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Sample records for 2011-2013 cal poly

  1. Solar CalPoly

    SciTech Connect

    Stannard, Sandra

    2016-06-15

    The target budget of INhouse was about $650,000 for all materials and student expenses of the Solar Decathlon competition. In order to reach our goal, Cal Poly students and faculty worked with the College of Architecture and Environmental Design’s External Relations office to actively fundraise for INhouse. Students connected with Cal Poly alumni through phone calls, postal mail, email, and live presentations to reach as many alumni in the state of California as possible. Before construction begun, students and faculty met on a weekly basis to determine what brands of materials for the home to use and who would be responsible for reaching out to the company to seek a donation. Our College of Architecture and Environmental Design’s administration was essential in helping us fundraise. For some time, the college was hoping to depend on about half of our fundraising expenses to be covered through the sale of INhouse. However, plans to sell the home fell through during the design development phase; the college turned to the sale of a different asset in to help us meet our goal. If we were to do this project again, completing the design concept and securing a future location of our home sooner would have enhanced our fundraising activities.

  2. 26-Hours at Cal Poly: A Recruitment Strategy Targeting Underrepresented Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Bob; Kellogg, Bill

    The Agriculture Education Department at California Polytechnic State University conducted a program to recruit Black and Hispanic students for the school's agriculture programs during spring 1988 and twice since then. High school sophomores and juniors in Los Angeles were invited to Cal Poly for a 26-hour program of workshops designed to include a…

  3. Mapping Site Response Parameters on Cal Poly Pomona Campus Using the Spectral Ratio Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HO, K. Y. K.; Polet, J.

    2014-12-01

    Site characteristics are an important factor in earthquake hazard assessment. To better understand site response differences on a small scale, as well as the seismic hazard of the area, we develop site response parameter maps of Cal Poly Pomona campus. Cal Poly Pomona is located in southern California about 40 km east of Los Angeles, within 50 km of San Andreas Fault. The campus is situated on top of the San Jose Fault. With about twenty two thousand students on campus, it is important to know the site response in this area. To this end, we apply the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) spectral ratio technique, which is an empirical method that can be used in an urban environment with no environmental impact. This well-established method is based on the computation of the ratio of vertical ambient noise ground motion over horizontal ambient noise ground motion as a function of frequency. By applying the spectral ratio method and the criteria from Site Effects Assessment Using Ambient Excitations (SESAME) guidelines, we can determine fundamental frequency and a minimum site amplification factor. We installed broadband seismometers throughout the Cal Poly Pomona campus, with an initial number of about 15 sites. The sites are approximately 50 to 150 meters apart and about two hours of waveforms were recorded at each site. We used the Geopsy software to make measurements of the peak frequency and the amplitude of the main peak from the spectral ratio. These two parameters have been determined to be estimates of fundamental frequency and a minimum site amplification factor, respectively. Based on the geological map from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and our data collected from Cal Poly Pomona campus, our preliminary results suggest that the area of campus that is covered by alluvial fan material tends to have a single significant spectral peak with a fundamental frequency of ~1Hz and a minimum amplification factor of ~3.7. The minimum depth of the surface layer is about 56

  4. Energy, Sustainability, Collaboration: Learning it, Teaching it, and Living it -- At Cal Poly, in Guatemala, and at Home

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Pete

    2012-11-01

    Three questions have become important to me: *``What is the future of our energy dilemma, and how can I participate toward a solution?'' Since 2007, I have been teaching ``Energy, Society, and the Environment'' at Cal Poly as well as developing and analyzing renewable energy technologies. In the process I have learned as much as my students. This interest was initially sparked by making ``sustainable'' changes to my home and lifestyle, and has since fueled constant domestic experimentation. *The above question extends to ``Environmental Justice'', which is essentially a question of ``who benefits and who suffers as a result of our societal choices?'' For the past three years, I've developed and directed a collaborative (Guatemalan/Cal Poly) appropriate technology field school. Students from both countries learn together during the two-month summer program in a small mountain village in Guatemala (www.guateca.com). *``What happens to learning efficacy when students become friends?'' For the past three years, I've been actively engaged with a group of Cal Poly instructors in a quest to create community in the learning environment (www.sustainslo.org). Additionally, I've begun to teach all my classes ``inside out'', consistent with the advice of Physics Nobel Prize Laureate Carl Weiman (Science, 13 May 2011, VOL 332 862 -- 864). Students learn the material at home by reading or watching videos available on the web. This opens up class time for guided discussion, experimentation, and calculations. The Guateca field school provides an extreme example of this principle, as all the students do become friends. with very interesting results.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Chikungunya Virus, Philippines, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Sy, Ava Kristy; Saito-Obata, Mariko; Medado, Inez Andrea; Tohma, Kentaro; Dapat, Clyde; Segubre-Mercado, Edelwisa; Tandoc, Amado; Lupisan, Socorro; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2016-05-01

    During 2011-2013, a nationwide outbreak of chikungunya virus infection occurred in the Philippines. The Asian genotype was identified as the predominant genotype; sporadic cases of the East/Central/South African genotype were detected in Mindanao. Further monitoring is needed to define the transmission pattern of this virus in the Philippines.

  6. Shallow Subsurface Resistivity Profiles Across the San Jose Fault As It Transects the Cal Poly Pomona Campus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantrapornlert, K. J.; Polet, J.; Colin, H.

    2015-12-01

    The San Jose fault is a left-lateral strike-slip fault located in the San Gabriel Valley in Southern California. The 1988 (M4.6) and 1990 (M5.2) Upland earthquakes have been attributed to this fault and it has been suggested that it is capable of producing a magnitude M6.0-6.5 earthquake. Sections of the fault are considered to run through the campus of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona as inferred from a 2001 geotechnical engineering report (Geocon, 2001). As it cuts across the campus, the geotechnical engineering report concluded that it has a reverse component of motion. Ascertaining the precise location of the San Jose fault traces on campus is crucial as the university plans its future buildings. Resistivity surveys were conducted across several suggested traces of the fault. The surveys consisted of 24 electrodes in a Wenner electrode configuration with an electrode spacing that varies between 1-5m. An IRIS Instruments Syscal KID switcher unit provided the power source and data recording hardware. The data was processed using IRIS Prosys II software suite before using Geotomo's Res2Dinv software to obtain 2D images of subsurface resistivity for these profiles. A total of 23 surveys were conducted throughout the campus. Surveys were performed before and after rainfall to compensate for the variation of water content and its effect on resistivity. Preliminary results indicate shallow, north-dipping contrasts in resistivity across many of the areas where the fault was previously identified in the Geocon 2001 report. More data will be analyzed to present an enhanced understanding of the San Jose fault in the vicinity of the Cal Poly Pomona campus at AGU.

  7. ESO Science Outreach Network in Poland during 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czart, Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    ESON Poland works since 2010. One of the main tasks of the ESO Science Outreach Network (ESON) is translation of various materials at ESO website, as well as contacts with journalists. We support also science festivals, conferences, contests, exhibitions, astronomy camps and workshops and other educational and outreach activities. During 2011-2013 we supported events like ESO Astronomy Camp 2013, ESO Industry Days in Warsaw, Warsaw Science Festival, Torun Festival of Science and Art, international astronomy olympiad held in Poland and many others. Among big tasks there was also translation of over 60 ESOcast movies.

  8. Mode switching in volcanic seismicity: El Hierro 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Nick S.; Bell, Andrew F.; Main, Ian G.

    2016-05-01

    The Gutenberg-Richter b value is commonly used in volcanic eruption forecasting to infer material or mechanical properties from earthquake distributions. Such studies typically analyze discrete time windows or phases, but the choice of such windows is subjective and can introduce significant bias. Here we minimize this sample bias by iteratively sampling catalogs with randomly chosen windows and then stack the resulting probability density functions for the estimated b>˜ value to determine a net probability density function. We examine data from the El Hierro seismic catalog during a period of unrest in 2011-2013 and demonstrate clear multimodal behavior. Individual modes are relatively stable in time, but the most probable b>˜ value intermittently switches between modes, one of which is similar to that of tectonic seismicity. Multimodality is primarily associated with intermittent activation and cessation of activity in different parts of the volcanic system rather than with respect to any systematic inferred underlying process.

  9. Viral Hepatitis Surveillance--India, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tripurari; Shrivastava, Aakash; Kumar, Anil; Laserson, Kayla F; Narain, Jai P; Venkatesh, Srinivasaraghavan; Chauhan, Lakhbir S; Averhoff, Francisco

    2015-07-24

    The burden of viral hepatitis in India is not well characterized. In 2009, the national Integrated Disease Surveillance Programme (IDSP) began conducting surveillance across all Indian states for epidemic-prone diseases, including foodborne and waterborne forms of viral hepatitis (e.g., hepatitis A and E). Information on outbreaks of all forms of viral hepatitis, including A, B, C, and E, also is collected. This report summarizes viral hepatitis surveillance and outbreak data reported to IDSP during 2011-2013. During this period, 804,782 hepatitis cases and 291 outbreaks were reported; the virus type was unspecified in 92% of cases. Among 599,605 cases tested for hepatitis A, 44,663 (7.4%) were positive, and among 187,040 tested for hepatitis E, 19,508 (10.4%) were positive. At least one hepatitis outbreak report was received from 23 (66%) of 35 Indian states. Two-thirds of outbreaks were reported from rural areas. Among 163 (56%) outbreaks with known etiology, 78 (48%) were caused by hepatitis E, 54 (33%) by hepatitis A, 19 (12%) by both hepatitis A and E, and 12 (7%) by hepatitis B or hepatitis C. Contaminated drinking water was the source of most outbreaks. Improvements in water quality and sanitation as well as inclusion of hepatitis A vaccine in childhood immunization programs should be considered to reduce the public health burden of hepatitis in India. Efforts to decrease the proportion of cases for which the etiology is unspecified, including expanding the IDSP to support hepatitis B and C testing, might help further elucidate the epidemiology of these diseases.

  10. Symptomatic Exposures Among California Inmates 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Michael; Al-Abri, Suad; Huntington, Serena; Carlson, Terry; Geller, Richard J; Olson, Kent R

    2015-09-01

    Prisoners have a high prevalence of substance misuse and abuse, but few studies have examined symptomatic exposures among incarcerated populations. We sought to further characterize the nature of these exposures among this population using the California Poison Control System data. Keyword searches identified inmate cases in 2011-2013 for patients 20+ years old exposed to a single substance and taken to hospital from jail, prison, or police custody. Comparisons were made with non-inmate cases during the same period, using similar limitations. Body stuffers and body packers were analyzed as a subgroup. Seven hundred four inmate cases were compared to 106,260 non-inmate cases. Inmates were more likely to be younger, male, and to have engaged in drug misuse or abuse. They most commonly ingested methamphetamine, heroin, acetaminophen, and anticonvulsants. Inmates were more likely to receive activated charcoal (OR 9.87, 8.20-11.88), whole bowel irrigation (OR 44.50, 33.83-58.54), undergo endotracheal intubation (OR 4.09, 2.91-5.73), and to experience a major clinical outcome or death (OR 1.41, 1.05-1.89). When body stuffers and packers were removed, clinical findings were similar, though the odds of a major outcome or death became statistically non-significant. Body stuffers and body packers primarily used methamphetamine and heroin, and compared with other inmates had significantly higher odds of both adverse clinical effects and poor outcome. This large series provides a profile of symptomatic exposures among inmates, a little-studied population. The potential for high morbidity among body stuffers and packers suggests that a high index of suspicion of such ingestions be maintained when evaluating patients prior to incarceration.

  11. 76 FR 17808 - Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2011-2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... National Highway Traffic Safety Administration 49 CFR Part 571 Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking and Research... NHTSA Vehicle Safety and Fuel Economy Rulemaking and Research Priority Plan 2011-2013 (Priority Plan) in Docket No. NHTSA-2009-0108. This Priority Plan is an update to the Final Vehicle Safety Rulemaking...

  12. Current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44: United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Kimberly; Daugherty, Jill; Jones, Jo

    2014-12-01

    Nearly all women use contraception at some point in their lifetimes, although at any given time they may not be using contraception for reasons such as seeking pregnancy, being pregnant, or not being sexually active. Using data from the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) on contraceptive use in the month of the interview, this report provides a snapshot of current contraceptive status among women aged 15-44 in the United States. In addition to describing use of any method by age, Hispanic origin and race, and educational attainment, patterns of use are described for the four most commonly used contraceptive methods: the oral contraceptive pill, female sterilization, the male condom, and long-acting reversible contraceptives, which include contraceptive implants and intrauterine devices.

  13. Surveillance of norovirus in Portugal and the emergence of the Sydney variant, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Costa, I; Mesquita, J R; Veiga, E; Oleastro, M; Nascimento, M J S

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results of the national surveillance system of diarrhea etiology of the National Institute of Health of Portugal concerning norovirus (NoV) during a two-year period, May 2011-2013. Of the total 580 stool samples collected from patients hospitalized for acute diarrhea in 13 Hospitals of Portugal, 67 (11.6%) tested positive for NoV. From May 2011 to March 2012 the GII.4 variant New Orleans 2009 was the most predominant strain having been replaced by the new GII.4 variant Sydney 2012 since then till the end of the survey. To our knowledge this is the first study showing the circulation of GII.4 as the norovirus strain most commonly associated to gastroenteritis and the first to report the replacement of GII.4 New Orleans by GII.4 Sydney 2012 variant in Portugal.

  14. Effectiveness of Antibiotic Use Management in Tianjin (2011-2013): A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Hong; Du, Yue; Liu, Wei; Song, Shi-Duo; Zhao, Wen; Huang, Guo-Wei; Wang, He-Sheng

    2017-02-09

    BACKGROUND In this study we investigated changes in the status of antibiotic use in Tianjin since the implementation of the Antibiotic Stewardship Program (ASP) (2011-2013), as well as existing problems, strategies, and outcomes to promote rational clinical antibiotic use. MATERIAL AND METHODS A quasi-experimental study was performed to investigate situations of antibiotic use in secondary and tertiary general hospitals in Tianjin from April 2011 to 2013. Five major indicators were analyzed: percentage of antibiotic use in inpatient cases (%), antibacterial use density (AUD), proportion of prophylactic antibiotic application for type I surgical incision, compliance rate of medication administration 0.5-2.0 h before such procedures, and antibiotic prophylaxis for ≤24 h in patients receiving these surgeries. RESULTS There was a decrease in the percentage of antibiotic use across general hospitals (60.38% to 46.88%), in AUD (51.60% to 35.37%), and in the proportion of prophylactic antibiotic applications for type I incisions (86.67% to 25.08%). For patients undergoing these procedures, there was an increased compliance rate of medication administration of 0.5-2.0 h prior to surgery (86.38% to 100%), and of antibiotic prophylactic use for ≤24 h (40.30% to 96.37%). CONCLUSIONS Implementation of the ASP campaign has reduced irrational antibiotic use, promoted rational antibiotic use, and delayed antibiotic resistance.

  15. Characterization of rubella virus genotypes among pregnant women in northern Vietnam, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Van Le, Son; Le, Duc Hoang; Hoang, Huong Thi; Hoang, Ha; Nguyen, Nam Trung; Chu, Ha Hoang

    2015-02-01

    Rubella virus (RV) infection is an unresolved clinical complication that affects children in developing countries including Vietnam. RV infection during the first trimester of pregnancy causes severe birth defects known as congenital rubella syndrome. This study reports on the genomic characterization of RV strains circulating in northern Vietnam during 2011-2013. RV-IgM positive amniotic fluid specimens were collected from 38 women from northern Vietnam who presented with clinical rubella at the National Hospital of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Hanoi, Vietnam. The RV genes were determined by nested PCR with primers amplifying the 739-nucleotide coding region of the E1 gene. The sequences from the amplified DNA fragments were phylogenetically analyzed and compared to reference RV strains. Seventeen out of 38 samples are positive for RV detecting. All new RV isolates are clustered to genotype 2B. Eighteen amino acid mutations were found in the T and B cell epitopes. These results suggest that genotype 2B RV strains frequently circulate in northern Vietnam. These data describe the RV genotype in Vietnam with the aim of improving maternal and child health in this country.

  16. Coral reef monitoring in the Iles Eparses, Mozambique Channel (2011-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabanet, P.; Bigot, L.; Nicet, J.-B.; Durville, P.; Massé, L.; Mulochau, T.; Russo, C.; Tessier, E.; Obura, D.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of coral reefs has become a major tool for understanding how they are changing, and for managing them in a context of increasing degradation of coastal ecosystems. The Global Coral Reef Monitoring Network (GCRMN) has near-global coverage, but there are few remote sites free of direct human impact that can serve as reference sites. This study provides baseline data for the French Iles Eparses in the Mozambique Channel, Western Indian Ocean (WIO), whose coral reefs are little known owing to their limited accessibility, and have been free from fishing pressure for over 20 years. Surveys of coral reef health and fish community structure were undertaken at four of the islands (Europa, Bassas da India, Juan de Nova and Glorieuses) in 2011-2013. Monitoring was conducted using standardized GCRMN methods for benthos and fish communities, at the highest taxonomic level. Benthic cover showed a latitudinal gradient, with higher coral cover and conversely lower algae cover (60% and 14% respectively) in the south of the Mozambique Channel. This could be due to the geomorphology of the islands, the latitudinal temperature gradient, and/or the history of chronic stress and bleaching events during the last decades. Fish also showed a latitudinal gradient with higher diversity in the north, in a center of diversity for the western Indian Ocean already recognized for corals. An exceptional biomass fish was recorded (approximately 3500 kg/ha excluding sharks, compared to a maximum of 1400 kg/ha elsewhere in the WIO). The presence of large predators and sharks in all the islands as well as the absence of fleshy benthic algae were indicators of the good health of the reef systems. Nevertheless, these islands are beginning to experience illegal fishing, particularly in the north of the Mozambique Channel, demonstrating their vulnerability to exploitation and the need to protect them as reference sites for coral reef studies, including of climate change impacts, for the region

  17. Alcohol use and binge drinking among women of childbearing age - United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cheryl H; Denny, Clark H; Cheal, Nancy E; Sniezek, Joseph E; Kanny, Dafna

    2015-09-25

    Excessive alcohol use is risk factor for a wide range of health and social problems including liver cirrhosis, certain cancers, depression, motor vehicle crashes, and violence. Alcohol use during pregnancy can lead to fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) and other adverse birth outcomes . Community studies estimate that as many as 2% to 5% of first grade students in the United States might have an FASD, which include physical, behavioral, or learning impairments. In 2005, the Surgeon General reissued an advisory urging women who are or might be pregnant to abstain from alcohol consumption to eliminate the risk for FASDs or other negative birth outcomes. To estimate current prevalences of any alcohol use and binge drinking (consuming four or more drinks on an occasion) among pregnant and nonpregnant women aged 18-44 years in the United States, CDC analyzed 2011-2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data. Among pregnant women, the prevalences of any alcohol use and binge drinking in the past 30 days were 10.2% and 3.1%, respectively. Among nonpregnant women, the prevalences of any alcohol use and binge drinking in the past 30 days were 53.6% and 18.2%, respectively. Among binge drinkers, pregnant women reported a significantly higher frequency of binge drinking than nonpregnant women (4.6 and 3.1 episodes, respectively); the largest amount consumed during binge drinking was also higher among pregnant women than nonpregnant women (7.5 versus 6.0 drinks), although this difference was not statistically significant. Implementation of evidence-based clinical and community-level strategies would be expected to reduce binge drinking among pregnant women and women of childbearing age, and any alcohol consumption among women who are or might be pregnant. Healthcare professionals can support these efforts by implementing alcohol screening and brief interventions in their primary care practices, and informing women that there is no known safe level of

  18. Current Cigarette Smoking Among Workers in Accommodation and Food Services--United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Syamlal, Girija; Jamal, Ahmed; Mazurek, Jacek M

    2015-07-31

    Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States. One of the Healthy People 2020 objectives calls for reducing the proportion of U.S. adults who smoke cigarettes to ≤12% (objective TU-1.1). Despite progress in reducing smoking prevalence over the past several decades, nearly one in five U.S. adults, including millions of workers, still smoke cigarettes. During 2004-2010, nearly one fifth (19.6%) of U.S. working adults aged ≥18 years smoked cigarettes, and of all the industry sectors, current smoking prevalence among the accommodation and food services sector workers (30%) was the highest. CDC analyzed National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data for 2011-2013 to estimate current cigarette smoking prevalence among adults working in the accommodation and food services sector, and found that these workers had higher cigarette smoking prevalence (25.9%) than all other workers (17.3%). Among workers in accommodation and food services sector, the highest smoking prevalences were observed among males, non-Hispanic whites, those aged 25-44 years, those with a high school diploma or a General Educational Development (GED) certificate and no college education, those with an annual family income <$35,000, those with no health insurance, and those working in the food services and drinking places industry. These results indicate a need to better understand the reasons for higher smoking prevalence observed among accommodation and food services workers (e.g., workplace culture), so that appropriate intervention strategies can be developed and implemented. Evidence suggests that smoke-free worksites and workplace cessation programs, including comprehensive worksite smoke-free policies, health promotion, access to smoking cessation programs, and increasing the cost of tobacco products, can substantially reduce smoking among workers.

  19. Bromine Chemistry in the Tropical UTLS during the 2011, 2013 and 2014 ATTREX Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, J.; Spolaor, M.; Festa, J.; Tsai, J. Y.; Colosimo, S. F.; Cheung, R.; Werner, B.; Deutschmann, T.; Scalone, L.; Raecke, R.; Tricoli, U.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Navarro, M. A.; Atlas, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    Bromine chemistry impacts the levels of ozone in the upper troposphere and the stratosphere. An accurate quantitative understanding of the sources, sinks, and chemical transformation of bromine species is thus important to understand the bromine budget in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), which also serves as a gate to the stratosphere. Vertical transport of very short-lived organic bromine precursors, such as CHBr3, CH2Br2 and inorganic product gases has been identified as the main source of bromine in the UTLS. However, the contribution of inorganic vs. organic compounds is not well quantified, particularly in the tropical UTLS. A number of chemical processes, including the role of ice particles for the transformation and cycling of inorganic bromine species are also poorly understood. A limb scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy Instrument was deployed on-board NASA's unmanned high-altitude Global Hawk aircraft during the 2011, 2013, and 2014 NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). Flights in the eastern and western Pacific were performed to study, among other topics, the chemistry of bromine and ozone in the subtropical and tropical UTLS. Here we will present observations of BrO, NO2 and other trace species made by this instrument at altitudes between 15 - 20 km. The measurement methodology as well as the procedure to retrieve vertical trace gas concentration profiles will be briefly presented. The combination of those observations with the measurements of organic bromine species from the University of Miami's Whole Air Sampler (GWAS) will be used to determine and interpret the bromine budget in the UTLS.

  20. The Planner’s Role in the Civil-Military Relationship: Syrian Crisis Action Planning (2011-2013)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-22

    Approved for Public Release; Distribution is Unlimited The Planner’s Role in the Civil-Military Relationship: Syrian Crisis Action Planning (2011...Civil-Military Relationship: Syrian Crisis Action Planning (2011-2013) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Crisis action planning (CAP) is the military process for resolving imminent and emerging crises. CAP activities

  1. Cal Poly Contributions to the CUORE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David; Meijer, Samuel; Haskin, Michael; Gutierrez, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a multinational experimental collaboration searching for the lepton-violating neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) in ^130Te. The detection of 0νββ would indicate the neutrino is a Majorana fermion and also set the absolute mass scale of the electron neutrino. The experiment is currently being built in stages at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Assergi, Italy. CUORE-0 is a detector array expected to go online this year consisting of 52 bolometric crystals in a single tower, which is equivalent to 1/19th of the full mass of CUORE. We will describe our recent contributions to activities associated with CUORE-0 deployment, background reduction efforts, and the CUORE crystal verification runs as the collaboration works towards bringing CUORE online in 2014.

  2. Comparative analysis of quantity and quality of biomedical publications in Gulf Cooperation Council countries from 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Dawas, Reema B.; Mallick, Muaz A.; Hamadah, Reem E.; Kharraz, Razan H.; Chamseddin, Ranim A.; Khan, Tehreem A.; AlAmodi, Abdulhadi A.; Rohra, Dileep K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the research productivity of different Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries in the field of biomedical sciences from 2011-2013. Methods: This is a retrospective study conducted in the College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data on the biomedical publications originating from GCC countries published between January 2011 to December 2013 was searched via MEDLINE using PubMed. The total number of publications emanating from each country was normalized with the country’s population. The mean impact factor (IF) of all the publications in a year was calculated for comparative analysis. Results: A total of 11,000 publications were retrieved via MEDLINE using PubMed, out of which, 9222 were selected for analysis. A successive increase in the number of publications by every country was observed. The most striking increase in the number of publications was from Saudi Arabia. However, after normalization with population, the performance of Oman, Qatar, and Kuwait looks far better than Saudi Arabia in terms of research productivity. Data on mean IF showed that the overall mean IF of all GCC countries has remained largely unchanged except Oman. Although Oman had a comparatively low mean IF value in 2011, they recorded a tremendous improvement in successive years. Conclusion: All GCC countries underwent an increase in quantitative research productivity over the last 3 years. However, no increase in quality of research publications was noted based on the proxy reports of mean journal IF. PMID:26318469

  3. Hepatitis B virus in drug users in France: prevalence and vaccination history, ANRS-Coquelicot Survey 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Brouard, C; Pillonel, J; Sogni, P; Chollet, A; Lazarus, J V; Pascal, X; Barin, F; Jauffret-Roustide, M

    2017-01-19

    People who use drugs (PWUD) are a key population for hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination and screening. We aimed to estimate the seroprevalence of HBs antigen (HBsAg) and self-reported HBV vaccination history in French PWUD attending harm reduction centres using data from the ANRS-Coquelicot multicentre survey conducted in 2011-2013 in 1718 PWUD. Self-fingerprick blood samples were collected on dried blood spots to detect the presence of HBsAg. HBsAg seroprevalence was estimated at 1·4% [95% confidence interval (CI) 0·8-2·5]. It varied between PWUD born in high (7·6%, 95% CI 2·7-19·1), moderate (2·2%, 95% CI 0·8-5·7) and low (0·7%, 95% CI 0·3-1·5) endemic zones. Factors independently associated with HBsAg carriage were being born in a moderate or high endemic zone or reporting precarious housing. Self-reported HBV vaccination history varied from 47·4% in high endemic zones, to 59·3% and 62·6% for moderate and low endemic zones, respectively. Our results suggest that drug use plays a small and substantial role, respectively, in HBsAg carriage in PWUD born in high/moderate and low endemic zones.

  4. Fond Memories of Cal Council

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnis, Douglas L.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the author's personal involvement in the California Council for the Education of Teachers (Cal Council), beginning in 1960 and spanning four decades, which involved associations with key people in California teacher education and credentialing. The Cal Council was organized for leaders in teacher education from the…

  5. HIV Testing in the Past Year among the U.S. Household Population Aged 15-44: 2011-2013. NCHS Data Brief. Number 202

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copen, Casey E.; Chandra, Anjani; Febo-Vazquez, Isaedmarie

    2015-01-01

    In 2011, more than 1 million Americans aged 13 and over were living with HIV infection, and one in seven did not know their infection status. Routine, voluntary HIV testing is a recognized way to reduce HIV transmission. Using data from the 2011-2013 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG), this report updates nationally representative estimates…

  6. Prevalence of Chronic Kidney Disease in Korea: the Korean National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji In; Baek, Hyunjeong; Jung, Hae Hyuk

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a leading public health problem related to poor quality of life and premature death. As a resource for evidence-informed health policy-making, we evaluated the prevalence of chronic kidney disease using the data of non-institutionalized adults aged ≥ 20 years (n = 15,319) from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2011-2013. Chronic kidney disease was defined as a urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio ≥ 30 mg/g or an estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) using the Chronic Kidney Disease-Epidemiology Collaboration equation. The total prevalence estimate of chronic kidney disease for adults aged ≥ 20 years in Korea was 8.2%. By disease stage, the prevalence of chronic kidney disease was as follows: stage 1, 3.0%; stage 2, 2.7%; stage 3a, 1.9%; stage 3b, 0.4%; and stages 4-5, 0.2%. When grouped into three risk categories according to the 2012 Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines, the proportions for the moderately increased risk, high risk, and very high risk categories were 6.5%, 1.2%, and 0.5%, respectively. Factors including older age, diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, body mass indexes of ≥ 25 kg/m(2) and < 18.5 kg/m(2), and rural residential area were independently associated with chronic kidney disease. Based on this comprehensive analysis, evidence-based screening strategies for chronic kidney disease in the Korean population should be developed to optimize prevention and early intervention of chronic kidney disease and its associated risk factors.

  7. Geodetic constraints to the source mechanism of the 2011-2013 unrest at Campi Flegrei (Italy) caldera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasatti, Elisa; Polcari, Marco; Bonafede, Maurizio; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2016-04-01

    Campi Flegrei (Italy) is a nested caldera and together with Vesuvius is one of the Italian GEO Geohazard Supersites (GSNL). The area is characterized by one of the highest volcanic hazard of the world, due to the very high density of inhabitants (1800/km²), the persistent activity of the system and the explosive character of volcanism. A major unrest episode took place in 1982-84, when the town of Pozzuoli, located at the caldera center, was uplifted by 1.80 m. Minor uplifts of few centimeters, seismic swarms and degassing episodes took place in 1989, 2000 and 2004-06. Since 2005 Campi Flegrei is uplifting, reaching a ground velocity of 9 cm/yr in 2012, showing that the caldera is in a critical state on the verge of instability. In this work, we present results from SAR Interferometry and geodetic data modelling at Campi Flegrei in the framework of the EU's FP7 MED-SUV Project. We exploit two COSMO-SkyMed data sets to map the deformation field during 2011-2013. The spatial distributions of the cumulative displacement from COSMO-SkyMed ascending/descending orbits show similar behaviors, confirming the bell-shaped pattern of the deformation at least within the inner rim of the caldera. The resulting data, together with GPS data from the Neapolitan Volcanoes Continuous GPS network (NeVoCGPS) is fitted through a geophysical inversion process using finite element forward models to account for the 3D heterogeneous medium. The best fit model is a north dipping mixed-mode dislocation source lying at ~5 km depth. The driving mechanism is ascribable to magma input into the source of the large 1982-1984 unrest (since similar source characteristics were inferred) that generates initial inflation followed by additional shear slip accompanying the extension of crack tips. The history and the current state of the system indicate that Campi Flegrei is able to erupt again. Constraining the defomation source may have important implications in terms of civil protection and the

  8. Stability and subsidence across Rome (Italy) in 2011-2013 based on COSMO-SkyMed Persistent Scatterer Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francesca, Cigna; Lasaponara, Rosa; Nicola, Masini; Pietro, Milillo; Deodato, Tapete

    2015-04-01

    Ground stability of the built environment of the city of Rome in central Italy has been extensively investigated in the last years by using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), with focus on deformation of both the monuments of the historic centre (e.g., [1-2]) and the southern residential quarters (e.g., [3]). C-band ERS-1/2 and ENVISAT ASAR time series deformation analyses brought evidence of overall stability across the town centre, except for localized deformation concentrated in areas geologically susceptible to instability (e.g. western slope of the Palatine Hill), whereas clear subsidence patterns were detected over the compressible alluvial deposits lying in proximity of the Tiber River. To retrieve an updated picture of stability and subsidence across the city, we analysed a time series of 32 COSMO-SkyMed StripMap HIMAGE, right-looking, ascending mode scenes with an image swath of 40 km, 3-m resolution and HH polarization, acquired between 21 March 2011 and 10 June 2013, with repeat cycle mostly equal to 16 days. Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) processing was undertaken by using the Stanford Method for Persistent Scatterers (StaMPS) as detailed in [4], and more than 310,000 radar targets (i.e. PS) were identified, with an average target density of over 2,800 PS/km2. The performance of StaMPS to retrieve satisfactory PS coverage over the urban features of interest was assessed against their orientation and visibility to the satellite Line-Of-Sight, as well as their conservation history throughout the biennial investigated (2011-2013). In this work we discuss effects due to local land cover and land use by exploiting the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) European Urban Atlas (IT001L) of Rome at 1:10,000 scale, thereby also evaluating the capability of the X-band to spatially resolve targets coinciding with man-made structures in vegetated areas. Based on this assessment, our PSI results highlight those environmental

  9. David Georgi's Cal Council Presidency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgi, David

    2015-01-01

    When the author was asked to write a mini-memoir about his time as Cal Council president, his first thought was "Now, when exactly was that?" He says that pretty much summarizes the quality of his memory these days. The author's first contact with the California Council on the Education of Teachers was back in the 1970s when the…

  10. A comparison of aquatic trophic interactions (fish, benthic macroinvertebrates, and zooplankton) between the Lake Erie Central Basin and the Lake Erie Eastern Basin, 2011-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bodamer Scarbro, Betsy L.

    2016-01-01

    Lake Erie Biological Station (LEBS), located in Sandusky, Ohio, is a field station of the USGS Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC). LEBS is the primary federal agency for applied fisheries science excellence in Lake Erie. From 2011-2013, LEBS carried out a project which addressed the effects of regional climate change on aquatic food webs in the Great Lakes. This study focused on Lake Erie, as it is a representative system with a high level of anthropogenic impacts, strong nutrient gradients, seasonal hypoxia, and spatial overlap of cold- and cool-water fish guilds. In Lake Erie and in large embayments throughout the Great Lakes basin, this situation is a concern for fishery managers, as climate change may exacerbate hypoxia and reduce habitat volume for some species. We examined fish community composition, fine-scale distribution, prey availability, diets, and biochemical tracers for dominant fishes from study areas with medium-high nutrient levels (mesotrophic, Fairport study area), and low nutrient levels (oligotrophic, Erie study area). This multi-year database (2011-2013) provides the ability to contrast years with wide variation in rainfall, winter ice-cover, and thermal stratification. In addition, multiple indicators of dietary and distributional responses to environmental variability will allow resource managers to select the most informative approach for addressing specific climate change questions.

  11. Continuous magma recharge at Mt. Etna during the 2011-2013 period controls the style of volcanic activity and compositions of erupted lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viccaro, Marco; Calcagno, Rosario; Garozzo, Ileana; Giuffrida, Marisa; Nicotra, Eugenio

    2015-02-01

    Volcanic rocks erupted during the January 2011 - April 2013 paroxysmal sequence at Mt. Etna volcano have been investigated through in situ microanalysis of mineral phases and whole rock geochemistry. These products have been also considered within the framework of the post-2001 record, evidencing that magmas feeding the 2011-2013 paroxysmal activity inherited deep signature comparable to that of the 2007-2009 volcanic rocks for what concerns their trace element concentration. Analysis performed on plagioclase, clinopyroxene and olivine, which are sensitive to differentiation processes, show respectively fluctuations of the An, Mg# and Fo contents during the considered period. Also major and trace elements measured on the whole rock provide evidence of the evolutionary degree variations through time. Simulations by MELTS at fixed chemical-physical parameters allowed the definition of feeding system dynamics controlling the geochemical variability of magmas during the 2011-2013 period. Specifically, compositional changes have been interpreted as due to superimposition of fractional crystallization and mixing in variable proportions with more basic magma ascending from intermediate to shallower levels of the plumbing system. Composition of the recharging end-member is compatible with that of the most basic magmas emitted during the 2007 and the early paroxysmal eruptions of 2012. Analysis of the erupted volumes of magma combined with its petrologic evolution through time support the idea that large volumes of magma are continuously intruded and stored in the intermediate plumbing system after major recharging phases in the deepest levels of it. Transient recharge from the intermediate to the shallow levels is then responsible for the paroxysmal eruptions.

  12. USS Cal Builders, Inc. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    USS Cal Builders, Inc. (the Company) is located in Stanton, California. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in San Francisco, California.

  13. Academic Excellence Workshops for Underrepresented Students at Cal Poly, Pomona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiemenz, Paul C.; Hudspeth, M. Catharine

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Academic Excellence Workshops program at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, as a potential model for an academic support system specifically designed for underrepresented students in math-based disciplines. (PR)

  14. NOR CAL - An Impressive Achievement: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kester, Donald L.

    NOR CAL, the Northern California Research and Development Group composed of 28 California community colleges, aims at identifying problems in community colleges and alternatives for solving them. This paper is a review of the NOR CAL Attrition Project, a 3-year study of potential drop-outs in California community colleges. The purpose of the…

  15. A CAL-Based Undergraduate Genetics Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbutt, K.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes a second-year undergraduate practical course in quantitative genetics and biometrics, based upon computer-assisted learning (CAL); and discusses the educational benefits of the course, some problems encountered, and some implications of the extensive use of CAL. (Author/CMV)

  16. Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and 2 Seroprevalence among first-time blood donors in Chile, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    San Martín, Héctor; Balanda, Monserrat; Vergara, Nicolás; Valenzuela, María Antonieta; Cartier, Luis; Ayala, Salvador; Ramírez, Eugenio

    2016-06-01

    Infection with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1/2 (HTLV-1/2) is a major health problem. HTLV-1/2 infection is endemic in Chile but representative donor prevalence data are lacking. Data on all blood donors in a large network of Chilean blood centers were examined during 2011-2013. Screening of HTLV-1/2 antibodies were measured by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) at all blood banks. Blood samples with anticoagulants from initially reactive blood donors were analyzed by serological confirmation tests (immunofluorescence or recombinant immunoblot) at the HTLV National Reference Laboratory of the Public Health Institute of Chile. Additionally, detection of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 provirus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was performed in all blood donors as confirmatory test. Prevalence rates were calculated. Among 694,016 donors, 706 were seropositive for HTLV-1 (prevalence, 1.02 cases per 1,000; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94-1.09), and 97 were seropositive for HTLV-2 (prevalence, 0.14 cases per 1,000; 95%CI, 0.11-0.17). Prevalence of HTLV-1 differed considerably by region, from 0.51 to 1.69 per 1,000. Prevalence of HTLV-2 was similar across the country (0.12-0.16). HTLV-1 prevalence was associated with female sex, older age, and residence in the north of Chile. HTVL-2 prevalence was associated with older age. The HTLV-1 prevalence among Chilean blood donors was relatively high and could be reduced by improving donor recruitment and selection in high prevalence areas. Blood center data may contribute to surveillance for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections.

  17. Seismic hydraulic fracture migration originated by successive deep magma pulses: The 2011-2013 seismic series associated to the volcanic activity of El Hierro Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Moreno, A.; Ibáñez, J. M.; De Angelis, S.; García-Yeguas, A.; Prudencio, J.; Morales, J.; Tuvè, T.; García, L.

    2015-11-01

    In this manuscript we present a new interpretation of the seismic series that accompanied eruptive activity off the coast of El Hierro, Canary Islands, during 2011-2013. We estimated temporal variations of the Gutenberg-Richter b value throughout the period of analysis, and performed high-precision relocations of the preeruptive and syneruptive seismicity using a realistic 3-D velocity model. Our results suggest that eruptive activity and the accompanying seismicity were caused by repeated injections of magma from the mantle into the lower crust. These magma pulses occurred within a small and well-defined volume resulting in the emplacement of fresh magma along the crust-mantle boundary underneath El Hierro. We analyzed the distribution of earthquake hypocenters in time and space in order to assess seismic diffusivity in the lower crust. Our results suggest that very high earthquake rates underneath El Hierro represent the response of a stable lower crust to stress perturbations with pulsatory character, linked to the injection of magma from the mantle. Magma input from depth caused large stress perturbations to propagate into the lower crust generating energetic seismic swarms. The absence of any preferential alignment in the spatial pattern of seismicity reinforces our hypothesis that stress perturbation and related seismicity, had diffusive character. We conclude that the temporal and spatial evolution of seismicity was neither tracking the path of magma migration nor it defines the boundaries of magma storage volumes such as a midcrustal sill. Our conceptual model considers pulsatory magma injection from the upper mantle and its propagation along the Moho. We suggest, within this framework, that the spatial and temporal distributions of earthquake hypocenters reflect hydraulic fracturing processes associated with stress propagation due to magma movement.

  18. Holographic {\\cal N}=1 supersymmetric membrane flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changhyun; Woo, Kyungsung

    2010-10-01

    The M-theory lift of {\\cal N}=2 SU(3) × U(1)R-invariant RG flow via a combinatorical use of the four-dimensional flow and 11-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell equations was found previously. By taking the three internal coordinates differently and preserving only the SU(3) symmetry from the CP2 space, we find a new 11-dimensional solution of the {\\cal N}=1 SU(3)-invariant RG flow interpolating from the {\\cal N}=8 SO(8)-invariant UV fixed point to the {\\cal N}=2 SU(3) × U(1)R-invariant IR fixed point in four dimensions. We describe how the corresponding three-dimensional {\\cal N}=1 superconformal Chern-Simons matter theory deforms. By replacing the above CP2 space with the Einstein-Kahler twofold, we also find out a new 11-dimensional solution of the {\\cal N}=1 SU(2) × U(1)-invariant RG flow connecting the above two fixed points in four dimensions.

  19. NotCal04 - Comparison / Calibration 14C records 26-50 cal kBP

    SciTech Connect

    der Plicht, J v; Beck, J; Bard, E; Baille, M

    2004-11-11

    The radiocarbon calibration curve, IntCal04, extends back to 26 cal kBP. While several high resolution records exist beyond this limit, these data sets exhibit discrepancies one to another of up to several millennia. As a result, no calibration curve for the time range 26-50 cal kBP can be recommended as yet, but in this paper the IntCal04 working group compares the available data sets and offers a discussion of the information that they hold.

  20. Developmental evolution of flowering plant pollen tube cell walls: callose synthase (CalS) gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A number of innovations underlie the origin of rapid reproductive cycles in angiosperms. A critical early step involved the modification of an ancestrally short and slow-growing pollen tube for faster and longer distance transport of sperm to egg. Associated with this shift are the predominantly callose (1,3-β-glucan) walls and septae (callose plugs) of angiosperm pollen tubes. Callose synthesis is mediated by callose synthase (CalS). Of 12 CalS gene family members in Arabidopsis, only one (CalS5) has been directly linked to pollen tube callose. CalS5 orthologues are present in several monocot and eudicot genomes, but little is known about the evolutionary origin of CalS5 or what its ancestral function may have been. Results We investigated expression of CalS in pollen and pollen tubes of selected non-flowering seed plants (gymnosperms) and angiosperms within lineages that diverged below the monocot/eudicot node. First, we determined the nearly full length coding sequence of a CalS5 orthologue from Cabomba caroliniana (CcCalS5) (Nymphaeales). Semi-quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated low CcCalS5 expression within several vegetative tissues, but strong expression in mature pollen. CalS transcripts were detected in pollen tubes of several species within Nymphaeales and Austrobaileyales, and comparative analyses with a phylogenetically diverse group of sequenced genomes indicated homology to CalS5. We also report in silico evidence of a putative CalS5 orthologue from Amborella. Among gymnosperms, CalS5 transcripts were recovered from germinating pollen of Gnetum and Ginkgo, but a novel CalS paralog was instead amplified from germinating pollen of Pinus taeda. Conclusion The finding that CalS5 is the predominant callose synthase in pollen tubes of both early-diverging and model system angiosperms is an indicator of the homology of their novel callosic pollen tube walls and callose plugs. The data suggest that CalS5 had transient expression and pollen

  1. State-specific prevalence of current cigarette smoking and smokeless tobacco use among adults aged ≥18 years - United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kimberly; Marshall, LaTisha; Hu, Sean; Neff, Linda

    2015-05-22

    Cigarette smoking and the use of smokeless tobacco both cause substantial morbidity and premature mortality. The concurrent use of these products might increase dependence and the risk for tobacco-related disease and death. State-specific estimates of prevalence and relative percent change in current cigarette smoking, smokeless tobacco use, and concurrent cigarette smoking and smokeless tobacco use among U.S. adults during 2011-2013, developed using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), indicate statistically significant (p<0.05) changes for all three behaviors. From 2011 to 2013, there was a statistically significant decline in current cigarette smoking prevalence overall and in 26 states. During the same period, use of smokeless tobacco significantly increased in four states: Louisiana, Montana, South Carolina, and West Virginia; significant declines were observed in two states: Ohio and Tennessee. In addition, the use of smokeless tobacco among cigarette smokers (concurrent use) significantly increased in five states (Delaware, Idaho, Nevada, New Mexico, and West Virginia). Although annual decreases in overall cigarette smoking among adults in the United States have occurred in recent years, there is much variability in prevalence of cigarette smoking, smokeless tobacco, and concurrent use across states. In 2013, the prevalence ranged from 10.3% (Utah) to 27.3% (West Virginia) for cigarette smoking; 1.5% (District of Columbia and Massachusetts) to 9.4% (West Virginia) for smokeless tobacco; and 3.1% (Vermont) to 13.5% (Idaho) for concurrent use. These findings highlight the importance of sustained comprehensive state tobacco-control programs funded at CDC-recommended levels, which can accelerate progress toward reducing tobacco-related disease and deaths by promoting evidence-based population-level interventions. These interventions include increasing the price of tobacco products, implementing comprehensive smoke-free laws

  2. Quantifying the vulnerability of carbon stocks and fluxes in six semi-arid biomes in the Southwestern US to the severe 2011-2013 drought (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvak, M. E.; Krofcheck, D.; Hilton, T. W.; Fox, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The magnitude of carbon fluxes through arid and semi-arid ecosystems is considered modest, but integrated over the ~40% of the global land surface covered by these ecosystems, the total carbon stored is almost twice that in temperate forest ecosystems. Climatic extremes are typical in the Southwestern U.S, and the frequency of extreme temperature and precipitation events (both drought and large storms) in this region is predicted to increase in the next century. Understanding how resilient carbon pools and fluxes in these biomes are to climate extremes constitutes a large uncertainty in our ability to understand regional carbon balance. We use a 7 year record (2007-2013) of continuous measurements of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and its components (gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) made over the New Mexico Elevation Gradient (NMEG) network of flux tower sites (desert grassland, creosote shrubland, juniper savanna, piñon-juniper woodland, ponderosa pine and subalpine mixed conifer) to test hypotheses about the biome-specific sensitivity of carbon cycling to both drought and temperature extremes. In particular, we focus on the functional responses in these biomes to the extended drought in this region from 2011-2013, which has triggered extensive mortality in many biomes. We used time series of climatic variables, radiation absorbed by vegetation, sap flux, soil moisture storage, and remotely sensed structural and functional data, including rates of mortality, to compare the biome-specific mechanisms behind these responses. We also produce biome-specific functional response surfaces of productivity and respiration to VPD, temperature and soil water availability. Decreases in annual NEP from the relatively wet year of 2010 to the severe drought year 2011 ranged from 60-165 g C m-2 y-1 across the gradient, due more to decreases in GPP than Re. We observed the greatest sensitivity to both temperature and precipitation extremes in

  3. The TileCal Laser Calibration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giangiobbe, Vincent; ATLAS Tile Calorimeter Group

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS detector operating at LHC. It is a sampling calorimeter whose active material is made of scintillating plastic tiles. Scintillation light is read by photomultipliers. A Laser system is used to monitor their gain stability. During dedicated calibration runs the Laser system sends via long optical fibers, a monitored amount of light simultaneously to all the ≈10000 photomultipliers of TileCal. This note describes two complementary methods to measure the stability of the photomultipliers gain using the Laser calibration runs. The results of validation tests are presented for both methods and theirrespective performances and limitations are discussed.

  4. A Simple Acronym for Doing Calculus: CAL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    An acronym is presented that provides students a potentially useful, unifying view of the major topics covered in an elementary calculus sequence. The acronym (CAL) is based on viewing the calculus procedure for solving a calculus problem P* in three steps: (1) recognizing that the problem cannot be solved using simple (non-calculus) techniques;…

  5. Exact Polynomial Solution of {\\cal P}{\\cal T}/Non-{\\cal P}{\\cal T}- Symmetric and Non-Hermitian Modified Woods Saxon Potential by the Nikiforov Uvarov Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhdair, Sameer M.; Sever, Ramazan

    2007-06-01

    Using the Nikiforov Uvarov (NU) method, the bound state energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the {\\cal P{\\cal T}}-/non-{\\cal P}{\\cal T}-symmetric and non-Hermitian modified Woods Saxon (WS) model potential with the real and complex-valued energy levels are obtained in terms of the Jacobi polynomials. According to the {\\cal P}{\\cal T}-symmetric quantum mechanics, we exactly solved the time-independent Schrödinger equation with same potential for the s-states and also for any l-state as well. It is shown that the results are in good agreement with the ones obtained before.

  6. Structural Characterization of CalS8, a TDP-α-D-Glucose Dehydrogenase Involved in Calicheamicin Aminodideoxypentose Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanteri; Michalska, Karolina; Bigelow, Lance; Endres, Michael; Kharel, Madan K; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M; Bingman, Craig A; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Thorson, Jon S; Phillips, George N

    2015-10-23

    Classical UDP-glucose 6-dehydrogenases (UGDHs; EC 1.1.1.22) catalyze the conversion of UDP-α-d-glucose (UDP-Glc) to the key metabolic precursor UDP-α-d-glucuronic acid (UDP-GlcA) and display specificity for UDP-Glc. The fundamental biochemical and structural study of the UGDH homolog CalS8 encoded by the calicheamicin biosynthetic gene is reported and represents one of the first studies of a UGDH homolog involved in secondary metabolism. The corresponding biochemical characterization of CalS8 reveals CalS8 as one of the first characterized base-permissive UGDH homologs with a >15-fold preference for TDP-Glc over UDP-Glc. The corresponding structure elucidations of apo-CalS8 and the CalS8·substrate·cofactor ternary complex (at 2.47 and 1.95 Å resolution, respectively) highlight a notably high degree of conservation between CalS8 and classical UGDHs where structural divergence within the intersubunit loop structure likely contributes to the CalS8 base permissivity. As such, this study begins to provide a putative blueprint for base specificity among sugar nucleotide-dependent dehydrogenases and, in conjunction with prior studies on the base specificity of the calicheamicin aminopentosyltransferase CalG4, provides growing support for the calicheamicin aminopentose pathway as a TDP-sugar-dependent process.

