Science.gov

Sample records for 2011-10-01 false inert

  1. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  2. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  3. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  4. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  5. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  6. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  7. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  8. 42 CFR 21.23 - False statements as disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false False statements as disqualification. 21.23 Section 21.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.23 False statements as disqualification. Willfully false...

  9. 45 CFR 3.4 - False reports and reports of injury or damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false False reports and reports of injury or damage. 3.4 Section 3.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE General § 3.4 False reports...

  10. 47 CFR 11.45 - Prohibition of false or deceptive EAS transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prohibition of false or deceptive EAS transmissions. 11.45 Section 11.45 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.45 Prohibition of false or deceptive EAS transmissions. No person...

  11. 47 CFR 0.560 - Penalty for false representation of identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Penalty for false representation of identity. 0.560 Section 0.560 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Privacy Act Regulations § 0.560 Penalty for false representation of identity. Any individual who...

  12. 43 CFR 20.510 - Fraud or false statements in a Government matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fraud or false statements in a Government matter. 20.510 Section 20.510 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Other Employee Conduct Provisions § 20.510 Fraud or false statements in a...

  13. 47 CFR 80.335 - Procedures for canceling false distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for canceling false distress alerts. 80.335 Section 80.335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements and Procedures...

  14. 49 CFR 1570.13 - False statements regarding security background checks by public transportation agency or railroad...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY MARITIME AND LAND TRANSPORTATION SECURITY GENERAL RULES § 1570.13 False statements... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false False statements regarding security...

  15. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  16. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter. [5 FR 31, Jan. 4, 1940]...

  17. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  18. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter....

  19. 7 CFR 201.19 - Inert matter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inert matter. 201.19 Section 201.19 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.19 Inert matter. The label shall show the percentage by weight of inert matter. [5 FR 31, Jan. 4, 1940]...

  20. 46 CFR 153.501 - Requirement for dry inert gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirement for dry inert gas. 153.501 Section 153.501... Requirements § 153.501 Requirement for dry inert gas. When Table 1 refers to this section, an inert gas system for the containment system must supply inert gas containing no more than 100 ppm water....

  1. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  2. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  3. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas piping: Location. 154.910 Section 154.910... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping...

  4. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas system: Controls. 154.904 Section 154.904... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas...

  5. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  6. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  7. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  8. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system must have a permanent inert gas system that: (a) Maintains the vapor space of the containment system in...

  9. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  10. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  11. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  12. 46 CFR 154.908 - Inert gas generator: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inert gas generator: Location. 154.908 Section 154.908... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.908 Inert gas generator: Location. (a) Except as allowed in paragraph (b) of this section, an inert gas generator must be located in the main...

  13. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas generators. 154.906 Section 154.906 Shipping... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.906 Inert gas generators. The inert gas generator must... sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in...

  14. 46 CFR 154.912 - Inerted spaces: Relief devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Inerted spaces: Relief devices. 154.912 Section 154.912 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.912 Inerted spaces: Relief devices. Inerted spaces...

  15. Glottal jet inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mphail, Michael; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of an inertive contribution of the glottal jet to glottal aerodynamic resistance is presented. Given that inertance of the flow in a constriction can be expressed in terms of the kinetic energy of the flow, and that a jet is a maximum kinetic energy flow pattern, it is argued that the glottal jet possesses its own inertance which is at least as large as that of the vocal tract. These arguments are supported by estimates of inertance obtained from simulations of an unsteady flow through an axisymmetric orifice, and of a compliant constriction with the approximate shape and mechanical properties of the vocal folds. It is further shown that the inertive effect of the glottal jet depends on the jet path and jet mixing, with a slowly diffusing, symmetric jet showing higher inertance than an asymmetric jet which rapidly mixes with supraglottal air. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  16. Inert electrode connection

    SciTech Connect

    Weyand, John D.; Woods, Robert W.; DeYoung, David H.; Ray, Siba P.

    1985-01-01

    An inert electrode connection is disclosed wherein a layer of inert electrode material is bonded to a layer of conductive material by providing at least one intermediate layer of material therebetween comprising a predetermined ratio of inert material to conductive material. In a preferred embodiment, the connection is formed by placing in a die a layer of powdered inert material, at least one layer of a mixture of powdered inert material and conductive material, and a layer of powdered conductive material. The connection is then formed by pressing the material at 15,000-20,000 psi to form a powder compact and then densifying the powder compact in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature of 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C.

  17. Inert electrode connection

    DOEpatents

    Weyand, J.D.; Woods, R.W.; DeYoung, D.H.; Ray, S.P.

    1985-02-19

    An inert electrode connection is disclosed wherein a layer of inert electrode material is bonded to a layer of conductive material by providing at least one intermediate layer of material therebetween comprising a predetermined ratio of inert material to conductive material. In a preferred embodiment, the connection is formed by placing in a die a layer of powdered inert material, at least one layer of a mixture of powdered inert material and conductive material, and a layer of powdered conductive material. The connection is then formed by pressing the material at 15,000--20,000 psi to form a powder compact and then densifying the powder compact in an inert or reducing atmosphere at a temperature of 1,200--1,500 C. 5 figs.

  18. Inert Anode Report

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    1999-07-01

    This ASME report provides a broad assessment of open literature and patents that exist in the area of inert anodes and their related cathode systems and cell designs, technologies that are relevant for the advanced smelting of aluminum. The report also discusses the opportunities, barriers, and issues associated with these technologies from a technical, environmental, and economic viewpoint.

  19. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  20. 46 CFR 153.500 - Inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Inert gas systems. 153.500 Section 153.500 Shipping... BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Special Requirements § 153.500 Inert gas systems. When Table 1 refers to this section, a cargo containment system...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  2. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  3. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  4. 46 CFR 154.1740 - Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. 154.1740... Operating Requirements § 154.1740 Vinyl chloride: Inhibiting and inerting. When a vessel is carrying vinyl chloride, the master shall ensure that: (a) Section 154.1818 is met; or (b) Section 154.1710 is met,...

  5. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  6. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  7. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  8. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  9. 33 CFR 157.164 - Use of inert gas system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Crude Oil Washing (COW) System on Tank Vessels Cow Operations § 157.164 Use of inert gas system. (a) The... following are maintained in each cargo tank being crude oil washed: (i) A gas or a mixture of gases with an... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of inert gas system....

  10. Inert Ingredients Overview and Guidance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Web page provides information on inert ingredients approved for use in pesticide products and the guidance documents that are available to assist in obtaining approval for a new inert ingredient.

  11. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters considered for space propulsion systems were investigated. Electron diffusion across a magnetic field was examined utilizing a basic model. The production of doubly charged ions was correlated using only overall performance parameters. The use of this correlation is therefore possible in the design stage of large gas thrusters, where detailed plasma properties are not available. Argon hollow cathode performance was investigated over a range of emission currents, with the positions of the inert, keeper, and anode varied. A general trend observed was that the maximum ratio of emission to flow rate increased at higher propellant flow rates. It was also found that an enclosed keeper enhances maximum cathode emission at high flow rates. The maximum cathode emission at a given flow rate was associated with a noisy high voltage mode. Although this mode has some similarities to the plume mode found at low flows and emissions, it is encountered by being initially in the spot mode and increasing emission. A detailed analysis of large, inert-gas thruster performance was carried out. For maximum thruster efficiency, the optimum beam diameter increases from less than a meter at under 2000 sec specific impulse to several meters at 10,000 sec. The corresponding range in input power ranges from several kilowatts to megawatts.

  12. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  13. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  14. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  15. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  16. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    Inert gases, particularly argon and xenon, are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. Hollow cathode data were obtained for a wide range of operating conditions. Some test conditions gave plasma coupling voltages at or below the sputtering threshold, hence should permit long operating lifetimes. All observations of hollow cathode operation were consistent with a single theory of operation, in which a significant amount of the total electron emission is from localized areas within the orifice. This mode of emission is also supported by scanning electron microscope photographs that indicate local temperatures at or near the melting temperature of the tungsten tip. Experimental hollow cathode performance was correlated for two orifice diameters, three inert gas propellants, and a range of flow rates for each propellant. The basic theory for the production of doubly ionized argon and xenon was completed. Experimental measurements of the doubly ionized fraction agree with theory within about plus or minus 20 percent. High voltage isolators were studied for the propellant feed line. The breakdown voltage per segment ranged from 300 to over 500 V with argon.

  17. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1980-01-01

    Some advances in component technology for inert gas thrusters are described. The maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar was increased 60-70% by the use of an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar, but without emissive oxide, was also obtained. A 30 cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages give double-ion measurements consistent with a double ion correlation developed previously using 15 cm thruster data. An attempt was made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The reason this attempt was unsuccessful is not yet clear. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration was evaluated. The ion impingement on the single grid accelerator was found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator was 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  18. Inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, W. D.

    1980-01-01

    Inert gas performance with three types of 12 cm diameter magnetoelectrostatic containment (MESC) ion thrusters was tested. The types tested included: (1) a hemispherical shaped discharge chamber with platinum cobalt magnets; (2) three different lengths of the hemispherical chambers with samarium cobalt magnets; and (3) three lengths of the conical shaped chambers with aluminum nickel cobalt magnets. The best argon performance was produced by a 8.0 cm long conical chamber with alnico magnets. The best xenon high mass utilization performance was obtained with the same 8.0 cm long conical thruster. The hemispherical thruster obtained 75 to 87% mass utilization at 185 to 205 eV/ion of singly charged ion equivalent beam.

  19. 46 CFR 76.15-15 - Piping.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping. 76.15-15 Section 76.15-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS FIRE PROTECTION EQUIPMENT Carbon Dioxide... forth in this paragraph. Only carbon dioxide or other inert gas shall be used for this test. (2)...

  20. 46 CFR 39.40-3 - Design and equipment for vapor balancing-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design and equipment for vapor balancing-TB/ALL. 39.40-3... Lightering and Topping-Off Operations with Vapor Balancing § 39.40-3 Design and equipment for vapor balancing... a vessel discharging cargo are not inerted, the vapor collection line on the service vessel must...

  1. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters have continued to be of interest for space propulsion applications. Xenon is of interest in that its physical characteristics are well suited to propulsion. High atomic weight and low tankage fraction were major factors in this choice. If a large amount of propellant was required, so that cryogenic storage was practical, argon is a more economical alternative. Argon was also the preferred propellant for ground applications of thruster technology, such as sputter etching and deposition. Additional magnetic field measurements are reported. These measurements should be of use in magnetic field design. The diffusion of electrons through the magnetic field above multipole anodes was studied in detail. The data were consistent with Bohm diffusion across a magnetic field. The theory based on Bohm diffusion was simple and easily used for diffusion calculations. Limited startup data were obtained for multipole discharge chambers. These data were obtained with refractory cathodes, but should be useful in predicting the upper limits for starting with hollow cathodes.

  2. Inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Inert gases are of interest as possible alternatives to the usual electric thruster propellants of mercury and cesium. The multipole discharge chamber investigated was shown capable of low discharge chamber losses and flat ion beam profiles with a minimum of optimization. Minimum discharge losses were 200 to 250 eV/ion for xenon and 300 to 350 eV/ion for argon, while flatness parameters in the plane of the accelerator grid were 0.85 to 0.95. The design used employs low magnetic field strengths, which permits the use of sheet-metal parts. The corner problem of the discharge chamber was resolved with recessed corner anodes, which approximately equalized both the magnetic field above the anodes and the electron currents to these anodes. Argon hollow cathodes were investigated at currents up to about 5 amperes using internal thermionic emitters. Cathode chamber diameter optimized in the 1.0 to 2.5 cm range, while orifices diameter optimized in the 0.5 to 5 mm range. The use of a bias voltage for the internal emitter extended the operating range and facilitated starting. The masses of 15 and 30 cm flight type thrusters were estimated at about 4.2 and 10.8 kg.

  3. Compressing the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Morrissey, David E.; de la Puente, Alejandro

    2016-02-16

    The Inert Doublet Model relies on a discrete symmetry to prevent couplings of the new scalars to Standard Model fermions. We found that this stabilizes the lightest inert state, which can then contribute to the observed dark matter density. In the presence of additional approximate symmetries, the resulting spectrum of exotic scalars can be compressed. Here, we study the phenomenological and cosmological implications of this scenario. In conclusion, we derive new limits on the compressed Inert Doublet Model from LEP, and outline the prospects for exclusion and discovery of this model at dark matter experiments, the LHC, and future colliders.

  4. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  5. 40 CFR 180.1122 - Inert ingredients of semiochemical dispensers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inert ingredients of semiochemical... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1122 Inert ingredients of semiochemical dispensers; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance. (a) All inert ingredients of...

  6. False assumptions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, M

    1997-01-01

    Indian women do not have to be told the benefits of breast feeding or "rescued from the clutches of wicked multinational companies" by international agencies. There is no proof that breast feeding has declined in India; in fact, a 1987 survey revealed that 98% of Indian women breast feed. Efforts to promote breast feeding among the middle classes rely on such initiatives as the "baby friendly" hospital where breast feeding is promoted immediately after birth. This ignores the 76% of Indian women who give birth at home. Blaming this unproved decline in breast feeding on multinational companies distracts attention from more far-reaching and intractable effects of social change. While the Infant Milk Substitutes Act is helpful, it also deflects attention from more pressing issues. Another false assumption is that Indian women are abandoning breast feeding to comply with the demands of employment, but research indicates that most women give up employment for breast feeding, despite the economic cost to their families. Women also seek work in the informal sector to secure the flexibility to meet their child care responsibilities. Instead of being concerned about "teaching" women what they already know about the benefits of breast feeding, efforts should be made to remove the constraints women face as a result of their multiple roles and to empower them with the support of families, governmental policies and legislation, employers, health professionals, and the media.

  7. 46 CFR 32.53-30 - Positive pressure-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Positive pressure-T/ALL. 32.53-30 Section 32.53-30... REQUIREMENTS Inert Gas System § 32.53-30 Positive pressure—T/ALL. Each inert gas system must be designed to enable the operator to maintain a gas pressure of 100 millimeters (4 inches) of water on filled...

  8. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  9. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17... Scientific Laboratory § 194.15-17 Compressed gases other than inert gases. (a) When, in consideration for a particular operation, compressed gases are needed within the laboratory, the cylinders may be...

  10. 46 CFR 153.923 - Inerting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations General Cargo Operational Requirements § 153.923 Inerting systems. The master shall ensure that the inert gas systems for any cargo...

  11. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... flammable vapors are purged from the tank by inert gas before air is admitted; and (4) When gas free cargo tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the...

  12. Welding Using Chilled-Inert-Gas Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Report describes study of fusion welding using chilled inert gas. Marked improvement shown in welding of aluminum using chilled helium gas. Chilling inert gas produces two additional benefits: 1) creation of ultradense inert atmosphere around welds; 2) chilled gas cools metal more quickly down to temperature at which metals not reactive.

  13. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  14. Hot nanoindentation in inert environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenkle, Jonathan C.; Packard, Corinne E.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2010-07-01

    An instrument capable of performing nanoindentation at temperatures up to 500 °C in inert atmospheres, including partial vacuum and gas near atmospheric pressures, is described. Technical issues associated with the technique (such as drift and noise) and the instrument (such as tip erosion and radiative heating of the transducer) are identified and addressed. Based on these considerations, preferred operation conditions are identified for testing on various materials. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, the hardness and elastic modulus of three materials are measured: fused silica (nonoxidizing), aluminum, and copper (both oxidizing). In all cases, the properties match reasonably well with published data acquired by more conventional test methods.

  15. Mechanisms of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Experiments describing the mechanism of inert gas narcosis are reported. A strain of mice, genetically altered to increase susceptibility to botulin poisoning (synaptic response) appears to increase metabolic rates while breathing argon; this infers a genetically altered synaptic response to both botulin toxin and narcotic gases. Studies of metabolic depression in human subjects breathing either air or a 30% mixture of nitrous oxide indicate that nitrous oxide narcosis does not produce pronounced metabolic depression. Tests on mice for relative susceptibilities to narcosis and oxygen poisoning as a function of fatty membrane composition show that alteration of the fatty acid composition of phospholipids increases resistance to metabolically depressant effects of argon but bas no effect on nitrous oxide narcosis. Another study suggests that acclimatization to low tension prior to high pressure oxygen treatment enhances susceptibility of mice to convulsions and death; developing biochemical lesions cause CNS metabolite reductions and pulmonary damage.

  16. Inert-gas thruster technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Trock, D. C.

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to recent advances in component technology for inert-gas thrusters. It is noted that the maximum electron emission of a hollow cathode with Ar can be increased 60-70% by using an enclosed keeper configuration. Operation with Ar but without emissive oxide has also been attained. A 30-cm thruster operated with Ar at moderate discharge voltages is found to give double-ion measurements consistent with a double-ion correlation developed earlier on the basis of 15-cm thruster data. An attempt is made to reduce discharge losses by biasing anodes positive of the discharge plasma. The performance of a single-grid ion-optics configuration is assessed. The ion impingement on the single-grid accelerator is found to approach the value expected from the projected blockage when the sheath thickness next to the accelerator is 2-3 times the aperture diameter.

  17. Electron clusters in inert gases.

    PubMed

    Nazin, S; Shikin, V

    2008-10-17

    This Letter addresses the counterintuitive behavior of electrons injected into dense cryogenic media with negative scattering length L. Instead of strongly reduced mobility at all but the lowest densities due to the polaronic effect involving the formation of density enhancement clusters (expected in the theory with a simple gas-electron interaction successfully applied earlier to electrons in helium where L>0) which should substantially decrease the electron mobility, an opposite picture is observed: with increasing |L| (the trend taking place for inert gases with the growth of atomic number) and the gas density, the electrons remain practically free. An explanation of this behavior is provided based on consistent accounting for the nonlinearity of the electron interaction with the gaseous medium in the gas atom number density.

  18. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF... that: (1) Hold and interbarrier spaces on a vessel with full secondary barriers are inerted so that the... interbarrier spaces contain only dry air or inert gas on: (i) A vessel with partial secondary barriers; (ii)...

  19. 46 CFR 154.904 - Inert gas system: Controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.904 Inert gas system: Controls. The inert gas system... the cargo area meeting paragraph (a) of this section; (c) Automatic and manual inert gas...

  20. Axial grading of inert matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R.

    2012-07-01

    Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

  1. Inert gas transport in blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Baker, A Barry; Farmery, Andrew D

    2011-04-01

    This article establishes the basic mathematical models and the principles and assumptions used for inert gas transfer within body tissues-first, for a single compartment model and then for a multicompartment model. From these, and other more complex mathematical models, the transport of inert gases between lungs, blood, and other tissues is derived and compared to known experimental studies in both animals and humans. Some aspects of airway and lung transfer are particularly important to the uptake and elimination of inert gases, and these aspects of gas transport in tissues are briefly described. The most frequently used inert gases are those that are administered in anesthesia, and the specific issues relating to the uptake, transport, and elimination of these gases and vapors are dealt with in some detail showing how their transfer depends on various physical and chemical attributes, particularly their solubilities in blood and different tissues. Absorption characteristics of inert gases from within gas cavities or tissue bubbles are described, and the effects other inhaled gas mixtures have on the composition of these gas cavities are discussed. Very brief consideration is given to the effects of hyper- and hypobaric conditions on inert gas transport.

  2. Inert gases in Sea of Fertility regolith

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinogradov, A. P.; Zadorozhnyy, I. K.

    1974-01-01

    The content and isotopic composition were studied of inert gases -- He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe -- in samples of lunar regolith returned by the Luna 16 automatic station. The samples were taken from depths of about 12 and 30 cm. The high concentrations of inert gases exceed by several orders their concentrations observed in ordinary stony meteorites. The gases in lunar regolith were a complex mixture of gases of different origins: Solar, cosmogenic, radiogenic, and so on. Solar wind gases predominated, distributed in the thin surficial layer of the regolith grains. The concentrations of these gases in the surficial layer is several cubic centimeters per gram. The isotopic composition of the inert gases of solar origin approaches their composition measured in gas-rich meteorites.

  3. Performance of an adjustable, threaded inertance tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, W. J.; Pfotenhauer, J. M.; Nellis, G. F.; Liu, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The performance of the Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler depends strongly on the design of the inertance tube. The phase angle produced by the inertance tube is very sensitive to its diameter and length. Recent developments are reported here regarding an adjustable inertance device that can be adjusted in real time. The inertance passage is formed by the root of a concentric cylindrical threaded device. The depth of the threads installed on the outer screw varies. In this device, the outer screw can be rotated four and half turns. At the zero turn position the length of the passage is 1.74 m and the hydraulic diameter is 7 mm. By rotating the outer screw, the inner threaded rod engages with additional, larger depth threads. Therefore, at its upper limit of rotation, the inertance passage includes both the original 1.74 m length with 7mm hydraulic diameter plus an additional 1.86 m length with a 10 mm hydraulic diameter. A phase shift change of 24° has been experimentally measured by changing the position of outer screw while operating the device at a frequency of 60 Hz. This phase angle shift is less than the theoretically predicted value due to the presence of a relatively large leak through the thread clearance. Therefore, the distributed component model of the inertance tube was modified to account for the leak path causing the data to agree with the model. Further, the application of vacuum grease to the threads causes the performance of the device to improve substantially.

  4. Inert strength of pristine silica glass fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.L.; Michalske, T.A.

    1993-11-01

    Silica glass fibers have been produced and tested under ultra high vacuum (UHV) conditions to investigate the inert strength of pristine fibers in absence of reactive agents. Analysis of the coefficient of variation in diameter ({upsilon}{sub d}) vs the coefficient of variation of breaking strength ({upsilon}{sub {sigma}}) does not adequately explain the variation of breaking stress. Distribution of fiber tensile strength data suggests that the inert strength of such fibers is not single valued and that the intrinsic strength is controlled by defects in the glass. Furthermore, comparison of room temperature UHV data with LN{sub 2} data indicates that these intrinsic strengths are not temperature dependent.

  5. Inert gas effects on embryonic development.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, H. S.; Grimard, M.

    1972-01-01

    It had been found in previous investigations that hatchability of fertile chicken eggs is reduced to 50% or less of controls if incubation takes place in a low nitrogen atmosphere containing He. Although these results suggest some role for nitrogen in embryogenesis, it is possible that a requirement exists for an inert molecule closer in physical characteristics to nitrogen than is He. An investigation is conducted involving incubation at ground level pressure in a gas mixture in which the 79% inert component was either neon or argon. The effect of varying combinations of nitrogen, helium, and oxygen was also studied.

  6. Fast, Nonspattering Inert-Gas Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed welding technique combines best features of metal (other than tungsten)/inert-gas welding, plasma arc welding, and tungsten/inert-gas welding. Advantages include: wire fed to weld joint preheated, therefore fed at high speed without spattering; high-frequency energy does not have to be supplied to workpiece to initiate welding; size of arc gap not critical, power-supply control circuit adjusts voltage across gap to compensate for changes; only low gas-flow rate needed; welding electrode replaced easily as prefabricated assembly; external wire-feeding manipulator not needed; and welding process relatively forgiving of operator error.

  7. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... oxygen concentration is 8 percent or less by volume when flammable cargoes are carried; (2) Hold and... tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the oxygen concentration in the tank is 8 percent or less by volume before cargo liquid or vapor is introduced. (b)...

  8. 46 CFR 154.1848 - Inerting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... oxygen concentration is 8 percent or less by volume when flammable cargoes are carried; (2) Hold and... tanks are to be filled with a flammable cargo, air is purged from the tank by inert gas until the oxygen concentration in the tank is 8 percent or less by volume before cargo liquid or vapor is introduced. (b)...

  9. Two systems developed for purifying inert atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, M. S.; Johnson, C. E.; Kyle, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Two systems, one for helium and one for argon, are used for purifying inert atmospheres. The helium system uses an activated charcoal bed at liquid nitrogen temperature to remove oxygen and nitrogen. The argon system uses heated titanium sponge to remove nitrogen and copper wool beds to remove oxygen. Both use molecular sieves to remove water vapor.

  10. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall...

  11. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1107-12 - Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inerting of mine atmosphere prohibited. 75.1107-12 Section 75.1107-12 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... atmosphere prohibited. No fire suppression device designed to control fire by total flooding shall...

  15. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17 Section 194.15-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory...

  16. 46 CFR 194.15-17 - Compressed gases other than inert gases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compressed gases other than inert gases. 194.15-17 Section 194.15-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS HANDLING, USE, AND CONTROL OF EXPLOSIVES AND OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Chemistry Laboratory...

  17. Refractory metals welded or brazed with tungsten inert gas equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Appropriate brazing metals and temperatures facilitate the welding or brazing of base metals with tungsten inert gas equipment. The highest quality bond is obtained when TIG welding is performed in an inert atmosphere.

  18. Portable spectrometer monitors inert gas shield in welding process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, E. L.

    1967-01-01

    Portable spectrometer using photosensitive readouts, monitors the amount of oxygen and hydrogen in the inert gas shield of a tungsten-inert gas welding process. A fiber optic bundle transmits the light from the welding arc to the spectrometer.

  19. Plasma processes in inert gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.

    1979-01-01

    Inert gas thrusters, particularly with large diameters, have continued to be of interest for space propulsion applications. Two plasma processes are treated in this study: electron diffusion across magnetic fields and double ion production in inert-gas thrusters. A model is developed to describe electron diffusion across a magnetic field that is driven by both density and potential gradients, with Bohm diffusion used to predict the diffusion rate. This model has applications to conduction across magnetic fields inside a discharge chamber, as well as through a magnetic baffle region used to isolate a hollow cathode from the main chamber. A theory for double ion production is presented, which is not as complete as the electron diffusion theory described, but it should be a useful tool for predicting double ion sputter erosion. Correlations are developed that may be used, without experimental data, to predict double ion densities for the design of new and especially larger ion thrusters.

  20. Positron-inert gas differential elastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauppila, W. E.; Smith, Steven J.; Kwan, C. K.; Stein, T. S.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are being made in a crossed beam experiment of the relative elastic differential cross section (DCS) for 5 to 300 eV positrons scattering from inert gas atoms (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) in the angular range from 30 to 134 deg. Results obtained at energies around the positronium (Ps) formation threshold provide evidence that Ps formation and possibly other inelastic channels have an effect on the elastic scattering channel.

  1. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dew point at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  2. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  3. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  4. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  5. 46 CFR 154.903 - Inert gas systems: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.903 Inert gas systems: General. (a) Inert gas carried... tanks, hold and interbarrier spaces, and insulation. (b) The boiling point and dewpoint at atmospheric pressure of the inert gas must be below the temperature of any surface in those spaces or −45 °C (−49...

  6. A new understanding of inert gas narcosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zhang; Yi, Gao; Haiping, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetics are extremely important in modern surgery to greatly reduce the patient’s pain. The understanding of anesthesia at molecular level is the preliminary step for the application of anesthetics in clinic safely and effectively. Inert gases, with low chemical activity, have been found to cause anesthesia for centuries, but the mechanism is unclear yet. In this review, we first summarize the progress of theories about general anesthesia, especially for inert gas narcosis, and then propose a new hypothesis that the aggregated rather than the dispersed inert gas molecules are the key to trigger the narcosis to explain the steep dose-response relationship of anesthesia. Project supported by the Supercomputing Center of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, China, the Shanghai Supercomputer Center, China, the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 21273268, 11290164, and 11175230), the Startup Funding from Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. Y290011011), “Hundred People Project” from Chinese Academy of Sciences, and “Pu-jiang Rencai Project” from Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality, China (Grant No. 13PJ1410400).

  7. Techniques for optimizing inerting in electron processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangwalla, I. J.; Korn, D. J.; Nablo, S. V.

    1993-07-01

    The design of an "inert gas" distribution system in an electron processor must satisfy a number of requirements. The first of these is the elimination or control of beam produced ozone and NO x which can be transported from the process zone by the product into the work area. Since the tolerable levels for O 3 in occupied areas around the processor are <0.1 ppm, good control techniques are required involving either recombination of the O 3 in the beam heated process zone, or exhausting and dilution of the gas at the processor exit. The second requirement of the inerting system is to provide a suitable environment for completing efficient, free radical initiated addition polymerization. In this case, the competition between radical loss through de-excitation and that from O 2 quenching must be understood. This group has used gas chromatographic analysis of electron cured coatings to study the trade-offs of delivered dose, dose rate and O 2 concentrations in the process zone to determine the tolerable ranges of parameter excursions can be determined for production quality control purposes. These techniques are described for an ink:coating system on paperboard, where a broad range of process parameters have been studied (D, Ġ, O 2. It is then shown how the technique is used to optimize the use of higher purity (10-100 ppm O 2) nitrogen gas for inerting, in combination with lower purity (2-20, 000 ppm O 2) non-cryogenically produced gas, as from a membrane or pressure swing adsorption generators.

