Science.gov

Sample records for 2011-07-01 false chesapeake

  1. 33 CFR 334.390 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. 334.390 Section 334.390 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....390 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. (a) The danger zone. A...

  2. 33 CFR 334.310 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. 334.310 Section 334.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....310 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. (a) The restricted area....

  3. 33 CFR 334.190 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. 334.190 Section 334.190 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. (a) The areas—(1) Prohibited area....

  4. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam...

  5. 33 CFR 334.400 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted area. 334.400 Section 334.400... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.400 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off...

  6. 33 CFR 334.370 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base. 334.370 Section 334.370 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.370 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base....

  7. 33 CFR 165.502 - Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. 165.502 Section 165.502 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.502 Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural...

  8. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  9. 33 CFR 334.360 - Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Virginia; restricted area, U.S. Naval Base and Naval Surface...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Virginia; restricted area, U.S. Naval Base and Naval Surface Weapon Center. 334.360 Section 334.360....S. Naval Base and Naval Surface Weapon Center. (a) The area. Beginning at latitude...

  10. 33 CFR 334.200 - Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cedar Point; thence easterly to the southern tip of Barren Island; thence southeasterly to latitude 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U.S. Naval Air Station, Patuxent...

  11. 38 CFR 21.9740 - False, late, or missing reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false False, late, or missing reports. 21.9740 Section 21.9740 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Post-9/11 GI Bill Pursuit of Courses § 21.9740...

  12. 39 CFR 501.13 - False representations of Postal Service actions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false False representations of Postal Service actions. 501.13 Section 501.13 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE POSTAGE PROGRAMS AUTHORIZATION TO MANUFACTURE AND DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.13 False representations of Postal Service...

  13. 34 CFR 685.215 - Discharge for false certification of student eligibility or unauthorized payment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the student did not meet the eligibility requirements described in 34 CFR part 668 and section 484(d... the eligibility requirements described in 34 CFR part 668 and section 484(d) of the Act, as applicable... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Discharge for false certification of...

  14. 29 CFR 1602.16 - Penalty for making of willfully false statements on report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Penalty for making of willfully false statements on report. 1602.16 Section 1602.16 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER TITLE VII, THE ADA AND GINA...

  15. 29 CFR 1602.23 - Penalty for making of willfully false statements on reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Penalty for making of willfully false statements on reports. 1602.23 Section 1602.23 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMISSION RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING REQUIREMENTS UNDER TITLE VII, THE ADA AND GINA Local Union...

  16. 33 CFR 165.511 - Security Zone; Atlantic Ocean, Chesapeake & Delaware Canal, Delaware Bay, Delaware River and its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... escorted passenger vessels in the Captain of the Port, Delaware Bay zone as defined in 33 CFR 3.25-05. (b... vessel in order to ensure safe passage in accordance with the Navigation Rules as seen in 33 CFR chapter... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Atlantic...

  17. 36 CFR 261.3 - Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interfering with a Forest officer, volunteer, or human resource program enrollee or giving false report to a Forest officer. 261.3 Section 261.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  18. Chesapeake Bay

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-13

    ... pollution and other particles in a volume of air over ocean, and at the same time characterizing the way the dark water surface below ... at the Chesapeake Lighthouse, a platform in the Atlantic Ocean 25 kilometers off the Virginia coast, and by six instrumented aircraft, ...

  19. CHESAPEAKE BAY MONITORING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chesapeake Bay Program is the unique regional partnership which has been directing and conducting the restoration of the Chesapeake Bay since the signing of the historic 1983 Chesapeake Bay Agreement. The Chesapeake Bay Program partners include the states of Maryland, Pennsyl...

  20. 33 CFR 80.510 - Chesapeake Bay Entrance, VA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay Entrance, VA. 80.510 Section 80.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Fifth District § 80.510 Chesapeake Bay Entrance, VA....

  1. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal). 162.40 Section 162.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS...

  2. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal); use, administration, and navigation. 207.100 Section 207.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  3. Learning on the Chesapeake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pogell, Suzanne Miller

    1981-01-01

    Presented are highlights of the research and educational programs of the Chesapeake Bay Center for Environmental Studies, which is operated by the Smithsonian Institution. Family-based activities are the focus of the Center's environmental education efforts. (WB)

  4. Chesapeake Bay study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Love, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The objectives and scope of the Chesapeake Bay study are discussed. The physical, chemical, biological, political, and social phenomena of concern to the Chesapeake Bay area are included in the study. The construction of a model of the bay which will provide a means of accurately studying the interaction of the ecological factors is described. The application of the study by management organizations for development, enhancement, conservation, preservation, and restoration of the resources is examined.

  5. The Chesapeake Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gribbon, Roberta; Gregory, Conway

    1984-01-01

    Describes Chesapeake College's annual Arts Contest and Social Science Fair for high school students from the college's five supporting counties as recruitment strategies which recognize the creative and academic achievement of students and establish the role of the college as a leader in the arts and social sciences. (AYC)

  6. Chesapeake Bay Critters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackay-Atha, Lynne

    2005-01-01

    When students enter the author's classroom on the first day of school, they are greeted with live crabs scuttling around in large bins. The crabs are her way of grabbing students' attention and launching the unit on the Chesapeake Bay watershed. She chooses to start the year with this unit because, despite the fact that the Potomac River can be…

  7. 33 CFR 334.390 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. 334.390 Section 334.390 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....390 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. (a) The danger zone. A...

  8. 33 CFR 334.390 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. 334.390 Section 334.390 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....390 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. (a) The danger zone. A...

  9. 33 CFR 334.390 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. 334.390 Section 334.390 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....390 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. (a) The danger zone. A...

  10. 33 CFR 334.390 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. 334.390 Section 334.390 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....390 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay; firing range. (a) The danger zone. A...

  11. 33 CFR 334.310 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. 334.310 Section 334.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....310 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. (a) The restricted area....

  12. 33 CFR 334.310 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. 334.310 Section 334.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....310 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. (a) The restricted area....

  13. 33 CFR 334.310 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. 334.310 Section 334.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....310 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. (a) The restricted area....

  14. 33 CFR 334.310 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. 334.310 Section 334.310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....310 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; navy amphibious training area. (a) The restricted area....

  15. 33 CFR 334.320 - Chesapeake Bay entrance; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay entrance; naval... entrance; naval restricted area. (a) The area. Beginning at a point on the south shore of Chesapeake Bay at... shall be placed on or near the bottom. (2) This section shall be enforced by the Commandant, Fifth...

  16. 33 CFR 334.190 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. 334.190 Section 334.190 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. (a) The areas—(1) Prohibited area....

  17. 33 CFR 334.190 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. 334.190 Section 334.190 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. (a) The areas—(1) Prohibited area....

  18. 33 CFR 334.190 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. 334.190 Section 334.190 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. (a) The areas—(1) Prohibited area....

  19. 33 CFR 334.190 - Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. 334.190 Section 334.190 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... Chesapeake Bay, in vicinity of Bloodsworth Island, MD, U.S. Navy. (a) The areas—(1) Prohibited area....

  20. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam...

  1. 33 CFR 334.400 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted area. 334.400 Section 334.400... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.400 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off...

  2. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam...

  3. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam...

  4. 33 CFR 334.380 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam Neck, Virginia; naval firing range. 334.380 Section 334.380 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.380 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Dam...

  5. 33 CFR 334.400 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted area. 334.400 Section 334.400... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.400 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off...

  6. 33 CFR 334.400 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted area. 334.400 Section 334.400... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.400 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off...

  7. 33 CFR 334.400 - Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off Camp Pendleton, Virginia; naval restricted area. 334.400 Section 334.400... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.400 Atlantic Ocean south of entrance to Chesapeake Bay off...

  8. 33 CFR 334.370 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base. 334.370 Section 334.370 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.370 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base....

  9. 33 CFR 334.370 - Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base. 334.370 Section 334.370 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS... REGULATIONS § 334.370 Chesapeake Bay, Lynnhaven Roads; danger zones, U.S. Naval Amphibious Base....

  10. Eutrophication in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulanowicz, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of using remote sensing to acquire fast reliable data on the nutrient problem in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem are discussed. Pollution effects to phytoplankton blooms during late summer and early fall months are also considered.

  11. Real World: NASA and the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn how NASA uses Earth observing satellites to monitor conditions in the Chesapeake Bay over time. Information about pollution, eutrophication, land cover and watershed runoff helps water manage...

  12. The Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powars, David S.; Edwards, Lucy E.; Gohn, Gregory S.; Horton, Jr., J. Wright

    2015-01-01

    About 35 million years ago, during late Eocene time, a 2-mile-wide asteroid or comet smashed into Earth in what is now the lower Chesapeake Bay in Virginia. The oceanic impact vaporized, melted, fractured, and (or) displaced the target rocks and sediments and sent billions of tons of water, sediments, and rocks into the air. Glassy particles of solidified melt rock rained down as far away as Texas and the Caribbean. Models suggest that even up to 50 miles away the velocity of the intensely hot air blast was greater than 1,500 miles per hour, and ground shaking was equivalent to an earthquake greater than magnitude 8.0 on the Richter scale. Large tsunamis affected most of the North Atlantic basin. The Chesapeake Bay impact structure is among the 20 largest known impact structures on Earth.

  13. Chesapeake Bay: Introduction to an Ecosystem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the contiguous United States. The Bay and its tidal tributaries make up the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. This document, which focuses of various aspects of this ecosystem, is divided into four major parts. The first part traces the geologic history of the Bay, describes the overall physical structure of…

  14. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.170 Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range...-west line through Chesapeake Beach Light 2 at the entrance channel to Fishing Creek; on the south by...

  15. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.170 Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range...-west line through Chesapeake Beach Light 2 at the entrance channel to Fishing Creek; on the south by...

  16. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.170 Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range...-west line through Chesapeake Beach Light 2 at the entrance channel to Fishing Creek; on the south by...

  17. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.170 Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range...-west line through Chesapeake Beach Light 2 at the entrance channel to Fishing Creek; on the south by...

  18. 33 CFR 334.170 - Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range, Naval Research Laboratory. 334.170 Section 334.170 Navigation... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.170 Chesapeake Bay, in the vicinity of Chesapeake Beach, Md.; firing range...-west line through Chesapeake Beach Light 2 at the entrance channel to Fishing Creek; on the south by...

  19. NASA Satellites Aid in Chesapeake Bay Recovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    By studying the landscape around the Chesapeake Bay, NASA spacecrafts are helping land managers figure out how to battle the harmful pollutants that have added to the destruction of the bay's once ...

  20. False assumptions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, M

    1997-01-01

    Indian women do not have to be told the benefits of breast feeding or "rescued from the clutches of wicked multinational companies" by international agencies. There is no proof that breast feeding has declined in India; in fact, a 1987 survey revealed that 98% of Indian women breast feed. Efforts to promote breast feeding among the middle classes rely on such initiatives as the "baby friendly" hospital where breast feeding is promoted immediately after birth. This ignores the 76% of Indian women who give birth at home. Blaming this unproved decline in breast feeding on multinational companies distracts attention from more far-reaching and intractable effects of social change. While the Infant Milk Substitutes Act is helpful, it also deflects attention from more pressing issues. Another false assumption is that Indian women are abandoning breast feeding to comply with the demands of employment, but research indicates that most women give up employment for breast feeding, despite the economic cost to their families. Women also seek work in the informal sector to secure the flexibility to meet their child care responsibilities. Instead of being concerned about "teaching" women what they already know about the benefits of breast feeding, efforts should be made to remove the constraints women face as a result of their multiple roles and to empower them with the support of families, governmental policies and legislation, employers, health professionals, and the media. PMID:12321627

  1. Improving measurement of Chesapeake Bay's dead zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Colin

    2013-09-01

    In the 1930s, researchers first noticed that the Chesapeake Bay had a dead zone, an expanse of water with drastically reduced concentrations of oxygen. In the 1980s, hypoxia—low-oxygen conditions—gave way in some places to anoxia—a near-total depletion of dissolved oxygen. A lack of oxygen makes the water inhospitable for many marine organisms, and the Chesapeake Bay is the focus of major ecosystem rehabilitation efforts.

  2. Deriving Chesapeake Bay Water Quality Standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tango, Peter J.; Batiuk, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving and maintaining the water quality conditions necessary to protect the aquatic living resources of the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries has required a foundation of quantifiable water quality criteria. Quantitative criteria serve as a critical basis for assessing the attainment of designated uses and measuring progress toward meeting water quality goals of the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership. In 1987, the Chesapeake Bay Program partnership committed to defining the water quality conditions necessary to protect aquatic living resources. Under section 303(c) of the Clean Water Act, States and authorized tribes have the primary responsibility for adopting water quality standards into law or regulation. The Chesapeake Bay Program partnership worked with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop and publish a guidance framework of ambient water quality criteria with designated uses and assessment procedures for dissolved oxygen, water clarity, and chlorophyll a for Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries in 2003. This article reviews the derivation of the water quality criteria, criteria assessment protocols, designated use boundaries, and their refinements published in six addendum documents since 2003 and successfully adopted into each jurisdiction's water quality standards used in developing the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load.

  3. ISOLATION AND DIVERSITY OF ACTINOMYCETES IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chesapeake Bay was investigated as a source of actinomycetes to creen for production of novel bioactive compounds. he presence of relatively large populations of actinoplanetes, chemotype IID actinomycetes in Chesapeake Bay sediment samples indicates that is an eminently suitable...

  4. Radionuclides in Chesapeake Bay sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cressy, P. J., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Natural and manmade gamma-ray emitting radionuclides were measured in Chesapeake Bay sediments taken near the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant site. Samples represented several water depths, at six locations, for five dates encompassing a complete seasonal cycle. Radionuclide contents of dry sediments ranged as follows: Tl-208, 40 to 400 pCi/kg; Bi-214, 200 to 800 pCi/kg; K, 0.04 to 2.1 percent; Cs-137 5 to 1900 pCi/kg; Ru106, 40 to 1000 pCikg Co60, 1 to 27 pCi/kg. In general, radionuclide contents were positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with sediment grain size.

  5. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... areas, found in 33 CFR 165.13, apply to the regulated navigation area described in paragraph (a) of this...; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. 165.556 Section 165.556 Navigation and..., Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. (a) Location. The following area is a regulated navigation area:...

  6. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... areas, found in 33 CFR 165.13, apply to the regulated navigation area described in paragraph (a) of this...; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. 165.556 Section 165.556 Navigation and..., Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. (a) Location. The following area is a regulated navigation area:...

  7. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... areas, found in 33 CFR 165.13, apply to the regulated navigation area described in paragraph (a) of this...; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. 165.556 Section 165.556 Navigation and..., Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. (a) Location. The following area is a regulated navigation area:...

  8. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... areas, found in 33 CFR 165.13, apply to the regulated navigation area described in paragraph (a) of this...; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. 165.556 Section 165.556 Navigation and..., Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. (a) Location. The following area is a regulated navigation area:...

  9. 33 CFR 165.556 - Regulated Navigation Area; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... areas, found in 33 CFR 165.13, apply to the regulated navigation area described in paragraph (a) of this...; Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. 165.556 Section 165.556 Navigation and..., Chesapeake City Anchorage Basin, MD. (a) Location. The following area is a regulated navigation area:...

  10. The Changing Chesapeake: An Introduction to the Natural History and Cultural History of the Chesapeake Bay. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Valerie

    This book is about changes in the Chesapeake Bay, its animals, plants, and the surrounding land during the last 15,000 years. Some changes were caused by natural forces while others were made by people. "Chesapeake Challenges" tests the student's thinking skills. "Family Action" lists things families can do to learn more about the Chesapeake Bay…

  11. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... vessels using the waterway. The District Engineer's representative is the Chesapeake City Resident Engineer. The Chesapeake City Resident Engineer through the dispatcher on duty will enforce these... transit the canal. (e) Anchorage and wharfage facilities. The anchorage basin at Chesapeake City and...

  12. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vessels using the waterway. The District Engineer's representative is the Chesapeake City Resident Engineer. The Chesapeake City Resident Engineer through the dispatcher on duty will enforce these... transit the canal. (e) Anchorage and wharfage facilities. The anchorage basin at Chesapeake City and...

  13. Status and Assessment of Chesapeake Bay Wildlife Contamination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Clark, D.R., Jr.; Albers, P.H.; Henry, P.; Batiuk, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    As an integral component of its priority setting process, the Chesapeake Bay Program`s Toxics Subcommittee has sought the expertise of Chesapeake Bay researchers and managers in developing a series of Chesapeake Bay toxics status and assessment papers. In the report, evidence for historical and current contaminant effects on key bird species, mammals, reptiles and amphibians which inhabit the Chesapeake Bay basin is examined. For each group of wildlife species, a general overview of effects caused by specific toxic substances is followed by detailed accounts of contaminant effects on selected species. Sponsored by Environmental Protection Agency, Annapolis, MD. Chesapeake Bay Program.

  14. A pollution history of Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, E.D.; Hodge, V.; Koide, M.; Griffin, J.; Gamble, E.; Bricker, O.P.; Matisoff, G.; Holdren, G.R., Jr.; Braun, R.

    1978-01-01

    Present day anthropogenic fluxes of some heavy metals to central Chesapeake Bay appear to be intermediate to those of the southern California coastal region and those of Narragansett Bay. The natural fluxes, however, are in general higher. On the bases of Pb-210 and Pu-239 + 240 geochronologies and of the time changes in interstitial water compositions, there is a mixing of the upper 30 or so centimeters of the sediments in the mid-Chesapeake Bay area through bioturbation by burrowing mollusks and polychaetes. Coal, coke and charcoal levels reach one percent or more by dry weight in the deposits, primarily as a consequence of coal mining operations. ?? 1978.

  15. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of St. Marks, Fla. 162.65 Section 162.65 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS...

  16. 33 CFR 165.502 - Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. 165.502 Section 165.502 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.502 Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural...

  17. 33 CFR 165.502 - Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. 165.502 Section 165.502 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.502 Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural...

  18. 33 CFR 165.502 - Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. 165.502 Section 165.502 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.502 Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural...

  19. 33 CFR 165.502 - Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural Gas Terminal, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland. 165.502 Section 165.502 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.502 Safety and Security Zone; Cove Point Liquefied Natural...

  20. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  1. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  2. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and... Areas Fifth Coast Guard District § 165.505 Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant,...

  3. 33 CFR 165.505 - Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zone; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Chesapeake Bay, Calvert County, Maryland. 165.505 Section 165.505 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED...

  4. 75 FR 11837 - Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    .... Section 1240Q of the Food Security Act of 1985, as amended by the Food, ] Conservation, and Energy Act of... various natural resources conservation programs authorized under Subtitle D, Title XII of the Food Security Act of 1985, as amended. The Chesapeake Bay Watershed Initiative assistance in FY 2010 will...

  5. Chesapeake Bay plume dynamics from LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, J. C., Jr.; Fedosh, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    LANDSAT images with enhancement and density slicing show that the Chesapeake Bay plume usually frequents the Virginia coast south of the Bay mouth. Southwestern (compared to northern) winds spread the plume easterly over a large area. Ebb tide images (compared to flood tide images) show a more dispersed plume. Flooding waters produce high turbidity levels over the shallow northern portion of the Bay mouth.

  6. Turning the tide: Saving the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, T.; Eichbaum, W.

    1991-07-01

    The Chesapeake Bay is one of the most productive and important ecosystems on earth, and as such is a model for other estuaries facing the demands of commerce, tourism, transportation, recreation, and other uses. This book presents a comprehensive look at two decades of efforts to save the bay, outlining which methods have worked and which have not.

  7. The Chesapeake Laser Tracker in Industrial Metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.; /SLAC

    2005-08-16

    In the summer of 1992, the survey and alignment team at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center acquired a CMS3000 laser tracker manufactured by Chesapeake Laser Systems in Lanham, Maryland. This paper gives a description of the principles of operation and calibration of the tracker. Several applications are explained and the results shared.

  8. Long-term history of Chesapeake Bay anoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.R.; Brush, G.S. )

    1991-11-15

    Stratigraphic records from four sediment cores collected along a transect across the Chesapeake Bay near the mouth of the Choptank River were used to reconstruct a 2,000-year history of anoxia and eutrophication in the Chesapeake Bay. Variations in pollen, diatoms, concentration of organic carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, acid-soluble iron, and an estimate of the degree of pyritization of iron indicate that sedimentation rates, anoxic conditions and eutrophication have increased in the Chesapeake Bay since the time of European settlement.

  9. Modeling nitrogen cycling in forested watersheds of Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Hunsaker, C.T.; Garten, C.T.; Mulholland, P.J.

    1995-03-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Agreement calls for a 40% reduction of controllable phosphorus and nitrogen to the tidal Bay by the year 2000. To accomplish this goal the Chesapeake Bay Program needs accurate estimates of nutrient loadings, including atmospheric deposition, from various land uses. The literature was reviewed on forest nitrogen pools and fluxes, and nitrogen data from research catchments in the Chesapeake Basin were identified. The structure of a nitrogen module for forests is recommended for the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Model along with the possible functional forms for fluxes.

  10. Status and assessment of Chesapeake Bay wildlife contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, G.H.; Wiemeyer, S.N.; Clark, D.R.; Albers, P.; Henry, P.

    1992-10-01

    As an integral component of its priority setting process, the Chesapeake Bay Program's Toxics Subcommittee has sought the expertise of Chesapeake Bay researchers and managers in developing a series of Chesapeake Bay toxics status and assessment papers. In the report, evidence for historical and current contaminant effects on key bird species, mammals, reptiles and amphibians which inhabit the Chesapeake Bay basin is examined. For each group of wildlife species, a general overview of effects caused by specific toxic substances is followed by detailed accounts of contaminant effects on selected species.

  11. Chesapeake Bay sediment flux model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Di Toro, D.M.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    1993-06-01

    Formulation and application of a predictive diagenetic sediment model are described in this report. The model considers two benthic sediment layers: a thin aerobic layer in contact with the water column and a thicker anaerobic layer. Processes represented include diagenesis, diffusion, particle mixing, and burial. Deposition of organic matter, water column concentrations, and temperature are treated as independent variables that influence sediment-water fluxes. Sediment oxygen demand and sediment-water fluxes of sulfide, ammonium, nitrate, phosphate, and silica are predicted. The model was calibrated using sediment-water flux observations collected in Chesapeake Bay 1985-1988. When independent variables were specified based on observations, the model correctly represented the time series of sediment-water fluxes observed at eight stations in the Bay and tributaries.... Chesapeake Bay, Models, Sediments, Dissolved oxygen, Nitrogen Eutrophication, Phosphorus.

  12. Hydraulic model of the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, A. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary planning for the formulation of the first year of hydraulic studies on the Chesapeake Bay model was recently completed. The primary purpose of this initial effort was to develop a study program that is both responsive to problems of immediate importance and at the same time ensure that from the very beginning of operation maximum economical use is made of the model. The formulation of this preliminary study plan involved an extensive analysis of the environmental, economic, and social aspects of a series of current problems in order to establish a priority listing of their importance. The study program that evolved is oriented towards the analysis of the effects of some of the works of man on the Chesapeake Bay estuarine environment.

  13. Mycobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay fish.

    PubMed

    Stine, C B; Kane, A S; Baya, A M

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteriosis in fish can result in ulcers, emaciation, and in some cases death. Mycobacteria have been previously isolated from a variety of Chesapeake Bay fish species, and the current study was designed to identify potential host specificity and location fidelity of mycobacterial isolates. Mycobacteria were isolated from wild fish of the Chesapeake Bay collected from the Upper Bay, the Choptank River, Herring Bay, the Chicamacomico River, the Pocomoke River and the Potomac River in 2003-2006. Mycobacterial isolates were recovered from striped bass, Morone saxatilis, Atlantic menhaden, Brevoortia tyrannus, white perch, Morone americana, summer flounder, Paralichthys dentatus, spot, Leiostomus xanthurus, largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, common carp, Cyprinus carpio carpio, spotted seatrout, Cynoscion nebulosus, killifish, Fundulus sp., blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis, American gizzard shad, Dorosoma cepedianum and American silver perch, Bairdiella chrysoura. Twenty-nine well-defined mycobacterial groups resulted from gas chromatography dendrogram clustering of isolates. The majority of groups included more than one host species and more than one site of collection. However, four groups contained only striped bass isolates, three of which were similar to M. shottsii. Therefore, multiple Chesapeake Bay fish species are colonized with multiple mycobacterial isolates, of which few appear to be host or location specific. PMID:19909394

  14. Incidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Tatsuo; Colwell, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    A Bay-wide survey of the distribution of Vibrio parahaemolyticus was carried out in Chesapeake Bay during May 1972, to determine whether the annual cycle of V. parahaemolyticus which was observed to occur in the Rhode River subestuary of Chesapeake Bay took place in other parts of Chesapeake Bay. In an earlier study, April to early June, when the water temperature rises from 14 to 19 C, was found to be a critical period in the annual cycle of the organism in the Rhode River, since this is the time period when the annual cycle is initiated. Results of this study, however, revealed that V. parahaemolyticus could not be found in the water column during May 1972. Neverthless, several samples of sediment and plankton yielded V. parahaemolyticus isolates. Comparison of data with those for the Rhode River area examined in the earlier studies of the annual cycle of V. parahaemolyticus suggests that the time of initiation of the annual cycle of V. parahaemolyticus in the open Bay proper may be influenced by various factors such as temperature and salinity, i.e., deeper water locations may show initiation of the V. parahaemolyticus annual cycle later than shallow areas. Confirmation of the presence of the organism in the samples studied was accomplished using numerical taxonomy with 19 reference strains also included in the analyses. PMID:1164012

  15. Incidence of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, T; Colwell, R R

    1975-08-01

    A Bay-wide survey of the distribution of Vibrio parahaemolyticus was carried out in Chesapeake Bay during May 1972, to determine whether the annual cycle of V. parahaemolyticus which was observed to occur in the Rhode River subestuary of Chesapeake Bay took place in other parts of Chesapeake Bay. In an earlier study, April to early June, when the water temperature rises from 14 to 19 C, was found to be a critical period in the annual cycle of the organism in the Rhode River, since this is the time period when the annual cycle is initiated. Results of this study, however, revealed that V. parahaemolyticus could not be found in the water column during May 1972. Nevertheless, several samples of sediment and plankton yielded V. parahaemolyticus isolates. Comparison of data with those for the Rhode River area examined in the earlier studies of the annual cycle of V. parahaemolyticus suggests that the time of initiation of the annual cycle of V. parahaemolyticus in the open Bay proper may be influenced by various factors such as temperature and salinity, i.e., deeper water locations may show initiation of the V. parahaemolyticus annual cycle later than shallow areas. Confirmation of the presence of the organisms in the samples studied was accomplished using numerical taxonomy with 19 reference strains also included in the analyses. PMID:1164012

  16. The Transatlantic Slave Trade and Colonial Chesapeake Slavery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Lorena S.