  7. Improving Supply Management: The CALS Connection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    several data systems and presents the data online through prestructured reports and responses to ad hoc queries. Status: Operational. 12. 5-2 CALS...DLA Online Characteristics Search System DLA LOGRUN allows users to search for items by characteristics. After modernization, a much improved system...Committee SMR - source, maintenance, and recoverability (code) SPOC Ships Parts Control Center (Navy) SPS = Ships’ Provisioning System (Navy) SPTD

  8. Preliminary CALS Phase II Architecture. Volume 19

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-03

    IDEF ICAM Definition Languages 5 IDEFO ICAM Definition Language: Activity Modeling IDEFIX ICAM Definition Language: Data Modeling 3 IDS Integrated Design...level. At the Conceptual Description level, data are defined by an integrated semantic data model, such as those produced using the IDEFIX modeling...Architecture with the dominate focus on the data dictionary for the IWSDB, represented by an IDEFIX semantic data model. It is at this level that CALS Phase II

  9. The thermodynamic contribution of the 5-methyl group of thymine in the two- and three-stranded complexes formed by poly(dU) and poly(dT) with poly(dA).

    PubMed

    Ross, Philip D; Howard, Frank B

    2003-02-01

    To assess the thermodynamic contribution of the 5-methyl group of thymine, we have studied the two-stranded helical complexes poly(dA).poly(dU) and poly(dA).poly(dT) and the three-stranded complexes--poly(dA).2poly(dU), poly(dA).poly(dT).poly(dU) and poly(dA).2poly(dT)--by differential scanning calorimetry, and uv optical melting experiments. The thermodynamic quantities associated with the 3 --> 2, 2 --> 1, and 3 --> 1 melting transitions are found to vary with salt concentration and temperature in a more complex manner than commonly believed. The transition temperatures, T(m), are generally not linear in the logarithm of concentration or activity of NaCl. The change in enthalpy and in entropy upon melting varies with salt concentration and temperature, and a change in heat capacity accompanies each transition. The poly(dA).2poly(dU) triple helix is markedly different from poly(dA).2poly(dT) in both its CD spectrum and thermodynamic behavior, while the poly(dA).poly(dT).poly(dU) triple helix resembles poly(dA).2poly(dT) in these properties. In comparing poly(dA).2poly(dT) with either the poly(dA).poly(dT).poly(dU) or the poly(dA).2poly(dU) triplexes, the substitution of thymine for uracil in the third strand results in an enhancement of stability against the 3 --> 2 dissociation of deltadeltaG degrees = -135 +/- 85 cal (mol A)(-1) at 37 degrees C. This represents a doubling of the absolute stability toward dissociation compared to the triplexes with poly(dU) as the third strand. The poly (dA).poly (dT) duplex is more stable than poly(dA).poly(dU) by deltadeltaG degrees = -350 +/- 60 cal (mol base pair)(-1) at 37 degrees C. Poly(dA).poly(dT) has 50% greater stability than poly(dA).poly(dU) as a result of the dT for dU substitution in the duplex.

  10. The CEOS Cal/Val Portal: a new instrument for the cal/val community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burini, Alessandro; Fox, Nigel; Chander, Gyanesh; Goryl, Philippe

    2010-10-01

    The exploitation of Earth Observation data depends with increasing importance on multi-source inter-calibrated data, as demonstrated, for example, in the ESA DUE GlobColour project.1 The subgroup on Calibration and Validation of the Committee on Earth Observing System (CEOS) formulated a recommendation during the plenary session held in China at the end of 2004, with the goal of setting-up and operating an Internet based system to provide sensor data, protocols and guidelines for the purposes of efficiently supporting sensor calibration, inter-calibration and product validation. ESA has taken the initiative and launched the version 1.0 of the Cal/Val Portal in October 2006 and the version 2.0 in mid 2009. This paper describes the Cal/Val portal webpage, components, and general content organization. It also gives an example of collaboration and Cal/Val facility.

  11. DOSAR/CalLab Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Bogard, J.S.

    2000-03-01

    The Life Sciences Division (LSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a long record of radiation dosimetry research, primarily using the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and the Dosimetry Applications Research (DOSAR) Program Calibration Laboratory (CalLab), referred to formerly as the Radiation Calibration Laboratory. These facilities have been used by a broad segment of the research community to perform a variety of experiments in areas including, but not limited to, radiobiology, radiation dosimeter and instrumentation development and calibration, and the testing of materials in a variety of radiation environments.

  12. 2006 National Caring Awards. Cal Ripken Jr.

    PubMed

    2006-11-01

    You can tell a lot about baseball legend Cal Ripken from his office in Baltimore. It's full of mahogany furniture that bespeaks his new role as businessman and philanthropist. Books are piled on the windowsill. Above the sofa are two pictures, one of the All-Century players--he and Ernie Banks are the only shortstops--and another of himself in 1995 after he broke Lou Gehrig's record for consecutive games played. Looming above it all is a huge pencil drawing of Mr. Ripken's dad, the person who shaped him as a player and a man.

  13. CALS Test Network Sacramento Air Logistics Center. CALS/EDI Transfer Test Number 2, Quick Short Test Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    McClellan AFB , CA. The test required CALS data (MIL-R-28002A Raster) to be sent in an EDI (Electronic Data Interchange) envelope over a commercial VAN...Livermore National Laboratory EC/EDI (Electronic Commerce Through Electronic Data Interchange) Project, and the Sacramento Air Logistics Center (SM-ALC...Value Added Network). CALS Test Network Sacramento Air Logistics Center CALS/EDI Data Transfer Test Number 2 Quick Short Test Report.

  14. Kinetic study of Candida antarctica lipase B immobilization using poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles obtained by miniemulsion polymerization as support.

    PubMed

    Valério, Alexsandra; Nicoletti, Gabrieli; Cipolatti, Eliane P; Ninow, Jorge L; Araújo, Pedro H H; Sayer, Cláudia; de Oliveira, Débora

    2015-03-01

    With the objective to obtain immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (CalB) with good activity and improved utilization rate, this study evaluated the influence of enzyme and crodamol concentrations and initiator type on the CalB enzyme immobilization in nanoparticles consisting of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) obtained by miniemulsion polymerization. The kinetic study of immobilized CalB enzyme in PMMA nanoparticles was evaluated in terms of monomer conversion, particle size, zeta potential, and relative activity. The optimum immobilization condition for CalB was compared with free enzyme in the p-NPL hydrolysis activity measurement. Results showed a higher CalB enzyme stability after 20 hydrolysis cycles compared with free CalB enzyme; in particular, the relative immobilized enzyme activity was maintained up to 40%. In conclusion, PMMA nanoparticles proved to be a good support for the CalB enzyme immobilization and may be used as a feasible alternative catalyst in industrial processes.

  15. Engineering Students' Use of Computer Assisted Learning (CAL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huczynski, Andrzej; Johnston, Scott Paul

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the use of Computer Assisted Learning (CAL) by undergraduate engineering students studying a business and management course. Discussing both the relationship between management and engineering and CAL applied to engineering education, this study is based on a survey of 82 undergraduates and adopts a quantitative research…

  16. SMOS Soil moisture Cal val activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, Y.; Mialon, A.; Bitar, A. Al; Leroux, D.; Richaume, P.; Gruhier, C.; Berthon, L.; Novello, N.; Rudiger, C.; Bircher, S.; Wigneron, J. P.; Ferrazzoli, P.; Rahmoune, R.

    2012-04-01

    SMOS, successfully launched on November 2, 2009, uses an L Band radiometer with aperture synthesis to achieve a good spatial resolution.. It was developed and made under the leadership of the European Space Agency (ESA) as an Earth Explorer Opportunity mission. It is a joint program with the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) in France and the Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnologico Industrial (CDTI) in Spain. SMOS carries a single payload, an L band 2D interferometric,radiometer in the 1400-1427 MHz protected band. This wavelength penetrates well through the vegetation and with the atmosphere being almost transparent, it enables us to infer both soil moisture and vegetation water content. SMOS achieves an unprecedented spatial resolution of 50 km at L-band maximum (43 km on average) with multi angular-dual polarized (or fully polarized) brightness temperatures over the globe and with a revisit time smaller than 3 days. SMOS is now acquiring data and has undergone the commissioning phase. The data quality exceeds what was expected, showing very good sensitivity and stability. The data is however very much impaired by man made emission in the protected band, leading to degraded measurements in several areas including parts of Europe and China. Many different international teams are now performing cal val activities in various parts of the world, with notably large field campaigns either on the long time scale or over specific targets to address the specific issues. These campaigns take place in various parts of the world and in different environments, from the Antarctic plateau to the deserts, from rain forests to deep oceans. SMOS is a new sensor, making new measurements and paving the way for new applications. It requires a detailed analysis of the data so as to validate both the approach and the quality of the retrievals, and allow for monitoring and the evolution of the sensor. To achieve such goals it is very important to link efficiently ground

  17. Evaluation Study on Simulation CAL in the Science Faculty of the Open University. CAL REsearch Group Technical Report No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, P. J.; And Others

    This report describes evaluations of two courses which were conducted, primarily through participant observation, in 1981. A general introduction looks at simulation in computer assisted learning (CAL) and at use of simulation CAL in the Open University science faculty. The first study discussed was based largely on a tutor's observations of…

  18. Evaluation of CalMHSA Student Mental Health Online Resources

    PubMed Central

    Sontag-Padilla, Lisa; Kase, Courtney Ann; Woodbridge, Michelle W.; Stein, Bradley D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Analysis of visitors to CalMHSA-funded student mental health websites shows that visitors at educational institutions comprised the largest audience segment and promotional campaigns likely increased traffic. PMID:28083438

  19. Contraceptive Use Among Nonpregnant and Postpartum Women at Risk for Unintended Pregnancy, and Female High School Students, in the Context of Zika Preparedness - United States, 2011-2013 and 2015.

    PubMed

    Boulet, Sheree L; D'Angelo, Denise V; Morrow, Brian; Zapata, Lauren; Berry-Bibee, Erin; Rivera, Maria; Ellington, Sascha; Romero, Lisa; Lathrop, Eva; Frey, Meghan; Williams, Tanya; Goldberg, Howard; Warner, Lee; Harrison, Leslie; Cox, Shanna; Pazol, Karen; Barfield, Wanda; Jamieson, Denise J; Honein, Margaret A; Kroelinger, Charlan D

    2016-08-05

    Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause congenital microcephaly and brain abnormalities (1,2). Since 2015, Zika virus has been spreading through much of the World Health Organization's Region of the Americas, including U.S. territories. Zika virus is spread through the bite of Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquitoes, by sex with an infected partner, or from a pregnant woman to her fetus during pregnancy.* CDC estimates that 41 states are in the potential range of Aedes aegypti or Aedes albopictus mosquitoes (3), and on July 29, 2016, the Florida Department of Health identified an area in one neighborhood of Miami where Zika virus infections in multiple persons are being spread by bites of local mosquitoes. These are the first known cases of local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission in the continental United States.(†) CDC prevention efforts include mosquito surveillance and control, targeted education about Zika virus and condom use to prevent sexual transmission, and guidance for providers on contraceptive counseling to reduce unintended pregnancy. To estimate the prevalence of contraceptive use among nonpregnant and postpartum women at risk for unintended pregnancy and sexually active female high school students living in the 41 states where mosquito-borne transmission might be possible, CDC used 2011-2013 and 2015 survey data from four state-based surveillance systems: the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS, 2011-2013), which surveys adult women; the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS, 2013) and the Maternal and Infant Health Assessment (MIHA, 2013), which surveys women with a recent live birth; and the Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS, 2015), which surveys students in grades 9-12. CDC defines an unintended pregnancy as one that is either unwanted (i.e., the pregnancy occurred when no children, or no more children, were desired) or mistimed (i.e., the pregnancy occurred earlier than desired). The proportion of

  20. Measurements of Gases and Aerosols during 2010Cal-Mex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Molina, L.

    2012-04-01

    The major goal of the collaborative Cal-Mex 2010 research project is to assess the sources and processing of emissions along the California-Mexico border region and their effects on regional air quality and climate in order to provide scientific information to decision makers of both nations when addressing these two inter-related issues. During the Cal-Mex 2010 field study, the TAMU teams have collected extensive data sets from Tijuana/San Diego border, including volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gaseous sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and a suite set of physical and chemical parameters of aerosols. This comprehensive data set requires additional effort to process and analyze the measurements of gases and aerosols during Cal-Mex 2010. In this talk, preliminary data analysis of gases and aerosols will be presented, including VOCs and particle mixing states, morphology, and effective densities.

  1. Cal Poly Pomona NUE Project: Implementing Microscale and Nanoscale Investigations Throughout the Undergraduate Curriculum

    PubMed Central

    Vandervoort, Kurt; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    2013-01-01

    NUE funded work at California State Polytechnic University involved development and implementation of nanotechnology modules for physics courses spanning all levels of the undergraduate curriculum, from freshman service courses to senior level laboratories and independent research projects. These modules demonstrate the application of fundamental physics at the nanoscale that complement macroscopic investigations. The introductory level and some of the advanced level modules have been described previously in journal papers and will be outlined briefly here. The main focus of this article, however, is to describe some newer work involving nanoscale experiments that have been developed for senior level laboratories and independent research. These experiments involve applications as diverse as tunneling diodes, gas discharge plasmas for biofilm inactivation, and quantized conductance in gold nanowires. PMID:24163716

  2. A Low Velocity 0.30-cal. Gun System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Chronograph velocity screens Shockwave arresting shield Shotline Panel Fixture 8” 12” 12” 105” 20” 26.5” X-ray film planes side and orthogonal X-ray heads...35-inch)-long test barrel. Test barrel Shockwave shield 10 Fig. 12 0.30-cal. FSP launch velocity as a function of propellant load

  3. CAL Packages for Civil Engineering Hydraulics and Structural Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, W. D.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Describes computer assisted learning (CAL) packages written in FORTRAN IV and developed for use in a degree course in civil engineering dealing with hydraulics and structures. All are used in the interactive mode through a terminal with a keyboard and visual display unit. (Author/CMV)

  4. Cal-Pal: A County-Wide Volunteer Service Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, John; And Others

    1993-01-01

    The implementation and continuing growth of a volunteer youth/adult match-up service, Cal-Pal, being provided in seven rural communities are described in this article. School social workers in these areas can collaborate with other school-based personnel and community leaders to make such a service available. A major benefit of the program is the…

  5. NATAL-74; Towards a Common Programming Language for CAL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahan, J. W.; Colpitts, B. A.

    NATAL-74 is a programing language designed for Canadian computer aided learning (CAL) programs. The language has two fundamental elements: the UNIT provides the interface between the student and the subject matter, and the PROCEDURE element embodies teaching strategy. Desirable features of several programing languages have been adapted to cope…

  6. Cal Council: A Story of Continuity and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunetti, Gerald J.

    2015-01-01

    Gerald Brunetti served as President of the California Council on the Education of Teachers (Cal Council or CCET) from 1992 to 1994. This article describes the author's involvement with the CCET beginning in 1979, and covers the details of accomplishments throughout his presidency, such as the development of "CCNews," mail balloting, and…

  7. 17. 'BIRDSEYEVIEW, PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CAL., JAN. 1938.' No signature, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. 'BIRDSEYEVIEW, PRESIDIO OF MONTEREY, CAL., JAN. 1938.' No signature, photographer probably Anton C. Heidrick. This panoramic view looks west over Soldier Field from the upper floor or roof of the gymnasium. Original cool toned silver gelatin print measures 85.1 cm by 22.4 cm, flush mounted on mat board. - Presidio of Monterey, Soldier Field, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  8. Followup Study of Transfer Students from C.O.S. to California State University, Fresno, & California Poly-Technic State University, San Luis Obispo, Fall 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Elaine

    A study was conducted at College of the Sequoias (COS) to assess the academic success of students transferring to California State University, Fresno (Fresno State), and California Poly-Technic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal-Poly). The study focused on the number of units completed at COS, grade point average (GPA) at COS, COS units…

  9. Manifestations of CAL F-- and CAL EP--transients in radio emission based on "Zimenki" station data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durasova, M. S.; Fridman, V. M.; Sheiner, O. A.

    The actual direction in the study of solar activity is the study of coronal mass ejection (CME). The onsets of CMEs associated with the flares are called in literature as cal F--transients. There are cases, when CME are not accompanied by flare phenomena in the optical range, although such processes have to associate the dynamical phenomena in the solar atmosphere. Such CMEs are called below cal EP--transients. It is assumed valid, that phenomena connected with formation of cal EP--transients must be manifested in radio emission, which reflects the processes at different levels of the solar atmosphere. We began our study with the examining the manifestations of cal EP--transients in radio emission, because of their lower energy levels than cal F--transients have, supposed that in that case there was the possibility to distinguish the typical features of these phenomenon. We considered the data of sixteen examples of observations made in 1980 and 1984--1989 connected with cal EP--transients. In the analysis we used the observational data of CME (Burkepile and Cyr 1993), the SGD data of the solar flares as well as the original records of observations of the solar radio emission fluxes at "Zimenki" station at six frequencies in the range of 9100--100 MHz. According to the data of optical observations during two--hour period before the registration of the transient, the flares either were not observed or weak flare events were observed but sufficiently far from the solar regions where the transient was formed. During the same time interval sufficiently bursts S and GRF types in the microwave emission were observed. As a rule, in the considered period of time, noise storms were registered at the meter wavelengths, the intensity of which decreased or fluctuated in the time interval preceding the registration of the transient at SMM. It allowed us to analyse radio spectra of manifestations and to give the estimation of appearance of several radio signs in CME-events on

  10. Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) program computer software design description

    SciTech Connect

    Pertzborn, N.F.

    1997-03-26

    The Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) Program System Design Description contains a discussion of the design details for the WinCal product. Information in this document will assist a developer in maintaining the WinCal system. The content of this document follows the guidance in WHC-CM-3-10, Software Engineering Standards, Standard for Software User Documentation.

  11. Paleoseismic investigations at the Cal thrust fault, Mendoza, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomon, Eric; Schmidt, Silke; Hetzel, Ralf; Mingorance, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Along the active mountain front of the Andean Precordillera between 30°S and 34°S in western Argentina several earthquakes occurred in recent times, including a 7.0 Ms event in 1861 which destroyed the city of Mendoza and killed two thirds of its population. The 1861 event and two other earthquakes (Ms = 5.7 in 1929 and Ms = 5.6 in 1967) were generated on the Cal thrust fault, which extends over a distance of 31 km north-south and runs straight through the center of Mendoza. In the city, which has now more than 1 million inhabitants, the fault forms a 3-m-high fault scarp. Although the Cal thrust fault poses a serious seismic hazard, the paleoseismologic history of this fault and its long-term slip rate remains largely unknown (Mingorance, 2006). We present the first results of an ongoing paleoseismologic study of the Cal thrust at a site located 5 km north of Mendoza. Here, the fault offsets Late Holocene alluvial fan sediments by 2.5 m vertically and exhibits a well developed fault scarp. A 15-m-long and 2-3-m-deep trench across the scarp reveals three east-vergent folds that we interpret to have formed during three earthquakes. Successive retrodeformation of the two youngest folds suggests that the most recent event (presumably the 1861 earthquake) caused ~1.1 m of vertical offset and ~1.8 m of horizontal shortening. For the penultimate event we obtain a vertical offset of ~0.7 m and a horizontal shortening of ~1.9 m. A vertical displacement of ~0.7 m observed on a steeply west-dipping fault may be associated with an older event. The cumulative vertical offset of 2.5 m for the three inferred events is in excellent agreement with the height of the scarp. Based on the retrodeformation of the trench deposits the fault plane dips ~25° to the west. In the deepest part of the trench evidence for even older seismic events is preserved beneath an angular unconformity that was formed during a period of erosion and pre-dates the present-day scarp. Dating of samples to

  12. Structure-Guided Functional Characterization of Enediyne Self-Sacrifice Resistance Proteins, CalU16 and CalU19

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Calicheamicin γ1I (1) is an enediyne antitumor compound produced by Micromonospora echinospora spp. calichensis, and its biosynthetic gene cluster has been previously reported. Despite extensive analysis and biochemical study, several genes in the biosynthetic gene cluster of 1 remain functionally unassigned. Using a structural genomics approach and biochemical characterization, two proteins encoded by genes from the 1 biosynthetic gene cluster assigned as “unknowns”, CalU16 and CalU19, were characterized. Structure analysis revealed that they possess the STeroidogenic Acute Regulatory protein related lipid Transfer (START) domain known mainly to bind and transport lipids and previously identified as the structural signature of the enediyne self-resistance protein CalC. Subsequent study revealed calU16 and calU19 to confer resistance to 1, and reminiscent of the prototype CalC, both CalU16 and CalU19 were cleaved by 1in vitro. Through site-directed mutagenesis and mass spectrometry, we identified the site of cleavage in each protein and characterized their function in conferring resistance against 1. This report emphasizes the importance of structural genomics as a powerful tool for the functional annotation of unknown proteins. PMID:25079510

  13. CalSimHydro Tool - A Web-based interactive tool for the CalSim 3.0 Hydrology Prepropessor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, P.; Stough, T.; Vu, Q.; Granger, S. L.; Jones, D. J.; Ferreira, I.; Chen, Z.

    2011-12-01

    CalSimHydro, the CalSim 3.0 Hydrology Preprocessor, is an application designed to automate the various steps in the computation of hydrologic inputs for CalSim 3.0, a water resources planning model developed jointly by California State Department of Water Resources and United States Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region. CalSimHydro consists of a five-step FORTRAN based program that runs the individual models in succession passing information from one model to the next and aggregating data as required by each model. The final product of CalSimHydro is an updated CalSim 3.0 state variable (SV) DSS input file. CalSimHydro consists of (1) a Rainfall-Runoff Model to compute monthly infiltration, (2) a Soil moisture and demand calculator (IDC) that estimates surface runoff, deep percolation, and water demands for natural vegetation cover and various crops other than rice, (3) a Rice Water Use Model to compute the water demands, deep percolation, irrigation return flow, and runoff from precipitation for the rice fields, (4) a Refuge Water Use Model that simulates the ponding operations for managed wetlands, and (5) a Data Aggregation and Transfer Module to aggregate the outputs from the above modules and transfer them to the CalSim SV input file. In this presentation, we describe a web-based user interface for CalSimHydro using Google Earth Plug-In. The CalSimHydro tool allows users to - interact with geo-referenced layers of the Water Budget Areas (WBA) and Demand Units (DU) displayed over the Sacramento Valley, - view the input parameters of the hydrology preprocessor for a selected WBA or DU in a time series plot or a tabular form, - edit the values of the input parameters in the table or by downloading a spreadsheet of the selected parameter in a selected time range, - run the CalSimHydro modules in the backend server and notify the user when the job is done, - visualize the model output and compare it with a base run result, - download the output SV file to be

  14. Chemical and Physical Properties of Hi-Cal-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spakowski, A. E.; Allen, Harrison, Jr.; Caves, Robert M.

    1955-01-01

    As part of the Navy Project Zip to consider various boron-containing materials as possible high-energy fuels, the chemical and physical properties of Hi-Cal-2 prepared by the Callery Chemical Company were evaluated at the NACA Lewis laboratory. Elemental chemical analysis, heat of combustion, vapor pressure and decomposition, freezing point, density, self ignition temperature, flash point, and blow-out velocity were determined for the fuel. Although the precision of measurement of these properties was not equal to that obtained for hydrocarbons, this special release research memorandum was prepared to make the data available as soon as possible.

  15. THE ORBITAL PERIOD EVOLUTION OF THE SUPERSOFT X-RAY SOURCE CAL 87

    SciTech Connect

    Ablimit, Iminhaji; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2015-12-10

    CAL 87 is one of the best known supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs). However, the measured masses, orbital period, and orbital period evolution of CAL 87 cannot be addressed by the standard thermal-timescale mass-transfer model for SSSs. In this work we explore the orbital evolution of CAL 87 with both analytic and numerical methods. We demonstrate that the characteristics mentioned above can be naturally accounted for by the excited-wind-driven mass-transfer model.

  16. The CEOS Cal/Val Portal: A New Collaborative Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burini, Alessandro; Block, Thomas; Brockmann, Carsten; Goryl, Philippe

    2010-12-01

    The exploitation of Earth Observation data depends with increasing importance on multi-source inter-calibrated data, as demonstrated, for example, in the ESA DUE GlobColour project. The subgroup on Calibration and Validation of the Committee on Earth Observing System (CEOS) formulated a recommendation during the plenary session held in China at the end of 2004, with the goal of setting-up and operating an internet based system to provide sensor data, protocols and guidelines for the purposes of efficiently supporting sensor calibration, inter-calibration and product validation. ESA has taken the initiative and launched the version 1.0 of the CalVal Portal in October 2006 and the version 2.0 in mid 2009.

  17. Cal Tech's Program in Meteorology: 1933-1948.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    The California Institute of Technology (Cal Tech) established a course of study in meteorology in 1933. It was intimately tied to the upsurge of activity in commercial and military aviation that occurred in the period between the world wars. The tragic crash of the airship U.S.S. Akron provided the stimulus for including meteorology as a subprogram in the aeronautics department at Cal Tech. Thoodore von K´rm´n, head of the department and director of the school's Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory, masterminded the design of the program and geared it toward the solution of practical problems using the principles of dynamic meteorology. One of his doctoral students, Irving Krick, was groomed to develop the program.Robert Millikan, head of the institute, fostered an approach to science that encouraged the faculty to consuit and work with industry. In this environment, Krick established links with aviation, motion picture studios, and public utilities that would set the stage for the research thrust in meteorology. The program was primarily designed for training at the master' degree level, and a significant number of the graduates became entrepreneurs in meteorology. Based on letters of reminiscence and oral histories from some of these consulting meteorologists, it has been concluded that the Millikan/von K´rm´n philosophy of science played an important part in directing the meteorologists into the private sector.Following World War II, Lee DuBridge replaced Millikan as head of the institute. DuBridge's efforts were directed toward making the small elite school scientifically competitive in the changed conditions of a postwar world. In this climate, the merging of private business with academic work fell into disfavor. Without champions such as Millikan and von K´rm´n,the meteorology program was unable to survive.

  18. Comparing Outcomes for Los Angeles County's HUD-Assisted and Unassisted CalWORKS Leavers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Nandita; Hendra, Richard

    The impact of supplemental assistance from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) on CalWORKs leavers was examined in a study of CalWORKs recipients in Los Angeles County, California, who stopped receiving welfare benefits in the third quarter of 1998. Two groups received federal housing assistance at the time of exit from…

  19. 78 FR 1264 - CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, MN; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Employment and Training Administration CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, MN; Notice of Negative... workers of the subject firm (TA-W-80,399A; CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, Minnesota... Wireless Networks Corporation, Waseca, Minnesota to apply for TAA, the Department determines that...

  20. Data Management Standards in Computer-aided Acquisition and Logistic Support (CALS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferson, David K.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs and discussion on data management standards in computer-aided acquisition and logistic support (CALS) are presented. CALS is intended to reduce cost, increase quality, and improve timeliness of weapon system acquisition and support by greatly improving the flow of technical information. The phase 2 standards, industrial environment, are discussed. The information resource dictionary system (IRDS) is described.

  1. Evaluation of the SB 1041 Reforms to California's CalWORKs Program: Background and Study Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karoly, Lynn A.; Bozick, Robert; Davis, Lois M.; Kitmitto, Sami; Turk-Bicakci, Lori; Bos, Johannes M.; Holod, Aleksandra; Blankenship, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The California Budget Act of 2012, through a trailer bill known as Senate Bill (SB) 1041, contained significant reforms to the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program. CalWORKs is California's Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program, a central component of the safety net that provides cash aid for…

  2. Computer-assisted learning (CAL) for general and specialist nursing education.

    PubMed

    Nerlich, S

    1995-09-01

    Computer-assisted learning (CAL) may be defined as any learning that is mediated by a computer and which requires no direct interaction between the user and a human instructor in order to run. Instead, CAL presents the user with an interface (constructed by an educator skilled in the field of study) which allows the user to follow a lesson plan or may allow self-directed access to particular information of interest. CAL has been claimed to improve knowledge retention and achievement scores, enhance clinical judgement skills and reduce required instruction time; performing as well (if not better) when compared to other more traditional education techniques. The advantages of the utilisation of CAL in nursing education can be made clear by consideration of adult education theory and curriculum design, as well as the particular learning needs of nurses themselves. Research and development into a theoretical framework for CAL design and implementation has allowed the identification of beneficial aspects of CAL resources. Although the cost of commercial software may be prohibitive to some institutions, possibilities exist for educators to create their own CAL packages relatively simply.

  3. 75 FR 52589 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the Cal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... (SEIS) for the Cal Black Memorial Airport at Halls Crossing, UT AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... Decision concerning the development of Cal Black Memorial Airport. This supplemental EIS does not involve any new development or project at the airport. The Cal Black Memorial Airport opened in April 1992....

  4. Computer-aided acquisition and logistics support (CALS): Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Bourgeois, N.C.; Greer, D.K.

    1993-04-01

    This CALS Concept of Operations for Depot Maintenance provides the foundation strategy and the near term tactical plan for CALS implementation in the depot maintenance environment. The user requirements enumerated and the overarching architecture outlined serve as the primary framework for implementation planning. The seamless integration of depot maintenance business processes and supporting information systems with the emerging global CALS environment will be critical to the efficient realization of depot user's information requirements, and as, such will be a fundamental theme in depot implementations.

  5. EXORCISM: EXOR optiCal Infrared Systematic Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniucci, Simone; Arkharov, Arkady A.; Di Paola, Andrea; Giannini, Teresa; Kishimoto, Makoto; Kloppenborg, Brian; Larionov, Valeri M.; Li Causi, Gianluca; Lorenzetti, Dario; Vitali, Fabrizio

    2013-07-01

    EXors are pre-main sequence eruptive stars showing intermittent outbursts (Dmag about 3-4) of short duration (months) superposed on longer (years) quiescence periods. While a general consensus exists about the origin of the outbursts (i.e. accretion events from the circumstellar disk), many important details (e.g. the trigger mechanism, the disk heating/cooling and its final fragmentation) are not clarified yet. To perform a comprehensive study of EXors, we have recently activated a regular optical/NIR photometric and spectroscopic monitoring program (EXORCISM - EXORs optiCal-Infrared Systematic Monitoring), which will carry on in a more systematic way an observational program that we started a few years ago. During this period we have already obtained interesting results that will be discussed here: (i) EXors become bluer (redder) when brightening (fading), but extinction cannot be uniquely responsible for that; (ii) (quasi-)simultaneous light-curves taken in different bands show a systematic lag with the wavelength; (iii) SEDs at outburst and quiescence differ by a single temperature black-body interpreted as the sudden heating of the inner disk wall by hot spots on the stellar surface; (iv) EXor near-IR spectra look like those of accreting T Tauri stars more than those of FUOr objects; (v) notably, near IR permitted line emission weakens when the continuum fades, but the continuum fluctuations appear faster than those of the lines. These results will help to clarify the scopes of our EXORCISM project and, more importantly, to framework new results on the mid-IR properties of EXors (mainly derived from WISE data), which are so far quite unexplored.

  6. The M8 Power Calibration Experiment (M8CAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, W. R.; Bauer, T. H.

    1994-05-01

    The M8 calibration experiment was a series of 23 irradiations in TREAT performed to determine the relationship between the fission power generated in the TREAT core and the fission power generated in experiment fuel located in an in-core experiment vehicle and irradiated by core neutrons. The experiment was planned to provide the essential calibration information specifically needed for planning and analysis of the M8 test (and subsequent tests similar in geometry to M8) to be performed in the post-upgrade TREAT core. Irradiations were performed in TREAT cores loaded with a full-slotted (to optimize hodoscope performance) and with a half-slotted (to maximize energy deposition). Tests included a few selected low-power irradiations of fresh IFR-type U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr fuel pins supplemented by multiple irradiations of uranium-zirconium monitor wires ranging from low steady-state power to high-power maximal transients. This report describes the M8CAL test hardware, measurements, analysis assumptions, and methods used to deduce power coupling between the reactor and experiment fuel--including both absolute magnitudes and axial distributions. Power coupling results are reported for fresh IF fuel pins under high-power transient test conditions appropriate to the planned M8 transient test. In line with previous calibration data, measured dependence of power coupling on the specifics of each irradiation is also shown to correlate well with the in-core axial locations of the TREAT control rods. Estimates are made for maximal test fuel energy deposition capabilty in controlled transients.

  7. The Schmallenberg virus epidemic in Europe-2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Ana; Abrahantes, Jose Cortinas; Conraths, Franz; Veldhuis, Anouk; Elbers, Armin; Roberts, Helen; Van der Stede, Yves; Méroc, Estelle; Gache, Kristel; Richardson, Jane

    2014-10-15

    During the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) epidemic, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) collected data on SBV occurrence across Europe in order to provide an assessment of spread and impact. By May 2013, twenty-nine countries were reporting to EFSA and twenty-two countries had reported cases of SBV. The total number of SBV herds reported was 13,846 and the number of SBV laboratory confirmed herds was 8730. The surveillance activities were based on the detection of SBV clinical cases (either adults or newborns). Malformation in newborns was the most commonly reported clinical sign of SBV-infection. All countries were able to provide the date when the first suspicion of SBV in the herd was reported and nineteen could report the location of the herd at a regional level. This allowed the spread of SBV in Europe to be measured both temporally and spatially. The number of SBV confirmed herds started to increase in December 2011 and two peaks were observed in 2012 (February and May). Confirmed herds continued to be reported in 2012 and into 2013. An increase during winter 2012 and spring 2013 was again observed, but the number of confirmed herds was lower than in the previous year. SBV spread rapidly throughout Europe from the initial area of detection. SBV was detected above the latitude of 60° North, which exceeds the northern expansion observed during the bluetongue virus serotype 8 epidemic in 2006-2009. The impact of SBV was calculated as ratio of the number of herds with at least one malformed SBV positive foetus and the total number of herds in this region. The 75th percentile of the malformations ratio in the various affected countries for the whole reporting period was below 1% and 3% for cattle and sheep herds, respectively. International data collection on emerging diseases represents a challenge as the nature of available data, data quality and the proportion of reported cases may vary widely between affected countries. Surveillance activities on emerging animal diseases are often structured only for case detection making the estimation of infection/diseases prevalence and the investigation of risk factors difficult. The impact of the disease must be determined to allow risk managers to take appropriate decisions. Simple within-herd impact indicators suitable for emerging disease outbreaks should be defined that could be measured as part of routine animal health surveillance programmes and allow for rapid and reliable impact assessment of emerging animal health diseases.

  8. Mathematics Academies: Cohort 1 Evaluation Study, 2011-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stohr, Amber D.

    2014-01-01

    Commencing in 2011, the Mathematics Academies Initiative is a series of professional development academies (lasting 1 to 2 years, depending on cohort) with the primary objectives of (a) providing educators with a high quality professional development experience that enhances their mathematical content knowledge and pedagogical skills, and (b)…

  9. Malnutrition: role of the TwoCal HN Med Pass program.

    PubMed

    Bender, S; Pusateri, M; Cook, A; Ferguson, M; Hall, J C

    2000-12-01

    Malnutrition is common in older adults and is associated with poor outcomes. The causes and outcomes of malnutrition are discussed, and the TwoCal HN Med Pass program, designed to overcome poor dietary intake, is described. Benefits of the program, role of the pharmacist, identification of candidates for the TwoCal HN Med Pass program, and health care team roles and responsibilities are reviewed.

  10. Structural and functional characterization of CalS11, a TDP-rhamnose 3′-O-methyltransferase involved in calicheamicin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shanteri; Chang, Aram; Helmich, Kate E.; Bingman, Craig A.; Wrobel, Russel L.; Beebe, Emily T.; Makino, Shin-Ichi; Aceti, David J.; Dyer, Kevin; Hura, Greg L.; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J.; Phillips, George N.; Thorson, Jon S.

    2013-01-01

    Sugar methyltransferases (MTs) are an important class of tailoring enzymes which catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to sugar-based N-, C- and O- nucleophiles. While sugar N- and C-MTs involved in natural product biosynthesis have been found to act on sugar nucleotide substrates prior to a subsequent glycosyltransferase reaction, corresponding sugar O-methylation reactions studied thus far occur after the glycosyltransfer reaction. Herein we report the first in vitro characterization using 1H-13C-gHSQC with isotopically-labeled substrates and the X-ray structure determination at 1.55 Å resolution of the TDP-3′-O-rhamnose-methyltransferase CalS11 from Micromonospora echinospora. This study highlights a unique NMR-based methyltransferase assay, implicates CalS11 to be a metal and general acid/base-dependent O-methyltransferase and, as a first crystal structure for a TDP-hexose-O-methyltransferase, presents a new template for mechanistic studies and/or engineering. PMID:23662776

  11. Structural and functional characterization of CalS11, a TDP-rhamnose 3'-O-methyltransferase involved in calicheamicin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shanteri; Chang, Aram; Helmich, Kate E; Bingman, Craig A; Wrobel, Russell L; Beebe, Emily T; Makino, Shin-Ichi; Aceti, David J; Dyer, Kevin; Hura, Greg L; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Phillips, George N; Thorson, Jon S

    2013-07-19

    Sugar methyltransferases (MTs) are an important class of tailoring enzymes that catalyze the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-l-methionine to sugar-based N-, C- and O-nucleophiles. While sugar N- and C-MTs involved in natural product biosynthesis have been found to act on sugar nucleotide substrates prior to a subsequent glycosyltransferase reaction, corresponding sugar O-methylation reactions studied thus far occur after the glycosyltransfer reaction. Herein we report the first in vitro characterization using (1)H-(13)C-gHSQC with isotopically labeled substrates and the X-ray structure determination at 1.55 Å resolution of the TDP-3'-O-rhamnose-methyltransferase CalS11 from Micromonospora echinospora. This study highlights a unique NMR-based methyltransferase assay, implicates CalS11 to be a metal- and general acid/base-dependent O-methyltransferase, and as a first crystal structure for a TDP-hexose-O-methyltransferase, presents a new template for mechanistic studies and/or engineering.

  12. The Efficiency of Delone Coverings of the Canonical Tilings cal T}(*(A_4)) -> T^*(A4) and cal T}(*(D_6)) -> T^*(D6)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopolos, Zorka; Kasner, Gerald

    This chapter is devoted to the coverings of the two quasiperiodic canonical tilings cal T}(*(A_4)) -> T^*(A4) and cal T}(*(D_6)) equiv {cal T}(*(2F)) -> T^*(D6) T^*(2F), obtained by projection from the root lattices A4 and D6, respectively. In the first major part of this chapter, in Sect. 5.2, we shall introduce a Delone covering cal C}(s_{{cal) T}(*(A_4)}) -> C^sT^*(A4) of the 2-dimensional decagonal tiling cal T}(*(A_4)) -> T^*(A4). In the second major part of this chapter, Sect. 5.3, we summarize the results related to the Delone covering of the icosahedral tiling cal T}(*(D_6)) -> T^*(D6), cal C}_{{cal T}(*(D_6)}) -> CT^*(D6) and determine the zero-, single-, and double- deckings and the resulting thickness of the covering. In the conclusions section, we give some suggestions as to how the definition of the Delone covering might be changed in order to reach some real (full) covering of the icosahedral tiling cal T}(*(D_6)) -> T^*(D6). In Section 5.2 the definition of the Delone covering is also changed in order to avoid an unnecessary large thickness of the covering.

  13. PAS-cal: a Generic Recombinant Peptide Calibration Standard for Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breibeck, Joscha; Serafin, Adam; Reichert, Andreas; Maier, Stefan; Küster, Bernhard; Skerra, Arne

    2014-08-01

    We describe the design, preparation, and mass-spectrometric characterization of a new recombinant peptide calibration standard with uniform biophysical and ionization characteristics for mass spectrometry. "PAS-cal" is an artificial polypeptide concatamer of peptide cassettes with varying lengths, each composed of the three small, chemically stable amino acids Pro, Ala, and Ser, which are interspersed by Arg residues to allow site-specific cleavage with trypsin. PAS-cal is expressed at high yields in Escherichia coli as a Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO) fusion protein, which is easily purified and allows isolation of the PAS-cal moiety after SUMO protease cleavage. Upon subsequent in situ treatment with trypsin, the PAS-cal polypeptide yields a set of four defined homogeneous peptides in the range from 2 to 8 kDa with equal mass spacing. ESI-MS analysis revealed a conveniently interpretable raw spectrum, which after deconvolution resulted in a very simple pattern of four peaks with similar ionization signals. MALDI-MS analysis of a PAS-cal peptide mixture comprising both the intact polypeptide and its tryptic fragments revealed not only the four standard peptides but also the singly and doubly charged states of the intact concatamer as well as di- and trimeric adduct ion species between the peptides, thus augmenting the observable m/z range. The advantageous properties of PAS-cal are most likely a result of the strongly hydrophilic and conformationally disordered PEG-like properties of the PAS sequences. Therefore, PAS-cal offers an inexpensive and versatile recombinant peptide calibration standard for mass spectrometry in protein/peptide bioanalytics and proteomics research, the composition of which may be further adapted to fit individual needs.

  14. CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge: Two Institutional Networks Increasing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2017-01-01

    We describe two programs, CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge, with the common mission of increasing participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in astronomy, through summer research opportunities, in the case of CAMPARE, scholarships in the case of Cal-Bridge, and significant mentoring in both programs, creating a national impact on their numbers successfully pursuing a PhD in the field.In 7 years, the CAMPARE program has sent 80 students, >80% from underrepresented groups, to conduct summer research at one of 14 major research institutions throughout the country. The graduation rate among CAMPARE scholars is 98%, and of the CAMPARE scholars who have graduated with a Bachelor’s degree, more than 60% have completed or are pursuing graduate education in astronomy or a related field, at institutions including UCLA, UC Riverside, UC Irvine, UC Santa Barbara, USC, Stanford, Univ. of Arizona, Univ. of Washington, and the Fisk-Vanderbilt Master’s-to-PhD program.Now entering its third year, the Cal-Bridge program is a CSU-UC Bridge program comprised of over 75 physics and astronomy faculty from 5 University of California (UC), 9 California State University (CSU), and 14 California Community College (CCC) campuses in Southern California. In the first three years, 22 Cal-Bridge Scholars have been selected, including 11 Hispanic, 3 African-American and 8 female students, 5 of whom are from URM groups. Nineteen (19) of the 22 Cal-Bridge Scholars are first-generation college students. The entire first cohort of 4 Cal-Bridge scholars was accepted to one or more PhD programs in astronomy or physics, including UC Irvine, UC Santa Cruz, UC Davis, Michigan State, and Georgia State Universities. The second cohort of 8 Cal-Bridge scholars is applying to graduate schools this fall.Cal-Bridge provides much deeper mentoring and professional development experiences over the last two years of undergraduate and first year of graduate school to students from this diverse network of higher

  15. A multi-proxy warm season temperature reconstruction (3400 cal yr BP - 1500 cal yr BP) from the varved sediments of Lake Silvaplana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Monique; Larocque, Isabelle; Grosjean, Martin

    2010-05-01

    A multi-proxy analysis of a nine-meter sediment core from Lake Silvaplana (1791 m a.s.l., 46°24'N, 9°42'E - 46°30'N, 9°52'E), including an innovative application of Spectrolino (380 - 730 nm) data, provides a decadal warm season temperature reconstruction (3400 cal yr BP - 1500 cal yr BP). The climate of this region has been shown to be representative of continental Europe (Trachsel et al., 2009). Consequently, we offer one of the first high-resolution multi-proxy records of European climate for this time period. The sediment of Silvaplana contains annual (‘varved') layers. Therefore, a chronology has been based on varve counts, 210Pb, 137Cs, documented flood layers and radiocarbon dates (Blass et al., 2007a;b). These varves enable high-resolution (sub-decadal) sampling and measurement of geochemical (Spectrolino, Biogenic Silica [BSi], varve thickness) and biological (chironomids) parameters. Spectrolino and BSi Flux measurements of the upper three meters of the core have been used to develop two independent calibrations-in-time and warm season (JJAS) temperature reconstructions back to AD 1177 (Spectrolino calibration period = 1864 - 1949; r = 0.92; pcorr = 0.001; BSi calibration period = 1864 - 1949; r = 0.67; pcorr = 0.03) (Trachsel et al., in review a;b; Blass et al., 2007b). A third warm season (July) temperature reconstruction to AD 1177 has been developed from chironomids (Larocque et al., 2009; Larocque-Tobler et al., 2009; accepted). Finally, Leemann and Niessen (1994), Ohlendorf et al. (1997), Nussbaumer et al. (in prep.) and Blass et al. (2007a) have shown a close relationship between local glacial activity and mean summer temperature. Here, the laboratory methods and calibrations-in-time previously used to reconstruct temperatures to AD 1177 are applied to the lower six meters of sediments (Spectrolino and varve thickness: 3400 cal yr BP - 1500 cal yr BP; BSi and chironomids: 2550 cal yr BP - 1810 cal yr BP). Both the BSi and chironomid based

  16. Estimated contributions of primary and secondary organic aerosol from fossil fuel combustion during the CalNex and Cal-Mex campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman-Morales, J.; Frossard, A. A.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Liu, S.; Takahama, S.; Taylor, J. W.; Allan, J.; Coe, H.; Zhao, Y.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2014-05-01

    Observations during CalNex and Cal-Mex field campaigns at Bakersfield, Pasadena, Tijuana, and on board the R/V Atlantis show a substantial contribution of fossil fuel emissions to the ambient particle organic mass (OM). At least two fossil fuel combustion (FFC) factors with a range of contributions of oxidized organic functional groups were identified at each site and accounted for 60-88% of the total OM. Additional marine, vegetative detritus, and biomass burning or biogenic sources contribute up to 40% of the OM. Comparison of the FTIR spectra of four different unburned fossil fuels (gasoline, diesel, motor oil, and ship diesel) with PMF factors from ambient samples shows absorbance peaks from the fuels are retained in organic aerosols, with the spectra of all of the FFC factors containing at least three of the four characteristic alkane peaks observed in fuel standards at 2954, 2923, 2869 and 2855 cm-1. Based on this spectral similarity, we estimate the primary OM from FFC sources for each site to be 16-20%, with secondary FFC OM accounting for an additional 42-62%. Two other methods for estimating primary OM that use carbon monoxide (CO) and elemental carbon (EC) as tracers of primary organic mass were investigated, but both approaches were problematic for the CalNex and Cal-Mex urban sites because they were influenced by multiple emission sources that had site-specific and variable initial ratios to OM. For example, using the ΔPOM/ΔCO ratio of 0.0094 μg ppb V-1 proposed by other studies produces unrealistically high estimates of primary FFC OM of 55-100%.

  17. Spectral aerosol direct radiative forcing from airborne radiative measurements during CalNex and ARCTAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leblanc, Samuel E.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Redemann, J.; Hostetler, C.; Ferrare, R.; Hair, J.; Langridge, J. M.; Lack, D. A.

    2012-09-01

    This study presents the aerosol radiative forcing derived from airborne measurements of shortwave spectral irradiance during the 2010 Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex). Relative forcing efficiency, the radiative forcing normalized by aerosol optical thickness and incident irradiance, is a means of comparing the aerosol radiative forcing for different conditions. In this study, it is used to put the aerosol radiative effects of an air mass in the Los Angeles basin in context with case studies from three field missions that targeted other regions and aerosol types, including a case study from the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS). For CalNex, we relied on irradiance measurements onboard the NOAA P-3 aircraft during a flight on 19 May 2010 over a ground station. CalNex presented a difficulty for determining forcing efficiency since one of the input parameters, optical thickness, was not available from the same aircraft. However, extinction profiles were available from a nearby aircraft. An existing retrieval algorithm was modified to use those measurements as initial estimate for the missing optical thickness. In addition, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter (secondary products of the method), were compared with CalNex in situ measurements. The CalNex relative forcing efficiency spectra agreed with earlier studies that found this parameter to be constrained at each wavelength within 20% per unit of aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm regardless of aerosol type and experiment, except for highly absorbing aerosols sampled near Mexico City. The diurnally averaged below-layer forcing efficiency integrated over the wavelength range of 350-700 nm for CalNex is estimated to be -58.6 ± 13.8 W/m2, whereas for the ARCTAS case it is -48.7 ± 11.5 W/m2.

  18. Structural characterization of CalO1: a putative orsellinic acid methyltransferase in the calicheamicin-biosynthetic pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Aram; Singh, Shanteri; Bingman, Craig A.; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr, George N.

    2011-11-07

    The X-ray structure determination at 2.4 {angstrom} resolution of the putative orsellinic acid C3 O-methyltransferase (CalO1) involved in calicheamicin biosynthesis is reported. Comparison of CalO1 with a homology model of the functionally related calicheamicin orsellinic acid C2 O-methyltransferase (CalO6) implicates several residues that are likely to contribute to the regiospecificity of alkylation. Consistent with the proposed requirement of an acyl-carrier-protein-bound substrate, this structural study also reveals structural determinants within CalO1 that are anticipated to accommodate an association with an acyl carrier protein.

  19. Plans: 3'/50 Cal. Gun Platform, Boat Deck House Top & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Plans: 3'/50 Cal. Gun Platform, Boat Deck House Top & Fidley Top, Boat Deck, Radar Platform Lower, Pilot House Top, Navigation Bridge, Upper Bridge Deck, Poop Deck, Cargo Deck, Motor Boat Platform, Bridge Deck, Forecastle Deck, Upper Deck - Taluga, Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  20. CriTi-CAL: A computer program for Critical Coiled Tubing Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    He, X.