  8. C(240)-----The most Chemically Inert Fullerene?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddon, R. C.; Scuseria, G. E.; Smalley, R. E.

    1997-01-01

    The reactivity of the fullerenes is primarily a function of their strain, as measured by the pyramidalization angle or curvature of the conjugated carbon atoms. The development of faceting in the structure of large icosahedral fullerenes leads to a minimum in the value of the maximum fullerene pyramidalization angle that lies in the vicinity of C-240. On this basis it is argued that C-240 will be the most chemically inert fullerene. This observation explains the production of [10,10] single-walled nanotubes because a C-240 hemisphere is required for the nucleation of such tubes.

  9. Performance of large inert-gas thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of large inert-gas thrusters is predicted based on present knowledge of ion optics performance and discharge chamber operation. Calculated performance data are given for argon and xenon propellants. The effect of varying propellant utilization and thruster diameter is discussed and the optimum choice of beam diameter for very large systems is indicated for low, intermediate, and high specific impulses. Optimum discharge chamber depths are also specified. Although detailed design considerations may modify the predictions, the general trends indicated should still be useful for directing future technology efforts and evaluating mission studies involving large thrusters.

  10. Leptogenesis, radiative neutrino masses and inert Higgs triplet dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wen-Bin; Gu, Pei-Hong

    2016-05-18

    We extend the standard model by three types of inert fields including Majorana fermion singlets/triplets, real Higgs singlets/triplets and leptonic Higgs doublets. In the presence of a softly broken lepton number and an exactly conserved Z{sub 2} discrete symmetry, these inert fields together can mediate a one-loop diagram for a Majorana neutrino mass generation. The heavier inert fields can decay to realize a successful leptogenesis while the lightest inert field can provide a stable dark matter candidate. As an example, we demonstrate the leptogenesis by the inert Higgs doublet decays. We also perform a systematic study on the inert Higgs triplet dark matter scenario where the interference between the gauge and Higgs portal interactions can significantly affect the dark matter properties.

  11. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  12. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  13. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  14. False Color Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    In a gray scale image, the suble variations seen in this false color image are almost impossible to identify. Note the orange band in the center of the frame, and the bluer bands to either side of it.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 87, Longitude 65.5 East (294.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. Passive Fuel Tank Inerting Systems for Ground Combat Vehicles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    operating principle is to supply an inert gas , usually nitrogen (N2 ) or carbon dioxide (CO), into the ullage or dry bay. The inert gas dilutes ?he available...logistics and economics tend to favor N2 . The source of the inert gas can be either a liquid (cryogenic) supply or an onboard generator. Liquid supplies have...Agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . 311 5.1.3. Damage Nodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 5.2. Current Fuel SIstem Descriptions . . . . . . . 14 5.2.1

  16. [Advances in research on neuroprotective effects of inert gas].

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Guo, Song-xue; Hong, Yuan; Zhang, Jian-min

    2011-01-01

    Inert gas is a group of rare gases with very low activity, their application in medical field has increasingly drawn attentions. It is known that inert gases helium, xenon and argon have protective effects on nervous system and the mechanisms are related to eradicating free radicals, anti-inflammation, suppressing apoptosis, influencing ion channels and so on. Further study on the neuroprotective effect of inert gas will shed light on a new approach to treat neurological diseases.

  17. Inert gases in closed crystal growth systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palosz, Witold

    1997-07-01

    The effect of desorption from, and diffusion through the wall on inert gas pressure in sealed fused silica ampoules was investigated. It is shown, that desorption from the surface and the bulk of silica may lead to an accumulation of residual gas on the order of a few Torr or more upon annealing. A prior outgassing of the ampoules under vacuum at high temperature reduces the amount of gas released from the glass by at least one order of magnitude. Presence of oxide and other impurities in the source material was found to increase the residual gas pressure, affect its composition, and reduce the vapor transport rate in PVT systems. It is shown, that light gases (hydrogen, helium, and neon) diffuse through silica wall and may change the pressure inside the sealed ampoule considerably even at moderate temperatures.

  18. Resonance-inert stabilization for space stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    An approach to stabilizing control systems is presented which structures controllers like passive mechanical systems. The controller is visualized as a structural part with a passive behavior similar to springs, dashpots, and masses. If such a controller is connected by a proper feedback arrangement, then a passive mechanical plant cannot upset stability, regardless of masses, resonances, and three-dimensional coupling. The concept of resonance-inert stabilization is explained by structuring the controller of a simple feedback loop. Reactive functions, connections, and matrices are defined and used in the stabilization concept. The realization of a possible Skylab control system is discussed and compared with the present design. This example demonstrates the applicability to three-dimensional problems with lagging controllers.

  19. Mucosal Vaccination against Tuberculosis Using Inert Bioparticles

    PubMed Central

    Reljic, Rajko; Sibley, Laura; Huang, Jen-Min; Pepponi, Ilaria; Hoppe, Andreas; Hong, Huynh A.

    2013-01-01

    Needle-free, mucosal immunization is a highly desirable strategy for vaccination against many pathogens, especially those entering through the respiratory mucosa, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Unfortunately, mucosal vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) is impeded by a lack of suitable adjuvants and/or delivery platforms that could induce a protective immune response in humans. Here, we report on a novel biotechnological approach for mucosal vaccination against TB that overcomes some of the current limitations. This is achieved by coating protective TB antigens onto the surface of inert bacterial spores, which are then delivered to the respiratory tract. Our data showed that mice immunized nasally with coated spores developed humoral and cellular immune responses and multifunctional T cells and, most importantly, presented significantly reduced bacterial loads in their lungs and spleens following pathogenic challenge. We conclude that this new vaccine delivery platform merits further development as a mucosal vaccine for TB and possibly also other respiratory pathogens. PMID:23959722

  20. Moon - False Color Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This false-color mosaic was constructed from a series of 53 images taken through three spectral filters by Galileo's imaging system as the spacecraft flew over the northern regions of the Moon on December 7, 1992. The part of the Moon visible from Earth is on the left side in this view. The color mosaic shows compositional variations in parts of the Moon's northern hemisphere. Bright pinkish areas are highlands materials, such as those surrounding the oval lava-filled Crisium impact basin toward the bottom of the picture. Blue to orange shades indicate volcanic lava flows. To the left of Crisium, the dark blue Mare Tranquillitatis is richer in titanium than the green and orange maria above it. Thin mineral-rich soils associated with relatively recent impacts are represented by light blue colors; the youngest craters have prominent blue rays extending from them. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the exploration of the Jupiter system in 1995-97, is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  1. North Polar False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This full resolution image contains dunes, and small areas of 'blue' which may represent fresh (ie. not dust covered) frost or ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 85, Longitude 235.8 East (124.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. False Color Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft were used to produce this false-color composite of Jupiter's northern aurora on the night side of the planet. The height of the aurora, the thickness of the auroral arc, and the small-scale structure are revealed for the first time. Images in Galileo's red, green, and clear filters are displayed in red, green, and blue respectively. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size, which is a ten-fold improvement over Hubble Space Telescope images and a hundred-fold improvement over ground-based images.

    The glow is caused by electrically charged particles impinging on the atmosphere from above. The particles travel along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which are nearly vertical at this latitude. The auroral arc marks the boundary between the 'closed' field lines that are attached to the planet at both ends and the 'open' field lines that extend out into interplanetary space. At the boundary the particles have been accelerated over the greatest distances, and the glow is especially intense.

    The latitude-longitude lines refer to altitudes where the pressure is 1 bar. The image shows that the auroral emissions originate about 500 kilometers (about 310 miles) above this surface. The colored background is light scattered from Jupiter's bright crescent, which is out of view to the right. North is at the top. The images are centered at 57 degrees north and 184 degrees west and were taken on April 2, 1997 at a range of 1.7 million kilometers (1.05 million miles) by Galileo's Solid State Imaging (SSI) system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at: http:// galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at: http:/ /www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  3. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA)...

  4. 40 CFR 174.533 - Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant... Glycine max Herbicide-Resistant Acetolactate Synthase (GM-HRA) inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Glycine max herbicide-resistant acetolactate synthase (GM-HRA)...

  5. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOEpatents

    Bingham, Dennis N [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  6. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping must not pass through or terminate in an accommodation, service, or control space....

  7. 46 CFR 154.910 - Inert gas piping: Location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Design, Construction and Equipment Atmospheric Control in Cargo Containment Systems § 154.910 Inert gas piping: Location. Inert gas piping must not pass through or terminate in an accommodation, service, or control space....

  8. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using ceramic inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Douglas A.; DiMilia, Robert A.; Dynys, Joseph M.; Phelps, Frankie E.; LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2002-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising ceramic inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The ceramic inert anodes used in the process may comprise oxides containing Fe and Ni, as well as other oxides, metals and/or dopants.

  9. Electrolytic production of high purity aluminum using inert anodes

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.

    2001-01-01

    A method of producing commercial purity aluminum in an electrolytic reduction cell comprising inert anodes is disclosed. The method produces aluminum having acceptable levels of Fe, Cu and Ni impurities. The inert anodes used in the process preferably comprise a cermet material comprising ceramic oxide phase portions and metal phase portions.

  10. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume....

  11. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume....

  12. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume....

  13. 46 CFR 154.906 - Inert gas generators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...: (a) Produce an inert gas containing less than 5% oxygen by volume; (b) Have a device to continuously sample the discharge of the generator for oxygen content; and (c) Have an audible and visual alarm in the cargo control station that alarms when the inert gas contains 5% or more oxygen by volume....

  14. Effect of inert propellant injection on Mars ascent vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, James E.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A Mars ascent vehicle is limited in performance by the amount of propellant which can be brought from earth. In some cases the vehicle performance can be improved by injecting inert gas into the engine, if the inert gas is available as an in situ resource. CO2, N2 and Ar are constituents of the Martian atmosphere which are available at every point on the Martian surface and could be produced by a very simple processing technique, consisting essentially of compressing the atmosphere. The effect of inert gas injection on rocket engine performance was analyzed with a numerical code calculating chemical equilibrium in the engine, for engines of varying combustion chamber pressure, expansion ratio, oxidizer/fuel ratio, and inert injection fraction. Results of this analysis were applied to several candidate missions to determine how the required mass of return propellant needed in LEO could be decreased using inert propellant injection.

  15. Effect of inert propellant injection on Mars ascent vehicle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, James E.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    A Mars ascent vehicle is limited in performance by the propellant which can be brought from Earth. In some cases the vehicle performance can be improved by injecting inert gas into the engine, if the inert gas is available as an in-situ resource and does not have to be brought from Earth. Carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and argon are constituents of the Martian atmosphere which could be separated by compressing the atmosphere, without any chemical processing step. The effect of inert gas injection on rocket engine performance was analyzed with a numerical combustion code that calculated chemical equilibrium for engines of varying combustion chamber pressure, expansion ratio, oxidizer/fuel ratio, and inert injection fraction. Results of this analysis were applied to several candidate missions to determine how the required mass of return propellant needed in low Earth orbit could be decreased using inert propellant injection.

  16. Inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Xiao; Smith, Roger; Kenny, S. D.

    2016-03-01

    The properties of inert gas bubbles in bcc Fe is examined using a combination of static energy minimisation, molecular dynamics and barrier searching methods with empirical potentials. Static energy minimisation techniques indicate that for small Ar and Xe bubbles, the preferred gas to vacancy ratio at 0 K is about 1:1 for Ar and varies between 0.5:1 and 0.9:1 for Xe. In contrast to interstitial He atoms and small He interstitial clusters, which are highly mobile in the lattice, Ar and Xe atoms prefer to occupy substitutional sites and any interstitials present in the lattice soon displace Fe atoms and become substitutional. If a pre-existing bubble is present then there is a capture radius around a bubble which extends up to the 6th neighbour position. Collision cascades can also enlarge an existing bubble by the capture of vacancies. Ar and Xe can diffuse through the lattice through vacancy driven mechanisms but with relatively high energy barriers of 1.8 and 2.0 eV respectively. This indicates that Ar and Xe bubbles are much harder to form than bubbles of He and that such gases produced in a nuclear reaction would more likely be dispersed at substitutional sites without the help of increased temperature or radiation-driven mechanisms.

  17. Hyperpolarized and inert gas MRI: the future.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Blasiak, Barbara; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Fox, Matthew S; Dowhos, Krista M; Albert, Mitchell S

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a potentially ideal imaging modality for noninvasive, nonionizing, and longitudinal assessment of disease. Hyperpolarized (HP) agents have been developed in the past 20 years for MR imaging, and they have the potential to vastly improve MRI sensitivity for the diagnosis and management of various diseases. The polarization of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-sensitive nuclei other than (1)H (e.g., (3)He, (129)Xe) can be enhanced by a factor of up to 100,000 times above thermal equilibrium levels, which enables direct detection of the HP agent with no background signal. In this review, a number of HP media applications in MR imaging are discussed, including HP (3)He and (129)Xe lung imaging, HP (129)Xe brain imaging, and HP (129)Xe biosensors. Inert fluorinated gas MRI, which is a new lung imaging technique that does not require hyperpolarization, is also briefly discussed. This technique will likely be an important future direction for the HP gas lung imaging community.

  18. Preliminary Design Report Shippingport Spent Fuel Drying and Inerting System

    SciTech Connect

    JEPPSON, D.W.

    2000-05-18

    A process description and system flow sheets have been prepared to support the design/build package for the Shippingport Spent Fuel Canister drying and inerting process skid. A process flow diagram was prepared to show the general steps to dry and inert the Shippingport fuel loaded into SSFCs for transport and dry storage. Flow sheets have been prepared to show the flows and conditions for the various steps of the drying and inerting process. Calculations and data supporting the development of the flow sheets are included.

  19. Bioactive and inert dental glass-ceramics.

    PubMed

    Montazerian, Maziar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra

    2017-02-01

    The global market for dental materials is predicted to exceed 10 billion dollars by 2020. The main drivers for this growth are easing the workflow of dentists and increasing the comfort of patients. Therefore, remarkable research projects have been conducted and are currently underway to develop improved or new dental materials with enhanced properties or that can be processed using advanced technologies, such as CAD/CAM or 3D printing. Among these materials, zirconia, glass or polymer-infiltrated ceramics, and glass-ceramics (GCs) are of great importance. Dental glass-ceramics are highly attractive because they are easy to process and have outstanding esthetics, translucency, low thermal conductivity, high strength, chemical durability, biocompatibility, wear resistance, and hardness similar to that of natural teeth, and, in certain cases, these materials are bioactive. In this review article, we divide dental GCs into the following two groups: restorative and bioactive. Most restorative dental glass-ceramics (RDGCs) are inert and biocompatible and are used in the restoration and reconstruction of teeth. Bioactive dental glass-ceramics (BDGCs) display bone-bonding ability and stimulate positive biological reactions at the material/tissue interface. BDGCs are suggested for dentin hypersensitivity treatment, implant coating, bone regeneration and periodontal therapy. Throughout this paper, we elaborate on the history, processing, properties and applications of RDGCs and BDGCs. We also report on selected papers that address promising types of dental glass-ceramics. Finally, we include trends and guidance on relevant open issues and research possibilities. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 105A: 619-639, 2017.

  20. Results from electrolysis test of a prototype inert anode: Inert Electrode Program

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Koski, O.H.; Morgan, L.G. ); Peterson, R.D.; Richards, N.E.; Tabereaux, A.T. . Mfg. Technology Lab.)

    1990-05-01

    Nonconsumable or inert anodes are being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)({sup a}) for use in the electrolytic production of aluminum. A series of laboratory test on the laboratory scale (Hart et al. 1987; Strachan et al. 1989; Marschman 1989) has shown the technology to be potentially feasible. A series of larger-scale experiments are now being run to determine the viability of the technology on a commercial scale. The results reported here are from a test performed at the Reynolds Metals Company, Manufacturing Technology Laboratory, Sheffield, Alabama, using a prototype anode. The prototype anode was approximately 15 cm in diameter and 20 cm high (Figure 1.1). The objectives of the test were to determine if an anode, produced by a commercial vendor, could survive in a test under conditions approximating those found in a commercial electrolysis cell; to familiarize the Reynolds staff with the operation of such an anode in a subsequent pilot cell test of the inert anode technology; and to familiarize the PNL staff with the operations at the Reynolds Metals Company facility. 8 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

  1. Novel type of tuned mass damper with inerter which enables changes of inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeski, P.; Kapitaniak, T.; Perlikowski, P.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper we propose the novel type of tuned mass damper and investigate its properties. Characteristic feature of the device is that it contains a special type of inerter equipped with a continuously variable transmission and gear-ratio control system which enables stepless and accurate changes of inertance. We examine the damping properties of the proposed tuned mass damper with respect to one-degree-of-freedom harmonically forced oscillator. To prove the potential of introduced device we test its four different embodiments characterized by four different sets of parameters. We generalize our investigation and show that proposed device has broad spectrum of applications, we consider three different stiffness characteristics of damped structure i.e. linear, softening and hardening. We use the frequency response curves to present how considered devices influence the dynamics of analyzed systems and demonstrate their capabilities. Moreover, we check how small perturbations introduced to the system by parametric and additive noise influence system's dynamics. Numerical results show excellent level of vibration reduction in an extremely wide range of forcing frequencies.

  2. Positive consequences of false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Patel, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research is replete with examples of the negative consequences of false memories. In the current research, we provide a different perspective on false memories and their development and demonstrate that false memories can have positive consequences. Specifically, we examined the role false memories play in subsequent problem-solving tasks. Children and adults studied and recalled neutral or survival-relevant lists of associated words. They then solved age-normed compound remote associates, some of whose solutions had been primed by false memories created when studying the previous lists. The results showed that regardless of age: (a) survival-related words were not only better recollected but were also more susceptible than neutral words to false memory illusions; and (b) survival-related false memories were better than neutral false memories as primes for problem-solving. These findings are discussed in the context of recent speculation concerning the positive consequences of false memories, and the adaptive nature of reconstructive memory.

  3. False Position, Double False Position and Cramer's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We state and prove the methods of False Position (Regula Falsa) and Double False Position (Regula Duorum Falsorum). The history of both is traced from ancient Egypt and China through the work of Fibonacci, ending with a connection between Double False Position and Cramer's Rule.

  4. Apparatus For Metal/Inert-Gas Welding In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocks, C. O.

    1994-01-01

    Metal/inert-gas welding-torch assembly operates in vacuum. Plasma generated in interior chamber and focused onto workpiece in vacuum. Pinch rollers feed wire to weld puddle. Controlled flow of plasma reduces dispersal in vacuum, preventing extinction.

  5. 114. SMALL ARMS (BUILDINGS 9798) AND INERT STOREHOUSE (BLDGS. 1031040) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. SMALL ARMS (BUILDINGS 97-98) AND INERT STOREHOUSE (BLDGS. 103-1040) PLAN AND ELEVATIONS, FULLER/SCOTT, MARCH 15, 1941. QP ACC 1791. - Quonset Point Naval Air Station, Roger Williams Way, North Kingstown, Washington County, RI

  6. A sensitive image intensifier which uses inert gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerns, Q. A.; Miller, H. M.

    1972-01-01

    High gain optical image intensifier utilizes inert gas cavity with copper electrodes to form electron avalanches without excessive pulse voltages. Estimated optical gain for device is two times 10 to the power of seven.

  7. Inert gas spraying device aids in repair of hazardous systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teleha, S.

    1965-01-01

    Inert gas spraying device aids in safely making mechanical repairs to a cryogenic fluid system without prior emptying of the system. This method can be applied to any natural or bottled gas system and with modifications to gasoline transports.

  8. The use of inert gas xenon for cryopreservation of leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Laptev, D S; Polezhaeva, T V; Zaitseva, O O; Khudyakov, A N; Solomina, O N; Utemov, S V

    2014-06-01

    We studied the possibility of cryopreservation of human blood nuclear cells under protection with inert gas xenon. A method for inducing clathrate anabiosis of leukocytes was developed that preserved the cells for practical use in biology and medicine.

  9. Inert electrodes program: Fiscal Year 1987 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, O.H.; Marschman, S.C.; Schilling, C.H.; Windisch, C.F.

    1988-12-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program is being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP). The purpose of the program is to develop long-lasting, energy-efficient anodes, cathodes, and ancillary equipment for Hall-Heroult cells used by aluminum industry. The program is divided into three tasks with the following objectives: Inert Anode Development - to improve the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells by development of inert anodes; Stable Cathode Studies - to develop methods for retrofitting Hall-Heroult cells with TiB/sub 2/-based cathode materials; and Sensor Development - to devise sensors to control the chemistry of Hall-Heroult Cells using stable anodes and cathodes. This Inert Electrodes Program annual report highlights the major technical accomplishment of FY 1987. The accomplishments are presented in the following sections: Management, Materials Development and Testing, Materials Evaluation, Stable Cathode Studies, and Sensor Development. 50 refs., 47 figs.

  10. Inert-Gas Diffuser For Plasma Or Arc Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Spencer, Carl N.; Hosking, Timothy J.

    1994-01-01

    Inert-gas diffuser provides protective gas cover for weld bead as it cools. Follows welding torch, maintaining continuous flow of argon over newly formed joint and prevents it from oxidizing. Helps to ensure welds of consistently high quality. Devised for plasma arc keyhole welding of plates of 0.25-in. or greater thickness, also used in tungsten/inert-gas and other plasma or arc welding processes.

  11. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed.

  12. The Kepler False Positive Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kepler False Positive Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has detected thousands of candidate exoplanets by observing transit signals in a sample of more than 190,000 stars. Many of these transit signals are false positives, defined as a transit-like signal that is not due to a planet orbiting the target star (or a bound companion if the target is a multiple-star system). Astrophysical causes of false positives include background eclipsing binaries, planetary transits not associated with the target star, and non-planetary eclipses of the target star by stellar companions. The fraction of Kepler planet candidates that are false positives ranges from about 10% at high Galactic latitudes to 40% at low Galactic latitudes. Creating a high-reliability planet candidate catalog for statistical studies such as occurrence rate calculations requires removing clearly identified false positives.The Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive flags false positives, and will soon provide a high-level classification of false positives, but lacks detailed description of why a KOI was determined to be a false positive. The Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) examines each false positive in detail to certify that it is correctly identified as a false positive, and determines the primary reason(s) a KOI is classified as a false positive. The work of the FPWG will be published as the Kepler False Positive Table, hosted at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive.The Kepler False Positive Table provides detailed information on the evidence for background binaries, transits caused by stellar companions, and false alarms. In addition to providing insight into the Kepler false positive population, the false positive table gives information about the background binary population and other areas of astrophysical interest. Because a planet around a star not associated with the target star is considered a false positive, the false positive table likely contains further planet candidates

  13. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    PubMed

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences.

  14. Dark matter with topological defects in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; Kirk, Russell; No, Jose Miguel; West, Stephen M.

    2015-05-26

    We examine the production of dark matter by decaying topological defects in the high mass region m{sub DM}≫m{sub W} of the Inert Doublet Model, extended with an extra U(1) gauge symmetry. The density of dark matter states (the neutral Higgs states of the inert doublet) is determined by the interplay of the freeze-out mechanism and the additional production of dark matter states from the decays of topological defects, in this case cosmic strings. These decays increase the predicted relic abundance compared to the standard freeze-out only case, and as a consequence the viable parameter space of the Inert Doublet Model can be widened substantially. In particular, for a given dark matter annihilation rate lower dark matter masses become viable. We investigate the allowed mass range taking into account constraints on the energy injection rate from the diffuse γ-ray background and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, together with constraints on the dark matter properties coming from direct and indirect detection limits. For the Inert Doublet Model high-mass region, an inert Higgs mass as low as ∼200 GeV is permitted. There is also an upper limit on string mass per unit length, and hence the symmetry breaking scale, from the relic abundance in this scenario. Depending on assumptions made about the string decays, the limits are in the range 10{sup 12} GeV to 10{sup 13} GeV.

  15. Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of inertant acoustic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Prateek P.; Manimala, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Longitudinal elastic wave propagation characteristics of acoustic metamaterials with various inerter configurations are investigated using their representative one-dimensional discrete element lattice models. Inerters are dynamic mass-amplifying mechanical elements that are activated by a difference in acceleration across them. They have a small device mass but can provide a relatively large dynamic mass presence depending on accelerations in systems that employ them. The effect of introducing inerters both in local attachments and in the lattice was examined vis-à-vis the propagation characteristics of locally resonant acoustic metamaterials. A simple effective model based on mass, stiffness, or their combined equivalent was used to establish dispersion behavior and quantify attenuation within bandgaps. Depending on inerter configurations in local attachments or in the lattice, both up-shift and down-shift in the bandgap frequency range and their extent are shown to be possible while retaining static mass addition to the host structure to a minimum. Further, frequency-dependent negative and even extreme effective-stiffness regimes are encountered. The feasibility of employing tuned combinations of such mass-delimited inertant configurations to engineer acoustic metamaterials that act as high-pass filters without the use of grounded elements or even as complete longitudinal wave inhibitors is shown. Potential device implications and strategies for practical applications are also discussed.

  16. Dark matter with topological defects in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hindmarsh, Mark; No, Jose Miguel; Kirk, Russell; West, Stephen M. E-mail: russell.kirk.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk E-mail: stephen.west@rhul.ac.uk

    2015-05-01

    We examine the production of dark matter by decaying topological defects in the high mass region m{sub DM} >> m{sub W} of the Inert Doublet Model, extended with an extra U(1) gauge symmetry. The density of dark matter states (the neutral Higgs states of the inert doublet) is determined by the interplay of the freeze-out mechanism and the additional production of dark matter states from the decays of topological defects, in this case cosmic strings. These decays increase the predicted relic abundance compared to the standard freeze-out only case, and as a consequence the viable parameter space of the Inert Doublet Model can be widened substantially. In particular, for a given dark matter annihilation rate lower dark matter masses become viable. We investigate the allowed mass range taking into account constraints on the energy injection rate from the diffuse γ-ray background and Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, together with constraints on the dark matter properties coming from direct and indirect detection limits. For the Inert Doublet Model high-mass region, an inert Higgs mass as low as ∼ 200 GeV is permitted. There is also an upper limit on string mass per unit length, and hence the symmetry breaking scale, from the relic abundance in this scenario. Depending on assumptions made about the string decays, the limits are in the range 10{sup 12} GeV to 10{sup 13} GeV.

  17. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  18. Study modality and false recall.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebekah E; Engle, Randall W

    2011-01-01

    False memories occur when individuals mistakenly report an event as having taken place when that event did not in fact occur. The DRM (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) paradigm provides an effective technique for creating and investigating false memories. In this paradigm participants study a list of words (e.g., SOUR, CANDY,…) that are highly associated to a non-presented critical item (e.g., SWEET). The study phase is followed by a test of memory for the study list words. Researchers typically find very high levels of false recall of the critical non-presented item. However, the likelihood of falsely remembering the non-presented critical items can be reduced by presenting studied associates visually rather than auditorally (e.g., Smith & Hunt, 1998). This is referred to as the modality effect in false memory. The current study investigated the role of resource availability in the expression of this modality effect in false recall. In Experiment 1 false recall was reduced in the visual study presentation condition relative to the auditory condition for participants with higher working memory capacity, but not for participants with lower working memory capacity. In Experiment 2 the effect of study modality on false recall was eliminated by the addition of a divided attention task at encoding. Both studies support the proposal that resource availability plays a role in the expression of the modality effect in the DRM paradigm (Smith, Lozito, & Bayen, 2005).

  19. Damping Performance of Taut Cables with Passive Absorbers Incorporating Inerters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiannan; Jiang, Jason Zheng; Macdonald, John H. G.

    2016-09-01

    As stay cables are prone to vibrations due to their low inherent damping, a common method to limit unwanted vibrations is to install a viscous damper normal to the cable near one of its supports. This paper investigates the potential performance improvement that can be delivered by a numbers of candidate absorbers that incorporate inerters. The inerter device is the true network dual of a spring, with the property that the force is proportional to the relative acceleration between its two terminals. A finite element taut cable model is used for this study. A specific cost function indicating the damping performance of a cable with an absorber attached is proposed. An optimisation of the performance is then carried out. Based on optimisation results, the best damping performance for each of the candidate absorber structures against a specific range of inertance values is presented.

  20. METAL SPRAYER FOR USE IN VACUUM OR INERT ATMOSPHERE

    DOEpatents

    Monroe, R.E.