    2003-01-01

    Explores the slave trade system that brought slaves to the Chesapeake Bay area during the eighteenth century colonial United States. Uses information from the "Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade: A Database on CD-ROM" to examine slave routes. Provides information on the origins and distribution of slaves in the Chesapeake Bay region and the experiences of…

  17. Overwintering Habitats of Migratory Juvenile American Shad in Chesapeake Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    We describe overwintering habitats of age-0 American shad in the lower Chesapeake Bay estuary through analyses of multiple, complementary data sets, including bottom-trawls of the Virginia portion of Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries, stable isotope analysis of American shad a...

  18. The Chesapeake Bay through Ebony Eyes. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillin, Holli S.

    This curriculum guide contains eight lessons which complement "The Chesapeake Bay through Ebony Eyes," a book that recounts the contributions blacks have made to Maryland's Chesapeake Bay's maritime and seafood industries. The guide is for use as supplemental material or as cultural enrichment. Lesson plans in the guide are: (1) "Profile of the…

  19. Chesapeake bay watershed land cover data series

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Irani, Frederick M.; Claggett, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    To better understand how the land is changing and to relate those changes to water quality trends, the USGS EGSC funded the production of a Chesapeake Bay Watershed Land Cover Data Series (CBLCD) representing four dates: 1984, 1992, 2001, and 2006. EGSC will publish land change forecasts based on observed trends in the CBLCD over the coming year. They are in the process of interpreting and publishing statistics on the extent, type and patterns of land cover change for 1984-2006 in the Bay watershed, major tributaries and counties.

  20. Engineering works and the tidal Chesapeake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hargis, W. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The tidal tributaries of the ocean and coastal areas of the mid-Atlantic region and the ecological significance of engineering projects are discussed. The effects of engineering works on maritime environments and resources, with the Chesapeake Bay as the area of prime interest are examined. Significant engineering projects, both actual and proposed, are described. The conflict of navigational demands and maintenance of an estuarine environment for commercial and sport fishing and recreation is described. Specific applications of remote sensors for analyzing ecological conditions of the bay are included.

  1. 33 CFR 334.360 - Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Virginia; restricted area, U.S. Naval Base and Naval Surface...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Virginia; restricted area, U.S. Naval Base and Naval Surface Weapon Center. 334.360 Section 334.360....S. Naval Base and Naval Surface Weapon Center. (a) The area. Beginning at latitude...

  2. 33 CFR 334.360 - Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Virginia; restricted area, U.S. Naval Base and Naval Surface...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Virginia; restricted area, U.S. Naval Base and Naval Surface Weapon Center. 334.360 Section 334.360....S. Naval Base and Naval Surface Weapon Center. (a) The area. Beginning at latitude...

  3. 33 CFR 334.360 - Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Virginia; restricted area, U.S. Naval Base and Naval Surface...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Virginia; restricted area, U.S. Naval Base and Naval Surface Weapon Center. 334.360 Section 334.360....S. Naval Base and Naval Surface Weapon Center. (a) The area. Beginning at latitude...

  4. 33 CFR 334.200 - Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Cedar Point; thence easterly to the southern tip of Barren Island; thence southeasterly to latitude 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U.S. Naval Air Station, Patuxent...

  5. 33 CFR 334.200 - Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Cedar Point; thence easterly to the southern tip of Barren Island; thence southeasterly to latitude 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U.S. Naval Air Station, Patuxent...

  6. 33 CFR 334.200 - Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Cedar Point; thence easterly to the southern tip of Barren Island; thence southeasterly to latitude 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U.S. Naval Air Station, Patuxent...

  7. 33 CFR 334.200 - Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Cedar Point; thence easterly to the southern tip of Barren Island; thence southeasterly to latitude 38... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Chesapeake Bay, Point Lookout to Cedar Point; aerial and surface firing range and target area, U.S. Naval Air Station, Patuxent...

  8. PRIMARY PRODUCTION ESTIMATES IN CHESAPEAKE BAY USING SEAWIFS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The temporal and spatial variability in primary production along the main stem of Chesapeake Bay was examined from 1997 through 2000. Primary production estimates were determined from the Vertically Generalized Production Model (VGPM) (Behrenfeld and Falkowski, 1997) using chloro...

  9. INTEGRATED ASSESSMENTS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITION OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary, has experienced environmental degradation due to nutrient enrichment, contamination, loss of habitat, and over-harvesting of living resources. Resource managers need information on the extent of degradation to formulate restoratio...

  10. Defining a data management strategy for USGS Chesapeake Bay studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ladino, Cassandra

    2013-01-01

    The mission of U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Chesapeake Bay studies is to provide integrated science for improved understanding and management of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Collective USGS efforts in the Chesapeake Bay watershed began in the 1980s, and by the mid-1990s the USGS adopted the watershed as one of its national place-based study areas. Great focus and effort by the USGS have been directed toward Chesapeake Bay studies for almost three decades. The USGS plays a key role in using “ecosystem-based adaptive management, which will provide science to improve the efficiency and accountability of Chesapeake Bay Program activities” (Phillips, 2011). Each year USGS Chesapeake Bay studies produce published research, monitoring data, and models addressing aspects of bay restoration such as, but not limited to, fish health, water quality, land-cover change, and habitat loss. The USGS is responsible for collaborating and sharing this information with other Federal agencies and partners as described under the President’s Executive Order 13508—Strategy for Protecting and Restoring the Chesapeake Bay Watershed signed by President Obama in 2009. Historically, the USGS Chesapeake Bay studies have relied on national USGS databases to store only major nationally available sources of data such as streamflow and water-quality data collected through local monitoring programs and projects, leaving a multitude of other important project data out of the data management process. This practice has led to inefficient methods of finding Chesapeake Bay studies data and underutilization of data resources. Data management by definition is “the business functions that develop and execute plans, policies, practices and projects that acquire, control, protect, deliver and enhance the value of data and information.” (Mosley, 2008a). In other words, data management is a way to preserve, integrate, and share data to address the needs of the Chesapeake Bay studies to better

  11. Chesapeake Bay Watershed - Protecting the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers through science, restoration, and partnership

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2012-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay, the Nation's largest estuary, has been degraded due to the impact of human-population increase, which has doubled since 1950, resulting in degraded water quality, loss of habitat, and declines in populations of biological communities. Since the mid-1980s, the Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP), a multi-agency partnership which includes the Department of Interior (DOI), has worked to restore the Bay ecosystem. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has the critical role of providing unbiased scientific information that is utilized to document and understand ecosystem change to help assess the effectiveness of restoration strategies in the Bay and its watershed. The USGS revised its Chesapeake Bay science plan for 2006-2011 to address the collective needs of the CBP, DOI, and USGS with a mission to provide integrated science for improved understanding and management of the Bay ecosystem. The USGS science themes for this mission are: Causes and consequences of land-use change; Impact of climate change and associated hazards; Factors affecting water quality and quantity; Ability of habitat to support fish and bird populations; and Synthesis and forecasting to improve ecosystem assessment, conservation, and restoration.

  12. 46 CFR 7.50 - Chesapeake Bay and tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...°56.8′ N. longitude 75°55.1′ W. (North Chesapeake Entrance Lighted Gong Buoy “NCD”); thence to latitude 36°54.8′ N. longitude 75°55.6′ W. (Chesapeake Bay Entrance Lighted Bell Buoy “CBC”); thence to latitude 36°55.0′ N. longitude 75°58.0′ W. (Cape Henry Buoy “1”); thence to Cape Henry Light....

  13. 46 CFR 7.50 - Chesapeake Bay and tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...°56.8′ N. longitude 75°55.1′ W. (North Chesapeake Entrance Lighted Gong Buoy “NCD”); thence to latitude 36°54.8′ N. longitude 75°55.6′ W. (Chesapeake Bay Entrance Lighted Bell Buoy “CBC”); thence to latitude 36°55.0′ N. longitude 75°58.0′ W. (Cape Henry Buoy “1”); thence to Cape Henry Light....

  14. 46 CFR 7.50 - Chesapeake Bay and tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...°56.8′ N. longitude 75°55.1′ W. (North Chesapeake Entrance Lighted Gong Buoy “NCD”); thence to latitude 36°54.8′ N. longitude 75°55.6′ W. (Chesapeake Bay Entrance Lighted Bell Buoy “CBC”); thence to latitude 36°55.0′ N. longitude 75°58.0′ W. (Cape Henry Buoy “1”); thence to Cape Henry Light....

  15. 46 CFR 7.50 - Chesapeake Bay and tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...°56.8′ N. longitude 75°55.1′ W. (North Chesapeake Entrance Lighted Gong Buoy “NCD”); thence to latitude 36°54.8′ N. longitude 75°55.6′ W. (Chesapeake Bay Entrance Lighted Bell Buoy “CBC”); thence to latitude 36°55.0′ N. longitude 75°58.0′ W. (Cape Henry Buoy “1”); thence to Cape Henry Light....

  16. 46 CFR 7.50 - Chesapeake Bay and tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...°56.8′ N. longitude 75°55.1′ W. (North Chesapeake Entrance Lighted Gong Buoy “NCD”); thence to latitude 36°54.8′ N. longitude 75°55.6′ W. (Chesapeake Bay Entrance Lighted Bell Buoy “CBC”); thence to latitude 36°55.0′ N. longitude 75°58.0′ W. (Cape Henry Buoy “1”); thence to Cape Henry Light....

  17. 76 FR 26767 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment... John Maounis, Superintendent, Captain John Smith National Historic Trail, telephone: (410)...

  18. 76 FR 52691 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-23

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment... John Maounis, Superintendent, Captain John Smith National Historic Trail, telephone: (410)...

  19. 77 FR 12324 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting. Designated through an amendment... John Maounis, Superintendent, Captain John Smith National Historic Trail, telephone: (410)...

  20. Distribution and movement of shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum) in the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, S.A.; Mangold, M.F.; Skjeveland, J.E.; Spells, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    During a reward program for Atlantic sturgeon (Acipenser oxyrinchus), 40 federally endangered shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum) were captured and reported by commercial fishers between January 1996 and January 2000 from the Chesapeake Bay. Since this is more than double the number of published records of shortnose sturgeon in the Chesapeake Bay between 1876 and 1995, little information has been available on distributions and movement. We used fishery dependent data collected during the reward program to determine the distribution of shortnose sturgeon in the Chesapeake Bay. Sonically-tagged shortnose sturgeon in the Chesapeake Bay and Delaware River were tracked to determine if individuals swim through the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. Shortnose sturgeon were primarily distributed within the upper Chesapeake Bay. The movements of one individual, tagged within the Chesapeake Bay and later relocated in the canal and Delaware River, indicated that individuals traverse the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal.

  1. 78 FR 44556 - Chesapeake Energy Marketing, Inc. v. Midcontinent Express Pipeline LLC; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chesapeake Energy Marketing, Inc. v. Midcontinent Express Pipeline LLC... Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.206, Chesapeake Energy Marketing, Inc. (CEMI...

  2. 76 FR 78335 - North Carolina & Virginia Railroad Company, LLC, Chesapeake & Albemarle Railroad Division-Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Surface Transportation Board North Carolina & Virginia Railroad Company, LLC, Chesapeake & Albemarle Railroad Division--Lease Amendment Exemption--Norfolk Southern Railway Company North Carolina & Virginia Railroad, LLC, Chesapeake & Albemarle Railroad Division (NCVR), a Class III carrier, has filed a...

  3. Coring the Chesapeake Bay impact crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.

    2004-01-01

    In July 1983, the shipboard scientists of Deep Sea Drilling Project Leg 95 found an unexpected bonus in a core taken 150 kilometers east of Atlantic City, N.J. At Site 612, the scientists recovered a 10-centimeter-thick layer of late Eocene debris ejected from an impact about 36 million years ago. Microfossils and argon isotope ratios from the same layer reveal that the ejecta were part of a broad North American impact debris field, previously known primarily from the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. Since that serendipitous beginning, years of seismic reflection profiling, gravity measurements and core drilling have confirmed the source of that strewn field - the Chesapeake Bay impact crater, the largest structure of its kind in the United States, and the sixth-largest impact crater on Earth.

  4. Resource protection for waterbirds in Chesapeake bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erwin, R. Michael; Haramis, G. Michael; Krementz, David G.; Funderburk, Steven L.

    1993-09-01

    Many living resources in the Chesapeake Bay estuary have deteriorated over the past 50 years. As a result, many governmental committees, task forces, and management plans have been established. Most of the recommendations for implementing a bay cleanup focus on reducing sediments and nutrient flow into the watershed. We emphasize that habitat requirements other than water quality are necessary for the recovery of much of the bay's avian wildlife, and we use a waterbird example as illustration. Some of these needs are: (1) protection of fast-eroding islands, or creation of new ones by dredge deposition to improve nesting habitat for American black ducks (Anas rubripes), great blue herons (Ardea herodias), and other associated wading birds; (2) conservation of remaining brackish marshes, especially near riparian areas, for feeding black ducks, wading birds, and wood ducks (Aix sponsa); (3) establishment of sanctuaries in open-water, littoral zones to protect feeding and/or roosting areas for diving ducks such as canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) and redheads (Aythya americana), and for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus); and (4) limitation of disturbance by boaters around nesting islands and open-water feeding areas. Land (or water) protection measures for waterbirds need to include units at several different spatial scales, ranging from “points” (e.g., a colony site) to large-area resources (e.g., a marsh or tributary for feeding). Planning to conserve large areas of both land and water can be achieved following a biosphere reserve model. Existing interagency committees in the Chesapeake Bay Program could be more effective in developing such a model for wildlife and fisheries resources.

  5. 40 CFR Appendix X to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false X Appendix X to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix X to Part 268...

  6. 28 CFR 551.60 - Volunteer community service projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Procedure (see 28 CFR part 542). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Volunteer community service projects. 551... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Volunteer Community Service Projects § 551.60 Volunteer community service...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10034 - Substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted nitrobenzonitrile, diazotized...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Substituted pyridine coupled with... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10034 Substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted... as substituted pyridine coupled with diazotized substituted nitrobenzonitrile, diazotized...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10214 - Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha... Poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted carbomonocycle-.omega.-substituted carbomonocycle (generic... identified generically as poly(oxyalkylenediyl),.alpha.-substituted...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 58 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false B Appendix B to Part 58 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Appendix B to Part 58...

  10. 40 CFR 81.400 - Scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Scope. 81.400 Section 81.400 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF... Service (FS)....

  11. 32 CFR 635.30 - Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of... Establishing domestic violence Memoranda of Understanding. (a) Coordination between military law enforcement..., especially concerning domestic violence investigations, arrests, and prosecutions involving...

  12. 28 CFR 513.35 - Accounting/nonaccounting of disclosures to third parties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... contained in 28 CFR 16.52. ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accounting/nonaccounting of disclosures... JUSTICE GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION ACCESS TO RECORDS Release of Information General...

  13. 40 CFR 205.57 - Selective enforcement auditing requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing requirements. 205.57 Section 205.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE... Selective enforcement auditing requirements....

  14. 40 CFR 204.57 - Selective enforcement auditing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Selective enforcement auditing. 204.57 Section 204.57 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT... enforcement auditing....

  15. 32 CFR 202.13 - Technical assistance for public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... TAPP regulations located in 32 CFR Part 203. ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Technical assistance for public participation... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS RESTORATION ADVISORY BOARDS Administrative Support, Funding,...

  16. 40 CFR 721.9480 - Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9480 Resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted... chemical substance identified generically as resorcinol, formaldehyde substituted carbomonocycle resin...

  17. 40 CFR 74.45 - Reduced utilization for process sources. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reduced utilization for process sources. 74.45 Section 74.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR....45 Reduced utilization for process sources....

  18. 36 CFR 242.18 - Regulation adoption process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accordance with 43 CFR part 14. ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulation adoption process... SUBSISTENCE MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS FOR PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA Program Structure § 242.18 Regulation...

  19. 34 CFR 1100.32 - What is the duration of a fellowship?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 CFR 74.61. ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What is the duration of a fellowship? 1100.32 Section... INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM What...

  20. 40 CFR 745.230 - Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: public and commercial...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Work practice standards for conducting lead-based paint activities: public and commercial buildings, bridges and superstructures. 745.230... commercial buildings, bridges and superstructures....

  1. 32 CFR 989.12 - AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact Analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... record the focusing of environmental issues. ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false AF Form 813, Request for Environmental Impact... FORCE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ANALYSIS PROCESS (EIAP) § 989.12 AF Form...

  2. 40 CFR 300.220 - Related Title III issues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... are found in 40 CFR part 355. ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Related Title III issues. 300.220 Section 300.220 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SUPERFUND,...

  3. 33 CFR 55.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Purpose. 55.1 Section 55.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL CHILD DEVELOPMENT... Child Development Services....

  4. 30 CFR 75.1708-1 - Surface structures; fireproof construction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Surface structures; fireproof construction. 75... Surface structures; fireproof construction. Structures of fireproof construction is interpreted to mean structures with fireproof exterior surfaces....

  5. 40 CFR 501.18 - Prohibition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... writing under 40 CFR 123.44. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prohibition. 501.18 Section 501.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SEWAGE SLUDGE STATE SLUDGE...

  6. 40 CFR 49.10104 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10104 Section 49.10104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  7. 40 CFR 49.10344 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10344 Section 49.10344 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  8. 40 CFR 49.11014 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.11014 Section 49.11014 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  9. 40 CFR 49.10374 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10374 Section 49.10374 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  10. 40 CFR 49.9864 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.9864 Section 49.9864 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... surveillance....

  11. 40 CFR 49.11074 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.11074 Section 49.11074 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  12. 40 CFR 49.10954 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10954 Section 49.10954 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  13. 40 CFR 49.9894 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.9894 Section 49.9894 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... surveillance....

  14. 40 CFR 49.9954 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.9954 Section 49.9954 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... surveillance....

  15. 40 CFR 49.10494 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10494 Section 49.10494 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... Source surveillance....

  16. 40 CFR 49.11104 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.11104 Section 49.11104 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  17. 40 CFR 49.10194 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10194 Section 49.10194 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  18. 40 CFR 49.10284 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10284 Section 49.10284 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... Source surveillance....

  19. 40 CFR 49.10674 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10674 Section 49.10674 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... Source surveillance....

  20. 40 CFR 49.10924 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10924 Section 49.10924 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  1. 40 CFR 49.10854 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10854 Section 49.10854 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  2. 40 CFR 49.9984 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.9984 Section 49.9984 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... Source surveillance....

  3. 40 CFR 49.9924 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.9924 Section 49.9924 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE... surveillance....

  4. 40 CFR 49.10764 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10764 Section 49.10764 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  5. 40 CFR 49.10704 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10704 Section 49.10704 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... Source surveillance....

  6. 40 CFR 49.10434 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10434 Section 49.10434 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  7. 40 CFR 49.10134 - Source surveillance. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Source surveillance. 49.10134 Section 49.10134 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER FEDERAL... surveillance....

  8. 38 CFR 17.64 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 17.64 Section 17.64 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Community Residential Care § 17.64...

  9. 40 CFR 799.19 - Chemical imports and exports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the requirements of 40 CFR part 707. ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Chemical imports and exports. 799.19... CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) IDENTIFICATION OF SPECIFIC CHEMICAL SUBSTANCE AND MIXTURE TESTING...

  10. 40 CFR 19.3 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 19.3 Section 19.3 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL ADJUSTMENT OF CIVIL MONETARY PENALTIES FOR INFLATION § 19.3...

  11. 28 CFR 544.32 - Goals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... activities (see 28 CFR 544.81). ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Goals. 544.32 Section 544.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT EDUCATION Inmate...

  12. 28 CFR 551.81 - Manuscript preparation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manuscript preparation. 551.81 Section... MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Manuscripts § 551.81 Manuscript preparation. An inmate may prepare a manuscript for private... to prepare a manuscript....

  13. 40 CFR 211.206 - Methods for measurement of sound attenuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methods for measurement of sound attenuation. 211.206 Section 211.206 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... measurement of sound attenuation....

  14. 28 CFR 33.51 - Audit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Audit. 33.51 Section 33.51 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE BUREAU OF JUSTICE ASSISTANCE GRANT PROGRAMS Criminal Justice Block Grants... Justice Programs....

  15. 40 CFR 147.2752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2752 Section 147.2752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS....2752 Aquifer exemptions....

  16. 40 CFR 147.2152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2152 Section 147.2152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  17. 40 CFR 147.1402 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1402 Section 147.1402 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  18. 40 CFR 147.1302 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1302 Section 147.1302 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  19. 40 CFR 147.152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.152 Section 147.152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  20. 40 CFR 147.1152 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1152 Section 147.1152 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  1. 40 CFR 147.252 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.252 Section 147.252 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  2. 40 CFR 147.652 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.652 Section 147.652 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  3. 40 CFR 147.502 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.502 Section 147.502 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  4. 40 CFR 147.2852 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.2852 Section 147.2852 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Pacific Islands § 147.2852 Aquifer exemptions....

  5. 40 CFR 147.902 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.902 Section 147.902 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  6. 40 CFR 147.1202 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1202 Section 147.1202 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  7. 40 CFR 147.1802 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1802 Section 147.1802 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  8. 40 CFR 147.752 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.752 Section 147.752 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  9. 40 CFR 147.1452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.1452 Section 147.1452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... Aquifer exemptions....

  10. 40 CFR 147.452 - Aquifer exemptions. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Aquifer exemptions. 147.452 Section 147.452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS... § 147.452 Aquifer exemptions....

  11. 40 CFR 429.66 - Pretreatment standards for new sources (PSNS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for new...

  12. 40 CFR 429.115 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  13. 40 CFR 429.45 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  14. 40 CFR 429.25 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  15. 40 CFR 429.155 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subject to this subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  16. 40 CFR 429.146 - Pretreatment standards for new sources (PSNS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this subpart which introduce process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for new...

  17. 40 CFR 429.56 - Pretreatment standards for new sources (PSNS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for new...

  18. 40 CFR 429.135 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  19. 40 CFR 429.126 - Pretreatment standards for new sources (PSNS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... this subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for new...

  20. 40 CFR 429.65 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  1. 40 CFR 429.145 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subject to this subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  2. 40 CFR 429.125 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... source subject to this subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  3. 40 CFR 429.156 - Pretreatment standards for new sources (PSNS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which introduces process wastewater pollutants into publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for new...

  4. 40 CFR 429.55 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  5. 40 CFR 429.35 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  6. 40 CFR 445.3 - General pretreatment standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subject to this part that introduces wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works (POTW) must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General pretreatment standards....

  7. 40 CFR 429.105 - Pretreatment standards for existing sources (PSES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... subpart which introduces process wastewater pollutants into a publicly owned treatment works must comply with 40 CFR part 403. ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pretreatment standards for...

  8. 40 CFR 91.906 - Responsibility under other legal provisions preserved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... under any provision of law. ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibility under other legal... Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 91.906 Responsibility under...

  9. 40 CFR 94.407 - Responsibility under other legal provisions preserved.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... notice under any provision of law. ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibility under other legal...-related Defect Reporting Requirements, Voluntary Emission Recall Program § 94.407 Responsibility...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix V to Part 268 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false V Appendix V to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) LAND DISPOSAL RESTRICTIONS Appendix V to Part 268...

  11. 40 CFR 468.16 - Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Effluent limitations representing the degree of effluent reduction attainable by the application of the best conventional pollution control... best conventional pollution control technology (BCT)....

  12. 30 CFR 41.12 - Changes; notification by operator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Changes; notification by operator. 41.12... Changes; notification by operator. Within 30 days after the occurrence of any change in the information... of such change....

  13. 32 CFR 324.13 - Access to medical and psychological records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Program’ (see 32 CFR part 310). ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to medical and psychological records. 324... to medical and psychological records. Individual access to medical and psychological records...

  14. 33 CFR 117.671 - Upper Mississippi River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Upper Mississippi River. 117.671... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Minnesota § 117.671 Upper Mississippi River. (a) The.... Mississippi...

  15. 30 CFR 256.38 - Joint bidding provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Joint bidding provisions. 256.38 Section 256.38 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE....38 Joint bidding provisions....

  16. 30 CFR 1206.152 - Valuation standards-unprocessed gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Interior, 43 CFR part 2. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Valuation standards-unprocessed gas. 1206.152... INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue PRODUCT VALUATION Federal Gas § 1206.152 Valuation...

  17. 28 CFR 104.42 - Applicable state law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Applicable state law. 104.42 Section 104.42 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND... on behalf of the victim....

  18. 28 CFR 105.24 - Employee's rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 CFR 16.34. ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employee's rights. 105.24 Section 105.24 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIMINAL HISTORY BACKGROUND CHECKS...