    1995-12-31

    A computer software package for simulating coiled tubing operations has been developed at Rogaland Research. The software is named CriTiCAL, for Critical Coiled Tubing Calculations. It is a PC program running under Microsoft Windows. CriTi-CAL is designed for predicting force, stress, torque, lockup, circulation pressure losses and along-hole-depth corrections for coiled tubing workover and drilling operations. CriTi-CAL features an user-friendly interface, integrated work string and survey editors, flexible input units and output format, on-line documentation and extensive error trapping. CriTi-CAL was developed by using a combination of Visual Basic and C. Such an approach is an effective way to quickly develop high quality small to medium size software for the oil industry. The software is based on the results of intensive experimental and theoretical studies on buckling and post-buckling of coiled tubing at Rogaland Research. The software has been validated by full-scale test results and field data.

  1. Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) program computer software configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-26

    This document describes the system configuration management activities performed in support of the Windows Calorimeter Control (WinCal) system, in accordance with Site procedures based on Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Standard 828-1990, Standard for Software Configuration Management Plans (IEEE 1990) and IEEE Standard 1042-1987, Guide to Software Configuration Management (IEEE 1987).

  2. Parallel implementation of a hyperspectral image linear SVM classifier using RVC-CAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madroñal, D.; Fabelo, H.; Lazcano, R.; Callicó, G. M.; Juárez, E.; Sanz, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral Imaging (HI) collects high resolution spectral information consisting of hundreds of bands across the electromagnetic spectrum -from the ultraviolet to the infrared range-. Thanks to this huge amount of information, an identification of the different elements that compound the hyperspectral image is feasible. Initially, HI was developed for remote sensing applications and, nowadays, its use has been spread to research fields such as security and medicine. In all of them, new applications that demand the specific requirement of real-time processing have appear. In order to fulfill this requirement, the intrinsic parallelism of the algorithms needs to be explicitly exploited. In this paper, a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier with a linear kernel has been implemented using a dataflow language called RVC-CAL. Specifically, RVC-CAL allows the scheduling of functional actors onto the target platform cores. Once the parallelism of the classifier has been extracted, a comparison of the SVM classifier implementation using LibSVM -a specific library for SVM applications- and RVC-CAL has been performed. The speedup results obtained for the image classifier depends on the number of blocks in which the image is divided; concretely, when 3 image blocks are processed in parallel, an average speed up above 2.50, with regard to the RVC-CAL sequential version, is achieved.

  3. Taking the Plunge with CLEM: The Design and Evaluation of a Large Scale CAL System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Tom; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a computer-assisted learning (CAL) package called CLEM (CORE Learning Environment for Modula-2) that was developed in Great Britain for teaching the Modula-2 programming language to first-year college students. Topics discussed include interactivity, flexibility, ease of use, student…

  4. The Evolution and Redefining of "CAL": A Reflection on the Interplay of Theory and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, R.

    2010-01-01

    This article comments on how the core idea of the computer as an assistant to teaching and learning became reconfigured through changing technologies, pedagogies and educational cultures. Early influential researchers in computer assisted learning (CAL) made strong but differing links to theories and representations of learning, showing a…

  5. Organic Aerosol Composition and Sources in Pasadena, California during the 2010 CalNex Campaign

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic aerosols (OA) in Pasadena are characterized using multiple measurements from the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign. Five OA components are identified using positive matrix factorization including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) ...

  6. Black Carbon Aerosol over the Los Angeles Basin during CalNex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-20

    4183, doi:10.1029/2001JD001409. Blumenthal, D., W. White, and T. Smith (1978), Anatomy of a Los Angeles smog episode: Pollutant transport in the...flights during CalNex. METCALF ET AL.: BLACK CARBON OVER L.A. DURING CALNEX D00V13D00V13 21 of 24 Los Angeles smog aerosol. I. Comparison of calculated

  7. Spectroscopic Classification of SN 2017cal (=ASASSN-17dh) as a Type Ia Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Danfeng; Rui, Liming; Wang, Xiaofeng; Jia, Junjun; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Tianmeng; Zhang, Jujia

    2017-03-01

    We obtained an optical spectrum (range 360-860 nm) of SN 2017cal (=ASASSN-17dh, see ATEL 10156), discovered by All Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN), on UT Mar.09.9 2017 with the 2.16-m telescope (+BFOSC) at Xinglong Station of National Astronomical Observatories of China (NAOC).

  8. Partners in Success for Young Adolescents: The Cal Ripken, Sr. Foundation and National Middle School Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Janice

    2007-01-01

    Middle school students are at a critical point in their lives. One way or another they are learning the decision-making and coping skills that they will use as adults. To be successful they need guidance from caring teachers, parents, coaches, and other significant adults who are positive role models. For Cal Ripken, Jr. and his brother Bill, it…

  9. Hospital Selective Contracting without Consumer Choice: What Can We Learn from Medi-Cal?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bamezai, Anil; Melnick, Glenn A.; Mann, Joyce M.; Zwanziger, Jack

    2003-01-01

    In the selective contracting era, consumer choice has generally been absent in most state Medicaid programs, including California's (called Medi-Cal). In a setting where beneficiary exit is not a threat, a large payer may have both the incentives and the ability to exercise undue market power, potentially exposing an already vulnerable population…

  10. CAL Community School: An Invitation to Patrons To Participate. 1995-96 Report to the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAL Community School, Latimer, IA.

    This annual report provides information on the CAL Community School, a small K-12 school that serves the communities of Alexander, Coulter, and Latimer, Iowa. The mission of the school is to provide a positive educational environment, maintain high academic standards, and promote the value of life-long learning among students. In addition, the…

  11. Scaffolding and Integrated Assessment in Computer Assisted Learning (CAL) for Children with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Ivan L.

    2005-01-01

    Computer assisted learning (CAL) can involve a computerised intelligent learning environment, defined as an environment capable of automatically, dynamically and continuously adapting to the learning context. One aspect of this adaptive capability involves automatic adjustment of instructional procedures in response to each learner's performance,…

  12. Graphics and Animation in Teaching Dialogues. CAL Research Group Technical Report No. 14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Every, I. M.

    An Open University project was planned to develop a set of computer assisted learning (CAL) microcomputer programs for a second level, summer school physics course, scheduled to begin in 1982. Major project aims were the development of an underlying system to effectively use medium resolution graphics with a simple animation capability;…

  13. 78 FR 1252 - CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation (CWNC), Satellite Products Division, Including On-Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... Division, Including On-Site Leased Workers From Select Staffing, Oxnard, CA; CalAmp Wireless Networks... Select Staffing, Oxnard, California (TA-W-80,399). The workers are engaged in the production of converter... Select Staffing, Oxnard, California (TA-W-80,399) and CalAmp Wireless Networks Corporation...

  14. 76 FR 70520 - Rovac Corp., RS Group of Companies, Inc., Rymer Foods, Inc. Stratus Services Group, Inc., Sun Cal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... COMMISSION Rovac Corp., RS Group of Companies, Inc., Rymer Foods, Inc. Stratus Services Group, Inc., Sun Cal Energy, Inc., Sun Motor International, Inc., Surebet Casinos, Inc., and Swiss Medica, Inc.; Order of... Sun Cal Energy, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended March...

  15. 78 FR 62614 - CalWind Resources, Inc. v. California Independent System Operator Corporation; Notice of Complaint

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission CalWind Resources, Inc. v. California Independent System Operator...) Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 CFR 385.206 (2013), CalWind Resources, Inc. (Complainant) filed...

  16. Monitoring Outcomes for Los Angeles County's Pre- and Post-CalWORKS Leavers: How Are They Faring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verma, Nandita; Hendra, Richard

    The characteristics, earnings, employment experiences, and material well-being of California welfare recipients after leaving welfare were examined by comparing the postwelfare experiences of groups who exited welfare before and after institution of California's welfare reform program CalWORKs. The first group (pre-CalWORKs group) exited welfare…

  17. Dimensionality reduction and endmember extraction for hyperspectral imaging using an RVC-CAL library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madroñal Quintín, D.; Lazcano López, R.; Juárez Martínez, E.; Sanz Álvaro, C.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral Imaging (HI) collects high resolution spectral information consisting of hundred of bands raging from the infrared to the ultraviolet wave lengths. In the medical field, specifically, in the cancer tissue identification at the operating room, the potential of HI is huge. However, given the data volume of HI and the computational complexity and cost of identification algorithms, real-time processing is the key, differential feature that brings value to surgeons. In order to achieve real-time implementations, the parallelism available in a specification needs to be explicitly highlighted. Data-flow programming languages, like RVC-CAL, are able to accomplish this goal. In this paper, an RVC-CAL library to implement dimensionality reduction and endmember extraction is presented. The results obtained show significant improvements with regard to a state-of-the-art analysis tool. A speedup of 30% is carried out using the complete processing chain and, in particular, a speedup of 5% has been achieved in the dimensionality reduction step. This dimensionality reduction takes ten of the thirteen seconds that the whole system needs to analyze one of the images. In addition, the RVC-CAL library is an excellent tool to simplify the implementation process of HI algorithms. Effectively, during the experimental test, the potential of the RVC-CAL library to reveal possible bottlenecks present in the HI processing chain and, therefore, to improve the system performance to achieve real-time constraints has been shown. Furthermore, the RVC-CAL library provides the possibility of system performance testing.

  18. CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge: Two Institutional Networks Increasing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, Chris David; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe two programs, CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge, with the common mission of increasing participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in astronomy, through summer research opportunities, in the case of CAMPARE, scholarships in the case of Cal-Bridge, and significant mentoring in both programs, leading to an increase in their numbers successfully pursuing a PhD in the field.In 6 years, the CAMPARE program has sent 62 students, >85% from underrepresented groups, to conduct summer research at one of twelve major research institutions in California, Arizona, and Wyoming. The graduation rate among CAMPARE scholars is 97%, and of the 37 CAMPARE scholars who have graduated with a Bachelor's degree, almost 60% (21) have completed or are pursuing graduate education in astronomy or a related field, at institutions including UCLA, USC, UC Riverside, Stanford, Univ. of Rochester, Georgia Tech, Kent State, Indiana Univ., Univ. of Oregon, Syracuse, and the Fisk-Vanderbilt Master's-to-PhD program. The Cal-Bridge program is a CSU-UC Bridge program comprised of faculty form 5 University of California (UC), 8 California State University (CSU), and 8 California Community College (CCC) campuses in Southern California. Cal-Bridge provides much deeper mentoring and professional development experiences over the last two years of undergraduate and first year of graduate school to students from this diverse network of higher education institutions. Cal-Bridge Scholars benefit from financial support, intensive, joint mentoring by CSU and UC faculty, professional development workshops, and exposure to research opportunities at the participating UC campuses.

  19. CalWater 2015 — Atmospheric Rivers and Aerosol Impacts on Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Doyle, J. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field experiment was conducted between January and March and consisted of more than fifty science flights, a major research cruise, and continuous ground-based observations coordinated to study phenomena driving the incidence of extreme precipitation events and the variability of water supply along the West Coast of the United States. CalWater 2015 examined key processes linked to (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major winter storms, and (2) aerosols, originating from local sources as well as from remote continents, within and between storms and their modulating effects on precipitation on the U.S. West Coast. As part of a large interagency field effort including NOAA, DOE, NASA, NSF, and the Naval Research Laboratory, four research aircraft from three government agencies were deployed in coordination with the oceangoing NOAA Ronald H. Brown and were equipped with meteorological and chemical observing systems in near-shore regions of California and the eastern Pacific. At the same time, ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network on the U.S. West Coast and a major NSF-supported observing site for aerosols and microphysics at Bodega Bay, California provided continuous near surface-level meteorological and chemical observations, respectively, during CalWater 2015. The DOE-sponsored ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) was executed in close coordination with NOAA and NASA facilities and deployed airborne and ship-based observing systems. This presentation summarizes the objectives, implementation strategy, data acquisitions, and some preliminary results from CalWater 2015 addressing science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic

  20. Biodiesel production from different algal oil using immobilized pure lipase and tailor made rPichia pastoris with Cal A and Cal B genes.

    PubMed

    Bharathiraja, B; Ranjith Kumar, R; PraveenKumar, R; Chakravarthy, M; Yogendran, D; Jayamuthunagai, J

    2016-08-01

    In this investigation, oil extraction was performed in marine macroalgae Gracilaria edulis, Enteromorpha compressa and Ulva lactuca. The algal biomass was characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fourier Transform-Infra Red Spectroscopy. Six different pre-treatment methods were carried out to evaluate the best method for maximum oil extraction. Optimization of extraction parameters were performed and high oil yield was obtained at temperature 55°C, time 150min, particle size 0.10mm, solvent-to-solid ratio 6:1 and agitation rate 500rpm. After optimization, 9.5%, 12.18% and 10.50 (g/g) of oil extraction yield was achieved from the respective algal biomass. The rate constant for extraction was obtained as first order kinetics, by differential method. Stable intracellular Cal A and Cal B lipase producing recombinant Pichia pastoris was constructed and used as biocatalyst for biodiesel production. Comparative analysis of lipase activity and biodiesel yield was made with immobilized Candida antarctica lipase.

  1. OxCal: versatile tool for developing paleoearthquake chronologies--a primer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lienkaemper, J.J.; Ramsey, C.B.

    2009-01-01

    Ages of paleoearthquakes (events), i.e., evidence of earthquakes inferred from the geologic record, provide a critical constraint on estimation of the seismic hazard posed by an active fault. The radiocarbon calibration program OxCal (4.0.3 and above; Bronk Ramsey 2007, 2001) provides paleoseismologists with a straightforward but rigorous means of estimating these event ages and their uncertainties. Although initially developed for the chronologic modeling of archaeological data from diverse sources (e.g., radiocarbon, historical knowledge, etc.), OxCal is readily adaptable to other disciplines requiring chronological modeling, such as paleoseismology (Fumal et al. 2002; Lindvall et al. 2002; Kelson et al. 2006; Noriega et al. 2006; Lienkaemper and Williams 2007; Yen et al. 2008).

  2. Lipase-catalyzed enantioselective synthesis of (R,R)-lactide from alkyl lactate to produce PDLA (poly D-lactic acid) and stereocomplex PLA (poly lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Jeon, Byoung Wook; Lee, Jumin; Kim, Hyun Sook; Cho, Dae Haeng; Lee, Hyuk; Chang, Rakwoo; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2013-10-20

    R-lactide, a pivotal monomer for the production of poly (D-lactic acid) (PDLA) or stereocomplex poly (lactic acid) (PLA) was synthesized from alkyl (R)-lactate through a lipase-catalyzed reaction without racemization. From among several types of lipase, only lipase B from Candida antarctica (Novozym 435; CAL-B) was effective in the reaction that synthesized (R,R)-lactide. Enantiopure (R,R)-lactide, which consisted of over 99% enantiomeric excess, was synthesized from methyl (R)-lactate through CAL-B catalysis. Removal of the methanol by-product was critical to obtain a high level of lactide conversion. The (R,R)-lactide yield was 56% in a reaction containing 100 mg of Novozym 435, 10 mM methyl (R)-lactate and 1500 mg of molecular sieve 5A in methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The important monomer (R,R)-lactide that is required for the production of the widely recognized bio-plastic PDLA and the PLA stereocomplex can be obtained using this novel synthetic method.

  3. The Relationship Between Computer-Aided Acquisition and Logistics Support (CALS) and Concurrent Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    Analysis Packaging Density Estimation Design Decision Traceability Producibility Design Analysis Environmental Control and Sensitivity Analysis First-Cut...cen- or process that operates on target with tered, not tool centered. smallest variance, is insensitive to 4.1 CommonCharateristis environmental ...report discusses a broad array of empiri- Sachieve the goals of improving quality cal, simulation, and analytical models. achiee simtnegouly o r ing quity

  4. A Comparison of CAL with a Conventional Method of Delivery of Cell Biology to Undergraduate Nursing Students Using an Experimental Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharrad, Heather J.; Kent, Christine; Allcock, Nick; Wood, Barry

    2001-01-01

    In study 1, 12 nursing students attended slide lectures on cell biology; 13 used interactive computer-assisted learning (CAL). Study 2 surveyed 38 students who used CAL to study immunology. Students preferred CAL and felt confident in their grasp of the material, even without the presence of lecturers to answer questions. (Contains 16 references.)…

  5. Assessment of DOD and industry networks for Computer-Aided Logistics Support (CALS) telecommunications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaura, F.L.; Sharp, S.J.; Clark, R.

    1987-06-01

    The Department of Defense is committed to applying the best in modern technology toward improving the transfer of design, engineering, and manufacturing technical information among weapon-system contractors and DoD organizations. The Military Services, the Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the Defense Communications Agency (DCA), and industry are undertaking or planning telecommunications support for such transfer. In view of these many and diverse efforts, the Computer Aided Logistics Support (CALS) Steering Group through the CALS Communications Working Group has recognized the need for evaluating them. The report presents an evaluation of CALS-related telecommunications requirements in DoD, the major efforts for automating engineering drawing and technical data repositories, and various intelligent-gateway efforts in each of the Services. The overall direction within each Service for telecommunication support and transitioning to the OSI (Open Systems Interconnection) standards is presented, as well as the status of commercial efforts for defining and implementing the OSI standards and improving long-haul telecommunications support.

  6. Exploiting Parallelism in the TileCal Trigger System with GPGPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacks, Marc

    2015-10-01

    After the 2022 upgrades, the Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) detector at ATLAS will be generating raw data at a rate of approximately 41 TB/s. The TileCal triggering system contains a degree of parallelism in its processing algorithms and thus presents an opportunity to explore the use of general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU). Currently, research into the viability of an sROD ARM-based co-processing unit (PU) is being conducted at Wits University with especial regard to increasing the I/O throughput of the detector. Integration of GPGPU into this PU could enhance its performance by relieving the ARMs of particularly parallel computations. In addition to the PU, use of GPGPU in the front-end trigger is being investigated on the basis of the used algorithms having a similarity to image processing algorithms - where GPU can be used optimally. The use of GPUs in assistance to or in place of FPGAs can be justified by GPUs’ relative ease of programming; C/C++ like languages as opposed to assembly-like Hardware Description Languages (HDLs). This project will consider how GPUs can best be utilised as a subsystem of TileCal in terms of power and computing efficiency; and therefore cost.

  7. Ionization Nebulae Surrounding CAL 83 and Other Supersoft X-ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Rappaport, S.; Macri, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of an optical search for ionized gaseous nebulae surrounding luminous, "supersoft" X-ray sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. This relatively new and mysterious X-ray class has characteristic luminosities approximately 10(exp 37) - 10(exp 38) ergs/s with effective temperatures in the range of 2 - 6 x 10(exp 5) K. The presence of a large flux of UV and soft X-ray photons from these objects has led to predictions of bright optical emission lines from the local interstellar medium. One such object, CAL 83 in the LMC, was known to have an associated nebula, and we quantify here the asymmetry and luminosity of this remarkable nebula. Deep images were made using narrowband filters to isolate the emission lines of H.alpha and [O III] (lamda5007). In these emission lines, the nebula is detected out to distances as far as 25 pc from the central object, and the integrated luminosity in each line is of order approximately 100 solar luminosity. Model calculations of such nebulae for chemical abundances characteristic of the LMC indicate that approximately 1% of the X-ray luminosity of the central source is reprocessed into the nebular H.alpha and [O III] lamda5007 emission lines, from which we conclude that the time-averaged X-ray luminosity of the central source, CAL 83, is greater than 3 x 10(exp 37) ergs/s. The bright inner nebula contains approximately 150 solar mass within 7.5 pc of CAL 83, which clearly indicates that the nebular material has its origin in the interstellar medium. In sharp contrast, there were null detections for nebulae associated with nine other luminous, supersoft X-ray sources in the LMC and SMC, with upper limits for the [O III] luminosity that are a factor of approximately 10 below that for CAL 83. For eight of these latter sources, we conclude that either their time-averaged luminosity is substantially below that of CAL 83, or that the local interstellar medium is much less dense. The latter effect may be

  8. Ionization nebulae surrounding CAL 83 and other supersoft X-ray sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remillard, R. A.; Rappaport, S.; Macri, L. M.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of an optical search for ionized gaseous nebulae surrounding luminous, 'supersoft' X-ray sources in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. This relatively new and mysterious X-ray class has characteristic luminosities approximately 10(exp 37)-10(exp 38) ergs/s with effective temperatures in the range of 2-6 x 10(exp 5) K. The presence of a large flux of UV and soft X-ray photons from these objects has led to predictions of bright optical emission lines from the local interstellar medium. One such object, CAL 83 in the LMC, was known to have an associated nebula, and we quantify here the asymmetry and luminosity of this remarkable nebula. Deep images were made using narowband filters to isolate the emission lines of H alpha and (O III) (lambda 5007). In these emission lines, the nebula is detected out to distances as far as 25 pc from the central object, and the integrated luminositu in each line is of order approximately 100 solar luminosity. Model calculations of such nebulae for chemical abundances characteristic of the LMC indicate that approximately 1% of the X-ray luminosity of the central source is reprocessed into the nebular H-alpha and (O III) lambda 5007 emission lines, from which we conclude that the time-averaged X-ray luminosity of the central source, CAL 83, is greater than 3 x 10(exp 37) ergs/s. The bright inner nebula contains approximately 150 solar mass within 7.5 pc of CAL 83, which clearly indicates that the nebular material has its origin in the interstelar medium. In sharp contrast, there were null detections for nebulae associated with nine other luminous, supersoft X-ray sources in the LMC and SMC, with upper limits for the (O III) luminosity that are a factor of approximately 10 below that for CAL 83. For eight of these latter sources, we conclude that either their time-averaged luminosity is substantially below that of CAL 83, or that the local interstellar medium is much less dense. The latter effect may be enhanced

  9. CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge: Two Institutional Networks Increasing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, Chris David; Phillips, Cynthia B.; Povich, Matthew S.; Prather, Edward E.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe two programs, CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge, with the common mission of increasing participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in astronomy, particularly underrepresented minorities and women, through summer research opportunities, in the case of CAMPARE, scholarships in the case of Cal-Bridge, and significant mentoring in both programs, leading to an increase in their numbers successfully pursuing a PhD in the field.CAMPARE is an innovative REU-like summer research program, currently in its sixth year, comprising a network of comprehensive universities and community colleges in Southern California and Arizona (most of which are minority serving institutions), and ten major research institutions (University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, JPL, Caltech, and the five Southern California UC campuses, UCLA, UCI, UCSD, UCR, and UCSB).In its first five summers, CAMPARE sent a total of 49 students from 10 different CSU and community college campuses to 5 research sites of the program. Of these 49 participants, 25 are women and 24 are men; 22 are Hispanic, 4 are African American, and 1 is Native American, including 6 female Hispanic and 2 female African-American participants. Twenty-one (21) CAMPARE participants have graduated from college, and more than half (11) have attended or are attending a graduate program, including 8 enrolled in PhD or Master's-to-PhD programs. Over twenty CAMPARE students have presented at the AAS and other national meetings.The Cal-Bridge program is a diverse network of higher education institutions in Southern California, including 5 UC campuses, 8 CSU campuses, and 7 community colleges dedicated to the goal of increasing the number of underrepresented minority and female students attending graduate school in astronomy or related fields. We have recently selected our inaugural group of five 2014 Cal-Bridge Scholars, including four women (two Hispanic and one part Native American), and one Hispanic man

  10. CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge: Two Institutional Networks Increasing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Impey, Chris David; Phillips, Cynthia B.; Povich, Matthew S.; Prather, Edward E.; Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.

    2015-01-01

    We describe two programs, CAMPARE and Cal-Bridge, with the common mission of increasing participation of groups traditionally underrepresented in astronomy, particularly underrepresented minorities and women, through summer research opportunities, in the case of CAMPARE, scholarships in the case of Cal-Bridge, and significant mentoring in both programs, leading to an increase in their numbers successfully pursuing a PhD in the field.CAMPARE is an innovative REU-like summer research program, currently in its sixth year, comprising a network of comprehensive universities and community colleges in Southern California and Arizona (most of which are minority serving institutions), and ten major research institutions (University of Arizona Steward Observatory, the SETI Institute, JPL, Caltech, and the five Southern California UC campuses, UCLA, UCI, UCSD, UCR, and UCSB).In its first five summers, CAMPARE sent a total of 49 students from 10 different CSU and community college campuses to 5 research sites of the program. Of these 49 participants, 25 are women and 24 are men; 22 are Hispanic, 4 are African American, and 1 is Native American, including 6 female Hispanic and 2 female African-American participants. Twenty-one (21) CAMPARE participants have graduated from college, and more than half (11) have attended or are attending a graduate program, including 8 enrolled in PhD or Master's-to-PhD programs. Over twenty CAMPARE students have presented at the AAS and other national meetings.The Cal-Bridge program is a diverse network of higher education institutions in Southern California, including 5 UC campuses, 8 CSU campuses, and 7 community colleges dedicated to the goal of increasing the number of underrepresented minority and female students attending graduate school in astronomy or related fields. We have recently selected our inaugural group of five 2014 Cal-Bridge Scholars, including four women (two Hispanic and one part Native American), and one Hispanic man

  11. Structural characterization of CalO2: A putative orsellinic acid P450 oxidase in the calicheamicin biosynthetic

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, Jason G.; Johnson, Heather D.; Singh, Shanteri; Bingman, Craig A.; Lei, In-Kyoung; Thorson, Jon S.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2009-08-13

    Although bacterial iterative Type I polyketide synthases are now known to participate in the biosynthesis of a small set of diverse natural products, the subsequent downstream modification of the resulting polyketide products remains poorly understood. Toward this goal, we report the X-ray structure determination at 2.5 A resolution and preliminary characterization of the putative orsellenic acid P450 oxidase (CalO2) involved in calicheamicin biosynthesis. These studies represent the first crystal structure for a P450 involved in modifying a bacterial iterative Type I polyketide product and suggest the CalO2-catalyzed step may occur after CalO3-catalyzed iodination and may also require a coenzyme A- (CoA) or acyl carrier protein- (ACP) bound substrate. Docking studies also reveal a putative docking site within CalO2 for the CLM orsellinic acid synthase (CalO5) ACP domain which involves a well-ordered helix along the CalO2 active site cavity that is unique compared with other P450 structures.

  12. The Aspergillus nidulans cetA and calA genes are involved in conidial germination and cell wall morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Belaish, Ravit; Sharon, Haim; Levdansky, Emma; Greenstein, Shulamit; Shadkchan, Yana; Osherov, Nir

    2008-03-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans genes cetA (AN3079.2) and calA (AN7619.2) encode a novel class of fungal thaumatin-like proteins of unknown function. Deletion of cetA does not result in an observable phenotype [Greenstein, S., Shadkchan, Y., Jadoun, J., Sharon, C., Markovich, S., Osherov, N., 2006. Analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans thaumatin-like cetA gene and evidence for transcriptional repression of pyr4 expression in the cetA-disrupted strain. Fungal Genet. Biol. 43, 42-53]. We prepared knockout calA and calA/cetA A. nidulans strains. The calA mutants were phenotypically identical to the wild-type. In contrast, the cetA/calA double mutant showed a synthetic lethal phenotype suggesting that the two genes affect a single function or pathway: most of its conidia were completely inhibited in germination. Many collapsed and underwent lysis. A few showed abnormal germination characterized by short swollen hyphae and abnormal hyphal branching. Nongerminated conidia contained a single condensed nucleus suggesting a block in early germination. This is the first functional analysis of the novel cetA/calA family of thaumatin-like genes and their role in A. nidulans conidial germination. We show that CETA and CALA are secreted proteins that together play an essential role in early conidial germination.

  13. Vibrio parahaemolyticus CalR down regulates the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) gene transcription and thereby inhibits hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiquan; Zhang, Ying; Gao, He; Zhang, Lingyu; Yin, Zhe; Huang, Xinxiang; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Huiying; Yang, Wenhui; Wang, Li

    2017-03-04

    TDH, encoded by tdh gene, is a major virulent determinant of V. parahaemolyticus that controls various biological activities, such as hemolytic activity, cytotoxicity, and enterotoxicity. The hemolytic activity on Wagatsuma agar ascribed to TDH is called Kanagawa phenomenon (KP). All KP positive strains contain tdh1 and tdh2 genes, but tdh2 is predominantly responsible for KP. CalR is a regulatory protein that was originally identified as a repressor of swarming motility and T3SS1 gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus. In the present study, the regulation of tdh2 by CalR was investigated using a set of experiments including qRT-PCR, primer extension, LacZ fusion, hemolytic phenotype, EMSA, and DNase I footprinting assays. The results showed that His-CalR protected a single region from 224bp to 318bp upstream of tdh2 against DNase I digestion, and a transcriptional start site located at 42bp upstream of tdh2 was detected and its transcribed activity was inhibited by CalR. Moreover, the KP test results showed that the hemolytic activity of V. parahaemolyticus is also under negative control of CalR. The data demonstrated that CalR is a repressor of the tdh2 transcription and thereby inhibits the hemolytic activity of V. parahaemolyticus.

  14. Crystallization and Preliminary Diffraction Analysis of the CAL PDZ Domain in Complex with a Selective Peptide Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    J Amacher; P Cushing; J Weiner; D Madden

    2011-12-31

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which regulates epithelial fluid and ion homeostasis. The CFTR cytoplasmic C-terminus interacts with a number of PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) proteins that modulate its intracellular trafficking and chloride-channel activity. Among these, the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL) has a negative effect on apical-membrane expression levels of the most common disease-associated mutant {Delta}F508-CFTR, making CAL a candidate target for the treatment of CF. A selective peptide inhibitor of the CAL PDZ domain (iCAL36) has recently been developed and shown to stabilize apical expression of {Delta}F508-CFTR, enhancing net chloride-channel activity, both alone and in combination with the folding corrector corr-4a. As a basis for structural studies of the CAL-iCAL36 interaction, a purification protocol has been developed that increases the oligomeric homogeneity of the protein. Here, the cocrystallization of the complex in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 35.9, b = 47.7, c = 97.3 {angstrom}, is reported. The crystals diffracted to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (1.96 {angstrom}{sup 3} Da{sup -1}), it appears that the asymmetric unit contains two complexes.

  15. User-Friendly Interface Developed for a Web-Based Service for SpaceCAL Emulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszka, Kathy J.; Holtz, Allen P.

    2004-01-01

    A team at the NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a Space Communications Architecture Laboratory (SpaceCAL) for protocol development activities for coordinated satellite missions. SpaceCAL will provide a multiuser, distributed system to emulate space-based Internet architectures, backbone networks, formation clusters, and constellations. As part of a new effort in 2003, building blocks are being defined for an open distributed system to make the satellite emulation test bed accessible through an Internet connection. The first step in creating a Web-based service to control the emulation remotely is providing a user-friendly interface for encoding the data into a well-formed and complete Extensible Markup Language (XML) document. XML provides coding that allows data to be transferred between dissimilar systems. Scenario specifications include control parameters, network routes, interface bandwidths, delay, and bit error rate. Specifications for all satellite, instruments, and ground stations in a given scenario are also included in the XML document. For the SpaceCAL emulation, the XML document can be created using XForms, a Webbased forms language for data collection. Contrary to older forms technology, the interactive user interface makes the science prevalent, not the data representation. Required versus optional input fields, default values, automatic calculations, data validation, and reuse will help researchers quickly and accurately define missions. XForms can apply any XML schema defined for the test mission to validate data before forwarding it to the emulation facility. New instrument definitions, facilities, and mission types can be added to the existing schema. The first prototype user interface incorporates components for interactive input and form processing. Internet address, data rate, and the location of the facility are implemented with basic form controls with default values provided for convenience and efficiency using basic XForms operations

  16. Los Angeles Basin airborne organic aerosol characterization during CalNex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A.; Hayes, P. L.; Duong, H. T.; Sorooshian, A.; Jimenez, J. L.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2013-10-01

    We report airborne organic aerosol (OA) measurements over Los Angeles carried out in May 2010 as part of the CalNex field campaign. The principal platform for the airborne data reported here was the CIRPAS Twin Otter (TO); airborne data from NOAA WP-3D aircraft and Pasadena CalNex ground-site data acquired during simultaneous TO flybys are also presented. Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer measurements constitute the main source of data analyzed. The increase in organic aerosol oxidation from west to east in the basin was sensitive to OA mass loading, with a greater spatial trend in O:C associated with lower mass concentration. Three positive matrix factorization (PMF) components (hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol (HOA), semi-volatile oxidized organic aerosol (SVOOA), and low volatility oxidized organic aerosol (LVOOA)) were resolved for the one flight that exhibited the largest variability in estimated O:C ratio. Comparison of the PMF factors with two optical modes of refractory black carbon (rBC)-containing aerosol revealed that the coating of thinly coated rBC-containing aerosol, dominant in the downtown region, is likely composed of HOA, whereas more thickly coated rBC-containing aerosol, dominant in the Banning pass outflow, is composed of SVOOA and LVOOA. The correlation of water-soluble organic mass to oxidized organic aerosol (OOA) is higher in the outflows than in the basin due to the higher mass fraction of OOA/OA in the outflows. By comparison, the average OA concentration over Mexico City MILAGRO (Megacity Initiative: Local and Global Research Observations) campaign was ˜7 times higher than the airborne average during CalNex.

  17. Playback Station #2 for Cal Net and 5-day-recorder tapes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, Jerry P.

    1978-01-01

    A second system (Playback Station #2) has been set up to play back Cal Net 1" tapes and 5-day-recorder 1/2" tapes. As with the first playback system (Playback Station #1) the tapes are played back on a Bell and Howell VR3700B tape deck and the records are written out on a 16-channel direct-writing Siemens "0scillomink." Separate reproduce heads, tape guides, and tape tension sensor rollers are required for playing back 111 tapes and 1/2" tapes, but changing these tape deck components is a simple task that requires only a few minutes. The discriminators, patch panels, selector switches, filters, time code translators, and signal conditioning circuits for the time code translators and for the tape-speed-compensation signal are all mounted in an equipment rack that stands beside the playback tape deck. Changing playback speeds (15/16 ips or 3 3/4 ips) or changing from Cal Net tapes to 5-day-recorder tapes requires only flipping a few switches and/or changing a few patch cables on the patch panel (in addition to changing the reproduce heads, etc., to change from 1" tape to 1/2" tape). For the Cal Net tapes, the system provides for playback of 9 data channels (680 Hz thru 3060 Hz plus 400 Hz) and 3 time signals (IRIG-E, IRIG-C, and WWVB) at both 15/16 ips (x1 speed) and 3 3/4 ips (x4 speed). Available modes of compensation (using either a 4688 Hz reference or a 3125 Hz reference) are subtractive, capstan, capstan plus subtractive, or no compensation.

  18. Cal/Val activities for DubaiSat-2 performance assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bushahab, A.; Al-Mansoori, S.; Al-Suwaidi, K.; Al Matroushi, Hessa; Al-Tunaiji, E.; Al Shamsi, Meera

    2014-10-01

    Emirates Institution for Advanced Science and Technology (EIAST) was established by the Dubai Government in 2006. After three years of working together with Satrec Initiative (South Korea), EIAST was able to launch DubaiSat-1 on the 29th of July 2009. Building on the success of DubaiSat-1 and the roll out of the knowledge transfer program, UAE engineers were involved in almost 70% of the total build and design of DubaiSat-2. Targeting the commercial market, DubaiSat-2 was launched on the 21st of November 2013 for capturing 1-meter resolution images. The 1st Cal/Val phase was the most critical phase in the satellite life-time, where most of the initial measurements took place. This phase extended over the period of 25/11/2013 till 12/12/2013. Moreover, this phase included most of the relative calibration tasks, color balancing and band matching. 2nd Cal/Val phase included most of the debugging and the pointing accuracy calibration tests. This phase extended over the period of 11/02/2014 till 09/03/2014. This phase emphasized on the calibration of the pointing accuracy. The 3rd Cal/Val phase included fine tuning for the Gyro system to further increase the stability of the satellite and thus improve the pointing accuracy. Moreover, new techniques were implemented to the Pan-Sharpening and to the MTF compensation procedures to enhance the final product. This phase extended over the period of 04/05/2014 till 21/05/2014.

  19. IntCal04: A New Consensus Radiocarbon Calibration Dataset from 0-26 ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimer, P. J.; Baillie, M. G.; Bard, E.; Beck, J. W.; Buck, C. E.; Blackwell, P. G.; Burr, G. S.; Cutler, K. B.; Damon, P. E.; Edwards, R. L.; Fairbanks, R. G.; Friedrich, M.; Guilderson, T. P.; Hogg, A. G.; Hughen, K. A.; Kromer, B.; McCormac, G.; Ramsey, C. B.; Reimer, R. W.; Remmele, S.; Southon, J. R.; Stuiver, M.; Taylor, F. W.; van der Plicht, J.; Weyhenmeyer, C. E.

    2003-12-01

    Because atmosphere 14C levels have not been constant through time, it is necessary to calibrate radiocarbon dates with known age radiocarbon datasets in order to compare paleorecords based on 14C ages and those based on other timescales. The need for a consensus calibration dataset was acknowledged by the radiocarbon community as a way of preventing confusion and the subjective use of selected datasets (1). Since then, radiocarbon calibration datasets have been developed by international collaborations and presented for ratification at the International Radiocarbon Conference (2-4). The IntCal04 Radiocarbon Calibration/Comparison Working Group has put together a dataset which incorporates existing and new measurements of tree-ring records, foraminifera from varved sediments, and corals that meet a strict set of acceptance criteria (5). Uncertainties for both the calendar time scale and the radiocarbon ages have been quantified and included in the dataset combination using a statistical technique based on the ideas of Christen and Nicholls (6) and Gomez Portugal Aguilar (7). The IntCal04 dataset, which covers the range of 0 to 26 ka BP, was presented for ratification at the 19th International Radiocarbon Conference in Wellington, New Zealand, in September, 2003. This paper will highlight the differences between IntCal98 and the new IntCal04 dataset and give an example showing the effect on the calibrated age for a Younger Dryas age sample. 1. J. Klein, J. C. Lerman, P. E. Damon, E. K. Ralph, Radiocarbon 24, 103-150 (1982). 2. M. Stuiver, Radiocarbon 28, R2-R2 (1986). 3. M. Stuiver et al., Radiocarbon 40, 1041-1083 (1998). 4. M. Stuiver, P. J. Reimer, Radiocarbon 35, 215-230 (1993). 5. P. J. Reimer et al., Radiocarbon 44, 653-661. (2002). 6. J. A. Christen, G. Nicholls, "Random-walk radiocarbon calibration." (Mathematics Department, University of Auckland, 2000). 7.D. G. P. Aguilar, C. D. Litton, A. O'Hagan, Radiocarbon 44, 195-212 (2002).

  20. Transfer of Air Force technical procurement bid set data to small businesses, using CALS and EDI: Test report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-15

    This report documents a test transfer of three Air Force technical procurement bid sets to one large and twelve small businesses, using the Department of Defense (DoD) Continuous Acquisition and Life-cycle Support (CALS) and ANSI ASC X12 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The main goal of the test was to evaluate the effectiveness of using CALS technical data within the context of the DoD`s EDI-based standard approach to electronic commerce in procurement, with particular emphasis on receipt and use of the data by small contractors. Air Force procurement data was provided by the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base; the manufacturing participants were selected from among McClellan`s ``Blue Ribbon`` contractors, located throughout the US. The test was sponsored by the Air Force CALS Test Network, headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The test successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of including CALS MIL-R-28002 (Raster) engineering data in an EDI Specification/Technical Information transaction set (ANSI ASC X12 841) when issuing electronic requests for quotation to small businesses. In many cases, the data was complete enough for the contractor participant to feel comfortable generating a quote. Lessons learned from the test are being fed back to the CALS and EDI standards organizations, and to future implementors of CALS-EDI based acquisition or contracting systems, which require the transfer of technical information, such as engineering data, manufacturing process data, quality test data, and other product or process data, in the form of a CALS or other digital datafile.

  1. Upgrade of the Laser calibration system for the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter TileCal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Woerden, Marius Cornelis

    2016-07-01

    We present in this contribution the new system for Laser calibration of the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter TileCal. The Laser system is a part of the three stage calibration apparatus designed to compute the calibration factors of the individual cells of TileCal. The Laser system is mainly used to correct for short term drifts of the readout of the individual cells. A sub-percent accuracy in the control of the calibration factors is required. To achieve this goal in the LHC Run2 conditions, a new Laser system was designed. The architecture of the system is described with details on the new optical line used to distribute Laser pulses in each individual detector module and on the new electronics used to drive the Laser, to read out optical monitors and to interface the system with the ATLAS readout, trigger and slow control. The LaserII system has been fully integrated into the framework used for measuring calibration factors and for monitoring data quality. First results on the Laser system performances studied are presented.

  2. Investigating Atmospheric Rivers using GPS TPW during CalWater 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almanza, V.; Foster, J. H.; Businger, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ship-based Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers have been successful in obtaining millimeter accuracy total precipitable water (TPW). We apply this technique with a field experiment using a GPS meteorology system installed on board the R/V Ronald Brown during the CalWater 2015 project. The goal of CalWater is to monitor atmospheric river (AR) events over the Eastern Pacific Ocean and improve forecasting of the extreme precipitation events they can produce. During the 30-day cruise, TPW derived from radiosonde balloons released from the Ron Brown are used to verify the accuracy of shipboard GPS TPW. The results suggest that ship-based GPS TPW offers a cost-effective approach for acquiring accurate real-time meteorological observations of TPW in AR's over remote oceans, as well as near the coastlines where satellites algorithms have limited accuracy. The results have implications for augmenting operational observing networks to improve weather prediction and nowcasting of ARs, thereby supporting hazard response and mitigation efforts associated with coastal flooding events.

  3. Cytotoxic effect of clodronate and zoledronate on the chondrosarcoma cell lines HTB-94 and CAL-78.

    PubMed

    Streitbuerger, Arne; Henrichs, Marcel; Ahrens, Helmut; Lanvers-Kaminzky, Claudia; Gouin, Francois; Gosheger, Georg; Hardes, Jendrik

    2011-09-01

    The wide surgical tumour resection is the only effective treatment in chondrosarcoma. However, a major problem remains the high rate of local recurrences and metastases due to the lack of adjuvant therapies. In this study the cytotoxic effect of the bisphosphonate clodronate (0.1-1000 μM) and zoledronate (0.1-1000 μM) in different concentrations on two chondrosarcoma cell lines (HTB-94 and CAL-78) has been investigated. After an incubation period of 48, 72 and 96 hours the chondrosarcoma cell viability was measured as the MTT-proliferation rate. In concentrations of >1 μm zoledronate the cell activity was reduced by up to 95% for the CAL-78 cells. Further, zoledronate has been more effective in lower concentrations than clodronate in the reduction of cell viability for both cell lines. However, clodronate showed significant cytotoxic effects in high concentrations and after longer incubation periods. Further research is necessary, but in the light of these results bisphosphonates may also play a role in the treatment of chondrosarcomas.

  4. NO2 fluxes from Tijuana using a mobile mini-DOAS during Cal-Mex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Claudia; Barrera, Hugo; Grutter, Michel; Zavala, Miguel; Galle, Bo; Bei, Naifang; Li, Guohui; Molina, Luisa T.

    2013-05-01

    NO2 fluxes were measured using a mobile mini-DOAS during Cal-Mex 2010 field study, between May 15 and June 30, 2010, from the urban area of Tijuana, Baja California as well as the Rosarito power plant. The average calculated NO2 fluxes were 328 ± 184 (269 ± 201) g s-1, and 23.4 ± 4.9 (12.9 ± 11.9) g s-1 for Tijuana urban area and Rosarito power plant, respectively, using model based wind fields and onsite measurements (in parenthesis). Wind speed and wind direction data needed to estimate the fluxes were both modeled and obtained from radiosondes launched regularly during the field campaign, whereas the mixing layer height throughout the entire field campaign was measured using a ceilometer. Large variations in the NO2 fluxes from both the Tijuana urban area and Rosarito power plant were observed during Cal-Mex 2010; however, the variability was less when model based wind fields were used. Qualitative comparisons of modeled and measured plumes from the Tijuana urban area and Rosarito power plant showed good agreement.

  5. A Discussion on Personnel Exposure to Posttest Byproducts from a 50-cal. Light Gas Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Don; Rodriquez, Karen

    2007-01-01

    In January of 2002, employees working in the Hypervelocity Test Facility (HTF) at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) began to notice common physical complaints. These included loss of smell, loss of taste, skin irritation, a burning sensation of the mucus membranes, and redness and chapping of the lips. These conditions extended to home during the weekends and throughout holiday breaks as well. Concerns about air contaminants were raised with regard to the operation of the .50-cal. two-stage light gas gun (2SLGG). Employees suspected that these conditions might be caused by air contaminants from small leaks at the gun pump tube joint at the breech, and exhaust gas entrainment into the WAC systems. The WSTF Industrial Hygienist (IH) was notified and samples were collected using the MIRAN infrared spectrometer (real time) air sampler on 08 January 2002 at the SO-cal. gun. The results from this screening test suggested the need for more detailed investigations with analytical sampling and analysis.

  6. Blueprint for a European calciphylaxis registry initiative: the European Calciphylaxis Network (EuCalNet).

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Vincent; Adragao, Teresa; van Dam, Bastiaan; Evenepoel, Pieter; Frazão, João M; Ketteler, Markus; Mazzaferro, Sandro; Urena Torres, Pablo; Ramos, Rosa; Torregrosa, Jose-Vicente; Cozzolino, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (CUA) is a rare disease and continues to be a clinical challenge. The typical course of CUA is characterized by painful skin discolouration and induration evolving to necrotic ulcerations. Medial calcification of cutaneous arterioles and extensive extracellular matrix remodelling are the hallmarks of CUA. The epidemiology and risk factors associated with this disease are still not fully understood. Moreover, CUA treatment strategies vary significantly among centres and expert recommendations are heterogeneous. Registries may provide important insights and information to increase our knowledge about epidemiology and clinical aspects of CUA and may help to optimize its therapeutic management. In 2006, we established an internet-based registry in Germany (www.calciphylaxie.de) to allow online notification of patients with established or suspected CUA. The registry includes a comprehensive database with questions covering >70 parameters and items regarding patient-related and laboratory data, clinical background and presentation as well as therapeutic strategies. The next phase will be to allow international patient registration via www.calciphylaxis.net as part of the multinational EuCalNet (European Calciphylaxis Network) initiative, which is supported by the ERA-EDTA scientific working group 'CKD-MBD'. Based on the valuable experience with the previous German CUA registry, EuCalNet will be a useful tool to collect data on the rare disease CUA and may become a basis for prospective controlled trials in the near future.

  7. Characterization of emissions sources in the California-Mexico Border Region during Cal-Mex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala, M. A.; Lei, W.; Li, G.; Bei, N.; Barrera, H.; Tejeda, D.; Molina, L. T.; Cal-Mex 2010 Emissions Team

    2010-12-01

    The California-Mexico border region provides an opportunity to evaluate the characteristics of the emission processes in rapidly expanding urban areas where intensive international trade and commerce activities occur. Intense anthropogenic activities, biomass burning, as well as biological and geological sources significantly contribute to high concentration levels of particulate matter (PM), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitrogen oxides (NOx), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), air toxics, and ozone observed in the California-US Baja California-Mexico border region. The continued efforts by Mexico and US for improving and updating the emissions inventories in the sister cities of San Diego-Tijuana and Calexico-Mexicali has helped to understand the emission processes in the border region. In addition, the recent Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign included a series of measurements aimed at characterizing the emissions from major sources in the California-Mexico border region. In this work we will present our analyzes of the data obtained during Cal-Mex 2010 for the characterization of the emission sources and their use for the evaluation of the recent emissions inventories for the Mexican cities of Tijuana and Mexicali. The developed emissions inventories will be implemented in concurrent air quality modeling efforts for understanding the physical and chemical transformations of air pollutants in the California-Mexico border region and their impacts.

  8. The TileCal Online Energy Estimation for the Next LHC Operation Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotto-Maior Peralva, B.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the detector used in the reconstruction of hadrons, jets and missing transverse energy from the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It covers the central part of the ATLAS detector (|η| < 1.6). The energy deposited by the particles is read out by approximately 5,000 cells, with double readout channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm, which expects a single signal with a well-defined shape. However, the LHC luminosity is expected to increase leading to pile-up that deforms the signal of interest. Due to limited resources, the current hardware setup, which is based on Digital Signal Processors (DSP), does not allow the implementation of sophisticated energy estimation methods that deal with the pile-up. Therefore, the technique to be employed for online energy estimation in TileCal for next LHC operation period must be based on fast filters such as the Optimal Filter (OF) and the Matched Filter (MF). Both the OF and MF methods envisage the use of the background second order statistics in its design, more precisely the covariance matrix. However, the identity matrix has been used to describe this quantity. Although this approximation can be valid for low luminosity LHC, it leads to biased estimators under pile- up conditions. Since most of the TileCal cell present low occupancy, the pile-up, which is often modeled by a non-Gaussian distribution, can be seen as outlier events. Consequently, the classical covariance matrix estimation does not describe correctly the second order statistics of the background for the majority of the events, as this approach is very sensitive to outliers. As a result, the OF (or MF) coefficients are miscalculated leading to a larger variance and biased energy estimator. This work evaluates the usage of a robust covariance estimator, namely the Minimum

  9. CalTOX (registered trademark), A multimedia total exposure model spreadsheet user's guide. Version 4.0(Beta)

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.; Enoch, K.G.