    1958-10-14

    A metal sprayer is described for use in a vacuum or inert atmosphere with a straight line wire feed and variable electrode contact angle. This apparatus comprises two wires which are fed through straight tubes of two mechanisms positioned on opposite sides of a central tube to which an inert gas is fed. The two mechanisms and the wires being fed constitute electrodes to which electrical current is supplied so that the wires are melted by the electric are formed at their contacting region and sprayed by the gas supplied by the central tube. This apparatus is designed specifically to apply a zirconium coating to uranium in an inert atmosphere and without the use of an oxidizing flame.

  1. Inertization of pyrite cinders and co-inertization with electric arc furnace flue dusts by pyroconsolidation at solid state.

    PubMed

    Viñals, J; Balart, M J; Roca, A

    2002-01-01

    The viability of a pyroconsolidation process to render pyrite cinders inert and to co-inert pyrite cinders with a hazardous polymetallic residue such as electric arc furnace flue dusts (EAF) containing Pb, Cu, Zn, As, Cr, Ni and Mo were investigated. The effects of pyroconsolidation temperature (800-1200 degrees C), milling pyrite cinders and additions of both CaO and EAF on the resulting microstructure of the pellets were determined. The microstructural changes were then compared with the results of the standard leaching tests. Full inertization of pyrite cinders was achieved after milling to < 100 micron followed by a pelletization and pyroconsolidation process at a temperature of 1200 degrees C. This process also allows co-inertization of pyrite cinders with controlled additions of EAF (up to approximately to 10%). Following pyroconsolidation at 1200 degrees C, the metallic elements were inert components in the four main phases: traces of Cr in hematite; Cr, Cu, Zn and Ni in spinel-phase; traces of Cr and Zn in calcium ferrites; and Pb and traces of Cu, Zn and Ba in K-Ca-Al-Fe glassy silicate.

  2. Nonchamber, Root-Side, Inert-Gas Purging During Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, William F.; Rybicki, Daniel J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved apparatus distributes inert gas to protect against oxidation on root side of weld during welding and after welding while joint remains hot. Simple and lightweight; readily moved along weld path in synchronism with torch. Because it concentrates inert gas where needed, consumes gas at relatively low rate, and not necessary to monitor oxygen content of protective atmosphere. Apparatus does not obscure view of root side of weld. Used for full-penetration plasma-arc welding of such reactive metals as aluminum/lithium alloys and titanium.

  3. Tunneling decay of false kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; MacKenzie, Richard; Marleau, Luc; Paranjape, M. B.; Ung, Yvan

    2015-07-01

    We consider the decay of "false kinks," that is, kinks formed in a scalar field theory with a pair of degenerate symmetry-breaking false vacua in 1 +1 dimensions. The true vacuum is symmetric. A second scalar field and a peculiar potential are added in order for the kink to be classically stable. We find an expression for the decay rate of a false kink. As with any tunneling event, the rate is proportional to exp (-SE) where SE is the Euclidean action of the bounce describing the tunneling event. This factor varies wildly depending on the parameters of the model. Of interest is the fact that for certain parameters SE can get arbitrarily small, implying that the kink is only barely stable. Thus, while the false vacuum itself may be very long-lived, the presence of kinks can give rise to rapid vacuum decay.

  4. False allegation of child abduction.

    PubMed

    Canning, Kathleen E; Hilts, Mark A; Muirhead, Yvonne E

    2011-05-01

    Cases in which a child has been falsely reported as missing or abducted can be extremely challenging to the law enforcement agencies responsible for their investigation. In the absence of a witnessed abduction or an obvious crime scene, it is difficult to determine whether a child has actually been abducted or has become a victim of a homicide and a false allegation. The purpose of this study was to examine falsely alleged kidnapping cases and identify successful investigative strategies. Sixty-one adjudicated false allegation cases involving 66 victims were analyzed. The mean age of the victim was 5 years. Victims came from generally unstable, high-risk family situations and were killed primarily by biological parents. Victims were killed because they were unwanted or viewed as an obstacle to a desired goal, or they were victims of abuse or maltreatment that ended in fatality.

  5. Heaterless ignition of inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatz, M. F.

    1985-01-01

    Heaterless inert gas ion thruster hollow cathodes were investigated with the aim of reducing ion thruster complexity and increasing ion thruster reliability. Cathodes heated by glow discharges are evaluated for power requirements, flowrate requirements, and life limiting mechanisms. An accelerated cyclic life test is presented.

  6. 33 CFR 154.2107 - Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... non-high flash point liquid cargoes. (a) Before receiving cargo vapor, a vapor control system (VCS... with at least two analyzers. The analyzers must be connected so that— (1) When two oxygen analyzers are used, the higher oxygen concentration reading controls the inerting or enriching system and...

  7. Inert fluorinated gas MRI: a new pulmonary imaging modality.

    PubMed

    Couch, Marcus J; Ball, Iain K; Li, Tao; Fox, Matthew S; Ouriadov, Alexei V; Biman, Birubi; Albert, Mitchell S

    2014-12-01

    Fluorine-19 ((19)F) MRI of the lungs using inhaled inert fluorinated gases can potentially provide high quality images of the lungs that are similar in quality to those from hyperpolarized (HP) noble gas MRI. Inert fluorinated gases have the advantages of being nontoxic, abundant, and inexpensive compared with HP gases. Due to the high gyromagnetic ratio of (19)F, there is sufficient thermally polarized signal for imaging, and averaging within a single breath-hold is possible due to short longitudinal relaxation times. Therefore, the gases do not need to be hyperpolarized prior to their use in MRI. This eliminates the need for an expensive polarizer and expensive isotopes. Inert fluorinated gas MRI of the lungs has been previously demonstrated in animals, and more recently in healthy volunteers and patients with lung diseases. The ongoing improvements in image quality demonstrate the potential of (19)F MRI for visualizing the distribution of ventilation in human lungs and detecting functional biomarkers. In this brief review, the development of inert fluorinated gas MRI, current progress, and future prospects are discussed. The current state of HP noble gas MRI is also briefly discussed in order to provide context to the development of this new imaging modality. Overall, this may be a viable clinical imaging modality that can provide useful information for the diagnosis and management of chronic respiratory diseases.

  8. Determination of Ethane-1,2-diamine in Inert Complexes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Searle, Graeme H.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a procedure for determining ethane-1,2-diamine (EN) which is generally applicable for inert or labile complexes or for EN in its salts, although it cannot be used directly with ammonium or coordinated ammonia. It gives results with five percent accuracy or better and requires less than one hour laboratory time. (JN)

  9. 33 CFR 154.824 - Inerting, enriching, and diluting systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... oxygen analyzers are used, the higher oxygen concentration reading controls the inerting or enriching... section. (f) Each oxygen or hydrocarbon analyzer required by this section must: (1) Be installed in... concentration continuously not more than 30 pipe diameters from the gas injection point. (g) Oxygen...

  10. Inert Electrodes Program fiscal year 1988 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, D.M.; Marschman, S.C.; Davis, N.C.; Friley, J.R.; Schilling, C.H.

    1989-10-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program, being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), involves improving the Hall-Heroult cells used by the Aluminum Industry for the electrochemical production of aluminum. The PNL research centers on developing more energy efficient, longer-lasting anodes and cathodes and ancillary equipment. Major accomplishments for Fiscal Year 1988 are summarized below. 14 refs., 56 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from...

  12. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from...

  13. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from...

  14. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from...

  15. 40 CFR 174.525 - E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a... E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme as a plant-incorporated protectant inert ingredient; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of E. coli B-D-glucuronidase enzyme are exempt from...

  16. Bubbling the false vacuum away

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.; Rogers, B.; Thorarinson, J.

    2008-01-15

    We investigate the role of nonperturbative, bubblelike inhomogeneities on the decay rate of false-vacuum states in two- and three-dimensional scalar field theories. The inhomogeneities are induced by setting up large-amplitude oscillations of the field about the false vacuum, as, for example, after a rapid quench or in certain models of cosmological inflation. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, the presence of large-amplitude bubblelike inhomogeneities greatly accelerates the decay rate, changing it from the well-known exponential suppression of homogeneous nucleation to a power-law suppression. It is argued that this fast, power-law vacuum decay--known as resonant nucleation--is promoted by the presence of long-lived oscillons among the nonperturbative fluctuations about the false vacuum. A phase diagram is obtained distinguishing three possible mechanisms for vacuum decay: homogeneous nucleation, resonant nucleation, and crossover. Possible applications are briefly discussed.

  17. Tunneling decay of false vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M. B.; Yajnik, U. A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-10-01

    We consider the decay of vortices trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. The potential is inspired by models with intermediate symmetry breaking to a metastable vacuum that completely breaks a U(1) symmetry, while in the true vacuum, the symmetry is unbroken. The false vacuum is unstable through the formation of true vacuum bubbles; however, the rate of decay can be extremely long. On the other hand, the false vacuum can contain metastable vortex solutions. These vortices contain the true vacuum inside in addition to a unit of magnetic flux and the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum outside. We numerically establish the existence of vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they can decay via tunneling. In general terms, they tunnel to a configuration which is a large, thin-walled vortex configuration that is now classically unstable to the expansion of its radius. We compute an estimate for the tunneling amplitude in the semiclassical approximation. We believe our analysis would be relevant to superconducting thin films or superfluids.

  18. Sleep Loss Produces False Memories

    PubMed Central

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., “night”, “dark”, “coal”,…), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: “black”). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss. PMID:18946511

  19. The Danger of False Dichotomies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBoskey, Vicky Kubler

    1998-01-01

    Responds to an article that examined 10 dichotomies in teacher education (SP 527 128), suggesting that too much time and energy are spent debating false dichotomies and addressing two specific dichotomies (preservice versus inservice and campus versus school site). Recommends that professional educators pool their energy and collaborate (rather…

  20. Evolutionary Psychology and False Confession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bering, Jesse M.; Shackelford, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on Kassin's review, (see record 2005-03019-002) of the psychology of false confessions. The authors note that Kassin's review makes a compelling argument for the need for legal reform in police interrogation practices. Because his work strikes at the heart of the American criminal justice system--its fairness--the…

  1. Sleep deprivation and false confessions

    PubMed Central

    Frenda, Steven J.; Berkowitz, Shari R.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.; Fenn, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    False confession is a major contributor to the problem of wrongful convictions in the United States. Here, we provide direct evidence linking sleep deprivation and false confessions. In a procedure adapted from Kassin and Kiechel [(1996) Psychol Sci 7(3):125–128], participants completed computer tasks across multiple sessions and repeatedly received warnings that pressing the “Escape” key on their keyboard would cause the loss of study data. In their final session, participants either slept all night in laboratory bedrooms or remained awake all night. In the morning, all participants were asked to sign a statement, which summarized their activities in the laboratory and falsely alleged that they pressed the Escape key during an earlier session. After a single request, the odds of signing were 4.5 times higher for the sleep-deprived participants than for the rested participants. These findings have important implications and highlight the need for further research on factors affecting true and false confessions. PMID:26858426

  2. Sleep loss produces false memories.

    PubMed

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal",...), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black"). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss.

  3. MSPI False Indication Probability Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Kurt Vedros; Robert Youngblood

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines false indication probabilities in the context of the Mitigating System Performance Index (MSPI), in order to investigate the pros and cons of different approaches to resolving two coupled issues: (1) sensitivity to the prior distribution used in calculating the Bayesian-corrected unreliability contribution to the MSPI, and (2) whether (in a particular plant configuration) to model the fuel oil transfer pump (FOTP) as a separate component, or integrally to its emergency diesel generator (EDG). False indication probabilities were calculated for the following situations: (1) all component reliability parameters at their baseline values, so that the true indication is green, meaning that an indication of white or above would be false positive; (2) one or more components degraded to the extent that the true indication would be (mid) white, and “false” would be green (negative) or yellow (negative) or red (negative). In key respects, this was the approach taken in NUREG-1753. The prior distributions examined were the constrained noninformative (CNI) prior used currently by the MSPI, a mixture of conjugate priors, the Jeffreys noninformative prior, a nonconjugate log(istic)-normal prior, and the minimally informative prior investigated in (Kelly et al., 2010). The mid-white performance state was set at ?CDF = ?10 ? 10-6/yr. For each simulated time history, a check is made of whether the calculated ?CDF is above or below 10-6/yr. If the parameters were at their baseline values, and ?CDF > 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false positive. Conversely, if one or all of the parameters are set to values corresponding to ?CDF > 10-6/yr but that time history’s ?CDF < 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false negative indication. The false indication (positive or negative) probability is then estimated as the number of false positive or negative counts divided by the number of time histories (100,000). Results are presented for a set of base case parameter values

  4. Outcome Knowledge and False Belief

    PubMed Central

    Ghrear, Siba E.; Birch, Susan A. J.; Bernstein, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually every social interaction involves reasoning about the perspectives of others, or ‘theory of mind (ToM).’ Previous research suggests that it is difficult to ignore our current knowledge when reasoning about a more naïve perspective (i.e., the curse of knowledge). In this Mini Review, we discuss the implications of the curse of knowledge for certain aspects of ToM. Particularly, we examine how the curse of knowledge influences key measurements of false belief reasoning. In closing, we touch on the need to develop new measurement tools to discern the mechanisms involved in the curse of knowledge and false belief reasoning, and how they develop across the lifespan. PMID:26903922

  5. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  6. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  7. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  8. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  9. 40 CFR 174.705 - Inert ingredients from sexually compatible plant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... genetic material that encodes the inert ingredient or leads to the production of the inert ingredient is derived from a plant sexually compatible with the recipient food plant. (b) The genetic material has...

  10. Does sleep promote false memories?

    PubMed

    Darsaud, Annabelle; Dehon, Hedwige; Lahl, Olaf; Sterpenich, Virginie; Boly, Mélanie; Dang-Vu, Thanh; Desseilles, Martin; Gais, Stephen; Matarazzo, Luca; Peters, Frédéric; Schabus, Manuel; Schmidt, Christina; Tinguely, Gilberte; Vandewalle, Gilles; Luxen, André; Maquet, Pierre; Collette, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    Memory is constructive in nature so that it may sometimes lead to the retrieval of distorted or illusory information. Sleep facilitates accurate declarative memory consolidation but might also promote such memory distortions. We examined the influence of sleep and lack of sleep on the cerebral correlates of accurate and false recollections using fMRI. After encoding lists of semantically related word associates, half of the participants were allowed to sleep, whereas the others were totally sleep deprived on the first postencoding night. During a subsequent retest fMRI session taking place 3 days later, participants made recognition memory judgments about the previously studied associates, critical theme words (which had not been previously presented during encoding), and new words unrelated to the studied items. Sleep, relative to sleep deprivation, enhanced accurate and false recollections. No significant difference was observed in brain responses to false or illusory recollection between sleep and sleep deprivation conditions. However, after sleep but not after sleep deprivation (exclusive masking), accurate and illusory recollections were both associated with responses in the hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex. The data suggest that sleep does not selectively enhance illusory memories but rather tends to promote systems-level consolidation in hippocampo-neocortical circuits of memories subsequently associated with both accurate and illusory recollections. We further observed that during encoding, hippocampal responses were selectively larger for items subsequently accurately retrieved than for material leading to illusory memories. The data indicate that the early organization of memory during encoding is a major factor influencing subsequent production of accurate or false memories.

  11. Nonlinear Pressure Shifts of Rubidium in Inert Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuyer, Bart; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2009-05-01

    Vapor-cell atomic frequency standards are based on the hyperfine (microwave) magnetic-resonance frequencies of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms in inert buffer gas. Through the hyperfine-shift interaction, buffer gas induces pressure shift and broadening in these microwave resonances. Previous work uncovered nonlinear dependence in the pressure shifts of ^87Rb and Cs atoms to the pressure of buffer gases Ar and Kr, but not He or N2. The nonlinearity is thought to result from alteration to the hyperfine-shift interaction due to temporary van der Waals molecules formed between alkali-metal and buffer-gas atoms. We investigate nonlinear pressure shifts for both isotopes of Rb, ^87Rb and ^85Rb. This study will test the current model for nonlinear pressure shifts of alkali metals in inert gases.

  12. Operation of the J-series thruster using inert gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1982-01-01

    Electron bombardment ion thrusters using inert gases are candidates for large space systems. The J-Series 30 cm diameter thruster, designed for operation up to 3 k-W with mercury, is at a state of technology readiness. The characteristics of operation with xenon, krypton, and argon propellants in a J-Series thruster with that obtained with mercury are compared. The performance of the discharge chamber, ion optics, and neutralizer and the overall efficiency as functions of input power and specific impulse and thruster lifetime were evaluated. As expected, the discharge chamber performance with inert gases decreased with decreasing atomic mass. Aspects of the J-Series thruster design which would require modification to provide operation at high power with insert gases were identified.

  13. Significant gamma lines from inert Higgs dark matter.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Michael; Lundström, Erik; Bergström, Lars; Edsjö, Joakim

    2007-07-27

    One way to unambiguously confirm the existence of particle dark matter and determine its mass would be to detect its annihilation into monochromatic gamma-rays in upcoming telescopes. One of the most minimal models for dark matter is the inert doublet model, obtained by adding another Higgs doublet with no direct coupling to fermions. For a mass between 40 and 80 GeV, the lightest of the new inert Higgs particles can give the correct cosmic abundance of cold dark matter in agreement with current observations. We show that for this scalar dark matter candidate, the annihilation signal of monochromatic gammagamma and Zgamma final states would be exceptionally strong. The energy range and rates for these gamma-ray line signals make them ideal to search for with the soon upcoming GLAST satellite.

  14. The electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2015-07-21

    We study the strength of a first-order electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model (IDM), where particle dark matter (DM) is comprised of the lightest neutral inert Higgs boson. We improve over previous studies in the description and treatment of the finite-temperature effective potential and of the electroweak phase transition. We focus on a set of benchmark models inspired by the key mechanisms in the IDM leading to a viable dark matter particle candidate, and illustrate how to enhance the strength of the electroweak phase transition by adjusting the masses of the yet undiscovered IDM Higgs states. We argue that across a variety of DM masses, obtaining a strong enough first-order phase transition is a generic possibility in the IDM. We find that due to direct dark matter searches and collider constraints, a sufficiently strong transition and a thermal relic density matching the universal DM abundance is possible only in the Higgs funnel regime.

  15. Correlation of inert gas hollow cathode performance. [for electric propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehn, L.; Kaufman, H. R.

    1978-01-01

    A use of the inert gases argon and xenon as possible alternatives to mercury and cesium is being considered for electrical propulsion applications. Operation up to 200 hours has been demonstrated for hollow cathodes employing argon as propellant. A description is presented of an investigation which has been conducted to obtain basic information for an improvement of hollow cathode performance with inert gases. Neutralizer tests were conducted in a 1.2-m diameter vacuum tank, with a 15-cm multipole thruster. Progress was achieved towards the goal of a generalized description of hollow cathode performance. Extrapolation of the erosion based upon a 200-hour endurance test predicts an ultimate lifetime of 1400 to 10,000 hours.

  16. Preparation of mesoporous zirconia microspheres as inert matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ting; Wang, Chen; Lv, Jinlong; Liang, Tongxiang

    2016-12-01

    Mesoporous zirconia microspheres, with a diameter of 900 μm, were prepared as an inert accelerator driven system (ADS) transmutation element matrix by the sol-gel method. The purpose of mesopores is to improve the adsorption capacity of inert matrix fuel (IMF) for minor actinides. The study indicated that the mesoporous zirconia performance was improved after the microspheres were hydrothermally treated at 150 °C, the specific surface area increased from 28.29 m2/g to 61.28 m2/g, and hydrothermal treatment avoided the cracking of the microspheres. Pre-decomposition of the organics during the hydrothermal process stabilized the mesoporous structure. The average pore diameter of mesoporous microsphere was 14.3 nm.

  17. The electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Blinov, Nikita; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim E-mail: profumo@ucsc.edu

    2015-07-01

    We study the strength of a first-order electroweak phase transition in the Inert Doublet Model (IDM), where particle dark matter (DM) is comprised of the lightest neutral inert Higgs boson. We improve over previous studies in the description and treatment of the finite-temperature effective potential and of the electroweak phase transition. We focus on a set of benchmark models inspired by the key mechanisms in the IDM leading to a viable dark matter particle candidate, and illustrate how to enhance the strength of the electroweak phase transition by adjusting the masses of the yet undiscovered IDM Higgs states. We argue that across a variety of DM masses, obtaining a strong enough first-order phase transition is a generic possibility in the IDM. We find that due to direct dark matter searches and collider constraints, a sufficiently strong transition and a thermal relic density matching the universal DM abundance is possible only in the Higgs funnel regime.

  18. Evolution of weak disturbances in inert binary mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    The evolution of weak disturbances in inert binary mixtures is determined for the one-dimensional piston problem. The interaction of the dissipative and nonlinear mechanisms is described by Burgers' equation. The binary mixture diffusion mechanisms enter as an additive term in an effective diffusivity. Results for the impulsive motion of a piston moving into an ambient medium and the sinusoidally oscillating piston are used to illustrate the results and elucidate the incorrect behavior pertaining to the associated linear theory.

  19. Inert blanketing of a hydride bed using typical grade protium

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes the impact of 500 ppm (0.05%) impurities in protium on the absorption rate of a 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride bed. The presence of 500 ppm or less inerts (i.e. non-hydrogen isotopes) can significantly impact hydrogen bed absorption rates. The impact on reducing absorption rates is significantly greater than predicted assuming uniform temperature, pressure, and compositions throughout the bed. Possible explanations are discussed. One possibility considered was the feed gas contained impurity levels higher than 500 ppm. It was shown that a level of 5000 ppm of inerts would have been necessary to fit the experimental result so this possibility wa dismissed. Another possibility is that the impurities in the protium supply reacted with the hydride material and partially poisoned the hydride. If the hydride were poisoned with CO or another impurity, the removal of the over-pressure gas in the bed would not be expected to allow the hydride loading of the bed to continue as the experimental results showed, so this possibility was also dismissed. The last possibility questions the validity of the calculations. It is assumed in all the calculations that the gas phase composition, temperature, and pressure are uniform throughout the bed. These assumptions are less valid for large beds where there can be large temperature, pressure, and composition gradients throughout the bed. Eventually the impact of 0.05% inerts in protium on bed absorption rate is shown and explained in terms of an increase in inert partial pressure as the bed was loaded.

  20. METHOD OF OBTAINING AN IMPROVED WELD IN INERT ARC WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Correy, T.B.

    1962-12-11

    A method is reported for inert arc welding. An a-c welding current is applied to the workpiece and welding electrode such that the positive portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode positive, has only sufficient energy to clean the surface of the workpiece and the negative portion of each cycle thereof, with the electrode negative, contains the energy required to weld. (AEC)

  1. Quasi-Static Compaction Studies for DDT Investigations: Inert Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-01

    and Identify by block number) Compaction Melamine Porous Beds Sound Velocity Deflagration to Detonation Vickers Hardness Transition Shore Hardness...porous beds of two powdered inert materials: Teflon 7C, a highly crystalline polvmer and melamine , a molecular crystal. These two materials were...compaction measurements on melamine were funded by the NAVSEA 6.2 Explosives Block. The results and conclusions given in this report regarding the quasi

  2. Reduced temperature aluminum production in an electrolytic cell having an inert anode

    DOEpatents

    Dawless, Robert K.; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.; Kozarek, Robert L.; LaCamera, Alfred F.

    2000-01-01

    Aluminum is produced by electrolytic reduction of alumina in a cell having a cathode, an inert anode and a molten salt bath containing metal fluorides and alumina. The inert anode preferably contains copper, silver and oxides of iron and nickel. Reducing the molten salt bath temperature to about 900-950.degree. C. lowers corrosion on the inert anode constituents.

  3. Inert gas analysis of ventilation-perfusion matching during hemodialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, D D; Ott, S M; Sherrard, D J; Hlastala, M P

    1984-01-01

    The mechanism of hypoxemia during hemodialysis was investigated by the multiple inert gas elimination technique in anesthetized, paralyzed, mechanically ventilated dogs. Profound leukopenia occurred in the first hour of a 2-h hemodialysis with a cuprophan membrane and dialysate that contained acetate. Arterial partial pressure of O2 and CO2 and oxygen consumption remained unchanged during dialysis. Pulmonary carbon dioxide elimination and lung respiratory exchange ratio decreased with the initiation of dialysis, remained depressed throughout the duration of dialysis, and returned to predialysis levels after the cessation of dialysis. Cardiac output diminished during dialysis but did not return to base-line levels after dialysis. Multiple indices calculated from inert gas analysis revealed no ventilation-perfusion mismatching during dialysis. The shunt and perfusion to regions of low alveolar ventilation-to-perfusion ratio (VA/Q) were unchanged during dialysis. There was no change in the mean or standard deviation of the profile of the percentage of total perfusion to regions of the lung that had VA/Q near 1.0; nor was there any increase in the directly calculated arterial-alveolar partial pressure differences for the inert gases during dialysis. Dead space became mildly elevated during dialysis. These results show that during dialysis with controlled ventilation there is no ventilation-perfusion mismatching that leads to hypoxemia. During spontaneous ventilation any hypoxemia must occur due to hypoventilation secondary to the CO2 exchange by the dialyzer and subsequent reduction in pulmonary CO2 exchange. PMID:6715542

  4. Permeabilization of adhered cells using an inert gas jet.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Scott; Jonak, Paul; Chouinard-Pelletier, Guillaume; Coulombe, Sylvain; Jones, Elizabeth; Leask, Richard L

    2013-09-04

    Various cell transfection techniques exist and these can be broken down to three broad categories: viral, chemical and mechanical. This protocol describes a mechanical method to temporally permeabilize adherent cells using an inert gas jet that can facilitate the transfer of normally non-permeable macromolecules into cells. We believe this technique works by imparting shear forces on the plasma membrane of adherent cells, resulting in the temporary formation of micropores. Once these pores are created, the cells are then permeable to genetic material and other biomolecules. The mechanical forces involved do run the risk of permanently damaging or detaching cells from their substrate. There is, therefore, a narrow range of inert gas dynamics where the technique is effective. An inert gas jet has proven efficient at permeabilizing various adherent cell lines including HeLa, HEK293 and human abdominal aortic endothelial cells. This protocol is appropriate for the permeabilization of adherent cells both in vitro and, as we have demonstrated, in vivo, showing it may be used for research and potentially in future clinical applications. It also has the advantage of permeabilizing cells in a spatially restrictive manner, which could prove to be a valuable research tool.

  5. Development and interactions of two inert gas bubbles during decompression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Y; Homer, L D; Thalmann, E D

    1996-09-01

    A mathematical model has been developed to simulate the evolution of two inert gas bubbles in tissue. This is useful for understanding the dynamics of bubbles that presumably arise during decompression. It is assumed that they are spherical and that the tissue volume surrounding them is infinite. The total pressure in each bubble is determined by the barometric and metabolic gas pressures as well as the pressure due to surface tension. Bipolar coordinates are employed to determine the inert gas pressure distribution. Two coupled governing equations for bubble radii are then derived and solved numerically. The results demonstrate how bubble evolution is affected by the distance between bubbles and the initial bubble radii. The existence time and bubble surface flux of two equal-sized bubbles are calculated and compared with those of a single gas bubble model. The results indicate that when two bubbles are very close, it takes 20% more time for two bubbles to dissolve than for a single one, and the total surface flux of two bubbles is nearly 20% less than twice of a single bubble. When the center-to-center distance is 10 times of bubble radius, the effect of bubble interaction on bubble existence time and surface flux are about 6 and 9% changes, respectively. We conclude that if bubbles are not too small, the interactions among bubbles should be included in inert gas bubble models predicting bubble evolution.

  6. Structure of Inert Gases Adsorbed in MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Dylan; Sokol, Paul

    One-dimensional quantum liquids of 3He or 4He have generated recent interest for investigation in the Luttinger liquid model. Unfortunately, current studies lack a clear demonstration of definitively one-dimensional behavior. We propose using the templated, porous material, MCM-41, as a host for an atomic Luttinger liquid. In general, the pores of MCM-41 are too wide to provide a strictly one-dimensional environment, so we investigate preplating these pores with inert gases to effectively reduce their diameter. We present the results of studies of the structure of inert gases in MCM-41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms were used to characterize the sample. Then, using inert gases as adsorbates, we determined the minimum effective pore diameter that can be achieved in our sample before capillary condensation takes over. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed on the ideally preplated sample to investigate the structure of the adsorbates in the nanopores. The XRD measurements are compared to simulations of core-shell cylinder model scattering, and the validity of the model is assessed. The prospects for creating a definitively one-dimensional channel for the application of studying the structure and dynamics of helium confined in one dimension are discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DGE-1069091.

