulate some aspects of immune function. Improved immune function could enhance the host’s ability to respond to infections. There is limited information on the effects of β2-1 fructans on immune responses in humans. The objective of the study was to determine the effect of a specific combination of long-chain inulin and oligofructose (Orafti® Synergy1) on immune function in middle-aged humans, with the primary outcome being response to seasonal influenza vaccination. Healthy middle-aged humans (45–63 years of age) were randomly allocated to consume β2-1 fructans in the form of Orafti® Synergy1 (8 g/day; n = 22) or maltodextrin as control (8 g/day; n = 21) for 8 weeks. After 4 weeks, participants received the 2008/2009 seasonal influenza vaccine. Blood and saliva samples were collected prior to vaccination and 2 and 4 weeks after vaccination. They were used to measure various immune parameters. The primary outcome was the serum concentration of anti-vaccine antibodies. Serum antibody titers against the vaccine and vaccine-specific immunoglobulin concentrations increased post-vaccination. Antibodies to the H3N2-like hemagglutinin type 3, neuraminidase type 2-like strain were higher in the Synergy1 group (P = 0.020 for overall effect of treatment group), as was serum vaccine-specific IgG1 2 weeks post-vaccination (P = 0.028 versus control). There were no other differences between groups in antibody titers or anti-vaccine immunoglobulin concentrations, in blood immune cell phenotypes, or in a range of immune parameters. It is concluded that Orafti® Synergy1, a combination of β2-1 fructans, can enhance some aspects of the immune response in healthy middle-aged adults, but that this is not a global effect. PMID:26441994

  4. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. PMID:27486731

  5. New treatments for influenza

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Influenza has a long history of causing morbidity and mortality in the human population through routine seasonal spread and global pandemics. The high mutation rate of the RNA genome of the influenza virus, combined with assortment of its multiple genomic segments, promote antigenic diversity and new subtypes, allowing the virus to evade vaccines and become resistant to antiviral drugs. There is thus a continuing need for new anti-influenza therapy using novel targets and creative strategies. In this review, we summarize prospective future therapeutic regimens based on recent molecular and genomic discoveries. PMID:22973873

  6. Factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding in Timor-Leste: findings from Demographic and Health Survey 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Vishnu; da Cruz, Jonia Lourenca Nunes Brites; Karkee, Rajendra; Lee, Andy H

    2014-04-01

    Exclusive breastfeeding is known to have nutritional and health benefits. This study investigated factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding among infants aged five months or less in Timor-Leste. The latest data from the national Demographic and Health Survey 2009-2010 were analyzed by binary logistic regression. Of the 975 infants included in the study, overall 49% (95% confidence interval 45.4% to 52.7%) were exclusively breastfed. The exclusive breastfeeding prevalence declined with increasing infant age, from 68.0% at less than one month to 24.9% at five months. Increasing infant age, mothers with a paid occupation, who perceived their newborn as non-average size, and residence in the capital city Dili, were associated with a lower likelihood of exclusive breastfeeding. On the other hand, women who could decide health-related matters tended to breastfeed exclusively, which was not the case for others whose decisions were made by someone else. The results suggested the need of breastfeeding promotion programs to improve the exclusive breastfeeding rate. Antenatal counseling, peer support network, and home visits by health workers could be feasible options to promote exclusive breastfeeding given that the majority of births occur at home. PMID:24756151

  7. Assessment of dietary lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene intakes and sources in the Spanish survey of dietary intake (2009-2010).

    PubMed

    Estévez-Santiago, Rocío; Beltrán-de-Miguel, Beatriz; Olmedilla-Alonso, Begoña

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the intake and major dietary sources of lutein, zeaxanthin and lycopene (non-provitamin A carotenoids) in Spain using food consumption data from the Spanish National Dietary Intake Survey (2009-2010). Three-day diaries and one 24-h recall were used to collect dietary data and a software application that includes HPLC data was used. Average intake of those carotenoids was 4290.8 μg/d (67.1% total carotenoid intake), mainly from vegetables (3414.0 μg/d), followed by fruits (393.5 μg/d), oils/fats (204.0 μg/d) and eggs/egg products (170.0 μg/d). Main sources of lutein and zeaxanthin were vegetables (62.9% total diet, 1235.2 μg/person/d). Lycopene intake was 3055.6 μg/d (71.2% of non-provitamin A carotenoids), mainly from tomato and by-products (86.3%) and watermelon. Red- and orange-colored fruits and vegetables were the major contributors of non-provitamin carotenoids (3219.0 μg/person/d). Balanced diets should favor fruits and vegetables over other dietary sources (oils, eggs, processed foods) that contain components to be consumed with moderation. PMID:26903293