    2002-08-01

    CalTOX has been developed as a set of spreadsheet models and spreadsheet data sets to assist in assessing human exposures from continuous releases to multiple environmental media, i.e. air, soil, and water. It has also been used for waste classification and for setting soil clean-up levels at uncontrolled hazardous wastes sites. The modeling components of CalTOX include a multimedia transport and transformation model, multi-pathway exposure scenario models, and add-ins to quantify and evaluate uncertainty and variability. All parameter values used as inputs to CalTOX are distributions, described in terms of mean values and a coefficient of variation, rather than as point estimates or plausible upper values such as most other models employ. This probabilistic approach allows both sensitivity and uncertainty analyses to be directly incorporated into the model operation. This manual provides CalTOX users with a brief overview of the CalTOX spreadsheet model and provides instructions for using the spreadsheet to make deterministic and probabilistic calculations of source-dose-risk relationships.

  10. POLY-1,2,4-TRIAZOLES AND POLY-1,3,4-OXADIAZOLES FROM PRECURSOR POLY-N-ACYLHYDRAZIDINES,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    oxadiazole . Whereas, conversion of the precursor poly-N-acylhydrazidine predominantly to poly-1,2,4-triazole was affected by refluxing in solvents such... oxadiazole depending upon the heating rate. Poly-N-acylhydrazidine was of sufficient molecular weight to cast a clear yellow film which exhibited good...flexibility. The film, upon thermal treatment to temperatures as high as 300C, became brittle. The poly-1,3,4- oxadiazole and poly-1,2,4-triazole

  11. The mouse immune response to the double stranded polyribonucleotide complex poly(G) . poly(C).

    PubMed Central

    Gaffiero, G V; Robin, P; Nahon, E

    1984-01-01

    Ten inbred strains of mice were immunized with the double stranded polyribonucleotide complex polyguanylic . polycytidylic acid [poly(G) . poly(C)]. While some immunogenic properties of this duplex were comparable to those of other nucleic acids antigens, differences were also noted. High (SJL/J, BALB/c), low (DBA/2, AKR) and intermediate responders were observed; these differences were not abolished by adsorption of the duplex to MBSA. This pattern of immune response is distinct both from that observed with two other synthetic polyribonucleotide double helices [poly(A) . poly(U) and poly(I) . poly(C)] and with single stranded DNA. The anti-poly(G) . poly(C) activity was localized in the 7S region, whether the sera came from high or low responders, from mice immunized with or without a carrier, after one or several injections. In contrast with anti-poly(A) . poly(U) sera which do not react with poly(G) . poly(C), anti-poly(G) . poly(C) exhibited poly(A) . poly(U) binding activity; no clear relationship between the two activities, however, could be demonstrated. Thus a series of immunological properties differentiates poly(G) . poly(C) not only from the natural polydeoxyribonucleotide single stranded DNA, but also, and more unexpectedly, from two other double stranded polyribonucleotide complexes. These observations suggest that the mechanism controlling the antibody response to poly(G) . poly(C) differs from that regulating poly(A) . poly(U) and/or poly(I) . poly(C), and are to be connected with the fact that the anti-poly(G) . poly(C) antibodies occurring in the sera of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus did not correlate with the antibody activities directed toward the other duplexes. PMID:6697564

  12. Presentations at CALS Conference (Computer-Aided Acquisition and Logistic Support). Phase 1.1. Core Requirements Held in Gaithersburg, Maryland on April 26,1988

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-04-26

    82174 -4 ~,,... ~ VV*.- ’o-:.k.- CONTENTS Introduction . . . ........................ 1 CALS Points of Contact . ..................... 2 CALS Bulletin...MIL-M-28001. . . ........................ 80 MIL-D-28000 Amendment 1 . .................... 87 Program Implementation Guide - MIL-HDBK-CALS...List of Attendees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 200 flTIC -i INSP OED i. *_. . - M. - - - - - ~ V ’S "S ~ 1 ’p ..~) S. S. 9 ~ * .5. * f 5. 5% ’a

  13. Nucleolar activity and CENP-C regulate CENP-A and CAL1 availability for centromere assembly in meiosis.

    PubMed

    Kwenda, Lucretia; Collins, Caitriona M; Dattoli, Anna A; Dunleavy, Elaine M

    2016-04-15

    The centromere-specific histone CENP-A is the key epigenetic determinant of centromere identity. Whereas most histones are removed from mature sperm, CENP-A is retained to mark paternal centromeres. In Drosophila males we show that the centromere assembly factors CAL1 and CENP-C are required for meiotic chromosome segregation, CENP-A assembly and maintenance on sperm, as well as fertility. In meiosis, CENP-A accumulates with CAL1 in nucleoli. Furthermore, we show that CENP-C normally limits the release of CAL1 and CENP-A from nucleoli for proper centromere assembly in meiotic prophase I. Finally, we show that RNA polymerase I transcription is required for efficient CENP-A assembly in meiosis, as well as centromere tethering to nucleoli.

  14. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, Ryan; Ralph, Marty; Prather, Kim; Cayan, Dan; DeMott, Paul; Dettinger, Mike; Fairall, Chris; Leung, Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Rutledge, Steven; Waliser, Duane; White, Allen

    2014-05-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes science gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In the near term, a science investigation is being planned including a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific for an intensive observing period between January 2015 and March 2015. DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program and NOAA are coordinating on deployment of airborne and ship-borne facilities for this period in a DOE-sponsored study called ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment) to complement CalWater 2. The motivation for this major study is based on findings that have emerged in the last few years from airborne and ground-based studies including CalWater and NOAA's HydroMeterology Testbed

  15. Transfer of Air Force technical procurement bid set data to small businesses, using CALS and EDI. Summary report. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-10

    This report provides a summary of the Air Force CALS Test Network (AFCTN) Test Report Transfer of Air Force Technical Procurement Bid Set Data to Small Businesses, Using CALS and EDI (AFCTN Test Report 94-034, UCRL-ID-118619). It represents a synthesis of the results, conclusions, and recommendations, as well as a more concise presentation of the issues and strategies as viewed from AFCTN`s perspective. This report documents a test transfer of three Air Force technical procurement bid sets to one large and twelve small businesses, using the Department of Defense (DoD) Continuous Acquisition and Life-cycle Support (CALS) and ANSI ASC X12 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The main goal of the test was to evaluate the effectiveness of using CALS technical data within the context of the DoD`s EDI-based standard approach to electronic commerce in procurement, with particular emphasis on receipt and use of the data by small contractors. Air Force procurement data was provided by the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base; the manufacturing participants were selected from among McClellan`s {open_quote}Blue Ribbon{close_quote} contractors, located throughout the United States. The test was sponsored by the Air Force CALS Test Network, headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The test successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of including CALS MIL-R-28002 (Raster) engineering data in an EDI Specification/Technical Information transaction set (ANSI ASC X12 841) when issuing electronic requests for quotation to small businesses. In many cases, the data was complete enough for the contractor participant to feel comfortable generating a quote.

  16. SarConfoCal: simultaneous sarcomere length and cytoplasmic calcium measurements for laser scanning confocal microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Pasqualin, Côme; Gannier, François; Yu, Angèle; Malécot, Claire O; Bredeloux, Pierre; Maupoil, Véronique

    2016-12-22

    Simultaneous recordings of myocytes contractility and their cytoplasmic calcium concentration allow powerful studies, particularly on heart failure and other cardiac dysfunctions. Such studies require dedicated and expensive experimental devices that are difficult to use. Thus we propose SarConfoCal, the first and only software to simultaneously analyse both cytoplasmic calcium variations (from fluorescence signal) and myocytes contractility (from sarcomere length measurement) on laser scanning confocal microscopy images. SarConfoCal is easy to set up and use, especially by people without programming skills.

  17. A High Resolution Spectroscopic Observation of CAL 83 with XMM-Newton/RGS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paerels, Frits; Rasmussen, Andrew P.; Hartmann, H. W.; Heise, J.; Brinkman, A. C.; deVries, C. P.; denHerder, J.-W.

    2000-01-01

    We present the first high resolution photospheric X-ray spectrum of a Supersoft X-ray Source, the famous CAL 83 in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The spectrum was obtained with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer on XMM-Newton during the Calibration/Performance Verification phase of the observatory. The spectrum covers the range 20-40 A at an approximately constant resolution of 0.05 A, and shows very significant, intricate detail, that is very sensitive to the physical properties of the object. We present the results of an initial investigation of the spectrum, from which we draw the conclusion that the spectral structure is probably dominated by numerous absorption features due to transitions in the Gshells of the mid-2 elements and the M-shell of Fe, in addition to a few strong K-shell features due to CNO.

  18. NEW APPROACHES: Production of a multimedia CAL package in basic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M. F.; Gregory, J. R.

    1997-09-01

    In the late 1980s access to Engineering courses in higher education was widened and Foundation Years were introduced. Some pedagogical problems arose due to the unusually heterogeneous groups which ensued. The authors, who were associated with the Science and Engineering Foundation Programme at Loughborough University, which was instigated in 1991, investigated teaching and learning strategies which could be used beneficially with students having wide ranging previous educational experiences. One area which appeared to be very promising was that of Computer Assisted Learning, which could be undertaken by students as and when required. A piece of computer assisted learning and assessment courseware was produced during the academic year 1994 - 5 and evaluated in the following academic year. The responses of the Foundation students with whom the CAL courseware was piloted were generally favourable, and some useful suggestions concerning ways in which the courseware could be improved were made.

  19. Aerosol Impacts on Cloud Properties Observed during CalWater 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suski, K.; Prather, K. A.; Hubbe, J.; Kluzek, C.; Jonsson, H.

    2011-12-01

    In February and March of 2011, an aircraft aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (A-ATOFMS) was deployed on the DOE G-1 during CalWater, a multiyear field campaign aimed at understanding the effects of aerosols and atmospheric rivers on precipitation in California. Flights were conducted out of Sacramento and traversed the western coast of California to the eastern edge of the Sierra Nevada Mountain Range. Initial results show that when heavily processed Asian dust was present, clouds contained more ice than when dust wasn't present, showing that cloud processed Asian dust acts as an efficient ice nucleus. In one particular cloud, salty, processed dust was at the core of most cloud droplets, while aged soot remained unactivated in the interstitial aerosol. These results show that atmospheric aging can have varying effects on CCN and IN abilities. Further analysis of chemical mixing state and atmospheric aging effects on cloud properties are presented.

  20. Calibration of the HyCal calorimeter for the PRad Experiment at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Li; PRad Collaboration Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ``Proton Charge Radius Puzzle'' refers to the large discrepancy observed between the proton charge radius extracted from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements and that from the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift and e-p elastic scattering measurements. In order to get a better understanding of this puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor and the charge radius of proton by simultaneously measuring the e - p elastic scattering cross section and the M øller cross section at very low Q2(2 × 10-4 10-1(GeV / c) 2) region, with sub-percent precision. A windowless hydrogen gas flow target was used to better control the background. A high-efficiency and high-resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and a pair of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers were used in the experiment. Before the production run, a very careful calibration of HyCal was performed with 0.3 GeV - 1.07 GeV tagged photon beam. This talk will present detailed calibration results as well as some preliminary results on ep and ee scattering data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contacts No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Mississippi State University and PRad collaboration.

  1. Inorganic and black carbon aerosols in the Los Angeles Basin during CalNex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ensberg, J. J.; Craven, J. S.; Metcalf, A. R.; Allan, J. D.; Angevine, W. M.; Bahreini, R.; Brioude, J.; Cai, C.; Coe, H.; Gouw, J. A.; Ellis, R. A.; Flynn, J. H.; Haman, C. L.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lefer, B. L.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Murphy, J. G.; Neuman, J. A.; Nowak, J. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Stutz, J.; Taylor, J. W.; Veres, P. R.; Walker, J. M.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2013-02-01

    We evaluate predictions from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ version 4.7.1) model against a suite of airborne and ground-based meteorological measurements, gas- and aerosol-phase inorganic measurements, and black carbon (BC) measurements over Southern California during the CalNex field campaign in May/June 2010. Ground-based measurements are from the CalNex Pasadena ground site, and airborne measurements took place onboard the Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Navy Twin Otter and the NOAA WP-3D aircraft. BC predictions are in general agreement with observations at the Pasadena ground site and onboard the WP-3D, but are consistently overpredicted when compared to Twin Otter measurements. Adjustments to predicted inorganic mass concentrations, based on predicted aerosol size distributions and the AMS transmission efficiency, are shown to be significant. Owing to recent shipping emission reductions, the dominant source of sulfate in the L.A. Basin may now be long-range transport. Sensitivity studies suggest that severely underestimated ammonia emissions, and not the exclusion of crustal species (Ca2 +, K+, and Mg2 +), are the single largest contributor to measurement/model disagreement in the eastern part of the L.A. Basin. Despite overstated NOx emissions, total nitrate concentrations are underpredicted, which suggests a missing source of HNO3 and/or overprediction of deposition rates. Adding gas-phase NH3 measurements and size-resolved measurements, up to 10 μm, of nitrate and various cations (e.g. Na+, Ca2 +, K+) to routine monitoring stations in the L.A. Basin would greatly facilitate interpreting day-to-day fluctuations in fine and coarse inorganic aerosol.

  2. RVC-CAL library for endmember and abundance estimation in hyperspectral image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazcano López, R.; Madroñal Quintín, D.; Juárez Martínez, E.; Sanz Álvaro, C.

    2015-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HI) collects information from across the electromagnetic spectrum, covering a wide range of wavelengths. Although this technology was initially developed for remote sensing and earth observation, its multiple advantages - such as high spectral resolution - led to its application in other fields, as cancer detection. However, this new field has shown specific requirements; for instance, it needs to accomplish strong time specifications, since all the potential applications - like surgical guidance or in vivo tumor detection - imply real-time requisites. Achieving this time requirements is a great challenge, as hyperspectral images generate extremely high volumes of data to process. Thus, some new research lines are studying new processing techniques, and the most relevant ones are related to system parallelization. In that line, this paper describes the construction of a new hyperspectral processing library for RVC-CAL language, which is specifically designed for multimedia applications and allows multithreading compilation and system parallelization. This paper presents the development of the required library functions to implement two of the four stages of the hyperspectral imaging processing chain--endmember and abundances estimation. The results obtained show that the library achieves speedups of 30%, approximately, comparing to an existing software of hyperspectral images analysis; concretely, the endmember estimation step reaches an average speedup of 27.6%, which saves almost 8 seconds in the execution time. It also shows the existence of some bottlenecks, as the communication interfaces among the different actors due to the volume of data to transfer. Finally, it is shown that the library considerably simplifies the implementation process. Thus, experimental results show the potential of a RVC-CAL library for analyzing hyperspectral images in real-time, as it provides enough resources to study the system performance.

  3. Firmware development for the ATLAS TileCal sROD

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    TileCal is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. A main upgrade of the LHC (also called Phase-II) is planned in order to increase the instantaneous luminosity in 2022. At the TileCal level, the upgrade involves the redesign of the complete read-out architecture, affecting both the front-end and the back-end electronics. In the new read-out architecture, the front-end electronics will transmit digitized information of the full detector to the back-end system every single bunch crossing. Thus, the back-end system must provide digital calibrated information to the first level of trigger. Having all detector data per bunch crossing in the back-end will increase the precision and granularity of the trigger information, improving this way the trigger efficiencies. A reduced part of the detector, 1/256 of the total, will be equipped with the new electronics during 2014 to evaluate the proposed architecture in real conditions in the so-called 'demonstrator project'. The upgraded version of the Read-Out Driver (sROD) will be the core element of the back-end electronics in Phase-II. The sROD demonstrator is a prototype that is being developed to validate in the demonstrator project the future sROD for Phase-II. This module includes two Xilinx Series 7 Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) for data receiving and processing and will be installed and working in an ATCA framework. A complete description of the sROD functionality in terms of firmware will be introduced. In addition, the status of the firmware development and a summary of the main milestones achieved and the future plans will be presented. (authors)

  4. The Kunming CalFit study: modeling dietary behavioral patterns using smartphone data.

    PubMed

    Seto, Edmund; Hua, Jenna; Wu, Lemuel; Bestick, Aaron; Shia, Victor; Eom, Sue; Han, Jay; Wang, May; Li, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Human behavioral interventions aimed at improving health can benefit from objective wearable sensor data and mathematical models. Smartphone-based sensing is particularly practical for monitoring behavioral patterns because smartphones are fairly common, are carried by individuals throughout their daily lives, offer a variety of sensing modalities, and can facilitate various forms of user feedback for intervention studies. We describe our findings from a smartphone-based study, in which an Android-based application we developed called CalFit was used to collect information related to young adults' dietary behaviors. In addition to monitoring dietary patterns, we were interested in understanding contextual factors related to when and where an individual eats, as well as how their dietary intake relates to physical activity (which creates energy demand) and psychosocial stress. 12 participants were asked to use CalFit to record videos of their meals over two 1-week periods, which were translated into nutrient intake by trained dietitians. During this same period, triaxial accelerometry was used to assess each subject's energy expenditure, and GPS was used to record time-location patterns. Ecological momentary assessment was also used to prompt subjects to respond to questions on their phone about their psychological state. The GPS data were processed through a web service we developed called Foodscoremap that is based on the Google Places API to characterize food environments that subjects were exposed to, which may explain and influence dietary patterns. Furthermore, we describe a modeling framework that incorporates all of these information to dynamically infer behavioral patterns that may be used for future intervention studies.

  5. Meteorological overview and plume transport patterns during Cal-Mex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bei, Naifang; Li, Guohui; Zavala, Miguel; Barrera, Hugo; Torres, Ricardo; Grutter, Michel; Gutiérrez, Wilfredo; García, Manuel; Ruiz-Suarez, Luis Gerardo; Ortinez, Abraham; Guitierrez, Yaneth; Alvarado, Carlos; Flores, Israel; Molina, Luisa T.

    2013-05-01

    Cal-Mex 2010 Field Study is a US-Mexico collaborative project to investigate cross-border transport of emissions in the California-Mexico border region, which took place from May 15 to June 30, 2010. The current study presents an overview of the meteorological conditions and plume transport patterns during Cal-Mex 2010 based on the analysis of surface and vertical measurements (radiosonde, ceilometers and tethered balloon) conducted in Tijuana, Mexico and the modeling output using a trajectory model (FLEXPRT-WRF) and a regional model (WRF). The WRF model has been applied for providing the meteorological daily forecasts that are verified using the available observations. Both synoptic-scale and urban-scale forecasts (including wind, temperature, and humidity) agree reasonably well with the NCEP-FNL reanalysis data and the measurements; however, the WRF model frequently underestimates surface temperature and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height during nighttime compared to measurements. Based on the WRF-FLEXPART simulations with particles released in Tijuana in the morning, four representative plume transport patterns are identified as “plume-southeast”, “plume-southwest”, “plume-east” and “plume-north”, indicating the downwind direction of the plume; this will be useful for linking meteorological conditions with observed changes in trace gases and particular matter (PM). Most of the days during May and June are classified as plume-east and plume-southeast days, showing that the plumes in Tijuana are mostly carried to the southeast and east of Tijuana within the boundary layer during daytime. The plume transport directions are generally consistent with the prevailing wind directions on 850 hPa. The low level (below 800 m) wind, temperature, and moisture characteristics are different for each plume transport category according to the measurements from the tethered balloon. Future studies (such as using data assimilation and ensemble forecasts) will be

  6. Parallelism exploitation of a PCA algorithm for hyperspectral images using RVC-CAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazcano, R.; Sidrach-Cardona, I.; Madroñal, D.; Desnos, K.; Pelcat, M.; Juárez, E.; Sanz, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HI) collects information from across the electromagnetic spectrum, covering a wide range of wavelengths. The tremendous development of this technology within the field of remote sensing has led to new research fields, such as cancer automatic detection or precision agriculture, but has also increased the performance requirements of the applications. For instance, strong time constraints need to be respected, since many applications imply real-time responses. Achieving real-time is a challenge, as hyperspectral sensors generate high volumes of data to process. Thus, so as to achieve this requisite, first the initial image data needs to be reduced by discarding redundancies and keeping only useful information. Then, the intrinsic parallelism in a system specification must be explicitly highlighted. In this paper, the PCA (Principal Component Analysis) algorithm is implemented using the RVC-CAL dataflow language, which specifies a system as a set of blocks or actors and allows its parallelization by scheduling the blocks over different processing units. Two implementations of PCA for hyperspectral images have been compared when aiming at obtaining the first few principal components: first, the algorithm has been implemented using the Jacobi approach for obtaining the eigenvectors; thereafter, the NIPALS-PCA algorithm, which approximates the principal components iteratively, has also been studied. Both implementations have been compared in terms of accuracy and computation time; then, the parallelization of both models has also been analyzed. These comparisons show promising results in terms of computation time and parallelization: the performance of the NIPALS-PCA algorithm is clearly better when only the first principal component is achieved, while the partitioning of the algorithm execution over several cores shows an important speedup for the PCA-Jacobi. Thus, experimental results show the potential of RVC-CAL to automatically generate

  7. An eLIMA model for the 67 s X-ray periodicity in CAL 83

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odendaal, A.; Meintjes, P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Supersoft X-ray sources (SSSs) are characterized by their low effective temperatures and high X-ray luminosities. The soft X-ray emission can be explained by hydrogen nuclear burning on the surface of a white dwarf (WD) accreting at an extremely high rate. A peculiar ˜67 s periodicity (P67) was previously discovered in the XMM-Newton light curves of the SSS CAL 83. P67 was detected in X-ray light curves spanning ˜9 years, but exhibits variability of several seconds on time-scales as short as a few hours, and its properties are remarkably similar to those of dwarf nova oscillations (DNOs). DNOs are short time-scale modulations (≲1 min) often observed in dwarf novae during outburst. DNOs are explained by the well established low-inertia magnetic accretor (LIMA) model. In this paper, we show that P67 and its associated period variability can be satisfactorily explained by an application of the LIMA model to the more `extreme' environment in a SSS (eLIMA), contrary to another recent study attempting to explain P67 and its associated variability in terms of non-radial g-mode oscillations in the extended envelope of the rapidly accreting white dwarf in CAL 83. In the eLIMA model, P67 originates in an equatorial belt in the WD envelope at the boundary with the inner accretion disc, with the belt weakly coupled to the WD core by a ˜105 G magnetic field. New optical light curves obtained with the Sutherland High-speed Optical Camera (SHOC) are also presented, exhibiting quasi-periodic modulations on time-scales of ˜1000 s, compatible with the eLIMA framework.

  8. CalWater 2 - Precipitation, Aerosols, and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D. R.; DeMott, P. J.; Dettinger, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; Leung, L. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S. A.; Waliser, D. E.; White, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Emerging research has identified two phenomena that play key roles in the variability of the water supply and the incidence of extreme precipitation events along the West Coast of the United States. These phenomena include the role of (1) atmospheric rivers (ARs) in delivering much of the precipitation associated with major storms along the U.S. West Coast, and (2) aerosols—from local sources as well as those transported from remote continents—and their modulating effects on western U.S. precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of extreme precipitation and its effects, including the provision of beneficial water supply. This presentation summarizes the science objectives and strategies to address gaps associated with (1) the evolution and structure of ARs including cloud and precipitation processes and air-sea interaction, and (2) aerosol interaction with ARs and the impact on precipitation, including locally-generated aerosol effects on orographic precipitation along the U.S. West Coast. Observations are proposed for multiple winter seasons as part of a 5-year broad interagency vision referred to as CalWater 2 to address these science gaps (http://esrl.noaa.gov/psd/calwater). In January-February 2015, a field campaign has been planned consisting of a targeted set of aircraft and ship-based measurements and associated evaluation of data in near-shore regions of California and in the eastern Pacific. In close coordination with NOAA, DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program is also contributing air and shipborne facilities for ACAPEX (ARM Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Experiment), a DOE-sponsored study complementing CalWater 2. Ground-based measurements from NOAA's HydroMeteorological Testbed (HMT) network in California and aerosol chemical instrumentation at Bodega Bay, California have been designed to add important near surface-level context for the

  9. Modeling Aerosol Effects on Clouds and Precipitation: Insights from CalWater 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. R.; Lim, K. S. S.; Fan, J.; Prather, K. A.; DeMott, P. J.; Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The CalWater 2015 field campaign took place in northern California from mid January through early March of 2015. The field campaign, including collaborations between CalWater 2 and ACAPEX, aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with atmospheric rivers (ARs) and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. An observational strategy was employed using land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. During the field campaign, an AR developed in the Northeast Pacific Ocean in early February and made landfall in northern California. In-situ aerosol and cloud measurements from the G-1 aircraft; remote sensing data of clouds and aerosols; and meteorological measurements from aircraft, ship, and ground-based instruments collected from February 5 - 8, 2015 are analyzed to characterize the large-scale environment and cloud and precipitation forming processes. Modeling experiments are designed using a regional model for simulations with a cloud resolving limited area domain and quasi-global coarser resolution domain to evaluate the impacts of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and to explore the relative contributions of long-range transported and regional aerosols that interacted with the clouds before, during, and after AR landfall. Preliminary results will be discussed in the context of the field data as well as a multi-year simulation of the climatological contributions of long-range transported dust during AR landfall in California.

  10. Droplet activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, Fan; Hayes, Patrick L.; Ortega, Amber; Taylor, Jonathan W.; Allan, James D.; Gilman, Jessica; Kuster, William; de Gouw, Joost; Jimenez, Jose L.; Wang, Jian

    2013-04-11

    Size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra and aerosol chemical composition were characterized at an urban supersite in Pasadena, California, from 15 May to 4 June 2010, during the CalNex campaign. The derived hygroscopicity (κCCN) of CCN-active particles with diameter between 97 and 165 nm ranged from 0.05 to 0.4. Diurnal variation showed a slight decrease of κCCN from 8:00 to 16:00 (from 0.24 to 0.20), which is attributed to increasing organics volume fraction resulted from secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. The derived hygroscopicity distribution and maximum activated fraction of the size selected particles were examined as functions of photochemical age. The result indicates that condensation of secondary species (e.g., SOA and sulfate) quickly converted hydrophobic particles to hydrophilic ones, and during daytime, nearly every particle became a CCN at ~0.4% in just a few hours. Based on κCCN and aerosol chemical composition, the organic hygroscopicity (κorg) was derived, and ranged from 0.05 to 0.23 with an average value of 0.13, consistent with the results from earlier studies. The derived κorg generally increased with the organic oxidation level, and most of the variation in κorg could be explained by the variation of the organic O : C atomic ratio alone. The least squares fit of the data yielded κorg = (0.83 ± 0.06) × (O:C) + (-0.19 ± 0.02). Compared to previous results based on CCN measurements of laboratory generated aerosols, κorg derived from measurements during the CalNex campaign exhibited stronger increase with O : C atomic ratio and therefore substantially higher values for organics with average O : C greater than 0.5.

  11. Poly-instanton inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Cicoli, Michele; Pedro, Francisco G.; Tasinato, Gianmassimo E-mail: f.pedro1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2011-12-01

    We propose a new inflationary scenario in type IIB Calabi-Yau compactifications, where the inflaton is a Kähler modulus parameterising the volume of an internal four-cycle. The inflaton potential is generated via poly-instanton corrections to the superpotential which give rise to a naturally flat direction due to their double exponential suppression. Given that the volume mode is kept stable during inflation, all the inflaton-dependent higher dimensional operators are suppressed. Moreover, string loop effects can be shown to be negligible throughout all the inflationary dynamics for natural values of the underlying parameters. The model is characterised by a reheating temperature of the order T{sub rh} ≅ 10{sup 6} GeV which requires N{sub e} ≅ 54 e-foldings of inflation. All the inflationary observables are compatible with current observations since the spectral index is n{sub s} ≅ 0.96, while the tensor-to-scalar ratio is r ≅ 10{sup −5}. The volume of the Calabi-Yau is of order 10{sup 3} in string units, corresponding to an inflationary scale around 10{sup 15} GeV.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1635 - Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p... Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene). Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber... purposes of this section, poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methylstyrene) are...

  13. 21 CFR 177.1635 - Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p... Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene). Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber... purposes of this section, poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methylstyrene) are...

  14. 21 CFR 177.1635 - Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p... Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene). Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber... purposes of this section, poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methylstyrene) are...

  15. 21 CFR 177.1635 - Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p... Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene). Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber... purposes of this section, poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methylstyrene) are...

  16. Reconstruction of climatic and environmental changes in NW Romania during the early part of the last deglaciation (˜15,000-13,600 cal yr BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfarth, Barbara; Hannon, Gina; Feurdean, Angelica; Ghergari, Lucretia; Onac, Bogdan P.; Possnert, Göran

    2001-12-01

    High resolution pollen, plant macrofossil, charcoal, mineral magnetic and sedimentary analyses, combined with AMS 14C measurements, were performed on multiple sediment sequences along a transect through the former crater lake Preluca Ţiganului in northwestern Romania in order to reconstruct the climatic and environmental changes during the early part of the Last Termination. Lake sediments started to accumulate at ˜14,700 cal yr BP. Initially the upland vegetation consisted of an open forest with mainly Betula and Salix and few Pinus sp., but from 14,500 cal yr BP onwards, Pinus mugo, P. sylvestris and Populus and later on also Larix became established around the lake. Between 14,150 and 13,950 cal yr BP, Pinus cembra seems to have replaced P. mugo and P. sylvestris. At ˜13,950 cal yr BP the tree cover increased and Picea appeared for the first time, together with Pinus cembra, P. mugo and Larix. From ˜13,750 cal yr BP onwards, a Picea forest developed around the site. Based on the combined proxy data the following climatic development may be inferred: 14,700-14,500 cal yr BP, cooler and wet/humid; 14,500-14,400 cal yr BP: gradually warmer temperatures, wet/humid with dry summers; 14,400-14,320 cal yr BP: warm and dry; 14,320-14,150 cal yr BP: cooler and wet/humid; 14,150-14,100 cal yr BP: warm and dry; 14,100-13,850 cal yr BP: warmer and wet/humid; <13,850 cal yr BP: warm and dry. The tentative correlation of this development with the North Atlantic region assumes that the period >14,700 cal yr could correspond to GS-2a, the time span between 14,700 and 14,320 to GI-1e, the phase between 14,320 and 14,150 cal yr BP to GI-1d and the time frame between 14,150 and 13,600 cal yr BP to the lower part of GI-1c.

  17. Teachers' Perceptions on the Use of ICT in a CAL Environment to Enhance the Conception of Science Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Frikkie; Ogunniyi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Instructional methodologies increasingly require teachers' efficacy and implementation of computer-assisted learning (CAL) practices in general and particularly in the science classroom. The South African National Education Department's e-Education[1] policy also encourages the use of computers and computer software in implementing outcome-based…

  18. Co-evolving CENP-A and CAL1 Domains Mediate Centromeric CENP-A Deposition across Drosophila Species.

    PubMed

    Rosin, Leah; Mellone, Barbara G

    2016-04-18

    Centromeres mediate the conserved process of chromosome segregation, yet centromeric DNA and the centromeric histone, CENP-A, are rapidly evolving. The rapid evolution of Drosophila CENP-A loop 1 (L1) is thought to modulate the DNA-binding preferences of CENP-A to counteract centromere drive, the preferential transmission of chromosomes with expanded centromeric satellites. Consistent with this model, CENP-A from Drosophila bipectinata (bip) cannot localize to Drosophila melanogaster (mel) centromeres. We show that this result is due to the inability of the mel CENP-A chaperone, CAL1, to deposit bip CENP-A into chromatin. Co-expression of bip CENP-A and bip CAL1 in mel cells restores centromeric localization, and similar findings apply to other Drosophila species. We identify two co-evolving regions, CENP-A L1 and the CAL1 N terminus, as critical for lineage-specific CENP-A incorporation. Collectively, our data show that the rapid evolution of L1 modulates CAL1-mediated CENP-A assembly, suggesting an alternative mechanism for the suppression of centromere drive.

  19. 77 FR 77183 - Union Pacific Railroad Company-Abandonment of Freight Easement Exemption-in Alameda County, Cal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board [Docket No. AB 33 (Sub-No. 309X); Docket No. AB 980 (Sub-No. 2X)] Union Pacific Railroad Company--Abandonment of Freight Easement Exemption--in Alameda County, Cal. (San...

  20. Recommendations for Adjusting the Maximum Cal Grant Award at California's Nonpublic Colleges and Universities. Commission Report 05-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This report discusses proposals to adjust the maximum Cal Grant award for students attending California's nonpublic colleges and universities. The Commission agrees with the need to enact a long-term policy for adjusting the maximum award and offers two additional recommendations to address implementation and institutional reporting requirements.

  1. 78 FR 42156 - Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit District-Acquisition Exemption-In Marin County, Cal.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-15

    ... Surface Transportation Board Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit District--Acquisition Exemption-- In Marin.... 10902 for Sonoma-Marin Area Rail Transit District (SMART), a Class III rail carrier, to acquire an approximately 11.25-mile line of railroad in Marin County, Cal., from Golden Gate Bridge, Highway,...

  2. The 3000-4000 cal. BP anthropogenic shift in fire regime in the French Pyrenees.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rius, D.; Vannière, B.; Galop, D.; Richard, H.

    2009-04-01

    Fire is a key disturbing agent in a wide range of ecosystems: boreal biome (Pitkanen, 2000), Mediterranean area (Colombaroli et al., 2008) as well as temperate European mountain zones (Tinner et al., 1999). During the Holocene, climate may control fire regime by both ignition and fire spread-favouring conditions (i.e. composition, structure and moisture of biomass) whereas man may change charcoal accumulation patterns through type and intensity of agro-pastoral activities. In western and Mediterranean Europe, single sites charcoal analysis recorded the anthropogenic forcing over fire regime broadly between the mid and the late-Holocene. Turner et al (2008) showed that climate and fire had been disconnected since 1700 cal. BP in Turkey. In central Swiss, Mean Fire Interval decreased by two times 2000 years ago due to increasing human impact (Stahli et al., 2006). In Italy, climate and man have had a combined influence on fire-hazard since ca 4000 cal. BP (Vannière et al., 2008). In the Pyrenees Mountains, the linkage between agro-pastoral practices and fire could be dated back to ca 4000-3000 cal. BP with a clear succession of a clearance phase (high fire frequency) followed by a quite linear trend throughout Middle Ages and Modern times corresponding to a change in fire use (Vanniere et al., 2001; Galop et al., 2002, Rius et al., in press). The quantification of fire regimes parameters such as frequency with robust methodological tools (Inferred Fire Frequency, Mean Fire Interval) is needed to understand and characterise such shifts. Here we present two sequences from the Lourdes basin (col d'Ech peat bog) and from the occidental Pyrenees (Gabarn peat bog), which cover the last 9000 years with high temporal resolution. The main goals of this study were to (1) assess control factors of fire regime throughout the lateglacial and Holocene (climate and/or man) on the local scale, (2) evidence the local/regional significance of these control factors , (3) discuss the

  3. Searching for Evidence of Curricular Effect on the Teaching and Learning of Mathematics: Some Insights from the LieCal Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Jinfa

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on evidence from the Longitudinal Investigation of the Effect of Curriculum on Algebra Learning (LieCal) Project, issues related to mathematics curriculum reform and student learning are discussed. The LieCal Project was designed to longitudinally investigate the impact of a reform mathematics curriculum called the Connected Mathematics…

  4. Can Verbalisers Learn as well as Visualisers in Simulation-Based CAL with Predominantly Visual Representations? Preliminary Evidence from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Tzu-Chien; Kinshuk; Lin, Yi-Chun; Wang, Ssu-Chin

    2012-01-01

    Simulation-based computer-assisted learning (CAL) is emerging as new technologies are finding a place in mainstream education. Dynamically linked multiple representations (DLMRs) is at the core of simulation-based CAL. DLMRs includes multiple visual representations, and it enables students to manipulate one representation and to immediately…

  5. Meeting the Needs of CALS Students for Computing Capabilities. Final Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Student Computing Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monk, David; And Others

    The Ad Hoc Committee on the Cornell University (New York) College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) Student Computing Competencies was appointed in the fall of 1995 to determine (1) what all CALS undergraduate students should know about computing and related technologies; (2) how the college can make it possible for students to develop these…

  6. A Lactose-Binding Lectin from the Marine Sponge Cinachyrella Apion (Cal) Induces Cell Death in Human Cervical Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rabelo, Luciana; Monteiro, Norberto; Serquiz, Raphael; Santos, Paula; Oliveira, Ruth; Oliveira, Adeliana; Rocha, Hugo; Morais, Ana Heloneida; Uchoa, Adriana; Santos, Elizeu

    2012-01-01

    Cancer represents a set of more than 100 diseases, including malignant tumors from different locations. Strategies inducing differentiation have had limited success in the treatment of established cancers. Marine sponges are a biological reservoir of bioactive molecules, especially lectins. Several animal and plant lectins were purified with antitumor activity, mitogenic, anti-inflammatory and antiviral, but there are few reports in the literature describing the mechanism of action of lectins purified from marine sponges to induce apoptosis in human tumor cells. In this work, a lectin purified from the marine sponge Cinachyrella apion (CaL) was evaluated with respect to its hemolytic, cytotoxic and antiproliferative properties, besides the ability to induce cell death in tumor cells. The antiproliferative activity of CaL was tested against HeLa, PC3 and 3T3 cell lines, with highest growth inhibition for HeLa, reducing cell growth at a dose dependent manner (0.5–10 µg/mL). Hemolytic activity and toxicity against peripheral blood cells were tested using the concentration of IC50 (10 µg/mL) for both trials and twice the IC50 for analysis in flow cytometry, indicating that CaL is not toxic to these cells. To assess the mechanism of cell death caused by CaL in HeLa cells, we performed flow cytometry and western blotting. Results showed that lectin probably induces cell death by apoptosis activation by pro-apoptotic protein Bax, promoting mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, cell cycle arrest in S phase and acting as both dependent and/or independent of caspases pathway. These results indicate the potential of CaL in studies of medicine for treating cancer. PMID:22690140

  7. Funnel Beaker weather (6200-4900 cal BP) - reconstructed from the palaeolimnological record of synchronously deposited varves in northern Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreibrodt, Stefan; Zahrer, Jürgen; Brauer, Achim

    2013-04-01

    Depositional patterns of synchronously deposited varves of Lake Belauer See and Lake Poggensee (northern Germany) were studied on thin sections under the microscope comparatively. Events and trends that occurred synchronously in the lake systems were detected and interpret as limnologic responses to supra-regional extrinsic (climate) drivers. The different thresholds of the compared lake systems implied by different lake size were utilized to infer about weather conditions. For Lake Belauer See microfacies types of sub-recent varves were proved to reflect responses of certain meteorological conditions (e.g. severity of winters). A short weather anomaly at around 5950 cal BP was detected. Cold summers of about 40 successive years (probably with sudden frost events) lead to breaks of the thermal summer stratification and the associated carbonate precipitation. Instead renewed blooms of planctic diatoms occurred. The subsequent interval of the Funnel Beaker Culture seems to have experienced a period with favorable wea¬ther conditions, with warm summers and not extra-ordinary severe winters. Between ca. 5400 and 5340 cal BP an interval with pronounced warm winters is indicated. The favorable weather conditions termina¬ted abruptly at around 5275 cal BP when the weather (in particular summers) became colder. The comparison of the sediment sequences also provides evidence for the asynchronic onset of anthropogenic activity in the catchment areas of the lakes. A significant increase of minerogenic matter (quartz grains) indication soil erosion in the lake catchment started at ca. 3850 cal BC in Lake Poggensee, and at ca. 3500 cal BC in Lake Belau. Cycles of minerogenic input have been detected with duration of 20-25 years. Whether these cycles could represent slash and burn cycles has to be studied further.

  8. Novel mutations in RASGRP2, which encodes CalDAG-GEFI, abrogate Rap1 activation, causing platelet dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lozano, María Luisa; Cook, Aaron; Bastida, José María; Paul, David S; Iruin, Gemma; Cid, Ana Rosa; Adan-Pedroso, Rosa; Ramón González-Porras, José; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María; Fletcher, Sarah J; Johnson, Ben; Morgan, Neil; Ferrer-Marin, Francisca; Vicente, Vicente; Sondek, John; Watson, Steve P; Bergmeier, Wolfgang; Rivera, José

    2016-09-01

    In addition to mutations in ITG2B or ITGB3 genes that cause defective αIIbβ3 expression and/or function in Glanzmann's thrombasthenia patients, platelet dysfunction can be a result of genetic variability in proteins that mediate inside-out activation of αIIbβ3 The RASGRP2 gene is strongly expressed in platelets and neutrophils, where its encoded protein CalDAG-GEFI facilitates the activation of Rap1 and subsequent activation of integrins. We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) and whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify 2 novel function-disrupting mutations in RASGRP2 that account for bleeding diathesis and platelet dysfunction in 2 unrelated families. By using a panel of 71 genes, we identified a homozygous change (c.1142C>T) in exon 10 of RASGRP2 in a 9-year-old child of Chinese origin (family 1). This variant led to a p.Ser381Phe substitution in the CDC25 catalytic domain of CalDAG-GEFI. In 2 Spanish siblings from family 2, WES identified a nonsense homozygous variation (c.337C>T) (p.Arg113X) in exon 5 of RASGRP2 CalDAG-GEFI expression was markedly reduced in platelets from all patients, and by using a novel in vitro assay, we found that the nucleotide exchange activity was dramatically reduced in CalDAG-GEFI p.Ser381Phe. Platelets from homozygous patients exhibited agonist-specific defects in αIIbβ3 integrin activation and aggregation. In contrast, α- and δ-granule secretion, platelet spreading, and clot retraction were not markedly affected. Integrin activation in the patients' neutrophils was also impaired. These patients are the first cases of a CalDAG-GEFI deficiency due to homozygous RASGRP2 mutations that are linked to defects in both leukocyte and platelet integrin activation.

  9. A CubeSat for Calibrating Ground-Based and Sub-Orbital Millimeter-Wave Polarimeters (CalSat)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Bradley R.; Vourch, Clement J.; Drysdale, Timothy D.; Kalman, Andrew; Fujikawa, Steve; Keating, Brian; Kaufman, Jon

    2015-10-01

    We describe a low-cost, open-access, CubeSat-based calibration instrument that is designed to support ground-based and sub-orbital experiments searching for various polarization signals in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). All modern CMB polarization experiments require a robust calibration program that will allow the effects of instrument-induced signals to be mitigated during data analysis. A bright, compact and linearly polarized astrophysical source with polarization properties known to adequate precision does not exist. Therefore, we designed a space-based millimeter-wave calibration instrument, called CalSat, to serve as an open-access calibrator, and this paper describes the results of our design study. The calibration source on board CalSat is composed of five “tones” with one each at 47.1, 80.0, 140, 249 and 309GHz. The five tones we chose are well matched to (i) the observation windows in the atmospheric transmittance spectra, (ii) the spectral bands commonly used in polarimeters by the CMB community and (iii) the Amateur Satellite Service bands in the Table of Frequency Allocations used by the Federal Communications Commission. CalSat would be placed in a polar orbit allowing visibility from observatories in the Northern Hemisphere, such as Mauna Kea in Hawaii and Summit Station in Greenland, and the Southern Hemisphere, such as the Atacama Desert in Chile and the South Pole. CalSat also would be observable by balloon-borne instruments launched from a range of locations around the world. This global visibility makes CalSat the only source that can be observed by all terrestrial and sub-orbital observatories, thereby providing a universal standard that permits comparison between experiments using appreciably different measurement approaches.

  10. Novel mutations in RASGRP2, which encodes CalDAG-GEFI, abrogate Rap1 activation, causing platelet dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, María Luisa; Cook, Aaron; Bastida, José María; Paul, David S.; Iruin, Gemma; Cid, Ana Rosa; Adan-Pedroso, Rosa; Ramón González-Porras, José; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Johnson, Ben; Morgan, Neil; Ferrer-Marin, Francisca; Vicente, Vicente; Sondek, John; Watson, Steve P.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    In addition to mutations in ITG2B or ITGB3 genes that cause defective αIIbβ3 expression and/or function in Glanzmann’s thrombasthenia patients, platelet dysfunction can be a result of genetic variability in proteins that mediate inside-out activation of αIIbβ3. The RASGRP2 gene is strongly expressed in platelets and neutrophils, where its encoded protein CalDAG-GEFI facilitates the activation of Rap1 and subsequent activation of integrins. We used next-generation sequencing (NGS) and whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify 2 novel function-disrupting mutations in RASGRP2 that account for bleeding diathesis and platelet dysfunction in 2 unrelated families. By using a panel of 71 genes, we identified a homozygous change (c.1142C>T) in exon 10 of RASGRP2 in a 9-year-old child of Chinese origin (family 1). This variant led to a p.Ser381Phe substitution in the CDC25 catalytic domain of CalDAG-GEFI. In 2 Spanish siblings from family 2, WES identified a nonsense homozygous variation (c.337C>T) (p.Arg113X) in exon 5 of RASGRP2. CalDAG-GEFI expression was markedly reduced in platelets from all patients, and by using a novel in vitro assay, we found that the nucleotide exchange activity was dramatically reduced in CalDAG-GEFI p.Ser381Phe. Platelets from homozygous patients exhibited agonist-specific defects in αIIbβ3 integrin activation and aggregation. In contrast, α- and δ-granule secretion, platelet spreading, and clot retraction were not markedly affected. Integrin activation in the patients’ neutrophils was also impaired. These patients are the first cases of a CalDAG-GEFI deficiency due to homozygous RASGRP2 mutations that are linked to defects in both leukocyte and platelet integrin activation. PMID:27235135

  11. The CalWater 2 - ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, L. Y.; Prather, K. A.; Ralph, F. M.; Rosenfeld, D.; Spackman, J. R.; Fairall, C. W.; DeMott, P. J.; Fan, J.; Zhao, C.

    2014-12-01

    The western U.S. receives precipitation predominantly during the cold season when storms approach from the Pacific Ocean. The snowpack that accumulates during winter storms provides about 70-90% of water supply for the region. Two elements of significant importance in predicting precipitation variability in the western U.S. are atmospheric rivers and aerosols. Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow bands of enhanced water vapor associated with the warm sector of extratropical cyclones over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. While ARs are responsible for a large fraction of heavy precipitation in the western U.S. during winter, much of the rest of the orographic precipitation occurs in post-frontal clouds, which are typically quite shallow, with tops just high enough to pass the mountain barrier. Such clouds are inherently quite susceptible to aerosol effects on both warm rain and ice precipitation-forming processes. In January - March 2015, the ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment (ACAPEX) field campaign will take place in northern California. Joined with CalWater 2, the field campaign aims to improve understanding and modeling of large-scale dynamics and cloud and precipitation processes associated with ARs and aerosol-cloud interactions that influence precipitation variability and extremes in the western U.S. We will implement an observational strategy consisting of the use of land and offshore assets to monitor (1) the evolution and structure of ARs from near their regions of development, (2) long range transport of aerosols in eastern North Pacific and potential interactions with ARs, and (3) how aerosols from long-range transport and local sources influence cloud and precipitation in the U.S. West Coast where ARs make landfall and post-frontal clouds are frequent. This presentation will provide an overview of the science questions and hypotheses to be addressed by CalWater 2/ACAPEX, review key results from prior studies, and discuss recent findings from

  12. Sediment record of environmental change at Lake Lop Nur (Xinjiang, NW China) from 13.0 to 5.6 cal ka BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingzhong; Jia, Hongjuan

    2016-09-01

    Lake Lop Nur is located in the eastern part of the Tarim Basin in Xinjiang, northwestern China. A 220-cm-long sediment core was collected from the center of the ear-shaped depression forming the basin and dated with AMS14C. Grain size, total organic matter (TOC), total nitrogen (TN), and TOC/TN (C/N) analyses were used to reconstruct climatic conditions from 13.0 to 5.6 cal ka BP. The results showed five main climatic stages. Zone I (13.0-11.3 cal ka BP) was a wet-dry environment, whereas Zone II (11.3-8.9 cal ka BP) consisted of a primarily wet environment. Zone III (8.9-7.7 cal ka BP) was subdivided into Zone IIIa (8.9-8.2 cal ka BP) that indicated lake constriction and dry climate, and Zone IIIb (8.2-7.7 cal ka BP) in which the proxies indicated wet conditions. In Zone IV (7.7-6.6 cal ka BP), the climate presented a bit wet conditions. In Zone V (6.6-5.6 cal ka BP), abundant glauberite is present in the sediment and silt dominates the lithology; these results indicate the lake shrank and the overall climate was dry. Abrupt environmental events were also identified, including six dry events at 11.0, 10.5, 9.3, 8.6, 8.2, and 7.6 cal ka BP and one flood event from 7.8 to 7.7 cal ka BP in the Early-Middle Holocene.

  13. Poly(lactide)-block-poly([epsilon]-caprolactone-co-[epsilon]-decalactone)-block-poly(lactide) copolymer elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Schneiderman, Deborah K.; Hill, Erin M.; Martello, Mark T.; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2015-08-28

    Batch ring opening transesterification copolymerization of ε-caprolactone and ε-decalactone was used to generate statistical copolymers over a wide range of compositions and molar masses. Reactivity ratios determined for this monomer pair, rCL = 5.9 and rDL = 0.03, reveal ε-caprolactone is added preferentially regardless of the propagating chain end. Relative to poly(ε-caprolactone) the crystallinity and melting point of these statistical copolymers were depressed by the addition of ε-decalactone; copolymers containing greater than 31 mol% (46 wt%) ε-decalactone were amorphous. Poly(lactide)-block-poly(ε-caprolactone-co-ε-decalactone)-block-poly(lactide) triblock polymers were also prepared and used to explore the influence of midblock composition on the temperature dependent Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χ). In addition, uniaxial extension tests were used to determine the effects of midblock composition, poly(lactide) content, and molar mass on the mechanical properties of these new elastomeric triblocks.

  14. Interfacial microstructure in a B{sub 4}C/Al composite fabricated by pressureless infiltration.

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Z.; Song, Y.; Zhang, S.; Miller, D. J.