  7. False advertising in the greenhouse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, K.

    1991-12-01

    Most scientists are convinced of the importance of their own research subjects. Broecker [1991] has deplored the temptation, if not the tendency, to go overboard and exaggerate this importance once funding enters the mind. In particular, he alleges inflated or even false claims by biological (and other) oceanographers regarding the relevance of their research to the "greenhouse effect," caused by the anthropogenic enhancement of the atmospheric CO2 content. He writes [Broecker, 1991, p. 191]: "In my estimation, on any list of subjects requiring intense study with regard to the prediction of the consequences of CO2 buildup in the atmosphere, I would place marine biological cycles near the bottom."

  8. Development of a standard bench-scale cell for electrochemical studies on inert anodes. Inert Anode/Cathode Program

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Boget, D.I.

    1986-07-01

    Objective of this work was to develop a standard bench-scale cell for performing short-term ac and dc polarization studies on inert anode candidate materials in molten cryolite. Two designs for electrochemical cells were developed and successfully evaluated in short-term experiments. Both cells consisted on the inert anode as a small cylindrical specimen partially sheathed in alumina, an Al/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ reference electrode, and a cryolite bath saturated in alumina. The difference between the two cells was in the design of the cathode. One cell used a bare solid metal cathode; the other used an aluminum pad similar to the Hall-Heroult configuration.

  9. Cape Verde in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A promontory nicknamed 'Cape Verde' can be seen jutting out from the walls of Victoria Crater in this false-color picture taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover took this picture on martian day, or sol, 1329 (Oct. 20, 2007), more than a month after it began descending down the crater walls -- and just 9 sols shy of its second Martian birthday on sol 1338 (Oct. 29, 2007). Opportunity landed on the Red Planet on Jan. 25, 2004. That's nearly four years ago on Earth, but only two on Mars because Mars takes longer to travel around the sun than Earth. One Martian year equals 687 Earth days.

    This view was taken using three panoramic-camera filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  10. Effects of inert gases on fatigue crack growth and their transportation into subsurface regions in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Shimojo, M.; Higo, Y.; Oya-Seimiya, Y.

    2000-05-01

    To clarify the effects of inert gases on the fatigue behavior of titanium, fatigue crack growth tests were carried out in pure inert gases and in vacuum. Fatigue crack growth rates increased, and the fracture surface appearance was changed in inert gases, as compared to those in vacuum. The transportation of inert gases into subsurface regions of fracture surfaces was confirmed using Auger electron spectroscopy. This transportation is considered to be due to the reverse slip of slip planes on which inert gas atoms have adsorbed.

  11. Dusty Crater In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This false color image of a crater rim illustrates just how complete the dust cover can be. The small white/blue regions on the rim are of areas where the dust cover has been removed - due to heating on sun facing slopes or by gravitational effects.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 70.1, Longitude 352.8 East (7.2 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-3, Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG), Metal Inert Gas (MIG) and Submerged Arc Welding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espy, John

    This third in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection presents the apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspection for the tungsten inert gas, metal inert gas, and submerged arc welding processes. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1)…

  13. Methanol Droplet Combustion in Oxygen-Inert Environments in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nayagam, Vedha; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Hicks, Michael C.; Williams, Forman A.

    2013-01-01

    The Flame Extinguishment (FLEX) experiment that is currently underway in the Combustion Integrated Rack facility onboard the International Space Station is aimed at understanding the effects of inert diluents on the flammability of condensed phase fuels. To this end, droplets of various fuels, including alkanes and alcohols, are burned in a quiescent microgravity environment with varying amounts of oxygen and inert diluents to determine the limiting oxygen index (LOI) for these fuels. In this study we report experimental observations of methanol droplets burning in oxygen-nitrogen-carbon dioxide and oxygen-nitrogen-helium gas mixtures at 0.7 and 1 atmospheric pressures. The initial droplet size varied between approximately 1.5 mm and 4 mm to capture both diffusive extinction brought about by insufficient residence time at the flame and radiative extinction caused by excessive heat loss from the flame zone. The ambient oxygen concentration varied from a high value of 30% by volume to as low as 12%, approaching the limiting oxygen index for the fuel. The inert dilution by carbon dioxide and helium varied over a range of 0% to 70% by volume. In these experiments, both freely floated and tethered droplets were ignited using symmetrically opposed hot-wire igniters and the burning histories were recorded onboard using digital cameras, downlinked later to the ground for analysis. The digital images yielded droplet and flame diameters as functions of time and subsequently droplet burning rate, flame standoff ratio, and initial and extinction droplet diameters. Simplified theoretical models correlate the measured burning rate constant and the flame standoff ratio reasonably well. An activation energy asymptotic theory accounting for time-dependent water dissolution or evaporation from the droplet is shown to predict the measured diffusive extinction conditions well. The experiments also show that the limiting oxygen index for methanol in these diluent gases is around 12% to

  14. An electromagnetic inerter-based vibration suppression device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Buelga, A.; Clare, L. R.; Neild, S. A.; Jiang, J. Z.; Inman, D. J.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes how an inerter-based device for structural vibration suppression can be realized using an electromagnetic transducer such as a linear motor. When the motor shaft moves, a difference of voltage is generated across the transducer coil. The voltage difference is proportional to the relative velocity between its two terminals. The electromagnetic transducer will exert a force proportional to current following the Lorentz principle if the circuit is closed around the transducer coil. If an electronic circuit consisting of a capacitor, an inductance and a resistance with the appropriate configuration is connected, the resulting force reflected back into the mechanical domain is equivalent to that achieved by a mechanical inerter-based device. The proposed configuration is easy to implement and very versatile, provided a high quality conversion system with negligible losses. With the use of electromagnetic devices, a new generation of vibration absorbers can be realized, for example in the electrical domain it would be relatively uncomplicated to synthesize multi-frequency or real time tunable vibration absorbers by adding electrical components in parallel. In addition by using resistance emulators in the electrical circuits, part of the absorbed vibration energy can be converted into usable power. Here an electromagnetic tuned inerter damper (E-TID) is tested experimentally using real time dynamic substructuring. A voltage compensation unit was developed in order to compensate for coil losses. This voltage compensation unit requires power, which is acquired through harvesting from the vibration energy using a resistance emulator. A power balance analysis was developed in order to ensure the device can be self sufficient. Promising experimental results, using this approach, have been obtained and are presented in this paper. The ultimate goal of this research is the development of autonomous electromagnetic vibration absorbers, able to harvest energy

  15. Hard-sphere kinetic models for inert and reactive mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polewczak, Jacek

    2016-10-01

    I consider stochastic variants of a simple reacting sphere (SRS) kinetic model (Xystris and Dahler 1978 J. Chem. Phys. 68 387-401, Qin and Dahler 1995 J. Chem. Phys. 103 725-50, Dahler and Qin 2003 J. Chem. Phys. 118 8396-404) for dense reacting mixtures. In contrast to the line-of-center models of chemical reactive models, in the SRS kinetic model, the microscopic reversibility (detailed balance) can be easily shown to be satisfied, and thus all mathematical aspects of the model can be fully justified. In the SRS model, the molecules behave as if they were single mass points with two internal states. Collisions may alter the internal states of the molecules, and this occurs when the kinetic energy associated with the reactive motion exceeds the activation energy. Reactive and non-reactive collision events are considered to be hard sphere-like. I consider a four component mixture A, B, A *, B *, in which the chemical reactions are of the type A+B\\rightleftharpoons {{A}\\ast}+{{B}\\ast} , with A * and B * being distinct species from A and B. This work extends the joined works with George Stell to the kinetic models of dense inert and reactive mixtures. The idea of introducing smearing-type effect in the collisional process results in a new class of stochastic kinetic models for both inert and reactive mixtures. In this paper the important new mathematical properties of such systems of kinetic equations are proven. The new results for stochastic revised Enskog system for inert mixtures are also provided.

  16. Inert Electrodes Program: Fiscal year 1990 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr; Strachan, D.M.

    1991-08-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program, conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), involves improving the Hall-Heroult Cells used by the aluminum industry for the electrochemical production of aluminum. The PNL research centers on developing more energy-efficient, longer-lasting anodes, cathodes, and ancillary equipment. During the FY 1989 and FY 1990, preparations for the pilot cell test continued. Numerous unanticipated problems were encountered that delayed the test schedule. The delays resulted primarily from three factors: (1) modifications for anode design based on the results obtained from the prototype test (documented here); (2) difficulties in procuring a manufacturer for the cermet inert anodes to be used in the pilot cell; and (3) problems in the actual scale-up activities, both in the production of the ferrite powder and in the fabrication of the anodes themselves. Issues related to scaling up the fabrication of the anodes are still being addressed in FY 1991. Important accomplishments in FY 1989 and FY 1990 include the completion of laboratory cell tests in which the effects of current density, pre-corrosion, and silica content on anode performance were confirmed; the performance of tests that resulted in the identification of the reaction layer on cermet anodes; the initiation of electrochemical tests to determine the source of the anode impedance; the completion of studies to identify and summarize optimal fabrication conditions for the cermet inert anodes, including advanced compositions; the testing of anodes with advanced composition; the refinement of the electrical connection for the anode; and modeling the dynamics of the anode array to be used in the pilot cell. 15 refs., 23 figs.

  17. Ice Surfaces In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This full resolution image shows a marked difference in the 'blueness' of the ice surfaces. The lower (presumably older) surface is oranger and the top (presumably younger) surface is blue. This may represent the fresher ice of the upper surface which has not yet covered with as much dust as the lower surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.8, Longitude 302.1 East (57.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Polar Layers in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image again illustrates the oranger/bluer nature of the polar layers.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6, Longitude 70.2 East (289.8 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Sand Sea in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image is of part of the northern sand sea. The small dunes in the image are bluer than the ice/dust filled central crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 73.7, Longitude 323 East (37 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. Development of a large inert gas ion thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, G.

    1982-01-01

    A 30 cm inert gas electrostatic ion thruster has been developed, exhibiting excellent performance. In the development, the effective anode area was reduced by altering the magnetic field geometry to improve plasma containment, consistent with operational stability. The propellant introduction scheme has the effect of 'folding' the discharge chamber without the increased wall loss penalty associated with a longer chamber. These features contribute to a low discharge cost (eV/ion) versus mass utilization characteristic which remains relatively flat even to high mass utilizations.

  1. Inertance Tube Modeling and the Effects of Temperature

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Radebaugh , R., “Pulse tube cryocoolers for cooling infrared sensors,” Proceedings of SPIE, Vol. 4130, pp. 363-379, 2000. 2. Kittel, P., Kashani, A...Steijaert, P.P., and Gijzen, J., Cryogenics, Vol. 37, pp. 313-324, 1997 5. Lewis, M., Bradley, P. and Radebaugh , R., “Impedance measurements of inertance...Churchill, S. “Friction factor equation spans all fluid-flow regimes”, Chemical Engineering, pg. 91-92, November 1977. 10. Radebaugh , R., Lewis, M., Luo, E

  2. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Ronald Baney

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

  3. Xenon for NMR biosensing--inert but alert.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Leif

    2013-01-01

    NMR studies with hyperpolarized xenon as functionalized sensor or contrast agent recently made notable progress in developing a new approach for detecting molecular markers and parameters of biomedical interest. Combining spin polarization enhancement with novel indirect detection schemes easily enables a 10⁷-fold signal gain, thus having promising potential to solve the NMR sensitivity problem in many applications. Though an inert element, ¹²⁹Xe has exquisite NMR properties to sense molecular environments. This review summarizes recent developments in the production of hyperpolarized xenon and the design and detection schemes of xenon biosensors.

  4. Closed-Loop System Removes Contaminants From Inert Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.

    1995-01-01

    Concentration of oxygen in this closed-loop system kept low by use of heated catalytic sorbent bed in cartridge. Proposed to keep concentration of water vapor low by use of predried zeolite sorbent bed in another cartridge, and to remove particles smaller than 0.1 micrometer by use of porous metal filters. In specific application, chamber is one in which semiconducting materials processed. By virtue of closed-loop operation, limited supply of inert gas adequate to provide atmosphere for industrial processing of semiconductors.

  5. Inert Anode Life in Low Temperature Reduction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Bradford, Donald R.

    2005-06-30

    The production of aluminum metal by low temperature electrolysis utilizing metal non-consumable anodes and ceramic cathodes was extensively investigated. Tests were performed with traditional sodium fluoride--aluminum fluoride composition electrolytes, potassium fluoride-- aluminum fluoride electrolytes, and potassium fluoride--sodium fluoride--aluminum fluoride electrolytes. All of the Essential First-Tier Requirements of the joint DOE-Aluminum Industry Inert Anode Road Map were achieved and those items yet to be resolved for commercialization of this technology were identified. Methods for the fabrication and welding of metal alloy anodes were developed and tested. The potential savings of energy and energy costs were determined and potential environmental benefits verified.

  6. Coating crystalline nuclear waste forms to improve inertness

    SciTech Connect

    Stinton, D.P.; Angelini, P.; Caputo, A.J.; Lackey, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Crystalline waste forms of high simulated waste loading were successfully coated with layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. Sol-gel technology was used to produce microspheres that contained simulated waste. A separate process for cesium immobilization was developed, which loads 5 wt % Cs onto zeolite particles for subsequent coating. The chemical vapor deposition process was developed for depositing thin layers of carbon and silicon carbide onto particles in a fluidized-bed coater. Pyrolytic carbon-coated particles were extremely inert in numerous leach tests. Aqueous leach test results of coated waste forms were below detection limits of such sensitive analytical techniques as atomic absorption and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission.

  7. Inert particles size distribution influence on heterogeneous detonation suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratova, Yu. V.; Fedorov, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    Interaction of a detonation wave propagating in the cellular detonation mode with a cloud of non-reactive particles is numerically studied. It is demonstrated that the presence of inert particles alters the detonation wave structure and its velocity. The influence of various parameters of the non-reactive cloud is investigated. The critical length of the cloud sufficient for detonation suppression is determined. It is shown that the disperse composition and the non-uniform distribution of particles in the cloud are important parameters affecting the detonation propagation mode.

  8. Testing New Inert Matrix and Thoria Fuels for Plutonium Incineration

    SciTech Connect

    Vettraino, F.; Padovan, E.; Tverberg, T.

    2002-07-01

    One major issue for nuclear power continues to be the public concern about rad-waste and proliferation risk induced by large plutonium stockpiles accumulated worldwide. In this context, nuclear fuels which exhibit no-plutonium production, and possibly allow for an efficient utilization of the plutonium to get rid of, are of great interest. This is the basic reason for the efforts that many international institutions are devoting to R and D on such new U-free fuel concepts as Inert Matrix (IMF) and Thorium fuels. At the moment the major merit of such innovative fuels is primarily related to the safe closure of the nuclear fuel cycle as especially expected from those new concepts like ADS (Accelerated Driven System) for the transmutation of plutonium, minor actinides and LLFP. Both ceramic inert matrix (IM) and thoria (T) fuels have been identified as suitable to the scope of burning weapon and civilian plutonium and to act also as possible carrier for transmutation of minor actinides. For testing the irradiation behaviour of these new materials, three kinds of fuels have been selected: inert matrix (IM) fuel, inert matrix thoria-doped (IMT) fuel, and thoria (T) fuel. A first experiment, IFA-652, 40 MWD/kg burnup target, including high enriched uranium (HEU) as fissile phase, instead of plutonium, is currently underway in the Halden HWBR. The reason for this choice was that manufacturing of Pu containing fuels is more complex and there was no fabrication facility available at the needed time for the Pu fuel. It is expected, however, that the relative behaviour of the different kind of matrices would be only slightly dependent on the adopted fissile material. So, the comparison of the in-pile performance of the three fuels will constitute a significant common database also for plutonium bearing fuels. The primary aim for the IFA-652 experiment is the measurement of basic characteristics under LWR irradiation conditions over a period of 4-5 years. The design of a

  9. Polyvinyl alcohol battery separator containing inert filler. [alkaline batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheibley, D. W.; Hsu, L. C.; Manzo, M. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A cross-linked polyvinyl alcohol battery separator is disclosed. A particulate filler, inert to alkaline electrolyte of an alkaline battery, is incorporated in the separator in an amount of 1-20% by weight, based on the weight of the polyvinyl alcohol, and is dispersed throughout the product. Incorporation of the filler enhances performance and increases cycle life of alkaline batteries when compared with batteries containing a similar separator not containing filler. Suitable fillers include titanates, silicates, zirconates, aluminates, wood floor, lignin, and titania. Particle size is not greater than about 50 microns.

  10. Mimas Showing False Colors #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false color image of Saturn's moon Mimas reveals variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    This image is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined with a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences to create the final product.

    Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of the image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in the surface composition or the sizes of grains making up the icy soil.

    This image was obtained when the Cassini spacecraft was above 25 degrees south, 134 degrees west latitude and longitude. The Sun-Mimas-spacecraft angle was 45 degrees and north is at the top.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian

  11. Southern Spring in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This image was collected June 25, 2003 during the southern spring season. This false color image shows both the layered ice cap and darker 'spots' that are seen only when the sun first lights the polar surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -82.3, Longitude 306 East (54 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the

  12. White Rock in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows the wind eroded deposit in Pollack Crater called 'White Rock'. This image was collected during the Southern Fall Season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8, Longitude 25.2 East (334.8 West). 0 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  13. Iani Chaos in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image of a portion of the Iani Chaos region was collected during the Southern Fall season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.6 Longitude 342.4 East (17.6 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The

  14. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  15. Dynamics of galloping detonations: inert hydrodynamics with pulsed energy release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Shepherd, Joseph E.

    2015-11-01

    Previous models for galloping and cellular detonations of Ulyanitski, Vasil'ev and Higgins assume that the unit shock decay or cell can be modeled by Taylor-Sedov blast waves. We revisit this concept for galloping detonations, which we model as purely inert hydrodynamics with periodically pulsed energy deposition. At periodic time intervals, the chemical energy of the non-reacted gas accumulating between the lead shock and the contact surface separating reacted and non reacted gas is released nearly instantaneously. In between these pulses, the gas evolves as an inert medium. The resulting response of the gas to the periodic forcing is a sudden gain in pressure followed by mechanical relaxation accompanied by strong shock waves driven both forward and backwards. It is shown that the decay of the lead shock in-between pulses follows an exponential decay, whose time constant is controlled by the frequency of the energy deposition. More-over, the average speed of the lead shock is found to agree within 2 percent to the ideal Chapman-Jouguet value, while the large scale dynamics of the wave follows closely the ideal wave form of a CJ wave trailed by a Taylor expansion. When friction and heat losses are accounted for, velocity deficits are predicted, consistent with experiment. Work performed while MIR was on sabbatical at Caltech.

  16. When Inert Becomes Active: A Fascinating Route for Catalyst Design.

    PubMed

    Lyalin, Andrey; Gao, Min; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2016-10-01

    In this Personal Account, we review the work of our group in the area of environmental and energy-related nanocatalysis over the past seven years. We focus on understanding the fundamental mechanisms that control the properties of atomic clusters and nanoparticles - a form of matter that is intermediate between atoms and their bulk counterpart. The emphasis is on the theoretical design of effective catalysts based on cheap and abundant elements. The main idea that stands behind our work is that even catalytically inactive or completely inert materials can be functionalized at the nanoscale via the size, structure, morphology, and support effects. Such an approach opens up new ways to design catalytically active systems based on materials never before considered as catalysts. In particular, we demonstrate that hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), which has been traditionally considered an inert material, can be functionalized and become active for a number of catalytic reactions involving oxygen activation, oxidation by molecular oxygen, and the oxygen reduction reaction.

  17. Probing the inert doublet dark matter model with Cherenkov telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Cely, Camilo; Gustafsson, Michael; Ibarra, Alejandro E-mail: michael.gustafsson@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2016-02-01

    We present a detailed study of the annihilation signals of the inert dark matter doublet model in its high mass regime. Concretely, we study the prospects to observe gamma-ray signals of the model in current and projected Cherenkov telescopes taking into account the Sommerfeld effect and including the contribution to the spectrum from gamma-ray lines as well as from internal bremsstrahlung. We show that present observations of the galactic center by the H.E.S.S. instrument are able to exclude regions of the parameter space that give the correct dark matter relic abundance. In particular, models with the charged and the neutral components of the inert doublet nearly degenerate in mass have strong gamma-ray signals. Furthermore, for dark matter particle masses above 1 TeV, we find that the non-observation of the continuum of photons generated by the hadronization of the annihilation products typically give stronger constraints on the model parameters than the sharp spectral features associated to annihilation into monochromatic photons and the internal bremsstrahlung process. Lastly, we also analyze the interplay between indirect and direct detection searches for this model, concluding that the prospects for the former are more promising. In particular, we find that the upcoming Cherenkov Telescope Array will be able to probe a significant part of the high mass regime of the model.

  18. The CTA aims at the Inert Doublet Model

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Yaguna, Carlos E. E-mail: carlos.yaguna@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    2016-02-01

    We show that the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) can realistically challenge the Inert Doublet Model, one of the simplest and best known models of dark matter. Specifically, the CTA may exclude its heavy regime up to dark matter masses of 800 GeV and probe a large fraction of the remaining viable parameter space at even higher masses. Two features of the Inert Doublet Model make it particularly suitable for CTA searches. First, the dark matter mass (in the heavy regime) must be larger than 500 GeV. Second, the dark matter annihilation cross section, σ v, is always larger than the thermal one, reaching values as high as 10{sup −25} cm{sup 3}s{sup −1}. This higher value of σv is the result of the unavoidable coannihilation effects that determine the relic density via thermal freeze-out in the early Universe. We find that with 100 hours of Galactic Center exposure, CTA's expected limit widely surpasses, even after the inclusion of systematic errors, current and projected bounds from Fermi-LAT and HESS on this model.

  19. Isentropic Compression of Multicomponent Mixtures of Fuels and Inert Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barragan, Michelle; Julien, Howard L.; Woods, Stephen S.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Saulsberry, Regor L.

    2000-01-01

    In selected aerospace applications of the fuels hydrazine and monomethythydrazine, there occur conditions which can result in the isentropic compression of a multicomponent mixture of fuel and inert gas. One such example is when a driver gas such as helium comes out of solution and mixes with the fuel vapor, which is being compressed. A second example is when product gas from an energetic device mixes with the fuel vapor which is being compressed. Thermodynamic analysis has shown that under isentropic compression, the fuels hydrazine and monomethylhydrazine must be treated as real fluids using appropriate equations of state. The appropriate equations of state are the Peng-Robinson equation of state for hydrazine and the Redlich-Kwong-Soave equation of state for monomethylhydrazine. The addition of an inert gas of variable quantity and input temperature and pressure to the fuel compounds the problem for safety design or analysis. This work provides the appropriate thermodynamic analysis of isentropic compression of the two examples cited. In addition to an entropy balance describing the change of state, an enthalpy balance is required. The presence of multicomponents in the system requires that appropriate mixing rules are identified and applied to the analysis. This analysis is not currently available.

  20. Moving in extreme environments: inert gas narcosis and underwater activities.

    PubMed

    Clark, James E

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to the underwater environment for pleasure or work poses many challenges on the human body including thermal stress, barotraumas, decompression sickness as well as the acute effects of breathing gases under pressure. With the popularity of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving on the increase and deep inland dive sites becoming more accessible, it is important that we understand the effects of breathing pressurised gas at depth can have on the body. One of the common consequences of hyperbaric gas is the narcotic effect of inert gas. Nitrogen (a major component of air) under pressure can impede mental function and physical performance at depths of as little as 10 m underwater. With increased depth, symptoms can worsen to include confusion, disturbed coordination, lack of concentration, hallucinations and unconsciousness. Narcosis has been shown to contribute directly to up to 6% of deaths in divers and is likely to be indirectly associated with other diving incidents at depth. This article explores inert gas narcosis, the effect on divers' movement and function underwater and the proposed physiological mechanisms. Also discussed are some of the factors that affect the susceptibility of divers to the condition. In conclusion, understanding the cause of this potentially debilitating problem is important to ensure that safe diving practices continue.

  1. Inert gas sparge leads to alternate reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Franchini, M K; Carstensen, J T

    2000-06-01

    The effect of sparging with an inert gas (argon) was evaluated during the investigation of the solution kinetics of an oxidation-prone amphiphilic drug containing a sulphide moiety. Samples stored with an air headspace in pH7 and 8 phosphate buffers at elevated temperatures and in the absence of light degraded to two main products, a sulphoxide and a cinnamic acid analogue. Initially, this appeared to be a sequential mechanism which could be blocked by removing oxygen. Instead, argon-sparge forced the direct degradation to the cinnamate, which was evidenced by the formation of a strong odour of sulphide. In addition, argon-sparged samples remained colourless, while those sparged with oxygen or stored with an air headspace turned yellow and had negligible odour. The half-lives for samples stored in pH 8 buffers at 93 degrees C at an initial drug concentration of 25 mg mL(-1) were 128 days (argon sparged), 86 days (air headspace), and 65 days (oxygen sparged). The results indicated that for the drug under study, sparging with an inert gas affected the mechanism as well as the rate of the reaction at elevated temperatures.

  2. Production of light oil by injection of hot inert gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruidas, Bidhan C.; Ganguly, Somenath

    2016-05-01

    Hot inert gas, when injected into an oil reservoir is capable of generating a vaporization-condensation drive and as a consequence, a preferential movement of the lighter components to the production well. This form of displacement is an important unit mechanism in hot flue-gas injection, or in thermal recovery from a watered-out oil reservoir. This article presents the movement of heat front vis-à-vis the changes in the saturation profile, and the gas-phase composition. The plateau in the temperature profile due to the exchange of latent heat, and the formation of water bank at the downstream are elaborated. The broadening of the vaporization-condensation zone with continued progression is discussed. The effect of inert gas temperature on the cumulative production of oil is reviewed. The results provide insight to the vaporization-condensation drive as a stand-alone mechanism. The paper underscores the relative importance of this mechanism, when operated in tandem with other processes in improved oil recovery and CO2 sequestration.

  3. Teflon films for chemically-inert microfluidic valves and pumps.

    PubMed

    Grover, William H; von Muhlen, Marcio G; Manalis, Scott R

    2008-06-01

    We present a simple method for fabricating chemically-inert Teflon microfluidic valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. These structures are modeled after monolithic membrane valves and pumps that utilize a featureless polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane bonded between two etched glass wafers. The limited chemical compatibility of PDMS has necessitated research into alternative materials for microfluidic devices. Previous work has shown that spin-coated amorphous fluoropolymers and Teflon-fluoropolymer laminates can be fabricated and substituted for PDMS in monolithic membrane valves and pumps for space flight applications. However, the complex process for fabricating these spin-coated Teflon films and laminates may preclude their use in many research and manufacturing contexts. As an alternative, we show that commercially-available fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) Teflon films can be used to fabricate chemically-inert monolithic membrane valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. The FEP Teflon valves and pumps presented here are simple to fabricate, function similarly to their PDMS counterparts, maintain their performance over extended use, and are resistant to virtually all chemicals. These structures should facilitate lab-on-a-chip research involving a vast array of chemistries that are incompatible with native PDMS microfluidic devices.

  4. Teflon films for chemically-inert microfluidic valves and pumps

    PubMed Central

    Grover, William H.; von Muhlen, Marcio G.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple method for fabricating chemically-inert Teflon microfluidic valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. These structures are modeled after monolithic membrane valves and pumps that utilize a featureless polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membrane sandwiched between two etched glass wafers. The limited chemical compatibility of PDMS has necessitated research into alternative materials for microfluidic devices. Previous work has shown that spin-coated amorphous fluoropolymers and Teflon-fluoropolymer laminates can be fabricated and substituted for PDMS in monolithic membrane valves and pumps for space flight applications. However, the complex process for fabricating these spin-coated Teflon films and laminates may preclude their use in many research and manufacturing contexts. As an alternative, we show that commercially-available fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) Teflon films can be used to fabricate chemically-inert monolithic membrane valves and pumps in glass microfluidic devices. The FEP Teflon valves and pumps presented here are simple to fabricate, function similarly to their PDMS counterparts, maintain their performance over extended use, and are resistant to virtually all chemicals. These structures should facilitate lab-on-a-chip research involving a vast array of chemistries that are incompatible with native PDMS microfluidic devices. PMID:18497911

  5. Analysis and optimisation for inerter-based isolators via fixed-point theory and algebraic solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yinlong; Chen, Michael Z. Q.; Shu, Zhan; Huang, Lixi

    2015-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the problem of analysis and optimisation of the inerter-based isolators based on a "uni-axial" single-degree-of-freedom isolation system. In the first part, in order to gain an in-depth understanding of inerter from the prospective of vibration, the frequency responses of both parallel-connected and series-connected inerters are analysed. In the second part, three other inerter-based isolators are introduced and the tuning procedures in both the H∞ optimisation and the H2 optimisation are proposed in an analytical manner. The achieved H2 and H∞ performance of the inerter-based isolators is superior to that achieved by the traditional dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) when the same inertance-to-mass (or mass) ratio is considered. Moreover, the inerter-based isolators have two unique properties, which are more attractive than the traditional DVA: first, the inertance-to-mass ratio of the inerter-based isolators can easily be larger than the mass ratio of the traditional DVA without increasing the physical mass of the whole system; second, there is no need to mount an additional mass on the object to be isolated.