  8. The 2009-2010 arctic stratospheric winter - general evolution, mountain waves and predictability of an operational weather forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Nishii, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2011-12-01

    The relatively warm 2009-2010 Arctic winter was an exceptional one as the North Atlantic Oscillation index attained persistent extreme negative values. Here, selected aspects of the Arctic stratosphere during this winter inspired by the analysis of the international field experiment RECONCILE are presented. First of all, and as a kind of reference, the evolution of the polar vortex in its different phases is documented. Special emphasis is put on explaining the formation of the exceptionally cold vortex in mid winter after a sequence of stratospheric disturbances which were caused by upward propagating planetary waves. A major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) occurring near the end of January 2010 concluded the anomalous cold vortex period. Wave ice polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by spaceborne remote-sensing instruments over the Arctic during the cold period in January 2010. Here, one such case observed over Greenland is analysed in more detail and an attempt is made to correlate flow information of an operational numerical weather prediction model to the magnitude of the mountain-wave induced temperature fluctuations. Finally, it is shown that the forecasts of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system for the onset of the major SSW were very skilful and the ensemble spread was very small. However, the ensemble spread increased dramatically after the major SSW, displaying the strong non-linearity and internal variability involved in the SSW event.

  9. The 2009-2010 Arctic stratospheric winter - general evolution, mountain waves and predictability of an operational weather forecast model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dörnbrack, A.; Pitts, M. C.; Poole, L. R.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Nishii, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2012-04-01

    The relatively warm 2009-2010 Arctic winter was an exceptional one as the North Atlantic Oscillation index attained persistent extreme negative values. Here, selected aspects of the Arctic stratosphere during this winter inspired by the analysis of the international field experiment RECONCILE are presented. First of all, and as a kind of reference, the evolution of the polar vortex in its different phases is documented. Special emphasis is put on explaining the formation of the exceptionally cold vortex in mid winter after a sequence of stratospheric disturbances which were caused by upward propagating planetary waves. A major sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) occurring near the end of January 2010 concluded the anomalous cold vortex period. Wave ice polar stratospheric clouds were frequently observed by spaceborne remote-sensing instruments over the Arctic during the cold period in January 2010. Here, one such case observed over Greenland is analysed in more detail and an attempt is made to correlate flow information of an operational numerical weather prediction model to the magnitude of the mountain-wave induced temperature fluctuations. Finally, it is shown that the forecasts of the ECMWF ensemble prediction system for the onset of the major SSW were very skilful and the ensemble spread was very small. However, the ensemble spread increased dramatically after the major SSW, displaying the strong non-linearity and internal variability involved in the SSW event.

  10. Anomalous geomagnetic variations associated with the volcanic activity of the Mayon volcano, Philippines during 2009-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takla, E. M.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kawano, H.; Uozumi, T.; Abe, S.

    2014-12-01

    Local anomalous geomagnetic variations preceding and accompanying the volcanic eruptions had been reported by several researchers. This paper uses continuous high-resolution geomagnetic data to examine the occurrence of any anomalous geomagnetic field variations that possibly linked with the volcanic eruption of the Mayon volcano, Philippines during 2009-2010. The nearest geomagnetic observing point from the Mayon volcano is the Legazpi (LGZ) station, Philippines; which is located about 13 km South of the Mayon volcano. The amplitude range of daily variations and the amplitude of Ultra Low Frequency emissions in the Pc3 range (Pc3; 10-45 s) were examined at the LGZ station and also were compared with those from the Davao (DAV) station, Philippines as a remote reference station. Both the LGZ and DAV stations belong to the MAGDAS Network. The result of data analysis reveals significant anomalous changes in the amplitude range of daily variations and the Pc3 amplitude at the LGZ station before and during the volcanic eruption of the Mayon volcano. From the obtained results, it appears that the observed anomalous variations are dependent on the change in the underground conductivity connected with variation in the physical properties of the Earth's crust due to the activity of the Mayon volcano. Therefore, these anomalous geomagnetic variations are considered to be of a local volcanic origin.