    2012-01-01

    In this work, B{sub 4}C particulate-reinforced Al composite was fabricated by a pressureless infiltration technique, and its interfacial microstructure was studied in detail by X-ray diffraction as well as by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The B{sub 4}C phase was unstable in Al melt during the infiltration process, forming AlB{sub 10}-type AlB{sub 24}C{sub 4} or Al{sub 2.1}B{sub 51}C{sub 8} as a major reactant phase. The Al matrix was large grains (over 10 {micro}m), which had no definite orientation relationships (ORs) with the randomly orientated B{sub 4}C or its reactant particles, except for possible nucleation sites with {l_brace}011{r_brace}{sub B{sub 4}C} almost parallel to {l_brace}111{r_brace}{sub Al} at a deviation angle of 1.5 deg. Both B{sub 4}C-Al and reactant-Al interfaces are semicoherent and free of other phases. A comparison was made with the SiC/Al composite fabricated similarly by the pressureless infiltration. It was suggested that the lack of ORs between the Al matrix and reinforced particles, except for possible nucleation sites, is the common feature of the composites prepared by the infiltration method.

  15. FoCal - A high granularity electromagnetic calorimeter for forward direct photon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.

    2017-02-01

    The measurement of direct photon production at forward rapidity (y ∼ 3 - 5) at the LHC provides access to the structure of protons and nuclei at very small values of fractional momentum (x ∼10-5) . FoCal, an extremely-high-granularity Forward Calorimeter covering 3.3 < η < 5.3 is proposed as a detector upgrade to the ALICE experiment. To facilitate the design of the upgrade and to perform generic R&D necessary for such a novel calorimeter, a compact high-granularity electromagnetic calorimeter prototype has been built. The corresponding R&D studies are the focus of this paper. The prototype is a Si/W sampling calorimeter. It was instrumented with 24 layers of Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors, a total of 39 M pixels. We report on performance studies of the prototype with test beams at DESY and CERN in a broad energy range. The results of the measurements demonstrate a very small Molière radius (∼ 11 mm) and good linearity of the response. Unique results on the detailed lateral shower shape, which are crucial for the two-shower separation capabilities, are presented. We compare the measurements to GEANT-based MC simulations, which additionally include a modeling of charge diffusion. The studies demonstrate the feasibility of this high-granularity technology for use in the proposed detector upgrade. They also show the extremely high potential of this technology for future calorimeter development.

  16. CCN and IN Effects on Cloud Properties and Precipitation - Case Studies from CalWater 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L.; Comstock, J. M.; Tomlinson, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosols in the atmosphere can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) to modify cloud microphysical processes, which could potentially change the location, intensity, and type of precipitation. Dust aerosols are often observed over California in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in winter/spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia. Although anthropogenic pollution has been postulated to contribute to reduction of precipitation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, the effects of dust aerosols on the winter clouds and precipitation has not been examined in detail particularly with model simulations. We incorporate recent progress in ice nucleation parameterizations to link dust with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with WRF, to exclusively look into how dust can possibly affect cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cases under different environmental conditions with atmospheric river (AR) and Sierra barrier jet (SBJ) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. It is shown that increasing IN concentrations or adding a dust layer at 4-6 km as IN enhances surface rain and snow due to enhanced production of ice and snow in clouds. However, increasing CCN suppresses surface rain and snow, and significantly redistributes surface precipitation upwind and downwind of the mountains, with important implication to improving our understanding of the impacts of aerosols on orographic precipitation and water supply in the region.

  17. Coatings of black carbon in Tijuana, Mexico, during the CalMex Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, S.; Russell, L. M.; Duran, R.; Subramanian, R.; Kok, G.

    2010-12-01

    Black carbon number and mass concentrations were measured by a single-particle soot photometer (SP2; by Droplet Measurement Technologies) in Tijuana, Mexico between May 15, 2010, and June 30, 2010, for the CalMex campaign. The measurement site, Parque Morelos, is a recreational area located in the Southeast region of Tijuana. The SP2 was equipped with 8-channels of signal detection that spans a wider range of sensitivity for incandescing and scattering measurements than traditional configurations. The campaign-average number concentration of incandescing particles was 280 #/cc, peaking during traffic activity in the mornings. Incandescing particles made up 50% of all particles (incandescing and purely scattering) detected by the SP2. The mode of the number size distribution estimated for black carbon, according to estimated mass-equivalent diameters, was approximately 100 nm or smaller. Temporal variations in estimated coating thicknesses for these black carbon particles are discussed together with co-located measurements of organic aerosol and inorganic salts.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of poly(D,L-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) multiblock poly(ether-ester-urethane)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haw, Tan Ching; Ahmad, Azizan; Anuar, Farah Hannan

    2015-09-01

    In this study, poly(D,L-lactide)-poly(ethylene glycol) multiblock poly(ether-ester-urethane)s was synthesized in the framework of environmental friendly products to meet the need for highly flexible polymers. Triblock copolymer with poly(ethylene glycol) as center block and poly(D,L-lactide) as side block were first synthesized by ring-opening polymerization of D,L-lactide, followed by chain extension reaction of triblocks using hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI). NMR and infra-red spectroscopies were used to determine the molecular composition whereas XRD analysis revealed crystallinity behavior of synthesized multiblock copolymers.

  19. Massachusetts Special Olympics Poly Hockey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Jim

    Poly Hockey is featured in this manual of instructions for coaches and teachers to use with mentally retarded boys and girls of all ages and ability levels. It is noted that the sport has been supported by the Board of Directors of the Special Olympics and has been used in Massachusetts for over 7 years. Explained is use of the game indoors, and…

  20. 21 CFR 177.1635 - Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p... Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1635 Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methyl-styrene). Poly(p-methylstyrene) and rubber-modified poly(p-methylstyrene)...

  1. User's guide to CAL3QHC version 2. 0: A modeling methodology for predicting pollutant concentrations near roadway intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    CAL3QHC is a microcomputer based model to predict carbon monoxide (CO) or other inert pollutant concentrations from motor vehicles at roadway intersections. The model includes the CALINE-3 line source dispersion model and a traffic algorithm for estimating vehicular queue lengths at signalized intersections. CAL3QHC enhances CALINE-3 by incorporating methods for estimating queue lengths and the contribution of emissions from idling vehicles. The model permits the estimation of total air pollution concentrations from both moving and idling vehicles. It is a reliable tool for predicting concentrations of inert air pollutants near signalized intersections. Because idle emissions account for a substantial portion of the total emissions at an intersection, the model is relatively insensitive to traffic speed, a parameter difficult to predict with a high degree of accuracy on congested urban roadways without a substantial data collection effort.

  2. Development of the FoCal-E PAD detector and its electronics for the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Motoi; Chujo, Tatsuya; Hirano, Masahiro

    2016-07-01

    In order to study the initial state of high-energy heavy-ion collisions, a forward calorimeter as an upgrade to the ALICE experiment is in the planning stage. The first beam test of the forward electro-magnetic calorimeter (FoCal-E) prototype was carried out in 2014 at the CERN PS and SPS accelerators. With the aim of reading out a signal from the low-granularity silicon pad sensors of FoCal-E, electronic circuits such as a temperature monitor, a trigger-signal converting-circuit, a trigger-signal processor, an independent regulated power circuit and an isolated high-voltage generator were developed. The electric noise problem was solved by means of both the power circuit and the high-voltage generator, and the signal was successfully read out.

  3. Comparing High-redshift Galaxy Dropouts in GOODS-S from SelfCal and MultiDrizzle Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Jennifer; Cooray, Asantha R.; Nayyeri, Hooshang

    2017-01-01

    A subset of the multi-wavelength CANDELS survey is utilized to compare results of high-redshift photometric dropout galaxies from two different image processing techniques in the GOODS-S region. The maps used are the publicly available CANDELS mosaics and SelfCal, which is a self-calibration method that removes anisotropy offsets that are introduced from combining frames taken at different times. The identified dropout sources for redshifts 4 and larger from each dataset are compared to Lyman-break galaxy catalogs. Preliminary results indicate a low match rate for sources between the SelfCal maps and published catalogs, which could be attributed to differing map depth and processing techniques.

  4. Supersoft X-ray source CAL 83 in an optical-high, X-ray off state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, .; Schwarz, R.; Sala, G.; Ness, J.-U.; Mennickent, R.

    2008-01-01

    Between Dec. 20 and 27, 2007, the optical (B&R) brightness of CAL 83 jumped up by 0.5 mag, and stayed at that level since then. With the anti- correlation in mind of optical and X-ray flux as indicated by MACHO data and earlier Chandra and XMM observations (Greiner & DiStefano 2002, A&A 387, 944), we performed a 4.7 ksec Swift ToO observation on January 2, 2008, between 0:00--6:00 UT. As expected, we find no X-ray emission from CAL 83, with a 2-sigma upper limit of 6.1*10-4 cts/s in the <1.0 keV band.

  5. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of primary amines catalyzed by CAL-B at 38-40 °C.

    PubMed

    Poulhès, Florent; Vanthuyne, Nicolas; Bertrand, Michèle P; Gastaldi, Stéphane; Gil, Gérard

    2011-09-02

    The (R)-selective chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of primary amines was performed at 38-40 °C in MTBE, in good to high yields and with high enantiomeric excesses. These reactions associating CAL-B to octanethiol as radical racemizing agent were carried out in the presence of methyl β-methoxy propanoate as acyl donor, under photochemical irradiation at 350 nm in glassware.

  6. OSD CALS Architecture Master Plan Study. Data Dictionary. Concept Paper. Draft Version 1.2. Volume 29

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    VERSION 1.2 Prepared by U.S. Department of Transportation Research and Special Programs Administration Transportation Systems Center Cambridge, MA142...process will provide the services needed to create, acquire, manage, i distribute, and use technical information resources. Transportation Systems Center 1.2...management within CALS. Transportation Systems Center 1.2 mb SECTION 2: BASIC DEFINITION AND CONCEPTS 2.1 What Is A Data Dictionary? A data dictionary

  7. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    DOE PAGES

    Woody, Matthew C.; Baker, Kirk R.; Hayes, Patrick L.; ...

    2016-03-29

    Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations utilizing the traditional organic aerosol (OA) treatment (CMAQ-AE6) and a volatility basis set (VBS) treatment for OA (CMAQ-VBS) were evaluated against measurements collected at routine monitoring networks (Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE)) and those collected during the 2010 California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaign to examine important sources of OA in southern California. Traditionally, CMAQ treats primary organic aerosol (POA) as nonvolatile and uses a two-product framework to represent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. CMAQ-VBS instead treats POA asmore » semivolatile and lumps OA using volatility bins spaced an order of magnitude apart. The CMAQ-VBS approach underpredicted organic carbon (OC) at IMPROVE and CSN sites to a greater degree than CMAQ-AE6 due to the semivolatile POA treatment. However, comparisons to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements collected at Pasadena, CA, indicated that CMAQ-VBS better represented the diurnal profile and primary/secondary split of OA. CMAQ-VBS SOA underpredicted the average measured AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, a surrogate for SOA) concentration by a factor of 5.2, representing a considerable improvement to CMAQ-AE6 SOA predictions (factor of 24 lower than AMS). We use two new methods, one based on species ratios (SOA/ΔCO and SOA/Ox) and another on a simplified SOA parameterization, to apportion the SOA underprediction for CMAQ-VBS to slow photochemical oxidation (estimated as 1.5 ×  lower than observed at Pasadena using −log(NOx : NOy)), low intrinsic SOA formation efficiency (low by 1.6 to 2 ×  for Pasadena), and low emissions or excessive dispersion for the Pasadena site (estimated to be 1.6 to 2.3 ×  too low/excessive). The first and third factors are common to CMAQ-AE6, while the intrinsic SOA formation

  8. Measurement of Greenhouse gases (GHGs) and source apportionment in Bakersfield, CA during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guha, A.; Gentner, D. R.; Weber, R.; Gardner, A.; Provencal, R. A.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    The California Global Warming Solutions Act 2006 (AB 32) creates a need to verify and validate the state GHG inventory, which is largely based on activity data and emission factor based estimates. The "bottom-up" emission factors for methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) have large uncertainties and there is a lack of adequate "top-down" measurements to characterize emission rates from sources. Emissions from non-CO2 GHG sources display spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability, and are thus, often, poorly characterized. The Central Valley of California is an agriculture and industry intensive region with huge concentration of dairies, refineries and active oil fields which are known CH4 sources. As part of the CalNex campaign, we performed measurements of principal trace GHG gases (CO2, CH4, and N2O) and combustion tracer CO at the Bakersfield super-site during the summer of 2010. Measurements were made over a period of six weeks using fast response lasers based on cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (LGR Inc. CA). Coincident measurements of hundreds of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) served as anthropogenic and biogenic tracers of the GHG sources at local and regional levels. The local mean CH4 (1.93ppm) and N2O (325ppb) minimum are larger than that measured at Mauna Loa (NOAA). Daytime winds from the north-west draw emissions from the city center, Fruitvale oilfield and two refineries. Huge enhancements of CH4 relative to CO2 (> 4ppm of CH4) are seen on some days but almost on each night, when wind reversal and valley backflow brings winds from the east (oil fields and landfill). Winds from south-southwest (dairies) have ΔCH4 / ΔCO2 ratios similar to previous dairy chamber studies (Mitloehner et al., 2009). The ΔCH4 / ΔCO ratios at Bakersfield are much larger than that calculated downwind of Los Angeles at Mt. Wilson (Hsu et al., 2009) or in-flight measurements during CalNex (NOAA) suggesting additional non-combustion sources strongly influence

  9. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, Matthew C.; Baker, Kirk R.; Hayes, Patrick L.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Koo, Bonyoung; Pye, Havala O. T.

    2016-03-01

    Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations utilizing the traditional organic aerosol (OA) treatment (CMAQ-AE6) and a volatility basis set (VBS) treatment for OA (CMAQ-VBS) were evaluated against measurements collected at routine monitoring networks (Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE)) and those collected during the 2010 California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaign to examine important sources of OA in southern California. Traditionally, CMAQ treats primary organic aerosol (POA) as nonvolatile and uses a two-product framework to represent secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. CMAQ-VBS instead treats POA as semivolatile and lumps OA using volatility bins spaced an order of magnitude apart. The CMAQ-VBS approach underpredicted organic carbon (OC) at IMPROVE and CSN sites to a greater degree than CMAQ-AE6 due to the semivolatile POA treatment. However, comparisons to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements collected at Pasadena, CA, indicated that CMAQ-VBS better represented the diurnal profile and primary/secondary split of OA. CMAQ-VBS SOA underpredicted the average measured AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, a surrogate for SOA) concentration by a factor of 5.2, representing a considerable improvement to CMAQ-AE6 SOA predictions (factor of 24 lower than AMS). We use two new methods, one based on species ratios (SOA/ΔCO and SOA/Ox) and another on a simplified SOA parameterization, to apportion the SOA underprediction for CMAQ-VBS to slow photochemical oxidation (estimated as 1.5 × lower than observed at Pasadena using -log(NOx : NOy)), low intrinsic SOA formation efficiency (low by 1.6 to 2 × for Pasadena), and low emissions or excessive dispersion for the Pasadena site (estimated to be 1.6 to 2.3 × too low/excessive). The first and third factors are common to CMAQ-AE6, while the intrinsic SOA formation efficiency for that model is

  10. Understanding sources of organic aerosol during CalNex-2010 using the CMAQ-VBS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woody, M. C.; Baker, K. R.; Hayes, P. L.; Jimenez, J. L.; Koo, B.; Pye, H. O. T.

    2015-10-01

    Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model simulations utilizing the volatility basis set (VBS) treatment for organic aerosols (CMAQ-VBS) were evaluated against measurements collected at routine monitoring networks (Chemical Speciation Network (CSN) and Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE)) and those collected during the 2010 California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaign to examine important sources of organic aerosol (OA) in southern California. CMAQ-VBS (OA lumped by volatility, semivolatile POA) underpredicted total organic carbon (OC) at CSN (-25.5 % Normalized Median Bias (NMdnB)) and IMPROVE (-63.9 % NMdnB) locations and total OC was underpredicted to a greater degree compared to the CMAQ-AE6 (9.9 and -55.7 % NMdnB, respectively; semi-explicit OA treatment, SOA lumped by parent hydrocarbon, nonvolatile POA). However, comparisons to aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) measurements collected at Pasadena, CA indicated that CMAQ-VBS better represented the diurnal profile and the primary/secondary split of OA. CMAQ-VBS secondary organic aerosol (SOA) underpredicted the average measured AMS oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA, a surrogate of SOA) concentration by a factor of 5.2 (4.7 μg m-3 measured vs. 0.9 μg m-3 modeled), a considerable improvement to CMAQ-AE6 SOA predictions, which were approximately 24× lower than the average AMS OOA concentration. We use two new methods, based on species ratios and on a simplified SOA parameterization from the observations, to apportion the SOA underprediction for CMAQ-VBS to too slow photochemical oxidation (estimated as 1.5× lower than observed at Pasadena using - log (NOx: NOy)), low intrinsic SOA formation efficiency (low by 1.6 to 2× for Pasadena), and too low emissions or too high dispersion for the Pasadena site (estimated to be 1.6 to 2.3× too low/high). The first and third factors will be similar for CMAQ-AE6, while the intrinsic SOA formation

  11. Cloud activation properties of organic aerosols observed at an urban site during CalNex-LA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, F.; Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Jimenez, J.; Wang, J.

    2010-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols strongly influence the global energy budget by scattering and absorbing sunlight (direct effects) and by changing the microphysical structure, lifetime, and coverage of clouds (indirect effects). Currently, the indirect effects of aerosols remain the most uncertain components in forcing of climate change over the industrial period. This large uncertainty is in part due to our incomplete understanding of the ability of aerosol particles to form cloud droplets under climatically relevant supersaturations. During CalNex study, size-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum and aerosol chemical composition were measured at an urban supersite in Pasadena, California from May 15 to June 6, 2010. Monodispersed aerosol particles are first classified using a differential mobility analyzer at sizes ranging from 25 to 320 nm. The activation efficiency of the classified aerosol, defined as the ratio of its CCN concentration (characterized by a DMT CCN counter) to total CN concentration (measured by a condensation particle counter, TSI 3771), is derived as a function of both particle size and supersaturation, which ranges from 0.08% to 0.39%. Aerosol chemical composition was characterized using a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS). In most of days, increases in aerosol mode diameter, organics mass loading, and aerosol organics volume fraction were observed from 10:00 AM to 15:00 PM. These increases are attributed to formation of secondary organic aerosols through photochemical reactions. On average, the aerosol was dominated by organics (~65% by volume), with the contribution from ammonium sulfate (~20%) and ammonium nitrate (~15%), and the balance being made up of elemental carbon. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis shows the oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) (~75%) was the dominant organics component. Additionally, the organics O:C ratio was within a narrow range of 0.50±0.12. Particle overall

  12. Evaluating N2O5 heterogeneous hydrolysis parameterizations for CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wayne L.; Brown, Steven S.; Stutz, Jochen; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Bahreini, Roya; Wagner, Nicholas L.; Dubé, William P.; Pollack, Ilana B.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Riemer, Nicole

    2016-05-01

    Nighttime chemistry in the troposphere is closely tied to the dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) budget, but high uncertainties remain regarding the model representation of the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 on aerosol particles. In this study we used the community model WRF-Chem to simulate a 3-day period during the California Nexus (CalNex) Campaign in 2010. We extended WRF-Chem to include the heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 and contrasted the impact of different published parameterizations of N2O5 heterogeneous hydrolysis on the spatial distribution of uptake coefficients and the resulting N2O5 concentrations. For all the cases, modeled N2O5 uptake coefficients showed strong spatial variability, with higher values in the nocturnal boundary layer compared to the residual layer, especially in environments with high relative humidities, such as over the ocean and along the coast. The best agreement of modeled and observed uptake coefficients was obtained using the parameterization by Davis et al. (2008) combined with the treatment of organic coating by Riemer et al. (2009). For this case the temporal evolution of lower boundary layer N2O5 mixing ratios was reproduced well, and the predictions of surface mixing ratios of ozone and NOx were improved. However, the model still overpredicted the uptake coefficients in the residual layer and consequently underpredicted N2O5 concentrations in the residual layer. This study also highlights that environments with low relative humidities pose a challenge for aerosol thermodynamic models in calculating aerosol water uptake, and this impacts N2O5 heterogeneous hydrolysis parameterizations.

  13. Volatile organic compounds in Tijuana during the Cal-Mex 2010 campaign: Measurements and source apportionment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jun; Garzón, Jessica P.; Huertas, María E.; Zhang, Renyi; Levy, Misti; Ma, Yan; Huertas, José I.; Jardón, Ricardo T.; Ruíz, Luis G.; Tan, Haobo; Molina, Luisa T.

    2013-05-01

    As part of the Cal-Mex 2010 air quality study, a proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) was deployed at the San Diego-Tijuana border area to measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from 15 May to 30 June 2010. The major VOCs identified during the study included oxygenated VOCs (e.g., methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, and methyl ethyl ketone) and aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, C8- and C9-aromatics). Biogenic VOCs (e.g., isoprene) were scarce in this region because of the lack of vegetation in this arid area. Using an U.S. EPA positive matrix factorization model, VOCs together with other trace gases (NOx, NOz and SO2) observed in this border region were attributed to four types of sources, i.e., local industrial solvent usage (58% in ppbC), gasoline vehicle exhaust (19% in ppbC), diesel vehicle exhaust (14% in ppbC), and aged plume (9% in ppbC) due to regional background and/or long-range transport. Diesel vehicle emission contributed to 87% of SO2 and 75% of NOx, and aged plume contributed to 92% of NOz. An independent conditional probability function analysis of VOCs, wind direction, and wind speed indicated that the industrial source did not show a significant tendency with wind direction. Both gasoline and diesel engine emissions were associated with air masses passing through two busy cross-border ports. Aged plumes were strongly associated with NW wind, which likely brought in aged air masses from the populated San Diego area.

  14. Organic aerosol composition and sources in Pasadena, California, during the 2010 CalNex campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Cubison, M. J.; Froyd, K. D.; Zhao, Y.; Cliff, S. S.; Hu, W. W.; Toohey, D. W.; Flynn, J. H.; Lefer, B. L.; Grossberg, N.; Alvarez, S.; Rappenglück, B.; Taylor, J. W.; Allan, J. D.; Holloway, J. S.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Gouw, J. A.; Massoli, P.; Zhang, X.; Liu, J.; Weber, R. J.; Corrigan, A. L.; Russell, L. M.; Isaacman, G.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Goldstein, A. H.; Thalman, R.; Waxman, E. M.; Volkamer, R.; Lin, Y. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Dusanter, S.; Griffith, S.; Stevens, P. S.; Brioude, J.; Angevine, W. M.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2013-08-01

    Organic aerosols (OA) in Pasadena are characterized using multiple measurements from the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign. Five OA components are identified using positive matrix factorization including hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and two types of oxygenated OA (OOA). The Pasadena OA elemental composition when plotted as H : C versus O : C follows a line less steep than that observed for Riverside, CA. The OOA components from both locations follow a common line, however, indicating similar secondary organic aerosol (SOA) oxidation chemistry at the two sites such as fragmentation reactions leading to acid formation. In addition to the similar evolution of elemental composition, the dependence of SOA concentration on photochemical age displays quantitatively the same trends across several North American urban sites. First, the OA/ΔCO values for Pasadena increase with photochemical age exhibiting a slope identical to or slightly higher than those for Mexico City and the northeastern United States. Second, the ratios of OOA to odd-oxygen (a photochemical oxidation marker) for Pasadena, Mexico City, and Riverside are similar, suggesting a proportional relationship between SOA and odd-oxygen formation rates. Weekly cycles of the OA components are examined as well. HOA exhibits lower concentrations on Sundays versus weekdays, and the decrease in HOA matches that predicted for primary vehicle emissions using fuel sales data, traffic counts, and vehicle emission ratios. OOA does not display a weekly cycle—after accounting for differences in photochemical aging —which suggests the dominance of gasoline emissions in SOA formation under the assumption that most urban SOA precursors are from motor vehicles.

  15. Characterization of Particulate Ship Emissions during CalNex 2010 (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappa, C. D.; Mellon, D.; Lack, D. A.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Onasch, T. B.; Massoli, P.; Coffman, D. J.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T. S.; Nuaaman, I.; Li, S.; Hayden, K.; Gaston, C. J.; Prather, K. A.

    2010-12-01

    An important and under-characterized source of particulate matter is emissions from ships, and in particular, ocean going vessels. For example, emissions from commercial shipping operations are thought to be ca. 8% of primary organic emissions from fossil and bio fuels and 2% of the global black carbon (BC) emissions. Although nominally a small contribution, ship emissions often occur in either pristine marine environments or concentrated near large population centers making the impacts potentially much more important than such numbers would tacitly suggest. During CalNex 2010, particulate emissions from numerous ships were directly characterized and quantified from measurements made on board the R/V Atlantis and the NOAA P3 aircraft. In this talk, first results from these measurements will be discussed, with a particular emphasis on emissions of black carbon (BC). On board the R/V Altlantis, BC emissions were characterized at high time resolution using a variety of methods and techniques: light absorption (via PAS and PSAP), SP2, SP-AMS and ATOFMS. On the NOAA P3, BC was characterized using an SP2 and PAS. In addition to these BC-focused techniques, a wide range of other techniques were employed to determine emissions factors of co-emitted pollutants. Specific discussion will focus on two case studies: emissions from a single ship operating at different engine loads and emissions from a single ship as it changed from a high sulfur to low sulfur fuel type. The results from this study have implications for impending US and global regulations that mandate lower sulfur fuel and an industry wide push to slow steaming which reduces fuel consumption.

  16. Diurnal cycle of fossil and nonfossil carbon using radiocarbon analyses during CalNex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotter, Peter; El-Haddad, Imad; Zhang, Yanlin; Hayes, Patrick L.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Lin, Ying-Hsuan; Wacker, Lukas; Schnelle-Kreis, Jürgen; Abbaszade, Gülcin; Zimmermann, Ralf; Surratt, Jason D.; Weber, Rodney; Jimenez, José L.; Szidat, Sönke; Baltensperger, Urs; Prévôt, André S. H.

    2014-06-01

    Radiocarbon (14C) analysis is a unique tool to distinguish fossil/nonfossil sources of carbonaceous aerosols. We present 14C measurements of organic carbon (OC) and total carbon (TC) on highly time resolved filters (3-4 h, typically 12 h or longer have been reported) from 7 days collected during California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) 2010 in Pasadena. Average nonfossil contributions of 58% ± 15% and 51% ± 15% were found for OC and TC, respectively. Results indicate that nonfossil carbon is a major constituent of the background aerosol, evidenced by its nearly constant concentration (2-3 μgC m-3). Cooking is estimated to contribute at least 25% to nonfossil OC, underlining the importance of urban nonfossil OC sources. In contrast, fossil OC concentrations have prominent and consistent diurnal profiles, with significant afternoon enhancements (~3 μgC m-3), following the arrival of the western Los Angeles (LA) basin plume with the sea breeze. A corresponding increase in semivolatile oxygenated OC and organic vehicular emission markers and their photochemical reaction products occurs. This suggests that the increasing OC is mostly from fresh anthropogenic secondary OC (SOC) from mainly fossil precursors formed in the western LA basin plume. We note that in several European cities where the diesel passenger car fraction is higher, SOC is 20% less fossil, despite 2-3 times higher elemental carbon concentrations, suggesting that SOC formation from gasoline emissions most likely dominates over diesel in the LA basin. This would have significant implications for our understanding of the on-road vehicle contribution to ambient aerosols and merits further study.

  17. Nitrous Oxide (N2O) Emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex Airborne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, B.; Miller, S.; Kort, E. A.; Santoni, G. W.; Daube, B.; Commane, R.; Angevine, W. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Andrews, A. E.; Nehrkorn, T.; Tian, H.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with an atmospheric lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements of atmospheric concentrations. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the Central Valley of California, based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA P-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in May and June, 2010. We coupled WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) model to STILT (Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport) to link our in-situ observations to surface emissions, and then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to extract optimized emission rates from the inversion. Our results support the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. But the spatial distribution of derived surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emissions inventory (EDGAR 4.0), and our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California during the study period was 3 - 4 times larger than EDGAR and other inventories.

  18. Dietary shift after 3600 cal yr BP and its influencing factors in northwestern China: Evidence from stable isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Minmin; Dong, Guanghui; Jia, Xin; Wang, Hui; Cui, Yifu; Chen, Fahu

    2016-08-01

    Human diets rely on natural resource availability and can reflect social and cultural values. When environments, societies, and cultures change, diets may also shift. This study traced the extent of dietary change and the factors influencing such change. Through stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of late Neolithic and early Bronze Age human and animal bone collagen, we found that significant shifts in human diets were closely associated with intercontinental cultural exchanges in Eurasia and climate change in northwestern China. The isotopic evidence indicated that human diets mainly consisted of C4 foodstuffs (presumably millet and/or animals fed with C4 foods) around 4000 calibrated years before the present (cal yr BP), corresponding to the flourishing of millet agriculture in the context of the optimal climate conditions of the mid-Holocene. Subsequently, more C3 foods (probably wheat, barley, and animals fed with C3 foods) were added to human diets post-3600 cal yr BP when the climate became cooler and drier. Such dietary variation is also consistent with the increasing intensity of long-distance exchange after 4000 cal yr BP. While many factors can lead to human dietary shifts (e.g. climate change, population growth, cultural factors, and human migration), climate may have been a key factor in Gansu and Qinghai.

  19. The Cal-Bridge Program: Increasing the Gender and Ethnic Diversity of Astrophysics Students in Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smecker-Hane, Tammy A.; Rudolph, Alexander L.

    2016-06-01

    The mission of the Cal-Bridge program is to increase the number of underrepresented minority and women students completing a bachelor’s degree and entering a PhD program in astronomy, physics, or closely-related fields. The program has created a network of faculty at diverse higher education institutions, including 5 University of California (UC) campuses, 9 California State Universities (CSUs), and 10 community colleges in southern California, dedicated to this goal. Students selected for the program are know as “Cal-Bridge Scholars” and they are given a wide variety of support: (1) scholarships in their junior/senior years at CSU and their first year of graduate school at a UC, (2) intensive mentoring by a pair of CSU and UC faculty members, (3) tutoring, when needed, (4) professional development workshops, (5) exposure to research opportunities at various universities, and (6) membership in a growing cohort of like-minded students. We report on the structure of our program, lessons learned with our current 12 Cal-Bridge scholars, and the results of our first two years of operation. Funding for this program is provided by NSF-SSTEM Grant #1356133.

  20. Searching for evidence of curricular effect on the teaching and learning of mathematics: some insights from the LieCal project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jinfa

    2014-12-01

    Drawing on evidence from the Longitudinal Investigation of the Effect of Curriculum on Algebra Learning (LieCal) Project, issues related to mathematics curriculum reform and student learning are discussed. The LieCal Project was designed to longitudinally investigate the impact of a reform mathematics curriculum called the Connected Mathematics Project (CMP) in the USA on teachers' teaching and students' learning. Using a three-level conceptualization of curriculum (intended, implemented, and attained), a variety of evidence from the LieCal Project is presented to show the impact of mathematics curriculum reform on teachers' teaching and students' learning. This paper synthesizes findings from the two longitudinal studies spanning 7 years of the LieCal Project both to show the kind of impact curriculum has on teachers' teaching and students' learning and to suggest powerful but feasible ways researchers can investigate curriculum effect on both teaching and learning.

  1. User`s guide to CAL3QHC version 2.0: A modeling methodology for predicting pollutant concentrations near roadway intersections (revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Eckhoff, P.

    1995-09-01

    CAL3QHC is a microcomputer based model to predict carbon monoxide (CO) or other pollutant concentrations from motor vehicles at roadway intersections. The model includes the CALINE3 dispersion model along with traffic algorithm to estimate vehicular queue lengths at signalized intersections. CAL3QHC estimates total air pollutant concentrations from both moving and idling vehicles. This document provides a technical description of the model, user instructions, and example applications.

  2. Emission estimates of HCFCs and HFCs in California from the 2010 CalNex study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barletta, Barbara; Carreras-Sospedra, Marc; Cohan, Alex; Nissenson, Paul; Dabdub, Donald; Meinardi, Simone; Atlas, Elliot; Lueb, Rich; Holloway, John S.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Pederson, James; Vancuren, Richard A.; Blake, Donald R.

    2013-02-01

    The CalNex 2010 (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) study was designed to evaluate the chemical composition of air masses over key source regions in California. During May to June 2010, air samples were collected on board a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D aircraft over the South Coast Air Basin of California (SoCAB) and the Central Valley (CV). This paper analyzes six effective greenhouse gases—chlorodifluoromethane (HCFC-22), 1,1-dichloro-1-fluoroethane (HCFC-141b), 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane (HCFC-142b), 2-chloro-1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HCFC-124), 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (HFC-134a), and 1,1-difluoroethane (HFC-152a)—providing the most comprehensive characterization of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacement compound emissions in California. Concentrations of measured HCFCs and HFCs are enhanced greatly throughout the SoCAB and CV, with highest levels observed in the SoCAB: 310 ± 92 pptv for HCFC-22, 30.7 ± 18.6 pptv for HCFC-141b, 22.9 ± 2.0 pptv for HCFC-142b, 4.86 ± 2.56 pptv for HCFC-124, 109 ± 46.4 pptv for HFC-134a, and 91.2 ± 63.9 pptv for HFC-152a. Annual emission rates are estimated for all six compounds in the SoCAB using the measured halocarbon to carbon monoxide (CO) mixing ratios and CO emissions inventories. Emission rates of 3.05 ± 0.70 Gg for HCFC-22, 0.27 ± 0.07 Gg for HCFC-141b, 0.06 ± 0.01 Gg for HCFC-142b, 0.11 ± 0.03 Gg for HCFC-124, 1.89 ± 0.43 Gg for HFC-134a, and 1.94 ± 0.45 Gg for HFC-152b for the year 2010 are calculated for the SoCAB. These emissions are extrapolated from the SoCAB region to the state of California using population data. Results from this study provide a baseline emission rate that will help future studies determine if HCFC and HFC mitigation strategies are successful.

  3. Ozone formation along the California-Mexican border region during Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guohui; Bei, Naifang; Zavala, Miguel; Molina, Luisa T.

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ozone (O3) formation along the California-Mexico border region using the WRF-CHEM model in association with the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign. Four two-day episodes in 2010 are chosen based on plume transport patterns: 1) May 15-16 (plume north), 2) May 29-30 (plume southwest), 3) June 4-5 (plume east), and 4) June 13-14 (plume southeast). Generally, the predicted O3 spatial patterns and temporal variations agree well with the observations at the ambient monitoring sites in the San Diego-Tijuana region, but in the Calexico-Mexicali region, the model frequently underestimates the observation. In the San Diego-Tijuana region, the morning anthropogenic precursor emissions in the urbanized coastal plain are carried inland and mixed with the local biogenic emissions during transport, causing the high O3 level over the mountain region. Biogenic emissions enhance the O3 concentrations by up to 40 ppb over the mountain region in the afternoon. The factor separation approach is used to evaluate the contributions of trans-boundary transport of emissions from California and Baja California to the O3 level in the California-Mexico border region. The Baja California emissions play a minor role in the O3 formation in the San Diego region and do not seem to contribute to the O3 exceedances in the region, but have large potential to cause O3 exceedances in the Calexico region. The California emissions can considerably enhance the O3 level in the Tijuana region. Generally, the California emissions play a more important role than the Baja California emissions on O3 formation in the border region (within 40 km to the California-Mexico border). On average, the O3 concentrations in the border region are decreased by 2-4 ppb in the afternoon due to the interactions of emissions from California and Baja California. Further studies need to be conducted to improve the sea breeze simulations in the border region for evaluating O3 formation.

  4. Quantifying Atmospheric Mercury Emissions Sources in coastal California from Shipboard Measurements During CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss-Penzias, P. S.; Lerner, B. M.; Williams, E. J.; Bates, T. S.; Gaston, C. J.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Mercury is a neurotoxin that can bioaccumulate in aquatic ecosystems to levels that are unsafe for humans and biota. It has both natural and anthropogenic sources to the atmosphere, where it can be transported and undergo transformations that lead to its deposition in both wet and dry forms. Due to recent surveys of mercury in fish in California that show widespread contamination, there is great interest in knowing the source of this mercury, whether it be from local, regional, or global emissions. In this study we made simultaneous measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), CO2, CO, NOx, SO2, O3, and meteorology during the spring of 2010 (May 14-June 8) on board the research vessel Atlantis during the CalNex campaign. The goal of this study was to observe and quantify emissions of GEM from known and potential sources along the California coast, including an incinerator, oil refineries, cargo ships, and natural ocean emissions. Additionally, an understanding of the behavior of GEM in the marine boundary layer under land-sea breeze conditions was sought. Our results indicate that on at least one occasion when the ship was located in the San Pedro harbor, emissions from an incinerator were observed, as indicated by high concentrations of GEM and unique single particle chemical composition. Using the ratio of the enhancements in GEM and CO and the CO emissions inventory for this facility, it was estimated that the annual GEM emissions were 11 +/- 5 kg. This is a factor of 5 lower than the reported total mercury emissions inventory for this facility in 2008. The discrepancy may be explained if a significant fraction of the emissions were gaseous oxidized and particulate mercury, since only GEM was measured. Additionally, a plume from a cargo ship was intercepted and the GEM/CO2 enhancement ratio indicated that approximately 13 tonnes of GEM are emitted from shipping worldwide, assuming values for global fuel usage and a CO2/fuel burned mass ratio. In spite of

  5. Nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from California based on 2010 CalNex airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Bin; Miller, Scot M.; Kort, Eric A.; Santoni, Gregory W.; Daube, Bruce C.; Commane, Roisin; Angevine, Wayne M.; Ryerson, Tom B.; Trainer, Michael K.; Andrews, Arlyn E.; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Tian, Hanqin; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2013-04-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important gas for climate and for stratospheric chemistry, with a lifetime exceeding 100 years. Global concentrations have increased steadily since the 18th century, apparently due to human-associated emissions, principally from the application of nitrogen fertilizers. However, quantitative studies of agricultural emissions at large spatial scales are lacking, inhibited by the difficulty of measuring small enhancements in atmospheric concentration. Here we derive regional emission rates for N2O in the agricultural heartland of California based on analysis of in-situ airborne atmospheric observations collected using a new quantum cascade laser spectrometer. The data were obtained on board the NOAA WP-3 research aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) program in late spring 2010. We coupled the WRF (weather research and forecasting) model, a meso-scale meteorology model, with the STILT (stochastic time-inverted Lagrangian transport) model, a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, to link our in-situ airborne observations to surface emissions. We then used a variety of statistical methods to identify source areas and to optimize emission rates. Our results are consistent with the view that fertilizer application is the largest source of N2O in the Central Valley. The spatial distribution of surface emissions, based on California land use and activity maps, was very different than indicated in the leading emission inventory (EDGAR 4.0). Our estimated total emission flux of N2O for California in May and June was 3 - 4 times larger than the annual mean given for the state by EDGAR and other inventories, indicating a strong seasonal variation. We estimated the statewide total annual emissions of N2O to be 0.042 ± 0.011 Tg N/year, roughly equivalent to inventory values if we account for seasonal variations using observations obtained in the midwestern United States. This state total N2O

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-δ inhibitor CAL-101 shows promising preclinical activity in chronic lymphocytic leukemia by antagonizing intrinsic and extrinsic cellular survival signals

    PubMed Central

    Herman, Sarah E. M.; Gordon, Amber L.; Wagner, Amy J.; Heerema, Nyla A.; Zhao, Weiqiang; Flynn, Joseph M.; Jones, Jeffrey; Andritsos, Leslie; Puri, Kamal D.; Lannutti, Brian J.; Giese, Neill A.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wei, Lai; Byrd, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Targeted therapy with imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) prompted a new treatment paradigm. Unlike CML, chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) lacks an aberrant fusion protein kinase but instead displays increased phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. To date, PI3K inhibitor development has been limited because of the requirement of this pathway for many essential cellular functions. Identification of the hematopoietic-selective isoform PI3K-δ unlocks a new therapeutic potential for B-cell malignancies. Herein, we demonstrate that PI3K has increased enzymatic activity and that PI3K-δ is expressed in CLL cells. A PI3K-δ selective inhibitor CAL-101 promoted apoptosis in primary CLL cells ex vivo in a dose- and time-dependent fashion that was independent of common prognostic markers. CAL-101–mediated cytotoxicity was caspase dependent and was not diminished by coculture on stromal cells. In addition, CAL-101 abrogated protection from spontaneous apoptosis induced by B cell–activating factors CD40L, TNF-α, and fibronectin. In contrast to malignant cells, CAL-101 does not promote apoptosis in normal T cells or natural killer cells, nor does it diminish antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. However, CAL-101 did decrease activated T-cell production of various inflammatory and antiapoptotic cytokines. Collectively, these studies provide rationale for the clinical development of CAL-101 as a first-in-class targeted therapy for CLL and related B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:20522708

  7. Multilineage polyclonal engraftment of Cal-1 gene-modified cells and in vivo selection after SHIV infection in a nonhuman primate model of AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christopher W.; Haworth, Kevin G.; Burke, Bryan P.; Polacino, Patricia; Norman, Krystin K.; Adair, Jennifer E.; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Bartlett, Jeffrey S.; Symonds, Geoff P.; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have focused on gene therapy approaches to induce functional cure/remission of HIV-1 infection. Here, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of the clinical grade anti-HIV lentiviral vector, Cal-1, in pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina). Cal-1 animals exhibit robust levels of gene marking in myeloid and lymphoid lineages without measurable adverse events, suggesting that Cal-1 transduction and autologous transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells are safe, and lead to long-term, multilineage engraftment following myeloablative conditioning. Ex vivo, CD4+ cells from transplanted animals undergo positive selection in the presence of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV). In vivo, Cal-1 gene-marked cells are evident in the peripheral blood and in HIV-relevant tissue sites such as the gastrointestinal tract. Positive selection for gene-marked cells is observed in blood and tissues following SHIV challenge, leading to maintenance of peripheral blood CD4+ T-cell counts in a normal range. Analysis of Cal-1 lentivirus integration sites confirms polyclonal engraftment of gene-marked cells. Following infection, a polyclonal, SHIV-resistant clonal repertoire is established. These findings offer strong preclinical evidence for safety and efficacy of Cal-1, present a new method for tracking protected cells over the course of virus-mediated selective pressure in vivo, and reveal previously unobserved dynamics of virus-dependent T-cell selection. PMID:26958575

  8. CalTOX, a multimedia total exposure model for hazardous-waste sites; Part 1, Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    McKone, T.E.

    1993-06-01

    CalTOX has been developed as a spreadsheet model to assist in health-risk assessments that address contaminated soils and the contamination of adjacent air, surface water, sediments, and ground water. The modeling effort includes a multimedia transport and transformation model, exposure scenario models, and efforts to quantify and reduce uncertainty in multimedia, multiple-pathway exposure models. This report provides an overview of the CalTOX model components, lists the objectives of the model, describes the philosophy under which the model was developed, identifies the chemical classes for which the model can be used, and describes critical sensitivities and uncertainties. The multimedia transport and transformation model is a dynamic model that can be used to assess time-varying concentrations of contaminants introduced initially to soil layers or for contaminants released continuously to air or water. This model assists the user in examining how chemical and landscape properties impact both the ultimate route and quantity of human contact. Multimedia, multiple pathway exposure models are used in the CalTOX model to estimate average daily potential doses within a human population in the vicinity of a hazardous substances release site. The exposure models encompass twenty-three exposure pathways. The exposure assessment process consists of relating contaminant concentrations in the multimedia model compartments to contaminant concentrations in the media with which a human population has contact (personal air, tap water, foods, household dusts soils, etc.). The average daily dose is the product of the exposure concentrations in these contact media and an intake or uptake factor that relates the concentrations to the distributions of potential dose within the population.

  9. Evidence for a nitrous acid (HONO) reservoir at the ground surface in Bakersfield, CA, during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    VandenBoer, T. C.; Markovic, M. Z.; Sanders, J. E.; Ren, X.; Pusede, S. E.; Browne, E. C.; Cohen, R. C.; Zhang, L.; Thomas, J.; Brune, W. H.; Murphy, J. G.

    2014-07-01

    Measurements of HONO(g) and particulate nitrite (NO2-(p)) were made with a modified Ambient Ion Monitor-Ion Chromatography (AIM-IC) instrument during California at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate 2010 in Bakersfield, CA (CalNex-San Joaquin Valley (SJV)). Observations of gas and particulate matter (PM2.5) water-soluble composition showed accumulation of both species at night, followed by loss the next day. Intercomparison with a Stripping Coil-UV/Vis Absorption Photometer (SC-AP) demonstrated excellent agreement with the AIM-IC HONO(g) measurement (slope = 0.957, R2 = 0.86), and the particulate nitrite observations were validated to be free of known interferences for wet chemical instrumentation. The accumulation of nitrite into particulate matter was found to be enhanced when gaseous mixing ratios of HONO(g) were highest. Reactive uptake of HONO(g) on to lofted dust and the ground surface, forming a reservoir, is a potential mechanism to explain these observations. The AIM-IC HONO(g) measurements were parameterized in a chemical model to calculate the ground surface daytime HONO(g) source strength at 4.5 m above the surface, found to be on the order of 1.27 ppb h-1, to determine the relative importance of a surface reservoir. If all deposited nighttime HONO(g) is reemitted the following day, up to 30% of the daytime HONO(g) source at CalNex-SJV may be accounted for. The observations of HONO(g) and NO2-(p) in Bakersfield, during CalNex, suggest a surface sink and source of HONO(g). Extension of currently accepted unknown daytime HONO(g) source reactions to include a potential surface HONO(g) reservoir should therefore be sound, but quantitation of the relative contributions of each surface source toward daytime HONO(g) production remains to be resolved.

  10. Quantification of cell, actin, and nuclear DNA morphology with high-throughput microscopy and CalMorph.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroki; Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2015-04-01

    Automated image acquisition and processing systems have been developed to quantitatively describe yeast cell morphology. These systems are superior to the preceding qualitative methods in terms of reproducibility, as they completely avoid subjective recognition of images. Because high-throughput microscopy has enabled rapid production of numerous cellular images, reinforcement of high-performance and high-throughput automated image-processing techniques has been in increasing demand in the field of biology. This protocol describes how to use a high-throughput microscope in conjunction with the image-processing software CalMorph, which outputs more than 500 morphological parameters, for quantification of cell, actin, and nuclear DNA morphology.

  11. The Impact of Science Graduate Students in Urban Science Classrooms: The SFOS Program at Cal State Los Angeles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terebey, S.; Mayo, D.; Strauss, J.

    2005-12-01

    The SFOS program at Cal State Los Angeles places science graduate students in minority serving high schools and middle schools in the Los Angeles region. Graduate fellows pursue Master's degrees in biology, chemistry, geology, or physics while working with partner teachers to provide science demonstrations and activities that are based on California science content standards. Fellows in the classroom are not apprentice teachers, but rather, their role is science communication. Now in its third year, we discuss the impacts of the SFOS program on graduate fellows, teachers, and high school curricula. We thank the National Science Foundation for funding through the GK-12 program.

  12. Poly(ethylene oxide) functionalization

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, Russell Clayton

    2014-04-08

    A simple procedure is provided by which the hydroxyl termini of poly(ethylene oxide) can be appended with functional groups to a useful extent by reaction and precipitation. The polymer is dissolved in warmed toluene, treated with an excess of organic base and somewhat less of an excess of a reactive acylating reagent, reacted for several hours, then precipitated in isopropanol so that the product can be isolated as a solid, and salt byproducts are washed away. This procedure enables functionalization of the polymer while not requiring laborious purification steps such as solvent-solvent extraction or dialysis to remove undesirable side products.

  13. Final Technical Report for NSF/DOE partnership grant 1004284/ER54905/SC0004660; 2011- 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, Manuel

    2014-10-15

    Research has been performed on two topics: (1) Nonlinear time-dependent phenomena in the regime of electron magnetohydrodynamics (EMHD). (2) Plasma structures forming ”bubbles”. The latter are regions of localized density depletions or enhancements separated from the ambient plasma by sheaths or double layers. Three-dimensional magnetic null points can also be considered as ”magnetic bubbles”. Nonlinear EMHD fields are generated by pulsed magnetic loops. The magnetic field varies in time faster than an ion cyclotron period, hence interacts only with electrons. Space charge electric fields are created when magnetic forces try to separate electrons from ions. Electric and magnetic forces nearly balance to keep the plasma quasi neutral. This leads to rotational electron motions, i.e. Hall currents and associated magnetic perturbations. When the time scale falls between the ion and electron cyclotron period the magnetic perturbation is convected in the whistler mode. When the time-varying magnetic field exceeds the background magnetic field the whistler mode becomes highly nonlinear since its properties depend on the total magnetic field. When the time-varying magnetic field creates magnetic null points or null lines EMHD breaks down. Electrons can be accelerated in null lines which dissipated magnetic energy like in magnetic reconnection. Energized electrons with anisotropic distributions create secondary whistler instabilities. These effects have been observed in field topologies resembling spheromaks and field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The whistler mode propagation near magnetic nulls is not trivial when the field gradients and wavelength are comparable. Ray tracing is inappropriate when the WKB approximation breaks down. Experiments have been started to map wave propagation on curved field lines with null points. Initial results show that whistlers in highly nonuniform fields have highly oblique phase velocities but the energy flow remains dominantly along the field. Density bubbles are created by anode discharges, typically forming spherical ”fireballs” bounded by a double layer. In a magnetized plasma the shape becomes cylindrical, in nonuniform magnetic fields many asymmetric fireball shapes are possible. Due to electron energization the fireball plasma has higher density and temperature than the ambient plasma. The double layer can also be produced by a high transparency positively biased grid. Instabilities arise from the electron transit through the plasma bubble and the double layer. When a permanent magnet is biased positively the electrons perform ExB drifts in the equatorial plane between the poles. Electron drift modes are excited with a high spectral contents. Similarly, a negatively biased magnet produces a disk-shaped plasma bubble. The cold magnet emits secondary electrons due to the impact of energetic ions. Such magnetron discharges exhibit a variety of instabilities which affect the cross-field transport and sputtering applications. This report will summarize the main effects observed and provide references to more detailed publications.