  19. 40 CFR 141.718 - Treatment performance toolbox components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Treatment for... performance. The State may approve Cryptosporidium treatment credit for drinking water treatment processes... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Treatment performance...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 58 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false F Appendix F to Part 58 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) AMBIENT AIR QUALITY SURVEILLANCE Appendix F to Part 58...

  1. 38 CFR 48.655 - Individual.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Individual. 48.655...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.655 Individual. Individual means a natural person....

  2. 40 CFR 240.203 - General design.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General design. 240.203 Section 240.203 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES GUIDELINES FOR... design....

  3. 32 CFR 736.6 - Certification prior to disposition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Certification prior to disposition. 736.6 Section 736.6 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PROCUREMENT... defense of the United States....

  4. 40 CFR 35.4175 - What other reporting and record keeping requirements are there?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements in the terms and conditions of the “grant agreement”; (b) Keep complete financial records... CFR part 30. ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What other reporting and record...

  5. 32 CFR 644.81 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false General. 644.81 Section 644.81 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK... survey and exploration....

  6. 40 CFR 246.200 - High-grade paper recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false High-grade paper recovery. 246.200 Section 246.200 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES SOURCE... paper recovery....

  7. 40 CFR 1039.110 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false 1039.110 Section 1039.110 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS CONTROL OF... Requirements § 1039.110...

  8. 40 CFR 1508.24 - Referring agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Referring agency. 1508.24 Section 1508.24 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.24... or environmental quality....

  9. 29 CFR 1471.880 - What factors may influence the debarring official during reconsideration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What factors may influence the debarring official during... may influence the debarring official during reconsideration? The debarring official may reduce or... debarring official finds appropriate....

  10. 77 FR 2317 - Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... National Park Service Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY... Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting via conference call. Designated... National Historic Trail, telephone: (410) 260-2471. DATES: The Captain John Smith Chesapeake...

  11. 77 FR 27621 - Special Local Regulations and Safety Zone; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemorations, Chesapeake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... Bicentennial Commemorations, Chesapeake Bay and Port of Baltimore, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 15323... Zone; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemorations, Chesapeake Bay and Port of Baltimore, MD AGENCY: Coast... local regulations and a safety zone in the Chesapeake Bay and Port of Baltimore, Maryland for War...

  12. 77 FR 64352 - Notice of Meeting for Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Meeting for Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory... Advisory Committee on the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail will hold a meeting...-1609 voyages of Captain John Smith to chart the land and waterways of the Chesapeake Bay. This...

  13. DEVELOP Chesapeake Bay Watershed Hydrology - UAV Sensor Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, S. D.; Baruah, A.

    2008-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in the United States, with a watershed extending through six states and the nation's capital. Urbanization and agriculture practices have led to an excess runoff of nutrients and sediment into the bay. Nutrients and sediment loading stimulate the growth of algal blooms associated with various problems including localized dissolved oxygen deficiencies, toxic algal blooms and death of marine life. The Chesapeake Bay Program, among other stakeholder organizations, contributes greatly to the restoration efforts of the Chesapeake Bay. These stakeholders contribute in many ways such as monitoring the water quality, leading clean-up projects, and actively restoring native habitats. The first stage of the DEVELOP Chesapeake Bay Coastal Management project, relating to water quality, contributed to the restoration efforts by introducing NASA satellite-based water quality data products to the stakeholders as a complement to their current monitoring methods. The second stage, to be initiated in the fall 2008 internship term, will focus on the impacts of land cover variability within the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. Multiple student led discussions with members of the Land Cover team at the Chesapeake Bay Program Office in the DEVELOP GSFC 2008 summer term uncovered the need for remote sensing data for hydrological mapping in the watershed. The Chesapeake Bay Program expressed in repeated discussions on Land Cover mapping that significant portions of upper river areas, streams, and the land directly interfacing those waters are not accurately depicted in the watershed model. Without such hydrological mapping correlated with land cover data the model will not be useful in depicting source areas of nutrient loading which has an ecological and economic impact in and around the Chesapeake Bay. The fall 2008 DEVELOP team will examine the use of UAV flown sensors in connection with in-situ and Earth Observation satellite data. To maximize the

  14. Measurements of spectral attenuation coefficients in the lower Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The spectral transmission was measured for water samples taken in the lower Chesapeake Bay to allow characterization of several optical properties. The coefficients of total attenuation, particle attenuation, and absorption by dissolved organic matter were determined over a wavelength range from 3500 A to 8000 A. The data were taken over a 3 year period and at a number of sites so that an indication of spatial and temporal variations could be obtained. The attenuations determined in this work are, on the average, 10 times greater than those obtained by Hulburt in 1944, which are commonly accepted in the literature for Chesapeake Bay attenuation.

  15. Total plankton respiration in the Chesapeake Bay plume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, C. N.; Thomas, J. P.

    1981-01-01

    Total plankton respiration (TPR) was measured at 17 stations within the Chesapeake Bay plume off the Virginia coast during March, June, and October 1980. Elevated rates of TPR, as well as higher concentrations of chlorophyll a and phaeopigment a, were found to be associated with the Bay plume during each survey. The TPR rates within the Bay plume were close to those found associated with the Hudson River plume for comparable times of the year. The data examined indicate that the Chesapeake Bay plume stimulates biological activity and is a source of organic loading to the contiguous shelf ecosystem.

  16. Ecosystem Services and Environmental Markets in Chesapeake Bay Restoration

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report contains two separate analyses, both of which make use of an optimization framework previously developed to evaluate trade-offs in alternative restoration strategies to achieve the Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL). The first analysis expands on model app...

  17. The Chesapeake College Social Sciences Exposition and Fair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Conway

    A Social Sciences Exposition and Fair has been conducted annually by Chesapeake College since 1978 as part of an effort to involve high school students and community organizations in competitive, academic events related to the social sciences and history, and to encourage faculty to participate in student recruitment. The first fair, held in…

  18. Elementary Teacher's Resource Manual, Lightship Chesapeake, 1973-1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC. National Capital Parks.

    This resource guide was written to help teachers prepare students for a tour of the Lightship Chesapeake in Washington, D.C. However, much of the information would be useful in any unit on marine biology and water pollution. A glossary of nautical terms is included as well as possible laboratory assignments and related activities in such areas as…

  19. EUTROPHICATION OF CHESAPEAKE BAY: HISTORICAL TRENDS AND ECOLOGICAL INTERACTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides an integrated synthesis with timelines and evaluations of ecological responses to eutrophication in Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the USA. Analyses of dated sediment cores reveal initial evidence of organic enrichment in approximately 200 y-old strat...

  20. Schizotypy and false memory.

    PubMed

    Dagnall, Neil; Parker, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm the present study examined the relationship between schizotypy and recognition memory. Participants scoring in the upper and lower quartile ranges for schizotypy (Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire brief version; SPQ-B) and on each of the SPQ-B subscales (cognitive-perceptual, interpersonal and disorganized) were compared on true and false memory performance. Participants scoring in the lower quartile range on the cognitive-perceptual subscale recognised a higher proportion of both true and false memories than those scoring in the higher quartile range. Participants scoring in the upper quartile on the interpersonal factor recognised fewer true items than those in the lower quartile range. No differences were found for overall schizotypy or on the disorganized subscale. PMID:18817907

  1. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... transit the waterway, and other special conditions and requirements which will govern the movement of... transit the canal. (e) Anchorage and wharfage facilities. The anchorage basin at Chesapeake City and free... breadth of this type of tow which may transit the canal are as described in rules governing...

  2. Moon - False Color Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This false-color photograph is a composite of 15 images of the Moon taken through three color filters by Galileo's solid-state imaging system during the spacecraft's passage through the Earth-Moon system on December 8, 1992. When this view was obtained, the spacecraft was 425,000 kilometers (262,000 miles) from the Moon and 69,000 kilometers (43,000 miles) from Earth. The false-color processing used to create this lunar image is helpful for interpreting the surface soil composition. Areas appearing red generally correspond to the lunar highlands, while blue to orange shades indicate the ancient volcanic lava flow of a mare, or lunar sea. Bluer mare areas contain more titanium than do the orange regions. Mare Tranquillitatis, seen as a deep blue patch on the right, is richer in titanium than Mare Serenitatis, a slightly smaller circular area immediately adjacent to the upper left of Mare Tranquillitatis. Blue and orange areas covering much of the left side of the Moon in this view represent many separate lava flows in Oceanus Procellarum. The small purple areas found near the center are pyroclastic deposits formed by explosive volcanic eruptions. The fresh crater Tycho, with a diameter of 85 kilometers (53 miles), is prominent at the bottom of the photograph, where part of the Moon's disk is missing.

  3. 33 CFR 167.200 - In the approaches to Chesapeake Bay Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Eastern Approach, and a Southern Approach. The Southern Approach consists of inbound and outbound lanes... Approaches to Chesapeake Bay should use the appropriate inbound or outbound traffic lane....

  4. 33 CFR 167.200 - In the approaches to Chesapeake Bay Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Eastern Approach, and a Southern Approach. The Southern Approach consists of inbound and outbound lanes... Approaches to Chesapeake Bay should use the appropriate inbound or outbound traffic lane....

  5. 33 CFR 167.200 - In the approaches to Chesapeake Bay Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Eastern Approach, and a Southern Approach. The Southern Approach consists of inbound and outbound lanes... Approaches to Chesapeake Bay should use the appropriate inbound or outbound traffic lane....

  6. 33 CFR 167.200 - In the approaches to Chesapeake Bay Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Eastern Approach, and a Southern Approach. The Southern Approach consists of inbound and outbound lanes... Approaches to Chesapeake Bay should use the appropriate inbound or outbound traffic lane....

  7. 33 CFR 167.200 - In the approaches to Chesapeake Bay Traffic Separation Scheme: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Eastern Approach, and a Southern Approach. The Southern Approach consists of inbound and outbound lanes... Approaches to Chesapeake Bay should use the appropriate inbound or outbound traffic lane....

  8. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  9. Callisto False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This false color picture of Callisto was taken by Voyager 2 on July 7, 1979 at a range of 1,094,666 kilometers (677,000 miles) and is centered on 11 degrees N and 171 degrees W. This rendition uses an ultraviolet image for the blue component. Because the surface displays regional contrast in UV, variations in surface materials are apparent. Notice in particular the dark blue haloes which surround bright craters in the eastern hemisphere. The surface of Callisto is the most heavily cratered of the Galilean satellites and resembles ancient heavily cratered terrains on the moon, Mercury and Mars. The bright areas are ejecta thrown out by relatively young impact craters. A large ringed structure, probably an impact basin, is shown in the upper left part of the picture. The color version of this picture was constructed by compositing black and white images taken through the ultraviolet, clear and orange filters.

  10. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  11. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  12. Neptune in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    In this false color image of Neptune, objects that are deep in the atmosphere are blue, while those at higher altitudes are white. The image was taken by Voyager 2's wide-angle camera through an orange filter and two different methane filters. Light at methane wavelengths is mostly absorbed in the deeper atmosphere. The bright, white feature is a high altitude cloud just south of the Great Dark Spot. The hard, sharp inner boundary within the bright cloud is an artifact of computer processing on Earth. Other, smaller clouds associated with the Great Dark Spot are white or pink, and are also at high altitudes. Neptune's limb looks reddish because Voyager 2 is viewing it tangentially, and the sunlight is scattered back to space before it can be absorbed by the methane. A long, narrow band of high altitude clouds near the top of the image is located at 25 degrees north latitude, and faint hazes mark the equator and polar regions. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  13. Management of Urban Stormwater Runoff in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hogan, Dianna M.

    2008-01-01

    Urban and suburban development is associated with elevated nutrients, sediment, and other pollutants in stormwater runoff, impacting the physical and environmental health of area streams and downstream water bodies such as the Chesapeake Bay. Stormwater management facilities, also known as Best Management Practices (BMPs), are increasingly being used in urban areas to replace functions, such as flood protection and water quality improvement, originally performed by wetlands and riparian areas. Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have partnered with local, academic, and other Federal agency scientists to better understand the effectiveness of different stormwater management systems with respect to Chesapeake Bay health. Management of stormwater runoff is necessary in urban areas to address flooding and water quality concerns. Improving our understanding of what stormwater management actions may be best suited for different types of developed areas could help protect the environmental health of downstream water bodies that ultimately receive runoff from urban landscapes.

  14. False Color Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft were used to produce this false-color composite of Jupiter's northern aurora on the night side of the planet. The height of the aurora, the thickness of the auroral arc, and the small-scale structure are revealed for the first time. Images in Galileo's red, green, and clear filters are displayed in red, green, and blue respectively. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size, which is a ten-fold improvement over Hubble Space Telescope images and a hundred-fold improvement over ground-based images.

    The glow is caused by electrically charged particles impinging on the atmosphere from above. The particles travel along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which are nearly vertical at this latitude. The auroral arc marks the boundary between the 'closed' field lines that are attached to the planet at both ends and the 'open' field lines that extend out into interplanetary space. At the boundary the particles have been accelerated over the greatest distances, and the glow is especially intense.

    The latitude-longitude lines refer to altitudes where the pressure is 1 bar. The image shows that the auroral emissions originate about 500 kilometers (about 310 miles) above this surface. The colored background is light scattered from Jupiter's bright crescent, which is out of view to the right. North is at the top. The images are centered at 57 degrees north and 184 degrees west and were taken on April 2, 1997 at a range of 1.7 million kilometers (1.05 million miles) by Galileo's Solid State Imaging (SSI) system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at: http:// galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at: http:/ /www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  15. Chesapeake Bay: an unprecedented decline in submerged aquatic vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Orth, R.J.; Moore, K.A.

    1983-10-07

    Data on the distribution and abundance of submerged aquatic vegetation in Chesapeake Bay indicate a significant reduction in all species in all sections of the bay during the last 15 to 20 years. This decline is unprecedented in the bay's recent history. The reduction in one major species, Zostera marina, may be greater than the decline that occurred during the pandemic demise of the 1930's. 19 references, 2 figures.

  16. Infrared view of Chesapeake Bay showing Virginia, Maryland and Delaware

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    An infrared, near view of the Chesapeake Bay area showing portions of Virginia, Maryland and Delaware, as photographed from the Apollo spacecraft in Earth orbit during the joint U.S.-USSR Apollo Soyuz Test Project (ASTP) mission. Richmond and Norfolk can be seen in this picture. Tidewater, Virginia covers much of this view. The photograph was taken at an altitude of 217 kilometers (135 statute miles).

  17. Chesapeake Bay subsidence monitored as wetlands loss continues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerem, R. S.; van Dam, T. M.; Schenewerk, M. S.

    Fragile wetland ecosystems, which support an abundance of wildlife, are being lost around the Chesapeake Bay at an alarming rate due to an increase in sea level. For example, one third of the total area of the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge (Figure 1) (approximately 20 km2) was lost between 1938 and 1979 [Leatherman, 1992]. Approximately 4,100 km2 of the perimeter of the Chesapeake Bay are covered by wetlands of which 58% forested wetlands and 28% are salt marshes. It is likely that many factors are responsible for the wetlands loss, some that have global implications, and some that reflect local phenomena.Understanding the mechanisms responsible for wetlands deterioration and loss, however, has been impeded by the lack of adequate data including quantitative monitoring of the types and distribution of flora, Tthe boundaries of specific habitat types, and data on the spatial variations in sea level and land subsidence. This article focuses on the latter problem, which is to determine the relative roles of sea level rise and land subsidence in the region. Over the past four years, a small network of Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been installed near tide gauges in the Chesapeake Bay to help determine the cause of relative sea level rise in this region. These receivers are just beginning to yield results.

  18. Recent estuarine deposits, Chesapeake Bay and Apalachicola Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Donoghue, J.F.

    1985-02-01

    Estuarine facies are not easily discernible in the ancient record, because they represent a transition stage between fluvial and marine deposits. Modern estuarine sediments, nevertheless, are widespread because of the ongoing marine transgression. This widespread occurrence indicates that, during a highstand, estuaries are important centers for deposition of sediments shed from the continents. Sedimentologic studies have been made of 2 major estuaries: Chesapeake Bay (the largest US estuary) and Apalachicola Bay (estuary of the largest river in Florida). A detailed sediment budget for the Chesapeake, using radiotracers, clay mineralogy, magnetic stratigraphy, and other methods, demonstrates that the estuary is filling rapidly with sediment. Its remaining sedimentologic lifetime can be measured in centuries. Most of this filling has come at the expense of shoreline erosion. The rate of sedimentation, as measured by C-14, Pb-210, and Cs-137, has accelerated sharply over the past 2 centuries, from a few millimeters per year to present rates of a few centimeters per year. Sediment trapping effectiveness of the Chesapeake is nearly 100%. For Apalachicola Bay, the filling rate has been slower, although it appears to be nearly as efficient in retaining sediment. It has undergone a comparable change in sedimentation rates and sources over the past few centuries, as shown by magnetic stratigraphy and clay mineralogy. Given favorable conditions, such estuaries might be expected to contribute relatively thin but areally extensive bodies of fine-grained sediment to the rock record.

  19. COMPARISON OF TWO INDICES OF BENTHIC COMMUNITY CONDITION IN CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chesapeake Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity (B-IBI) and the EMAP-VP Benthic Index were applied to samples from 239 sites in Chesapeake Bay. The B-IBI weights several community measures equally and uses a simple scoring system while the EMAP-VP Benthic Index uses discriminant...

  20. Managing manure for sustainable livestock production in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure presents one of the greatest challenges to livestock operations in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed. The Chesapeake Bay is threatened by excessive nutrient loadings and, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, manure is the source of 18% of the nitrogen and 27% of the phosphorus en...

  1. Bay BC's: A Multidisciplinary Approach To Teaching about the Chesapeake Bay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slattery, Britt Eckhardt

    The Chesapeake Bay is the largest estuary in North America, providing food and habitat for an abundance of fish and wildlife. This booklet provides lesson plans for lower elementary students introducing the Chesapeake, its inhabitants, and pollution problems, and suggesting ways that individuals can contribute to the Bay's restoration. Background…

  2. Best management practices for reducing nutrient loads in a sub-watershed of Chesapeake Bay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality improvement in the Chesapeake Bay is a grave concern. An initiative to reduce the nutrient loads to stream has been undertaken to attain a target total maximum daily load (TMDL) at Chesapeake Bay. A general guideline with a set of best management practices (BMPs) has been in place for ...

  3. Best management practices for reducing nutrient loads in a sub-watershed of Chesapeake Bay area

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Water quality improvement in the Chesapeake Bay is a grave concern. An initiative to reduce the nutrient loads to stream has been undertaken to attain a target total maximum daily load (TMDL) at Chesapeake Bay. A general guideline with a set of best management practices (BMPs) has been in place for ...

  4. MARYLAND/VIRGINIA CHESAPEAKE BAY AND TRIBUTARIES IN SITU FLUORESCENCE PROFILES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Chesapeake Bay Program, surface to bottom fluorescence measurements (vertical profiles) have been made at fixed sampling stations in the upper Chesapeake Bay, Maryland tributaries, and the Potomac River since July 1984. The data through December of 1995 are availab...

  5. APPLICATION OF TWO INDICES OF BENTHIC COMMUNITY CONDITION IN CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chesapeake Bay Benthic Index of Biotic Integrity (B-161) and the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program's Virginian Province Benthic Index (EMAP-VP BI) were applied to 294 sampling events in Chesapeake Bay and the results were compared. These benthic indices are inte...

  6. 77 FR 15323 - Special Local Regulations and Safety Zone; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemorations, Chesapeake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may...; War of 1812 Bicentennial Commemorations, Chesapeake Bay and Port of Baltimore, MD AGENCY: Coast Guard... special local regulations and safety zone in the Chesapeake Bay and Port of Baltimore, Maryland for War...

  7. 76 FR 12356 - A Method To Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ...: Application in the Chesapeake Bay'' (EPA/600/R-10/096a), announced earlier (76 FR 4345, January 25, 2011). EPA... received during the public comment period from August 31 to November 1, 2010 (announced in 75 FR 168... AGENCY A Method To Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay...

  8. THE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY: A SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS OF TOXIC TRACE ELEMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) efforts in a multidisciplinary study of the Chesapeake Bay coordinated by the Chesapeake Bay Program Office of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The NBS used the best available technology to determine the trace ...

  9. 76 FR 4345 - A Method To Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... AGENCY A Method To Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay AGENCY... review draft document titled, ``A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the.../conferences/peerreview/register-chesapeake.htm . The draft ``A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant...

  10. Derivation of Habitat-Specific Dissolved Oxygen Criteria for Chesapeake Bay and its Tidal Tributaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chesapeake 2000 Agreement committed its state and federal signatories to “define the water quality conditions necessary to protect aquatic living resources” in the Chesapeake Bay (USA) and its tidal tributaries. Hypoxia is one of the key water quality issues addressed as a re...

  11. 75 FR 37462 - Official Trail Marker for the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... National Park Service Official Trail Marker for the Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail....S.C. 701. SUMMARY: This notice issues the official trail marker insignias of the Captain John Smith... John Maounis, Superintendent, Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail. The...

  12. 75 FR 27552 - Guidance for Federal Land Management in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... Information Executive Order 13508, Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration, dated May 12, 2009 (74 FR 23099... 24, 2010 (75 FR 91294, March 24). This final guidance incorporates revisions resulting from public... water pollution'' that are appropriate to restore and protect the Chesapeake Bay. Assuming that...

  13. The Chesapeake: A Boating Guide to Weather. Educational Series Number 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucy, Jon; And Others

    The purpose of this publication is to promote a better understanding of how basic weather features develop on Chesapeake Bay and enable boaters to enjoy the Bay's unique waterways. Sections include: (1) Chesapeake Bay climate; (2) general weather features; (3) seasonal trends; (4) sources of weather information and forecasts; (5) weather service…

  14. Possible role of remote sensing for increasing public awareness of the Chesapeake Bay environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, T. D.; Maher, P. A.; Billings, G.; Cressy, P. J.; Jarman, J. W.; Macleod, N. H.; Trombka, J. I.; Wisner, T.

    1978-01-01

    Application of remote sensing techniques to the study of the Chesapeake Bay and the availability of the resulting information are discussed in terms of public awareness of the Chesapeake Bay, its total environment, and the need to protect that environment and to preserve the Bay. Recommendations given include: (1) continue the study of remote sensing technology and its use in the Chesapeake Bay region; (2) emphasize the importance of LANDSAT imagery to the evolution of remote sensing technological developments and the awareness of the environment and its changes; (3) increase dissemination of information of the environmental applications of remote sensing technology to the public; (4) design surveys of the Chesapeake Bay environment and its manmade changes; and (5) establish a coordinating regional institution to develop a management plan for the Chesapeake Bay.

  15. Investigations on classification categories for wetlands of Chesapeake Bay using remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. S. L.

    1974-01-01

    The use of remote sensors to determine the characteristics of the wetlands of the Chesapeake Bay and surrounding areas is discussed. The objectives of the program are stated as follows: (1) to use data and remote sensing techniques developed from studies of Rhode River, West River, and South River salt marshes to develop a wetland classification scheme useful in other regions of the Chesapeake Bay and to evaluate the classification system with respect to vegetation types, marsh physiography, man-induced perturbation, and salinity; and (2) to develop a program using remote sensing techniques, for the extension of the classification to Chesapeake Bay salt marshes and to coordinate this program with the goals of the Chesapeake Research Consortium and the states of Maryland and Virginia. Maps of the Chesapeake Bay areas are developed from aerial photographs to display the wetland structure and vegetation.

  16. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > For Teens > Diabetes: ... which are false. Eating too much sugar causes diabetes. False: Type 1 diabetes happens when the cells ...

  17. Diabetes: What's True and False?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sledding, Skiing, Snowboarding, Skating Crushes What's a Booger? Diabetes: What's True and False? KidsHealth > For Kids > Diabetes: ... True or False: Eating Too Much Sugar Causes Diabetes False: When kids get type 1 diabetes , it's ...

  18. Application of the benthic index of biotic integrity to environmental monitoring in Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Llansó, Roberto J; Dauer, Daniel M; Vølstad, Jon H; Scott, Lisa C

    2003-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay benthic index of biotic integrity (B-IBI) was developed to assess benthic community health and environmental quality in Chesapeake Bay. The B-IBI provides Chesapeake Bay monitoring programs with a uniform tool with which to characterize bay-wide benthic community condition and assess the health of the Bay. A probability-based design permits unbiased annual estimates of areal degradation within the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries with quantifiable precision. However, of greatest interest to managers is the identification of problem areas most in need of restoration. Here we apply the B-IBI to benthic data collected in the Bay since 1994 to assess benthic community degradation by Chesapeake Bay Program segment and water depth. We used a new B-IBI classification system that improves the reliability of the estimates of degradation. Estimates were produced for 67 Chesapeake Bay Program segments. Greatest degradation was found in areas that are known to experience hypoxia or show toxic contamination, such as the mesohaline portion of the Potomac River, the Patapsco River, and the Maryland mainstem. Logistic regression models revealed increased probability of degraded benthos with depth for the lower Potomac River, Patapsco River. Nanticoke River, lower York River, and the Maryland mainstem. Our assessment of degradation by segment and water depth provided greater resolution of relative condition than previously available, and helped define the extent of degradation in Chesapeake Bay. PMID:12620013

  19. Occurrence and toxicology of heavy metals in Chesapeake Bay waterfowl

    SciTech Connect

    Di Giulio, R.T.

    1982-01-01

    The goals of this study were to elucidate relationships between food habits and tissue accumulations of heavy metals in Chesapeake Bay waterfowl and to determine effects of chronic cadmium and lead ingestion on energy metabolism in waterfowl. In combination with an imposed food restriction, cadmium ingestion appeared to alter some indices of energy metabolism, such as plasma concentrations of free fatty acids and triiodothyronine, at dietary cadmium levels far below those eliciting similar responses in the absence of a food restriction. Those results suggest the importance of considering interactions with other stressors when examining potential effects of environmental contaminants on wild animals.