  11. Prevention and management of influenza in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Richard H

    2014-12-01

    Influenza infections are an important global source of morbidity and mortality. Pregnant and postpartum women are at increased risk for serious disease, related complications, and death from influenza infection. This increased risk is thought to be mostly caused by the altered physiologic and immunologic specifics of pregnancy. The morbidity of influenza infection during pregnancy is compounded by the potential for adverse obstetric, fetal, and neonatal outcomes. Importantly, influenza vaccination to prevent or minimize the severity of influenza infection during pregnancy (and the neonatal period) is recommended for all women who are or will be pregnant during influenza season. PMID:25454989

  12. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM Primary-Level Mathematics Measures (Grades K-2), 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Daniel; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Nese, Joseph F. T.; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Saez, Leilani; Jamgochian, Elisa; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In the following technical report, we present evidence of the technical adequacy of the easyCBM[R] math measures in grades K-2. In addition to reliability information, we present criterion-related validity evidence, both concurrent and predictive, and construct validity evidence. The results represent data gathered throughout the 2009/2010 school…

  13. The Thurgood Marshall School of Law Empirical Findings: A Report of the Watson-Glaser for the 2009-2010 Test Takers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadhi, T.; Palasota, A.; Holley, D.; Rudley, D.

    2010-01-01

    The following report gives the statistical findings of the 2009-2010 Watson-Glaser test. Data is pre-existing and was given to the Evaluator by email from the Director, Center for Legal Pedagogy. Statistical analyses were run using SPSS 17 to address the following questions: 1. What are the statistical descriptors of the Watson-Glaser results of…

  14. Annual Performance Report 2009-2010. Bureau of Indian Education. Submitted February 1, 2011. Revised Clarification, April 18, 2011. APR Template-Part B (4)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    During SY 2009-2010, the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) continued their efforts to improve the validity and reliability of data reporting. BIE data collections are dependent on school level entry (self reporting) into the Native American Student Information System (NASIS) or into the Bureau's Annual Report from the schools. In addition,…

  15. 50 CFR Table 4 (south) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Limited Entry Fixed Gear South of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Limited Entry Fixed Gear South of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 4 Table 4 (South) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST...

  16. 50 CFR Table 4 (north) to Part 660... - 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Limited Entry Fixed Gear North of 40°10′ N. Lat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false 2009-2010 Trip Limits for Limited Entry Fixed Gear North of 40°10ⲠN. Lat. 4 Table 4 (North) to Part 660, Subpart G Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE (CONTINUED) FISHERIES OFF WEST...

  17. Technical Adequacy of the easyCBM[R] Mathematics Measures: Grades 3-8, 2009-2010 Version. Technical Report #1007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nese, Joseph F. T.; Lai, Cheng-Fei; Anderson, Daniel; Jamgochian, Elisa M.; Kamata, Akihito; Saez, Leilani; Park, Bitnara J.; Alonzo, Julie; Tindal, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    In this technical report, data are presented on the practical utility, reliability, and validity of the easyCBM[R] mathematics (2009-2010 version) measures for students in grades 3-8 within four districts in two states. Analyses include: minimum acceptable within-year growth; minimum acceptable year-end benchmark performance; internal and…

  18. Association of School-Based Influenza Vaccination Clinics and School Absenteeism--Arkansas, 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gicquelais, Rachel E.; Safi, Haytham; Butler, Sandra; Smith, Nathaniel; Haselow, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a major cause of seasonal viral respiratory illness among school-aged children. Accordingly, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) coordinates >800 school-based influenza immunization clinics before each influenza season. We quantified the relationship between student influenza vaccination in Arkansas public schools…

  19. Influenza Prevention: Information for Travelers

    MedlinePlus

    ... season and are traveling to parts of the world where influenza activity is ongoing should get a ... have been circulating in other parts of the world. People should get vaccinated at least 2 weeks ...