  14. 75 FR 51853 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests: Public Libraries Survey, FY 2011-2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2010-20882] THE NATIONAL FOUNDATION FOR THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Notice of Proposed... Services, National Foundation for the Arts and the Humanities. ACTION: Notice, request for comments, collection of information. SUMMARY: The Institute of Museum and Library Service (``IMLS'') as part of...

  15. Norovirus surveillance among callers to foodborne illness complaint hotline, Minnesota, USA, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Saupe, Amy A; Kaehler, Dawn; Cebelinski, Elizabeth A; Nefzger, Brian; Hall, Aron J; Smith, Kirk E

    2013-08-01

    Norovirus is the leading cause of foodborne disease in the United States. During October 2011-January 2013, we conducted surveillance for norovirus infection in Minnesota among callers to a complaint-based foodborne illness hotline who reported diarrhea or vomiting. Of 241 complainants tested, 127 (52.7%) were positive for norovirus.

  16. Groundwater levels in the Denver Basin bedrock aquifers of Douglas County, Colorado, 2011-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Everett, Rhett

    2014-01-01

    Manual and automated (time-series) water-level data collection from these sites between 2011 and 2013 showed water level declines in 36 wells. Over the 2-year monitoring period, average declines of approximately 0.4 foot per year were observed in the upper Dawson aquifer, declines of over 2.6 feet per year were observed in the lower Dawson aquifer, declines of about 3.2 feet per year were observed in the Denver aquifer, declines of about 1.9 feet per year were observed in the Arapahoe aquifer, and declines of about 9.9 feet per year were observed in the Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer.

  17. NAEP Fourth-, Eighth-, and Twelfth-Grade Reading Scores by Gender: 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klecker, Beverly M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a secondary analysis of the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reading scores by gender. Data were national public 4th- and 8th-grade reading scores from composite and subscales for 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, and 2013. Twelfth-grade scores for composite and literary experience from 2005, 2009, and 2013 and gain…

  18. Density and abundance of badger social groups in England and Wales in 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Judge, Johanna; Wilson, Gavin J.; MacArthur, Roy; Delahay, Richard J.; McDonald, Robbie A.

    2014-01-01

    In the United Kingdom, European badgers Meles meles are a protected species and an important wildlife reservoir of bovine tuberculosis. We conducted a survey of badger dens (main setts) in 1614 1 km squares across England and Wales, between November 2011 and March 2013. Using main setts as a proxy for badger social groups, the estimated mean density of badger social groups in England and Wales was 0.485 km-2 (95% confidence interval 0.449-0.521) and the estimated abundance of social groups was 71,600 (66,400-76,900). In the 25 years since the first survey in 1985-88, the annual rate of increase in the estimated number of badger social groups was 2.6% (2.2-2.9%), equating to an 88% (70-105%) increase across England and Wales. In England, we estimate there has been an increase of 103% (83-123%) in badger social groups, while in Wales there has been little change (-25 to +49%).

  19. [Implementation of the eHealth Strategy and Plan of Action in Argentina, 2011-2013].

    PubMed

    Marti, Myrna; Balladelli, Pier Paolo; Gherardi, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the adoption of the regional eHealth Strategy and Plan of Action of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)/World Health Organization (WHO) in 2011, a technical cooperation project was carried out in Argentina among the PAHO/WHO Representative Office, WHO, and the Argentine Ministry of Health, for the purpose of instituting the strategy at the national level. To do this, a series of meetings and activities were held and documents developed, which included mapping of eHealth initiatives in Argentina that have integrated health information and communication technology, the identification and selection of successful eHealth experiences, promotion of horizontal cooperation, a virtual collaboration program, a digital literacy program, and an eHealth workshop. The results obtained in this process are related to achievement of the four strategic objectives in the PAHO/WHO eHealth Strategy and Plan of Action.

  20. Epidemiological investigation of bovine tuberculosis outbreaks in Uruguay (2011-2013).

    PubMed

    Picasso, Catalina; Alvarez, Julio; VanderWaal, Kimberly L; Fernandez, Federico; Gil, Andres; Wells, Scott J; Perez, Andres

    2017-03-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) is a chronic disease of cattle caused by infection with the Mycobacterium bovis. While bTB prevalence in Uruguay has been low (<11 outbreaks/year) for the past 50 years as a consequence of a national control program, annual incidence increased in 2011 through 2013-15, 26 and 16 infected herds each year, raising concerns from livestock stakeholders and the government. The goal of this study was to assess the spatial dynamics of bTB in Uruguay from 2011 to 2013 and the association between bTB and potential demographic and movement risk factors at the herd level using data provided by the Uruguayan Ministry of Livestock, Agriculture, and Fisheries. Clustering of incident outbreaks was assessed using the Cuzick-Edwards' test and the Bernoulli model of the spatial scan statistic, and a conditional multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess risk factors associated with bTB in a subset of Uruguayan dairy farms. Significant (P<0.05) global clustering was detected in 2012, while high-risk local clusters were detected in southwestern (2011, 2012, 2013), northwestern (2012), and southeastern (2012) Uruguay. Increased risk of bTB in different regions of Uruguay suggests a potential role of animal movements in disease dissemination. Larger herds, higher numbers of animals purchased, and incoming steers to the farm were associated with increased odds of breaking with bTB, in agreement with previous studies but also suggesting other additional sources of risk. These results will contribute to enhanced effectiveness of bTB control programs in Uruguay with the ultimate objective of preventing or mitigating the impact of the disease in the human and animal populations of the country.

  1. Density and abundance of badger social groups in England and Wales in 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Judge, Johanna; Wilson, Gavin J; Macarthur, Roy; Delahay, Richard J; McDonald, Robbie A

    2014-01-23

    In the United Kingdom, European badgers Meles meles are a protected species and an important wildlife reservoir of bovine tuberculosis. We conducted a survey of badger dens (main setts) in 1614 1 km squares across England and Wales, between November 2011 and March 2013. Using main setts as a proxy for badger social groups, the estimated mean density of badger social groups in England and Wales was 0.485 km(-2) (95% confidence interval 0.449-0.521) and the estimated abundance of social groups was 71,600 (66,400-76,900). In the 25 years since the first survey in 1985-88, the annual rate of increase in the estimated number of badger social groups was 2.6% (2.2-2.9%), equating to an 88% (70-105%) increase across England and Wales. In England, we estimate there has been an increase of 103% (83-123%) in badger social groups, while in Wales there has been little change (-25 to +49%).

  2. Volcanic Alert System (VAS) developed during the (2011-2013) El Hierro (Canary Islands) volcanic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Ramon; Berrocoso, Manuel; Marrero, Jose Manuel; Fernandez-Ros, Alberto; Prates, Gonçalo; De la Cruz-Reyna, Servando; Garcia, Alicia

    2014-05-01

    In volcanic areas with long repose periods (as El Hierro), recently installed monitoring networks offer no instrumental record of past eruptions nor experience in handling a volcanic crisis. Both conditions, uncertainty and inexperience, contribute to make the communication of hazard more difficult. In fact, in the initial phases of the unrest at El Hierro, the perception of volcanic risk was somewhat distorted, as even relatively low volcanic hazards caused a high political impact. The need of a Volcanic Alert System became then evident. In general, the Volcanic Alert System is comprised of the monitoring network, the software tools for the analysis of the observables, the management of the Volcanic Activity Level, and the assessment of the threat. The Volcanic Alert System presented here places special emphasis on phenomena associated to moderate eruptions, as well as on volcano-tectonic earthquakes and landslides, which in some cases, as in El Hierro, may be more destructive than an eruption itself. As part of the Volcanic Alert System, we introduce here the Volcanic Activity Level which continuously applies a routine analysis of monitoring data (particularly seismic and deformation data) to detect data trend changes or monitoring network failures. The data trend changes are quantified according to the Failure Forecast Method (FFM). When data changes and/or malfunctions are detected, by an automated watchdog, warnings are automatically issued to the Monitoring Scientific Team. Changes in the data patterns are then translated by the Monitoring Scientific Team into a simple Volcanic Activity Level, that is easy to use and understand by the scientists and technicians in charge for the technical management of the unrest. The main feature of the Volcanic Activity Level is its objectivity, as it does not depend on expert opinions, which are left to the Scientific Committee, and its capabilities for early detection of precursors. As a consequence of the El Hierro experience we consider the objectivity of the Volcanic Activity Level a powerful tool to focus the discussions in a Scientific Committee on the activity forecast and on the expected scenarios, rather than on the multiple explanations of the data fluctuations, which is one of the main sources of conflict in the Scientific Committee discussions. Although the Volcanic Alert System was designed specifically for the unrest episodes at El Hierro, the involved methodologies may be applied to other situations of unrest.

  3. Harnessing the Internet for International Exchanges on Learning Cities: The Pie Experience 2011-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearns, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The PASCAL International Exchanges (PIE) project was developed to facilitate online exchanges of information and experience between learning cities around the world and, in doing this, to test the potential of the internet to enable such low-cost exchanges. The author provides a personal assessment of the PIE experience over the three years 2011…

  4. Multistate Outbreak of Human Salmonella Typhimurium Infections Linked to Pet Hedgehogs - United States, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Anderson, T C; Marsden-Haug, N; Morris, J F; Culpepper, W; Bessette, N; Adams, J K; Bidol, S; Meyer, S; Schmitz, J; Erdman, M M; Gomez, T M; Barton Behravesh, C

    2016-10-13

    Zoonotic Salmonella infections cause approximately 130 000 illnesses annually in the United States. Of 72.9 million US households owning at least one pet, five million own small mammals; 3000 hedgehogs were documented by USDA in USDA-licensed breeding facilities and pet stores in 2012. State health department collaborators and PulseNet, the national bacterial subtyping network, identified human infections of a Salmonella Typhimurium outbreak strain, which were investigated by CDC, USDA-APHIS and state public and animal health officials. A case was defined as an illness in a person infected with the outbreak strain identified between 1 December 2011 and 3 June 2013. Investigators collected information on patient exposures, cultured animal and environmental specimens for Salmonella, and conducted traceback investigations of USDA-licensed hedgehog facilities. There were 26 cases in 12 states. Illness onset dates ranged from 26 December 2011 to 8 April 2013. The median patient age was 15 years (range = <1-91 years); 58% were female. Among 23 persons with available information, 8 (35%) were hospitalized and one outbreak strain-associated death was reported. Of 25 patients with available information, 20 (80%) reported pet hedgehog contact in the week before illness onset. The outbreak strain was isolated from animal and environmental samples collected from three ill persons' homes in three states. Hedgehogs were purchased in geographically distant states from USDA-licensed breeders (10/17, 59%); a USDA-licensed pet store (1/17, 6%); unlicensed or unknown status breeders (3/17, 18%); and private individuals (3/17, 18%). Traceback investigations of USDA-licensed facilities did not reveal a single source of infection. Public and animal health collaboration linked pet hedgehog contact to human infections of Salmonella Typhimurium, highlighting the importance of a One Health investigative approach to zoonotic salmonellosis outbreaks. More efforts are needed to increase awareness among multiple stakeholders on the risk of illness associated with pet hedgehogs.

  5. Alcohol Use and Binge Drinking Among Women of Childbearing Age: United States, 2011-2013

    MedlinePlus

    ... Denny , PhD 1 ; Nancy E. Cheal , PhD 1 ; Joseph E. Sniezek , MD 1 ; Dafna Kanny , PhD 2 ... 21.8) 1.5 (1.4–1.6) Black, non-Hispanic 49.6 (48.4–50.7) ... 3.5 (2.8–4.4) NA †† NA †† Black, non-Hispanic 13.9 (10.0–19.0) ...

  6. Bromine Chemistry in the Tropical UTLS during the 2011, 2013 and 2014 ATTREX Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Bodo; Stutz, Jochen; Spolaor, Max; Festa, James; Tsai, Catalina; Colosimo, Fedele; Cheung, Ross; Deutschmann, Tim; Raecke, Rasmus; Scalone, Lisa; Tricoli, Ugo; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Navarro, Maria; Atlas, Elliot; Chipperfield, Martyn; Hossaini, Ryan

    2015-04-01

    Bromine plays an important role for the chemistry of ozone in the stratosphere and upper troposphere. An accurate quantitative understanding of the sources, sinks, and chemical transformation of bromine species is thus important to understand the bromine budget in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), which also serves as a gate to the stratosphere. Vertical transport of very short-lived organic bromine precursors and inorganic product gases has been identified as the main source of bromine in the UTLS. However, the contribution of inorganic vs. organic compounds is not well quantified, particularly in the tropical UTLS. A limb scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument was deployed onboard NASA's UAV Global Hawk during the NASA Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX) during a series of flights into the eastern and western Pacific tropopause layer (flight altitudes up to 18 km), which is a gateway to the stratosphere. The measurement methodology to retrieve vertical trace gas concentration profiles will be briefly presented. Observations of BrO, NO2 and O3 and of other trace species, in particular of brominated hydrocarbons are compared with simulations of the SLIMCAT CTM and interpreted with respect to photochemistry and the budget of bromine within the tropical tropopause layer (TTL).

  7. Arkansas Public Higher Education Personal Services Recommendations, 2011-2013 Biennium. 7-B

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Department of Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This publication lists "non-classified" personal services recommendations of the Arkansas Higher Education Coordinating Board, and "classified" positions recommended by the Office of Personnel Management, Department of Finance and Administration for public institutions of higher education for the 2011-13 biennium. The Office of…

  8. Synoptic typing of high ozone events in Arizona (2011-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Jessica

    This thesis examines the synoptic characteristics associated with ozone exceedance events in Arizona during the time period of 2011 to 2013. Finding explanations and sources to the ground level ozone in this state is crucial to maintaining the state's adherence to federal air quality regulations. This analysis utilizes ambient ozone concentration data, surface meteorological conditions, upper air analyses, and HYSPLIT modeling to analyze the synoptic characteristics of ozone events. Based on these data and analyses, five categories were determined to be associated with these events. The five categories all exhibit distinct upper air patterns and surface conditions conducive to the formation of ozone, as well as distinct potential transport pathways of ozone from different nearby regions. These findings indicate that ozone events in Arizona can be linked to synoptic-scale patterns and potential regional transport of ozone. These results can be useful in the forecasting of high ozone pollution and influential on the legislative reduction of ozone pollution.

  9. Modeling the diurnal variability of agricultural ammonia in Bakersfield, California, during the CalNex campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonsdale, Chantelle R.; Hegarty, Jennifer D.; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.; Alvarado, Matthew J.; Henze, Daven K.; Turner, Matthew D.; Capps, Shannon L.; Nowak, John B.; Neuman, J. Andy; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Bahreini, Roya; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Markovic, Milos Z.; VandenBoer, Trevor C.; Russell, Lynn M.; Scarino, Amy Jo

    2017-02-01

    NH3 retrievals from the NASA Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), as well as surface and aircraft observations of NH3(g) and submicron NH4(p), are used to evaluate modeled concentrations of NH3(g) and NH4(p) from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign. We find that simulations of NH3 driven with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) emission inventory are qualitatively and spatially consistent with TES satellite observations, with a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.64. However, the surface observations at Bakersfield indicate a diurnal cycle in the model bias, with CMAQ overestimating surface NH3 at night and underestimating it during the day. The surface, satellite, and aircraft observations all suggest that daytime NH3 emissions in the CARB inventory are underestimated by at least a factor of 2, while the nighttime overestimate of NH3(g) is likely due to a combination of overestimated NH3 emissions and underestimated deposition.Running CMAQ v5.0.2 with the bi-directional NH3 scheme reduces NH3 concentrations at night and increases them during the day. This reduces the model bias when compared to the surface and satellite observations, but the increased concentrations aloft significantly increase the bias relative to the aircraft observations. We attempt to further reduce model bias by using the surface observations at Bakersfield to derive an empirical diurnal cycle of NH3 emissions in the SJV, in which nighttime and midday emissions differ by about a factor of 4.5. Running CMAQv5.0.2 with a bi-directional NH3 scheme together with this emissions diurnal profile further reduces model bias relative to the surface observations. Comparison of these simulations with the vertical profile retrieved by TES shows little bias except for the lowest retrieved level, but the model bias relative to flight data aloft increases

  10. CU Airborne MAX-DOAS measurements over California during the CalNEx and CARES field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Coburn, S.; Ortega, I.; Dix, B. K.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The University of Colorado Airborne Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed aboard the NOAA Optical Remote Sensing Twin Otter Research Aircraft during the CalNEx 2010 and CARES field campaigns. A total of 52 flights (48 research + 4 transfer flights) were carried out between May 19 and July 19 2010 and included flights in the South California Air Basin, the High deserts, Northern Mexico, the Central Valley, Sacramento, and the San Francisco Bay Area. A particular component of the CU AMAX-DOAS deployment was to enhance the value of ground-based super sites in Pasadena and Bakersfield, as well as the CARES T0 and T1 sites. The CU AMAX-DOAS is measuring column amounts of NO2, HCHO, CHOCHO, O4 and other gases above and below the aircraft. The focus of this deployment was to map the horizontal and vertical distribution of these gases. Here we describe the CU AMAX-DOAS instrument and give an overview of the NO2 vertical columns below the plane along the flight tracks. A first comparison of NO2 vertical columns measured by AMAX-DOAS and two CU Ground based MAX-DOAS instruments which were deployed in Pasadena and Fontana Arrows during CalNEx and at the T1 site during CARES is also presented.

  11. The X-ray eclipse geometry of the super-soft X-ray source CAL 87

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, T.; Lopes de Oliveira, R.

    2014-09-01

    We explore XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing super-soft X-ray source CAL 87 in order to map the accretion structures of the system. Indirect imaging techniques were applied in X-ray light curves to provide eclipse maps. The surface brightness distribution exhibits an extended and symmetric emission, and a feature is revealed from the hardest X-rays that is likely due to a bright spot. A rate of P-dot =(+6±2)×10{sup −10} for changes in the orbital period of the system was derived from the eclipses. There is no significant variation of the emission lines even during eclipses, arguing that the lines are formed in an extended region. The continuum emission dominates the decrease in flux that is observed during eclipses. The O VIII Lyα line reveals a broadening velocity that is estimated to be 365{sub −69}{sup +65} km s{sup –1} (at 1σ), marginal evidence for asymmetry in its profile, and sometimes shows evidence of double-peaked emission. Together, the results support that the wind-driven mass transfer scenario is running in CAL 87.

  12. Proapoptotic Activity of Propolis and Their Components on Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Line (CAL-27).

    PubMed

    Czyżewska, Urszula; Siemionow, Katarzyna; Zaręba, Ilona; Miltyk, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has been used since ancient times in folk medicine. It is a popular medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. This material is one of the richest sources of polyphenolic compounds such as flavonoids and phenolic acids. The ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) evokes antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal and anticancer properties. Due to pharmacological properties it is used in the commercial production of nutritional supplements. In this study, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify main polyphenols in EEPs. The effect of EEPs, individual EEPs components (chrysin, galangin, pinocembrin, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid) and their mixture on viability of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line (CAL-27) as well as the molecular mechanisms of the process were examined. The results of MTTs assay demonstrated that EEP, polyphenols and mixture of polyphenolic compounds were cytotoxic for CAL-27 cells in a dose dependent manner. The mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by these components undergoes through apoptosis as detected by flow cytometry. The ethanolic extracts of propolis activated caspases -3, -8, -9. Mixture of polyphenols was found as the most potent inducer of apoptosis thorough both intrinsic and extrinsic pathway. Therefore, we suggest that anticancer properties of propolis is related to synergistic activity of its main components.

  13. Proapoptotic Activity of Propolis and Their Components on Human Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Line (CAL-27)

    PubMed Central

    Czyżewska, Urszula; Siemionow, Katarzyna; Zaręba, Ilona; Miltyk, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Propolis has been used since ancient times in folk medicine. It is a popular medicine possessing a broad spectrum of biological activities. This material is one of the richest sources of polyphenolic compounds such as flavonoids and phenolic acids. The ethanolic extract of propolis (EEP) evokes antibacterial, antiviral, antifungal and anticancer properties. Due to pharmacological properties it is used in the commercial production of nutritional supplements. In this study, gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to quantify main polyphenols in EEPs. The effect of EEPs, individual EEPs components (chrysin, galangin, pinocembrin, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ferulic acid) and their mixture on viability of human tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line (CAL-27) as well as the molecular mechanisms of the process were examined. The results of MTTs assay demonstrated that EEP, polyphenols and mixture of polyphenolic compounds were cytotoxic for CAL-27 cells in a dose dependent manner. The mechanism of cytotoxicity induced by these components undergoes through apoptosis as detected by flow cytometry. The ethanolic extracts of propolis activated caspases -3, -8, -9. Mixture of polyphenols was found as the most potent inducer of apoptosis thorough both intrinsic and extrinsic pathway. Therefore, we suggest that anticancer properties of propolis is related to synergistic activity of its main components. PMID:27281369

  14. Mass concentration, composition and sources of fine and coarse particulate matter in Tijuana, Mexico, during Cal-Mex campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minguillón, María Cruz; Campos, Arturo Alberto; Cárdenas, Beatriz; Blanco, Salvador; Molina, Luisa T.; Querol, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    This work was carried out in the framework of the Cal-Mex project, which focuses on investigating the atmosphere along Mexico-California border region. Sampling was carried out at two sites located in Tijuana urban area: Parque Morelos and Metales y Derivados. PM2.5 and PM10 24 h samples were collected every three days from 17th May 2010 to 27th June 2010, and were used for gravimetric and chemical analyses (major and minor elements, inorganic ions, organic and elemental carbon) of PM. A subsequent Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis was performed. PM2.5 and PM10 average concentrations during Cal-Mex were relatively lower compared to usual annual averages. Trace elements concentrations recorded in the present study were lower than those recorded in Mexico City in 2006, with the exception of Pb at Metales y Derivados, attributed to the influence of a specific industrial source, which also includes As, Cd and Tl. Apart from this industrial source, both urban sites were found to be affected by similar sources with respect to bulk PM. Fine PM (PM2.5) was mainly apportioned by fueloil and biomass combustion and secondary aerosols, and road traffic. Coarse PM (PM2.5-10) was mainly apportioned by a mineral source (sum of road dust resuspension, construction emissions and natural soil) and fresh and aged sea salt. The road traffic was responsible for more than 60% of the fine elemental carbon and almost 40% of the fine organic matter.

  15. Woody vegetation, fuel and fire track the melting of the Scandinavian ice-sheet before 9500 cal yr BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carcaillet, Christopher; Hörnberg, Greger; Zackrisson, Olle

    2012-11-01

    New studies indicate the presence of early Holocene ice-free areas far north in Scandinavia. Post-glacial fire and vegetation were investigated based on sedimentary charcoal and pollen from two small lakes in northern Sweden. Accumulation of organic sediment started around 10,900 and 9200 cal yr BP, showing that both lake valleys were ice-free extremely early given their northerly location. Fire events started after 9600 cal yr BP and became less common around the '8.2-ka event'. Woody vegetation provided fuel that contributed to fires. The first vegetation in our pollen record consisted of Hippophae, Dryas, grasses and sedges. Subsequently broadleaved trees (Betula, Salix) increased in abundance and later Pinus, Alnus, ferns and Lycopodium characterized the vegetation. Pollen from Larix, Picea and Malus were also found. The change in vegetation composition was synchronous with the decrease in lake-water pH in the region, indicating ecosystem-scale processes; this occurred during a period of net global and regional warming. The changes in fire frequency and vegetation appear independent of regional trends in precipitation. The reconstructed fire history and vegetation support the scenario of early ice-free areas far north in Scandinavia during early Holocene warming, creating favorable conditions for woody plants and wildfires.

  16. Determination of the sources and impacts of aerosols on clouds and orographic precipitation during CalWater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, K. A.; Suski, K.; Cazorla, A.; Cahill, J. F.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Ralph, F. M.; Cayan, D. R.; Rosenfeld, D.; DeMott, P. J.; Sullivan, R. C.; Comstock, J. M.; Leung, L.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Roberts, G. C.; Nenes, A.; Lin, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections for the remainder of this century for the U.S. Southwest, including parts of California, suggest a drying trend (reductions ~ 10 -15 %). Thus, understanding factors which could potentially influence the amount and type of precipitation is critical to future water resources in California. Previous studies suggest aerosols transported from the Central Valley into the mountains may be reducing the amount of orographic precipitation in the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the key region for water storage in the snowpack. CalWater, which commenced in the Winter of 2009, is an ongoing multi-year, multi-agency field campaign to investigate the primary sources of aerosols influencing clouds and precipitation in this region. Single particle measurements, used in both ground as well as PNNL G1 aircraft measurements, in the recent campaign provide insight into the sources of aerosols impacting the clouds and precipitation. Biomass burning, Central Valley pollution, long range transported Asian dust and pollution, locally generated newly formed particles, and marine aerosols all show strong impacts on the cloud microphysical properties. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the objective and key findings from CalWater measurements of aerosols, precipitation, clouds, and meteorology conducted from 2009-2011 in this region.

  17. Evaluation of IsoCal geometric calibration system for Varian linacs equipped with on-board imager and electronic portal imaging device imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Du, Weiliang; Balter, Peter; Munro, Peter; Jeung, Andrew

    2014-05-08

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the IsoCal geometric calibration system for kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) imagers on Varian C-series linear accelerators (linacs). IsoCal calibration starts by imaging a phantom and collimator plate using MV images with different collimator angles, as well as MV and kV images at different gantry angles. The software then identifies objects on the collimator plate and in the phantom to determine the location of the treatment isocenter and its relation to the MV and kV imager centers. It calculates offsets between the positions of the imaging panels and the treatment isocenter as a function of gantry angle and writes a correction file that can be applied to MV and kV systems to correct for those offsets in the position of the panels. We performed IsoCal calibration three times on each of five Varian C-series linacs, each time with an independent setup. We then compared the IsoCal calibrations with a simplified Winston-Lutz (WL)-based system and with a Varian cubic phantom (VC)-based system. The maximum IsoCal corrections ranged from 0.7 mm to 1.5 mm for MV and 0.9 mm to 1.8 mm for kV imagers across the five linacs. The variations in the three calibrations for each linac were less than 0.2 mm. Without IsoCal correction, the WL results showed discrepancies between the treatment isocenter and the imager center of 0.9 mm to 1.6 mm (for the MV imager) and 0.5 mm to 1.1 mm (for the kV imager); with IsoCal corrections applied, the differences were reduced to 0.2 mm to 0.6 mm (MV) and 0.3 mm to 0.6 mm (kV) across the five linacs. The VC system was not as precise as the WL system, but showed similar results, with discrepancies of less than 1.0 mm when the IsoCal corrections were applied. We conclude that IsoCal is an accurate and consistent method for calibration and periodic quality assurance of MV and kV imaging systems.

  18. High-resolution study of planktic foraminifera from the eastern Mediterranean over the last 13 cal ka BP. Example from the Nile prodelta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojtahid, Meryem; Rose, Manceau; Ralf, Schiebel; Rick, Hennekam; Lange Gert, de

    2014-05-01

    A unique high-resolution record from the Nile prodelta has been investigated in order to study past hydrological and climatic changes in the southeastern Levantine region over the last 13 cal ka BP. To this end, we used planktic foraminifera (accumulation rates, diversity, assemblages and size properties) as bioindicators of the ecological characteristics of the water column (temperature, salinity, primary production and hydrology). These characteristics were mainly connected to Nile discharges and thermohaline circulation which in turn were controlled by various global and regional climatic forcing factors (e.g., orbital forcing, African and Indian Monsoon, North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)). Our data showed seven main climatic periods: 1) from 13.0 to 11.5 cal ka BP encompassing the Younger Dryas and characterized by rather cold productive and mixed waters; 2) from 11.5 to 10.1 cal ka BP matching the start of the Holocene and the onset of the African Humid Period (AHP). This period was defined by surface water warming and increasing stratification due to increased river outflow; 3) from 10.1 to 6.4 cal ka BP encompassing the Sapropel deposit (S1) and matching the maximum of the AHP with drastic ecological conditions and maximum water stratification. During this period, the dominant warm taxon Globigerinoides ruber increased significantly in size and accumulation rate marking an opportunistic behavior and a total adaptation to the less saline and stratified waters. After 8.8 cal ka BP, the increase in diversity marked a progressive return to normal conditions; 4) from 6.4 to 2.9 cal ka BP, a progressive aridification period was recorded and the planktic ecosystem returned progressively to equilibrium conditions due to the recovery of thermohaline circulation after S1 and the decrease in Nile runoff; 5) from 2.9 to 1.1 cal ka BP, particular dry conditions were recorded leading to a severe drop in planktic diversity. These conditions seemed to be connected to a

  19. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of two analogs of poly(dA): poly(2-aminopurine-9-beta-D-deoxyribonucleotide) and poly 2-amino-deoxyadenylic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Scheit, K H; Rackwitz, H R

    1982-01-01

    Polymerization of chemically synthesized dn2h6ATP and dn2ATP by deoxynucleotidyl transferase from calf thymus furnished poly(dn2h6A) and poly(dn2A) respectively. The synthetic polynucleotides were characterized by spectroscopic, ultracentrifugation and enzymatic methods. In polynucleotide-polynucleotide interaction, poly(dn2h6A) and poly(dn2A) behaved like analogs of poly(dnA). PMID:6287431

  20. Downregulation of KLF8 expression by shRNA induces inhibition of cell proliferation in CAL27 human oral cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Zhang; Ke-Yi, Li; Wei-Feng, Zhang; Li-Cheng, Jiang; Xian-Bin, Liu; Chun-Peng, Xia; Dao-Ying, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: KLF8 is a member of KLF transcription factors which play an important tolr in oncogenesis. It is barely expressed in normal human epithelial cells but highly overexpressed in several types of human cancer cell lines. In the present study, we investigate the role of KLF8 in oral cancer and the effects of KLF8 knockdown via lentivirus mediated siRNA infection in human adenosquamos carcinoma CAL 27 cells. Study Design: We developed a vector-based siRNA expression system that can induce RNAi in CAL 27 oral cancer cells. Downregulation of KLF8 was confirmed by evaluating GFP expressions, RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Finally, the effects of KLF8 downregulation were analyzed by MTT assay and colony formation assays. Results: The expression levels of KLF8 mRNA and proteins are reduced in CAL 27 cells that transfected with 21-nt siRNA against KLF8. Lentivirus-mediated silencing of KLF8 reduces cell proliferation and colonies number, thereby indicating the role of KLF8 in cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Conclusions: These results strongly suggest that KLF8 is essential for growth of CAL 27 cancer cells. A better understanding of KLF8 function and processing may provide novel insights into the clinical therapy of oral cancer. Key words:KLF8, lentivirus, CAL 27, oral cancer, cell proliferation. PMID:23722127

  1. Poly(A)-Driven and Poly(A)-Assisted Termination: Two Different Modes of Poly(A)-Dependent Transcription Termination

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, George; Choi, Louis M.; Chao, Lily C.; Park, Noh Jin; Liu, Dahai; Jamil, Amer; Martinson, Harold G.

    1998-01-01

    We mapped the elements that mediate termination of transcription downstream of the chicken βH- and βA-globin gene poly(A) sites. We found no unique element and no segment of 3′-flanking DNA to be significantly more effective than any other. When we replaced the native 3′-flanking DNA with bacterial DNA, it too supported transcription termination. Termination in the bacterial DNA depended on a functional poly(A) signal, which apparently compelled termination to occur in the downstream DNA with little regard for its sequence. We also studied premature termination by poorly processive polymerases close to the promoter. The rate of premature termination varied for different DNA sequences. However, the efficiencies of poly(A)-driven termination and promoter-proximal premature termination varied similarly on different DNAs, suggesting that poly(A)-driven termination functions by returning the transcription complex to a form which resembles a prior state of low processivity. The poly(A)-driven termination described here differs dramatically from the poly(A)-assisted termination previously described for the simian virus 40 (SV40) early transcription unit. In the SV40 early transcription unit, essentially no termination occurs downstream of the poly(A) site unless a special termination element is present. The difference between the βH-globin and SV40 modes of termination is governed by sequences in the upstream DNA. For maximum efficiency, the βH-globin poly(A) signal required the assistance of upstream enhancing sequences. Moreover, the SV40 early poly(A) signal also drove termination in βH-globin style when it was placed in a βH-globin sequence context. These studies were facilitated by a rapid, improved method of run-on transcription analysis, based on the use of a vector containing two G-free cassettes. PMID:9418875

  2. Progress toward studies of bubble-geometry Bose-Einstein condensates in microgravity with a ground-based prototype of NASA CAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundblad, Nathan; Jarvis, Thomas; Paseltiner, Daniel; Lannert, Courtney

    2016-05-01

    We have proposed using NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL, launching to the International Space Station in 2017) to generate bubble-geometry Bose-Einstein condensates through radiofrequency dressing of an atom-chip magnetic trap. This geometry has not been truly realized terrestrially due to the perturbing influence of gravity, making it an ideal candidate for microgravity investigation aboard CAL. We report progress in the construction of a functional prototype of the orbital BEC apparatus: a compact atom-chip machine loaded by a 2D+MOT source, conventional 3D MOT, quadrupole trap, and transfer coil. We also present preliminary modeling of the dressed trap uniformity, which will crucially inform the geometric closure of the BEC shell surface as atom number, bubble radius, and bubble aspect ratio are varied. Finally, we discuss plans for experimental sequences to be run aboard CAL guided by intuition from ground-based prototype operation. JPL 1502172.

  3. Aerosol Composition in Los Angeles During the 2010 CalNex Campaign Studied by High Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P. L.; Ortega, A. M.; Cubison, M.; Hu, W.; Toohey, D. W.; Flynn, J. H.; Grossberg, N.; Lefer, B. L.; Alvarez, S.; Rappenglueck, B.; Allan, J. D.; McKeen, S. A.; Holloway, J. S.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Richter, R.; Hofer, J.; Prevot, A. S.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Submicron atmospheric aerosols impact climate and human health, but their sources and composition are poorly understood. To address this knowledge gap, high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS) [DeCarlo et al. Anal. Chem. 2006] and other advanced instrumentation were deployed during the CalNex field campaign in May and June 2010 for 4 weeks to characterize the composition of aerosols in the Los Angeles area. Utilizing AMS, the concentrations for both organic and non-refractory inorganic (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride) submicron aerosols were quantified at the Caltech/Pasadena ground site 15 km NE of downtown Los Angeles. The total submicron mass concentration as well as the species concentrations measured by AMS compare well with other instruments. Nitrate aerosols appear to dominate in the cooler mornings, but their concentration is reduced in the afternoon when organic aerosols (OA) increase and dominate. The diurnal variations in concentration are strongly influenced by vertical dilution from the rising planetary boundary layer in the afternoon. Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are an important fraction of submicron aerosols. To assess the concentrations of different OA components present at the site, positive matrix factorization (PMF) is used to analyze the field data. The major OA classes are oxygenated OA (OOA, a surrogate for total SOA), and hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, a surrogate for primary combustion OA). Preliminary PMF analysis finds that OOA is consistently the largest type of OA present (~75% of the total OA concentration). This result suggests that the air mass over the site has undergone substantial chemical aging. The correlations between OOA and Ox (O3 + NO2) concentrations, as well as between HOA, CO and black carbon concentrations are strong and consistent with previous studies. AMS and 14C measurements are combined to determine the fractions of HOA and OOA from non-fossil vs. fossil sources. Using measurements of SOA

  4. Are Avellino (4365 cal BP) and Pompeii twin plinian eruptions? Pre-eruptive constraints and degassing history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudon, Georges; Balcone-Boissard, Hélène; Villemant, Benoît.; Ucciani, Guillaume; Cioni, Raffaello

    2010-05-01

    Somma-Vesuvius activity started 35 ky ago and is characterized by numerous eruptions of variable composition and eruptive style, sometimes interrupted by long periods of unrest. The main explosive eruptions are represented by four plinian eruptions: Pomici di Base eruption (22 cal ky), Mercato (~8900 cal BP), Avellino (4365 cal BP) and Pompeii (79 AD). The 79 AD eruption embodies the most famous eruption since it's responsible of the destruction of Pompeii and Herculanum and it's the first described eruption. The Avellino eruption represents the last plinian event that preceded the Pompeii eruption. The eruptive sequence is similar to the 79 AD plinian eruption, with an opening phase preceding a main plinian fallout activity which ended by a phreatomagmatic phase. The fallout deposit displays a sharp colour contrast from white to grey pumice, corresponding to a magma composition evolution. We focus our study on the main fallout deposit that we sampled in detail in the Traianello quarry, 9 km North-North East of the crater, to investigate the degassing processes during the eruption, using volatile content and textural observations. Density and vesicularity measurements were obtained on a minimum of 100 pumice clasts sampled in 10 stratigraphic levels in the fallout deposit. On the basis of the density distribution, bulk geochemical data, point analytical measurements on glasses (melt inclusions and residual glass) and textural observations were obtained simultaneously on a minimum of 5 pumice clasts per eruptive unit. The glass composition, in particular the Na/K ratio, evolves from Na-rich phonolite for white pumices to a more K-rich phonolite for grey pumices. The pre-eruptive conditions are constrained by systematic Cl measurements in melt inclusions and matrix glass of pumice clasts. The entire magma was saturated relative to sub-critical fluids (a Cl-rich H2O vapour phase and a brine), with a Cl melt content buffered at ~6000 ppm, and a mean pre-eruptive H2O

  5. Role of oxygen pressure on the structural, morphological and optical properties of c-Al2O3 films deposited by thermal evaporator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Ijaz Ahmad; Amna, Noureen; Kanwal, Nosheen; Razzaq, Maleeha; Farid, Amjad; Amin, Nasir; Ikhlaq, Uzma; Saleem, Murtaza; Ahmad, Riaz

    2017-03-01

    Aluminum oxide (c-Al2O3) films are deposited for various (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 mbar) oxygen pressures on glass substrates by thermal evaporator. The x-ray diffraction patterns exhibit the development of single diffraction peak related to c-Al2O3 phase which grows along (2 2 0) orientation up to 1.5 mbar pressure. For 2 mbar pressure, the deposited film becomes amorphous because no diffraction peak is observed. A minimum FWHM and maximum crystallite size of c-Al2O3 (2 2 0) plane is observed for 1 mbar pressure. The enhanced crystallite size of c-Al2O3 (2 2 0) plane is responsible to decrease the dislocation density and residual stresses developed during the deposition process. The field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis reveals the formation of smooth, uniform and compact films showing uniform distribution of nano-particles of different shapes and sizes. The energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopic analysis confirms the presence of Al whose content is decreased with the increase of oxygen pressures. The ellipsometric analysis confirms that the refractive index and the thickness of c-Al2O3 film deposited for 0.5 mbar pressure are found to 1.685 and 124.43 nm respectively. In short, the crystal structure, surface morphology, film thickness and refractive index of c-Al2O3 films are associated with the increase of oxygen pressures.

  6. Evaluation of the bond strength of different adhesive agents to a resin-modified calcium silicate material (TheraCal LC).

    PubMed

    Karadas, Muhammed; Cantekin, Kenan; Gumus, Husniye; Ateş, Sabit Melih; Duymuş, Zeynep Yesil

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of different adhesive agents to TheraCal LC and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and examined the morphologic changes of these materials with different surface treatments. A total of 120 specimens, 60 of MTA Angelus (AMTA), and 60 of TheraCal LC, were prepared and divided into six subgroups according to the adhesive agent used; these agents included Scotchbond Multipurpose, Clearfil SE Bond, Clearfil Protect Bond, Clearfil S(3) Bond, OptiBond All-in-One, and G-aenial Bond. After application of adhesive agents, Filtek Z250 composite resin was placed onto the specimens. Shear bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine, followed by examination of the fractured surfaces. The surface changes of the specimens were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Although no significant differences were found among the bond strengths of different adhesives to AMTA (p = 0.69), a significant difference was found in terms of bond strengths of different adhesives to the TheraCal LC surface (p < 0.001). The total-etch adhesive system more strongly bonded to TheraCal LC compared to the bond with other adhesives. TheraCal LC bonded significantly more strongly than AMTA regardless of the adhesive agents tested. Resin-modified calcium silicate showed higher bond strength than AMTA in terms of the composite bond to these materials with different bonding systems. On the other hand, the highest shear bond-strength values were found for composite bonds with the combination of TheraCal LC and the total-etch adhesive system. SCANNING 38:403-411, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 inhibits the growth, migration, and invasion of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Yang, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Jie; Liu, Hong-Bo; Ye, Ming; Zhang, Yu-Fei

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effects of Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632 on the growth, invasion, and migration of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). The methods of the study are as follows: After being routinely cultured for 24 h, Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells were treated with Y-27632 solution. The morphological change of Y-27632-treated cells was observed under an optical microscope and an inverted microscope; MTT assay was performed to measure the optical density (OD) of cells and calculate cell growth inhibition rate; the change of apoptosis was detected by AnnexinV-FITC/PI assay; cell invasion and migration were measured by Transwell assay. The results were as follows: (1) With increasing concentration of Y-27632, cell morphology changed and cell apoptosis appeared; (2) MTT assay showed that inhibition effect of Y-27632 on Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells was enhanced with increasing concentrations and time (all P < 0.01); (3) Apoptosis showed that, compared with controls, the number of apoptosis cells in experimental groups was significantly increased (all P < 0.01). Apoptosis rate was elevated with increasing concentrations of Y-27632; (4) Transwell assay showed, after a treatment with Y-27632, the number of migrated and invaded Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in each group was statistically different (all P < 0.01); compared with controls, the number of migrated cell in groups treated with Y-27632 was decreased and less Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells in experimental groups passed through polycarbonate membrane (all P < 0.05). The study concludes that Y-27632 can inhibit the growth, invasion, and migration of Tca8113 and CAL-27 cells, suggesting that Y-27632 may be therapeutically useful in TSCC.

  8. FlowCal: A User-Friendly, Open Source Software Tool for Automatically Converting Flow Cytometry Data from Arbitrary to Calibrated Units.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Hair, Sebastian M; Sexton, John T; Landry, Brian P; Olson, Evan J; Igoshin, Oleg A; Tabor, Jeffrey J

    2016-07-15

    Flow cytometry is widely used to measure gene expression and other molecular biological processes with single cell resolution via fluorescent probes. Flow cytometers output data in arbitrary units (a.u.) that vary with the probe, instrument, and settings. Arbitrary units can be converted to the calibrated unit molecules of equivalent fluorophore (MEF) using commercially available calibration particles. However, there is no convenient, nonproprietary tool available to perform this calibration. Consequently, most researchers report data in a.u., limiting interpretation. Here, we report a software tool named FlowCal to overcome current limitations. FlowCal can be run using an intuitive Microsoft Excel interface, or customizable Python scripts. The software accepts Flow Cytometry Standard (FCS) files as inputs and is compatible with different calibration particles, fluorescent probes, and cell types. Additionally, FlowCal automatically gates data, calculates common statistics, and produces publication quality plots. We validate FlowCal by calibrating a.u. measurements of E. coli expressing superfolder GFP (sfGFP) collected at 10 different detector sensitivity (gain) settings to a single MEF value. Additionally, we reduce day-to-day variability in replicate E. coli sfGFP expression measurements due to instrument drift by 33%, and calibrate S. cerevisiae Venus expression data to MEF units. Finally, we demonstrate a simple method for using FlowCal to calibrate fluorescence units across different cytometers. FlowCal should ease the quantitative analysis of flow cytometry data within and across laboratories and facilitate the adoption of standard fluorescence units in synthetic biology and beyond.

  9. Poly(meth)acrylate-based coatings.

    PubMed

    Nollenberger, Kathrin; Albers, Jessica

    2013-12-05

    Poly(meth)acrylate coatings for pharmaceutical applications were introduced in 1955 with the launch of EUDRAGIT(®) L and EUDRAGIT(®) S, two types of anionic polymers. Since then, by introducing various monomers into their polymer chains and thus altering their properties, diverse forms with specific characteristics have become available. Today, poly(meth)acrylates function in different parts of the gastrointestinal tract and/or release the drug in a time-controlled manner. This article reviews the properties of various poly(meth)acrylates and discusses formulation issues as well as application possibilities.

  10. Observations of isocyanic acid in the marine boundary layer during the CalNex 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisp, T. A.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Isocyanic acid (HNCO), a carcinogen present in cigarette smoke and industrial emissions, has recently been measured in the troposphere. Large uncertainties exist in ambient HNCO concentrations due to limited field measurements and limited understanding of the sources and fate of HNCO in the troposphere. Previous measurements indicate that HNCO mixing ratios may be elevated (>1ppb) in urban environments, posing significant health concerns. Here, we present ambient measurements of HNCO during the CalNex 2010 field study using a fast-response chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer. We discuss potential sources as well as the spatial and temporal distribution of HNCO in coastal California to comment on the impact of this gas-phase species in polluted marine regions.

  11. CAL3JHH: a Java program to calculate the vicinal coupling constants (3J H,H) of organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Valderrama, Alonso; Dobado, José A

    2008-12-01

    Here, we present a free web-accessible application, developed in the JAVA programming language for the calculation of vicinal coupling constant (3J(H,H)) of organic molecules with the H-Csp3-Csp3-H fragment. This JAVA applet is oriented to assist chemists in structural and conformational analyses, allowing the user to calculate the averaged 3J(H,H) values among conformers, according to its Boltzmann populations. Thus, the CAL3JHH program uses the Haasnoot-Leeuw-Altona equation, and, by reading the molecule geometry from a protein data bank (PDB) file format or from multiple pdb files, automatically detects all the coupled hydrogens, evaluating the data needed for this equation. Moreover, a "Graphical viewer" menu allows the display of the results on the 3D molecule structure, as well as the plotting of the Newman projection for the couplings.

  12. Ambient Concentrations and Emissions of a Comprehensive Suite of Volatile Organic Compounds at the CalNex-Bakersfield Supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentner, D. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Ambient concentrations of ~250 Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) were measured hourly via in-situ gas chromatography at the Bakersfield, CA supersite in May & June 2010 as part of the California at the Nexus between Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) Experiment. Measurements included anthropogenic and biogenic VOCs containing 1 to 17 carbon atoms and a variety of functional groups (e.g. aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, halogens, sulfur, & nitrogen). We quantified a very broad range of primary gas-phase organics that lead to the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and tropospheric ozone, and we also observed many gas-phase products of VOC photooxidation. Many of the observed VOCs are volatile and have been measured previously, but in this experiment we tailored the instrumentation to also measure compounds in the intermediate volatility range, which are thought to contribute significantly to SOA and have rarely or never been reported from in-situ measurements. Among the observed gas-phase VOCs with lower volatility are PAHs (e.g. naphthalene, methylnaphthalenes, and dimethylnaphthalenes), alkanes up to 17 carbon atoms, aromatics and cycloalkanes with multiple alkyl groups, and functionalized VOCs with lower volatility. Analyses of the diurnal variability, covariance between compounds, weekday/weekend differences, and statistical analyses for source apportionment such as Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) will be utilized to establish the major sources of these compounds and estimate regional emissions. Our VOC data provides excellent context for analysis of the broad array of gas and particle phase measurements during CalNex2010, which will be used to elucidate the chemistry leading to formation of SOA and tropospheric ozone in this polluted region of California with diverse urban, industrial, agricultural, and natural emission sources.

  13. Optical and X-ray properties of CAL 83 - II. An X-ray pulsation at ˜67 s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odendaal, A.; Meintjes, P. J.; Charles, P. A.; Rajoelimanana, A. F.

    2014-01-01

    CAL 83 is the prototypical close binary supersoft X-ray source in the Large Magellanic Cloud, has a 1 d orbital period, and is believed to consist of a white dwarf (WD) primary accreting from an evolved donor. Based on published WD model atmosphere fits to X-ray data, the WD has a mass of ˜1.3 M⊙, just below the Chandrasekhar limit. From a systematic search through archival XMM-Newton data for periodic emission from CAL 83 down to the shortest possible period just above the WD break-up period, we report the discovery of an ˜67 s supersoft X-ray modulation, which we interpret as the rotation period of a highly spun-up WD. Such a short period can be explained within the framework of a high mass accretion history, where accretion disc torques could have spun up the WD over time-scales comparable to the thermal time-scale. The presence of carbon, oxygen and nitrogen in published optical and ultraviolet spectra may suggest CNO cycling in the envelope of a secondary star that is oversized for its inferred mass, suggesting that the secondary star shed a significant fraction of its envelope during a high mass-transfer history, resulting in a highly spun-up WD. The reported 67 s period shows an approximately ±3 s drift from the median value in single runs, which we interpret as a hydrogen burning gas envelope surrounding the WD, with a period not quite synchronized with the WD rotation period.