  20. False Position, Double False Position and Cramer's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We state and prove the methods of False Position (Regula Falsa) and Double False Position (Regula Duorum Falsorum). The history of both is traced from ancient Egypt and China through the work of Fibonacci, ending with a connection between Double False Position and Cramer's Rule.

  1. Predicting potentially toxigenic Pseudo-nitzschia blooms in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Clarissa R.; Sapiano, Mathew R. P.; Prasad, M. Bala Krishna; Long, Wen; Tango, Peter J.; Brown, Christopher W.; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2010-11-01

    Harmful algal blooms are now recognized as a significant threat to the Chesapeake Bay as they can severely compromise the economic viability of important recreational and commercial fisheries in the largest estuary of the United States. This study describes the development of empirical models for the potentially domoic acid-producing Pseudo-nitzschia species complex present in the Bay, developed from a 22-year time series of cell abundance and concurrent measurements of hydrographic and chemical properties. Using a logistic Generalized Linear Model (GLM) approach, model parameters and performance were compared over a range of Pseudo-nitzschia bloom thresholds relevant to toxin production by different species. Small-threshold blooms (≥10 cells mL -1) are explained by time of year, location, and variability in surface values of phosphate, temperature, nitrate plus nitrite, and freshwater discharge. Medium- (100 cells mL -1) to large- threshold (1000 cells mL -1) blooms are further explained by salinity, silicic acid, dissolved organic carbon, and light attenuation (Secchi) depth. These predictors are similar to other models for Pseudo-nitzschia blooms on the west coast, suggesting commonalities across ecosystems. Hindcasts of bloom probabilities at a 19% bloom prediction point yield a Heidke Skill Score of ~53%, a Probability of Detection ˜ 75%, a False Alarm Ratio of ˜ 52%, and a Probability of False Detection ˜9%. The implication of possible future changes in Baywide nutrient stoichiometry on Pseudo-nitzschia blooms is discussed.

  2. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed. PMID:23639921

  3. Impact of Hurricane Isabel on Hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Li, M.

    2008-12-01

    Episodic forcing by tropical storms and hurricanes often consists of high winds, heavy precipitation, increased freshwater flow, strong vertical mixing, and intense pulses of nutrients, leading to enhanced plankton biomass and temporary relief or termination of hypoxic condition in estuaries and coastal oceans. The U.S. East and Gulf Coasts have experienced elevated tropical storm and hurricane activity in recent years, a pattern expected to persist for several more decades and that may increase due to global warming. Therefore, there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms governing the response of a coastal ecosystem to extreme weather events. Here we present a preliminary modeling investigation into Chesapeake Bay's response to Hurricane Isabel which made landfall at the Outer Banks of North Carolina and moved past the Bay on 18 and 19 Sept 2003. Strong storm winds eroded stratification and produced strong turbulent mixing which injected bottom nutrients to the surface euphotic layer and aerated the hypoxic bottom water. After the passage of the storm, however, the horizontal salinity gradient drove restratification and return to hypoxia in bottom water as well as producing a post-storm phytoplankton bloom. Using a coupled hydrodynamic-biogeochemical model, we conduct numerical experiments to investigate how the hurricane-induced destratification and restratification cycle affects the distribution of dissolved oxygen in Chesapeake Bay and explore the mechanisms responsible for the observed rapid return of hypoxia after the storm.

  4. An educational interactive numerical model of the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouch, Jessica R.; Shen, Yuzhong; Austin, Jay A.; Dinniman, Michael S.

    2008-03-01

    Scientists use sophisticated numerical models to study ocean circulation and other physical systems, but the complex nature of such simulation software generally make them inaccessible to non-expert users. In principle, however, numerical models represent an ideal teaching tool, allowing users to model the response of a complex system to changing conditions. We have designed an interactive simulation program that allows a casual user to control the forcing conditions applied to a numerical ocean circulation model using a graphical user interface, and to observe the results in real-time. This program is implemented using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) applied to the Chesapeake Bay. Portions of ROMS were modified to facilitate user interaction, and the user interface and visualization capabilities represent new software development. The result is an interactive simulation of the Chesapeake Bay environment that allows a user to control wind speed and direction along with the rate of flow from the rivers that feed the bay. The simulation provides a variety of visualizations of the response of the system, including water height, velocity, and salinity across horizontal and vertical planes.

  5. Nearshore surface currents in the Chesapeake Bight during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Donald R.

    1987-04-01

    In this study, several different approaches are used to study coastal surface currents in an application to the dispersion of blue crab larvae from Chesapeake Bay onto the Middle Atlantic Bight. Observations from the deployment of a newly developed surface current meter (RBCM—Rapid Boundary Current Meter) are presented and compared to calculated surface currents from a simple model. In addition, using currents calculated with actual winds in this model, traces are constructed from point of encounter of larvae on the shelf back to the bay entrance. This has provided a unique Lagrangian tag for evaluating model parameters and forcing terms. Comparisons to Lagrangian traces and to RBCM measurements led to the inclusion of "wall" layer boundary conditions in the model. Without this layer, modeled currents seriously underestimated measured currents. Vector correlations between wind stress and measured currents were high with average veering suggestive of Ekman dynamics at a site offshore of the entrance to Chesapeake Bay. At a shallower site, correlations were relatively high, but topography or coastline guidance was strong.

  6. Conowingo Reservoir Sedimentation and Chesapeake Bay: State of the Science.

    PubMed

    Cerco, Carl F

    2016-05-01

    The Conowingo Reservoir is situated on the Susquehanna River, immediately upstream of Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States. Sedimentation in the reservoir provides an unintended benefit to the bay by preventing sediments, organic matter, and nutrients from entering the bay. The sediment storage capacity of the reservoir is nearly exhausted, however, and the resulting increase in loading of sediments and associated materials is a potential threat to Chesapeake Bay water quality. In response to this threat, the Lower Susquehanna River Watershed Assessment was conducted. The assessment indicates the reservoir is in a state of "dynamic equilibrium" in which sediment loads from the upstream watershed to the reservoir are balanced by sediments leaving the reservoir. Increased sediment loads are not a threat to bay water quality. Increased loads of associated organic matter and nutrients are, however, detrimental. Bottom-water dissolved oxygen declines of 0.1 to 0.2 g m are projected as a result of organic matter oxidation and enhanced eutrophication. The decline is small relative to normal variations but results in violations of standards enforced in a recently enacted total maximum daily load. Enhanced reductions in nutrient loads from the watershed are recommended to offset the decline in water quality caused by diminished retention in the reservoir. The assessment exposed several knowledge gaps that require additional investigation, including the potential for increased loading at flows below the threshold for reservoir scour and the nature and reactivity of organic matter and nutrients scoured from the reservoir bottom. PMID:27136154

  7. Application of Remote Sensing to the Chesapeake Bay Region. Volume 2: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. T. (Editor); Freas, G. W., Jr. (Editor); Hickman, G. D. (Editor); Pemberton, D. A. (Editor); Wilkerson, T. D. (Editor); Adler, I. (Editor); Laurie, V. J. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A conference was held on the application of remote sensing to the Chesapeake Bay region. Copies of the papers, resource contributions, panel discussions, and reports of the working groups are presented.

  8. Existing Homes Retrofit Case Study: Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity, Baltimore, MD

    SciTech Connect

    2009-09-01

    This is a Building America fact sheet on the Chesapeake Habitat for Humanity's rowhouse retrofit project, where four row houses in Baltimore, Maryland, were made energy efficient for low-income residents.

  9. Scrubbing the Bay: Nutrient Removal Using Small Algal Turf Scrubbers on Chesapeake Bay Tributaries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoration of the Chesapeake Bay poses significant challenges because of increasing population pressure, conversion of farmland to urban/suburban development, and the expense of infrastructure needed to achieve significant and sustained nutrient reductions from agricultural and urban sources. One ...

  10. MARYLAND/VIRGINIA CHESAPEAKE BAY AND TRIBUTARIES MICROZOOPLANKTON COUNT FILES (AND RELATED EVENT FILES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Chesapeake Bay Program microzooplankton data has been collected by the Maryland Department of the Environment /Maryland Department of Natural Resources and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality since July 1984. Maryland Microzooplankton Count Files (and...

  11. MARYLAND/VIRGINIA CHESAPEAKE BAY AND TRIBUTARIES PHYTOPLANKTON TAXONOMIC COUNT FILES (AND RELATED EVENT FILES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the Chesapeake Bay program Phytoplankton data has been collected by the Maryland Department of the Environment /Maryland Department of Natural Resources and the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. Available datasets include: 1) Maryland Phytoplankton Taxonom...

  12. 78 FR 66266 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Chesapeake, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... Chesapeake, VA. This deviation is necessary to facilitate maintenance work on the rotary span limit switches... 33 CFR 117.997(e), to facilitate maintenance of the moveable spans on the structure. The...

  13. 3 CFR 13508 - Executive Order 13508 of May 12, 2009. Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... laws, and to protect and restore the health, heritage, natural resources, and social and economic value... Historic Trail, the Chesapeake Bay Gateways and Watertrails Network, and the Star-Spangled Banner...

  14. Willingness to Pay Survey for Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily Load

    EPA Science Inventory

    A stated preference survey to collect data on households’ use of Chesapeake Bay and its watershed, and of their preferences for a variety of water quality improvements likely to follow from pollution reduction programs.

  15. 33 CFR 167.203 - In the approaches to Chesapeake Bay: Southern approach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approaches to Chesapeake Bay: Southern approach. (a) An inbound traffic lane is established between... 36°49.70′ N 75°46.80′ W (b) An outbound traffic lane is established between separation lines...

  16. HANDBOOK: RETROFITTING POTWS FOR PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY DRAINAGE BASIN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document assesses the technology, economics, and efficiency of phosphorus removal processes for use in the Chesapeake Bay Drainage basin (CBDB). ince phosphorus removal requirements in the CBDB vary widely with geographic location, this document discusses the feasibility of ...

  17. Monitoring wetland inundation dynamics in response to weather variability in the Chesapeake Bay watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetlands provide a broad range of ecosystem services, including flood control, water purification, groundwater replenishment, and biodiversity support. The provision of these services, which are especially valued in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed, is largely controlled by varying levels of wetness. ...

  18. State of the Chesapeake Bay: second annual monitoring report, compendium. Report for January 1984-September 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, M.P.; Krome, E.C.

    1987-04-01

    The report is a summary of information collected at stations around the Chesapeake Bay. It is designed to be a more detailed/technical companion to the State Of The Bay Summary Report. It reports the results of the monitoring of the Chesapeake Bay in terms of its physical and chemical makeup (sediments, the distribution of toxics), the living resources, (plankton, benthos, submerged aquatic vegetation, birds), and the Patuxent River, as a case history.

  19. Draft Genome Sequences for Seven Streptococcus parauberis Isolates from Wild Fish in the Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Haines, Ashley; Nebergall, Emily; Besong, Elvira; Council, Kimaya; Lambert, Onaysha; Gauthier, David

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus parauberis is a pathogen of cattle and fish, closely related Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus iniae We report the genomes of seven S. parauberis strains recovered from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay. The availability of these genomes will allow comparative genomic analysis of Chesapeake Bay S. parauberis strains versus S. parauberis cultured from other animal hosts and geographic regions. PMID:27540054

  20. Draft Genome Sequences for Seven Streptococcus parauberis Isolates from Wild Fish in the Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Nebergall, Emily; Besong, Elvira; Council, Kimaya; Lambert, Onaysha; Gauthier, David

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus parauberis is a pathogen of cattle and fish, closely related Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus iniae. We report the genomes of seven S. parauberis strains recovered from striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the Chesapeake Bay. The availability of these genomes will allow comparative genomic analysis of Chesapeake Bay S. parauberis strains versus S. parauberis cultured from other animal hosts and geographic regions. PMID:27540054

  1. Ecological risk assessment of copper and cadmium in surface waters of Chesapeake Bay watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.W. Jr.; Scott, M.C.; Killen, W.D.

    1998-06-01

    This ecological risk assessment was designed to characterize risk of copper and cadmium exposure in the Chesapeake Bay watershed by comparing the probability distributions of environmental exposure concentrations with the probability distributions of species response data determined from laboratory studies. The overlap of these distributions was a measure of risk to aquatic life. Dissolved copper and cadmium exposure data were available from six primary data sources covering 102 stations in 18 basins in the Chesapeake Bay watershed from 1985 through 1996. Highest environmental concentrations of copper (based on 90th percentiles) were reported in the Chesapeake and Delaware (C and D) Canal, Choptank River, Middle River, and Potomac River; the lowest concentrations of copper were reported in the lower and middle mainstem Chesapeake Bay and Nanticoke River. Based on the calculation of 90th percentiles, cadmium concentrations were highest in the C and D Canal, Potomac River, Upper Chesapeake Bay, and West Chesapeake watershed. Lowest environmental concentrations of cadmium were reported in the lower and middle mainstem Chesapeake Bay and Susquehanna River. The ecological effects data used for this risk assessment were derived primarily from acute copper and cadmium laboratory toxicity tests conducted in both fresh water and salt water; chronic data were much more limited. The 10th percentile (concentration protecting 90% of the species) for all species derived from the freshwater acute copper toxicity database was 8.3 {micro}g/L. For acute saltwater copper data, the 10th percentile for all species was 6.3 {micro}g/L copper. The acute 10th percentile for all saltwater species was 31.7 {micro}g/L cadmium. Highest potential ecological risk from copper exposures was reported in the C and D Canal area of the northern Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  2. An evaluation of the utilization of remote sensing in resource and environmental management of the Chesapeake Bay region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, D. B.; Harmon, D. M.; Fuller, K. B.

    1976-01-01

    A nine-month study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the NASA Wallops Chesapeake Bay Ecological Program in remote sensing. The study consisted of a follow-up investigation and information analysis of actual cases in which remote sensing was utilized by management and research personnel in the Chesapeake Bay region. The study concludes that the NASA Wallops Chesapeake Bay Ecological Program is effective, both in terms of costs and performance.

  3. Nitrate export from forested watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay Region, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Bricker, O.P.; Kuebler, A.; Rice, K.C.; Anderson, R.T.; Kennedy, M.M.

    1994-12-31

    Current levels of nitrogen inputs to the Chesapeake Bay exceed the ecological demand, resulting in eutrophication and algal blooms which degrade water quality. The Chesapeake Bay receives nitrogen compounds from a variety of sources. Previously, much attention had been focused on point source contributions such as sewage treatment plants and industrial discharges. More recently, however, inputs from atmospheric deposition and non-point sources have been considered. Land use practices vary widely within the Chesapeake Bay watershed, however, the largest portion is forested. Given that forested watersheds occupy a large area of the Chesapeake Bay drainage system, export of nitrogen from forested watersheds could potentially play an important role in the nitrogen balance. Here, examine the nitrate input/output budgets for eight forested headwater watersheds in the Chesapeake Bay drainage, several of which have a 10-year record of chemical data. The authors explore annual and seasonal input/output budgets for these watersheds and, at several sites, define the variability in nitrate export during episodic events Seasonal and episodic information on nitrate export may be useful to watershed managers in designing and applying techniques for minimizing nitrate export from these systems. Comparison of the behavior of nitrate in these systems, and with forested watersheds in other regions across a deposition gradient, will help to elucidate the factors that control nitrate export from forested watersheds. This information will better define the expected nitrate exports from forested watersheds and contribute to improving the confidence limits of models of nutrient loading to the Chesapeake Bay.

  4. Identifying Watershed Sediment Sources In The Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gellis, A. C.; Pavich, M. J.; Landwehr, J. M.; Banks, W. S.; Bierman, P. R.; Reuter, J. M.

    2004-12-01

    Attenuation of light by fine-grained suspended sediment is having an adverse affect on the living resources and habitat of the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed. Different approaches are being used to identify sediment sources at several scales for the Chesapeake Bay watershed. At the subbasin scale (1.0 to 70,200 km 2), U. S. Geological Survey suspended-sediment data from 1985 through 2001 for 35 stations with at least 3 years of record were used to determine subbasin sediment yields. In the Susquehanna River Basin results showed that four streams draining the Conestoga River Basin,(1,220 km 2) which is in the Piedmont, had the highest sediment yields (60.9 to 356 t/km 2/yr). Cosmogenic 10Be provides another method to measure erosion which can be compared to subbasin sediment yields. Two pathways of the cosmogenic radionuclide 10Be, atmospheric and in situ, were used to determine erosion rates in the Susquehanna River Basin (70,200 km 2). Atmospheric 10Be was used to generate erosion indices at 25 subbasins by taking a ratio of 10Be in fluvial sediment exported out of the subbasin against the net atmospheric delivery of 10Be (values >1 = erosion). Examining the relation of in situ10Be concentrations compared to subbasin sediment yield provided an independent method to assess instrumental vs. background erosion rates. Subbasins in equilibrium show a linear relation of instrumental sediment yield to in situ10Be concentrations. Subbasins that deviate from this relation show either export or storage of sediment. Subbasins of the Conestoga River Basin showed departure from this relation, indicating erosion. The Conestoga River Basin drains primarily agricultural land and this land use may be influencing erosion rates and sediment yields. Within Chesapeake Bay subbasins, sediment fingerprinting is being used to determine watershed sources of sediment. Sediment fingerprinting is a technique where potential sediment sources can be characterized using a number of diagnostic

  5. The Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L., Jr.; Charlock, Thomas; Wielicki, Bruce; Kahn, Ralph; Martins, J. Vanderlei; Gatebe, Charles; Hobbs, Peter V.; Purgold, G. Carl; Redemann, Jens; Remer, Lorraine

    2004-01-01

    NASA has developed an Earth Observing System (EOS) consisting of a series of satellites designed to study global change from space. The EOS flagship is the EOS TERRA satellite, launched in December 1999, equipped with five unique sensors to monitor and study the Earth s heat budget and many of the key controlling variables governing the Earth's climate system. CLAMS, the Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites field campaign was conducted from NASA Wallops Flight Facility and successfully executed over the middle Atlantic eastern seaboard from July 10 August 2, 2001. CLAMS is primarily a shortwave closure experiment designed to validate and improve EOS TERRA satellite data products being derived from three sensors: CERES (Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System), MISR (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) and MODIS (MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). CLAMS is jointly sponsored by the CERES, MISR and MODIS instrument teams and the NASA GEWEX Global Aerosol Climatology Project (GACP). CLAMS primary objectives are to validate satellite-based retrievals of aerosol properties and vertical profiles of radiative flux, temperature and water vapor. Central to CLAMS measurement strategy is the Chesapeake Lighthouse, a stable sea platform located in the Atlantic Ocean, 13 miles east of Virginia Beach near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay and the site of an ongoing CERES Ocean Validation Experiment (COVE). Six research aircraft were deployed to make detailed measurements of the atmosphere and ocean surface in the vicinity of COVE, over the surrounding ocean, over nearby NOAA buoys and over a few land sites. The measurements are used to validate and provide ground truth for simultaneous products being derived from TERRA data, a key step toward an improved understanding and ability to predict changes in the Earth's climate. One of the two CERES instruments on-board TERRA was programmed for Rotating Azimuth Plane Scans (RAPS) during CLAMS

  6. Deep drilling in the Chesapeake Bay impact structure - An overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gohn, G.S.; Koeberl, C.; Miller, K.G.; Reimold, W.U.

    2009-01-01

    The late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure lies buried at moderate depths below Chesapeake Bay and surrounding landmasses in southeastern Virginia, USA. Numerous characteristics made this impact structure an inviting target for scientific drilling, including the location of the impact on the Eocene continental shelf, its threelayer target structure, its large size (??85 km diameter), its status as the source of the North American tektite strewn field, its temporal association with other late Eocene terrestrial impacts, its documented effects on the regional groundwater system, and its previously unstudied effects on the deep microbial biosphere. The Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure Deep Drilling Project was designed to drill a deep, continuously cored test hole into the central part of the structure. A project workshop, funding proposals, and the acceptance of those proposals occurred during 2003-2005. Initial drilling funds were provided by the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Supplementary funds were provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Science Mission Directorate, ICDP, and USGS. Field operations were conducted at Eyreville Farm, Northampton County, Virginia, by Drilling, Observation, and Sampling of the Earth's Continental Crust (DOSECC) and the project staff during September-December 2005, resulting in two continuously cored, deep holes. The USGS and Rutgers University cored a shallow hole to 140 m in April-May 2006 to complete the recovered section from land surface to 1766 m depth. The recovered section consists of 1322 m of crater materials and 444 m of overlying postimpact Eocene to Pleistocene sediments. The crater section consists of, from base to top: basement-derived blocks of crystalline rocks (215 m); a section of suevite, impact melt rock, lithic impact breccia, and cataclasites (154 m); a thin interval of quartz sand and lithic blocks (26 m); a

  7. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  8. Simulation of long-term trends in Chesapeake Bay eutrophication

    SciTech Connect

    Cerco, C.F.

    1995-04-01

    A predictive mathematical model was employed to examine trends in Chesapeake Bay eutrophication from 1959 to 1988. The model provided details of processes and substances for which no record existed. The simulation indicated the volume of anoxic water was largest in the decade 1969--78. Since then, anoxic volume has declined. The decline was largely due to hydrodynamic effects. In 1969--78, high runoff caused the Bay to be highly stratified and inhibited oxygen transport to bottom waters. Less runoff in the years 1979--88 diminished stratification and allowed enhanced oxygen transport to bottom waters. When only years of similar stratification were compared, an increase in anoxic volume was noted from the 1959--68 decade to the 1979--88 decade. The increase was associated with increasing nitrogen concentration in runoff from two major tributaries and with increasing chlorophyll concentration in the mainstem Bay.

  9. Deep drilling into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure.

    PubMed

    Gohn, G S; Koeberl, C; Miller, K G; Reimold, W U; Browning, J V; Cockell, C S; Horton, J W; Kenkmann, T; Kulpecz, A A; Powars, D S; Sanford, W E; Voytek, M A

    2008-06-27

    Samples from a 1.76-kilometer-deep corehole drilled near the center of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure (Virginia, USA) reveal its geologic, hydrologic, and biologic history. We conducted stratigraphic and petrologic analyses of the cores to elucidate the timing and results of impact-melt creation and distribution, transient-cavity collapse, and ocean-water resurge. Comparison of post-impact sedimentary sequences inside and outside the structure indicates that compaction of the crater fill influenced long-term sedimentation patterns in the mid-Atlantic region. Salty connate water of the target remains in the crater fill today, where it poses a potential threat to the regional groundwater resource. Observed depth variations in microbial abundance indicate a complex history of impact-related thermal sterilization and habitat modification, and subsequent post-impact repopulation. PMID:18583604

  10. Water color and circulation southern Chesapeake Bay, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. M.; Gordon, H. H.

    1975-01-01

    Satellite imagery from two EREP passes over the Rappahannock Estuary of the Chesapeake region is analyzed to chart colored water types, to delineate color boundaries and define circulatory patterns. Surface observations from boats and helicopters concurrent with Skylab overpass define the distributions of suspended sediment, transparency, temperature, salinity, phytoplankton, color of suspended material and optical ratio. Important features recorded by the imagery are a large-scale turbidity maximum and massive red tide blooms. Water movement is revealed by small-scale mixing patterns and tidal plumes of apparent sediment-laden water. The color patterns broadly reflect the bottom topography and the seaward gradient of suspended material between the river and the bay. Analyses of red, green and natural color photos by microdensitometry demonstrate the utility of charting water color types of potential use for managing estuarine water quality. The Skylab imagery is superior to aerial photography and surface observations for charting water color.

  11. Coordinated Field Campaigns in Chesapeake Bay and Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Novak, Michael; Tzortziou, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission concept recommended by the U.S. National Research Council (2007) focuses on measurements of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols and aquatic coastal ecology and biogeochemistry from geostationary orbit (35,786 km altitude). Two GEO-CAPE-sponsored multi-investigator ship-based field campaigns were conducted to coincide with the NASA Earth Venture Suborbital project DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaigns: (1) Chesapeake Bay in July 2011 and (2) northwestern Gulf of Mexico in September 2013. Goal: to evaluate whether GEO-CAPE coastal mission measurement and instrument requirements are optimized to address science objectives while minimizing ocean color satellite sensor complexity, size and cost - critical mission risk reduction activities. NASA continues to support science studies related to the analysis of data collected as part of these coordinated field campaigns and smaller efforts.

  12. Deep drilling into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gohn, G.S.; Koeberl, C.; Miller, K.G.; Reimold, W.U.; Browning, J.V.; Cockell, C.S.; Horton, J.W., Jr.; Kenkmann, T.; Kulpecz, A.A.; Powars, D.S.; Sanford, W.E.; Voytek, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Samples from a 1.76-kilometer-deep corehole drilled near the center of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure (Virginia, USA) reveal its geologic, hydrologic, and biologic history. We conducted stratigraphic and petrologic analyses of the cores to elucidate the timing and results of impact-melt creation and distribution, transient-cavity collapse, and ocean-water resurge. Comparison of post-impact sedimentary sequences inside and outside the structure indicates that compaction of the crater fill influenced long-term sedimentation patterns in the mid-Atlantic region. Salty connate water of the target remains in the crater fill today, where it poses a potential threat to the regional groundwater resource. Observed depth variations in microbial abundance indicate a complex history of impact-related thermal sterilization and habitat modification, and subsequent post-impact repopulation.