  20. Environmental chemicals mediated the effect of old housing on adult health problems: US NHANES, 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Ivy; Bramley, Glen

    2015-01-01

    Housing conditions affect occupants continuously, and health interventions have shown a positive association between housing investment or improvement and occupant's health. However, the sources of the housing problems were less understood. Since it was observed that lead dust and chloroanisoles released from housing (materials) as indoor pollutants affected child's health, we now aimed to examine the relationships among built year, environmental chemicals and individual health in adults in a national and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2009-2010, including demographics, housing characteristics, self-reported health status, biomarkers and blood and urinary chemical concentrations. Adults aged 20 and above were included for statistical analysis (n = 5,793). Analysis involved chi-square test, t test, and survey-weighted general linear regression and logistic regression modelling. People who resided in older housing built before 1990 tended to report chronic bronchitis, liver problems, stroke, heart failure, diabetes, asthma and emphysema. Higher values in HDL cholesterol, blood lead and blood cadmium and having positive responses of hepatitis A, B, C and E antibodies among occupants were also observed. Furthermore, higher environmental chemical concentrations related to old housing including urinary cadmium, cobalt, platinum, mercury, 2,5-dichlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol concentrations and mono-cyclohexyl phthalate and mono-isobutyl phthalate metabolites were shown in occupants as well. Older housing (≥30 years) seemed to contribute to the amount of environmental chemicals that affected human health. Regular monitoring, upgrading and renovation of housing to remove environmental chemicals and policy to support people in deprived situations against environmental injustice would be needed. PMID:25138559

  1. Residue analyses and exposure assessment of the Irish population to nitrofuran metabolites from different food commodities in 2009-2010.

    PubMed

    Radovnikovic, Anita; Conroy, Emma-Rose; Gibney, Mike; O'Mahony, John; Danaher, Martin

    2013-01-01

    An exposure assessment to nitrofuran residues was performed for three human populations (adults, teenagers and children), based on residue analyses of foods of animal origin (liver, honey, eggs and aquaculture) covering the 2-year period 2009-2010. The occurrence of nitrofuran metabolites in food on the Irish market was determined for the selected period using the data from Ireland's National Food Residue Database (NFRD) and from results obtained from the analysis of retail samples (aquaculture and honey). Laboratory analyses of residues were performed by methods validated in accordance with Commission Decision 2002/657/EC regarding performance of the analytical method and interpretation of results. Semicarbazide (SEM) was the contaminant most frequently identified and its content ranged from 0.09 to 1.27 μg kg(-1). SEM is currently used as a marker of nitrofuran abuse, but it may also occur from other sources. The presence of nitrofuran metabolite 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ) was detected in two aquaculture samples (prawns) at 1.63 and 1.14 μg kg(-1), but such a low number of positive cases did not present sufficient data for a full AOZ exposure assessment. Therefore, the evaluation of exposure was focused on SEM-containing food groups only. Exposure assessments were completed using a probabilistic approach that generated 10 iterations. The results of both the upper- and lower-bound exposure assessments demonstrate that SEM exposure for Irish adults, teenagers and children from selected food commodities are well below EFSA-estimated safe levels. PMID:24032469

  2. A Case Study of the New York City 2012-2013 Influenza Season With Daily Geocoded Twitter Data From Temporal and Spatiotemporal Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Qingyu; Freifeld, Clark C; Santillana, Mauricio; Nojima, Aaron; Chunara, Rumi; Brownstein, John S

    2014-01-01

    Background Twitter has shown some usefulness in predicting influenza cases on a weekly basis in multiple countries and on different geographic scales. Recently, Broniatowski and colleagues suggested Twitter’s relevance at the city-level for New York City. Here, we look to dive deeper into the case of New York City by analyzing daily Twitter data from temporal and spatiotemporal perspectives. Also, through manual coding of all tweets, we look to gain qualitative insights that can help direct future automated searches. Objective The intent of the study was first to validate the temporal predictive strength of daily Twitter data for influenza-like illness emergency department (ILI-ED) visits during the New York City 2012-2013 influenza season against other available and established datasets (Google search query, or GSQ), and second, to examine the spatial distribution and the spread of geocoded tweets as proxies for potential cases. Methods From the Twitter Streaming API, 2972 tweets were collected in the New York City region matching the keywords “flu”, “influenza”, “gripe”, and “high fever”. The tweets were categorized according to the scheme developed by Lamb et al. A new fourth category was added as an evaluator guess for the probability of the subject(s) being sick to account for strength of confidence in the validity of the statement. Temporal correlations were made for tweets against daily ILI-ED visits and daily GSQ volume. The best models were used for linear regression for forecasting ILI visits. A weighted, retrospective Poisson model with SaTScan software (n=1484), and vector map were used for spatiotemporal analysis. Results Infection-related tweets (R=.763) correlated better than GSQ time series (R=.683) for the same keywords and had a lower mean average percent error (8.4 vs 11.8) for ILI-ED visit prediction in January, the most volatile month of flu. SaTScan identified primary outbreak cluster of high-probability infection tweets with

  3. Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Making a Candidate Vaccine Virus Related Links Influenza Types Seasonal Avian Swine Variant Pandemic Other Get ... Button Past Newsletters Prevention and Treatment of Avian Influenza A Viruses in People Language: English Español ...