  14. Circum-Mediterranean fire activity and climate changes during the mid Holocene environmental transition (8500-2500 cal yr BP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannière, Boris; Power, Mitch J.; Roberts, Neil; Tinner, Willy; Carrión, José; Magny, Michel; Bartlein, Patrick

    2010-05-01

    In this contribution I will present a synthesis of mid- to late-Holocene fire activity from the Mediterranean basin and explore the linkages among fire, climate variability and seasonality, and people through several climatic and ecological transitions. Regional fire histories were created from 36 radiocarbon-dated sedimentary charcoal records, available from the Global Charcoal Database. During the mid-Holocene "Thermal Maximum", charcoal records from the northern Mediterranean suggest the region was more fire prone while records from the southern Mediterranean indicate a decrease in fire activity associated with wetter-than-present summers. A North-South partition at 40-43°N is apparent in the central and western Mediterranean. In the context of orbitally-induced summer insolation decrease, South Mediterranean wet conditions could be linked to the Afro-Asian summer monsoon which weakened after ca. 8000-6000 cal yr BP. Relatively abrupt changes in fire regime observed at ca. 5500-5000 cal yr BP may be associated to a threshold in this weakening influence of the orbitally-driven Afro-Asian monsoon strength. Charcoal records of past fire activity appear sensitive to both orbitally-forced climate changes and shorter lived excursions which may be related to cold events apparent in the North Atlantic record of ice-rafted debris. These results contradict former notions of gradual aridification of the entire region due to climatic forcing and/or human activities. In contrast, they suggest: 1) Teleconnections between the Mediterranean area and other climatic regions, in particular the North Atlantic and the low-latitude monsoon areas, influenced past fire regimes; 2) Gradual forcing, such as changes in orbital parameters, may have triggered more abrupt shifts in fire regime, either directly or indirectly through these teleconnections.

  15. Poly(silylene)vinylenes from ethynylhydridosilanes

    DOEpatents

    Barton, Thomas J.; Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Sina

    1992-11-10

    Catalytic polymerization of dialkyl-, alkylaryl- or diaryldiethynylhydridosilanes cleanly affords soluble poly(silylene)vinylenes which can be shaped as fibers, films and bulk objects and thermally converted to silicon carbide.

  16. Lignin poly(lactic acid) copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Olsson, Johan Vilhelm; Chung, Yi-Lin; Li, Russell Jingxian; Waymouth, Robert; Sattely, Elizabeth; Billington, Sarah; Frank, Curtis W.

    2017-02-14

    Provided herein are graft co-polymers of lignin and poly(lactic acid) (lignin-g-PLA copolymer), thermoset and thermoplastic polymers including them, methods of preparing these polymers, and articles of manufacture including such polymers.

  17. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masutani, Mitsuko; Fujimori, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    Cancer develops through diverse genetic, epigenetic and other changes, so-called 'multi-step carcinogenesis', and each cancer harbors different alterations and properties. Here in this article we review how poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is involved in multi-step and diverse pathways of carcinogenesis. Involvement of poly- and mono-ADP-ribosylation in carcinogenesis has been studied at molecular and cellular levels, and further by animal models and human genetic approaches. PolyADP-ribosylation acts in DNA damage repair response and maintenance mechanisms of genomic stability. Several DNA repair pathways, including base-excision repair and double strand break repair pathways, involve PARP and PARG functions. These care-taker functions of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation suggest that polyADP-ribosyation may mainly act in a tumor suppressive manner because genomic instability caused by defective DNA repair response could serve as a driving force for tumor progression, leading to invasion, metastasis and relapse of cancer. On the other hand, the new concept of 'synthetic lethality by PARP inhibition' suggests the significance of PARP activities for survival of cancer cells that harbor defects in DNA repair. Accumulating evidence has revealed that some PARP family molecules are involved in various signaling cascades other than DNA repair, including epigenetic and transcriptional regulations, inflammation/immune response and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation both promotes and suppresses carcinogenic processes depending on the conditions. Expanding understanding of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation suggests that strategies to achieve cancer prevention targeting poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation for genome protection against life-long exposure to environmental carcinogens and endogenous carcinogenic stimuli.

  18. Prediction of Poly(A) Sites by Poly(A) Read Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Bonfert, Thomas; Friedel, Caroline C.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-seq reads containing part of the poly(A) tail of transcripts (denoted as poly(A) reads) provide the most direct evidence for the position of poly(A) sites in the genome. However, due to reduced coverage of poly(A) tails by reads, poly(A) reads are not routinely identified during RNA-seq mapping. Nevertheless, recent studies for several herpesviruses successfully employed mapping of poly(A) reads to identify herpesvirus poly(A) sites using different strategies and customized programs. To more easily allow such analyses without requiring additional programs, we integrated poly(A) read mapping and prediction of poly(A) sites into our RNA-seq mapping program ContextMap 2. The implemented approach essentially generalizes previously used poly(A) read mapping approaches and combines them with the context-based approach of ContextMap 2 to take into account information provided by other reads aligned to the same location. Poly(A) read mapping using ContextMap 2 was evaluated on real-life data from the ENCODE project and compared against a competing approach based on transcriptome assembly (KLEAT). This showed high positive predictive value for our approach, evidenced also by the presence of poly(A) signals, and considerably lower runtime than KLEAT. Although sensitivity is low for both methods, we show that this is in part due to a high extent of spurious results in the gold standard set derived from RNA-PET data. Sensitivity improves for poly(A) sites of known transcripts or determined with a more specific poly(A) sequencing protocol and increases with read coverage on transcript ends. Finally, we illustrate the usefulness of the approach in a high read coverage scenario by a re-analysis of published data for herpes simplex virus 1. Thus, with current trends towards increasing sequencing depth and read length, poly(A) read mapping will prove to be increasingly useful and can now be performed automatically during RNA-seq mapping with ContextMap 2. PMID:28135292

  19. Adsorption of biopolymers on SWCNT: ordered poly(rC) and disordered poly(rI).

    PubMed

    Karachevtsev, Maksym V; Gladchenko, Galina O; Plokhotnichenko, Alexander M; Leontiev, Victor S; Karachevtsev, Victor A

    2013-03-07

    Polymer adsorption onto single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) depends on its rigidity/flexibility. The adsorption properties of two related homopolynucleotides poly(rI) and poly(rC) but of different rigidities were compared, employing absorption spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulation. It was shown that adsorption of the poor base stacked poly(rI) onto the nanotube is less effective than that of the strong base stacked poly(rC), the chain of which is of higher rigidity. Analysis of UV absorption spectra of polymer:nanotube suspension at heating until 90 °C, which leads to partial nanotube aggregation because of the weakly bound polymer sliding from the tube surface, revealed that the percent of precipitated nanotubes in suspension with poly(rI) is larger than that in suspension with poly(rC) (16% vs 7%). This fact indicates the higher stability of SWCNT:poly(rC) hybrid in comparison with SWCNT:poly(rI). Less effective adsorption of poly(rI) is confirmed with a weaker hypochromic effect of nanotubes covered with poly(rI) than with poly(rC), which originates from π-π stacking of nitrogen bases with the nanotube surface. Spontaneous adsorption of oligomers on the nanotube simulated by the molecular dynamics showed that oligomer r(I)25 has a weaker energy of binding to the carbon nanotube surface than r(C)25. The oligomer with ordered bases has a tendency to form the stretched conformation along the nanotube, which provides a higher binding energy, while more flexible r(I)25 forms the stable loop spaced away from the nanotube surface, the stability of which is strengthened with H-bonding between bases.

  20. Molecular analysis of SV-40-CAL, a new slow growing SV-40 strain from the kidney of a caged New World monkey with fatal renal disease.

    PubMed

    Zdziarski, Jacqueline M; Sarich, Nicolene A; Witecki, Kelley E; Lednicky, John A

    2004-10-01

    A decline of the Callimico goeldii population in American zoos is presently occurring due to glomerulonephritis of unknown etiology. We hypothesized that this emerging idiopathic fatal renal disease (IFRD) was caused by a virus. We therefore attempted to isolate virus from the kidneys three C. goeldi in Illinois that had IFRD. Along with other viruses, Simian virus 40 (SV-40) strain CAL was isolated. SV-40-CAL is currently the slowest-growing natural isolate of SV-40 in CV-1 cells. Inefficient SV-40-CAL growth in CV-1 cells stems from two features: a suboptimal protoarchetypal regulatory region, and a Large tumor antigen gene sequence like that of SV-40 strain T302, previously considered the slow-growing natural isolate of SV-40. To our knowledge, this is the first documented isolation of SV-40 from a New World monkey outside of a laboratory setting. Though SV-40 is renaltropic, the role of SV-40-CAL in IFRD is uncertain. Transmission of SV-40 to C. goeldii through anthropogenic activity is suspected.

  1. Impact of climate variability on terrestrial environment in Western Europe between 45 and 9 kyr cal. BP: vegetation dynamics recorded by the Bergsee Lake (Black Forest, Germany).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duprat-Oualid, Fanny; Begeot, Carole; Rius, Damien; Millet, Laurent; Magny, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Between 9 and 45 kyr cal. BP, two great transitions lead the global climate system to evolve from the Last-Glacial period (115-14.7 kyr cal. BP), to two successive warmer periods, the Late-Glacial Interstadial (14.7-11.7 kyr cal. BP) and the Holocene (11.7-0 kyr cal. BP). δ18O variations recorded in Greenland ice cores (GRIP & NGRIP) revealed high frequency climate variability within the Last Glacial. These reference isotopic records highlighted a succession of centennial-to-millennial warm/cold events, the so-called Greenland Interstadials (GI) and Greenland Stadials (GS). The number continental records about the period 14.7-0 kyr cal. BP is substantial. This allowed to understand the vegetation dynamics in response to climate changes this period at the North-Atlantic scale. However, sequences covering the glacial period (beyond 20 kyr cal.BP) remain rare, because of hiatuses mostly due to local glaciers. Therefore, sedimentary continuous records of vegetation dynamics are still needed to better understand climate changes during the Last Glacial in Western Europe (Heiri et al. 2014). Here we present a new high-resolution pollen record from Lake Bergsee (47°34'20''N, 7°56'11''E, 382 m a.s.l). This lake is located south of Black Forest and north of the Alps, beyond the zone of glaciers maximal extension. Therefore it could have recorded the whole last climatic cycle, i.e. 120-0 kyr cal. BP. In 2013, a 29 m long core was extracted from the Bergsee. According to the depth-age model based on 14C AMS dating and the Laacher See Tephra (LST), the record spans continuously at least the last 45 kyrs. The first series of pollen analysis, focused on the 45-9 kyr cal. BP time window, allows us to reconstruct a precise, faithful and continuous vegetation history at the centennial scale. This high temporal resolution enabled to assess the response of vegetation to secular climate events (e.g. GI-4 = 200 yrs). First, our results show that vegetation responded to climate

  2. [Biosynthesis and accumulation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) in Vibrio natriegens].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2002-09-01

    Accumulation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [poly(3HB)] by V. natriegens was studied. Results indicated that V. natriegens used glucose, gluconate, fructose and molasses as carbon sources for poly(3HB) synthesis. When molasses was used, up to 28.4% of poly(3HB) to cellular dry weight was accumulated. The accumulation of poly(3HB) followed, was not simultaneously to, the cell growth. Analysis of the PHA polymerase, beta-ketothiolase, and acetoacetyl-CoA reductase showed that the poly(3HB) accumulation was correlated to the increase of their activities in cells. Poly(3HB) accumulation was also related to the de novo fatty acid synthesis, as revealed by the results that cerulenin, a specific inhibitor to the de novo fatty acid synthesis, significantly reduced accumulation of poly(3HB). Based on the results from this study, the synthetic pathway of poly(3HB) was proposed.

  3. The late Holocene dry period: multiproxy evidence for an extended drought between 2800 and 1850 cal yr BP across the central Great Basin, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mensing, Scott A.; Sharpe, Saxon E.; Tunno, Irene; Sada, Don W.; Thomas, Jim M.; Starratt, Scott W.; Smith, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Evidence of a multi-centennial scale dry period between ∼2800 and 1850 cal yr BP is documented by pollen, mollusks, diatoms, and sediment in spring sediments from Stonehouse Meadow in Spring Valley, eastern central Nevada, U.S. We refer to this period as the Late Holocene Dry Period. Based on sediment recovered, Stonehouse Meadow was either absent or severely restricted in size at ∼8000 cal yr BP. Beginning ∼7500 cal yr BP, the meadow became established and persisted to ∼3000 cal yr BP when it began to dry. Comparison of the timing of this late Holocene drought record to multiple records extending from the eastern Sierra Nevada across the central Great Basin to the Great Salt Lake support the interpretation that this dry period was regional. The beginning and ending dates vary among sites, but all sites record multiple centuries of dry climate between 2500 and 1900 cal yr BP. This duration makes it the longest persistent dry period within the late Holocene. In contrast, sites in the northern Great Basin record either no clear evidence of drought, or have wetter than average climate during this period, suggesting that the northern boundary between wet and dry climates may have been between about 40° and 42° N latitude. This dry in the southwest and wet in the northwest precipitation pattern across the Great Basin is supported by large-scale spatial climate pattern hypotheses involving ENSO, PDO, AMO, and the position of the Aleutian Low and North Pacific High, particularly during winter.

  4. CalWater Field Studies Designed to Quantify the Roles of Atmospheric Rivers and Aerosols in Modulating U.S. West Coast Precipitation in a Changing Climate

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.; Cayan, D.; Spackman, J. R.; DeMott, P.; Dettinger, M.; Fairall, C.; Leung, R.; Rosenfeld, D.; Rutledge, S.; Waliser, D.; White, A. B.; Cordeira, J.; Martin, A.; Helly, J.; Intrieri, J.

    2016-07-01

    The variability of precipitation and water supply along the U.S. West Coast creates major challenges to the region’s economy and environment, as evidenced by the recent California drought. This variability is strongly influenced by atmospheric rivers (AR), which deliver much of the precipitation along the U.S. West Coast and can cause flooding, and by aerosols (from local sources and transported from remote continents and oceans) that modulate clouds and precipitation. A better understanding of these processes is needed to reduce uncertainties in weather predictions and climate projections of droughts and floods, both now and under changing climate conditions.To address these gaps a group of meteorologists, hydrologists, climate scientists, atmospheric chemists, and oceanographers have created an interdisciplinary research effort, with support from multiple agencies. From 2009-2011 a series of field campaigns (CalWater 1) collected atmospheric chemistry, cloud microphysics and meteorological measurements in California and associated modeling and diagnostic studies were carried out. Based on remaining gaps, a vision was developed to extend these studies offshore over the Eastern North Pacific and to enhance land based measurements from 2014-2018 (CalWater 2). The data set and selected results from CalWater 1 are summarized here. The goals of CalWater-2, and measurements to date, are then described. CalWater is producing new findings and exploring new technologies to evaluate and improve global climate models and their regional performance and to develop tools supporting water and hydropower management. These advances also have potential to enhance hazard mitigation by improving near-term weather prediction and subseasonal and seasonal outlooks.

  5. Spatially resolving methane emissions in California: constraints from the CalNex aircraft campaign and from present (GOSAT, TES) and future (TROPOMI, geostationary) satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, K. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Parker, R.; Bösch, H.; Worden, J.

    2014-02-01

    We apply a continental-scale inverse modeling system for North America based on the GEOS-Chem model to optimize California methane emissions at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution using atmospheric observations from the CalNex aircraft campaign (May-June 2010) and from satellites. Inversion of the CalNex data yields a best estimate for total California methane emissions of 2.86 ± 0.21 Tg yr-1, compared with 1.92 Tg yr-1 in the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori and 1.51 Tg yr-1 in the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory used for state regulations of greenhouse gas emissions. These results are consistent with a previous Lagrangian inversion of the CalNex data. Our inversion provides 12 independent pieces of information to constrain the geographical distribution of emissions within California. Attribution to individual source types indicates dominant contributions to emissions from landfills/wastewater (1.1 Tg yr-1), livestock (0.87 Tg yr-1), and gas/oil (0.64 Tg yr-1). EDGAR v4.2 underestimates emissions from livestock while CARB underestimates emissions from landfills/wastewater and gas/oil. Current satellite observations from GOSAT can constrain methane emissions in the Los Angeles Basin but are too sparse to constrain emissions quantitatively elsewhere in California (they can still be qualitatively useful to diagnose inventory biases). Los Angeles Basin emissions derived from CalNex and GOSAT inversions are 0.42 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.08, respectively. An observation system simulation experiment (OSSE) shows that the future TROPOMI satellite instrument (2015 launch) will be able to constrain California methane emissions at a detail comparable to the CalNex aircraft campaign. Geostationary satellite observations offer even greater potential for constraining methane emissions in the future.

  6. Spatially resolving methane emissions in California: constraints from the CalNex aircraft campaign and from present (GOSAT, TES) and future (TROPOMI, geostationary) satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecht, K. J.; Jacob, D. J.; Sulprizio, M. P.; Santoni, G. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Parker, R.; Bösch, H.; Worden, J.

    2014-08-01

    We apply a continental-scale inverse modeling system for North America based on the GEOS-Chem model to optimize California methane emissions at 1/2° × 2/3° horizontal resolution using atmospheric observations from the CalNex aircraft campaign (May-June 2010) and from satellites. Inversion of the CalNex data yields a best estimate for total California methane emissions of 2.86 ± 0.21 Tg a-1, compared with 1.92 Tg a-1 in the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory used as a priori and 1.51 Tg a-1 in the California Air Resources Board (CARB) inventory used for state regulations of greenhouse gas emissions. These results are consistent with a previous Lagrangian inversion of the CalNex data. Our inversion provides 12 independent pieces of information to constrain the geographical distribution of emissions within California. Attribution to individual source types indicates dominant contributions to emissions from landfills/wastewater (1.1 Tg a-1), livestock (0.87 Tg a-1), and gas/oil (0.64 Tg a-1). EDGAR v4.2 underestimates emissions from livestock, while CARB underestimates emissions from landfills/wastewater and gas/oil. Current satellite observations from GOSAT can constrain methane emissions in the Los Angeles Basin but are too sparse to constrain emissions quantitatively elsewhere in California (they can still be qualitatively useful to diagnose inventory biases). Los Angeles Basin emissions derived from CalNex and GOSAT inversions are 0.42 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.08 Tg a-1 that the future TROPOMI satellite instrument (2015 launch) will be able to constrain California methane emissions at a detail comparable to the CalNex aircraft campaign. Geostationary satellite observations offer even greater potential for constraining methane emissions in the future.

  7. Rainfall Process Partitioning Using S-PROF Radar Observations Collected During the CalWater Field Campaign Winters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, A. B.; Neiman, P. J.; Creamean, J.; Hughes, M. R.; Moore, B.; Ralph, F. M.; Prather, K. A.

    2011-12-01

    Vertically pointing S-band radar (S-PROF) observations collected during the CalWater field campaign winter wet seasons are analyzed to partition the observed rainfall into three primary categories: brightband (BB) rain, non-brightband (NBB) rain, and convective rain. NBB rain is primarily a shallow, warm rain process driven by collision and coalescence. Because of its shallow nature, NBB rain is often undetected by the operational NEXRAD radar network. Previous rainfall process partitioning analysis conducted for a coastal mountain site in California has shown that NBB rain contributes about one-third, on average, of the total wet season precipitation observed there. Shallow moist flow with near neutral stability, which is often present in the coastal environment during the warm sectors of landfalling storms, is a key ingredient in the formation of NBB rain. However, NBB rain also has been observed in other storm regimes (e.g., post-cold frontal). NBB rain has been shown to produce rain rates known by forecasters to be capable of producing floods. During the CalWater field campaign winters, S-PROF radars were located in the Sierra Nevada at Sugar Pine Dam (SPD) for three consecutive winters (2009-2011) and at Mariposa (MPI) for the latter two winters (2010-2011). During the southwesterly flow present in the warm sectors of many California landfalling storms, the SPD site was directly downwind of the gap in coastal terrain associated with the San Francisco Bay Delta. This orientation would allow relatively unmodified maritime flow to arrive at SPD. The MPI site was located further south such that airflow arriving at this site during winter storms likely was processed by the coastal terrain south of San Francisco Bay. In this presentation we will examine whether the relative locations of SPD and MPI relative to the coastal terrain impacted the amount of NBB rain that was observed at each site during the CalWater wet seasons. We will use synoptic and mesoscale

  8. Oceanographic and climatic record for the last 18 ka cal BP in marine sediments from Pescadero Basin, Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escorza-Reyes, M.; Pérez-Cruz, L.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.; Salas-de-León, D.

    2012-04-01

    In this study a marine sequence is analyzed in order to reconstruct the oceanographic and climatic conditions based on geochemical and magnetic data, in centennial to multi-decadal time scales during the past 18 ka in the southern Gulf of California. The gravity core DIPAL III-T2 was recovered in the eastern part of Pescadero Basin, at 577 m depth, in the Pacific Intermediate Water (PIW) and Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ), aboard the R/V "El Puma" of the National University of Mexico (UNAM). The core is 262 cm long. This core is characterized by clay sediments. It shows massive and homogeneous sediments from bottom to 200 cm, and from there to the top a well defined laminated structure. Light laminae exhibit high content of biogenic components (mainly diatoms, radiolarian and silicoflagellates remains), whereas dark laminae are formed mostly by terrigenous material. Age model is based on five AMS radiocarbon dating, calibrated applying the CALIB 6.1.0 radiocarbon program. The sedimentation rates estimated range from ~0.1 mm/yr to ~0.3 mm/yr (in the upper part); sedimentary sequence comprises approximately the past 18 ka cal BP. Samples were taken every cm and they were dried and grounded, and elemental chemical concentrations measured using an X-ray fluorescence analyzer (Niton XL3t GOLDD). For magnetic susceptibility, measurements were taken every 0.5 cm with a Bartington Susceptibilimeter with MS2B sensor. A sharp difference in concentrations of Fe, Ti, K, Si, Ca y V, also observed in magnetic susceptibility measurements, marks the transition between Holocene and Pleistocene epochs, suggesting deposition under different conditions of atmospheric and oceanic circulation. In particular, low Ti, Fe and K concentrations at ~ 8 ka cal BP, indicate a decrease in terrigenous input, indicating a decrease in rainfall and river discharges from mainland to the basin, suggesting dry and cold conditions. We propose that this signal correlate with the 8.2 ka cooling event, that

  9. Ground-based Rayleigh-Mie Doppler wind lidar: design, observations and proposal for ADM-Aeolus cal/val

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaykin, Sergey; Hauchecorne, Alain; Porteneuve, Jacques; Mariscal, Jean-François; D'Almeida, Eric; Cammas, Jean-Pierre; Keckhut, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    A unique Rayleigh-Mie Doppler wind lidar, measuring Doppler shift between the emitted and backscattered light by means of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is deployed at Observatory of Haute-Provence (Southern France) and at Reunion island (tropical Indian Ocean). The technique was shown capable of wind measurements between 5 and 50 km with accuracy better than 1 m/s up to 30 km. The system consists of a monomode Nd:Yag laser operating at 532 nm, three telescopes and a double-edge Fabry-Perot interferometer. The laser light is sent alternatively in the vertical as well as zonal and meridional directions at 45° from the zenith using a rotating mirror. The two components of the horizontal wind are obtained from the measurement of the Doppler shift of the return signal spectrally filtered by a double-edge Fabry-Pérot etalon. The vertical pointing is used to obtain zero Doppler shift. After demonstration of the method in 1989 at Observatory of Haute-Provence the measurements were used for studying mesoscale wind fluctuations and intertia-gravity waves in the mid-stratosphere as well as for constructing wind climatology up to 50 km altitude. A new system, featuring a more compact design was installed at Maïdo observatory at Reunion island (22° S). The design of the instrument, the results of observations and comparisons against GPS radiosondes are presented. The European Space Agency (ESA) Atmospheric Dynamic Mission (ADM-Aeolus) aimed at providing global observations of wind in the lower and middle atmosphere using 355 nm Doppler lidar ALADIN is expected to be launched in late-2015. A similarity of the measurements techniques exploited by ALADIN system and by the French ground-based Doppler lidar makes the latter an attractive mean for Aeolus validation. We present a proposal for ADM-Aeolus cal/val activities based on the operations of two wind lidars operating at mid-latitude and tropical sites. These activities include a pre-cal/val phase aimed at development of a

  10. Multistep food plant processing at Grotta Paglicci (Southern Italy) around 32,600 cal B.P.

    PubMed Central

    Mariotti Lippi, Marta; Foggi, Bruno; Aranguren, Biancamaria; Ronchitelli, Annamaria; Revedin, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Residue analyses on a grinding tool recovered at Grotta Paglicci sublayer 23A [32,614 ± 429 calibrated (cal) B.P.], Southern Italy, have demonstrated that early modern humans collected and processed various plants. The recording of starch grains attributable to Avena (oat) caryopses expands our information about the food plants used for producing flour in Europe during the Paleolithic and about the origins of a food tradition persisting up to the present in the Mediterranean basin. The quantitative distribution of the starch grains on the surface of the grinding stone furnished information about the tool handling, confirming its use as a pestle-grinder, as suggested by the wear-trace analysis. The particular state of preservation of the starch grains suggests the use of a thermal treatment before grinding, possibly to accelerate drying of the plants, making the following process easier and faster. The study clearly indicates that the exploitation of plant resources was very important for hunter–gatherer populations, to the point that the Early Gravettian inhabitants of Paglicci were able to process food plants and already possessed a wealth of knowledge that was to become widespread after the dawn of agriculture. PMID:26351674

  11. Synergistic Stimulation with Different TLR7 Ligands Modulates Gene Expression Patterns in the Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Line CAL-1

    PubMed Central

    Hilbert, Tobias; Steinhagen, Folkert; Weisheit, Christina; Baumgarten, Georg; Hoeft, Andreas; Klaschik, Sven

    2015-01-01

    Objective. TLR7 ligation in plasmacytoid dendritic cells is promising for the treatment of cancer, allergy, and infectious diseases; however, high doses of ligands are required. We hypothesized that the combination of structurally different TLR7 ligands exponentiates the resulting immune response. Methods. CAL-1 (human pDC line) cells were incubated with the TLR7-specific adenine analog CL264 and single-stranded 9.2s RNA. Protein secretion was measured by ELISA. Microarray technique was used to detect modified gene expression patterns upon synergistic stimulation, revealing underlying functional groups and networks. Cell surface binding properties were studied using FACS analysis. Results. CL264 in combination with 9.2s RNA significantly enhanced cytokine and interferon secretion to supra-additive levels. This effect was due to a stronger stimulation of already regulated genes (by monostimulation) as well as to recruitment of thus far unregulated genes. Top scoring canonical pathways referred to immune-related processes. Network analysis revealed IL-1β, IL-6, TNF, and IFN-β as major regulatory nodes, while several minor regulatory nodes were also identified. Binding of CL264 to the cell surface was enhanced by 9.2s RNA. Conclusion. Structurally different TLR7 ligands act synergistically on gene expression patterns and on the resulting inflammatory response. These data could impact future strategies optimizing TLR7-targeted drug design. PMID:26770023

  12. New Particle Formation and Growth in CMAQ: Application of Comprehensive Modal Methods to Observations during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, B.

    2015-12-01

    Secondary formation and subsequent growth of ultrafine atmospheric particles is an important source of larger particles that can activate clouds and affect their microphysical properties. It is likewise important for models attempting to quantify cloud-aerosol feedbacks to realistically account for this pervasive pathway. Representing these phenomena accurately in models requires in-depth knowledge of the chemical interactions that lead to new particle formation as well as the availability of condensable species to sustain a growth event. Further, models must represent the numerical aspects of particle growth reasonably well in order to preserve the essential characteristics of the aerosol size distribution (e.g. unimodal vs. bimodal, peak diameter, etc). Such characteristics are critical for calculating the number of particles participating as nuclei for liquid and solid hydrometeors. We implement into the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model a new aerosol processing module designed for robust prediction of particle number concentrations, sources and sinks. The new module leverages the speed and flexibility of modal aerosol techniques with state-of-the-art, schemes for treating new particle formation, coagulation, and intermodal transference. Moreover, we incorporate an updated treatment of organic aerosol (OA) formation and explore the sensitivity of growth rates predicted by the CMAQ model to the uncertain OA formation parameters. We apply the new model to observations made during the CalNex 2010 campaign and evaluate model performance against observed number concentrations, time-dependent growth rates, and size distributions.

  13. Retrieving Vegetation Water Content from MODIS, High Resolution and Ground Data in the SMOS VAS Cal/Val Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, F.; Cernicharo, J.; Martinez, B.; Lopez-Baeza, E.

    2010-12-01

    Ground measurements are required to calibrate/validate remote sensing products. This work describes a method to derive vegetation water content (VWC) maps at medium resolution from ground data, applied to the VAS (Valencia Anchor Station) cal/val area for SMOS soil moisture products. The method is based on a transfer function that establishes an empirical relationship between in-situ data and reflectance values retrieved from high resolution (CHRIS/PROBA, TM/LANDSAT) and medium resolution (MODIS/TERRA+AQUA) imagery. The up-scaling process is developed in two steps: (1) by using in-situ values with CHRIS and TM data to derive high resolution ground based maps over small regions, and (2) using the high resolution maps with MODIS data to produce the medium resolution ground based maps over the whole region. The convex hull technique has been proposed to assess the transfer function interpolation quality. Results obtained by applying the selected band combination of bands show cross validation errors (RC=0.221 kg/m2 and RC=0.051 kg/m2 for high-resolution and RC=0.386 kg/m2 for medium resolution) lower than traditional spectral indices ones, good correlations with observed data and a high interpolation capacity (70% and 95%). VWC mean values at medium resolution range between 0.04 kg/m2, for non-irrigated areas, and 0.7 kg/m2, for irrigated crops.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Organic Aerosol Using Nanospray Desorption/Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Liu, Shang; Weber, Robin; Russell, Lynn; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol samples from the CalNex 2010 field study were analyzed using high resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) coupled to a nanospray-desorption/electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) source. The samples were collected in Bakersfield, CA on June 22-23, 2010. The chemical formulas of over 1300 unique molecular species were detected in the mass range of 50-800 m/z. Our analysis focused on identification of two main groups: compounds containing only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen (CHO only), and nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC). The NOC accounted for 35% (by number) of the compounds observed in the afternoon, and for 59% in the early morning samples. By comparing plausible reactant-product pairs, we propose that over 50% of the NOC in each sample could have been formed through reactions transforming carbonyls into imines. The CHO only compounds were dominant in the afternoon suggesting a photochemical source. The average O:C ratios of all observed compounds were fairly consistent throughout the day, ranging from 0.34 in the early morning to 0.37 at night. We conclude that both photooxidation and ammonia chemistry play important roles in forming the compounds observed in this mixed urban-rural environment.

  15. Multistep food plant processing at Grotta Paglicci (Southern Italy) around 32,600 cal B.P.

    PubMed

    Mariotti Lippi, Marta; Foggi, Bruno; Aranguren, Biancamaria; Ronchitelli, Annamaria; Revedin, Anna

    2015-09-29

    Residue analyses on a grinding tool recovered at Grotta Paglicci sublayer 23A [32,614 ± 429 calibrated (cal) B.P.], Southern Italy, have demonstrated that early modern humans collected and processed various plants. The recording of starch grains attributable to Avena (oat) caryopses expands our information about the food plants used for producing flour in Europe during the Paleolithic and about the origins of a food tradition persisting up to the present in the Mediterranean basin. The quantitative distribution of the starch grains on the surface of the grinding stone furnished information about the tool handling, confirming its use as a pestle-grinder, as suggested by the wear-trace analysis. The particular state of preservation of the starch grains suggests the use of a thermal treatment before grinding, possibly to accelerate drying of the plants, making the following process easier and faster. The study clearly indicates that the exploitation of plant resources was very important for hunter-gatherer populations, to the point that the Early Gravettian inhabitants of Paglicci were able to process food plants and already possessed a wealth of knowledge that was to become widespread after the dawn of agriculture.

  16. Multi-Decadal Variations in Calcareous Holozooplankton in the California Current System: Thecosome Pteropods and Foraminifera from CalCOFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, M. D.; Lavaniegos, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    We examine long-term (58 year) variability of two major taxa of calcareous holozooplankton (thecosome pteropods and planktonic foraminifera) in light of recent interest in the impingement of waters undersaturated with respect to aragonite onto shelf depths in the California Current. We utilize the extraordinary CalCOFI zooplankton record from two regions: the Southern California sector (lines 80-93), which is the current location of the California Current Ecosystem-LTER site, and the Central California sector (lines 60-70). We address interannual variability in springtime abundances of net-collected zooplankton sampled in the epipelagic layer from 1951 through 2008. Although the net mesh excluded most of the foram population, the mesh size was held constant through time and is suitable for the largest foram individuals. Sampling was quantitative for the thecosome pteropods, which were typically identified to genus or species from 4 major families. Despite significant long-term trends in density stratification, chlorophyll concentration, and other characteristics of the water column, as of this writing the calcareous holozooplankton do not yet show evidence of significant declines in abundance. Sustained in situ measurement programs are vital to the detection of ecosystem responses, including thresholds and other nonlinear dynamics

  17. Skill Test of the West-WRF and GFS Models Verified Using CalWater Dropsonde Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirdjian, R.; Martin, A.; Ralph, F. M.; Iacobellis, S.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (AR) play a crucial role in the horizontal transport of water vapor and moist static energy in the midlatitudes and in delivering water to a variety of continental climate zones. In California, up to 60% of the annual precipitation depends on the arrival of a small number of AR. Despite their importance, state-of-the art atmospheric circulation models are consistently poor in predicting AR location and timing. We will demonstrate that model predictions also contain large errors in the magnitude of AR horizontal vapor transport. In this study we aim to compare the prediction skill in horizontal water vapor transport from a modified version of the Weather Research and Forecast (West-WRF) and the Global Forecast System (GFS) models. We verify model skill using dropsonde observations taken from the CalWater 2014 - 2015 field campaigns and a ground-based network of co-located wind profiling radar and GPS receivers. We compare each model across a large number of lead times ranging from 12 hours to 8 days. Our preliminary results suggest that the Integrated Vapor Transport (IVT) and total vapor flux are more accurately predicted by the higher resolution West-WRF model. Furthermore, we find that GFS typically has a consistent 2-6 hour lag in the timing of peak water vapor flux compared to the West-WRF model. Physical explanations of the more accurate West-WRF horizontal vapor transport and the apparent delay in peak vapor flux timing are also examined.

  18. Extending MAM5 Meta-Model and JaCalIV E Framework to Integrate Smart Devices from Real Environments

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of a meta-model (MAM5) and a framework based on the model (JaCalIVE) for developing intelligent virtual environments. The goal of this extension is to develop augmented mirror worlds that represent a real and virtual world coupled, so that the virtual world not only reflects the real one, but also complements it. A new component called a smart resource artifact, that enables modelling and developing devices to access the real physical world, and a human in the loop agent to place a human in the system have been included in the meta-model and framework. The proposed extension of MAM5 has been tested by simulating a light control system where agents can access both virtual and real sensor/actuators through the smart resources developed. The results show that the use of real environment interactive elements (smart resource artifacts) in agent-based simulations allows to minimize the error between simulated and real system. PMID:26926691

  19. Extending MAM5 Meta-Model and JaCalIV E Framework to Integrate Smart Devices from Real Environments.

    PubMed

    Rincon, J A; Poza-Lujan, Jose-Luis; Julian, V; Posadas-Yagüe, Juan-Luis; Carrascosa, C

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the extension of a meta-model (MAM5) and a framework based on the model (JaCalIVE) for developing intelligent virtual environments. The goal of this extension is to develop augmented mirror worlds that represent a real and virtual world coupled, so that the virtual world not only reflects the real one, but also complements it. A new component called a smart resource artifact, that enables modelling and developing devices to access the real physical world, and a human in the loop agent to place a human in the system have been included in the meta-model and framework. The proposed extension of MAM5 has been tested by simulating a light control system where agents can access both virtual and real sensor/actuators through the smart resources developed. The results show that the use of real environment interactive elements (smart resource artifacts) in agent-based simulations allows to minimize the error between simulated and real system.

  20. Ketoprofen-poly(vinylpyrrolidone) physical interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Martino, Piera; Joiris, Etienne; Gobetto, Roberto; Masic, Admir; Palmieri, Giovanni F.; Martelli, Sante

    2004-04-01

    Amorphous solid solutions were obtained in different proportions by dissolving ketoprofen (Ket) and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) K30 in methanol and by evaporating them under reduced pressure. Their physical properties were studied by powder X-ray diffraction and by differential scanning calorimetry and compared to that of same physical mixtures (PM). The interaction of Keto and poly(vinylpyrrolidone) K30 in the solid state was then investigated by 13C NMR CPMAS analysis. The results indicated that in the Ket-(PVP) co-precipitates, the ket molecules, interacting with their carboxylic group through hydrogen bonding with the poly(vinylpyrrolidone) moieties, are molecularly and irregularly dispersed within the amorphous solvendum that acts as mechanical substratum for amorphous stabilization. In their simple PM, no evidence exists of the Ket-polymer interaction during the considered time interval.

  1. Poly(styrenesulfonate)/poly(allylamine) multilayers: a route to favor endothelial cell growth on expanded poly(tetrafluoroethylene) vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Moby, Vanessa; Boura, Cédric; Kerdjoudj, Halima; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Marchal, Luc; Dumas, Dominique; Schaaf, Pierre; Stoltz, Jean-François; Menu, Patrick

    2007-07-01

    Small-diameter synthetic vascular grafts of expanded poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (ePTFE) polymer concern one of the most common alternatives for the replacement of diseased vessels. However, high failure rates arise especially due to the lack of endothelial cells (ECs). EC seeding was developed to build a monolayer on the luminal surface. Because ECs show little or no adhesion on synthetic prostheses, it is necessary to promote their retention. On ePTFE surfaces we successfully deposited polyelectrolyte multilayer films (PMFs) consisting of poly(ethylenimine) (PEI), poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS), and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) to obtain PEI-(PSS-PAH)3 films. EC adhesion and spreading on modified ePTFE were assessed by scanning electron and confocal microscopies. Cell viability was evaluated by Alamar Blue assay. After 7 days of culture, the ePTFE modified with PMF exhibited improvements of EC viability as compared to that of the controls (nonmodified ePTFE) or even ePTFE coated by a PAH monolayer (p < 0.05). Moreover, the spreading of ECs was largely enhanced compared to that of the same controls, resulting in a healthy confluent cell monolayer formation. Positive staining for the von Willebrand factor confirmed the EC phenotype. Promoting EC attachment and function on ePTFE modified with PMFs could become in the future a promising treatment for synthetic small-diameter vascular grafts.

  2. Poly(arylene ether)s containing pendent ethynyl groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor); Jensen, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Poly(arylene ether)s containing pendent ethynyl and substituted ethynyl groups and poly(arylene ether) copolymers containing pendent ethynyl and substituted ethynyl groups are readily prepared from bisphenols containing ethynyl and substituted ethynyl groups. The resulting polymers are cured up to 350.degree. C. to provide crosslinked poly(arylene ether)s with good solvent resistance, high strength and modulus.

  3. CalMaTe: a method and software to improve allele-specific copy number of SNP arrays for downstream segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Estevez, Maria; Aramburu, Ander; Bengtsson, Henrik; Neuvial, Pierre; Rubio, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Summary: CalMaTe calibrates preprocessed allele-specific copy number estimates (ASCNs) from DNA microarrays by controlling for single-nucleotide polymorphism-specific allelic crosstalk. The resulting ASCNs are on average more accurate, which increases the power of segmentation methods for detecting changes between copy number states in tumor studies including copy neutral loss of heterozygosity. CalMaTe applies to any ASCNs regardless of preprocessing method and microarray technology, e.g. Affymetrix and Illumina. Availability: The method is available on CRAN (http://cran.r-project.org/) in the open-source R package calmate, which also includes an add-on to the Aroma Project framework (http://www.aroma-project.org/). Contact: arubio@ceit.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22576175

  4. A comparison of the Greenland Ice-Core and IntCal timescales through the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion, utilising new 14c data from Tenaghi Philippon, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staff, Richard A.; Hardiman, Mark; Bronk Ramsey, Christopher; Koutsodendris, Andreas; Pross, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic radionuclides, such as 10Be and 14C, share a common production signal, with their formation in the Earth's upper atmosphere modulated by changes to the geomagnetic field, as well as variations in the intensity of the solar wind. Here, we present 54 new 14C measurements from a terrestrial fen peat core extracted from the classical site of Tenaghi Philippon, NE Greece, contiguously spanning the time period between ~48,000 and 39,000 cal. BP. Utilising the most pronounced cosmogenic production peak of the last 100,000 years - that associated with the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion circa 41,000 years ago - we exploit this common production signal, comparing Greenland 10Be with our Tenaghi Philippon 14C record, thereby providing a means to assess the concordance between the radiocarbon (IntCal) and Greenland ice-core (GICC05) timescales themselves for this, the oldest portion of the radiocarbon technique.

  5. HypCal, a general-purpose computer program for the determination of standard reaction enthalpy and binding constant values by means of calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Arena, Giuseppe; Gans, Peter; Sgarlata, Carmelo

    2016-09-01

    The program HypCal has been developed to provide a means for the simultaneous determination, from data obtained by isothermal titration calorimetry, of both standard enthalpy of reaction and binding constant values. The chemical system is defined in terms of species of given stoichiometry rather than in terms of binding models (e.g., independent or cooperative). The program does not impose any limits on the complexity of the chemical systems that can be treated, including competing ligand systems. Many titration curves may be treated simultaneously. HypCal can also be used as a simulation program when designing experiments. The use of the program is illustrated with data obtained with nicotinic acid (niacin, pyridine-3 carboxylic acid). Preliminary experiments were used to establish the rather different titration conditions for the two sets of titration curves that are needed to determine the parameters for protonation of the carboxylate and amine groups.

  6. Graphics Standards in the Computer-Aided Acquisition and Logistic Support (CALS) Program Fiscal Year 1989 Volume 2: MIL-D-28003 Revisions, CGM registration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    revision of the CALS profile. Criteria used to guide the selection of additions and changes to the profile will be presented. Finally all of the...point in the standards and registration pipeline. In selecting those changes I to go into the first revision of MIL-D-28003 NIST/NCSL has attempted to...timeliness is dependent upon continuity of efforts to "shepherd" the proposals once they are formulated). In selecting this definition the alternatives were

  7. Glacial to paraglacial history and forest recovery in the Oglio glacier system (Italian Alps) between 26 and 15 ka cal BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravazzi, Cesare; Badino, Federica; Marsetti, Diego; Patera, Glauco; Reimer, Paula J.

    2012-12-01

    The integrated stratigraphic, radiocarbon and palynological record from an end-moraine system of the Oglio valley glacier (Italian Alps), propagating a lobe upstream in a lateral reach, provided evidence for a complete cycle of glacial advance, culmination and withdrawal during the Last Glacial Maximum and early Lateglacial. The glacier culminated in the end moraine shortly after 25.8 ± 0.8 ka cal BP, and cleared the valley floor 18.3-17.2 ± 0.3 ka cal BP. A primary paraglacial phase is then recorded by fast progradation of the valley floor. As early as 16.7 ± 0.3 ka cal BP, early stabilization of alluvial fans and lake filling promoted expansion of cembran pine. This is an unprecedented evidence of direct tree response to depletion of paraglacial activity during the early Lateglacial, and also documents the cembran pine survival in the mountain belt of the Italian Alps during the last glaciation. Between 16.1 and 14.6 ± 0.5 ka cal BP, debris cones emplacement points to a moisture increase favouring tree Betula and Pinus sylvestris-mugo. A climate perturbation renewed paraglacial activity. According to cosmogenic ages on glacial deposits and AMS radiocarbon ages from lake records in South-Eastern Alps such phase compares favourably with the Gschnitz stadial and with the oscillations recorded at lakes Ragogna, Längsee and Jeserzersee, most probably forced by the latest freshening phases of the Heinrich Event 1. A further sharp pine rise marks the subsequent onset of Bølling interstadial. The chronology of the Oglio glacier compares closely with major piedmont glaciers on the Central and Eastern Alpine forelands. On the other hand, the results of the present study imply a chronostratigraphic re-assessment of the recent geological mapping of the Central Italian Alps.

  8. Application of the CAL 3-D CVS program to evaluate the equilibrium position of an Euler-jointed Alderson Part572

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, S. J.

    1982-08-01

    The adaptation of the Cal 3-D crash victim simulation program in its version 20A form to a Vax 11/780 computer is described. The effectiveness of the modifications is demonstrated by using the program to seat a Euler-jointed Alderson Part 572 dummy with the equilibrium subroutine. The resulting segment linear acceleration values of .09 g or better indicate that the dummy can be considered to be in equilibrium.

  9. CalNex cloud properties retrieved from a ship-based spectrometer and comparisons with satellite and aircraft retrieved cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, P. J.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Walther, A.; Heidinger, A. K.; Wolfe, D. E.; Fairall, C. W.; Lance, S.

    2012-10-01

    An algorithm to retrieve cloud optical thickness and effective radius (reff) from spectral transmittance was applied to radiance and irradiance observations of the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) during the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change Campaign (CalNex). Data from an overcast day, 16 May 2010, was used to validate the algorithm. Retrievals from the SSFR, deployed on the Woods Hole Oceanic Institute R/V Atlantis, were compared to retrievals made from an airborne SSFR, the Geostationary Operations Environmental Satellite (GOES), an Atlantis-based microwave radiometer, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. In situ observations of reff during a flight over the Atlantis were compared to the Atlantis SSFR and GOES retrievals. The cloud statistics for the CalNex campaign were compared to previous studies. The agreement between the different retrievals, quantified by determining the number of coincident observations when retrieval uncertainty overlapped, improved as the difference between the field-of-views (FOV) of the instruments decreased. It is shown that averaging the 1 Hz SSFR observations to the 15 minute GOES interval cannot fully account for the impact of the different FOVs. The average in situ reff (7.7 μm) fell between the average reff retrieved using the Atlantis-based SSFR radiance (5.7 μm) and irradiance (9.5 μm). The CalNex clouds showed a diurnal pattern observed in previous studies of marine boundary layer clouds in the region. The distribution of cloud optical thickness and liquid water path during CalNex was shown to be a gamma distribution, consistent with previous studies of high cloud fraction marine boundary layer clouds.

  10. CalNex cloud properties retrieved from a ship-based spectrometer and comparisons with satellite and aircraft retrieved cloud properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, P. J.; Schmidt, K. S.; Pilewskie, P.; Walther, A.; Heidinger, A. K.; Wolfe, D. E.; Fairall, C. W.; Lance, S.

    2011-11-01

    An algorithm to retrieve cloud optical thickness and effective radius (reff) from spectral transmittance was applied to radiance and irradiance observations of the Solar Spectral Flux Radiometer (SSFR) during the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change Campaign (CalNex). Data from an overcast day, 16 May 2010, was used to validate the algorithm. Retrievals from the SSFR, deployed on the Woods Hole Oceanic Institute R/V Atlantis, were compared to retrievals made from an airborne SSFR, the Geostationary Operations Environmental Satellite (GOES), an Atlantis-based microwave radiometer, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. In situ observations of reffduring a flight over the Atlantis were compared to the Atlantis SSFR and GOES retrievals. The cloud statistics for the CalNex campaign were compared to previous studies. The agreement between the different retrievals, quantified by determining the number of coincident observations when retrieval uncertainty overlapped, improved as the difference between the field-of-views (FOV) of the instruments decreased. It is shown that averaging the 1 Hz SSFR observations to the 15 minute GOES interval cannot fully account for the impact of the different FOVs. The average in situ reff (7.7 μm) fell between the average reffretrieved using the Atlantis-based SSFR radiance (5.7μm) and irradiance (9.5 μm). The CalNex clouds showed a diurnal pattern observed in previous studies of marine boundary layer clouds in the region. The distribution of cloud optical thickness and liquid water path during CalNex was shown to be a gamma distribution, consistent with previous studies of high cloud fraction marine boundary layer clouds.

  11. WRF-Chem simulation of NOx and O3 in the L.A. basin during CalNex-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dan; Li, Qinbin; Stutz, Jochen; Mao, Yuhao; Zhang, Li; Pikelnaya, Olga; Tsai, Jui Yi; Haman, Christine; Lefer, Barry; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Alvarez, Sergio L.; Neuman, J. Andrew; Flynn, James; Roberts, James M.; Nowak, John B.; de Gouw, Joost; Holloway, John; Wagner, Nicholas L.; Veres, Patrick; Brown, Steven S.; Ryerson, Thomas B.; Warneke, Carsten; Pollack, Ilana B.