  6. Unidentified Inert Ingredients in Pesticides: Implications for Human and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Caroline; Surgan, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Background By statute or regulation in the United States and elsewhere, pesticide ingredients are divided into two categories: active and inert (sometimes referred to as other ingredients, adjuvants, or coformulants). Despite their name, inert ingredients may be biologically or chemically active and are labeled inert only because of their function in the formulated product. Most of the tests required to register a pesticide are performed with the active ingredient alone, not the full pesticide formulation. Inert ingredients are generally not identified on product labels and are often claimed to be confidential business information. Objectives In this commentary, we describe the shortcomings of the current procedures for assessing the hazards of pesticide formulations and demonstrate that inert ingredients can increase the toxicity of and potential exposure to pesticide formulations. Discussion Inert ingredients can increase the ability of pesticide formulations to affect significant toxicologic end points, including developmental neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, and disruption of hormone function. They can also increase exposure by increasing dermal absorption, decreasing the efficacy of protective clothing, and increasing environmental mobility and persistence. Inert ingredients can increase the phytotoxicity of pesticide formulations as well as the toxicity to fish, amphibians, and microorganisms. Conclusions Pesticide registration should require full assessment of formulations. Evaluations of pesticides under the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and similar statutes should include impact assessment of formulations. Environmental monitoring for pesticides should include inert ingredients. To enable independent research and risk assessment, inert ingredients should be identified on product labels. PMID:17185266

  7. Cold Inertance Tube for 4 K Stirling Type Pulse Tube Cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, ZhuoPei; Gan, ZhiHua; Qiu, LiMin

    The losses in the regenerator are minimized when the amplitude of the mass flow is minimized for a given acoustic power which requires that the mass flow lags the pressure by about 30° at the cold end of regenerator. The phase shift provided by an inertance tube is strongly influenced by the temperature of the inertance tube and the acoustic power at the cold end of the regenerator. For a 4 K Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler, the acoustic power at the cold end of the regenerator decreases significantly with the temperature thereby it's difficult to achieve ideal phase relationship with ambient inertance tube. While cold inertance tube provide a larger phase shift in that the viscosity of the working fluid decreases and the density increases as the temperature decreases. However, use of cold inertance tube increases additional heat load to the regenerator. Therefore it's of great significance to determine when a cold inertance tube should be used. In this paper effect of temperature of inertance tube is calculated for a 4 K Stirling type pulse tube cryocooler with different acoustic powers at the cold end. A comparison of ambient temperature inertance tube and cold inertance tube is made.

  8. 49 CFR 520.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Policy. 520.2 Section 520.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... affect the quality of the human environment....

  9. 48 CFR 232.503 - Postaward matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Postaward matters. 232.503 Section 232.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT....503 Postaward matters....

  10. 48 CFR 232.502 - Preaward matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preaward matters. 232.502 Section 232.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT....502 Preaward matters....

  11. 48 CFR 970.0470 - Department of Energy Directives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Department of Energy Directives. 970.0470 Section 970.0470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY... Energy Directives....

  12. 48 CFR 225.7703 - Acquisition of products or services other than small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Acquisition of products or services other than small arms. 225.7703 Section 225.7703 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... than small arms....

  13. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  14. 47 CFR 10.310 - Federal alert gateway. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal alert gateway. 10.310 Section 10.310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.310 Federal alert gateway....

  15. 48 CFR 931.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 931.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 931.205 Selected costs....

  16. 48 CFR 31.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 31.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.205 Selected costs....

  17. 48 CFR 1331.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 1331.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1331.205 Selected costs....

  18. 48 CFR 970.3102-05-30 - Patent costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patent costs. 970.3102-05... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Contract Cost Principles and Procedures 970.3102-05-30 Patent costs....

  19. 48 CFR 970.3102-05 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 970.3102... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Contract Cost Principles and Procedures 970.3102-05 Selected costs....

  20. 48 CFR 1231.205 - Selected costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Selected costs. 1231.205... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 1231.205 Selected costs....

  1. 48 CFR 628.309 - Contract clauses for workers' compensation insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contract clauses for workers' compensation insurance. 628.309 Section 628.309 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... workers' compensation insurance....

  2. 48 CFR 53.301-1423 - Inventory Verification Survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Inventory Verification Survey. 53.301-1423 Section 53.301-1423 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Survey. ER05AP04.000...

  3. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Management Controls...

  4. 48 CFR 1327.201 - Patent and copyright infringement liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patent and copyright... GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 1327.201 Patent and copyright infringement liability....

  5. 48 CFR 27.201 - Patent and copyright infringement liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patent and copyright... REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 27.201 Patent and copyright infringement liability....

  6. 48 CFR 1427.201 - Patent and copyright infringement liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patent and copyright... INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 1427.201 Patent and copyright infringement liability....

  7. 47 CFR 22.703 - Separate rural subscriber station authorization not required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... or base station from which they receive service. ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Separate rural subscriber station authorization... subscriber station authorization not required. A separate authorization is not required for rural...

  8. 48 CFR 236.604 - Performance evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance evaluation... Architect-Engineer Services 236.604 Performance evaluation. Prepare a separate performance evaluation after... familiar with the architect-engineer contractor's performance....

  9. 48 CFR 1816.402-2 - Performance incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Performance incentives. 1816.402-2 Section 1816.402-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... Performance incentives....

  10. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  11. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  12. 48 CFR Appendix - Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Index

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Index Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT... (IFMS) Contract clause. FAR Index Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Index Editorial Note:...

  13. 43 CFR 2912.1 - Nature of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nature of interest. 2912.1 Section 2912.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Nature of interest....

  14. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  15. 48 CFR 236.606 - Negotiations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Negotiations. 236.606 Section 236.606 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT...-Engineer Services 236.606 Negotiations....

  16. 48 CFR 249.110 - Settlement negotiation memorandum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Settlement negotiation... Settlement negotiation memorandum. Follow the procedures at PGI 249.110 for preparation of a settlement negotiation memorandum....

  17. 48 CFR 19.808 - Contract negotiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contract negotiation. 19.808 Section 19.808 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION SOCIOECONOMIC....808 Contract negotiation....

  18. 48 CFR 619.808 - Contract negotiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contract negotiation. 619.808 Section 619.808 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS... Contract negotiation....

  19. 48 CFR 836.606 - Negotiations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Negotiations. 836.606 Section 836.606 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SPECIAL CATEGORIES... Negotiations....

  20. 42 CFR 5a.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applicability. 5a.2 Section 5a.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL PHYSICIAN... Public Health Service Act....

  1. 48 CFR 25.702 - Prohibition on contracting with entities that conduct restricted business operations in Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prohibition on contracting with entities that conduct restricted business operations in Sudan. 25.702 Section 25.702 Federal... operations in Sudan....

  2. 43 CFR 3103.4 - Production incentives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Production incentives. 3103.4 Section 3103.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Production incentives....

  3. 47 CFR 76.227 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 76.227 Section 76.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.227...

  4. 49 CFR 369.5 - Records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Records. 369.5 Section 369.5 Transportation Other... TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS REPORTS OF MOTOR CARRIERS § 369.5 Records. Books, records... Records....

  5. 47 CFR 27.59 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 27.59 Section 27.59 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.59...

  6. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management....

  7. 48 CFR 970.2201-2 - Overtime management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Overtime management. 970... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Application of Labor Policies 970.2201-2 Overtime management....

  8. 48 CFR 25.703 - Prohibition on contracting with entities that engage in certain activities relating to Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prohibition on contracting with entities that engage in certain activities relating to Iran. 25.703 Section 25.703 Federal... to Iran....

  9. 48 CFR 803.570 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commercial advertising. 803.570 Section 803.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL... Commercial advertising....

  10. 47 CFR 22.169 - International coordination of channel assignments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false International coordination of channel assignments. 22.169 Section 22.169 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Applications...

  11. 47 CFR 22.107 - General application requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Applications and Notifications § 22.107 General application requirements. In general, applications for authorizations, assignments of... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General application requirements....

  12. 48 CFR 225.7009 - Restriction on ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restriction on ball and roller bearings. 225.7009 Section 225.7009 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... roller bearings....

  13. 48 CFR 519.1202 - Evaluation factor or subfactor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Evaluation factor or subfactor. 519.1202 Section 519.1202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION... Evaluation factor or subfactor....

  14. 48 CFR 19.1202 - Evaluation factor or subfactor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Evaluation factor or subfactor. 19.1202 Section 19.1202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION... Evaluation factor or subfactor....

  15. 48 CFR 4.501 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 4.501 Section 4.501 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 4.501...

  16. 43 CFR 3.8 - Applications referred for recommendation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applications referred for recommendation... AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.8 Applications referred for recommendation. Applications for permits shall be referred to the Smithsonian Institution for recommendation....

  17. 49 CFR 37.39 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 37.39 Section 37.39 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.39...

  18. 48 CFR 219.502 - Setting aside acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Setting aside acquisitions..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 219.502 Setting aside acquisitions....

  19. 48 CFR 225.7004 - Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses. 225.7004 Section 225.7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on acquisition of foreign buses....

  20. 46 CFR 308.305 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 308.305 Section 308.305 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.305...

  1. 46 CFR 308.301 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 308.301 Section 308.301 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.301...

  2. 48 CFR 245.201 - Solicitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Solicitation. 245.201... OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Solicitation and Evaluation Procedures 245.201 Solicitation....

  3. 48 CFR 239.7201 - Solicitation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Solicitation requirements... Standards 239.7201 Solicitation requirements. Contracting officers shall ensure that all applicable Federal Information Processing Standards are incorporated into solicitations....

  4. 48 CFR 1524.104 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Solicitation provisions....104 Solicitation provisions. The Contracting Officer shall insert the provision at 1552.224-70, Social... solicitations....

  5. 48 CFR 514.201-6 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Solicitation provisions... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 514.201-6 Solicitation provisions... solicitation....

  6. 48 CFR 2116.105 - Solicitation provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Solicitation provision... TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Selecting Contract Types 2116.105 Solicitation provision. FAR 16.105 has no... solicitations....

  7. 48 CFR 606.570 - Solicitation provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Solicitation provision... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Competition Advocates 606.570 Solicitation provision. The... solicitations exceeding the simplified acquisition threshold....

  8. 44 CFR 19.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Military and merchant marine... marine educational institutions. These Title IX regulations do not apply to an educational institution... the merchant marine....

  9. 45 CFR 2555.210 - Military and merchant marine educational institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Military and merchant marine educational... ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Coverage § 2555.210 Military and merchant marine... marine....

  10. 43 CFR 11.16 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 11.16 Section 11.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.16...

  11. 43 CFR 11.19 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 11.19 Section 11.19 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Introduction § 11.19...

  12. 48 CFR 243.204-70 - Definitization of change orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT MODIFICATIONS Change Orders 243.204-70 Definitization of change orders. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definitization of...

  13. 49 CFR 178.33b - Specification 2S; inner nonrefillable plastic receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification 2S; inner nonrefillable plastic receptacles. 178.33b Section 178.33b Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... nonrefillable plastic receptacles....

  14. 43 CFR 1784.4 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public participation. 1784.4 Section 1784.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Public participation....

  15. 48 CFR 1.602 - Contracting officers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contracting officers. 1... FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM Career Development, Contracting Authority, and Responsibilities 1.602 Contracting officers....

  16. 48 CFR 3017.204 - Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contracts. 3017.204... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) CONTRACT METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options. 3017.204 Contracts....

  17. 47 CFR 32.6362 - Other terminal equipment expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Other terminal equipment expense. 32.6362... Other terminal equipment expense. This account shall include expenses associated with other terminal equipment....

  18. 47 CFR 32.6351 - Public telephone terminal equipment expense.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Public telephone terminal equipment expense. 32....6351 Public telephone terminal equipment expense. This account shall include expenses associated with public telephone terminal equipment....

  19. 46 CFR 308.106 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 308.106 Section 308.106 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance §...

  20. 47 CFR 24.832 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24.832 Section 24.832 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Interim Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for Broadband PCS §...

  1. 47 CFR 73.766 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 73.766 Section 73.766 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES International Broadcast Stations §...

  2. 46 CFR 308.201 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 308.201 Section 308.201 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance §...

  3. 47 CFR 73.659-73.663 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 73.659-73.663 Section 73.659-73.663 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations §§...

  4. 46 CFR 298.34 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 298.34 Section 298.34 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION VESSEL FINANCING ASSISTANCE OBLIGATION GUARANTEES Documentation §...

  5. 47 CFR 22.215 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 22.215 Section 22.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Competitive Bidding Procedures §...

  6. 47 CFR 24.710 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24.710 Section 24.710 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for Broadband PCS §...

  7. 47 CFR 24.101 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24.101 Section 24.101 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Narrowband PCS §...

  8. 47 CFR 73.3534 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 73.3534 Section 73.3534 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Rules Applicable to All Broadcast Stations §...

  9. 47 CFR 73.672 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 73.672 Section 73.672 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Television Broadcast Stations §...

  10. 47 CFR 24.713 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24.713 Section 24.713 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for Broadband PCS §...

  11. 46 CFR 308.101 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 308.101 Section 308.101 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Hull and Disbursements Insurance §...

  12. 47 CFR 24.130 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24.130 Section 24.130 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Narrowband PCS §...

  13. 47 CFR 24.320 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 24.320 Section 24.320 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for Narrowband PCS §...

  14. 45 CFR 1233.4 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 1233.4 Section 1233.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF ACTION PROGRAMS §...

  15. 46 CFR 308.206 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 308.206 Section 308.206 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE War Risk Protection and Indemnity Insurance §...

  16. 47 CFR 22.961-22.967 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 22.961-22.967 Section 22.961-22.967 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service §§...

  17. 48 CFR 1511.011-79 - Information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Information resources... AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-79 Information resources management. The... Resource Management, in all solicitations and contracts....

  18. 48 CFR 5416.203 - Fixed-price contracts with economic price adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fixed-price contracts with economic price adjustment. 5416.203 Section 5416.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... contracts with economic price adjustment....

  19. 48 CFR 225.7005 - Restriction on certain chemical weapons antidote.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Restriction on certain chemical weapons antidote. 225.7005 Section 225.7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on certain chemical weapons antidote....

  20. 46 CFR 8.320 - Classification society authorization to issue international certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Classification society authorization to issue... Classification society authorization to issue international certificates. (a) The Commandant may authorize a recognized classification society to issue certain international convention certificates. Authorization...

  1. 49 CFR 236.780 - Plunger, facing point lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Plunger, facing point lock. 236.780 Section 236.780 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... plunger stand when the switch is locked....

  2. 47 CFR 73.6023 - Distributed transmission systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Distributed transmission systems. 73.6023... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6023 Distributed transmission... distributed transmission system....

  3. 49 CFR 200.3 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... railroads for freight transportation. ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Definitions. 200.3 Section 200.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  4. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 224 - Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Report

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Report B Appendix B to Part 224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION REFLECTORIZATION OF RAIL FREIGHT...

  5. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 224 - Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Guidelines for Electronic Submission of Reflectorization Implementation Compliance Reports C Appendix C to Part 224 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  6. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form... OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Financial Responsibility Requirements; Claims Against...

  7. 46 CFR 154.516 - Piping: Hull protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Piping: Hull protection. 154.516 Section 154.516 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... manifolds; and (c) Pump seals....

  8. 43 CFR 3191.5 - Delegation for Indian lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Delegation for Indian lands. 3191.5 Section 3191.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND... lands....

  9. 48 CFR 215.404 - Proposal analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Proposal analysis. 215.404 Section 215.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Proposal analysis....

  10. 47 CFR 74.643 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 74... Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.643 Interference to geostationary-satellites. Applicants and... geostationary-satellites....

  11. 47 CFR 25.219 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 25.219 Section 25.219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.219...

  12. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...-satellite service....

  13. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2.1055 Section 2.1055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization...

  14. 49 CFR 236.731 - Controller, circuit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Controller, circuit. A device for opening and closing electric circuits. ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Controller, circuit. 236.731 Section 236.731 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  15. 49 CFR 236.720 - Circuit, common return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Circuit, common return. A term applied where one wire is used for the return of more than one electric circuit. ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Circuit, common return. 236.720 Section...

  16. 45 CFR 1627.7 - Tax sheltered annuities, retirement accounts and pensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tax sheltered annuities, retirement accounts and... SERVICES CORPORATION SUBGRANTS AND MEMBERSHIP FEES OR DUES § 1627.7 Tax sheltered annuities, retirement..., retirement account, or pension fund....

  17. 48 CFR 27.204 - Patented technology under trade agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Patented technology under trade agreements. 27.204 Section 27.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Patented technology under trade agreements....

  18. 47 CFR 32.15 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 32.15 Section 32.15 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.15...

  19. 49 CFR 236.206 - Battery or power supply with respect to relay; location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Battery or power supply with respect to relay... to relay; location. The battery or power supply for each signal control relay circuit, where an open... from the relay....

  20. 47 CFR 25.402 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false 25.402 Section 25.402 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.402...

  1. 48 CFR 3032.006 - Reduction or suspension of contract payments upon finding of fraud.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Reduction or suspension of contract payments upon finding of fraud. 3032.006 Section 3032.006 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... finding of fraud....

  2. 48 CFR 1616.7002 - Clause-contracts based on cost analysis (experience rated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Clause-contracts based on... FEHBP contracts based on cost analysis (experience rated). ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS ACQUISITION REGULATION...

  3. 48 CFR 219.401 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false General. 219.401 Section 219.401 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF... point for interface with the SBA....

  4. 48 CFR 252.239-7016 - Telecommunications security equipment, devices, techniques, and services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Telecommunications... Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS... telecommunications security equipment, devices, techniques, or services to contractor telecommunications systems....

  5. 49 CFR 178.346 - Specification DOT 406; cargo tank motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification DOT 406; cargo tank motor vehicle...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.346 Specification DOT 406; cargo tank motor vehicle....

  6. 49 CFR 178.348 - Specification DOT 412; cargo tank motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification DOT 412; cargo tank motor vehicle...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.348 Specification DOT 412; cargo tank motor vehicle....

  7. 49 CFR 178.347 - Specification DOT 407; cargo tank motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specification DOT 407; cargo tank motor vehicle...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation § 178.347 Specification DOT 407; cargo tank motor vehicle....

  8. 50 CFR 38.5 - Emergency authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Executive Authority; Authorized... Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency authority. 38.5 Section...

  9. Plasma induced by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization in inert gas

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2007-12-15

    We present a detailed model for the evolution of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) produced plasma during and after the ionizing laser pulse in inert gas (argon, as an example) at arbitrary pressures. Our theory includes the complete process of the REMPI plasma generation and losses, together with the changing gas thermodynamic parameters. The model shows that the plasma expansion follows a classical ambipolar diffusion and that gas heating results in a weak shock or acoustic wave. The gas becomes involved in the motion not only from the pressure gradient due to the heating, but also from the momentum transfer from the charged particles to gas atoms. The time dependence of the total number of electrons computed in theory matches closely with the results of coherent microwave scattering experiments.

  10. A high-temperature inert gas fusion apparatus.

    PubMed

    Mosen, A W; Kelley, R E; Mitchell, H P

    1966-03-01

    A high-temperature inert gas fusion apparatus capable of operating at crucible temperatures as high as 3,100 degrees is described. While this apparatus has been used primarily for the determination of oxygen in pyrolytic carbon-coated uranium carbide particles, its usefulness is not limited to this type of material. It can be generally applied to the determination of oxygen and nitrogen in metals, alloys and other materials amenable to analysis by vacuum-fusion techniques. Analytical results obtained on steel and uranium carbide samples are presented. The apparatus, in its present form, has been in daily use for nearly 2 years. Down time during this period has been negligible. A total of 20 samples can be run in duplicate in an 8-hr shift.

  11. Development of advanced inert-gas ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poeschel, R. L.

    1983-01-01

    Inert gas ion thruster technology offers the greatest potential for providing high specific impulse, low thrust, electric propulsion on large, Earth orbital spacecraft. The development of a thruster module that can be operated on xenon or argon propellant to produce 0.2 N of thrust at a specific impulse of 3000 sec with xenon propellant and at 6000 sec with argon propellant is described. The 30 cm diameter, laboratory model thruster is considered to be scalable to produce 0.5 N thrust. A high efficiency ring cusp discharge chamber was used to achieve an overall thruster efficiency of 77% with xenon propellant and 66% with argon propellant. Measurements were performed to identify ion production and loss processes and to define critical design criteria (at least on a preliminary basis).

  12. 19 CFR 111.32 - False information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False information. 111.32 Section 111.32 Customs... CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.32 False information. A broker must... procure the giving of, any false or misleading information or testimony in any matter pending before...

  13. Muco-inert nanoparticle probes and drug carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying-Ying

    2011-12-01

    Mucus coats the exposed surfaces of the eyes and respiratory, gastrointestinal (GI) and cervicovaginal (CV) tracts, and protects mucosal tissues against pathogens and other foreign particulates. Most foreign particles are effectively trapped in mucus through steric and adhesive interactions, and are rapidly eliminated by different mucus clearance mechanisms. Nevertheless, mucus also immobilizes conventional drug and gene carriers, thereby precluding sustained and targeted drug delivery to mucosal sites. Synthetic particles engineered with muco-inert surfaces, and some viruses, can readily penetrate mucus gel, and may serve as useful probes to understand the biophysical barrier properties of mucus. Improved understanding of the mucus barrier could provide insights into methods to enhance drug and gene delivery at mucosal surfaces, as well as understanding the occasional failure of mucus to protect against infection or injury. Recently, muco-inert nanoparticles were developed by conjugating a dense layer of low MW polyethylene glycol to particle surfaces. Since they are slowed only by steric obstruction from the mucus mesh, various sized muco-inert nanoparticles can be used to probe the microstructure and microrheology of mucus. I applied this technique to determine whether the mucus barrier may be altered by exogenous factors, including the presence of detergent, pH changes and synthetic nanoparticles. I first studied the microrheology of native human cervicovaginal mucus (CVM), and found that CVM behaves as a viscoelastic solid at length scales ≥ 1 microm (preventing large particles from diffusing through) but as a viscoelastic liquid at length scales up to at least 500 nm (allowing smaller particles to diffuse through low viscosity fluid-filled pores). Treating CVM with a nonionic detergent, N9, shifted the viscoelastic liquid-solid transition point to < 200 nm, suggesting hydrophobic interactions between mucin fibers play an important role in regulating the

  14. Inert-gas welding and brazing enclosure fabricated from sheet plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisner, J. P.

    1965-01-01

    Custom-fabricated plastic bag maintains an inert-gas atmosphere for welding and brazing certain metals. The bag fits over part of the workpieces and the welding and brazing tools. It is also used for metal brazing and fusion plating which require an inert-gas atmosphere.

  15. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-12-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  16. 75 FR 282 - Restricting the Mailing of Replica or Inert Explosive Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ... Explosive Devices AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Proposed rule; revised. SUMMARY: The Postal Service...]) to clarify that a proposed new standard to allow for the mailing of replica or inert explosive.... More specifically identify these items as ``replica or inert explosive devices'' rather than...

  17. 75 FR 30300 - Restricting the Mailing of Replica or Inert Explosive Devices

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... 111 Restricting the Mailing of Replica or Inert Explosive Devices AGENCY: Postal Service\\TM\\. ACTION... replica or inert explosive devices, such as simulated grenades that are not dangerous but bear a realistic appearance to explosive devices, to Registered Mail\\TM\\ service only. DATES: Effective Date: July 6,...

  18. 75 FR 7560 - Public Availability of Identities of Inert Ingredients in Pesticides; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 156 Public Availability of Identities of Inert Ingredients in Pesticides; Extension of... identities of the inert ingredients in pesticide products. Two requests for a 90-day extension of the comment... comment period on the initiation of rulemaking to increase public availability of the identities of...

  19. Young Infants' Reasoning about Physical Events Involving Inert and Self-Propelled Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luo, Yuyan; Kaufman, Lisa; Baillargeon, Renee

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined whether 5- to 6.5-month-old infants would hold different expectations about various physical events involving a box after receiving evidence that it was either inert or self-propelled. Infants were surprised if the inert but not the self-propelled box: reversed direction spontaneously (Experiment 1); remained…

  20. Minimum Risk Pesticides - Inert Ingredient and Active Ingredient Eligibility under 40 CFR 152.25(f)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ingredients found on both the Minimum Risk Active Ingredient and List 4A Inert Ingredients of Minimal Concern lists may be used either as an active or an inert ingredient. Otherwise, it can only be used based on the list it appears on.

  1. First principles study of inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) interactions with hydrogen in tungsten

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiang-Shan; Hou, Jie; Li, Xiang-Yan; Wu, Xuebang; Liu, C. S.; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.

    2017-04-01

    We have systematically evaluated binding energies of hydrogen with inert-gas (helium, neon, and argon) defects, including interstitial clusters and vacancy-inert-gas complexes, and their stable configurations using first-principles calculations. Our calculations show that these inert-gas defects have large positive binding energies with hydrogen, 0.4-1.1 eV, 0.7-1.0 eV, and 0.6-0.8 eV for helium, neon, and argon, respectively. This indicates that these inert-gas defects can act as traps for hydrogen in tungsten, and impede or interrupt the diffusion of hydrogen in tungsten, which supports the discussion on the influence of inert-gas on hydrogen retention in recent experimental literature. The interaction between these inert-gas defects and hydrogen can be understood by the attractive interaction due to the distortion of the lattice structure induced by inert-gas defects, the intrinsic repulsive interaction between inert-gas atoms and hydrogen, and the hydrogen-hydrogen repelling in tungsten lattice.

  2. Passive vibration suppression using inerters for a multi-storey building structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sara Ying; Jiang, Jason Zheng; Neild, Simon

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the use of inerters for vibration suppression of a multistorey building structure. The inerter was proposed as a two-terminal replacement for the mass element, with the property that the applied force is proportional to the relative acceleration across its terminals. It completes the force-current mechanical-electrical network analogy, providing the mechanical equivalent to a capacitor. Thus allows all passive mechanical impedances to be synthesised. The inerter has been used in Formula 1 racing cars and applications to various systems such as vehicle suspension have been identified. Several devices that incoporate inerter(s), as well as spring(s) and damper(s), have also been identified for vibration suppression of building structures. These include the tuned inerter damper (TID) and the tuned viscous mass damper (TVMD). In this paper, a three-storey building model with an absorber located at the bottom subjected to base excitation is studied. Four simple absorber layouts, in terms of how spring, damper and inerter components should be arranged, have been studied. In order to minimise the maximum relative displacement of the building, the optimum parameter values for each of the layouts have been obtained with respect to the inerter's size.

  3. Fiscal year 1989 annual report for the Sensors Development Program: Inert Electrodes Program

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Koski, O.H.; Stice, N.D.; Morgan, L.G. ); Nikias, C.L. )

    1990-04-01

    The Sensors Development Program is conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP). The work is being performed in conjunction with the Inert Electrodes Program at PNL. The objectives of the Sensors Development Program are to (1) investigate and develop methods of process monitoring/control for operating electrolytic cells and (2) determine safe operating conditions for the inert anodes. The majority of work in FY 1989 involved (1) evaluating Digital Signal Analysis (DSA) methods to monitor inert anode operation and to determine alumina concentration in both PNL bench-scale laboratory cells and the Prototype Inert Anode Test and (2) developing the reference anode against which inert anode voltage signals could be measured by the DSA-based or other methods. 3 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. An Association Account of False Belief Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bruin, L. C.; Newen, A.