  13. Endocrine disrupter--estradiol--in Chesapeake Bay tributaries.

    PubMed

    Dorabawila, Nelum; Gupta, Gian

    2005-04-11

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17beta-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l-1. E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound-Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l-1. Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l-1. PMID:15811666

  14. The Design and Application of a Chesapeake Bay Environmental Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. P.; Burns, R.; Cuker, B. E.; di Toro, D. M.; Kemp, W. M.; Murray, L.; Piasecki, M.; Zaslavsky, I.; Aguayo, M.; Bosch, J.; Brady, D. C.; Murphy, R.; Perlman, E.; Rodriguez, M.; Testa, J. M.; Whitenack, T.

    2009-12-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Environmental Observatory (CBEO) is a prototypical observatory funded by the 2005 NSF program on “Cyberinfrastructure for Environmental Observatories: Prototype Systems to Address Cross-Cutting Needs (CEO:P).” For the past three years, our multi-institutional team of estuary and hydrologic scientists, environmental engineers, computer scientists, and educators has designed and built the CBEO infrastructure with an inter-disciplinary approach that integrates four parallel efforts: Network, Education, Testbed, and Science. In this project, we have used a major science question to drive cyberinfrastructure (CI) development, under the assumption that data collection, testbed structure, educational tools, and other aspects of CI can be more appropriately and efficiently designed if driven by specific science questions. The major question chosen for evaluation relates to historical hypoxia trends in the Bay. In particular, the project seeks to better understand why reduction in nutrient loads over the past few decades have apparently not resulted in reduced “hypoxic volume” (volume of Bay water with dissolved oxygen below specified criteria - e.g., 1.0 mg/L). These trends are in contrast to expectations based on decades of research that show a clear impact of excessive nutrient fluxes on algal blooms and depletion of dissolved oxygen in bottom waters. To fully investigate the reasons for this recent “regime shift” in Bay responses to management, the CBEO team required better access to multiple long-term observational datasets, new access to past modeling results (i.e., model output data from decades of calibration and simulation work), new predictive model runs, and new tools for data analysis. The breadth and depth of data and tools required has made hypoxia research in the Chesapeake Bay an ideal application for CI. In building the CBEO testbed and CI, the project team has collaborated with the Chesapeake Bay Program, multiple state

  15. Birds and environmental contaminants in San Francisco and Chesapeake Bays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Fleming, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The direct and indirect effects of human activities, including environmental contamination, upon bird populations in San Francisco Bay and Chesapeake Bay are imperfectly understood, and few data are available. that allow a comparison of the contamination levels in birds from these two areas. Certain trace elements and organochlorine compounds have been found at sufficiently high concentrations in bird tissues or their foods to expect adverse effects in these birds, based upon results of field and laboratory studies conducted with other avian species. The decline and recovery of populations of many avian species have been recorded, including some associated with organochlorine contamination. The present paper summarizes available information on the occurrence and potential effects of contaminants upon birds in these two regions.

  16. Regional geochemistry of trace elements in Chesapeake Bay sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinex, S. A.; Helz, G. R.

    1981-11-01

    The concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in 177 surface sediment samples from throughout Chesapeake Bay are reported. Analyses were made of both unfractionated samples and the <63 μm fractions. Analytical uncertainty, always less than ±10%, controlled reproducibility in analyses of the <63 μm fractions, but sampling variance controlled reproducibility in the unfractionated samples, especially when coarse-grained sediments were being analyzed. Sediments in the northernmost part of the bay are enriched relative to average continental crust in all elements except Cr. This reflects the composition of dissolved and suspended material being delivered to that region by the Susquehanna River. The enriched sediments appear not to be transported south of Baltimore in significant quantily. Zinc, cadmium, and lead are enriched relative to average crust throughout the bay and in most other estuaries in the eastern United States.

  17. Potential climate-change impacts on the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, Raymond G.; Pyke, Christopher R.; Adams, Mary Beth; Breitburg, Denise; Hershner, Carl; Kemp, Michael; Howarth, Robert; Mulholland, Margaret R.; Paolisso, Michael; Secor, David; Sellner, Kevin; Wardrop, Denice; Wood, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We review current understanding of the potential impact of climate change on the Chesapeake Bay. Scenarios for CO 2 emissions indicate that by the end of the 21 st century the Bay region will experience significant changes in climate forcings with respect to historical conditions, including increases in CO 2 concentrations, sea level, and water temperature of 50-160%, 0.7-1.6 m, and 2-6 °C, respectively. Also likely are increases in precipitation amount (very likely in the winter and spring), precipitation intensity, intensity of tropical and extratropical cyclones (though their frequency may decrease), and sea-level variability. The greatest uncertainty is associated with changes in annual streamflow, though it is likely that winter and spring flows will increase. Climate change alone will cause the Bay to function very differently in the future. Likely changes include: (1) an increase in coastal flooding and submergence of estuarine wetlands; (2) an increase in salinity variability on many time scales; (3) an increase in harmful algae; (4) an increase in hypoxia; (5) a reduction of eelgrass, the dominant submerged aquatic vegetation in the Bay; and (6) altered interactions among trophic levels, with subtropical fish and shellfish species ultimately being favored in the Bay. The magnitude of these changes is sensitive to the CO 2 emission trajectory, so that actions taken now to reduce CO 2 emissions will reduce climate impacts on the Bay. Research needs include improved precipitation and streamflow projections for the Bay watershed and whole-system monitoring, modeling, and process studies that can capture the likely non-linear responses of the Chesapeake Bay system to climate variability, climate change, and their interaction with other anthropogenic stressors.

  18. Potential climate-change impacts on the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najjar, R.; Pyke, C.; Adams, M.; Breitburg, D.; Hershner, C.; Kemp, M.; Howarth, R.; Mulholland, M.; Paolisso, M.; Secor, D.; Sellner, K.; Wardrop, D.; Wood, R.

    2008-12-01

    We review current understanding of the potential impact of climate change on the Chesapeake Bay. Scenarios for carbon dioxide emissions indicate that by the end of the 21st century the Bay region will experience significant changes in climate forcings with respect to historic conditions, including increases in carbon dioxide concentrations, sea level, and water temperature of 50-160 percent, 0.7-1.6 m, and 2-6 K, respectively. Also likely are increases in precipitation amount (particularly in the winter and spring), precipitation intensity, intensity of tropical and extratropical cyclones (though their frequency may decrease), and sea-level variability. The greatest uncertainty is associated with changes in annual streamflow, though it is likely that winter and spring flows will increase. Climate change alone will cause the Bay to function very differently in the future. Likely changes include: (1) an increase in coastal flooding and submergence of estuarine wetlands; (2) an increase in salinity variability on many time scales; (3) an increase in harmful algae; (4) an increase in hypoxia; (5) a reduction of eelgrass, the dominant submerged aquatic vegetation in the Bay; and (6) altered interactions among trophic levels, with warm-water fish and shellfish species ultimately being favored in the Bay. The magnitude of these changes is sensitive to the carbon dioxide emission trajectory, so that actions taken now to reduce carbon dioxide emissions will reduce climate impacts on the Bay. Research needs include improved precipitation and streamflow projections for the Bay watershed and whole-system monitoring and modeling (supplemented by process studies) that can capture the likely non-linear responses of the Chesapeake Bay system to climate variability and change.

  19. Fluxes of dissolved organic carbon from Chesapeake Bay sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burdige, D.J.; Homstead, J. )

    1994-08-01

    Benthic fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) were measured over an annual cycle at two contrasting sites in Chesapeake Bay. At an organic-rich, sulfidic site in the mesohaline portion of the Bay (site M) DOC fluxes from the sediments ranged from 1.4 to 2.9 mmol/m[sup 2]/d. Measured benthic DOC fluxes at site M corresponded to [approximately]3-13% of the depth-integrated benthic C remineralization rates ([Sigma]OCR), and agreed well with calculated diffusive DOC fluxes based on porewater DOC profiles. This agreement suggests that DOC fluxes from site M sediments were likely controlled by molecular diffusion. The second site that was studied is a heavily bioturbated site in the southern Bay (site S). The activity of macrobenthos did not appear to enhance DOC fluxes from these sediments, since measured benthic DOC fluxes (>0.5 mmol/m[sup 2]/d) were lower than those at site M. The ratios of benthic DOC fluxes to [Sigma]OCR values at site S were also slightly smaller than those observed at site M. Benthic DOC fluxes from Chesapeake Bay sediments do not appear to significantly affect the transport of DOC through this estuary, although uncertainties in the reactivity of DOC in estuaries makes this conclusion somewhat tentative at this time. However, when these results are used to make a lower limit estimate of the globally integrated benthic DOC flux from marine sediments, a value similar to that previously calculated by Burdige et al. is obtained. This observation further supports suggestions in this paper about the importance of benthic DOC fluxes in the oceanic C cycle.

  20. Wetland habitats for wildlife of the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    The wetlands of Chesapeake Bay have provided the vital habitats that have sustained the impressive wildlife populations that have brought international fame to the Bay. As these wetland habitats decrease in quantity and quality we will continue to see the decline in the wildlife populations that started when European settlers first came to this continent. These declines have accelerated significantly in this century. As the human population continues to increase in the Bay watershed, one can expect that wetland habitats will continue to decline, resulting in declines in species diversity and population numbers. Although federal, state, and local governments are striving for 'no net loss' of wetlands, the results to date are not encouraging. It is unrealistic to believe that human populations and associated development can continue to increase and not adversely affect the wetland resources of the Bay. Restrictions on human population growth in the Chesapeake area is clearly the best way to protect wetland habitats and the wildlife that are dependent on these habitats. In addition, there should be more aggressive approaches to protect wetland habitats from continued perturbations from humans. More sanctuary areas should be created and there should be greater use of enhancement and management techniques that will benefit the full complement of species that potentially exist in these wetlands. The present trend in wetland loss can be expected to continue as human populations increase with resultant increases in roads, shopping malls, and housing developments. Creation of habitat for mitigation of these losses will not result in 'no net loss'. More innovative approaches should be employed to reverse the long-term trend in wetland loss by humans.

  1. Executive Functioning and Preschoolers' Understanding of False Beliefs, False Photographs, and False Signs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabbagh, Mark A.; Moses, Louis J.; Shiverick, Sean

    2006-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to investigate the specificity of the relationship between preschoolers' emerging executive functioning skills and false belief understanding. Study 1 (N=44) showed that 3- to 5-year-olds' performance on an executive functioning task that required selective suppression of actions predicted performance on false belief…

  2. Tunneling decay of false kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; MacKenzie, Richard; Marleau, Luc; Paranjape, M. B.; Ung, Yvan

    2015-07-01

    We consider the decay of "false kinks," that is, kinks formed in a scalar field theory with a pair of degenerate symmetry-breaking false vacua in 1 +1 dimensions. The true vacuum is symmetric. A second scalar field and a peculiar potential are added in order for the kink to be classically stable. We find an expression for the decay rate of a false kink. As with any tunneling event, the rate is proportional to exp (-SE) where SE is the Euclidean action of the bounce describing the tunneling event. This factor varies wildly depending on the parameters of the model. Of interest is the fact that for certain parameters SE can get arbitrarily small, implying that the kink is only barely stable. Thus, while the false vacuum itself may be very long-lived, the presence of kinks can give rise to rapid vacuum decay.

  3. False allegation of child abduction.

    PubMed

    Canning, Kathleen E; Hilts, Mark A; Muirhead, Yvonne E

    2011-05-01

    Cases in which a child has been falsely reported as missing or abducted can be extremely challenging to the law enforcement agencies responsible for their investigation. In the absence of a witnessed abduction or an obvious crime scene, it is difficult to determine whether a child has actually been abducted or has become a victim of a homicide and a false allegation. The purpose of this study was to examine falsely alleged kidnapping cases and identify successful investigative strategies. Sixty-one adjudicated false allegation cases involving 66 victims were analyzed. The mean age of the victim was 5 years. Victims came from generally unstable, high-risk family situations and were killed primarily by biological parents. Victims were killed because they were unwanted or viewed as an obstacle to a desired goal, or they were victims of abuse or maltreatment that ended in fatality. PMID:21361941

  4. Sleep deprivation and false confessions.

    PubMed

    Frenda, Steven J; Berkowitz, Shari R; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2016-02-23

    False confession is a major contributor to the problem of wrongful convictions in the United States. Here, we provide direct evidence linking sleep deprivation and false confessions. In a procedure adapted from Kassin and Kiechel [(1996) Psychol Sci 7(3):125-128], participants completed computer tasks across multiple sessions and repeatedly received warnings that pressing the "Escape" key on their keyboard would cause the loss of study data. In their final session, participants either slept all night in laboratory bedrooms or remained awake all night. In the morning, all participants were asked to sign a statement, which summarized their activities in the laboratory and falsely alleged that they pressed the Escape key during an earlier session. After a single request, the odds of signing were 4.5 times higher for the sleep-deprived participants than for the rested participants. These findings have important implications and highlight the need for further research on factors affecting true and false confessions. PMID:26858426

  5. VESPA: False positive probabilities calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, Timothy D.

    2015-03-01

    Validation of Exoplanet Signals using a Probabilistic Algorithm (VESPA) calculates false positive probabilities and statistically validates transiting exoplanets. Written in Python, it uses isochrones [ascl:1503.010] and the package simpledist.

  6. Nonlinear dynamics of false bottoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizovtseva, Irina; Alexandrov, Dmitri; Ryashko, Lev

    2014-05-01

    Nansen from his observations in the Beaufort Sea published in 1897 noted that heat transfer from the fresh water to the arctic salt water is the only source of ice accretion during the polar summer. This transfer mechanism, unusual at first sight, is responsible for the initiation and evolution of a false bottom ice, changing ice properties to a great extent and affecting various processes while interacting with the ocean and the atmosphere. A false bottom represents a thin layer of ice which forms in summer underneath the floe where fresh water lies between the salt water and the ice. Details of how this process occurs in nature are now emerging from different laboratory and field experiments. The false bottoms appearing at the interface between the fresh and salt water as a result of double-diffusive convection normally lie below surface and under-ice melt ponds. Such false bottoms represent the only significant source of ice growth in the Arctic during the spring-summer period. Their evolution influences the mass balance of the Arctic sea-ice cover recognized as an indicator of climate change. However, the quantity, aerial extent and other properties of false bottoms are difficult to measure because coring under the surface melt ponds leads to direct mixing of surface and under-ice water. This explains why their aerial extent and overall volume is still not known despite the fact that the upper limit of the ice coverage by the false bottom is approximately half of the ice surface. The growth of false bottoms also leads to other important consequences for different physical, chemical and biological processes associated with their dynamics. This study addressed to a broad community of readers is concerned with non-linear behavior of false bottoms including their stochastic dynamics due to possible fluctuations of the main process parameters in the ocean and the atmosphere.

  7. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Engineers also has regulations dealing with this section in 33 CFR Part 207. ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

  8. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Engineers also has regulations dealing with this section in 33 CFR Part 207. ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

  9. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Engineers also has regulations dealing with this section in 33 CFR Part 207. ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

  10. HYPOXIA IN CHESAPEAKE BAY, 1950-2001: LONG-TERM CHANGE IN RELATION TO NUTRIENT LOADING AND RIVER FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    A 52-yr record of dissolved oxygen in Chesapeake Bay (1950 to 2001) and a record of nitrate (NO3-) loading by the Susquehanna River spanning a longer period (1903, 1945 to 2001) were assembled to describe the long-term pattern of hypoxia and anoxia in Chesapeake Bay an...

  11. 33 CFR 207.160 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of St. Marks, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. (a... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay or with the Gulf of Mexico east and south......

  12. Oyster Reef Communities in the Chesapeake Bay. Virginia Institute of Marine Science Educational Series. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Juliana M.; Mann, Roger; Clark, Vicki P.

    This CD-ROM, Oyster Reef Communities in the Chesapeake Bay, describes oyster reefs, reef communities, and their roles in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Detailed descriptions of scientific research methods and techniques used to monitor and describe oyster reef communities as well as applications of the resulting data are provided. The CD-ROM was…

  13. 33 CFR 207.160 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of St. Marks, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. (a... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay or with the Gulf of Mexico east and south of St. Marks, Florida....

  14. Chesapeake Bay Crater, Virginia: Confirmation of Impact Origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeberl, C.; Reimold, W. U.; Brandt, D.; Poag, C. W.

    1995-09-01

    Poag et al. [1] identified a late Eocene boulder bed in drill cores from southeast Virginia, and interpreted it as an impact-generated tsunami deposit. Seismic studies and other geophysical evidence indicated the existence of a possible impact structure centered at Chesapeake Bay (37 degrees x 15' N and 76 degrees x 04' W), which may be 85-90 km in diameter [2]. Four drill cores have penetrated into the breccia, although none is available from the center of the structure, or reaches basement. A central peak-ring of crystalline rocks with about 25 km diameter is surrounded by a 30 km-wide annular trough and terrace terrane. The trough is filled with polymictic breccia composed mainly of autochthonous sedimentary clasts in a sandy matrix with some angular clasts of granitic and metasedimentary basement rocks [2]. The Chesapeake Bay crater is of special interest, because it is close to the region identified as the possible source region for the North American tektites, is of about the expected size, and has an age identical to that of the tektites [3]. While the source craters for the Central European and Ivory Coast tektite strewn fields are known, the source crater of the North American tektites has remained elusive. A variety of locations were suggested, including Popigai (Siberia), Wanapitei (Canada), Mistastin (Canada), and Bee Bluff (Texas), but all were later discounted. The distribution of the tektites and microtektites in the strewn field suggests that the North American tektite source crater is likely to be located at or near the eastern coast of the North American continent, maybe underwater [4,5]. The location of the Chesapeake Bay structure is in agreement with the area suggested before [4,5]. We have started a petrological and geochemical study of target rocks and breccias from the Chesapeake Bay structure. We analyzed the major and trace element composition of 17 mainly sedimentary samples, for comparison with North American tektite values. 14 of these

  15. Sleep Loss Produces False Memories

    PubMed Central

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., “night”, “dark”, “coal”,…), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: “black”). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss. PMID:18946511

  16. Sleep deprivation and false confessions

    PubMed Central

    Frenda, Steven J.; Berkowitz, Shari R.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.; Fenn, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    False confession is a major contributor to the problem of wrongful convictions in the United States. Here, we provide direct evidence linking sleep deprivation and false confessions. In a procedure adapted from Kassin and Kiechel [(1996) Psychol Sci 7(3):125–128], participants completed computer tasks across multiple sessions and repeatedly received warnings that pressing the “Escape” key on their keyboard would cause the loss of study data. In their final session, participants either slept all night in laboratory bedrooms or remained awake all night. In the morning, all participants were asked to sign a statement, which summarized their activities in the laboratory and falsely alleged that they pressed the Escape key during an earlier session. After a single request, the odds of signing were 4.5 times higher for the sleep-deprived participants than for the rested participants. These findings have important implications and highlight the need for further research on factors affecting true and false confessions. PMID:26858426

  17. Tunneling decay of false vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M. B.; Yajnik, U. A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-10-01

    We consider the decay of vortices trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. The potential is inspired by models with intermediate symmetry breaking to a metastable vacuum that completely breaks a U(1) symmetry, while in the true vacuum, the symmetry is unbroken. The false vacuum is unstable through the formation of true vacuum bubbles; however, the rate of decay can be extremely long. On the other hand, the false vacuum can contain metastable vortex solutions. These vortices contain the true vacuum inside in addition to a unit of magnetic flux and the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum outside. We numerically establish the existence of vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they can decay via tunneling. In general terms, they tunnel to a configuration which is a large, thin-walled vortex configuration that is now classically unstable to the expansion of its radius. We compute an estimate for the tunneling amplitude in the semiclassical approximation. We believe our analysis would be relevant to superconducting thin films or superfluids.

  18. Evolutionary Psychology and False Confession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bering, Jesse M.; Shackelford, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on Kassin's review, (see record 2005-03019-002) of the psychology of false confessions. The authors note that Kassin's review makes a compelling argument for the need for legal reform in police interrogation practices. Because his work strikes at the heart of the American criminal justice system--its fairness--the…

  19. Multiple True-False Questions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, G. C.; Woods, G. T.

    1974-01-01

    Two types of objective questions are compared: the multiple choice item, in which one and only one of several stated alternatives is correct for a given initial statement, and the multiple true-false item, where the stem is followed by several completions of which one or more can be correct. (DT)

  20. MSPI False Indication Probability Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Kurt Vedros; Robert Youngblood

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines false indication probabilities in the context of the Mitigating System Performance Index (MSPI), in order to investigate the pros and cons of different approaches to resolving two coupled issues: (1) sensitivity to the prior distribution used in calculating the Bayesian-corrected unreliability contribution to the MSPI, and (2) whether (in a particular plant configuration) to model the fuel oil transfer pump (FOTP) as a separate component, or integrally to its emergency diesel generator (EDG). False indication probabilities were calculated for the following situations: (1) all component reliability parameters at their baseline values, so that the true indication is green, meaning that an indication of white or above would be false positive; (2) one or more components degraded to the extent that the true indication would be (mid) white, and “false” would be green (negative) or yellow (negative) or red (negative). In key respects, this was the approach taken in NUREG-1753. The prior distributions examined were the constrained noninformative (CNI) prior used currently by the MSPI, a mixture of conjugate priors, the Jeffreys noninformative prior, a nonconjugate log(istic)-normal prior, and the minimally informative prior investigated in (Kelly et al., 2010). The mid-white performance state was set at ?CDF = ?10 ? 10-6/yr. For each simulated time history, a check is made of whether the calculated ?CDF is above or below 10-6/yr. If the parameters were at their baseline values, and ?CDF > 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false positive. Conversely, if one or all of the parameters are set to values corresponding to ?CDF > 10-6/yr but that time history’s ?CDF < 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false negative indication. The false indication (positive or negative) probability is then estimated as the number of false positive or negative counts divided by the number of time histories (100,000). Results are presented for a set of base case parameter values

  1. Comments on recent canvasback habitat trends and threats on Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, M.C.

    1976-01-01

    During the last 22 years, the North American winter population of canvasbacks has fluctuated from 481,000 in 1955 to 179,000 in 1972. The Chesapeake Bay population has averaged 33 percent of the North American population and 64 percent of the Atlantic Flyway population. In Maryland, significant annual fluctuations have been recorded between the eastern and western shore of Chesapeake Bay. In 1968, 11 percent of the Bay canvasbacks were on the western shore, whereas in 1971, 87 percent of the birds wintered in this area. This increase in 1971 is believed to be in response to large populations of small Rangia cuneata clams. I n recent years, mortality of small clams and reduced spawning have resulted in a larger size class for Rangia making them less desirable as a waterfowl food. Canvasback populations in 1975 and 1976 were more dispersed in Chesapeake Bay when the predominant food of canvasbacks was Macoma balthica. In the last 5 years, the number of canvasbacks wintering in Chesapeake Bay has declined slightly, while the North American and Atlantic Flyway populations have increased. Increases have been noted in New Jersey and North Carolina. This trend may indicate that the quality of canvasback habitat in Chesapeake Bay is declining at a faster rate than other areas along the Atlantic coast.

  2. Watershed nutrient inputs, phytoplankton accumulation, and C stocks in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, T. R.; Boynton, W. R.; Hagy, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Inputs of N and P to Chesapeake Bay have been enhanced by anthropogenic activities. Fertilizers, urbanization, N emissions, and industrial effluents contribute to point and diffuse sources currently 2-7X higher for P and 5-20X higher for N than those from undisturbed watersheds. Enhanced nutrient inputs cause phytoplankton blooms which obscure visibility, eliminate submerged grasses, and influence the distribution of C within the Bay. Accumulations of dissolved organic and particulate organic C lead to enhanced microbial respiration in isolated bottom waters, and dissolved oxygen is seasonally reduced to trace levels during summer. Cultural eutrophication is not unique to Chesapeake Bay. Although some estuaries such as the Delaware, Hudson, and San Francisco Bay also have high anthropogenic inputs, these estuaries have much shorter residence times, and much of the N and P may be exported to the coastal ocean. However, in Chesapeake Bay, with residence times >2 months, internal processing of watershed inputs results in local algal blooms within the estuary. Watershed restoration strategies for Chesapeake watersheds have had limited success to date. Groundwaters are enriched with nitrate, and the long residence times of groundwaters mean slow responses to watershed improvements. The few successes in the Chesapeake have been associated with point source reductions, although continued human population growth can easily override restoration efforts. Widespread improvement in water quality has yet to occur, but the limited successes show that the Bay responds to load changes.

  3. Conceptual Design of a Chesapeake Bay Environmental Observatory (CBEO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, W. P.; di Toro, D.; Gross, T. F.; Kemp, W. M.; Burns, R.; Piasecki, M.; Zaslavsky, I.; Cuker, B. E.; Murray, L.