  4. Influenza A H1N1 2009 (Swine Flu) and Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Boon H; Mahmood, Tahir A

    2011-08-01

    The Influenza A H1N1 pandemic (A H1N1) occurred between June 2009 and August 2010. Although the pandemic is now over, the virus has emerged as the predominant strain in the current seasonal influenza phase in the northern hemisphere. The A H1N1 influenza is a novel strain of the influenza A virus and is widely known as swine flu. The virus contains a mixture of genetic material from human, pig and bird flu virus. It is a new variety of flu which people have not had much immunity to. Much has been learnt from the Pandemic of 2009/2010 but the messages about vaccination and treatment seem to be taken slowly by the clinical profession. Most people affected by the virus, including pregnant women, suffer a mild viral illness, and make a full recovery. The median duration of illness is around seven days. This influenza typically affects the younger age group i.e. from the ages of 5-65 years. Current experience shows that the age group experiencing increased morbidity and mortality rates are in those under 65 years of age. Pregnant women, because of their altered immunity and physiological adaptations, are at higher risk of developing pulmonary complications, especially in the second and third trimesters. In the United Kingdom, twelve maternal deaths were reported to be associated with the H1N1 virus during the pandemic and clear avoidable factors were identified (Modder, Review of Maternal Deaths in the UK related to A H1N1 2009 influenza (CMACE). www.cmace.org.uk, 2010). The pregnancy outcomes were also poor for women who were affected by the virus with a fivefold increase in the perinatal mortality rate and threefold increase in the preterm delivery rate (Yates et al. Health Technol Assess 14(34):109-182, 2010). There continues to be a low uptake of the flu vaccine and commencement of antiviral treatment for pregnant women. PMID:22851818

  5. B‐ and T‐cell memory elicited by a seasonal live attenuated reassortant influenza vaccine: assessment of local antibody avidity and virus‐specific memory T‐cells using trogocytosis‐based method

    PubMed Central

    Petukhova, Galina; Korenkov, Daniil; Chirkova, Tatiana; Donina, Svetlana; Rudenko, Larisa; Naykhin, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Petukhova et al. (2011) B‐ and T‐cell memory elicited by a seasonal live attenuated reassortant influenza vaccine: assessment of local antibody avidity and virus‐specific memory T‐cells using trogocytosis‐based method. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses DOI: 10.1111/j.1750‐2659.2011.00279.x. Purpose  The main purpose of vaccination is to generate immunological memory providing enhanced immune responses against infectious pathogens. The standard and most commonly used assay for influenza vaccine immunogenicity evaluation is a hemagglutination inhibition assay (HAI). It is clear now that HAI assay is unable to properly assess the proven protective immunity elicited by live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIV). New methods need to be developed for more accurate LAIV immunogenicity assessment and prediction of vaccine efficacy among target populations. Objective  Randomized placebo‐controlled study of memory B‐ and T‐cell responses to intranasal LAIV in young adults. Methods  A total of 56 healthy young adults 18–20 years old received seasonal monovalent LAIV. Mucosal memory B‐cell responses were measured by IgA avidity assessment in nasal swabs. CD4 memory T cells in peripheral blood were examined by the expression of CD45RO marker and in functional test by the ability of virus‐specific T cells to maintain the trogocytosis with antigen‐loaded target cells. Results  Intranasal LAIV immunization enhances mucosal IgA avidity even without reliable increases in antibody titers. At the day 21 after vaccination, up to 40% of subjects demonstrated significant increases in both total and virus‐specific CD4 memory T cells that were observed regardless of seroconversion rate measured by HAI assay. Conclusion  The data suggest that immunogenicity of LAIV vaccines should be evaluated on the mucosal and cellular immunity basis. The assays applied could be used to support influenza clinical trials through