    2012-01-01

    The elicited-response false belief task has traditionally been considered as reliably indicating that children acquire an understanding of false belief around 4 years of age. However, recent investigations using spontaneous-response tasks suggest that false belief understanding emerges much earlier. This leads to a developmental paradox: if young…

  5. 20 CFR 356.3 - False claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false False claims. 356.3 Section 356.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 356.3 False claims. In the case of penalties assessed under 31...

  6. 20 CFR 356.3 - False claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False claims. 356.3 Section 356.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 356.3 False claims. In the case of penalties assessed under 31...

  7. 30 CFR 281.5 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false False statements. 281.5 Section 281.5 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General § 281.5 False statements. Under...

  8. The diverse biological properties of the chemically inert noble gases.

    PubMed

    Winkler, David A; Thornton, Aaron; Farjot, Géraldine; Katz, Ira

    2016-04-01

    The noble gases represent an intriguing scientific paradox. They are extremely inert chemically but display a remarkable spectrum of clinically useful biological properties. Despite a relative paucity of knowledge of their mechanisms of action, some of the noble gases have been used successfully in the clinic. Studies with xenon have suggested that the noble gases as a class may exhibit valuable biological properties such as anaesthesia; amelioration of ischemic damage; tissue protection prior to transplantation; analgesic properties; and a potentially wide range of other clinically useful effects. Xenon has been shown to be safe in humans, and has useful pharmacokinetic properties such as rapid onset, fast wash out etc. The main limitations in wider use are that: many of the fundamental biochemical studies are still lacking; the lighter noble gases are likely to manifest their properties only under hyperbaric conditions, impractical in surgery; and administration of xenon using convectional gaseous anaesthesia equipment is inefficient, making its use very expensive. There is nonetheless a significant body of published literature on the biochemical, pharmacological, and clinical properties of noble gases but no comprehensive reviews exist that summarize their properties and the existing knowledge of their models of action at the molecular (atomic) level. This review provides such an up-to-date summary of the extensive, useful biological properties of noble gases as drugs and prospects for wider application of these atoms.

  9. Asymmetric inelastic inert doublet dark matter from triplet scalar leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arina, Chiara; Sahu, Narendra

    2012-01-01

    The nature of dark matter (DM) particles and the mechanism that provides their measured relic abundance are currently unknown. In this paper we investigate inert scalar and vector like fermion doublet DM candidates with a charge asymmetry in the dark sector, which is generated by the same mechanism that provides the baryon asymmetry, namely baryogenesis-via-leptogenesis induced by decays of scalar triplets. At the same time the model gives rise to neutrino masses in the ballpark of oscillation experiments via type II seesaw. We discuss possible sources of depletion of asymmetry in the DM and visible sectors and solve the relevant Boltzmann equations for quasi-equilibrium decay of triplet scalars. A Monte-Carlo-Markov-Chain analysis is performed for the whole parameter space. The survival of the asymmetry in the dark sector leads to inelastic scattering off nuclei. We then apply Bayesian statistic to infer the model parameters favoured by the current experimental data, in particular the DAMA annual modulation and XENON100 exclusion limit. The latter strongly disfavours asymmetric scalar doublet DM of mass O(TeV) as required by DM-DM¯ oscillations, while an asymmetric vector like fermion doublet DM with mass around 100 GeV is a good candidate for DAMA annual modulation yet satisfying the constraints from XENON100 data.

  10. Exploring collider signatures of the inert Higgs doublet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Amitava; Ganguly, Nabanita; Khan, Najimuddin; Rakshit, Subhendu

    2017-01-01

    We revisit the multilepton (m l )+ ET+X signatures of the inert doublet model (IDM) of dark matter in future LHC experiments for m =3 , 4 and simulate, for the first time, the m =5 case. Here X stands for any number of jets. We illustrate these signals with benchmark points consistent with the usual constraints like unitarity, perturbativity, the precision electroweak data, the observed dark matter relic density of the Universe and, most importantly, the stringent LHC constraints from the post-Higgs (h ) discovery era like the measured Mh and the upper bound on the invisible width of h decay, which were not included in earlier analyses of multilepton signatures. We find that if the IDM is embedded in a grand desert scenario so that the unitarity constraint holds up to a very high scale, the whole of the highly restricted parameter space allowed by the above constraints can be probed at the LHC via the 3 l signal for an integrated luminosity ˜3000 fb-1 . On the other hand, if any new physics shows up at a scale ˜10 TeV , only a part of the enlarged allowed parameter space can be probed. The 4 l and 5 l signals can help to discriminate among different IDM scenarios as and when sufficient integrated luminosity accumulates.

  11. Inert dark matter in type-II seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chuan-Hung; Nomura, Takaaki

    2014-09-01

    Weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) as a dark matter (DM) candidate is further inspired by recent AMS-02 data, which confirm the excess of positron fraction observed earlier by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments. Additionally, the excess of positron+electron flux is still significant in the measurement of Fermi-LAT. For solving the problems of massive neutrinos and observed excess of cosmic-ray, we study the model with an inert Higgs doublet (IHD) in the framework of type-II seesaw model by imposing a Z 2 symmetry on the IHD, where the lightest particle of IHD is the DM candidate and the neutrino masses originate from the Yukawa couplings of Higgs triplet and leptons. We calculate the cosmic-ray production in our model by using three kinds of neutrino mass spectra, which are classified by normal ordering, inverted ordering and quasi-degeneracy. We find that when the constraints of DM relic density and comic-ray antiproton spectrum are taken into account, the observed excess of positron/electron flux could be explained well in normal ordered neutrino mass spectrum. Moreover, excess of comic-ray neutrinos is implied in our model. We find that our results on < σv> are satisfied with and close to the upper limit of IceCube analysis. More data from comic-ray neutrinos could test our model.

  12. Porous HMX initiation studies -- Sugar as an inert simulant

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Alcon, R.R.

    1997-11-01

    For several years the authors have been using magnetic particle velocity gauges to study the shock loading of porous HMX (65 and 73% TMD) of different particle sizes to determine their compaction and initiation characteristics. Because it has been difficult to separate the effects of compaction and reaction, an inert simulant was needed with properties similar to HMX. Sugar was selected as the simulant for several reasons: (1) the particle size distribution of C and H granulated sugar is similar to the coarse HMX the authors have been using (120 {micro}m average size), (2) the particle size of C and H confectioners (powdered) sugar is similar to the fine HMX in the studies (10 {micro}m average size), (3) it is an organic material, and (4) sugar was readily available. Because the densities of HMX and sugar are somewhat different, the authors chose to do the experiments on sugar compacts at 65 and 73% TMD. As expected, no reaction was observed in the sugar experiments. Compaction wave profiles were similar to those measured earlier for the HMX, i.e., the compaction waves in the coarse sugar were quite disperse while those in the fine sugar were much sharper. This indicates that the compaction wave profiles are controlled by particle size and not reaction. Also, the coarse sugar gauge signals exhibited a great deal of noise, thought to the be result of fracto-emission.

  13. A review of recent neurochemical data on inert gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Rostain, J C; Lavoute, C; Risso, J J; Vallée, N; Weiss, M

    2011-01-01

    Nitrogen narcosis occurs in humans at around 0.4 MPa (4 ATA). Hydrogen narcosis occurs between 2.6 and 3.0 MPa. In rats, nitrogen disturbances occur from 1 MPa and a loss of righting reflex around 4 MPa. Neurochemical studies in striatum of rats with nitrogen at 3 MPa (75% of anesthesia threshold) with differential pulse voltammetry have demonstrated a decrease in dopamine (DA) release by neurons originated from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). Such a decrease is found also with compressed argon, which is more narcotic than nitrogen and with the anesthetic gas nitrous oxide. Inversely, compressed helium with its very low narcotic potency induces DA increase. Microdialysis studies in the striatum have indicated that nitrogen also induces a decrease of glutamate concentration. Nitrogen pressure did not modify NMDA glutamate receptor activities in SNc or striatum but enhanced GABAA receptors activities in SNc. Repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis suppressed the DA decrease and induced an increase. This fact and the lack of improvement of motor disturbances did not support the hypothesis of a physiological adaptation. The desensitization of the GABAA receptors on DA cells during recurrent exposures and the parallel long-lasting decrease of glutamate coupled to the increase in NMDA receptor sensitivity suggest a nitrogen neurotoxicity or addiction induced by recurrent exposures. The differential changes produced by inert gases indifferent neurotransmitter receptors would support the binding protein theory.

  14. Recent neurochemical basis of inert gas narcosis and pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Rostain, J C; Balon, N

    2006-01-01

    Compressed air or a nitrogen-oxygen mixture produces from 0.3 MPa nitrogen narcosis. The traditional view was that anaesthesia or narcosis occurs when the volume of a hydrophobic site is caused to expand beyond a critical amount by the absorption of molecules of a narcotic gas. The observation of the pressure reversal effect on general anaesthesia has for a long time supported the lipid theory. However, recently, protein theories are in increasing consideration since results have been interpreted as evidence for a direct anaesthetic-protein interaction. The question is to know whether inert gases act by binding processes on proteins of neurotransmitter receptors. Compression with breathing mixtures where nitrogen is replaced by helium which has a low narcotic potency induces from 1 MPa, the high pressure nervous syndrome which is related to neurochemical disturbances including changes of the amino-acid and monoamine neurotransmissions. The use of narcotic gas (nitrogen or hydrogen) added to a helium-oxygen mixture, reduced some symptoms of the HPNS but also had some effects due to an additional effect of the narcotic potency of the gas. The researches performed at the level of basal ganglia of the rat brain and particularly the nigro-striatal pathway involved in the control of the motor, locomotor and cognitive functions, disrupted by narcosis or pressure, have indicated that GABAergic neurotransmission is implicated via GABAa receptors.

  15. Simplified power processing for inert gas ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rawlin, V. K.; Pinero, L. R.; Hamley, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    Significant simplifications to power processors for inert gas ion thrusters in the 1 to 5 kW range have been identified. They include elimination of all but three power supplies - one each for the neutralizer, main discharge, and beam. The neutralizer and discharge power supplies would provide both cathode heating and plasma generating functions. This dual-use power supply concept was validated via integration tests with a 30 cm diameter xenon ion thruster. The beam/accelerator power supply would have positive and negative outputs to allow a single power supply to provide both functions. The discharge and beam power supplies would incorporate full-bridge inverters similar to those proven for flight-ready arcjet propulsion systems. Operation of this simplified power processing scheme at an inverter frequency of 50 kHz results in a projected power processor design with low mass and high efficiency. A 2 kW reference point design has estimated values of specific mass of 5.4 kg/kW and an efficiency of 93 percent.

  16. Relating indices of inert gas washout to localised bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Jennine H; Hoffman, Eric A; Tawhai, Merryn H

    2012-09-30

    Asthma is typically characterised by increased ventilation heterogeneity. This can be directly inferred from the visualisation of ventilation defects in imaging studies, or indirectly inferred from indices derived from the multiple-breath nitrogen washout (MBNW). The basis for the understanding of the MBNW indices and their implication for changes in structure and function at the largest and smallest scales in the lung has been facilitated by mathematical models for inert gas transport. A new model is presented that couples airway resistance and regional tissue compliance, for simulation of the effect of 'patchy' bronchoconstriction - as inferred from imaging studies - on the Scond index of ventilation heterogeneity. Patches of reduced washin gas concentration can emerge by constricting only the terminal bronchioles within localised regions, however this pattern of constriction is insufficient to affect Scond; Scond from this model is only sensitive to constriction that occurs within entire contiguous regions. Furthermore the model illustrates the possibility that the MBNW may not detect gas trapped in ventilation defects.

  17. Investigation of materials for inert electrodes in aluminum electrodeposition cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haggerty, J. S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-09-14

    Work was divided into major efforts. The first was the growth and characterization of specimens; the second was Hall cell performance testing. Cathode and anode materials were the subject of investigation. Preparation of specimens included growth of single crystals and synthesis of ultra high purity powders. Special attention was paid to ferrites as they were considered to be the most promising anode materials. Ferrite anode corrosion rates were studied and the electrical conductivities of a set of copper-manganese ferrites were measured. Float Zone, Pendant Drop Cryolite Experiments were undertaken because unsatisfactory choices of candidate materials were being made on the basis of a flawed set of selection criteria applied to an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate data base. This experiment was then constructed to determine whether the apparatus used for float zone crystal growth could be adapted to make a variety of important based melts and their interactions with candidate inert anode materials. The third major topic was Non Consumable Anode (Data Base, Candidate Compositions), driven by our perception that the basis for prior selection of candidate materials was inadequate. Results are presented. 162 refs., 39 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. Investigation of materials for inert electrodes in aluminum electrodeposition cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haggerty, J. S.; Sadoway, D. R.

    1987-09-01

    Work was divided into major efforts. The first was the growth and characterization of specimens; the second was Hall cell performance testing. Cathode and anode materials were the subject of investigation. Preparation of specimens included growth of single crystals and synthesis of ultra high purity powders. Special attention was paid to ferrites as they were considered to be the most promising anode materials. Ferrite anode corrosion rates were studied and the electrical conductivities of a set of copper-manganese ferrites were measured. Float Zone, Pendant Drop Cryolite Experiments were undertaken because unsatisfactory choices of candidate materials were being made on the basis of a flawed set of selection criteria applied to an incomplete and sometimes inaccurate data base. This experiment was then constructed to determine whether the apparatus used for float zone crystal growth could be adapted to make a variety of important based melts and their interactions with candidate inert anode materials. Compositions), driven by our perception that the basis for prior selection of candidate materials was inadequate. Results are presented.

  19. Behavioural response of Phytoseiulus persimilisin inert materials for technical application.

    PubMed

    Wendorf, Dennis; Sermann, Helga; Katz, Peter; Lerche, Sandra; Büttner, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    A large scale application of the predatory mite Phytoseiulus persimilis Athias-Henriot for use in the biological control of spider mites in the field requires testing the behaviour of Phytoseiulus persimilis in inert materials, like millet pelts and Vermiculite (1-3 mm). In laboratory studies, the distribution of the individuals in such materials, the time of remaining in the material were proved. To examine the abiotic influences on the time of remaining in the material, the dampness of the materials was varied (0%, 5% and 10%). Moreover, the influence of attitude of materials was tested. The time of emigration from the material was noted for each individual. Emigration from all dry materials was completed 15 minutes at the latest after set up of the mites. The increase of dampness had an obvious effect on the time of remaining in the material. In this respect the material millet pelts showed the most favourable effect with 10% dampness. Increasing attitude of material the mobility of predatory mites will be influenced negatively above 75 cm. Up to 50 cm, mites have not a problem to move in the material and the time of remaining can be prolonged considerably.

  20. Does the evoked response measure inert gas narcosis?

    PubMed

    Fowler, B; Ackles, K N

    1977-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine the validity of change in the cortical evoked response as a measure of inert gas narcosis in humans. Three criteria are defined which must all be met if a nonbehavioral measure is to be accepted as an indicator of narcosis. The evoked response is assessed in terms of these criteria. Two classes of experiments which have used the evoked response in hyperbaric ocnditions are identified. The first class allows the evoked response to be assessed against more than one of these criteria. The outcome of every experiment in this class supports the view that the evoked response is not a valid measure of narcosis. The second class of experiment assumed that the evoked response is a measure of narcosis and were not designed to assess validity appropriately. Arguments by Kinney and associates in support of the assumption of validity are shown to be unsound. Possible explanations for inability to demonstrate validity are discussed and it is suggested that factors other than narcotic potency of the breathing gas mixture determine or at least play a major role in determining amplitude of the evoked response.

  1. Determining inert content in coal dust/rock dust mixture

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Ward, Jr., Jack A.

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the inert content of a coal dust and rock dust mixture uses a transparent window pressed against the mixture. An infrared light beam is directed through the window such that a portion of the infrared light beam is reflected from the mixture. The concentration of the reflected light is detected and a signal indicative of the reflected light is generated. A normalized value for the generated signal is determined according to the relationship .phi.=(log i.sub.c `log i.sub.co) / (log i.sub.c100 -log i.sub.co) where i.sub.co =measured signal at 0% rock dust i.sub.c100 =measured signal at 100% rock dust i.sub.c =measured signal of the mixture. This normalized value is then correlated to a predetermined relationship of .phi. to rock dust percentage to determine the rock dust content of the mixture. The rock dust content is displayed where the percentage is between 30 and 100%, and an indication of out-of-range is displayed where the rock dust percent is less than 30%. Preferably, the rock dust percentage (RD%) is calculated from the predetermined relationship RD%=100+30 log .phi.. where the dust mixture initially includes moisture, the dust mixture is dried before measuring by use of 8 to 12 mesh molecular-sieves which are shaken with the dust mixture and subsequently screened from the dust mixture.

  2. False discoveries and models for gene discovery.

    PubMed

    van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2003-10-01

    In the search for genes underlying complex traits, there is a tendency to impose increasingly stringent criteria to avoid false discoveries. These stringent criteria make it hard to find true effects, and we argue that it might be better to optimize our procedures for eliminating and controlling false discoveries. Focusing on achieving an acceptable ratio of true- and false-positives, we show that false discoveries could be eliminated much more efficiently using a stepwise approach. To avoid a relatively high false discovery rate, corrections for 'multiple testing' might also be needed in candidate gene studies. If the appropriate methods are used, detecting the proportion of true effects appears to be a more important determinant of the genotyping burden than the desired false discovery rate. This raises the question of whether current models for gene discovery are shaped excessively by a fear of false discoveries.

  3. Phenomenology of the inert (2+1) and (4+2) Higgs doublet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keus, Venus; King, Stephen F.; Moretti, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    We make a phenomenological study of a model with two inert doublets plus one Higgs doublet [I(2+1)HDM] which is symmetric under a Z2 group, preserved after electroweak symmetry breaking by the vacuum alignment (0,0,v). This model may be regarded as an extension to the model with one inert doublet plus one Higgs doublet [I(1+1)HDM], by the addition of an extra inert scalar doublet. The neutral fields from the two inert doublets provide a viable dark matter (DM) candidate which is stabilized by the conserved Z2 symmetry. We study the new Higgs decay channels offered by the scalar fields from the extra doublets and their effect on the standard model Higgs couplings, including a new decay channel into (off-shell) photon(s) plus missing energy, which distinguishes the I(2+1)HDM from the I(1+1)HDM. Motivated by supersymmetry, which requires an even number of doublets, we then extend this model into a model with four inert doublets plus two Higgs doublets [I(4+2)HDM] and study the phenomenology of the model with the vacuum alignment (0,0,0,0,v ,v). This scenario offers a wealth of Higgs signals, the most distinctive ones being cascade decays of heavy Higgs states into inert ones. Finally, we also remark that the smoking-gun signature of all the considered models is represented by invisible Higgs decays into the lightest inert Higgs bosons responsible for DM.

  4. Experimental Study of an On-board Fuel Tank Inerting System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Fei; Lin, Guiping; Zeng, Yu; Pan, Rui; Sun, Haoyang

    2017-03-01

    A simulated aircraft fuel tank inerting system was established and experiments were conducted to investigate the performance of the system. The system uses hollow fiber membrane which is widely used in aircraft as the air separation device and a simplified 20% scale multi compartment fuel tank as the inerting object. Experiments were carried out to investigate the influences of different operating parameters on the inerting effectiveness of the system, including NEA (nitrogen-enriched air) flow rate, NEA oxygen concentration, NEA distribution, pressure of bleeding air and fuel load of the tank. Results showed that for the multi compartment fuel tank, concentrated flow washing inerting would cause great differences throughout the distribution of oxygen concentration in the fuel tank, and inerting dead zone would exist. The inerting effectiveness was greatly improved and the ullage oxygen concentration of the tank would reduce to 12% successfully when NEA entered three compartments evenly. The time span of a complete inerting process reduced obviously with increasing NEA flow rate and decreasing NEA concentration, but the trend became weaker gradually. However, the reduction of NEA concentration will decrease the utilization efficiency of the bleeding air. In addition, the time span can also be reduced by raising the pressure of bleeding air, which will improve the bleeding air utilization efficiency at the same time. The time span decreases linearly as the fuel load increases.

  5. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  6. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  7. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  8. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  9. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  10. Composition suitable for use as inert electrode having good electrical conductivity and mechanical properties

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Rapp, Robert A.

    1984-01-01

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metals or metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily.

  11. Composition suitable for use as inert electrode having good electrical conductivity and mechanical properties

    DOEpatents

    Ray, S.P.; Rapp, R.A.

    1984-06-12

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metals or metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily. 8 figs.

  12. Inert anode containing base metal and noble metal useful for the electrolytic production of aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua

    2000-01-01

    An inert anode for production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a base metal selected from Cu and Ag, and at least one noble metal selected from Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and Os. The inert anode may optionally be formed of sintered particles having interior portions containing more base metal than noble metal and exterior portions containing more noble metal than base metal. In a preferred embodiment, the base metal comprises Cu, and the noble metal comprises Ag, Pd or a combination thereof.

  13. Constructing rich false memories of committing crime.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julia; Porter, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Memory researchers long have speculated that certain tactics may lead people to recall crimes that never occurred, and thus could potentially lead to false confessions. This is the first study to provide evidence suggesting that full episodic false memories of committing crime can be generated in a controlled experimental setting. With suggestive memory-retrieval techniques, participants were induced to generate criminal and noncriminal emotional false memories, and we compared these false memories with true memories of emotional events. After three interviews, 70% of participants were classified as having false memories of committing a crime (theft, assault, or assault with a weapon) that led to police contact in early adolescence and volunteered a detailed false account. These reported false memories of crime were similar to false memories of noncriminal events and to true memory accounts, having the same kinds of complex descriptive and multisensory components. It appears that in the context of a highly suggestive interview, people can quite readily generate rich false memories of committing crime.

  14. Explaining the Development of False Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Holliday, Robyn; Marche, Tammy

    2002-01-01

    Reviews explanatory dimensions of children's false memory relevant to forensic practice: measurement, development, social factors, individual differences, varieties of memories and memory judgments, and varieties of procedures inducing false memories. Asserts that recent studies fail to use techniques that separate acquiescence from memory…

  15. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  16. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  17. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  18. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  19. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  20. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone…

  1. Can False Memories Prime Problem Solutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Garner, Sarah R.; Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Ball, Linden J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that false memories can prime performance on related implicit and explicit memory tasks. The present research examined whether false memories can also be used to prime higher order cognitive processes, namely, insight-based problem solving. Participants were asked to solve a number of compound remote associate task…

  2. 30 CFR 281.5 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false False statements. 281.5 Section 281.5 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General §...

  3. Item method directed forgetting diminishes false memory.

    PubMed

    Marche, Tammy A; Brainerd, Charles J; Lane, David G; Loehr, Janeen D

    2005-10-01

    Directed forgetting may reduce DRM false memory illusion by interfering with meaning processing. Participants were presented with a list composed of six 10-word semantically associated sub-lists, and they were either (a) asked to remember all list items of (b) asked to remember all associates from sub-lists and to forget all associates from other sub-lists. All participants were requested to recall and recognise list items. Although directed forgetting effects have been previously reported only for true responses in the DRM paradigm with the list method, we also found directed forgetting for false responses with the item method. Such forgetting instructions reduced both verbatim and meaning processing, decreasing both the intrusion and the false alarm rate. These results are consistent with two-process explanations of DRM false memories, such as fuzzy-trace theory, and add to our understanding of false memory editing.

  4. Emotional content of true and false memories.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-01-01

    Many people believe that emotional memories (including those that arise in therapy) are particularly likely to represent true events because of their emotional content. But is emotional content a reliable indicator of memory accuracy? The current research assessed the emotional content of participants' pre-existing (true) and manipulated (false) memories for childhood events. False memories for one of three emotional childhood events were planted using a suggestive manipulation and then compared, along several subjective dimensions, with other participants' true memories. On most emotional dimensions (e.g., how emotional was this event for you?), true and false memories were indistinguishable. On a few measures (e.g., intensity of feelings at the time of the event), true memories were more emotional than false memories in the aggregate, yet true and false memories were equally likely to be rated as uniformly emotional. These results suggest that even substantial emotional content may not reliably indicate memory accuracy.

  5. Priming analogical reasoning with false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Threadgold, Emma; Ball, Linden J

    2015-08-01

    Like true memories, false memories are capable of priming answers to insight-based problems. Recent research has attempted to extend this paradigm to more advanced problem-solving tasks, including those involving verbal analogical reasoning. However, these experiments are constrained inasmuch as problem solutions could be generated via spreading activation mechanisms (much like false memories themselves) rather than using complex reasoning processes. In three experiments we examined false memory priming of complex analogical reasoning tasks in the absence of simple semantic associations. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated the robustness of false memory priming in analogical reasoning when backward associative strength among the problem terms was eliminated. In Experiments 2a and 2b, we extended these findings by demonstrating priming on newly created homonym analogies that can only be solved by inhibiting semantic associations within the analogy. Overall, the findings of the present experiments provide evidence that the efficacy of false memory priming extends to complex analogical reasoning problems.

  6. Rapid induction of false memory for pictures.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Yana; Shanks, David R

    2010-07-01

    Recognition of pictures is typically extremely accurate, and it is thus unclear whether the reconstructive nature of memory can yield substantial false recognition of highly individuated stimuli. A procedure for the rapid induction of false memories for distinctive colour photographs is proposed. Participants studied a set of object pictures followed by a list of words naming those objects, but embedded in the list were names of unseen objects. When subsequently shown full colour pictures of these unseen objects, participants consistently claimed that they had seen them, while discriminating with high accuracy between studied pictures and new pictures whose names did not appear in the misleading word list. These false memories can be reported with high confidence as well as the feeling of recollection. This new procedure allows the investigation of factors that influence false memory reports with ecologically valid stimuli and of the similarities and differences between true and false memories.

  7. Inert anode containing oxides of nickel iron and cobalt useful for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.

    2002-01-01

    An inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode includes a ceramic oxide material preferably made from NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and CoO. The inert anode composition may comprise the following mole fractions of NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and CoO: 0.15 to 0.99 NiO; 0.0001 to 0.85 Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; and 0.0001 to 0.45 CoO. The inert anode may optionally include other oxides and/or at least one metal phase, such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. The Ni--Fe--Co--O ceramic material exhibits very low solubility in Hall cell baths used to produce aluminum.

  8. For cermet inert anode containing oxide and metal phases useful for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Liu, Xinghua; Weirauch, Douglas A.

    2002-01-01

    A cermet inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode comprises a ceramic phase including an oxide of Ni, Fe and M, where M is at least one metal selected from Zn, Co, Al, Li, Cu, Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, Ta, W, Mo, Hf and rare earths, preferably Zn and/or Co. Preferred ceramic compositions comprise Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3, NiO and ZnO or CoO. The cermet inert anode also comprises a metal phase such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. A preferred metal phase comprises Cu and Ag. The cermet inert anodes may be used in electrolytic reduction cells for the production of commercial purity aluminum as well as other metals.

  9. Inert anode containing oxides of nickel, iron and zinc useful for the electrolytic production of metals

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.; Weirauch, Jr., Douglas A.; Liu, Xinghua

    2002-01-01

    An inert anode for the electrolytic production of metals such as aluminum is disclosed. The inert anode includes a ceramic oxide material preferably made from NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and ZnO. The inert anode composition may comprise the following mole fractions of NiO, Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and ZnO: 0.2 to 0.99 NiO; 0.0001 to 0.8 Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 ; and 0.0001 to 0.3 ZnO. The inert anode may optionally include other oxides and/or at least one metal phase, such as Cu, Ag, Pd, Pt, Au, Rh, Ru, Ir and/or Os. The Ni--Fe--Co--O ceramic material exhibits very low solubility in Hall cell baths used to produce aluminum.

  10. Lepton flavor violation in the inert scalar model with higher representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Talal Ahmed; Nasri, Salah

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the lepton flavor violation (LFV) in the inert scalar model with higher representations. We generalize the inert doublet model with right handed neutrino by using higher scalar and fermion representation of SU(2) L . As the generalized model and the inert doublet model have the same parameter space, we compare the rates of μ → eγ, μ → eeē and μ - e conversion in nuclei in the doublet and its immediate extension, the quartet model. We show that the corresponding rates are larger in the case of higher representation compared to the Inert doublet for the same region of parameter space. This implies that such extended models are more constrained by current LFV bounds and will have better prospects in future experiments.

  11. Oxygen carrier for gas chromatographic analysis of inert gases in propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Gas chromatographic determination of small quantities of inert gases in reactive propellants is discussed. Operating conditions used for specific analyses of helium in diborane and nitrogen in oxygen difluoride are presented in tabular form.