    2006-12-01

    A new project is underway to develop and deploy a Chesapeake Bay Environmental Observatory (CBEO), which is intended to serve as a prototype of cyberinfrastructure (CI) for environmental observatory networks (EONs) that will demonstrate the transformative power of CI. The CBEO will be developed by a team of highly qualified computer scientists, ecologists, oceanographers and environmental engineers with a track record of working together on environmental observatory projects and complex cross-discipline research efforts. The project approach has been organized around the following four concurrent interacting elements, which follow the acronym "NETS": (1) The CBEO:N group will incorporate the test bed CI into the national EONs by constructing a GEON-based node for the CBEO. This will entail resolving complex cross-disciplinary issues of semantics, syntax and inter- operability as well as developing new shared CI tools for data assimilation and interpolation. (2) CBEO:E is the education element and will use the CBEO to translate observational science for public consumption. Direct participation of multicultural students and a K-12 teacher are planned. The test-bed and network components (described below and above) will provide the focus of five workshops for users, managers and science educators; (3) Prior to full integration via CBEO:N, CBEO:T will rapidly construct a locally accessible CBEO test-bed prototype that will integrate a subset of currently available large data sets characterized by multiple variables and widely disparate time and space scales ? grab and continuous sampling at fixed stations, undulating towed sensors, and satellite and aircraft remote sensing. A novel feature will be the inclusion of the fifteen year (1986-2000) simulated data from the Bay-wide fine spatial (1-10 km) and temporal (0.02-1 hr) scale hydrodynamic and water quality model. CBEO:T will serve initially as the development platform for data integration, interpolation, and

  4. Outcome Knowledge and False Belief

    PubMed Central

    Ghrear, Siba E.; Birch, Susan A. J.; Bernstein, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually every social interaction involves reasoning about the perspectives of others, or ‘theory of mind (ToM).’ Previous research suggests that it is difficult to ignore our current knowledge when reasoning about a more naïve perspective (i.e., the curse of knowledge). In this Mini Review, we discuss the implications of the curse of knowledge for certain aspects of ToM. Particularly, we examine how the curse of knowledge influences key measurements of false belief reasoning. In closing, we touch on the need to develop new measurement tools to discern the mechanisms involved in the curse of knowledge and false belief reasoning, and how they develop across the lifespan. PMID:26903922

  5. Partial 'Seminole' Panorama (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view from Spirit's panoramic camera is assembled from frames acquired on Martian days, or sols, 672 and 673 (Nov. 23 and 24, 2005) from the rover's position near an outcrop called 'Seminole.' The view is a southward-looking portion of a larger panorama still being completed. This is a false-color version to emphasize geological differences. It is a composite of images shot through three different filters, admitting light of wavelengths 750 nanometers, 530 nanometers and 430 nanometers.

  6. Transitioning a Chesapeake Bay Ecological Prediction System to Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C.; Green, D. S.; Eco Forecasters

    2011-12-01

    Ecological prediction of the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and human-induced change on ecosystems and their components, encompass a wide range of space and time scales, and subject matter. They vary from predicting the occurrence and/or transport of certain species, such harmful algal blooms, or biogeochemical constituents, such as dissolved oxygen concentrations, to large-scale ecosystem responses and higher trophic levels. The timescales of ecological prediction, including guidance and forecasts, range from nowcasts and short-term forecasts (days), to intraseasonal and interannual outlooks (weeks to months), to decadal and century projections in climate change scenarios. The spatial scales range from small coastal inlets to basin and global scale biogeochemical and ecological forecasts. The types of models that have been used include conceptual, empirical, mechanistic, and hybrid approaches. This presentation will identify the challenges and progress toward transitioning experimental model-based ecological prediction into operational guidance and forecasting. Recent efforts are targeting integration of regional ocean, hydrodynamic and hydrological models and leveraging weather and water service infrastructure to enable the prototyping of an operational ecological forecast capability for the Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries. A path finder demonstration predicts the probability of encountering sea nettles (Chrysaora quinquecirrha), a stinging jellyfish. These jellyfish can negatively impact safety and economic activities in the bay and an impact-based forecast that predicts where and when this biotic nuisance occurs may help management effects. The issuance of bay-wide nowcasts and three-day forecasts of sea nettle probability are generated daily by forcing an empirical habitat model (that predicts the probability of sea nettles) with real-time and 3-day forecasts of sea-surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS). In the first demonstration

  7. Apparent genetic homogeneity of spawning striped bass in the upper Chesapeak Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Sidell, B.D.; Otto, R.G.; Powers, D.A. Karweit, M.; Smith, J.

    1980-01-01

    The possible existence of genetically distinct populations of spawning striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in the river systems of the upper Chesapeake Bay was investigated by a biochemical genetic approach. Samples of blood and liver from adult fish were obtained during the 1976 spawning runs from the Rappanhannock (Virginia), Potomac, Choptank, Sassafras, Bohemia, and Elk rivers (Maryland), and Maryland waters of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. Samples were analyzed for frequency of occurrence of a polymorphic liver enzyme, glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and variable serum proteins which were not correlated with age or sex. Multivariate and Bayesian analyses of these data indicate apparent genetic homogeneity of spawning bass within the upper Chesapeake Bay. If natal stream homing occurs, a sufficient number of wanderers may provide significant gene flow among river systems. The results suggest that long-term management of the fishery need not be totally on the basis of separate river units.

  8. Black Ducks and Their Chesapeake Bay Habitats: Proceedings of a Symposium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Matthew C., (Edited By)

    2002-01-01

    The symposium 'Black Ducks and Their Chesapeake Bay Habitats,' held October 4,2000, provided a forum for scientists to share research about the American black duck (Anas rubripes), an important breeding and wintering waterfowl species dependent upon the Chesapeake Bay habitats. American black ducks have declined significantly in the last 50 years and continue to be a species of management concern. The symposium, sponsored by the Wildfowl Trust of North America and the U.S. Geological Survey, highlighted papers and posters on a range of topics, from the traditional concerns of hunting, habitat, and hybridization to the more recent concerns of human disturbance and neophobia. Other presentations provided a historical perspective of black duck management. The direction that black duck conservation initiatives could and/or should take in the future was also discussed. As populations of humans in the Chesapeake Bay region continue to increase, we can expect that these subjects will receive increased discussion in the future.

  9. False advertising in the greenhouse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, K.

    1991-12-01

    Most scientists are convinced of the importance of their own research subjects. Broecker [1991] has deplored the temptation, if not the tendency, to go overboard and exaggerate this importance once funding enters the mind. In particular, he alleges inflated or even false claims by biological (and other) oceanographers regarding the relevance of their research to the "greenhouse effect," caused by the anthropogenic enhancement of the atmospheric CO2 content. He writes [Broecker, 1991, p. 191]: "In my estimation, on any list of subjects requiring intense study with regard to the prediction of the consequences of CO2 buildup in the atmosphere, I would place marine biological cycles near the bottom."

  10. Synimpact-postimpact transition inside Chesapeake Bay crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poag, C. Wylie

    2002-11-01

    The transition from synimpact to postimpact sedimentation inside Chesapeake Bay impact crater began with accumulation of fallout debris, the final synimpact deposit. Evi dence of a synimpact fallout layer at this site comes from the presence of unusual, millimeter- scale, pyrite microstructures at the top of the Exmore crater-fill breccia. The porous geometry of the pyrite microstructures indicates that they originally were part of a more extensive pyrite lattice that encompassed a layer of millimeter-scale glass microspherules—fallout melt particles produced by the bolide impact. Above this microspherule layer is the initial postimpact deposit, a laminated clay-silt-sand unit, 19 cm thick. This laminated unit is a dead zone, which contains abundant stratigraphically mixed and diagenetically altered or impact-altered microfossils (foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, dinoflagellates, ostracodes), but no evidence of indigenous biota. By extrapolation of sediment- accumulation rates, I estimate that conditions unfavorable to microbiota persisted for as little as <1 k.y. to 10 k.y. after the bolide impact. Subsequently, an abrupt improvement of the late Eocene paleoenvironment allowed species-rich assemblages of foraminifera, ostracodes, dinoflagellates, radiolarians, and calcareous nannoplankton to quickly reoccupy the crater basin, as documented in the first sample of the Chickahominy Formation above the dead zone.

  11. Modeling Land Use Change in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claire, J. A.; Goetz, S. J.; Bockstael, N.

    2003-12-01

    Low density, decentralized residential and commercial development is increasingly the dominant pattern of exurban land use in many developed countries, particularly the United States. The term "sprawl" is now commonly used to describe this form of development, the environmental and quality-of-life impacts of which are becoming central to debates over land use in urban and suburban areas. Continued poor health of the Chesapeake Bay, located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, is due in part to disruptions in the hydrological system caused by urban and suburban development throughout the 167,000 square kilometer watershed. We present results of a spatial predictive model of land use change based on cellular automata (SLEUTH), which was calibrated using high resolution (30m cell size) maps of the built environment derived from Landsat ETM+ imagery for the period 1986-2000. The model was applied to a 23,740 square kilometer area centered on Washington DC - Baltimore MD, and predictions were made out to 2030 assuming three different policy scenarios (current trends, managed growth, and "sustainable"). Accuracy of the model was assessed at three scales (pixel, watershed and county) and overall strengths and weaknesses of the model are presented, particularly in comparison to other econometric modeling approaches.

  12. Foraminiferal repopulation of the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie

    2012-01-01

    The Chickahominy Formation is the initial postimpact deposit in the 85km-diameter Chesapeake Bay impact crater, which is centered under the town of Cape Charles, Virginia, USA. The formation comprises dominantly microfossil-rich, silty, marine clay, which accumulated during the final ~1.6myr of late Eocene time. At cored sites, the Chickahominy Formation is 16.8-93.7m thick, and fills a series of small troughs and subbasins, which subdivide the larger Chickahominy basin. Nine coreholes drilled through the Chickahominy Formation (five inside the crater, two near the crater margin, and two ~3km outside the crater) record the stratigraphic and paleoecologic succession of 301 indigenous species of benthic foraminifera, as well as associated planktonic foraminifera and bolboformids. Two hundred twenty of these benthic species are described herein, and illustrated with scanning electron photomicrographs. Absence of key planktonic foraminiferal and Bolboforma species in early Chickahominy sediments indicates that detrimental effects of the impact also disturbed the upper oceanic water column for at least 80-100kyr postimpact. After an average of ~73kyr of stressed, rapidly fluctuating paleoenvironments, which were destabilized by after-effects of the impact, most of the cored Chickahominy subbasins maintained stable, nutrient-rich, low-oxygen bottom waters and interstitial microhabitats for the remaining ~1.3myr of late Eocene time.

  13. Catastrophic anoxia in the Chesapeake Bay in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Seliger, H.H.; Boggs, J.A.; Biggley, W.H.

    1985-04-05

    In 1984, four climatic sequences combined to produce what may be a major anoxic catastrophe in the northern Chesapeake Bay, sufficient to severely threaten the major benthic species. These sequences are (1) the highest late-winter streamflow on record from the Susquehanna River watershed; (2) streamflows from the Susquehanna River for the consecutive months of June, July, and August that are higher by 2 standard deviations than the respective monthly mean values measured over the last 34 years; (3) a stationary high in August off the Atlantic Coast; and (4) an absence of strong storm events in summer. An empirical equation is proposed for the prediction of the monthly trend of dissolved oxygen decrease in terms of a temperature-dependent subpycnoclinal respiration and a modified estuarine Richardson number. As of 23 August 1984, the summer pycnocline of the northern bay had eroded upward from its historically recorded depth below 10 meters to an abnormally shallow 5 meters, with higher stratification than in earlier years. Dissolved oxygen concentrations directly below the pycnocline decreased to zero during June, 2 months earlier than for previous wet years. At present, oxygen-deficient waters containing significant concentrations of hydrogen sulfide have penetrated into Eastern Bay and the Choptank and Potomac rivers. Because most remaining shellfish-spawning and seed-bed areas in these tributaries are located at depths between 4 and 8 meters, the continued absence of major destratifying events will prolong the present anoxic trend and may result in high benthic mortalities. 11 references, 2 figures.

  14. Catastrophic anoxia in the chesapeake bay in 1984.

    PubMed

    Seliger, H H; Boggs, J A; Biggley, W H

    1985-04-01

    In 1984, four climatic sequences combined to produce what may be a major anoxic catastrophe in the northern Chesapeake Bay, sufficient to severely threaten the major benthic species. These sequences are (i) the highest late-winter streamflow on record from the Susquehanna River watershed; (ii) streamflows from the Susquehanna River for the consecutive months of June, July, and August that are higher by 2 standard deviations than the respective monthly mean values measured over the last 34 years; (iii) a stationary high in August off the Atlantic Coast; and (iv) an absence of strong storm events in summer. An empirical equation is proposed for the prediction of the monthly trend of dissolved oxygen decrease in terms of a temperature-dependent subpycnoclinal respiration and a modified estuarine Richardson number. As of 23 August 1984, the summer pycnocline of the northern bay had eroded upward from its historically recorded depth below 10 meters to an abnormally shallow 5 meters, with higher stratification than in earlier years. Dissolved oxygen concentrations directly below the pycnocline decreased to zero during June, 2 months earlier than for previous wet years. At present, oxygen-deficient waters containing significant concentrations of hydrogen sulfide have penetrated into Eastern Bay and the Choptank and Potomac rivers. Because most remaining shellfish-spawning and seed-bed areas in these tributaries are located at depths between 4 and 8 meters, the continued absence of major destratifying events will prolong the present anoxic trend and may result in high benthic mortalities. PMID:17811570

  15. Variable climatic conditions dominate recent phytoplankton dynamics in Chesapeake Bay

    PubMed Central

    Harding, Jr., Lawrence W.; Mallonee, Michael E.; Perry, Elgin S.; Miller, W. David; Adolf, Jason E.; Gallegos, Charles L.; Paerl, Hans W.

    2016-01-01

    Variable climatic conditions strongly influence phytoplankton dynamics in estuaries globally. Our study area is Chesapeake Bay, a highly productive ecosystem providing natural resources, transportation, and recreation for nearly 16 million people inhabiting a 165,000-km2 watershed. Since World War II, nutrient over-enrichment has led to multiple ecosystem impairments caused by increased phytoplankton biomass as chlorophyll-a (chl-a). Doubled nitrogen (N) loadings from 1945–1980 led to increased chl-a, reduced water clarity, and low dissolved oxygen (DO), while decreased N loadings from 1981–2012 suggest modest improvement. The recent 30+ years are characterized by high inter-annual variability of chl-a, coinciding with irregular dry and wet periods, complicating the detection of long-term trends. Here, we synthesize time-series data for historical and recent N loadings (TN, NO2 + NO3), chl-a, floral composition, and net primary productivity (NPP) to distinguish secular changes caused by nutrient over-enrichment from spatio-temporal variability imposed by climatic conditions. Wet years showed higher chl-a, higher diatom abundance, and increased NPP, while dry years showed lower chl-a, lower diatom abundance, and decreased NPP. Our findings support a conceptual model wherein variable climatic conditions dominate recent phytoplankton dynamics against a backdrop of nutrient over-enrichment, emphasizing the need to separate these effects to gauge progress toward improving water quality in estuaries. PMID:27026279

  16. Novel psychrotolerant picocyanobacteria isolated from Chesapeake Bay in the winter.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yongle; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2015-08-01

    Picocyanobacteria are major primary producers in the ocean, especially in the tropical or subtropical oceans or during warm seasons. Many "warm" picocyanobacterial species have been isolated and characterized. However, picocyanobacteria in cold environments or cold seasons are much less studied. In general, little is known about the taxonomy and ecophysiology of picocyanobacteria living in the winter. In this study, 17 strains of picocyanobacteria were isolated from Chesapeake Bay, a temperate estuarine ecosystem, during the winter months. These winter isolates belong to five distinct phylogenetic lineages, and are distinct from the picocyanobacteria previously isolated from the warm seasons. The vast majority of the winter isolates were closely related to picocyanobacteria isolated from other cold environments like Arctic or subalpine waters. The winter picocyanobacterial isolates were able to maintain slow growth or prolonged dormancy at 4°C. Interestingly, the phycoerythrin-rich strains outperformed the phycocyanin-rich strains at cold temperature. In addition, winter picocyanobacteria changed their morphology when cultivated at 4°C. The close phylogenetic relationship between the winter picocyanobacteria and the picocyanobacteria living in high latitude cold regions indicates that low temperature locations select specific ecotypes of picocyanobacteria. PMID:26986796

  17. Coesite in suevites from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, John C.; Horton, J. Wright; Chou, I.-Ming; Belkin, Harvey E.

    2016-05-01

    The occurrence of coesite in suevites from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure is confirmed within a variety of textural domains in situ by Raman spectroscopy for the first time and in mechanically separated grains by X-ray diffraction. Microtextures of coesite identified in situ investigated under transmitted light and by scanning electron microscope reveal coesite as micrometer-sized grains (1-3 μm) within amorphous silica of impact-melt clasts and as submicrometer-sized grains and polycrystalline aggregates within shocked quartz grains. Coesite-bearing quartz grains are present both idiomorphically with original grain margins intact and as highly strained grains that underwent shock-produced plastic deformation. Coesite commonly occurs in plastically deformed quartz grains within domains that appear brown (toasted) in transmitted light and rarely within quartz of spheroidal texture. The coesite likely developed by a mechanism of solid-state transformation from precursor quartz. Raman spectroscopy also showed a series of unidentified peaks associated with shocked quartz grains that likely represent unidentified silica phases, possibly including a moganite-like phase that has not previously been associated with coesite.

  18. Estimating effective longitudinal dispersion in the Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Jay A.

    2004-07-01

    An analysis of Environmental Protection Agency's Chesapeake Bay Program hydrographic dataset shows that the bay responds coherently to variability in freshwater flux. Mean salinity and salinity stratification both respond to variability in freshwater flux on time scales of roughly 90 days. Stratification is also influenced by local wind forcing but on much shorter (4-5 day) time scales. The volume of available data allows the effective longitudinal dispersion coefficient to be estimated as a function of either time or space. Values for this dispersion coefficient vary between 200 and 1000 m 2 s -1, with mean values around 650 m 2 s -1. The spatially dependent structure has a maximum roughly 75 km from the head of the estuary, and decreases gradually towards the mouth. The temporally varying effective dispersion varies spatially as the inverse of the estuarine cross-section, and temporally as the cube root of the freshwater flux, and is at least qualitatively consistent with models of estuarine circulation and results of previous field studies. Estimates of the numerical values of the dispersion are useful for better understanding distributions of other tracers within the bay, as well as providing another metric against which numerical models should be measured.

  19. Lagrangian circulation study near Cape Henry, Virginia. [Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the circulation near Cape Henry, Virginia, was made using surface and seabed drifters and radar tracked surface buoys coupled to subsurface drag plates. Drifter releases were conducted on a line normal to the beach just south of Cape Henry. Surface drifter recoveries were few; wind effects were strongly noted. Seabed drifter recoveries all exhibited onshore motion into Chesapeake Bay. Strong winds also affected seabed recoveries, tending to move them farther before recovery. Buoy trajectories in the vicinity of Cape Henry appeared to be of an irrotational nature, showing a clockwise rotary tide motion. Nearest the cape, the buoy motion elongated to almost parallel depth contours around the cape. Buoy motion under the action of strong winds showed that currents to at least the depth of the drag plates substantially are altered from those of low wind conditions near the Bay mouth. Only partial evidence could be found to support the presence of a clockwise nontidal eddy at Virginia Beach, south of Cape Henry.

  20. Nutrient controls on ecosystem dynamics: the Chesapeake mesohaline community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulanowicz, Robert E.; Baird, Daniel

    1999-02-01

    Ecological researchers have long borrowed concepts from the theory of chemical kinetics to describe nutrient dynamics in ecosystems. Contemporary ecology, however, is in the process of creating its own suite of ideas to quantify how whole ecosystems develop. In particular, the theory of ecosystem ascendency can be applied to data on the simultaneous flows of various chemical constituents to determine which element is limiting to each species via which individual input. That is, Liebig's law of the minimum appears a corollary to the broader description of whole-system development. Application of the method to networks of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous flowing through the 36 major compartments of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem reveals that, although nitrogen limits the production by most of the planktonic and benthic compartments, the nekton appear to be using phosphorus in limiting proportions. If one links together the ecosystem components via the controlling flows into each node, a new and sometimes dramatic picture of nutrient kinetics emerges. Not surprisingly, during the summer the root nutrient control on the system appears to be the recycle of nitrogen between particulate organic materials in the sediments and their attached bacteria. No coherent pattern of control is evident during the autumn turnover, whereas during winter and spring the ultimate control appears to be exerted by a feedback in the `microbial loop' that involves both N and P.

  1. Evaluation and Validation of Case 2 Algorithms in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, Lawrence W., Jr.; Magnuson, Adrea

    2004-01-01

    The high temporal and spatial resolution of satellite ocean color observations will prove invaluable for monitoring the health of coastal ecosystems where physical and biological variability demands sampling scales beyond that possible by ship. However, ocean color remote sensing of Case 2 waters is a challenging undertaking due to the optical complexity of the water. The focus of this SIMBIOS support has been to provide in situ optical measurements form Chesapeake Bay (CB) and adjacent mid-Atlantic bight (MAB) waters for use in algorithm development and validation efforts to improve the satellite retrieval of chlorophyll (chl a) in Case 2 waters. CB provides a valuable site for validation of data from ocean color sensors for a number of reasons. First, the physical dimensions of the Bay (greater than 6,500 square kilometers) make retrievals from satellites with a spatial resolution of approximately 1 kilometer (i.e., SeaWiFS) or less (i.e., MODIS) reasonable for most of the ecosystem. Second, CB is highly influenced by freshwater flow from major rivers, making it a classic Case 2 water body with significant concentrations of chlorophyll, particulates and chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) that highly impact the shape of reflectance spectra. Finally, past and ongoing research efforts provided an expensive data set of optical observations that support the goal of this project.

  2. Variable climatic conditions dominate recent phytoplankton dynamics in Chesapeake Bay.

    PubMed

    Harding, Lawrence W; Mallonee, Michael E; Perry, Elgin S; Miller, W David; Adolf, Jason E; Gallegos, Charles L; Paerl, Hans W

    2016-01-01

    Variable climatic conditions strongly influence phytoplankton dynamics in estuaries globally. Our study area is Chesapeake Bay, a highly productive ecosystem providing natural resources, transportation, and recreation for nearly 16 million people inhabiting a 165,000-km(2) watershed. Since World War II, nutrient over-enrichment has led to multiple ecosystem impairments caused by increased phytoplankton biomass as chlorophyll-a (chl-a). Doubled nitrogen (N) loadings from 1945-1980 led to increased chl-a, reduced water clarity, and low dissolved oxygen (DO), while decreased N loadings from 1981-2012 suggest modest improvement. The recent 30+ years are characterized by high inter-annual variability of chl-a, coinciding with irregular dry and wet periods, complicating the detection of long-term trends. Here, we synthesize time-series data for historical and recent N loadings (TN, NO2 + NO3), chl-a, floral composition, and net primary productivity (NPP) to distinguish secular changes caused by nutrient over-enrichment from spatio-temporal variability imposed by climatic conditions. Wet years showed higher chl-a, higher diatom abundance, and increased NPP, while dry years showed lower chl-a, lower diatom abundance, and decreased NPP. Our findings support a conceptual model wherein variable climatic conditions dominate recent phytoplankton dynamics against a backdrop of nutrient over-enrichment, emphasizing the need to separate these effects to gauge progress toward improving water quality in estuaries. PMID:27026279

  3. Variable climatic conditions dominate recent phytoplankton dynamics in Chesapeake Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, Lawrence W., Jr.; Mallonee, Michael E.; Perry, Elgin S.; Miller, W. David; Adolf, Jason E.; Gallegos, Charles L.; Paerl, Hans W.

    2016-03-01

    Variable climatic conditions strongly influence phytoplankton dynamics in estuaries globally. Our study area is Chesapeake Bay, a highly productive ecosystem providing natural resources, transportation, and recreation for nearly 16 million people inhabiting a 165,000-km2 watershed. Since World War II, nutrient over-enrichment has led to multiple ecosystem impairments caused by increased phytoplankton biomass as chlorophyll-a (chl-a). Doubled nitrogen (N) loadings from 1945–1980 led to increased chl-a, reduced water clarity, and low dissolved oxygen (DO), while decreased N loadings from 1981–2012 suggest modest improvement. The recent 30+ years are characterized by high inter-annual variability of chl-a, coinciding with irregular dry and wet periods, complicating the detection of long-term trends. Here, we synthesize time-series data for historical and recent N loadings (TN, NO2 + NO3), chl-a, floral composition, and net primary productivity (NPP) to distinguish secular changes caused by nutrient over-enrichment from spatio-temporal variability imposed by climatic conditions. Wet years showed higher chl-a, higher diatom abundance, and increased NPP, while dry years showed lower chl-a, lower diatom abundance, and decreased NPP. Our findings support a conceptual model wherein variable climatic conditions dominate recent phytoplankton dynamics against a backdrop of nutrient over-enrichment, emphasizing the need to separate these effects to gauge progress toward improving water quality in estuaries.

  4. 'Payson' Panorama in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The panoramic camera aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity acquired this panorama of the 'Payson' outcrop on the western edge of 'Erebus' Crater during Opportunity's sol 744 (Feb. 26, 2006). From this vicinity at the northern end of the outcrop, layered rocks are observed in the crater wall, which is about 1 meter (3.3 feet) thick. The view also shows rocks disrupted by the crater-forming impact event and subjected to erosion over time.

    To the left of the outcrop, a flat, thin layer of spherule-rich soils overlies more outcrop materials. The rover is currently traveling down this 'road' and observing the approximately 25-meter (82-foot) length of the outcrop prior to departing Erebus crater.

    The panorama camera took 28 separate exposures of this scene, using four different filters. The resulting panorama covers about 90 degrees of terrain around the rover. This false-color rendering was made using the camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer and 423-nanometer filters. Using false color enhances the subtle color differences between layers of rocks and soils in the scene so that scientists can better analyze them. Image-to-image seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see.

  5. Building false memories without suggestions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Jeffrey L; Garry, Maryanne

    2012-01-01

    People can come to remember doing things they have never done. The question we asked in this study is whether people can systematically come to remember performing actions they never really did, in the absence of any suggestion from the experimenter. People built LEGO vehicles, performing some steps but not others. For half the people, all the pieces needed to assemble each vehicle were laid out in order in front of them while they did the building; for the other half, the pieces were hidden from view. The next day, everyone returned for a surprise recognition test. People falsely and confidently remembered having carried out steps they did not; those who saw all the pieces while they built each vehicle were more likely to correctly remember performing steps they did perform but equally likely to falsely remember performing steps they did not. We explain our results using the source monitoring framework: People used the relationships between actions to internally generate the missing, related actions, later mistaking that information for genuine experience. PMID:22774684

  6. Assessing the fate of dredged sediments placed in open-water sites, Northern Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halka, Jeffrey; Panageotou, William; Sanford, Lawrence; Yu-Chou, Shenn

    1994-01-01

    An integrated series of field studies and experiments have been carried out on dredged sediments placed in open water sites in Northern Chesapeake Bay. The studies include: (1) examination of the potential for fluidized sediment flow, (2) quantifying the volumetric changes that the sediments undergo during dredging process and subsequent to deposition, (3) estimating parameters for cohesive sediment erosion models from field data on currents and suspended sediment concentrations, and (4) incorporating the erosion model parameters and sediment transport equation into a 3-D hydrodynamic model for the upper Chesapeake Bay to predict transport directions and setting sites of eroded sediments under a variety of seasonal weather and river flow conditions.