  6. [Influenza infection and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Anselem, Olivia; Floret, Daniel; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Goffinet, François; Launay, Odile

    2013-11-01

    Pregnant woman have an increased risk of respiratory complications and hospitalization related to influenza. The flu, like any systemic infection, may also be responsible for uterine contractions constituting a threat of miscarriage or premature labor according to gestational age at which it occurs. There is no specific recommendation regarding the management of influenza-like illness in pregnant women, but a nasopharyngeal sample can be performed in the presence of respiratory or general symptoms occurring during an epidemic to search influenza and establish if a specific treatment with oseltamivir (Tamiflu(®)). Surveillance in hospital or intensive care unit may be necessary. Vaccination against influenza provides a satisfactory immunity in pregnant women and reduces the risk of respiratory complications. Transplacental passage of maternal antibody protects newborns who are more likely to have severe influenza infection and because the vaccine cannot be administered before the age of 6 months. The available data show good tolerance influenza vaccination performed during pregnancy. Since 2012, vaccination against seasonal influenza is recommended for pregnant women, whatever the stage of pregnancy at the time of the vaccination campaign. PMID:23683385

  7. Liver involvement during influenza infection: perspective on the 2009 influenza pandemic

    PubMed Central

    Papic, Neven; Pangercic, Ana; Vargovic, Martina; Barsic, Bruno; Vince, Adriana; Kuzman, Ilija

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Papic et al. (2011) Liver involvement during influenza infection: perspective on the 2009 influenza pandemic. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(3), e2–e5. Elevation of liver transaminase levels is a frequent observation during systemic infections. The aim of our study was to investigate liver damage during pandemic 2009 influenza A/H1N1 infection in comparison with seasonal influenza. Serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma‐glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) were significantly higher in patients with pandemic influenza compared to seasonal influenza, which was strongly correlated with hypoxia. Moreover, a positive correlation between C‐reactive protein and serum GGT, alkaline phosphatase, and lactate dehydrogenase was noticed. Our findings support the hypothesis that the pandemic 2009 influenza A/H1N1 is an illness with a significant immune response to infection leading to hepatocellular injury. PMID:21951624

  8. Environmental Survey Report for ORNL: Small Mammal Abundance and Distribution Survey Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park 2009 - 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Giffen, Neil R; Reasor, R. Scott; Campbell, Claire L.

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes a 1-year small mammal biodiversity survey conducted on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The task was implemented through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Natural Resources Management Program and included researchers from the ORNL Environmental Sciences Division, interns in the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Higher Education Research Experiences Program, and ORNL Environmental Protection Services staff. Eight sites were surveyed reservation wide. The survey was conducted in an effort to determine species abundance and diversity of small mammal populations throughout the reservation and to continue the historical inventory of small mammal presence for biodiversity records. This data collection effort was in support of the approved Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation, a major goal of which is to maintain and enhance wildlife biodiversity on the Reservation. Three of the sites (Poplar Creek, McNew Hollow, and Deer Check Station Field) were previously surveyed during a major natural resources inventory conducted in 1996. Five new sites were included in this study: Bearden Creek, Rainy Knob (Natural Area 21), Gum Hollow, White Oak Creek and Melton Branch. The 2009-2010 small mammal surveys were conducted from June 2009 to July 2010 on the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park (OR Research Park). The survey had two main goals: (1) to determine species abundance and diversity and (2) to update historical records on the OR Research Park. The park is located on the Department of Energy-owned Oak Ridge Reservation, which encompasses 13,580 ha. The primary focus of the study was riparian zones. In addition to small mammal sampling, vegetation and coarse woody debris samples were taken at certain sites to determine any correlations between habitat and species presence. During the survey all specimens were captured and released using live trapping techniques including

  9. Planning and process evaluation of a multi-faceted influenza vaccination implementation strategy for health care workers in acute health care settings

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Influenza transmitted by health care workers (HCWs) is a potential threat to frail patients in acute health care settings. Therefore, immunizing HCWs against influenza should receive high priority. Despite recommendations of the World Health Organization, vaccine coverage of HCWs remains low in all European countries. This study explores the use of intervention strategies and methods to improve influenza vaccination rates among HCWs in an acute care setting. Methods The Intervention Mapping (IM) method was used to systematically develop and implement an intervention strategy aimed at changing influenza vaccination behaviour among