  12. Social influence and mental routes to the production of authentic false memories and inauthentic false memories.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael F; Skowronski, John J

    2017-03-09

    Two studies assessed the extent to which people incorporated false facts provided by bogus others into their own recognition memory reports, and how these false memory reports were affected by: (a) truth of the information in others' summaries supporting the false facts, (b) motivation to process stories and summaries, (c) source credibility, and (d) ease of remembering original facts. False memory report frequency increased when false facts in a summary were supported by true information and varied inversely with the ease with which original facts could be remembered. Results from a measure probing participants' memory perceptions suggest that some false memories are authentic: People sometimes lack awareness of both the incorporation of false facts into their memory reports and where the false facts came from. However, many false memories are inauthentic: Despite reporting a false memory, people sometimes retain knowledge of the original stimulus and/or the origin of false facts.

  13. Oxidation Processes in Blowing Steel With Inert Gas into the Ladle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gizatulin, R. A.; Valuev, D. V.; Trifonov, V. A.; Valueva, A. V.; Serikbol, A.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the possible development of oxidative processes in a metal when treating the melt in the ladle under intensive stirring with an inert gas. The industrial data have been received, confirming the possibility of reducing the concentration of silicon and aluminum in the metal, as well as changing the slag chemical composition with the bath blowing with the inert gas through the top submerged lance.

  14. The role of "inert" surface chemistry in marine biofouling prevention.

    PubMed

    Rosenhahn, Axel; Schilp, Sören; Kreuzer, Hans Jürgen; Grunze, Michael

    2010-05-07

    The settlement and colonization of marine organisms on submerged man-made surfaces is a major economic problem for many marine industries. The most apparent detrimental effects of biofouling are increased fuel consumption of ships, clogging of membranes and heat exchangers, disabled underwater sensors, and growth of biofoulers in aquaculture systems. The presently common-but environmentally very problematic-way to deal with marine biofouling is to incorporate biocides, which use biocidal products in the surface coatings to kill the colonizing organisms, into the surface coatings. Since the implementation of the International Maritime Organization Treaty on biocides in 2008, the use of tributyltin (TBT) is restricted and thus environmentally benign but effective surface coatings are required. In this short review, we summarize the different strategies which are pursued in academia and industry to better understand the mechanisms of biofouling and to develop strategies which can be used for industrial products. Our focus will be on chemically "inert" model surface coatings, in particular oligo- and poly(ethylene glycol) (OEG and PEG) functionalized surface films. The reasons for choosing this class of chemistry as an example are three-fold: Firstly, experiments on spore settlement on OEG and PEG coatings help to understand the mechanism of non-fouling of highly hydrated interfaces; secondly, these studies defy the common assumption that surface hydrophilicity-as measured by water contact angles-is an unambiguous and predictive tool to determine the fouling behavior on the surface; and thirdly, choosing this system is a good example for "interfacial systems chemistry": it connects the behavior of unicellular marine organisms with the antifouling properties of a hydrated surface coating with structural and electronic properties as derived from ab initio quantum mechanical calculations using the electronic wave functions of oxygen, hydrogen, and carbon. This short

  15. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2004-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  16. False recognition of instruction-set lures.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Evan T; Chubala, Chrissy M; Spear, Jackie; Jamieson, Randall K; Hockley, William E; Crump, Matthew J C

    2016-01-01

    False remembering has been examined using a variety of procedures, including the Deese-Roediger-McDermott procedure, the false fame procedure and the two-list recognition procedure. We present six experiments in a different empirical framework examining false recognition of words included in the experimental instructions (instruction-set lures). The data show that participants' false alarm rate to instruction-set lures was twice their false alarm rate to standard lures. That result was statistically robust even when (1) the relative strength of targets to instruction-set lures was increased, (2) participants were warned about the instruction-set lures, (3) the instruction-set lures were camouflaged in the study instructions and (4) the instruction-set lures were presented verbally at study but visually at test. False recognition of instruction-set lures was only mitigated when participants were distracted between encountering the instruction-set lures and studying the training list. The results confirm the ease with which recognition succumbs to familiarity and demonstrate the robustness of false recognition.

  17. Peptide derived from Pvfp-1 as bioadhesive on bio-inert surface.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhen; Yu, Yabiao; Du, Lina; Ding, Xiyu; Xu, Hui; Sun, Yanan; Zhang, Qiqing

    2012-02-01

    Surface property is one important characteristic of materials, especially for ones that are bio-inert but designed for bio-medical application. In this study, we designed a series of peptides and compared their capacities as bioadhesive to improve the surface bioactivity of bio-inert material. The peptides were designed according to the sequence of Perna viridis foot protein 1 (Pvfp-1), one of the Mfp-1s (mussel foot protein 1) which play key roles in wet adhesion of mussel byssus. And the Teflon (PTFE) was chosen as a model of bio-inert material. With adsorption, adhesion and coating analysis, it was found that peptide C2 (M) (derived from the non-repeating region of Pvfp-1, contains modified DOPA) has superior coating and adhesion abilities especially on the bio-inert surface of PTFE. After coating with peptide C2 (M), the cell adhesion and spreading of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells on PTFE were significantly improved compared with those on non-coated surface, and the peptide-coating did not show any cell toxicity. Therefore, peptide C2 (M) is effective for improving the bioactivity of bio-inert PTFE, and could be potentially used as a bioadhesive on other bio-inert materials for biomedical application. Moreover, this study also provided new insights in designing other peptide-based bioadhesive materials.

  18. Justifying all the fuss about false belief.

    PubMed

    Russell, James

    2005-07-01

    The classic study by Wimmer and Perner showed that children below the age of about 4 years of age fail to appreciate others' false beliefs. This opened the floodgates to the theory-of-mind research programme. Recently, a study by Riggs and Simpson has called the central challenge of false belief into question, reporting similar difficulties with true belief. I would argue, however, that not only should the acquisition of false belief remain a central concern but that we should think harder about it and its earlier manifestations.

  19. Visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali Reza; Heydari, Ali Hosain; Abdollahi, Mohammad Hossain; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Dalgleish, Tim; Jobson, Laura

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Scenic False Memory paradigm (SFM, Hauschildt, Peters, Jelinek, & Moritz, 2012) was administered to male Iranian military personnel who had participated in the Iran-Iraq war and were diagnosed with (n = 21) or without (n = 21) PTSD and a sample of healthy male non-trauma-exposed controls (n = 21). Trauma-exposed participants recalled and recognized a significantly lower percentage of hits and a significantly greater percentage of false memories for both trauma-related and non-trauma-related video scenes, than non-trauma-exposed controls. Among the trauma-exposed participants, those with and without PTSD did not differ significantly in terms of percentage of hits and false memories recalled on the SFM. Those with PTSD were found to recognize significantly fewer hits for both the trauma-related and non-trauma-related videos than those without PTSD. Those with PTSD also recognized significantly more false memories for the trauma video scene than the non-PTSD group. The findings suggest that those with trauma exposure, and in particular those with PTSD, may have a greater susceptibility to visual false memory.

  20. False Positive Mammograms and Detection Controlled Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kleit, Andrew N; Ruiz, James F

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the causes of false positive in mammograms. Data Sources Secondary data collected from extracts from computerized medical records from 1999 from five thousand patients at a single hospital in a medium-sized Southern city. Study Design Retrospective analysis of electronic medical data on screening and diagnostic mammograms. Detection-controlled estimation (DCE) was used to compare the efficacy of alternative readers of mammogram films. Analysis was also conducted on follow-up exams of women who tested positive in the first stage of investigation. Key variables included whether the patient had had a prior mammogram, age of the patient, and identifiers for the individual physicians. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Hospital maintains electronic medical records (EMR) on all patients. Extracts were performed on this EMR system under the guidance of clinical expertise. Data were collected for all women who had mammograms in 1999. Random samples were employed for screening mammograms, and all data was used for diagnostic mammograms. Principal Findings Study results imply that access to a previous mammogram greatly reduces the incidence of false positives readings. This has important consequences for benefit-cost, and cost-effectiveness analysis of mammography. Were previous mammograms always available, the results imply the number of false positives would decrease by at least half. The results here also indicate that there is no reason to believe this decrease in false positive would be accompanied by an increase in the number of false negatives. Other attributes also affected the number of false positives. Mondays and Wednesdays appear to be more prone to false positives than the other days in the week. There is also some disparity in false positive outcomes among the five physicians studied. With respect to detection-controlled estimation, the results are mixed. With follow-up data, the DCE estimator appears to generate reasonable, robust

  1. False Memories for Affective Information in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fairfield, Beth; Altamura, Mario; Padalino, Flavia A.; Balzotti, Angela; Di Domenico, Alberto; Mammarella, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown a direct link between memory for emotionally salient experiences and false memories. In particular, emotionally arousing material of negative and positive valence enhanced reality monitoring compared to neutral material since emotional stimuli can be encoded with more contextual details and thereby facilitate the distinction between presented and imagined stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia appear to be impaired in both reality monitoring and memory for emotional experiences. However, the relationship between the emotionality of the to-be-remembered material and false memory occurrence has not yet been studied. In this study, 24 patients and 24 healthy adults completed a false memory task with everyday episodes composed of 12 photographs that depicted positive, negative, or neutral outcomes. Results showed how patients with schizophrenia made a higher number of false memories than normal controls (p < 0.05) when remembering episodes with positive or negative outcomes. The effect of valence was apparent in the patient group. For example, it did not affect the production causal false memories (p > 0.05) resulting from erroneous inferences but did interact with plausible, script consistent errors in patients (i.e., neutral episodes yielded a higher degree of errors than positive and negative episodes). Affective information reduces the probability of generating causal errors in healthy adults but not in patients suggesting that emotional memory impairments may contribute to deficits in reality monitoring in schizophrenia when affective information is involved. PMID:27965600

  2. False Memories for Affective Information in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Beth; Altamura, Mario; Padalino, Flavia A; Balzotti, Angela; Di Domenico, Alberto; Mammarella, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown a direct link between memory for emotionally salient experiences and false memories. In particular, emotionally arousing material of negative and positive valence enhanced reality monitoring compared to neutral material since emotional stimuli can be encoded with more contextual details and thereby facilitate the distinction between presented and imagined stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia appear to be impaired in both reality monitoring and memory for emotional experiences. However, the relationship between the emotionality of the to-be-remembered material and false memory occurrence has not yet been studied. In this study, 24 patients and 24 healthy adults completed a false memory task with everyday episodes composed of 12 photographs that depicted positive, negative, or neutral outcomes. Results showed how patients with schizophrenia made a higher number of false memories than normal controls (p < 0.05) when remembering episodes with positive or negative outcomes. The effect of valence was apparent in the patient group. For example, it did not affect the production causal false memories (p > 0.05) resulting from erroneous inferences but did interact with plausible, script consistent errors in patients (i.e., neutral episodes yielded a higher degree of errors than positive and negative episodes). Affective information reduces the probability of generating causal errors in healthy adults but not in patients suggesting that emotional memory impairments may contribute to deficits in reality monitoring in schizophrenia when affective information is involved.

  3. Learning words from speakers with false beliefs.

    PubMed

    Papafragou, Anna; Fairchild, Sarah; Cohen, Matthew L; Friedberg, Carlyn

    2016-06-21

    During communication, hearers try to infer the speaker's intentions to be able to understand what the speaker means. Nevertheless, whether (and how early) preschoolers track their interlocutors' mental states is still a matter of debate. Furthermore, there is disagreement about how children's ability to consult a speaker's belief in communicative contexts relates to their ability to track someone's belief in non-communicative contexts. Here, we study young children's ability to successfully acquire a word from a speaker with a false belief; we also assess the same children's success on a traditional false belief attribution task. We show that the ability to consult the epistemic state of a speaker during word learning develops between the ages of three and five. We also show that false belief understanding in word-learning contexts proceeds similarly to standard belief-attribution contexts when the tasks are equated. Our data offer evidence for the development of mind-reading abilities during language acquisition.

  4. FALSE MEMORY AND OBSESSIVE–COMPULSIVE SYMPTOMS

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Heide; Amir, Nader; Garfinkel, Sarah N.

    2013-01-01

    Background The memory deficit hypothesis has been used to explain the maintenance of repetitive behavior in individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder, yet the majority of studies focusing on verbal memory show mixed results. These studies primarily evaluated memory accuracy via the inclusion or omission of previously encountered material, as opposed to false recognition (i.e., the inclusion of erroneous material). We evaluated false memories and memory processes in individuals with obsessive–compulsive washing symptoms (OC), individuals matched on depression and anxiety without OC symptoms (D/A), and in nonanxious individuals (NAC). Methods Twenty-eight OC, 28 D/A, and 29 NAC individuals read OC-threat relevant, positive, and neutral scenarios and then performed a recognition test. Erroneous recognition of words associated to encoded, but not previously viewed, scenarios were classified as false memories. To evaluate processes underlying memory, participants completed a modified remember/know task to examine whether the OC individuals differed from the other individuals in recollective clarity for false memories of OC-relevant (e.g., germs), positive (e.g., lottery), and neutral (e.g., bread) material. Results The OC individuals used “know” more than the D/A and NAC individuals for false memories of threat. For veridical memories, the OC individuals used “know” more than the NAC, but not, D/A individuals. Conclusions The greater reliance on “know” (i.e., feelings of familiarity) in general and false threat memories in particular in individuals with OC symptoms may add to feelings of uncertainty for threat-relevant material, which may contribute to compulsive behavior. PMID:18839404

  5. Effect of intrapulmonary hematocrit maldistribution on O2, CO2, and inert gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Young, I H; Wagner, P D

    1979-02-01

    The potential effect of intrapulmonary variations in hematocrit on gas exchange has been studied in theoretical models of the lung containing maldistribution of both hematocrit (Hct) and ventilation-perfusion (VA/Q) ratio. Hematocrit inequality enhanced gas exchange when units of low VA/Q were given a low Hct, arterial PO2 rising by as much as 14 Torr and PCO2 falling by up to 2 Torr depending on the particular distributions of Hct and VA/Q, whereas gas exchange was depressed when units of low VA/Q had a high Hct. After measuring inert gas solubilities in both dog and human blood of different Hct, the effect of Hct inequality on inert gas exchange was similarly assessed. Solubility was found to increase with HCT for less soluble gases. Because of this, conditions for enhancement of inert and O2 exchange by HCt inequality coincided, and it was found that in general the effects on O2 and inert gas transfer were quantitatively internally consistent. Even when Hct inequality was extreme, the resulting perturbation of inert gas concentrations was sufficiently small that the main features of the recovered VA/Q distributions were unaltered.

  6. Effect of inert gas switching at depth on decompression outcome in rats.

    PubMed

    Lillo, R S; MacCallum, M E

    1989-10-01

    The present investigation was performed to determine whether inert gas sequencing at depth would affect decompression outcome in rats via the phenomenon of counterdiffusion. Unanesthetized rats (Rattus norvegicus) were subjected to simulated dives in either air, 79% He-21% O2, or 79% Ar-21% O2; depths ranged from 125 to 175 feet of seawater (4.8-6.3 atmospheres absolute). After 1 h at depth, the dive chamber was vented (with depth held constant) over a 5-min period with the same gas as in the chamber (controls) or one of the other two inert gas-O2 mixtures. After the gas switch, a 5- to 35-min period was allowed for gas exchange between the animals and chamber atmosphere before rapid decompression to the surface. Substantial changes in the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) were observed after the gas switch because of differences in potencies (He less than N2 less than Ar) for causing DCS and gas exchange rates (He greater than Ar greater than N2) among the three gases. Based on the predicted gas exchange rates, transient increases or decreases in total inert gas pressure would be expected to occur during these experimental conditions. Because of differences in gas potencies, DCS risk may not directly follow the changes in total inert gas pressure. In fact, a decline in predicted DCS risk may occur even as total inert gas pressure in increasing.

  7. Feedback control unit with an inerter proof-mass electrodynamic actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zilletti, Michele

    2016-05-01

    In this study the use of an inerter is considered for active vibration control of a structure excited by white noise. The structure is modelled as a single degree of freedom system and the control system consists of a vibration absorber with a mass suspended on a spring, a damper and an inerter. The absorber is equipped with a reactive force transducer in parallel with the passive suspension which is driven with a signal proportional to the velocity of the structure under control measured by an ideal collocated sensor. The effect of the inerter on the control stability and performance of the control system is investigated. It is shown that the effect of the inerter is to reduce the natural frequency of the inertial actuator, improving the stability of the feedback loop and thus its performance. The optimisation of the physical and control parameters of the control system such as the internal damping of the actuator, its natural frequency, its inertance and the feedback gain are considered such that either the kinetic energy of the host structure is minimised or the power dissipated by the control system is maximised.

  8. Report on the source of the electrochemical impedance on cermet inert anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Stice, N.D.

    1991-02-01

    the Inert Electrode Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supported by the Office of Industrial Processes of the US Department of Energy and is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells through the development of inert anodes. The inert anodes currently under study are composed of a cermet material of the general composition NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu. The program has three primary objectives: (a) to evaluate the anode material in a scaled-up, pilot cell facility, (b) to investigate the mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions at the anode surface, and (c) to develop sensors for monitoring anode and/or electrolyte conditions. This report covers the results of a portion of the studies on anode reaction mechanisms. The electrochemical impedances of cermet inert anodes in alumina-saturated molten cryolite as a function of frequency, current density, and time indicated that a significant component of the impedance is due to the gas bubbles produced at the anode during electrolysis. The data also showed a connection between surface structure and impedance that appears to be related to the effects of surface structure on bubble flow. Given the results of this work, it is doubtful that a resistive film contributes significantly to the electrochemical impedances on inert anodes. Properties previously assigned to such a film are more likely due to the bubbles and those factors that affect the properties and dynamics of the bubbles at the anode surface. 12 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Biosafe inertization of municipal solid waste incinerator residues by COSMOS technology.

    PubMed

    Guarienti, Michela; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Bontempi, Elza; Moscoso Cardozo, Sdenka; Borgese, Laura; Zizioli, Daniela; Mitola, Stefania; Depero, Laura E; Presta, Marco

    2014-08-30

    Municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) residues can generate negative environmental impacts when improperly handled. The COlloidal Silica Medium to Obtain Safe inert (COSMOS) technology represents a new method to stabilize MSWI residues and to produce inert safe material. Here we report the results about aquatic biotoxicity of lixiviated MSWI fly ash and the corresponding inertized COSMOS material using a zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo toxicity test. Quantitative assessment of waste biotoxicity included evaluation of mortality rate and of different morphological and teratogenous endpoints in zebrafish embryos exposed to tested materials from 3 to 72h post-fertilization. The results demonstrate that lixiviated MSWI fly ash exerts a dose-dependent lethal effect paralleled by dramatic morphological/teratogenous alterations and apoptotic events in the whole embryo body. Similar effects were observed following MSWI fly ash stabilization in classical concrete matrices, demonstrating that the obtained materials are not biologically safe. On the contrary, no significant mortality and developmental defects were observed in zebrafish embryos exposed to COSMOS inert solution. Our results provide the first experimental in vivo evidence that, in contrast with concrete stabilization procedure, COSMOS technology provides a biologically safe inert.

  10. Infants' Reasoning about Others' False Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Hyun-joo; Baillargeon, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Prior research suggests that children younger than age 3 or 4 do not understand that an agent may be deceived by an object's misleading appearance. The authors asked whether 14.5-month-olds would give evidence in a violation-of-expectation task that they understand that agents may form false perceptions. Infants first watched events in which an…

  11. Development of the False-Memory Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Forrest, T. J.; Karibian, D.; Reyna, V. F.

    2006-01-01

    The counterintuitive developmental trend in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) illusion (that false-memory responses increase with age) was investigated in learning-disabled and nondisabled children from the 6- to 14-year-old age range. Fuzzy-trace theory predicts that because there are qualitative differences in how younger versus older children…

  12. False Accusations of Nosocomial Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John

    1992-01-01

    Practitioners performing routine physical examination may be falsely accused of sexual abuse. Criminal justice system is incompatible with biomedical system of prevention. It is responsible for establishment of sexual abuse industry, practitioners of which have vested interest in maintaining status quo of sexual criminalization. They themselves…

  13. Vendor cited for false PFC savings claim

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstein, I.

    1983-08-29

    A Cynex power factor controller (PFC) vendor claiming a 60% saving was cited by the Better Business Bureau for false advertising after a user survey revealed that savings were only 20% at best. The company plans no future advertising claims, although it insists that 60% savings are possible. The inventor disagrees. (DCK)

  14. How to Justify Teaching False Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Matthew H.

    2008-01-01

    We often knowingly teach false science. Such a practice conflicts with a prima facie pedagogical value placed on teaching only what is true. I argue that only a partial dissolution of the conflict is possible: the proper aim of instruction in science is not to provide an armory of facts about what things the world contains, how they interact, and…

  15. Memory distrust syndrome, confabulation and false confession.

    PubMed

    Gudjonsson, Gisli

    2017-02-01

    There are three types of false confessions: 'voluntary', 'pressured-compliant' and 'pressured-internalized'. On the basis of case studies, in the early 1980s Gudjonsson and MacKeith coined the term 'memory distrust syndrome (MDS)' to describe a condition where people develop profound distrust of their memory and become susceptible to relying on external cues and suggestions from others. Memory distrust can, under certain circumstances, lead to a false confession, particularly of the pressured-internalized type, described as 'confabulation'. This article reviews the evidence for the condition and the psychological mechanism and processes involved. A heuristic model is then presented of a 32 year old man who falsely confessed to murder whilst in police custody. The key elements of the model involve the impact of 'contextual risk factors' (i.e., isolation, long and persistent guilt presumptive interrogation, and high emotional intensity) on 'enduring' vulnerability and 'acute state' factors. The detainee had kept a detailed diary whilst in solitary confinement that provided a unique insight into the gradual development of a MDS, his mental state, and thinking process. This type of false confession is apparently quite rare, but it can occur in intellectually able and educated individuals and involves 'delayed' rather than 'immediate' suggestibility.

  16. Analysis of False Starts in Spontaneous Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shaughnessy, Douglas

    A primary difference between spontaneous speech and read speech concerns the use of false starts, where a speaker interrupts the flow of speech to restart his or her utterance. A study examined the acoustic aspects of such restarts in a widely-used speech database, examining approximately 1000 utterances, about 10% of which contained a restart.…

  17. Underpowered samples, false negatives, and unconscious learning.

    PubMed

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Konstantinidis, Emmanouil; Shanks, David R

    2016-02-01

    The scientific community has witnessed growing concern about the high rate of false positives and unreliable results within the psychological literature, but the harmful impact of false negatives has been largely ignored. False negatives are particularly concerning in research areas where demonstrating the absence of an effect is crucial, such as studies of unconscious or implicit processing. Research on implicit processes seeks evidence of above-chance performance on some implicit behavioral measure at the same time as chance-level performance (that is, a null result) on an explicit measure of awareness. A systematic review of 73 studies of contextual cuing, a popular implicit learning paradigm, involving 181 statistical analyses of awareness tests, reveals how underpowered studies can lead to failure to reject a false null hypothesis. Among the studies that reported sufficient information, the meta-analytic effect size across awareness tests was d z = 0.31 (95 % CI 0.24-0.37), showing that participants' learning in these experiments was conscious. The unusually large number of positive results in this literature cannot be explained by selective publication. Instead, our analyses demonstrate that these tests are typically insensitive and underpowered to detect medium to small, but true, effects in awareness tests. These findings challenge a widespread and theoretically important claim about the extent of unconscious human cognition.

  18. A Synchronization Account of False Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Brendan T.; Jones, Michael N.; Mewhort, Douglas J. K.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a computational model to explain a variety of results in both standard and false recognition. A key attribute of the model is that it uses plausible semantic representations for words, built through exposure to a linguistic corpus. A study list is encoded in the model as a gist trace, similar to the proposal of fuzzy trace theory…

  19. False positive reduction for lung nodule CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Luyin; Boroczky, Lilla; Drysdale, Jeremy; Agnihotri, Lalitha; Lee, Michael C.

    2007-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms 'automatically' identify lung nodules on thoracic multi-slice CT scans (MSCT) thereby providing physicians with a computer-generated 'second opinion'. While CAD systems can achieve high sensitivity, their limited specificity has hindered clinical acceptance. To overcome this problem, we propose a false positive reduction (FPR) system based on image processing and machine learning to reduce the number of false positive lung nodules identified by CAD algorithms and thereby improve system specificity. To discriminate between true and false nodules, twenty-three 3D features were calculated from each candidate nodule's volume of interest (VOI). A genetic algorithm (GA) and support vector machine (SVM) were then used to select an optimal subset of features from this pool of candidate features. Using this feature subset, we trained an SVM classifier to eliminate as many false positives as possible while retaining all the true nodules. To overcome the imbalanced nature of typical datasets (significantly more false positives than true positives), an intelligent data selection algorithm was designed and integrated into the machine learning framework, thus further improving the FPR rate. Three independent datasets were used to train and validate the system. Using two datasets for training and the third for validation, we achieved a 59.4% FPR rate while removing one true nodule on the validation datasets. In a second experiment, 75% of the cases were randomly selected from each of the three datasets and the remaining cases were used for validation. A similar FPR rate and true positive retention rate was achieved. Additional experiments showed that the GA feature selection process integrated with the proposed data selection algorithm outperforms the one without it by 5%-10% FPR rate. The methods proposed can be also applied to other application areas, such as computer-aided diagnosis of lung nodules.

  20. False alarm reduction in critical care.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Gari D; Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Li, Qiao; Kella, Danesh; Chahin, Abdullah; Kooistra, Tristan; Perry, Diane; Mark, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    High false alarm rates in the ICU decrease quality of care by slowing staff response times while increasing patient delirium through noise pollution. The 2015 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge provides a set of 1250 multi-parameter ICU data segments associated with critical arrhythmia alarms, and challenges the general research community to address the issue of false alarm suppression using all available signals. Each data segment was 5 minutes long (for real time analysis), ending at the time of the alarm. For retrospective analysis, we provided a further 30 seconds of data after the alarm was triggered. A total of 750 data segments were made available for training and 500 were held back for testing. Each alarm was reviewed by expert annotators, at least two of whom agreed that the alarm was either true or false. Challenge participants were invited to submit a complete, working algorithm to distinguish true from false alarms, and received a score based on their program's performance on the hidden test set. This score was based on the percentage of alarms correct, but with a penalty that weights the suppression of true alarms five times more heavily than acceptance of false alarms. We provided three example entries based on well-known, open source signal processing algorithms, to serve as a basis for comparison and as a starting point for participants to develop their own code. A total of 38 teams submitted a total of 215 entries in this year's Challenge. This editorial reviews the background issues for this challenge, the design of the challenge itself, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Additionally we make some recommendations for future changes in the field of patient monitoring as a result of the Challenge.

  1. False Belief vs. False Photographs: A Test of Theory of Mind or Working Memory?

    PubMed

    Callejas, Alicia; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Theory of mind (ToM), the ability to reason about other people's thoughts and beliefs, has been traditionally studied in behavioral and neuroimaging experiments by comparing performance in "false belief" and "false photograph" (control) stories. However, some evidence suggests that these stories are not matched in difficulty, complicating the interpretation of results. Here, we more fully evaluated the relative difficulty of comprehending these stories and drawing inferences from them. Subjects read false belief and false photograph stories followed by comprehension questions that probed true ("reality" questions) or false beliefs ("representation" questions) appropriate to the stories. Stories and comprehension questions were read and answered, respectively, more slowly in the false photograph than false belief conditions, indicating their greater difficulty. Interestingly, accuracy on representation questions for false photograph stories was significantly lower than for all other conditions and correlated positively with participants' working memory span scores. These results suggest that drawing representational inferences from false photo stories is particularly difficult and places heavy demands on working memory. Extensive naturalistic practice with ToM reasoning may enable a more flexible and efficient mental representation of false belief stories, resulting in lower memory load requirements. An important implication of these results is that the differential modulation of right temporal-parietal junction (RTPJ) during ToM and "false photo" control conditions may reflect the documented negative correlation of RTPJ activity with working memory load rather than a specialized involvement in ToM processes.

  2. Trade-off between false positives and false negatives in the linkage analysis of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Todorov, A A; Rao, D C

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the issue of false positives in genomic scans for detecting complex trait loci using subpair linkage methods and investigates the trade-off between the rate of false positives and the rate of false negatives. It highlights the tremendous cost in terms of power brought about by an excessive control of type I error and, at the same time, confirms that a larger number of false positives can occur otherwise in the course of a genomic scan. Finally, it compares the power and rate of false positives obtained in preplanned replicated studies conducted using a liberal significance level to those for single-step studies that use the same total sample size but stricter levels of significance. For the models considered here, replicate studies were found more attractive as long as one is willing to accept a trade-off, exchanging a much lower rate of false negatives for a slight increase in the rate of false positives.