  7. Ancient channels of the Susquehanna River beneath Chesapeake Bay and the Delmarva Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Halka, J.P.; Hobbs, C. H., III; Mixon, R.B.; Foster, D.S.

    1990-01-01

    The trunk channels of each system are 2 to 4 km wide and are incised 30 to 50 m into underlying strata; they have irregular longitudinal profiles and very low gradients within the Chesapeake Bay area. The youngest paleochannel is clearly of late Wisconsinan age, about 18 ka, and the intermediate one appears to be late Illinoian in age, or about 150 ka. The age of the oldest is in the range of about 200 to 400 ka. The three paleochannel systems imply a dynamic coastal-plain environment and at least two previous generations of the Chesapeake Bay. -from Authors

  8. Impact origin of the Chesapeake Bay structure and the source of the North American tektites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koeberl, C.; Poag, C.W.; Reimold, W.U.; Brandt, D.

    1996-01-01

    Seismic profiles, drill core samples, and gravity data suggest that a complex impact crater ???35.5 million years old and 90 kilometers in diameter is buried beneath the lower Chesapeake Bay. The breccia that fills the structure contains evidence of shock metamorphism, including impact melt breccias and multiple sets of planar deformation features (shock lamellae) in quartz and feldspar. The age of the crater and the composition of some breccia clasts are consistent with the Chesapeake Bay impact structure being the source of the North American tektites.

  9. Reproductive health of yellow perch, Perca flavescens, in Chesapeake Bay Tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blazer, Vicki; Pinkney, A.E.; Uphoff, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Yellow perch live in creeks, rivers, ponds, lakes, and estuaries across the central and eastern United States and Canada. In Chesapeake Bay, they tolerate salinities up to one-third that of seawater. The adults reside in the brackish waters of the bay’s tributaries and migrate upstream to spawn. Yellow perch are eagerly sought by recreational fishermen for their excellent taste and, because their late winter spawning runs are the earliest of the year, they are regarded as a harbinger of spring. Yellow perch also support a small but valuable, tightly regulated commercial fishery in the part of Chesapeake Bay that lies in Maryland.

  10. Selected data for sediment cores collected in Chesapeake Bay in 1996 and 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baucom, P.C.; Bratton, J.F.; Colman, Steven M.; Moore, Johnnie N.; King, John W.; Seal, Chip; Seal, R.R., II

    2001-01-01

    As part of a study of recent history of the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem, one- to eight- meter long sediment cores were obtained from the mesohaline section of the Chesapeake Bay between the mouths of the Potomac and Rhode Rivers. The sediments consist of three lithofacies: coarse-grained channel deposits, restricted-estuary sands and muds, and open-estuary muds. Water content, biogenic silica, magnetic susceptibility, trace metals, and nutrients (carbon, nitrogen, and their isotopes) were measured in the cores. Biogenic silica, trace-metal, and nutrient data provide a strong basis for discussing past primary productivity and water-column anoxia in the bay.

  11. Cape Verde in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A promontory nicknamed 'Cape Verde' can be seen jutting out from the walls of Victoria Crater in this false-color picture taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover took this picture on martian day, or sol, 1329 (Oct. 20, 2007), more than a month after it began descending down the crater walls -- and just 9 sols shy of its second Martian birthday on sol 1338 (Oct. 29, 2007). Opportunity landed on the Red Planet on Jan. 25, 2004. That's nearly four years ago on Earth, but only two on Mars because Mars takes longer to travel around the sun than Earth. One Martian year equals 687 Earth days.

    This view was taken using three panoramic-camera filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  12. Bacteria associated with false-positive most-probable-number coliform test results for shellfish and estuaries.

    PubMed Central

    Hussong, D; Damaré, J M; Weiner, R M; Colwell, R R

    1981-01-01

    Aerobic and facultatively anaerobic bacteria isolated from false-positive, presumptive, total coliform, most-probable-number tests of Chesapeake Bay oyster, water, and sediment samples were characterized and then classified by numerical taxonomy. A total of 538 bacterial strains clustered into 17 phena, the predominant groups of which were Enterobacteriaceae (including Escherichia coli), Aeromonas spp., and Bacillus spp. Bacillus spp. were recovered most frequently from sediment samples. Gas-producing strains which were not members of the Enterobacteriaceae were not isolated during this study. However, disproportionately large numbers of atypical and anaerogenic lactose-fermenting strains were encountered. We concluded that no single, specific bacterial group can be identified as being responsible for the false-positive reaction in the presumptive coliform test. Instead, the false-positive reaction is a result of complex interactions among various genera, representing predominantly bacteria other than coliforms. PMID:7013700

  13. 39 CFR 952.14 - Hearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hearings. 952.14 Section 952.14 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS (EFF. UNTIL 7-22-2011) § 952.14 Hearings. Hearings are held at 2101...

  14. 39 CFR 952.33 - Public Information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Public Information. 952.33 Section 952.33 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS (EFF. UNTIL 7-22-2011) § 952.33 Public Information. The Librarian of the...

  15. 39 CFR 952.8 - Service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Service. 952.8 Section 952.8 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS (EFF. UNTIL 7-22-2011) § 952.8 Service. (a) Where the Respondent's mailing address...

  16. 39 CFR 233.12 - Civil penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Civil penalties. 233.12 Section 233.12 Postal... Civil penalties. False representation and lottery orders— (a) Issuance. Pursuant to 39 U.S.C. 3005, the... be liable to the United States for a civil penalty in an amount not to exceed $11,000 for each...

  17. 39 CFR 952.18 - Evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Evidence. 952.18 Section 952.18 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCEDURES RULES OF PRACTICE IN PROCEEDINGS RELATIVE TO FALSE REPRESENTATION AND LOTTERY ORDERS (EFF. UNTIL 7-22-2011) § 952.18 Evidence. (a) Except as otherwise provided in these rules, the Federal Rules of Evidence...

  18. Ice conditions on the Chesapeake Bay as observed from LANDSAT during the winters of 1977, 1978 and 1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    The LANDSAT observations during the winters of 1977, 1978 and 1979, which were unusually cold in the northeastern U.S. and in the Chesapeake Bay area, were evaluated. Abnormal atmospheric circulation patterns displaced cold polar air to the south, and as a result, the Chesapeake Bay experienced much greater than normal icing conditions during these 3 years. The LANDSAT observations of the Chesapeake Bay area during these winters demonstrate the satellite's capabilities to monitor ice growth and melt, to detect ice motions, and to measure ice extent.

  19. Organic carbon balance and net ecosystem metabolism in Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kemp, W.M.; Smith, E.M.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M.; Boynton, W.R.

    1997-01-01

    The major fluxes of organic carbon associated with physical transport and biological metabolism were compiled, analyzed and compared for the mainstem portion of Chesapeake Bay (USA). In addition, 5 independent methods were used to calculate the annual mean net ecosystem metabolism (NEM = production - respiration) for the integrated Bay. These methods, which employed biogeochemical models, nutrient mass-balances anti summation of individual organic carbon fluxes, yielded remarkably similar estimates, with a mean NEM of +50 g C m-2 yr-1 (?? SE = 751, which is approximately 8% of the estimated annual average gross primary production. These calculations suggest a strong cross-sectional pattern in NEM throughout the Bay, wherein net heterotrophic metabolism prevails in the pelagic zones of the main channel, while net autotrophy occurs in the littoral zones which flank the deeper central area. For computational purposes, the estuary was separated into 3 regions along the land-sea gradient: (1) the oligohaline Upper Bay (11% of total area); (2) the mesohaline Mid Bay (36% of area); and (3) the polyhaline Lower Bay (53% of area). A distinct regional trend in NEM was observed along this salinity gradient, with net here(atrophy (NEM = 87 g C m-2 yr-1) in the Upper Bay, balanced metabolism in the Mid Bay and net autotrophy (NEM = +92 g C m-2 yr-1) in the Lower Bay. As a consequence of overall net autotrophy, the ratio of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) to total organic nitrogen (TON) changed from DIN:TON = 5.1 for riverine inputs to DIN:TON = 0.04 for water exported to the ocean. A striking feature of this organic C mass-balance was the relative dominance of biologically mediated metabolic fluxes compared to physical transport fluxes. The overall ratio of physical TOC inputs (1) to biotic primary production (P) was 0.08 for the whole estuary, but varied dramatically from 2.3 in the Upper Bay to 0.03 in the Mid and Lower Bay regions. Similarly, ecosystem respiration was

  20. Methylmercury production in a Chesapeake Bay salt marsh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Carl P. J.; Gilmour, Cynthia C.

    2008-06-01

    In a detailed study of the biogeochemical factors affecting the methylation of mercury in a Chesapeake Bay salt marsh, we examined relationships between mercury methylation and numerous variables, including sulfate reduction rates, organic carbon mineralization rates, iron and sulfur chemistry, and the character of dissolved organic matter (DOM). Our data show that salt marshes are important sites of de novo methylmercury (MeHg) production in coastal ecosystems. Some of the controls on MeHg production that have been well-described in other ecosystems also impacted MeHg production in this salt marsh, specifically the effect of sulfide accumulation on mercury bioavailability. We observed some novel biogeochemical relationships with Hg(II)-methylation and MeHg accumulation, particularly the positive association of Hg(II)-methylation with zones of microbial iron reduction. On the basis of this relationship, we suggest caution in wetland and groundwater remediation approaches involving iron additions. Aqueous phase Hg complexation appeared to be the dominant control on Hg bioavailability across the marsh sites examined, rather than Hg partitioning behavior. A detailed examination of DOM character in the marsh suggested a strong positive association between Hg(II)-methylation rate constants and increasing DOM molecular weight. Overall, our results indicate that net MeHg production is controlled by a balance between microbial activity and geochemical effects on mercury bioavailability, but that a significant zone of MeHg production can persist in near surface salt marsh soils. Production of MeHg in coastal marshes may negatively impact ecosystems via export to adjacent estuaries or through direct bioaccumulation in birds, fish and amphibians that feed in these highly productive ecosystems.

  1. Impact of Shoreline Stabilization Structures on Chesapeake Bay Nearshore Habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palinkas, C. M.; Sanford, L. P.; Koch, E.; Stevenson, J. C.; Ortt, R.; Lorie, S.; Booth, D.

    2014-12-01

    Currently 69% of Maryland's shoreline is eroding and 12% is hardened with increasing rates of hardening occurring as development progresses. Shoreline erosion rates are likely to increase, and community needs for shoreline protection are likely to become more important as rates of sea-level rise increase with climate change, constituting a serious coastal hazard. However, the effects of different shoreline stabilization structures on erosion and nearshore water quality and habitat are complex. A variety of stabilization techniques are used in the Maryland Chesapeake Bay, and while the qualitative effects of the different techniques are generally known, there is little quantitative, long-term information available. This study has developed a comprehensive data set comparing long-term impacts of different shoreline stabilization techniques on both the physical environment and habitat. These data include shoreline and bathymetric surveys for comparison to pre-installation information, comparison of pre- and post-construction submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) coverage, field surveys of SAV and marshes, and collection of cores to determine changes in sediment characteristics and accumulation rates. We have also assembled available estimates of wave and tides near each site to construct wave-sea level climatologies for use in a semi-empirical model of erosion potential. Statistical tests are used to explore relationships among variables. Preliminary results suggest that sediment characteristics depend on the source of material - shoreline type and estuarine salinity zone (proxy for fine sediment availability) - whereas sedimentation rate depends on structure geometry and the pre-construction sedimentation, which generally reflects physical processes controlling sediment transport. Also, sediment type, rather than structure type, seems to influence SAV (plants need sand).

  2. Enhanced stratification in the lower Chesapeake Bay following northeasterly winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valle-Levinson, Arnoldo; Miller, Jerry L.; Wheless, Glen H.

    1998-11-01

    Density data from a lower Chesapeake Bay transect obtained after two northeasterly wind events were used to describe the effects of these events on the density field in the lower estuary. The first northeaster occurred in early August 1995 and the second northeaster was related to the passage of hurricane Felix off the lower bay in mid-August 1995. The latter northeaster prolonged a period of persistent winds from the N and NE that began in early August and caused storm surges of similar magnitude to the former northeaster. The salinity fields observed after the early August event suggested encroachment of coastal waters into the lower bay as reflected by high salinities throughout the transect. Two days after weakening of the winds related to Felix, the density distribution across the lower bay showed strongly stratified conditions. This behavior suggested that the inflow of coastal water into the lower bay and the wind mixing related to Felix combined to produce a vertically uniform density gradient perpendicular to the bay entrance that relaxed after the winds weakened. This weakening of the winds coincided with neap tidal currents, which were not energetic enough to maintain vertical homogeneity and must have allowed the self-adjustment of the density gradient and the seaward advection of relatively buoyant waters near the surface. These mechanisms were illustrated with simplified numerical experiments. The findings of this study are used to propose the hypothesis that, in general, enhanced stratification and flushing in the lower bay will ensue the relaxation of a northeasterly wind event, provided that this relaxation coincides with a weak friction regime, i.e., neap tides.

  3. Chesapeake Bay coordinated split sample program annual report, 1990-1991: Analytical methods and quality assurance workgroup of the Chesapeake Bay program monitoring subcommittee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Program is a federal-state partnership with a goal of restoring the Chesapeake Bay. Its ambient water quality monitoring programs, started in 1984, sample over 150 monitoring stations once or twice a month a month. Due to the size of the Bay watershed (64,000 square miles) and the cooperative nature of the CBP, these monitoring programs involve 10 different analytical laboratories. The Chesapeake Bay Coordinated Split Sample Program (CSSP), initialed in 1988, assesses the comparability of the water quality results from these laboratories. The report summarizes CSSP results for 1990 and 1991, its second and third full years of operation. The CSSP has two main objectives: identifying parameters with low inter-organization agreement, and estimating measurement system variability. The identification of parmeters with low agreement is used as part of the overall Quality Assurance program. Laboratory and program personnel use the information to investigate possible causes of the differences, and take action to increase agreement if possible. Later CSSP results will document any improvements in inter-organization agreement. The variability estimates are most useful to data analysts and modelers who need confidence estimates for monitoring data.

  4. Cultural eutrophication in the Choptank and Patuxent estuaries of Chesapeake Bay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Choptank and Patuxent tributaries of Chesapeake Bay have become eutrophic over the last 50–100 years. Systematic monitoring of nutrient inputs began in ;1970, and there have been 2–5-fold increases in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs during 1970–2004 due to sewage disch...

  5. Radar monitoring of wetland hydrology: Water quality implications for the Chesapeake Bay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetlands are hydrologically dynamic ecosystems which have the potential to improve water quality. Unfortunately, many of the Chesapeake Bay’s wetlands, especially forested wetlands, have been lost or degraded due to human impacts primarily associated with agriculture and urban/suburban development. ...

  6. 78 FR 39599 - Safety Zone; Fort Monroe Fireworks Display, Chesapeake Bay, Hampton, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Fort Monroe Fireworks Display, Chesapeake... the Fort Monroe Fireworks. This action is intended to restrict vessel traffic movement in the... hazards associated with fireworks displays. DATES: This safety zone will be effective from 9 p.m. to 10...

  7. Chesapeake Bay ecosystem modeling program. Technical synthesis report 1993-94

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, S.B.; Boynton, W.R.; Kemp, W.M.; Wetzel, R.; Bartleson, R.

    1995-03-01

    ;Contents: Ecosystem models for management; Ecosystem regession models; Patuxent River Sav-Littoral Ecosystem Process Model; Lower Chesapeake Bay Polyhaline Sav Model; Emergent Intertidal Marsh Process Model; Plankton-Benthos Ecosystem Process Model; Fish Bioenergetics Models; Linking Water Quality with Fish Habitat; Data Visualization; Publications and Scientific Presentations Resulting From This Research.

  8. MISR Browse Images: Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS)

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-13

    MISR Browse Images: Chesapeake Lighthouse and Aircraft Measurements for Satellites (CLAMS)   These MISR Browse images provide a quick visual overview of the region observed during the ... is found at the  CLAMS home page . The MISR Browse images from the nadir camera include paths 13, 14, and 15 for July 10 to August ...

  9. 33 CFR 165.507 - Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. 165.507 Section 165.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.507 Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. (a... to the eastern shore at Kent Island, Maryland. (c) Regulations. (1) All persons are required...

  10. 33 CFR 165.507 - Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. 165.507 Section 165.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.507 Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. (a... to the eastern shore at Kent Island, Maryland. (c) Regulations. (1) All persons are required...

  11. 33 CFR 165.507 - Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. 165.507 Section 165.507 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Guard District § 165.507 Security Zone; Chesapeake Bay, between Sandy Point and Kent Island, MD. (a... to the eastern shore at Kent Island, Maryland. (c) Regulations. (1) All persons are required...

  12. 78 FR 48608 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Chesapeake, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... operation of the I64 Bridge across the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the Elizabeth River, mile 7.1, at Chesapeake, VA. This deviation is necessary to facilitate maintenance work on the moveable... route for vessels transiting this section on the South Branch of the Elizabeth River; however,...

  13. CULTURAL EUTROPHICATION IN THE CHOPTANK AND PATUXENT ESTUARIES OF CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Choptank and Patuxent tributaries of Chesapeake Bay have become eutrophic over the last 50-100 years. Systematic monitoring of nutrient inputs began in ~1970, and there have been 2-5-fold increases in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) inputs during 1970-2004 due to sewage disch...

  14. CLIMATE CHANGE AND EUTROPHICATION RESPONSES IN THE POTOMAC ESTUARY AND CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our analysis of tree ring and sediment core data indicates that climate variability in the 1900s had different consequences in the Potomac Estuary and Chesapeake Bay than in the previous two centuries as a result of anthropogenic activity affecting nutrient loadings in associated...

  15. A SIMPLE MODEL FOR FORECASTING THE EFFECTS OF NITROGEN LOADS ON CHESAPEAKE BAY HYPOXIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The causes and consequences of oxygen depletion in Chesapeake Bay have been the focus of research, assessment, and policy action over the past several decades. An ongoing scientific re-evaluation of what nutrients load reductions are necessary to meet the water quality goals is ...

  16. Decision Making: The Chesapeake Bay. An Interdisciplinary Environmental Education Curriculum Unit. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Sea Grant Program.

    As the oceans rose due to melting glaciers, the Chesapeake Bay became a crowned valley. The Bay is a biologically rich system in which the success of each species depends on the quality of water in the parts of the Bay used during its life history. With the increase in human population, technological developments associated with industrial…

  17. ANIMAL-SEDIMENT RELATIONSHIPS OF THE UPPER AND CENTRAL CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fifty-two bottom sediment box core samples were taken in fall 1978 and summer 1979 to investigate the relationship between benthic biota and the sedimentary environment of the upper and central Chesapeake Bay. Examination of the vertical distribution of the benthos and radiograph...

  18. Biofuels for the Bay: Cellulosic Double Crops in the Chesapeake Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For over two decades, technical experts and policy makers have been encouraging the use of cover crops throughout the Chesapeake Bay watershed as a way to reduce nutrient and soil losses and improve water quality. While such practices have been heavily adopted in some regions, the economic incentiv...

  19. 76 FR 63837 - Special Local Regulation for Marine Events; Chesapeake Bay Workboat Race; Back River, Messick...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation for Marine Events; Chesapeake... shall be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on October 30, 2011. The Coast Guard, at its discretion, when practical... voluntary consensus standards. Environment We have analyzed this rule under Department of Homeland...

  20. ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN SURFACE SEDIMENTS AND OYSTER TISSUES FROM THE CHESAPEAKE BAY. APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Detailed in the first part of this report is a development and discussion of the methodology used to extract and analyze sediment and oyster tissue samples from Chesapeake Bay for organic compounds. The method includes extraction, fractionation, and subsequent analysis using glas...

  1. The Building of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seyler, Sherilyn; Kupper, Kathleen

    This teaching guide explores the history of the Chesapeake and Ohio (C & O) National Historic Park, its building and its times. The lesson can be used in units on the early industrial period of U.S. history and in courses on geography or science and technology. Students realize the role canals played in western expansion and in the evolution of…

  2. Suspended particulate matter in the Chesapeake Bay entrance and adjacent shelf waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingerich, K. J.; Oertel, G. F.

    1981-01-01

    Approximately 400 samples were collected from the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay for various analyses, including 138 for suspended solids. Characteristics of suspended solids that were analyzed included: total suspended matter; total suspended inorganics, total suspended organics; percent organics; particle size distribution; and presence or absence of 11 of the most prominent particle types.

  3. Plymouth Park, Chesapeake, Virginia air quality experiment, 20 June - 11 July 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed field study of the various air pollutants in the South Norfolk section of the City of Chesapeake during the last half of June and the first half of July 1975 is presented and the calibration and processing procedures are reported.

  4. Derivation of habitat-specific dissolved oxygen criteria for Chesapeake Bay and its tidal tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batiuk, R.A.; Breitburg, D.L.; Diaz, R.J.; Cronin, T. M.; Secor, D.H.; Thursby, G.

    2009-01-01

    The Chesapeake 2000 Agreement committed its state and federal signatories to "define the water quality conditions necessary to protect aquatic living resources" in the Chesapeake Bay (USA) and its tidal tributaries. Hypoxia is one of the key water quality issues addressed as a result of the above Agreement. This paper summarizes the protection goals and specific criteria intended to achieve those goals for addressing hypoxia. The criteria take into account the variety of Bay habitats and the tendency towards low dissolved oxygen in some areas of the Bay. Stressful dissolved oxygen conditions were characterized for a diverse array of living resources of the Chesapeake Bay by different aquatic habitats: migratory fish spawning and nursery, shallow-water, open-water, deep-water, and deep-channel. The dissolved oxygen criteria derived for each of these habitats are intended to protect against adverse effects on survival, growth, reproduction and behavior. The criteria accommodate both spatial and temporal aspects of low oxygen events, and have been adopted into the Chesapeake Bay states - Maryland, Virginia, and Delaware - and the District of Columbia's water quality standards regulations. These criteria, now in the form of state regulatory standards, are driving an array of land-based and wastewater pollution reduction actions across the six-watershed.

  5. CHESAPEAKE BAY EARTH SCIENCE STUDY: INTERSTITIAL WATER CHEMISTRY-CHEMICAL ZONATION, TRIBUTARIES STUDY AND TRACE METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The sediments of the Chesapeake Bay constitute a large reservoir of chemical species derived from natural and anthropogenic sources. The behavior of these materials in the estuary is determined by the physiochemical sedimentary environments in which they are found. Three major en...

  6. Determining contaminate sources to the Chesapeake Bay and developing mitigation strategies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Contaminants and excess nutrients from atmospheric deposition and non-point sources contribute to water quality impairment in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Assessment of landscape metrics and air and water quality data have provided insight into the fate, delivery, and transport mechanisms of pollu...

  7. INPUTS, TRANSFORMATIONS, AND TRANSPORT OF NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS IN CHESAPEAKE BAY AND SELECTED TRIBUTARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this paper we assemble and analyze quantitative annual input-export budgets for total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) for Chesapeake Bay and three of its tributary estuaries (Potomac, Patuxent, and Choptank rivers). he budgets include estimates of TN and TP sources (po...

  8. 75 FR 26226 - Executive Order 13508 Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration Section 203 Final Coordinated...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-11

    ... released for public comment on November 9, 2009 (74 FR 57675, November 9, 2009). This final strategy... Order 13508, Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration, dated May 12, 2009 (74 FR 23099, May 15, 2009... May 12, 2009 (74 FR 23099, May 15, 2009), required a Federal Leadership Committee composed of...

  9. NET ANTHROPOGENIC PHOSPHORUS INPUTS; SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY REGION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal watershed eutrophication has increasingly become a regional and global issue as larger proportions of the earth’s human population settle in coastal areas. Human activities on the land have severely impacted the water resources of the Chesapeake Bay, one of the world’s l...

  10. 33 CFR 334.140 - Chesapeake Bay; U.S. Army Proving Ground Reservation, Aberdeen, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... approximately 9,275 yards S. 51°04′ W. to a point in Chesapeake Bay about 1,700 yards due east from Taylor... Bush River from Pond Point to Chelsea Chimney are closed for fishing purposes. (2) The remainder of the... purposes of water skiing as outlined above) including, but not limited to, swimming, scuba diving, or...

  11. 33 CFR 334.140 - Chesapeake Bay; U.S. Army Proving Ground Reservation, Aberdeen, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... approximately 9,275 yards S. 51°04′ W. to a point in Chesapeake Bay about 1,700 yards due east from Taylor... Bush River from Pond Point to Chelsea Chimney are closed for fishing purposes. (2) The remainder of the... purposes of water skiing as outlined above) including, but not limited to, swimming, scuba diving, or...

  12. 33 CFR 334.140 - Chesapeake Bay; U.S. Army Proving Ground Reservation, Aberdeen, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... approximately 9,275 yards S. 51°04′ W. to a point in Chesapeake Bay about 1,700 yards due east from Taylor... Bush River from Pond Point to Chelsea Chimney are closed for fishing purposes. (2) The remainder of the... purposes of water skiing as outlined above) including, but not limited to, swimming, scuba diving, or...

  13. 33 CFR 334.140 - Chesapeake Bay; U.S. Army Proving Ground Reservation, Aberdeen, Md.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... approximately 9,275 yards S. 51°04′ W. to a point in Chesapeake Bay about 1,700 yards due east from Taylor... Bush River from Pond Point to Chelsea Chimney are closed for fishing purposes. (2) The remainder of the... purposes of water skiing as outlined above) including, but not limited to, swimming, scuba diving, or...

  14. 78 FR 59368 - Notice of Joint Meeting for Captain John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail Advisory...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... Advisory Council and Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail Advisory Council AGENCY: National Park... John Smith Chesapeake National Historic Trail and the Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail will.... The Star-Spangled Banner National Historic Trail consists of ``water and overland routes...

  15. 77 FR 64980 - Chesapeake Renewable Energy LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Chesapeake Renewable Energy LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for Blanket Section 204 Authorization October 18, 2012. This is a supplemental notice in the...

  16. (U-Th)/He Zircon Dating of Chesapeake Bay Ejecta; Ocean Drilling Program Site 1073A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biren, M. B.; van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J.-A.; Hodges, K. V.; Glass, B. P.; Koeberl, C.; Hale, W.

    2014-09-01

    Results from our (U-Th)/He zircon dating of distal ejecta associated with the 40 km diameter Chesapeake Bay impact structure of Virginia, are in excellent agreement with previous K-Ar and Ar-Ar dating studies of the North American tektites.

  17. BOOK REVIEW OF "CHESAPEAKE BAY BLUES: SCIENCE, POLITICS, AND THE STRUGGLE TO SAVE THE BAY"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a book review of "Chesapeake Bay Blues: Science, Politics, and the Struggle to Save the Bay". This book is very well written and provides an easily understandable description of the political challenges faced by those proposing new or more stringent environmental regulat...

  18. An outbreak of fowl cholera in waterfowl on the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, L.N.; Stotts, V.; Wolfhard, G.

    1970-01-01

    An outbreak of fowl cholera (Pasteurella multocida infection) occurred in waterfowl wintering on the Chesapeake Bay during February to March 1970. Losses were primarily confined to sea ducks: oldsquaws (Clangula hyemalis), white-winged scoters (Melanitta deglandi), goldeneyes (Bucephala clangula), and buffleheads (Bucephala albeola).

  19. Capture locations and growth rates of Atlantic sturgeon in the Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, S.A.; Eyler, S.M.; Mangold, M.F.; Spells, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Little information exists on temporal and spatial distributions of wild and hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus oxyrinchus in the Chesapeake Bay. Approximately 3,300 hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon comprised of two size groups were released into the Nanticoke River, a tributary of the Chesapeake Bay, on 8 July 1996. During January 1996-May 2000, 1099 Atlantic sturgeon were captured incidentally (i.e., bycatch) by commercial watermen in the Chesapeake Bay, including 420 hatchery-reared individuals. Wild and hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon were captured primarily in pound nets and gill nets. Biologists tagged each fish and recorded weight, length, and location of capture. Although two adults greater than 2000 mm fork length (FL) were captured in Maryland waters, wild sturgeon were primarily juveniles from Maryland and Virginia waters (415 and 259 individuals below 1000 mm FL, respectively). A growth rate of 0.565 mm/d (N = 15, SE = 0.081) was estimated for wild individuals (487-944 mm TL at release) at liberty from 30 to 622 d. The average growth of the group of hatchery-reared Atlantic sturgeon raised at 10??C exceeded that of the group raised at 17??C. Our distributional data based on capture locations are biased by fishery dependence and gear selectivity. These data are informative to managers, however, because commercial effort is widely distributed in the Chesapeake Bay, and little distributional data were available before this study.

  20. Decision Making/The Chesapeake Bay. An Interdisciplinary Environmental Education Curriculum Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland Univ., College Park. Science Teaching Center.

    This multidisciplinary, self-contained curriculum unit focuses on the management of the Chesapeake Bay, a threatened and complex environmental system. Major unit goals include identifying and analyzing conflicting interests, issues, and public policies concerning the Bay, and determining their effects on people and the environment. The unit…

  1. ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION OF PESTICIDES TO AN AGRICULTURAL WATERSHED OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Choptank River watershed, located on the Delmarva Peninsula of the Chesapeake Bay, is dominated by agricultural land use which makes it vulnerable to runoff and atmospheric deposition of pesticides. Agricultural and wildlife areas are in close proximity, and off-site losses of pesticides may co...

  2. 33 CFR 334.220 - Chesapeake Bay, south of Tangier Island, Va.; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, Va.; naval firing range. 334.220 Section 334.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....220 Chesapeake Bay, south of Tangier Island, Va.; naval firing range. (a) The danger zone. Beginning... especially notified to the contrary. (2) All vessels, other than naval craft, are forbidden to anchor...

  3. 33 CFR 334.220 - Chesapeake Bay, south of Tangier Island, Va.; naval firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Island, Va.; naval firing range. 334.220 Section 334.220 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....220 Chesapeake Bay, south of Tangier Island, Va.; naval firing range. (a) The danger zone. Beginning... especially notified to the contrary. (2) All vessels, other than naval craft, are forbidden to anchor...

  4. Comparative productivity of American black ducks and mallards nesting on Chesapeake Bay Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krementz, D.G.; Stotts, D.B.; Pendleton, G.W.; Hines, J.E.; Stotts, V.D.

    1992-01-01

    The authors estimated laying dates, clutch sizes, and nest success rates of sympatrically breeding populations of American black ducks (Anas rubripes ) and mallards (Anas platyrhynchos ) on Chesapeake Bay islands between 1986 and 1989. Neither average laying date nor clutch size differed between black ducks and mallards. Nest success rates were higher for mallards in 2 of 4 years, but were area dependent.

  5. 75 FR 53298 - A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... AGENCY A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant Decisions: Application in the Chesapeake Bay AGENCY... 60-day public comment period for the draft document titled, ``A Method to Assess Climate-Relevant... and must be received by EPA by November 1, 2010. ADDRESSES: The draft ``A Method To Assess...

  6. Biofuels and the bay: Characterizing health and ecosystem impacts in the Chesapeake

    EPA Science Inventory

    The global climate crisis has stimulated the search for alternative fuels. Biofuels have been the focus of a recent report by the Chesapeake Bay Commission that evaluated alternative fuel development efforts in the local area. Already under stress from anthropomorphic factors,...

  7. Agricultural Pesticides and Selected Degradation Products in Five Tidal Regions and the Mainstem of Chesapeake Bay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrients, sediment, air pollution, and toxics from the water sources and the surrounding airshed are major problems contributing to poor water quality in many regions of the Chesapeake Bay (CB). Toxics are defined as chemicals that may affect the reproduction, development, and ultimately, the surv...

  8. Predicting thermal regimes of stream networks across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed: Natural and anthropogenic influences

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thermal regimes are a critical factor in models predicting joint effects of watershed management activities and climate change on fish habitat suitability. We have compiled a database of lotic temperature time series across the Chesapeake Bay Watershed (725 station-year combinat...

  9. 75 FR 54771 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Bay, Chesapeake Bay, Buckroe Beach Park, Hampton, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-09

    ... is establishing a 210-foot radius safety zone on the navigable waters of Chesapeake Bay in Hampton... be temporarily restricted within 210 feet of the fireworks launch site. Discussion of Rule The Coast... area bounded by a 210-foot radius circle centered on position 37 02'23'' N, 076 17'22'' W (NAD...

  10. 75 FR 78667 - Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative-Chesapeake Bay Watershed

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-16

    ...The purpose of this request for proposals is to solicit proposals from potential partner applicants who seek to enter into partnership agreements with the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) through the Cooperative Conservation Partnership Initiative-- Chesapeake Bay Watershed (CCPI-CBW) in order to provide assistance to producers enrolled in a conservation program. The NRCS is the......

  11. SETTLEMENT AND SURVIVAL OF THE OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA ON CREATED OYSTER REEF HABITATS IN CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Efforts to restore the Eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) reef habitats in Chesapeake Bay typically begin with the placement of hard substrata to form three-dimensional mounds on the seabed to serve as a base for oyster recruitment and growth. A shortage of oyster shell for ...

  12. Effects of power-plant generated contaminants on trophic relationships in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, J.G.; Riedel, G.F.; Connell, D.B.

    1997-09-01

    This project tested the hypothesis that shifts in phytoplankton species composition that occur when Chesapeake Bay phytoplankton communities are chronically exposed to low levels of toxic trace metals can lead to altered (reduced) flow of carbon to higher trophic levels of the conventional food web and increased movement of carbon through microbial food chains and degradation pathways.

  13. Oyster Reef Communities in the Chesapeake Bay: A Brief Primer. VORTEX: Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Juliana M.; Mann, Roger; Clark, Vicki P.

    This document introduces Virginia's Oyster Reef Teaching EXperience (VORTEX), which is an interdisciplinary program focusing on the importance of oyster reef communities in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. The VORTEX program uses field and laboratory experience supported by multimedia instruction. This document presents an overview on the biology of…

  14. DATABASE OF THE OCCURENCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF PESTICIDES IN THE CHESAPEAKE BAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This U.S. Department of Agriculture database provided by the Agricultural Research Service compiled most of the pesticide residue data measured in surface water, surface microlayer, groundwater, sediment, and biota, of Chesapeake Bay from 1976 to 1994. It was prepared to facilita...

  15. 75 FR 14152 - Executive Order 13508; Chesapeake Bay Protection and Restoration Section 502; Guidance for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ...-effective tools and practices that reduce water pollution and requests public comment. The document was... Bay Protection and Restoration, dated May 12, 2009 (74 FR 23099, May 15, 2009), requires the... Chesapeake Bay watershed describing proven, cost-effective tools and practices that reduce water...

  16. Incidence of malaria in a wintering population of canvasbacks (Aythya valisineria) on Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kocan, R.M.; Knisley, J.O.

    1970-01-01

    Canvasback ducks wintering on Chesapeake Bay had a 6% incidence of Leucocytozoon sirnondi and 2% incidence of Haemoproteus. Sub-inoculation of whole blood into Pekin ducklings produced a Plasmodium infection rate of 31%. Females were more frequently infected (12/22) than males (15/68). The parasite was identified as P. circumflexum.

  17. Characteristics of total suspended matter and associated hydrocarbon concentration adjacent to the Chesapeake Bay entrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oertel, G. F.; Wade, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Methodologies used to determine concentrations of hydrocarbons and associated suspended particulates at stations in and adjacent to the entrance to the Chesapeake Bay are described and the results are presented. Passive and active remote sensing data were acquired in conjunction with sea truth data collection.

  18. Chesapeake bay goal line 2025: Opportunities for enhancing agricultural conservation conference report

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for the Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries has been developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and has led sub-watershed managers within the Bay watershed to develop Watershed Improvement Plans (WIPs). The goals of the WIPs are to delineate nutrient a...

  19. White Rock in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows the wind eroded deposit in Pollack Crater called 'White Rock'. This image was collected during the Southern Fall Season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8, Longitude 25.2 East (334.8 West). 0 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  20. Southern Spring in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This image was collected June 25, 2003 during the southern spring season. This false color image shows both the layered ice cap and darker 'spots' that are seen only when the sun first lights the polar surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -82.3, Longitude 306 East (54 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the

  1. Iani Chaos in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image of a portion of the Iani Chaos region was collected during the Southern Fall season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.6 Longitude 342.4 East (17.6 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The

  2. Mimas Showing False Colors #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false color image of Saturn's moon Mimas reveals variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    This image is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined with a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences to create the final product.

    Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of the image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in the surface composition or the sizes of grains making up the icy soil.

    This image was obtained when the Cassini spacecraft was above 25 degrees south, 134 degrees west latitude and longitude. The Sun-Mimas-spacecraft angle was 45 degrees and north is at the top.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian

  3. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  4. COMPARATIVE FORM AND FUNCTION OF OYSTER CRASSOSTREA VIRGINICA HEMOCYTES FROM CHESAPEAKE BAY (VIRGINICA) AND APALACHICOLA BAY (FLORIDA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oysters (Crassostrea virginica) from Chesapeake Bay, Virginia, and Apalachicola Bay, Florida, were collected in March 1992, to determine relationships among hemocyte number, morphology and size with putative defense-related activities, including hemocyte mobility, particle bindin...

  5. Hydrogen isotopes in individual alkenones from the Chesapeake Bay estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, Valérie F.; Sachs, Julian P.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios of individual alkenones from haptophyte algae were measured in suspended particles and surface sediment from the Chesapeake Bay (CB) estuary, eastern USA, in order to determine their relationship to water δD values and salinity. δD values of four alkenones (MeC 37:2, MeC 37:3, EtC 38:2, EtC 38:3) from particles and sediments were between -165‰ and -221‰ and increased linearly ( R2 = 0.7-0.9) with water δD values from the head to the mouth of the Bay. Individual alkenones were depleted in deuterium by 156-188‰ relative to water. The MeC 37 alkenones were consistently enriched by ˜12‰ relative to the EtC 38 alkenones, and the di-unsaturated alkenones of both varieties were consistently enriched by ˜20‰ relative to the tri-unsaturated alkenones. All of the increase in alkenone δD values could be accounted for by the water δD increase. Consequently, no net change in alkenone-water D/ H fractionation occurred as a result of the salinity increase from 10 to 29. This observation is at odds with results from culture studies with alkenone-producing marine coccolithophorids, and from two field studies, one with a dinoflagellate sterol in the CB, and one with a wide variety of lipids in saline ponds on Christmas Island, that indicate a decline in D/ H fractionation with increasing salinity. Why D/ H fractionation in alkenones in the CB showed no dependence on salinity, while D/ H fractionation in CB dinsoterol decreased by 1‰ per unit increase in salinity remains to be determined. Two hypotheses we consider to be valid are that (i) the assemblage of alkenone-producing haptophytes changes along the Bay and each species has a different sensitivity to salinity, such that no apparent trend in αalkenone-water occurs along the salinity gradient, and (ii) greater osmoregulation capacity in coastal haptophytes may result in a diminished sensitivity of alkenone-water D/ H fractionation to salinity changes.

  6. 29 CFR 1926.60 - Methylenedianiline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Methylenedianiline. 1926.60 Section 1926.60 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Occupational Health and Environmental Controls § 1926.60 Methylenedianiline. (a) Scope...

  7. 29 CFR 34.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions. 34.2 Section 34.2 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NONDISCRIMINATION AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY REQUIREMENTS OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT OF 1982, AS AMENDED (JTPA) General Provisions § 34.2 Definitions. As used in this part, the term: Administrative Law Judge...

  8. 32 CFR Appendix A to Part 169a - Codes and Definitions of Functional Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Codes and Definitions of Functional Areas A Appendix A to Part 169a National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE DEFENSE CONTRACTING COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM PROCEDURES Pt. 169a, App. A Appendix A to Part 169a—Codes and Definitions of Functional Areas This list...

  9. 40 CFR 131.34 - Kansas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kansas. 131.34 Section 131.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY STANDARDS Federally Promulgated Water Quality Standards § 131.34 Kansas. (a) In addition to the State-adopted use designations, the following water...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix E to Part 61 - Compliance Procedures Methods for Determining Compliance With Subpart I

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Compliance Procedures Methods for Determining Compliance With Subpart I E Appendix E to Part 61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS Pt. 61, App. E Appendix E to Part...

  11. 36 CFR 60.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions. 60.3 Section 60... REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES § 60.3 Definitions. (a) Building. A building is a structure created to shelter... Molly Brown House (Denver, CO) Meek Mansion and Carriage House (Hayward, CA) Huron County Courthouse...

  12. 40 CFR 53.32 - Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test procedures for methods for SO2, CO... for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2. (a) Comparability. Comparability is shown for SO2, CO, O3, and NO2 methods.... (4) A 1-hour measurement consists of the integral of the instantaneous concentration over a...

  13. 40 CFR 60.45 - Emissions and fuel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emissions and fuel monitoring. 60.45 Section 60.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...-Fired Steam Generators for Which Construction Is Commenced After August 17, 1971 § 60.45 Emissions...

  14. 40 CFR 60.103 - Standard for carbon monoxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard for carbon monoxide. 60.103 Section 60.103 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Refineries § 60.103 Standard for carbon monoxide. Each owner or operator of any fluid catalytic cracking...

  15. 40 CFR 62.14452 - What test methods and procedures must I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What test methods and procedures must I use? 62.14452 Section 62.14452 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) APPROVAL AND PROMULGATION OF STATE PLANS FOR DESIGNATED FACILITIES AND POLLUTANTS Federal Plan Requirements for...

  16. 40 CFR 60.701 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions. 60.701 Section 60.701... Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Reactor Processes § 60.701 Definitions. As used in... of part 60, and the following terms shall have the specific meanings given them. Batch...

  17. 40 CFR 60.51c - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions. 60.51c Section 60.51c... Incinerators for Which Construction is Commenced After June 20, 1996 § 60.51c Definitions. Bag leak detection... the purpose of stopping or reversing the growth of malignant cells. Co-fired combustor means a...

  18. 40 CFR 60.7 - Notification and record keeping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Notification and record keeping. 60.7 Section 60.7 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES General Provisions § 60.7 Notification and...

  19. 40 CFR 60.102a - Emissions limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... exempted from the requirement for a CO continuous emissions monitoring system under § 60.105a(h)(3) shall... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emissions limitations. 60.102a Section 60.102a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...

  20. 40 CFR 60.32e - Designated facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... co-fired combustor (defined in § 60.51c) is not subject to this subpart if the owner or operator of... and the implementing regulations under 40 CFR part 70 in the State in which the unit is located... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Designated facilities. 60.32e...

  1. 40 CFR Table 3 to Subpart Ppppp of... - Requirements for Initial Compliance Demonstrations

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 14 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Requirements for Initial Compliance Demonstrations 3 Table 3 to Subpart PPPPP of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES (CONTINUED)...

  2. 40 CFR 60.257 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... test. CO performance tests are conducted concurrently (or within a 60-minute period) with NOX... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 60.257 Section 60.257 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  3. 40 CFR 60.252 - Standards for thermal dryers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... covered under another 40 CFR Part 60 subpart must meet the applicable requirements in that subpart but are... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standards for thermal dryers. 60.252 Section 60.252 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  4. 40 CFR 60.266 - Test methods and procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test methods and procedures. 60.266 Section 60.266 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS... Production Facilities § 60.266 Test methods and procedures. (a) During any performance test required in §...

  5. 40 CFR 60.661 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions. 60.661 Section 60.661... From Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Distillation Operations § 60.661... and in subpart A of part 60, and the following terms shall have the specific meanings given...

  6. 40 CFR 60.611 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Definitions. 60.611 Section 60.611... From the Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Air Oxidation Unit Processes § 60... in the Act and in subpart A of part 60, and the following terms shall have the specific...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5315 - Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5315 Nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide (generic). (a) Chemical substance... nickel, cobalt mixed metal oxide. (PMN P-02-90) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 34 CFR 200.36 - Communication with parents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Basic Programs Operated by Local Educational Agencies Lea and School Improvement § 200.36 Communication with parents. (a) Throughout the school improvement process, the State, LEA, or school must communicate... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Communication with parents. 200.36 Section...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix C to Subpart E of... - Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part 763 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools Pt. 763, Subpt. E, App. C Appendix C to Subpart E of Part...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix E to Subpart E of... - Interim Method of the Determination of Asbestos in Bulk Insulation Samples

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interim Method of the Determination of Asbestos in Bulk Insulation Samples E Appendix E to Subpart E of Part 763 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT ASBESTOS Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools Pt. 763, Subpt. E, App....

  11. 33 CFR 125.12 - Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.12 Section 125.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.12 Period of validity of Coast Guard Port Security...

  12. 33 CFR 125.17 - Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.17 Section 125.17 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... TO WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.17 Persons eligible for Coast Guard Port Security Cards....

  13. 29 CFR Appendix B to Subpart B of... - Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B, for Determination of Coast Guard...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B, for Determination of Coast Guard Authorized Persons B Appendix B to Subpart B of Part 1915... B to Subpart B of Part 1915—Reprint of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations Referenced in Subpart B,...

  14. 33 CFR 174.125 - Coast Guard address.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard address. 174.125 Section 174.125 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) BOATING SAFETY STATE NUMBERING AND CASUALTY REPORTING SYSTEMS State Reports § 174.125 Coast Guard...

  15. 33 CFR 67.50-35 - Eleventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eleventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-35 Section 67.50-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-35 Eleventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.55-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  16. 33 CFR 67.50-45 - Thirteenth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Thirteenth Coast Guard District. 67.50-45 Section 67.50-45 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Regulations § 67.50-45 Thirteenth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.65-1 of this chapter....

  17. 33 CFR 67.50-25 - Eighth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Eighth Coast Guard District. 67.50-25 Section 67.50-25 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-25 Eighth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.40-1 of this chapter. (b) Lines...

  18. 33 CFR 66.05-20 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 66.05-20 Section 66.05-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION PRIVATE AIDS TO NAVIGATION State Aids to Navigation § 66.05-20 Coast...

  19. 33 CFR 67.50-15 - Fifth Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fifth Coast Guard District. 67.50-15 Section 67.50-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS....50-15 Fifth Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.25-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  20. 33 CFR 64.33 - Marking by the Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Marking by the Coast Guard. 64.33 Section 64.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Marking by the Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander may mark for the protection of maritime...

  1. 33 CFR 100.10 - Coast Guard-State agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard-State agreements. 100.10 Section 100.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.10 Coast Guard-State agreements....

  2. 33 CFR 140.101 - Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors or Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inspection by Coast Guard marine....101 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF ACTIVITIES GENERAL Inspections § 140.101 Inspection by Coast Guard marine inspectors...

  3. 33 CFR 66.01-15 - Action by Coast Guard.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Action by Coast Guard. 66.01-15 Section 66.01-15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO... Coast Guard. (a) The District Commander receiving the application will review it for completeness...

  4. 33 CFR 149.10 - Where can I obtain a list of Coast Guard-approved equipment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Where can I obtain a list of Coast Guard-approved equipment? 149.10 Section 149.10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT General § 149.10 Where can I obtain a list of Coast Guard-approved equipment? Where equipment...

  5. 33 CFR 96.380 - How will the Coast Guard handle compliance and enforcement of these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How will the Coast Guard handle...? § 96.380 How will the Coast Guard handle compliance and enforcement of these regulations? (a) While operating in waters under the jurisdiction of the United States, the Coast Guard may board a vessel...

  6. 33 CFR 96.390 - When will the Coast Guard deny entry into a U.S. port?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false When will the Coast Guard deny entry into a U.S. port? 96.390 Section 96.390 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Coast Guard deny entry into a U.S. port? (a) Except for a foreign vessel entering U.S. waters...

  7. 33 CFR 8.1 - Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.1 Section 8.1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.1 Functions of the Coast Guard Reserve. (a) The Coast...

  8. 33 CFR 96.470 - How does the Coast Guard terminate an organization's authorization?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does the Coast Guard terminate an organization's authorization? 96.470 Section 96.470 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... How does the Coast Guard terminate an organization's authorization? At least every 12 months,...

  9. 33 CFR 23.15 - Coast Guard ensign.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard ensign. 23.15 Section 23.15 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.15 Coast Guard ensign. The Coast Guard...

  10. 33 CFR 173.79 - Expiration of Coast Guard certificate of number.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Expiration of Coast Guard certificate of number. 173.79 Section 173.79 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Certificate of Number § 173.79 Expiration of Coast Guard certificate of number. A certificate of number...

  11. 33 CFR 8.5 - Regulations for the Coast Guard Reserve.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Regulations for the Coast Guard Reserve. 8.5 Section 8.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL UNITED STATES COAST GUARD RESERVE § 8.5 Regulations for the Coast Guard Reserve. (a)...

  12. 33 CFR 165.506 - Safety Zones; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... zone, please see 33 CFR 3.25. (1) Coast Guard Sector Delaware Bay—Captain of the Port Zone... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zones; Fifth Coast Guard District Fireworks Displays. 165.506 Section 165.506 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  13. 33 CFR 67.50-20 - Seventh Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seventh Coast Guard District. 67.50-20 Section 67.50-20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... § 67.50-20 Seventh Coast Guard District. (a) Description. See § 3.35-1 of this chapter. (b) Line...

  14. 33 CFR 1.20-1 - Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... (a) The regulations in 49 CFR part 9 apply to the testimony of Coast Guard personnel, production of... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Testimony by Coast Guard personnel and production of records. 1.20-1 Section 1.20-1 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  15. 33 CFR 165.776 - Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; Coast Guard Base... Guard District § 165.776 Security Zone; Coast Guard Base San Juan, San Juan Harbor, Puerto Rico (a.... Coast Guard or U.S. naval vessels. (c) Regulations. (1) No person or vessel may enter into the...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1184 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION... Coast Guard District § 165.1184 Safety Zone; Coast Guard Use of Force Training Exercises, San Pablo...

  17. 33 CFR 125.33 - Holders of Coast Guard Port Security Cards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Holders of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. 125.33 Section 125.33 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... WATERFRONT FACILITIES OR VESSELS § 125.33 Holders of Coast Guard Port Security Cards. (a) Whenever...

  18. 33 CFR 173.81 - Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. 173.81 Section 173.81 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Issue of Certificate of Number § 173.81 Coast Guard forms for numbering and casualty reporting. (a) In...

  19. 33 CFR 23.12 - Coast Guard identifying insignia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coast Guard identifying insignia. 23.12 Section 23.12 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL DISTINCTIVE MARKINGS FOR COAST GUARD VESSELS AND AIRCRAFT § 23.12 Coast Guard identifying...

  20. 33 CFR 165.1334 - Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Elliot Bay, Seattle, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard... Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED... Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1334 Security Zone; U.S. Coast Guard BSU Seattle, Pier 36, Elliot...