  3. Thermodynamic stability and kinetic inertness of a Gd-DTPA bisamide complex grafted onto gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mogilireddy, Vijetha; Déchamps-Olivier, Isabelle; Alric, Christophe; Laurent, Gautier; Laurent, Sophie; Vander Elst, Luce; Muller, Robert; Bazzi, Rana; Roux, Stéphane; Tillement, Olivier; Chuburu, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles coated by gadolinium (III) chelates (Au@DTDTPA) where DTDTPA is a dithiolated bisamide derivative of diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N'',N''-pentaacetic acid (DTPA), constituted contrast agents for both X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. In an MRI context, highly stable Gd(3+) complexes are needed for in vivo applications. Thus, knowledge of the thermodynamic stability and kinetic inertness of these chelates, when grafted onto gold nanoparticles, is crucial since bisamide DTPA chelates are usually less suited for Gd(3+) coordination than DTPA. Therefore, these parameters were evaluated by means of potentiometric titrations and relaxivity measurements. The results showed that, when the chelates were grafted onto the nanoparticle, not only their thermodynamic stability but also their kinetic inertness were improved. These positive effects were correlated to the chelate packing at the nanoparticle surface that stabilized the corresponding Gd(3+) complexes and greatly enhanced their kinetic inertness.

  4. Inert electrode composition having agent for controlling oxide growth on electrode made therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Ray, Siba P.

    1986-01-01

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily. The electrode composition further includes a metal compound dopant which will aid in controlling the thickness of a protective oxide layer on at least the bottom portion of an electrode made therefrom during use.

  5. Carbothermic Reduction of Chromite Ore Under Different Flow Rates of Inert Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dolly; Ranganathan, S.; Sinha, S. N.

    2010-02-01

    The reduction of chromite ore with carbon has been studied extensively in many laboratories. Inert gases have been used in these investigations to control the experimental conditions. However, little information is available in the literature on the influence of the gas flow rate on the rate of reduction. Experiments were carried out to study the influence of the flow rate of inert gas on the reducibility of chromite ore. The experiments showed that the rate of reduction increased with the increasing flow rate of argon up to an optimum flow rate. At higher flow rates, the rate of reduction decreased. The influence of the proportion of reductant on the extent of reduction depended on the rate of flow rate of inert gas. The experimental results are interpreted on the basis of a model that postulates that the mechanism of reduction changes with the flow rate of argon.

  6. Inert electrode composition having agent for controlling oxide growth on electrode made therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Ray, S.P.

    1986-04-15

    An improved inert electrode composition is suitable for use as an inert electrode in the production of metals such as aluminum by the electrolytic reduction of metal oxide or metal salt dissolved in a molten salt bath. The composition comprises one or more metal alloys and metal compounds which may include oxides of the metals comprising the alloy. The alloy and metal compounds are interwoven in a network which provides improved electrical conductivity and mechanical strength while preserving the level of chemical inertness necessary for such an electrode to function satisfactorily. The electrode composition further includes a metal compound dopant which will aid in controlling the thickness of a protective oxide layer on at least the bottom portion of an electrode made therefrom during use. 12 figs.

  7. Absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by falling water droplets in the presence of inert solid particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Hung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Liu, Su-Chin; Chang, I.-Cheng; Shih, Shin-Min

    An experimental analysis of the absorption removal of sulfur dioxide by the free falling water droplets containing the inert solid particles is presented. The wheat flour powder is introduced as the inert solid particles. Tests with and without the flour powder in the water droplets are examined. The mass fluxes and mass transfer coefficients of SO 2 for the cases with and without the flour powder are compared to elucidate the effects of the inert solid particles contained in the water droplets on the gas absorption. The results indicate aignificant difference between the two cases for the concentrations of the flour powder in the absorbent droplets ( Cs) within the ranges of the experimental conditions, namely 0.1 to 10 wt% flour powder in the absorbent droplets. In general, the inert solid particles of the flour powder as the impurities in the water droplets tend to decrease the SO 2 absorption rate for the experimental absorption system under investigation. Various values of Cs cause various levels of the interfacial resistance and affect the gas absorption rate. The interfacial resistance is recognized by introducing an interfacial mass transfer coefficient ks with its reciprocal being proportional to the magnitude of the interfacial resistance. The values of 1/ ks may be computed by the use of the equation 1/ ks=(1/ KOLs-1/ KOL), where KOLs and KOL are the overall liquid-phase mass transfer coefficients with and without the inert solid particles, respectively. The values of ks with Cs of 0.1 to 10 wt% are about 0.295-0.032 cms -1 for absorbing 1000-3000 ppmv SO 2 with the water droplets. This kind of information is useful for the SO 2 removal and the information of acid rain that the impurities of the inert solid particles contaminate the water droplets.

  8. The problem with false vacuum Higgs inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Grothaus, Philipp; Hogan, Robert

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the possibility of using the only known fundamental scalar, the Higgs, as an inflaton with minimal coupling to gravity. The peculiar appearance of a plateau or a false vacuum in the renormalised effective scalar potential suggests that the Higgs might drive inflation. For the case of a false vacuum we use an additional singlet scalar field, motivated by the strong CP problem, and its coupling to the Higgs to lift the barrier allowing for a graceful exit from inflation by mimicking hybrid inflation. We find that this scenario is incompatible with current measurements of the Higgs mass and the QCD coupling constant and conclude that the Higgs can only be the inflaton in more complicated scenarios.

  9. Accounting for false negatives in hotspot detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Wilson, John E.

    2007-08-28

    Hotspot sampling designs are used in environmental sampling to identify the location of one (or more) contiguous regions of elevated contamination. These regions are known as hotspots. The problem of how to calculate the probability of detecting an elliptical hotspot using a rectangular or triangular grid of sampling points was addressed by Singer and Wickman in 1969. This approach presumed that any sample which coincided with a hotspot would detect the hotspot without error. However, for many sampling methodologies, there is a chance that the hotspot will not be detected even though it has been sampled directly--a false negative. We present a mathematical solution and a numerical algorithm which account for false negatives when calculating the probability of detecting hotspots that are circular in shape.

  10. Cosmic chirality both true and false.

    PubMed

    Barron, Laurence D

    2012-12-01

    The discrete symmetries of parity P, time reversal T, and charge conjugation C may be used to characterize the properties of chiral systems. It is well known that parity violation infiltrates into ordinary matter via an interaction between the nucleons and electrons, mediated by the Z(0) particle, that lifts the degeneracy of the mirror-image enantiomers of a chiral molecule. Being odd under P but even under T, this P-violating interaction exhibits true chirality and so may induce absolute enantioselection under all circumstances. It has been suggested that CP violation may also infiltrate into ordinary matter via a P-odd, T-odd interaction mediated by the (as yet undetected) axion. This CP-violating interaction exhibits false chirality and so may induce absolute enantioselection in processes far from equilibrium. Both true and false cosmic chirality should be considered together as possible sources of homochirality in the molecules of life.

  11. Spirit Beholds Bumpy Boulder (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit began collecting images for a 360-degree panorama of new terrain, the rover captured this view of a dark boulder with an interesting surface texture. The boulder sits about 40 centimeters (16 inches) tall on Martian sand about 5 meters (16 feet) away from Spirit. It is one of many dark, volcanic rock fragments -- many pocked with rounded holes called vesicles -- littering the slope of 'Low Ridge.' The rock surface facing the rover is similar in appearance to the surface texture on the outside of lava flows on Earth.

    Spirit took this false-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 810th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 13, 2006). This image is a false-color rendering using camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

  12. Constrained potential method for false vacuum decays

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-hyeon

    2011-02-01

    A procedure is reported for numerical analysis of false vacuum transition in a model with multiple scalar fields. It is a refined version of the approach by Konstandin and Huber. The alteration makes it possible to tackle a class of problems that was difficult or unsolvable with the original method, i.e. those with a distant or nonexistent true vacuum. An example with an unbounded-from-below direction is presented.

  13. False Context Fear Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Sarah; Holmes, Nathan M.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control…

  14. False memories in Lewy-body disease.

    PubMed

    Algarabel, Salvador; Pitarque, Alfonso; Sales, Alicia; Meléndez, Juan Carlos; Escudero, Joaquín

    2015-12-01

    Recently, de Boysson, Belleville, Phillips et al. (2011) found that patients with Lewy-body disease (LBD) showed significantly lower rates of false memories than healthy controls, using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) experimental procedure. Given that this result could be explained by the practically null rate of true recognition in the LBD group (0.09), we decided to replicate the study by de Boysson et al. (2011), but including a new condition that would maximize the true recognition rate (and analyze its effect on the rate of false memories). Specifically, in a DRM experiment, we manipulated (within subjects) two study and recognition conditions: in the "immediate" condition, both the LBD patients and the control group of healthy older people received a different recognition test after each study list (containing twelve words associated with a non-presented critical word), while in the "delayed" condition (similar to the one in de Boysson et al., 2011), the participants received the entire series of study lists and then took only one recognition test. The results showed that, in both samples, the "immediate" condition produced higher corrected rates of both true and false recognition than the "delayed" condition, although they were both lower in the LBD patients, which shows that these patients are capable of encoding and recognizing the general similitude underlying information (gist memory) in the right conditions.

  15. Infants’ Reasoning About Others’ False Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-joo; Baillargeon, Renée

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that children younger than age 3 or 4 do not understand that an agent may be deceived by an object’s misleading appearance. The authors asked whether 14.5-month-olds would give evidence in a violation-of-expectation task that they understand that agents may form false perceptions. Infants first watched events in which an agent faced a stuffed skunk and a doll with blue pigtails; the agent consistently reached for the doll, suggesting that she preferred it over the skunk. Next, while the agent was absent, the doll was hidden in a plain box, and the skunk was hidden in a box with a tuft of blue hair protruding from under its lid. Infants expected the agent to be misled by the tuft’s resemblance to the doll’s hair and to falsely perceive it as belonging to the doll. These and other results indicate that 14.5-month-old infants can already reason about agents’ false perceptions. PMID:18999340

  16. False Beliefs in Unreliable Knowledge Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, Evangelos; Varsakelis, Nikos; Antoniou, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this work are: (1) to extend knowledge dynamics analysis in order to assess the influence of false beliefs and unreliable communication channels, (2) to investigate the impact of selection rule-policy for knowledge acquisition, (3) to investigate the impact of targeted link attacks ("breaks" or "infections") of certain "healthy" communication channels. We examine the knowledge dynamics analytically, as well as by simulations on both artificial and real organizational knowledge networks. The main findings are: (1) False beliefs have no significant influence on knowledge dynamics, while unreliable communication channels result in non-monotonic knowledge updates ("wild" knowledge fluctuations may appear) and in significant elongation of knowledge attainment. Moreover, false beliefs may emerge during knowledge evolution, due to the presence of unreliable communication channels, even if they were not present initially, (2) Changing the selection rule-policy, by raising the awareness of agents to avoid the selection of unreliable communication channels, results in monotonic knowledge upgrade and in faster knowledge attainment, (3) "Infecting" links is more harmful than "breaking" links, due to "wild" knowledge fluctuations and due to the elongation of knowledge attainment. Moreover, attacking even a "small" percentage of links (≤5%) with high knowledge transfer, may result in dramatic elongation of knowledge attainment (over 100%), as well as in delays of the onset of knowledge attainment. Hence, links of high knowledge transfer should be protected, because in Information Warfare and Disinformation, these links are the "best targets".

  17. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1998-04-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger, and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  18. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, S.H.; Pigott, W.R.

    1997-12-30

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area. 3 figs.

  19. Continuous injection of an inert gas through a drill rig for drilling into potentially hazardous areas

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, Steve H.; Pigott, William R.

    1997-01-01

    A drill rig for drilling in potentially hazardous areas includes a drill having conventional features such as a frame, a gear motor, gear box, and a drive. A hollow rotating shaft projects through the drive and frame. An auger, connected to the shaft is provided with a multiplicity of holes. An inert gas is supplied to the hollow shaft and directed from the rotating shaft to the holes in the auger. The inert gas flows down the hollow shaft, and then down the hollow auger and out through the holes in the bottom of the auger into the potentially hazardous area.

  20. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs.

  1. A steam inerting system for hydrogen disposal for the Vandenberg Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belknap, Stuart B.

    1988-01-01

    A two-year feasibility and test program to solve the problem of unburned confined hydrogen at the Vandenberg Space Launch Complex Six (SLC-6) during Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) firings is discussed. A novel steam inerting design was selected for development. Available sound suppression water is superheated to flash to steam at the duct entrance. Testing, analysis, and design during 1987 showed that the steam inerting system (SIS) solves the problem and meets other flight-critical system requirements. The SIS design is complete and available for installation at SLC-6 to support shuttle or derivative vehicles.

  2. Three Extra Mirror or Sequential Families: Case for a Heavy Higgs Boson and Inert Doublet

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Homero; Melfo, Alejandra; Nesti, Fabrizio; Senjanovic, Goran

    2011-05-13

    We study the possibility of the existence of extra fermion families and an extra Higgs doublet. We find that requiring the extra Higgs doublet to be inert leaves space for three extra families, allowing for mirror fermion families and a dark matter candidate at the same time. The emerging scenario is very predictive: It consists of a standard model Higgs boson, with a mass above 400 GeV, heavy new quarks between 340 and 500 GeV, light extra neutral leptons, and an inert scalar with a mass below M{sub Z}.

  3. A closer look at self-reported suicide attempts: false positives and false negatives.

    PubMed

    Plöderl, Martin; Kralovec, Karl; Yazdi, Kurosch; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2011-02-01

    The validity of self-reported suicide attempt information is undermined by false positives (e.g., incidences without intent to die), or by unreported suicide attempts, referred to as false negatives. In a sample of 1,385 Austrian adults, we explored the occurrence of false positives and false negatives with detailed, probing questions. Removing false positives decreased the rate of suicide attempters from 4.3% to 2.7%. Probing questions also revealed 0.8% false negatives. We recommend using probing questions with both those who report a suicide attempt and those who do not report a suicide attempt to increase the validity of self-reported suicide-related information.

  4. Universal process-inert encoding architecture for polymer microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jiseok; Bisso, Paul W.; Srinivas, Rathi L.; Kim, Jae Jung; Swiston, Albert J.; Doyle, Patrick S.

    2014-05-01

    Polymer microparticles with unique, decodable identities are versatile information carriers with a small footprint. Widespread incorporation into industrial processes, however, is limited by a trade-off between encoding density, scalability and decoding robustness in diverse physicochemical environments. Here, we report an encoding strategy that combines spatial patterning with rare-earth upconversion nanocrystals, single-wavelength near-infrared excitation and portable CCD (charge-coupled device)-based decoding to distinguish particles synthesized by means of flow lithography. This architecture exhibits large, exponentially scalable encoding capacities (>106 particles), an ultralow decoding false-alarm rate (<10-9), the ability to manipulate particles by applying magnetic fields, and pronounced insensitivity to both particle chemistry and harsh processing conditions. We demonstrate quantitative agreement between observed and predicted decoding for a range of practical applications with orthogonal requirements, including covert multiparticle barcoding of pharmaceutical packaging (refractive-index matching), multiplexed microRNA detection (biocompatibility) and embedded labelling of high-temperature-cast objects (temperature resistance).

  5. False negative clinical diagnoses of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Osborne, J E; Bourke, J F; Graham-Brown, R A; Hutchinson, P E

    1999-05-01

    The false negative rate for the clinical diagnosis (FNR) for malignant melanoma is reported to be of the order of 20-50%. The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictor variables for FNR, with particular reference to the features and score of the seven-point check-list within the total population (778) of histologically proved malignant melanomas presenting in Leicestershire between 1982 and 1996. The FNR was 18.5%. The check-list would have failed as a referral indication in only 0.8-1. 1% of the lesions. The major check-list features occurred more commonly than the minor features, excepting size >/= 7 mm, confirming the diagnostic importance of the major criteria. The FNR was unaffected by age or sex. More rarely involved sites had higher rates (31-42%), and the face was a particularly difficult diagnostic site. Clinical features of lesions associated with a higher FNR were lack of irregular pigmentation and shape, altered sensation, the presence of inflammation and size < 7 mm. The FNR was inversely related to the total score and major feature score, but directly related to the minor score. The minor features, in addition to the major features, are potentially valuable in avoiding false negative diagnoses and we suggest their retention as part of the check-list. There was only one patient, in whom the diagnosis of melanoma was initially missed and who was not biopsied on presentation to hospital, who re-presented after 1 year. However, the study illustrates the importance of avoiding a false negative diagnosis as there was marked delay in the excision of such lesions.

  6. Uranus in True and False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    These two pictures of Uranus -- one in true color (left) and the other in false color -- were compiled from images returned Jan. 17, 1986, by the narrow-angle camera of Voyager 2. The spacecraft was 9.1 million kilometers (5.7 million miles) from the planet, several days from closest approach. The picture at left has been processed to show Uranus as human eyes would see it from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The picture is a composite of images taken through blue, green and orange filters. The darker shadings at the upper right of the disk correspond to the day-night boundary on the planet. Beyond this boundary lies the hidden northern hemisphere of Uranus, which currently remains in total darkness as the planet rotates. The blue-green color results from the absorption of red light by methane gas in Uranus' deep, cold and remarkably clear atmosphere. The picture at right uses false color and extreme contrast enhancement to bring out subtle details in the polar region of Uranus. Images obtained through ultraviolet, violet and orange filters were respectively converted to the same blue, green and red colors used to produce the picture at left. The very slight contrasts visible in true color are greatly exaggerated here. In this false-color picture, Uranus reveals a dark polar hood surrounded by a series of progressively lighter concentric bands. One possible explanation is that a brownish haze or smog, concentrated over the pole, is arranged into bands by zonal motions of the upper atmosphere. The bright orange and yellow strip at the lower edge of the planet's limb is an artifact of the image enhancement. In fact, the limb is dark and uniform in color around the planet. The Voyager project is manages for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  7. False discovery rates in spectral identification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyowon; Kim, Sangtae; Bandeira, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Automated database search engines are one of the fundamental engines of high-throughput proteomics enabling daily identifications of hundreds of thousands of peptides and proteins from tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. Nevertheless, this automation also makes it humanly impossible to manually validate the vast lists of resulting identifications from such high-throughput searches. This challenge is usually addressed by using a Target-Decoy Approach (TDA) to impose an empirical False Discovery Rate (FDR) at a pre-determined threshold x% with the expectation that at most x% of the returned identifications would be false positives. But despite the fundamental importance of FDR estimates in ensuring the utility of large lists of identifications, there is surprisingly little consensus on exactly how TDA should be applied to minimize the chances of biased FDR estimates. In fact, since less rigorous TDA/FDR estimates tend to result in more identifications (at higher 'true' FDR), there is often little incentive to enforce strict TDA/FDR procedures in studies where the major metric of success is the size of the list of identifications and there are no follow up studies imposing hard cost constraints on the number of reported false positives. Here we address the problem of the accuracy of TDA estimates of empirical FDR. Using MS/MS spectra from samples where we were able to define a factual FDR estimator of 'true' FDR we evaluate several popular variants of the TDA procedure in a variety of database search contexts. We show that the fraction of false identifications can sometimes be over 10× higher than reported and may be unavoidably high for certain types of searches. In addition, we further report that the two-pass search strategy seems the most promising database search strategy. While unavoidably constrained by the particulars of any specific evaluation dataset, our observations support a series of recommendations towards maximizing the number of resulting

  8. Maltreatment increases spontaneous false memories but decreases suggestion-induced false memories in children.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Muris, Peter

    2017-01-17

    We examined the creation of spontaneous and suggestion-induced false memories in maltreated and non-maltreated children. Maltreated and non-maltreated children were involved in a Deese-Roediger-McDermott false memory paradigm where they studied and remembered negative and neutral word lists. Suggestion-induced false memories were created using a misinformation procedure during which both maltreated and non-maltreated children viewed a negative video (i.e., bank robbery) and later received suggestive misinformation concerning the event. Our results showed that maltreated children had higher levels of spontaneous negative false memories but lower levels of suggestion-induced false memories as compared to non-maltreated children. Collectively, our study demonstrates that maltreatment both increases and decreases susceptibility to memory illusions depending on the type of false memory being induced. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Trauma affects memory. It is unclear how trauma affects false memory. What does this study add? This study focuses on two types of false memories.

  9. On False-Positive and False-Negative Decisions with a Mastery Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Rand R.

    Wilcox (1977) examines two methods of estimating the probability of a false-positive on false-negative decision with a mastery test. Both procedures make assumptions about the form of the true score distribution which might not give good results in all situations. In this paper, upper and lower bounds on the two possible error types are described…

  10. False alarm reduction during landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, P. J.; Chongpison, A.; Doraisamy, L.

    2007-04-01

    Quadrupole Resonance sensors have the unique capability of detecting explosives from buried, plastic-cased antipersonnel and antitank landmines. The chemical specificity of this radio-frequency technique provides the potential to deliver remarkably low false alarm rates during landmine detection. This is of particular importance to deminers, who frequently come across numerous clutter items before uncovering a mine. Quadrupole Resonance is typically utilized in a confirmation mode; preceded by rapid primary scans carried out by, for example, metal detectors, ground penetrating radars or a fusion of these. Significant technical and scientific advances have resulted in the fabrication of handheld and vehicle mounted Quadrupole Resonance landmine detectors in compact, power-efficient configurations. The development work is focused on baseline sensitivity increase, as well as the achievement of high detection performance under field conditions. The mine detection capability of Quadrupole Resonance detectors has been evaluated during various blind tests. A modular handheld unit, combining primary and confirmation sensors, was designed to be operated by a single person. A series of field tests demonstrate the unique capability of Quadrupole Resonance for significant false alarm reduction.

  11. Highly sensitive solids mass spectrometer uses inert-gas ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Mass spectrometer provides a recorded analysis of solid material surfaces and bulk. A beam of high-energy inert-gas ions bombards the surface atoms of a sample and converts a percentage into an ionized vapor. The mass spectrum analyzer separates the vapor ionic constituents by mass-to-charge ratio.

  12. a Study of Behavior of Inert Gases in Some Candidate Materials for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C. H.; Chen, K. Q.; Wang, Y. S.; Sun, J. G.; Hu, B. F.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2003-06-01

    This paper gives a review of our study of inert gases (helium, argon) in several materials candidate to future fusion reactors. The study is focused on the agglomeration of gas atoms and formation of nanoscale cavities in several materials including stainless steels and silicon carbide under irradiation with ions with energy ranging from 10 keV to 100 MeV.

  13. ATR-FTIR measurements of albumin and fibrinogen adsorption: Inert versus calcium phosphate ceramics.

    PubMed

    Boix, Marcel; Eslava, Salvador; Costa Machado, Gil; Gosselin, Emmanuel; Ni, Na; Saiz, Eduardo; De Coninck, Joël

    2015-11-01

    Arthritis, bone fracture, bone tumors and other musculoskeletal diseases affect millions of people across the world. Nowadays, inert and bioactive ceramics are used as bone substitutes or for bone regeneration. Their bioactivity is very much dictated by the way proteins adsorb on their surface. In this work, we compared the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on inert and calcium phosphates ceramics (CaPs) using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) to follow in situ protein adsorption on these materials. To this effect, we developed a sol-gel technique to control the surface chemistry of an ATR-FTIR detector. Hydroxyapatite adsorbed more albumin and β-tricalcium phosphate adsorbed more fibrinogen. Biphasic calcium phosphate presented the lowest adsorption among CaP for both proteins, illustrating the effect of surface heterogeneities. Inert ceramics adsorbed a lower amount of both proteins compared with bioactive ceramics. A significant change was observed in the conformation of the adsorbed protein versus the surface chemistry. Hydroxyapatite produced a larger loss of α-helix structure on albumin and biphasic calcium phosphate reduced β-sheet percentage on fibrinogen. Inert ceramics produced large α-helix loss on albumin and presented weak interaction with fibrinogen. Zirconia did not adsorb albumin and titanium dioxide promoted huge denaturalization of fibrinogen.

  14. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    DOEpatents

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  15. YOUNG INFANTS’ REASONING ABOUT PHYSICAL EVENTS INVOLVING INERT AND SELF-PROPELLED OBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuyan; Kaufman, Lisa; Baillargeon, Renée

    2009-01-01

    The present research examined whether 5- to 6.5-month-old infants would hold different expectations about various physical events involving a box after receiving evidence that it was either inert or self-propelled. Infants were surprised if the inert but not the self-propelled box: reversed direction spontaneously (Experiment 1); remained stationary when hit or pulled (Experiments 3 and 3A); remained stable when released in midair or with inadequate support from a platform (Experiment 4); or disappeared when briefly hidden by one of two adjacent screens (the second screen provided the self-propelled box with an alternative hiding place; Experiment 5). On the other hand, infants were surprised if the inert or the self-propelled box appeared to pass through an obstacle (Experiment 2) or disappeared when briefly hidden by a single screen (Experiment 5). The present results indicate that infants as young as 5 months of age distinguish between inert and self-propelled objects and hold different expectations for physical events involving these objects, even when incidental differences between the objects are controlled. These findings are consistent with the proposal by Gelman (1990), Leslie (1994), and others that infants endow self-propelled objects with an internal source of energy. Possible links between infants’ concepts of self-propelled object, agent, and animal are also discussed. PMID:19232579

  16. Does the Addition of Inert Gases at Constant Volume and Temperature Affect Chemical Equilibrium?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paiva, Joao C. M.; Goncalves, Jorge; Fonseca, Susana

    2008-01-01

    In this article we examine three approaches, leading to different conclusions, for answering the question "Does the addition of inert gases at constant volume and temperature modify the state of equilibrium?" In the first approach, the answer is yes as a result of a common students' alternative conception; the second approach, valid only for ideal…

  17. Mit Training vom Tragen Wissen zum Kompetenten Handeln? (With Training from Inert Knowledge to Competent Acting?).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Diethelm

    2002-01-01

    Argues that all forms of education have difficulty moving from knowledge to competent acting. Discusses practical exercise as an alternative to bridge the gap. Recognizes that exercises have to be embedded in trans-situational aims and planning and must include inert emotions. Proposes different training schemes for methodological-didactic and…

  18. Quasi-static vapor pressure measurements on reactive systems in inert atmosphere box

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, A. K.

    1968-01-01

    Apparatus makes vapor pressure measurements on air-sensitive systems in an inert atmosphere glove box. Once the apparatus is loaded with the sample and all connections made, all measuring operations may be performed outside the box. The apparatus is a single-tube adaptation of the double-tube quasi-static technique.

  19. Adhesion of biofilms to inert surfaces: A molecular level approach directed at the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Baty, A M; Frølund, B; Geesey, G G; Langille, S; Quintero, E J; Suci, P A; Weiner, R M

    1996-01-01

    Protein/ligand interactions involved in mediating adhesion between microorganisms and biological surfaces have been well-characterized in some cases (e.g. pathogen/host interactions). The strategies microorganisms employ for attachment to inert surfaces have not been so clearly elucidated. An experimental approach is presented which addresses the issues from the point of view of molecular interactions occurring at the interface.

  20. Improved design of dynamic vibration absorber by using the inerter and its application in vehicle suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yujie; Chen, Long; Yang, Xiaofeng; Shi, Dehua; Yang, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Inerter is a recently proposed mechanical element with two terminals. The novelty of this paper is to present the improved design which aims to add traditional dynamic vibration absorber to the vehicle body by using the inerter. Based on this background, a new vehicle suspension structure called ISD suspension, including the inerter, spring and damper has been created. A dual-mass vibration model including the ISD suspension is considered in this study. Parameters are obtained by using the genetic optimizing algorithm. The frequency-domain simulation confirms that the ISD suspension can effectively improve the damping performance of the suspension system, especially at the offset frequency of the vehicle body, which is consistent with the feature of the dynamic vibration absorber added to the vehicle body mass. At last, a prototype ball screw inerter has been designed and the bench test of a quarter-car model has been undertaken. Under the conditions of the random road input, the vehicle ride comfort evaluation of body acceleration RMS value decreases by 4% at most, the suspension deflection RMS value decreases by 16% at most, the tire dynamic load RMS value decreases by 6% at most. Power spectral density results also indicate that the ISD suspension has superior damping performance than passive suspension which proves that the proposed ISD suspension is deemed effective.