    2013-12-01

    NOx emissions and O3 chemistry in the Los Angeles (L.A.) Basin during the CalNex-2010 field campaign (May-June 2010) have been evaluated by analyzing O3 and NOy (NO, NO2, HNO3, PAN) observations using a regional air quality model (WRF-Chem). Model simulations were conducted at 4-km spatial resolution over the basin using the Carbon-Bond Mechanism version Z (CBM-Z) and NOx emissions reduced by 24% relative to 2005 National Emissions Inventory (NEI’05), according to recent state emission statistics (BASE_NOx scenario). In addition, a 22-26% NOx emission reduction from weekday to weekend was applied. WRF-Chem reproduced the observed diurnal cycle and day-to-day variations in surface O3, Ox, HNO3 and HCHO (correlation r2 = 0.57 - 0.63; pairs of data n > 400; confidence value p < 0.01) at the CalNex supersite at Caltech but consistently overestimated surface NO and NO2. A 45% reduction of NOx emissions relative to NEI’05 (LOW_NOx scenario), as suggested by the OMI-NO2 column trend in California over the same period, improved the agreement of modeled NO2, NOx, and O3 with observations on weekdays. Three-dimensional distributions of daytime O3 and NOy were compared with five daytime NOAA WP-3D flights (three on weekdays and two on weekends) to study the Weekend-to-Weekday (WE-to-WD) effects by using the LOW_NOx scenario. Aircraft data showed a 17.3 ppb O3 increase and a 54% NOy reduction in the boundary layer on weekends relative to weekdays, while modeled WE-to-WD differences were much smaller, with a 2.9 ppb O3 increase and 16% NOy reduction only. Model results on weekends underestimated O3 by 23% and overestimated NOy and HNO3 by 40% and 27%, respectively, which may indicate that weekend NOx emissions (45% reduction relative to NEI’05 with a 22-26% reduction on weekends compared to weekdays) were still overestimated in the model. Comparisons of PAN to HNO3 ratios also indicated that the enhanced photochemistry on weekends was not well represented in the model

  12. Modeling the formation and aging of secondary organic aerosols in Los Angeles during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P. L.; Carlton, A. G.; Baker, K. R.; Ahmadov, R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Alvarez, S.; Rappenglück, B.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Zotter, P.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Szidat, S.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    Four different parameterizations for the formation and evolution of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) are evaluated using a 0-D box model representing the Los Angeles Metropolitan Region during the CalNex 2010 field campaign. We constrain the model predictions with measurements from several platforms and compare predictions with particle and gas-phase observations from the CalNex Pasadena ground site. That site provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation close to anthropogenic emission sources with limited recirculation. The model SOA formed only from the oxidation of VOCs (V-SOA) is insufficient to explain the observed SOA concentrations, even when using SOA parameterizations with multi-generation oxidation that produce much higher yields than have been observed in chamber experiments, or when increasing yields to their upper limit estimates accounting for recently reported losses of vapors to chamber walls. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ) model (version 5.0.1) provides excellent predictions of secondary inorganic particle species but underestimates the observed SOA mass by a factor of 25 when an older VOC-only parameterization is used, which is consistent with many previous model-measurement comparisons for pre-2007 anthropogenic SOA modules in urban areas. Including SOA from primary semi-volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (P-S/IVOCs) following the parameterizations of Robinson et al. (2007), Grieshop et al. (2009), or Pye and Seinfeld (2010) improves model/measurement agreement for mass concentration. When comparing the three parameterizations, the Grieshop et al. (2009) parameterization more accurately reproduces both the SOA mass concentration and oxygen-to-carbon ratio inside the urban area. Our results strongly suggest that other precursors besides VOCs, such as P-S/IVOCs, are needed to explain the observed SOA concentrations in Pasadena. All the parameterizations over-predict urban SOA formation at long

  13. Direct Measurement of Cloud Condensation Nuclei Chemistry using a New Microfluidic Instrument During the CalWater 2011 Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noblitt, S. D.; Roberts, G. C.; Corrigan, C.; Creamean, J.; Collins, D. B.; Cahill, J. F.; Prather, K. A.; Collett, J. L.; Henry, C.

    2011-12-01

    The CalWater 2011 campaign took place in the California Sierra Nevada with the objective of determining the effects atmospheric rivers and aerosols have on California precipitation. To meet this goal, the role of chemistry on atmospheric aerosols' ability to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) needed to be evaluated because not all aerosols are CCN active. To date, direct measurement of ambient CCN chemistry has been difficult or unobtainable because of the difficulty in obtaining a well-defined CCN population, small aerosol masses, and low measurement flow rates. To address this need, a miniature CCN collector was employed that directly deposits CCN-active aerosol into an aqueous sample solution in a microfluidic device. Microchip electrophoresis (MCE) then performs chemical analysis on the soluble CCN components, and concentrations of water-soluble inorganic anions were obtained. Additional instruments were run alongside the CCN-MCE system to obtain a more complete characterization of the aerosol, including MCE coupled to a collector for all water condensation nuclei (WCN), two aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometers (ATOFMS), optical CCN counters, condensation particle counters, and aerosol sizing instrumentation. The work discussed here will describe the operation of the CCN-MCE instrument and show the preliminary results obtained for CCN chemistry measurements at the Sugar Pine Reservoir during CalWater 2011. The prototype CCN-MCE analyzer permits online monitoring at a single, constant supersaturation. The outlet stream of the CCN system inertially impacts wetted CCN particles into a buffer-filled sample reservoir for immediate electrophoretic analysis, requiring <1 min per run. The integrated CCN-MCE system collects aerosols at ~0.05 lpm and deposits them into ~20 μL of solution, providing detection limits of ~0.1 μg per cubic meter with 10 min of sampling. Because of the low (mostly rural) aerosol concentrations monitored at the Sugar Pine Reservoir

  14. The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in northern and southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, John F.; Suski, Kaitlyn; Seinfeld, John H.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2012-11-21

    Carbonaceous aerosols impact climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation, and hence play a major, although highly uncertain, role in global radiative forcing. Commonly, ambient carbonaceous aerosols are internally mixed with secondary species such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, which influence their climate impacts through optical properties, hygroscopicity, and atmospheric lifetime. Aircraft-aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (A-ATOFMS), which measures single-particle mixing state, was used to determine the fraction of organic and soot aerosols that were internally mixed and the variability of their mixing state in California during the Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaigns in the late spring and early summer of 2010. Nearly 88% of all A-ATOFMS measured particles (100-1000 nm in diameter) were internally mixed with secondary species, with 96% and 75% of particles internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate in southern and northern California, respectively. Even though atmospheric particle composition in both regions was primarily influenced by urban sources, the mixing state was found to vary greatly, with nitrate and soot being the dominant species in southern California, and sulfate and organic carbon in northern California. Furthermore, mixing state varied temporally in northern California, with soot becoming the prevalent particle type towards the end of the study as regional pollution levels increased. The results from these studies demonstrate that the majority of ambient carbonaceous particles are internally mixed and are heavily influenced by secondary species that are most predominant in each region. Based on these findings, considerations of regionally dominant sources and secondary species, as well as temporal variations of aerosol physical and optical properties, will be required to obtain more accurate predictions of the

  15. Selection of CalB immobilization method to be used in continuous oil transesterification: analysis of the economical impact.

    PubMed

    Séverac, Etienne; Galy, Olivier; Turon, Fabrice; Pantel, Catherine Azzaro; Condoret, Jean-Stéphane; Monsan, Pierre; Marty, Alain

    2011-01-05

    Enzymatic transesterification of triglycerides in a continuous way is always a great challenge with a large field of applications for biodiesel, bio-lubricant, bio-surfactant, etc. productions. The lipase B from Candida antarctica (CalB) is the most appreciated enzyme because of its high activity and its non-regio-selectivity toward positions of fatty acid residues on glycerol backbone of triglycerides. Nevertheless, in the field of heterogeneous catalysis, we demonstrated that the medium hydrophilic nature of the support used for its commercial form (Lewatit VPOC1600) is a limitation. Glycerol is adsorbed onto support inducing drastic decrease in enzyme activity. Glycerol would form a hydrophilic layer around the enzyme resulting in diffusional limitations during triglyceride transfer to the enzyme. Accurel MP, a very hydrophobic macroporous polymer of propylene, was found not to adsorb glycerol. Immobilization conditions using this support were optimized. The best support was Accurel MP1001 (particle size<1000 μm) and a pre-treatment of the support with acetone instead of ethanol enables the adsorption rate and the immobilized enzyme quantity to be maximized. An economical approach (maximization of the process net present value) was expanded in order to explore the impact of immobilization on development of an industrial packed bed reactor. The crucial ratio between the quantity of lipase and the quantity of support, taking into account enzyme, support and equipped packed bed reactor costs was optimized in this sense. The biocatalyst cost was found as largely the main cost centre (2-10 times higher than the investments for the reactor vessel). In consequence, optimal conditions for immobilization were a compromise between this immobilization yield (90% of lipase immobilized), biocatalyst activity, reactor volume and total investments.

  16. Submicron organic aerosol in Tijuana, Mexico, from local and Southern California sources during the CalMex campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, S.; Johnson, A.; Guzman Morales, J.; Russell, L. M.; Duran, R.; Rodriguez, G.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Toom-Sauntry, D.; Leaitch, W. R.

    2013-05-01

    The CalMex campaign was conducted from May 15 to June 30 of 2010 to study the properties and sources of air pollution in Tijuana, Mexico. In this study, submicron organic aerosol mass (OM) composition measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM), and X-ray spectromicroscopy are combined with statistical analysis and measurements of other atmospheric constituents. The average (±one standard deviation) OM concentration was 3.3 ± 1.7 μg m-3. A large source of submicron aerosol mass at this location was determined to be vehicular sources, which contributed approximately 40% to the submicron OM; largely during weekday mornings. The O/C ratio estimated from ACSM measurements was 0.64 ± 0.19; diurnal variations in this value and the more oxygenated fraction of OM as determined from Positive Matrix Factorization and classification analyses suggest the high degree of oxygenation originates from aged OM, rather than locally-produced secondary organic aerosol. A large contribution of this oxygenated aerosol to Tijuana from various source classes was observed; some fraction of this aerosol mass may be associated with non-refractory components, such as dust or BC. Backtrajectory simulations using the HYSPLIT model suggest that the mean wind vector consistently originated from the northwest region, over the Pacific Ocean and near the Southern California coast, which suggests that the origin of much of the oxygenated organic aerosol observed in Tijuana (as much as 60% of OM) may have been the Southern California Air Basin. The marine aerosol contribution to OM during the period was on average 23 ± 24%, though its contribution varied over synoptic rather than diurnal timescales. BB aerosol contributed 20 ± 20% of the OM during the campaign period, with notable BB events occurring during several weekend evenings.

  17. In-situ, Quantitative Speciation of Aerosols by 2D-TAG in Pasadena, CA during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Zhao, Y.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2011-12-01

    Concentrations of over 200 compounds were quantified and several hundred more were observed in organic aerosols over Pasadena, CA using the GCxGC Thermal Desorption Aerosol Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (2D-TAG) during the California at the Nexus between Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) Experiment in the summer of 2010. In order to improve quantitation, we incorporated recent improvements to the 2D-TAG instrument (detailed in Worton, et al., in review), such as valveless injection and regular use of an internal standard. Analysis of covariance and correlation between these compounds is used to build source profiles and identify related aerosol precursors. Measured compounds span a wide range of volatility and functionality, including alkanes and cycloalkanes, alkenes, furanones, ketones, nitriles, phthalic acids and anhydrides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), branched PAHs, and oxygenated PAHs, as well as known tracers for a variety of sources, such as methylphthalic acid for secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and hopanes for diesel fuels. The high time-resolution of these measurements allows for statistically significant analysis of the diurnal variability and covariance of these compounds. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) is used to determine "factors" composed of compounds that co-vary and are likely to be co-located. These correlations between constituents form complex source profiles used for source apportionment. While many SOA tracers are strongly correlated with each other, primary organic aerosol (POA) tracers such as PAHs have much more diurnal variability and less covariance, suggesting multiple hydrocarbon-like sources that can be separated using PMF. Many of the observed compounds are also correlated with measured gas-phase compounds and Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) factors, improving understanding of the sources and formation processes of these factors.

  18. In-situ, quantitative speciation of aerosols over Pasadena, CA during the CalNex 2010 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Zhao, Y.; Hering, S. V.; Goldstein, A.

    2010-12-01

    Concentrations of over 200 compounds were quantified and several hundred more were observed in organic aerosols over Pasadena, CA using the GCxGC Thermal Desorption Aerosol Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectrometer (2D-TAG) during the California at the Nexus between Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) Experiment in the summer of 2010. In order to improve quantitation, we incorporated recent improvements to the 2D-TAG instrument (detailed in Worton, et al., in prep), including valveless injection and an automated system for addition of deuterated internal standards. Measured compounds span a wide range of volatility and functionality, including alkanes and cycloalkanes, alkenes, furanones, ketones, nitriles, phthalic acids and anhydrides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), branched PAHs, and oxygenated PAHs, as well as known tracers for a variety of sources, such as secondary organic aerosol (SOA), diesel fuel, and biomass burning. These compounds represent not only fresh emissions, but also aged and slightly oxidized pollutants. Though most of these compounds have been quantified in the atmosphere in previous experiments, this represents the first multi-day, in-situ measurement of ambient urban aerosols using two-dimensional chromatography. The high time-resolution of these measurements allows for statistically significant analysis of the diurnal variability and covariance of these compounds, which will be used to better understand source profiles and attribute sources. Furthermore, because many of the observed compounds have been shown to be correlated with accepted Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) factors (hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, oxygenated organic aerosol, etc.), the data presented here will provide a better understanding of the composition of these factors in an urban environment. Putting this work into the context of the extensive suite of data from the Pasadena site will greatly contribute to our understanding of urban aerosol sources

  19. The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in northern and southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, J. F.; Suski, K.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Zaveri, R. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2012-11-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols impact climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation, and hence play a major, although highly uncertain, role in global radiative forcing. Commonly, ambient carbonaceous aerosols are internally mixed with secondary species such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, which influences their optical properties, hygroscopicity, and atmospheric lifetime, thus impacting climate forcing. Aircraft-aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (A-ATOFMS), which measures single-particle mixing state, was used to determine the fraction of organic and soot aerosols that are internally mixed and the variability of their mixing state in California during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaigns in the late spring and early summer of 2010. Nearly 88% of all A-ATOFMS measured particles (100-1000 nm in diameter) were internally mixed with secondary species, with 96% and 75% of particles internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate in southern and northern California, respectively. Even though atmospheric particle composition in both regions was primarily influenced by urban sources, the mixing state was found to vary greatly, with nitrate and soot being the dominant species in southern California, and sulfate and organic carbon in northern California. Furthermore, mixing state varied temporally in northern California, with soot becoming the prevalent particle type towards the end of the study as regional pollution levels increased. The results from these studies demonstrate that the majority of ambient carbonaceous particles in California are internally mixed and are heavily influenced by secondary species that are most prevalent in the particular region. Based on these findings, considerations of regionally dominant sources and secondary species, as well as temporal variations of aerosol physical and optical properties, will be required to obtain more

  20. The mixing state of carbonaceous aerosol particles in Northern and Southern California measured during CARES and CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, J. F.; Suski, K.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Zaveri, R. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2012-07-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols impact climate directly by scattering and absorbing radiation, and hence play a major, although highly uncertain, role in global radiative forcing. Commonly, ambient carbonaceous aerosols are internally mixed with secondary species such as nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium, which influences their optical properties, hygroscopicity, and atmospheric lifetime, thus impacting climate forcing. Aircraft-aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (A-ATOFMS), which measures single-particle mixing state, was used to determine the fraction of organic and soot aerosols that are internally mixed and the variability of their mixing state in California during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) and the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field campaigns in the late spring and early summer of 2010. Nearly 88% of all A-ATOFMS measured particles (100-1000 nm in diameter) were internally mixed with secondary species, with 96% and 75% of particles internally mixed with nitrate and/or sulfate in Southern and Northern California, respectively. Even though atmospheric particle composition in both regions was primarily influenced by urban sources, the mixing state was found to vary greatly, with nitrate and soot being the dominant species in Southern California, and sulfate and organic carbon in Northern California. Furthermore, mixing state varied temporally in Northern California, with soot becoming the prevalent particle type towards the end of the study as regional pollution levels increased. The results from these studies demonstrate that the majority of ambient carbonaceous particles in California are internally mixed and are heavily influenced by secondary species that are most prevalent in the particular region. Based on these findings, considerations of regionally dominant sources and secondary species, as well as temporal variations of aerosol physical and optical properties, will be required to obtain more

  1. In Vitro Effect of the Synthetic cal14.1a Conotoxin, Derived from Conus californicus, on the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    De León-Nava, Marco A; Romero-Núñez, Eunice; Luna-Nophal, Angélica; Bernáldez-Sarabia, Johanna; Sánchez-Campos, Liliana N; Licea-Navarro, Alexei F; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé

    2016-04-08

    Toxins that are secreted by cone snails are small peptides that are used to treat several diseases. However, their effects on parasites with human and veterinary significance are unknown. Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite that affects approximately 30% of the world's population and can be lethal in immunologically compromised individuals. The conventional treatment for this parasitic infection has remained the same since the 1950s, and its efficacy is limited to the acute phase of infection. These findings have necessitated the search for new drugs that specifically target T. gondii. We examined the effects of the synthetic toxin cal14.1a (s-cal14.1a) from C. californicus on the tachyzoite form of T. gondii. Our results indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, s-cal14.1a lowers viability and inhibits host cell invasion (by 50% and 61%, respectively) on exposure to extracellular parasites. Further, intracellular replication decreased significantly while viability of the host cell was unaffected. Our study is the first report on the antiparasitic activity of a synthetic toxin of C. californicus.

  2. In Vitro Effect of the Synthetic cal14.1a Conotoxin, Derived from Conus californicus, on the Human Parasite Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    De León-Nava, Marco A.; Romero-Núñez, Eunice; Luna-Nophal, Angélica; Bernáldez-Sarabia, Johanna; Sánchez-Campos, Liliana N.; Licea-Navarro, Alexei F.; Morales-Montor, Jorge; Muñiz-Hernández, Saé

    2016-01-01

    Toxins that are secreted by cone snails are small peptides that are used to treat several diseases. However, their effects on parasites with human and veterinary significance are unknown. Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite that affects approximately 30% of the world’s population and can be lethal in immunologically compromised individuals. The conventional treatment for this parasitic infection has remained the same since the 1950s, and its efficacy is limited to the acute phase of infection. These findings have necessitated the search for new drugs that specifically target T. gondii. We examined the effects of the synthetic toxin cal14.1a (s-cal14.1a) from C. californicus on the tachyzoite form of T. gondii. Our results indicate that, at micromolar concentrations, s-cal14.1a lowers viability and inhibits host cell invasion (by 50% and 61%, respectively) on exposure to extracellular parasites. Further, intracellular replication decreased significantly while viability of the host cell was unaffected. Our study is the first report on the antiparasitic activity of a synthetic toxin of C. californicus. PMID:27070627

  3. Modeling of Trans-boundary Transport of Air Pollutants in the California-Mexico Border Region during Cal-Mex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bei, N.; Zavala, M. A.; Lei, W.; Li, G.; Molina, L. T.

    2010-12-01

    The US and Mexico share a common air basin along the ~200 km border between California and Baja California. The economical activities in this region are heavily influenced by the international trade and commerce between Mexico and the US that mainly occurs through the borders of the sister cities of San Diego-Tijuana and Calexico-Mexicali. The diversity and differences in the characteristics of emissions sources of air pollutants in the California-Mexico border region make this an important area for the study of the chemistry and trans-boundary transport of air pollutants. During May-June of 2010, the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign included a series of measurements aimed at characterizing the emissions from major sources in the California-Mexico border region and assessing the possible impacts of these emissions on local and regional air quality. In this work we will present the results of the use of the Comprehensive Air quality model with extensions (CAMx) in a modeling domain that includes the sister cities of San Diego-Tijuana and Calexico-Mexicali for studying events of trans-boundary transport of air pollutants during Cal-Mex 2010. The measurements obtained during the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign are used in the evaluation of the model performance and in the design of air quality improvement policies in the California-Mexico border region.

  4. Ideal CO2/Light Gas Separation Performance of Poly(vinylimidazolium) Membranes and Poly(vinylimidazolium)-Ionic Liquid Composite Films

    SciTech Connect

    Carlisle, TK; Wiesenauer, EF; Nicodemus, GD; Gin, DL; Noble, RD

    2013-01-23

    Six vinyl-based, imidazolium room-temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) monomers were synthesized and photopolymerized to form dense poly(RTIL) membranes. The effect of polymer backbone (i.e., poly(ethylene), poly(styrene), and poly(acrylate)) and functional cationic substituent (e.g., alkyl, fluoroalkyl, oligo(ethylene glycol), and disiloxane) on ideal CO2/N-2 and CO2/CH4 membrane separation performance was investigated. The vinyl-based poly(RTIL)s were found to be generally less CO2-selective compared to analogous styrene- and acrylate-based poly(RTIL)s. The CO2 permeability of n-hexyl-(69 barrers) and disiloxane- (130 barrers) substituted vinyl-based poly(RTIL)s were found to be exceptionally larger than that of previously studied styrene and acrylate poly(RTIL)s. The CO2 selectivity of oligo(ethylene glycol)-functionalized vinyl poly(RTIL)s was enhanced, and the CO2 permeability was reduced when compared to the n-hexyl-substituted vinyl-based poly(RTIL). Nominal improvement in CO2/CH4 selectivity was observed upon fluorination of the n-hexyl vinyl-based poly(RTIL), with no observed change in CO2 permeability. However, rather dramatic improvements in both CO2 permeability and selectivity were observed upon blending 20 mol % RTIL (emim Tf2N) into the n-hexyl- and disiloxane-functionalized vinyl poly(RTIL)s to form solid liquid composite films.

  5. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BLENDS OF PAMAM DENDRIMERS WITH POLY(VINYL CHLORIDE) AND POLY(VINYL ACETATE)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hybrid blends of poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers with two linear high polymers, poly(vinyl chloride), PVC, and poly(vinyl acetate), PVAc, are reported. The interaction between the blend components was studied using dynamic mechanical analysis, xenon nuclear magnetic resonacne ...

  6. Case Studies in CAL!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, David F., Ed.; Smith, P. R., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Ten papers focus on applications in specific curriculum areas, modelling and simulation, and computer managed learning. Projects described include voice support for the visually handicapped, distance education, and industrial training, as well as teaching applied mathematics, several facets of engineering, zoology, and, with videodisc, observation…

  7. CALS Test Network Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-01

    Reduce media dependent instructions - Review, revise and simplify decl:ttra:on and data file header information - Review packaging requirements...5881 73 CTN Handbook March 1993 CTN Test Reports TEST DATA AND TOOLS X Media (F=Floppy; T=9-Track Tape) For Floppy: - 3.5" LD/HD - 5.25" LD/HD E I...CTNTB.350) CIN TAPETOOL (VAX, VMS. StN’UNIX. PC DOS) CTN Tech, Pubs. Ref Docs -l I Files (PreliminarN) _ CTN Tools Tape To receive copies of test data

  8. CAL Authoring Aids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinnis, N. P.

    In their eight years of involvement in Computer Assisted Learning, the Division of Education Research Services has assisted many authors in developing their courseware. Whether the courseware has been a short half hour module or a large course involving over a hundred hours of student time, there have been many common problems. A major objective…

  9. Enhanced gene delivery using biodegradable poly(ester amine)s (PEAs) based on low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine and poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-pluronic-poly(epsilon-caprolactone).

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Yu, Xiujun; Kan, Bing; Guo, Qingfa; Wang, Xiuhong; Shi, Shuai; Guo, Gang; Luo, Feng; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan; Qian, Zhiyong

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, the poly(ester amine)s (PEAs) were successfully prepared from low-molecular-weight PEI (Mn = 2000) and Poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(propylene glycol)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCFC) copolymers using isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) as cross-linker. The obtained PEAs copolymers are biodegradable and water-soluble. The PEAs/DNA complexes showed effective and stable DNA condensation with the particle size < or = 200 nm and zeta potential > or =10 mV, indicating its potential for intracellular delivery. Compared to the unmodified low-molecular-weight PEI, PEAs displayed similarly low cytotoxicity in all two cell lines (293T: Human kidney carcinoma, HUVEC: Human umbilical vein Endothelial cell) and revealed much higher transfection efficiency in 293T cell lines. Therefore these PEAs might be a novel safe and efficient polymeric gene delivery vectors.

  10. Raman spectroscopy of Z-form poly[d(A-T)].poly[d(A-T)].

    PubMed

    Ridoux, J P; Liquier, J; Taillandier, E

    1988-05-17

    Helical structures of double-stranded poly[d(A-T)] in solution have been studied by Raman spectroscopy. While the classical right-handed conformation B-type spectra are obtained in the case of sodium chloride solutions, a Z-form Raman spectrum is observed by addition of nickel ions at high sodium concentration, conditions in which the inversion of the circular dichroic spectrum of poly[d(A-T)] is detected, similar to that observed for high-salt poly[d(G-C)] solutions [Bourtayre, P., Liquier, J., Pizzorni, L., & Taillandier, E. (1987) J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn. 5, 97-104]. The characterization of the Z-form spectrum of poly[d(A-T)] is proposed by comparison with previously obtained characteristic Raman lines of Z-form poly[d(G-C)] and poly[d(A-C)].poly[d(G-T)] solutions and of d(CG)3 and d(CGCATGCG) crystals [Thamann, T. J., Lord, R. C., Wang, A. H.-J., & Rich, A. (1981) Nucleic Acids Res. 9, 5443-5457; Benevides, J. M., Wang, A. H.-J., van der Marel, G. A., van Boom, J. H., Rich, A., & Thomas, G. J., Jr. (1984) Nucleic Acids Res. 14, 5913-5925]. Detailed spectroscopic data are presented reflecting the reorientation of the purine-deoxyribose entities (C2'-endo/anti----C3'-endo/syn), the modification of the phosphodiester chain, and the adenosine lines in the 1300-cm-1 region. The role played by the hydrated nickel ions in the B----Z transition is discussed.

  11. Association of poly-purine/poly-pyrimidine sequences with meiotic recombination hot spots

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Andrew TM; Pitt, Joel PW; Gemmell, Neil J

    2006-01-01

    Background Meiotic recombination events have been found to concentrate in 1–2.5 kilo base regions, but these recombination hot spots do not share a consensus sequence and why they occur at specific sites is not fully understood. Some previous evidence suggests that poly-purine/poly-pyrimidine (poly-pu/py) tracts (PPTs), a class of sequence with distinctive biochemical properties, could be involved in recombination, but no general association of PPTs with meiotic recombination hot spots has previously been reported. Results We used computational methods to investigate in detail the relationship between PPTs and hot spots. We show statistical associations of PPT frequency with hot spots of meiotic recombination initiating lesions, double-strand breaks, in the genome of the yeast S. cerevisiae and with experimentally well characterized human meiotic recombination hot spots. Supporting a possible role of poly-pu/py-rich sequences in hot spot recombination, we also found that all three single nucleotide polymorphisms previously shown to be associated with human hot spot activity changes occur within sequence contexts of 14 bp or longer that are 85% or more poly-pu/py and at least 70% G/C. These polymorphisms are all close to the hot spot mid points. Comparing the sequences of experimentally characterized human hot spots with the orthologous regions of the chimpanzee genome previously shown not to contain hot spots, we found that in all five cases in which comparisons for the hot spot central regions are possible with publicly available sequence data, there are differences near the human hot spot mid points within sequences 14 bp or longer consisting of more than 80% poly-pu/py and at least 50% G/C. Conclusion Our results, along with previous evidence for the unique biochemical properties and recombination-stimulating potential of poly-pu/py-rich sequences, suggest that the possible functional involvement of this type of sequence in meiotic recombination hot spots

  12. Surface activity of poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(propylene oxide)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandridis, P.; Athanassiou, V.; Fukuda, Shinya; Hatton, T.A. )

    1994-08-01

    The surface tension of aqueous solutions of seven poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(propylene oxide)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) Pluronic copolymers, covering a wide range of molecular weights (3400-14600) and PPO/PEO ratios (0.19-1.79), was determined over the 10[sup [minus]5]-10% w/v concentration range, at two temperatures (25 and 35[degree]C). Two breaks (changes in slope) were observed in the surface tension vs log concentration curve for most of the copolymers. The low-concentration break, occurring at bulk copolymer concentrations of approximately 10[sup [minus]3]%, is believed to originate from rearrangement of the copolymer molecules on the surface at complete coverage of the air/water interface. The breaks at the high-concentration part of the surface tension curve occurred at concentrations that correspond to the critical micellization concentration values as determined by a dye solubilization technique. The surface area per copolymer molecule, A, increased as a function of the number of EO segments, N[sub EO], obeying a scaling law (A [approx] N[sub EO][sup 1/2]) similar to that of lower molecular weight C[sub i]E[sub j] nonionic surfactants. 56 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Stability of triple-helical poly(dT)-poly(dA)-poly(dT) DNA with counterions.

    PubMed Central

    Dadarlat, V M; Saxena, V K

    1998-01-01

    Structural conformation of triple-helical poly(dT)-poly(dA)-poly(dT) has been a very controversial issue recently. Earlier investigations, based on fiber diffraction data and molecular modeling, indicated an A-form conformation with C'3-endo sugar pucker. On the other hand, Raman, solution infrared spectral, and NMR studies show a B-form structure with C'2-endo sugars. In accordance with these experimental results, a theoretical model with B-form, C'2-endo sugars was proposed in 1993. In the present work we investigate the dynamics and stability of the two conformations within the effective local field approach applied to the normal mode calculations for the system. The presence of counterions was explicitly taken into account. Stable equilibrium positions for the counterions were calculated by analyzing the normal mode dynamics and free energy of the system. The breathing modes of the triple helix are shifted to higher frequencies over those of the double helix by 4-16 cm-1. The characteristic marker band for the B conformation at 835 cm-1 is split up into two marker bands at 830 and 835 cm-1. A detailed comparison of the normal modes and the free energies indicates that the B-form structure, with C'2-endo sugar pucker, is more stable than the A-form structure. The normal modes and the corresponding dipole moments are found to be in close agreement with recent spectroscopic findings. PMID:9649369

  14. Adsorption of poly(rA) on the carbon nanotube surface and its hybridization with poly(rU).

    PubMed

    Karachevtsev, Victor A; Gladchenko, Galyna O; Karachevtsev, Maksym V; Valeev, Vladimir A; Leontiev, Victor S; Lytvyn, Oksana S

    2008-10-06

    Adsorption of poly(rA) on a single-walled carbon nanotube surface in aqueous suspension and the subsequent hybridization of this polymer with free poly(rU) is studied. A comparison of the temperature dependence of the absorbance of free poly(rA) and poly(rA) adsorbed on the nanotube surface [poly(rA)(NT)] at nu(max)= 38,500 cm(-1) shows that the thermostability of the adsorbed polymer is higher. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that more than half of the adenines are not stacked on the tube surface and some of them undergo self-stacking. After addition of a complementary poly(rU) to the poly(rA)(NT) suspension, a double-stranded polymer is formed as confirmed by the characteristic S-like form of its melting curve. However, the melting temperature of this polymer is lower than that of the free poly(rA)poly(rU) duplex. This result indicates that poly(rU) hybridization with poly(rA)(NT) occurs with defects along the whole length of the polymer because of pi-pi stacking between nitrogen bases and the nanotube surface, which hinders the usual hybridization process. Computer modeling demonstrates different possible structures of hybridized polymers on the nanotube surface.

  15. An analysis of the kinetics of oxidation of ascorbate at poly(aniline)-poly(styrene sulfonate) modified microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Bonastre, A M; Sosna, M; Bartlett, P N

    2011-03-28

    A detailed kinetic study is provided for the oxidation of ascorbate at poly(aniline)-poly(styrene sulfonate) coated microelectrodes. Flat films with a low degree of polymer spillover and a thickness much lower than the microelectrode radius were produced by controlled potentiodynamic electrodeposition. The currents for ascorbate oxidation are found to be independent of the polymer thickness, indicating that the reaction occurs at the outer surface of the polymer film. At low ascorbate concentrations, below around 40 mM, the currents are found to be mass transport limited. At higher ascorbate concentrations the currents became kinetically limited. The experimental data for measurements at a range of potentials are fitted to a consistent kinetic model and the results summarized in a case diagram. The results obtained for the poly(aniline)-(polystyrene sulfonate) coated microelectrode are compared to those for a poly(aniline)-poly(vinyl sulfonate) coated microelectrode and to the results of an earlier study of the reaction at poly(aniline)-poly(vinyl sulfonate) coated rotating disc electrodes. For poly(aniline)-poly(styrene sulfonate) the oxidation of ascorbate is found to proceed by one electron reaction whereas for poly(aniline)-poly(vinyl sulfonate) the reaction is found to be a two electron oxidation.

  16. Compositions containing poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, P.J.; Delhaize, E.; Robinson, N.J.; Unkefer, C.J.; Furlong, C.

    1992-02-18

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting the removal, and the apparatus used in effecting the removal are described. One or more of the polypeptides, poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly ([gamma]glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form. 1 figs.

  17. Compositions containing poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Delhaize, Emmanuel; Robinson, Nigel J.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Furlong, Clement

    1992-01-01

    A method of removing heavy metals from aqueous solution, a composition of matter used in effecting said removal, and apparatus used in effecting said removal. One or more of the polypeptides, poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines, is immobilized on an inert material in particulate form. Upon contact with an aqueous solution containing heavy metals, the polypeptides sequester the metals, removing them from the solution. There is selectivity of poly (.gamma.-glutamylcysteinyl)glycines having a particular number of monomer repeat units for particular metals. The polypeptides are easily regenerated by contact with a small amount of an organic acid, so that they can be used again to remove heavy metals from solution. This also results in the removal of the metals from the column in a concentrated form.

  18. Thermal Decomposition of Poly(methylphenylsilane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Lujun; Zhang, Mei; Nakayama, Yoshikazu

    2000-03-01

    The thermal decomposition of poly(methylphenylsilane) was performed at constant heating rates and isothermal conditions. The evolved gases were studied by ionization-threshold mass spectroscopy. Pyrolysis under isothermal conditions reveals that the decomposition of poly(methylphenylsilane) is a type of depolymerization that has a first-order reaction. Kinetic analysis of the evolution spectra of CH3-Si-C6H5 radicals, phenyl and methyl substituents reveals the mechanism and activation energies of the decomposition reactions in main chains and substituents. It is found that the decomposition of main chains is a dominant reaction and results in the weight loss of approximately 90%. The effusion of phenyl and methyl substituents occurs in the two processes of rearrangement of main chains and the formation of stable Si-C containing residuals.

  19. Acetone transport in poly(ethylene terephthalate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Hao; Chen, Che-Chen

    1997-05-01

    Organic solvents like acetone can penetrate into poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). The model of case I (Fickian) and case II (swelling) is employed to study the phenomenon of mass transport. This model is successful in explaining the behavior of mass transport in an amorphous polymer, for example, poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The characteristic parameters, diffusivity D and velocity v, can be obtained from the analysis of experimental data. The mass transport in PET is different from that in PMMA. It is accompanied by a large-scale structural rearrangement, which leads to induced crystallization of the original amorphous state. This is the so-called "solvent-induced crystallization." Acetone-induced crystallization was confirmed by x-ray diffraction. The differential scanning calorimetry thermograms of acetone-treated PET show that the crystallization peak disappears and the glass transition temperature decreases.

  20. Enzymatic hydrolysis of poly(ethylene furanoate).

    PubMed

    Pellis, Alessandro; Haernvall, Karolina; Pichler, Christian M; Ghazaryan, Gagik; Breinbauer, Rolf; Guebitz, Georg M

    2016-10-10

    The urgency of producing new environmentally-friendly polyesters strongly enhanced the development of bio-based poly(ethylene furanoate) (PEF) as an alternative to plastics like poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) for applications that include food packaging, personal and home care containers and thermoforming equipment. In this study, PEF powders of various molecular weights (6, 10 and 40kDa) were synthetized and their susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis was investigated for the first time. According to LC/TOF-MS analysis, cutinase 1 from Thermobifida cellulosilytica liberated both 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid and oligomers of up to DP4. The enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PEF with higher molecular weights but was active on all tested substrates. Mild enzymatic hydrolysis of PEF has a potential both for surface functionalization and monomers recycling.

  1. Dexamethasone-loaded poly(D, L-lactic acid) microspheres/poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) micelles composite for skin augmentation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Min; Liao, Jinfeng; Guo, Gang; Ding, Qiuxia; Yang, Yi; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong

    2014-04-01

    Soft tissue augmentation using various injectable fillers has gained popularity as more patients seek esthetic improvement through minimally invasive procedures requiring little or no recovery time. The currently available injectable skin fillers can be divided into three categories. With careful assessment, stimulatory fillers are the most ideal fillers. In this study, dexamethasone-loaded poly(D, L-lactic acid) (PLA) microspheres of approximately 90 micro m suspended in poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG, PECE) micelles were prepared as stimulatory filler for skin augmentation. The biodegradable PECE copolymer can form nano-sized micelles in water, which instantly turns into a non-flowing gel at body temperature due to micellar aggregation. The PECE micelles (making up 90% of composite) served as vehicle for subcutaneous injection were metabolized within 44 days. At the same time, the dexamethasone-loaded PLA microspheres (10% of composite) merely served as stimulus for connective tissue formation. Dexamethasone-loaded PLA microspheres/PECE micelles composite presented great hemocompatibility in vitro. It was demonstrated in the in vive study that the composite was biodegradable, biocompatible, nontoxic and nonmigratory. Histopathological studies indicated that the composite could stimulate collagen regeneration. Furthermore, granuloma, the main complication of the stimulatory fillers, did not appear when the composite was injected into the back of SD rats, because of the dexamethasone controlled release from the composite. All results suggested that dexamethasone-loaded PLA microspheres/PECE micelles composite may be an efficient and promising biomaterial for skin augmentation.

  2. Final Report for the PolyHANAA

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, J.B.; Stratton, P.L.; Benett, W.J.; Koopman, R.P.; Milanovich, F.P.

    2001-04-30

    The PolyHanaa is a 24 chamber thermal cycling instrument designed to perform rapid, real-time optical detection of biological agents using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) process with TaqMan{trademark} reagents. Liquid samples are pipetted into small, disposable polypropylene tubes that are then inserted into the chambers. The 24 duplex chambers are divided into 6 independent groups and run information is presented simultaneously, in real time, for all groups.

  3. Solid state synthesis of poly(dichlorophosphazene)

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Christopher W.; Hneihen, Azzam S.; Peterson, Eric S.

    2001-01-01

    A method for making poly(dichlorophosphazene) using solid state reactants is disclosed and described. The present invention improves upon previous methods by removing the need for chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents, eliminating complicated equipment and simplifying the overall process by providing a "single pot" two step reaction sequence. This may be accomplished by the condensation reaction of raw materials in the melt phase of the reactants and in the absence of an environmentally damaging solvent.

  4. Platinum-Incorporating Poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone)-poly(aspartic acid) Pseudoblock Copolymer Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xikuang; Xie, Chen; Chen, Weizhi; Yang, Chenchen; Wu, Wei; Jiang, Xiqun

    2015-07-13

    Cisplatin-incorporating pseudoblock copolymer nanoparticles with high drug loading efficiency (ca. 50%) were prepared built on host-guest inclusion complexation between β-cyclodextrin end-capped poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) block and admantyl end-capped poly(aspartic acid) block, followed by the coordination between cisplatin and carboxyl groups in poly(aspartic acid). The host-guest interaction between the two polymer blocks was examined by two-dimensional nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy. The size and morphology of nanoparticles formed were characterized by dynamic light scattering, zeta potential, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The size control of nanoparticles was carried out by varying the ratio of poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) to poly(aspartic acid). The nanoparticles were stable in the aqueous medium with different pH values but disintegrated in the medium containing Cl(-) ions. The in vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles were evaluated. The biodistribution of the nanoparticles in vivo was studied by noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging and ion-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. It was found that cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles could effectively accumulate in the tumor site and exhibited significant superior in vivo antitumor activity to the commercially available free cisplatin by combining the tumor volume, body weight, and survival rate measurements.

  5. Mechanism of poly(A) synthesis by vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, R; Kates, J

    1974-08-01

    Data are presented which indicate that vaccinia DNA does not contain poly(dT) sequences the size of poly(A) sequences (50 to 200 nucleotides in length) found in vaccinia RNA. A hybridization experiment and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of pyrimidine tracts show that poly(dT) sequences can account for no more than 0.1% of vaccinia DNA. Ultraviolet irradiation (which causes thymine dimer formation) and phleomycin (which binds to thymidine) both inhibit RNA synthesis but not poly(A) synthesis by vaccinia cores. These data are consistent with a nontranscriptive mechanism for vaccinia poly(A) synthesis. Both trypsin and 50 C heat treatment inhibit RNA synthesis more than poly(A) synthesis by cores, suggesting that separate enzymes may be involved in these syntheses. When the rate of core RNA synthesis is reduced by lowering the UTP and GTP concentrations, the size of the poly(A) sequences increase. These and other data suggest that transcription is involved in the termination of poly(A) synthesis in cores. This might be due to the displacement of growing poly(A) chains by recently completed RNA 3' termini which have not yet acquired poly(A) sequences.

  6. Modeling the formation and aging of secondary organic aerosols in Los Angeles during CalNex 2010

    DOE PAGES

    Hayes, P. L.; Carlton, A. G.; Baker, K. R.; ...

    2015-05-26

    Four different literature parameterizations for the formation and evolution of urban secondary organic aerosol (SOA) frequently used in 3-D models are evaluated using a 0-D box model representing the Los Angeles metropolitan region during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) 2010 campaign. We constrain the model predictions with measurements from several platforms and compare predictions with particle- and gas-phase observations from the CalNex Pasadena ground site. That site provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation close to anthropogenic emission sources with limited recirculation. The model SOA that formed only from the oxidationmore » of VOCs (V-SOA) is insufficient to explain the observed SOA concentrations, even when using SOA parameterizations with multi-generation oxidation that produce much higher yields than have been observed in chamber experiments, or when increasing yields to their upper limit estimates accounting for recently reported losses of vapors to chamber walls. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ) model (version 5.0.1) provides excellent predictions of secondary inorganic particle species but underestimates the observed SOA mass by a factor of 25 when an older VOC-only parameterization is used, which is consistent with many previous model–measurement comparisons for pre-2007 anthropogenic SOA modules in urban areas. Including SOA from primary semi-volatile and intermediate-volatility organic compounds (P-S/IVOCs) following the parameterizations of Robinson et al. (2007), Grieshop et al. (2009), or Pye and Seinfeld (2010) improves model–measurement agreement for mass concentration. The results from the three parameterizations show large differences (e.g., a factor of 3 in SOA mass) and are not well constrained, underscoring the current uncertainties in this area. Our results strongly suggest that other precursors besides VOCs, such as P-S/IVOCs, are needed to explain the

  7. Modeling the formation and aging of secondary organic aerosols in Los Angeles during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, P. L.; Carlton, A. G.; Baker, K. R.; Ahmadov, R.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Alvarez, S.; Rappengluck, B.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; de Gouw, J. A.; Zotter, P.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Szidat, S.; Kleindienst, T. E.; Offenberg, J. H.; Ma, P. K.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-05-01

    Four different literature parameterizations for the formation and evolution of urban secondary organic aerosol (SOA) frequently used in 3-D models are evaluated using a 0-D box model representing the Los Angeles metropolitan region during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) 2010 campaign. We constrain the model predictions with measurements from several platforms and compare predictions with particle- and gas-phase observations from the CalNex Pasadena ground site. That site provides a unique opportunity to study aerosol formation close to anthropogenic emission sources with limited recirculation. The model SOA that formed only from the oxidation of VOCs (V-SOA) is insufficient to explain the observed SOA concentrations, even when using SOA parameterizations with multi-generation oxidation that produce much higher yields than have been observed in chamber experiments, or when increasing yields to their upper limit estimates accounting for recently reported losses of vapors to chamber walls. The Community Multiscale Air Quality (WRF-CMAQ) model (version 5.0.1) provides excellent predictions of secondary inorganic particle species but underestimates the observed SOA mass by a factor of 25 when an older VOC-only parameterization is used, which is consistent with many previous model-measurement comparisons for pre-2007 anthropogenic SOA modules in urban areas. Including SOA from primary semi-volatile and intermediate-volatility organic compounds (P-S/IVOCs) following the parameterizations of Robinson et al. (2007), Grieshop et al. (2009), or Pye and Seinfeld (2010) improves model-measurement agreement for mass concentration. The results from the three parameterizations show large differences (e.g., a factor of 3 in SOA mass) and are not well constrained, underscoring the current uncertainties in this area. Our results strongly suggest that other precursors besides VOCs, such as P-S/IVOCs, are needed to explain the observed

  8. Fine specificity and idiotypic expression of monoclonal antibodies directed against poly(Tyr,Glu)-poly(DLAla)--poly(Lys) and its ordered analogue (Tyr-Tyr-Glu-Glu)-poly(DLAla)--poly(Lys).

    PubMed Central

    Parhami-Seren, B; Eshhar, Z; Mozes, E

    1983-01-01

    In order to study the repertoire of poly(Tyr,Glu)-poly(DLAla)--poly(Lys) [(T,G)-A--L] specific antibodies, monoclonal antibodies were prepared by fusing myeloma cells with spleen cells from C3H.SW mice immunized with (T,G)-A--L and boosted with (Tyr-Tyr-Glu-Glu)-poly(DLAla)--poly(Lys)](T-T-G-G)-A--L]. Eleven clones which secreted homogeneous antibodies were obtained. In general, two families of monoclonal antibodies were detected: those which bind exclusively (T-T-G-G)-A--L and those which bind both (T-T-G-G)-A--L and (T,G)-A--L. Analysis for idiotypic expression revealed that only two antibodies (clones no. 103 and 160), which were found to be similar in their fine specificity, cross-reacted with antibodies against the major idiotypes of (T,G)A--L specific antibodies. Guinea-pig antibodies against clone no. 160 reacted with the polyclonal (T,G)-A--L specific antibodies, whereas antibodies against 103 monoclonal antibodies did not react with C3H.SW anti-(T,G)-A--L antibodies, but did cross-react with four other monoclonal antibodies. It appears that the idiotypic determinants expressed on polyclonal (T,G)-A--L specific antibodies are heterogeneous, and consist of at least two serologically different idiotypes detected by clones no. 103 and 160. PMID:6840812

  9. Overview Of Cal-Mex 2010: US-Mexico Collaborative Project On Air Quality And Climate Change In The California-Mexico Border Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina, L. T.; Cal-Mex Science Team

    2010-12-01

    The composition of the atmosphere over the US-Mexico border region is affected by cross-border transport of emissions in both directions. Air quality issues in the California-Mexico (Cal-Mex) border are associated with air masses originating in the portion of the border region adjacent to California, which includes two of the sister city pairs (Tijuana-San Diego and Mexicali-Calexico) that have the most severe air pollution problems, posing a serious health threat to their inhabitants as well as affecting ecosystem viability and regional climate for large downwind distances. During May-June 2010, an intensive field study was undertaken by US-Mexico collaborative teams to characterize the major sources of primary and secondary particulate matter and precursor gases in the California-Mexico (Cal-Mex) border region, their transport and transformation, and the impact of these emissions on regional air quality and climate. The ground-based measurements included a central fixed site located in Tijuana that housed state-of-the-science instruments to measure gases, aerosols, radiation and meteorological parameters; a mobile eddy covariance laboratory that measured surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes of carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and particle number; several mobile units for criteria pollutants and meteorological parameters; and measurements of fine particles and trace gases at the border crossing areas. Preliminary results from the field study will be presented. Cal-Mex Science Team includes: Molina Center for Energy and the Environment, Texas A & M University, Scripps Institution of Oceanography/University of California at San Diego, Virginia Tech, San Diego State University, National University of Mexico, National Institute of Ecology/Mexican Ministry of the Environment, University of the State of Morelos, LT Consulting Group, University of Baja California (Mexicali, Tijuana, Ensenada, Valle de Las Palmas campuses), Secretary of the Environment of Baja California

  10. Polymeric Nanomedicines Based on Poly(lactide) and Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Rong; Gabrielson, Nathan P.; Fan, Timothy M.; Cheng, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Small molecule chemotherapeutics often have undesired physiochemical and pharmacological properties, such as low solubility, severe side effect and narrow therapeutic index. To address these challenges, polymeric nanomedicine drug delivery technology has been routinely employed, in particular with the use of biodegradable and biocompatible polyesters, such as poly(lactide) (PLA) and poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA). Here we review the development and use of PLA and PLGA for the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents in the forms of polymer-drug conjugates and nanoconjugates. PMID:23914135

  11. Controlled synthesis of phosphorylcholine derivatives of poly(serine) and poly(homoserine).

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, Ilya; Deming, Timothy J

    2015-04-01

    We report methods for the synthesis of polypeptides that are fully functionalized with desirable phosphorylcholine, PC, groups. Because of the inherent challenges in the direct incorporation of the PC group into α-amino acid N-carboxyanhydride (NCA) monomers, we developed a synthetic approach that combined functional NCA polymerization with efficient postpolymerization modification. While poly(L-phosphorylcholine serine) was found to be unstable upon synthesis, we successfully prepared poly(L-phosphorylcholine homoserine) with controlled chain lengths and found these to be water-soluble with disordered chain conformations.

  12. Miscibility and Morphology of Poly(lactic ACID)/POLY(Β-HYDROXYBUTYRATE) Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tri Phuong, Nguyen; Guinault, Alain; Sollogoub, Cyrille

    2011-01-01

    The miscibility and morphology of poly(lactic)acid (PLA)/polyβ-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) prepared by melt blending method were investigated by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), melt rheology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations. FTIR and DSC methods present some limits to examine the miscibility state of PLA/PHB blends. This drawback can be overcome with the Cole-Cole method by observing the η" = f(η') curves to confirm the miscibility of semicrystalline PLA/ semicrystalline PHB blends. MEB micrographs of fractured surface of blends were also used to investigate the miscibility of these blends.

  13. Thermo-reversible gelation of atactic poly(methyl methacrylate) in poly(ethylene glycol) oligomers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun; Yu, Chunhong; Chen, Minzhi; Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhou, Dongshan; Xue, Gi

    2013-04-01

    The temperature-concentration behavior of physical gel by atactic poly(methyl methacrylate) (aPMMA) in poly(ethylene glycol) oligomer (PEG400) was investigated. A liquid-liquid demixing interferes with a glass transition during cooling. The combination of demixing and T g leads to the formation of amorphous gels at low temperature. We suggest that the gelation of aPMMA/PEG400 is a glassy gel, in which short-range attractive depletion interaction in the polymer/oligomer system was the driving force at molecular level.

  14. Graphics Standards in the Computer-aided Acquisition and Logistic Support (CALS) Program, Fiscal Year 1989. Volume 1. Test Requirements Document and Extended CGM (CGEM)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-07-01

    1989 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCEVOLUME 1 : TEST National Institute of Standards and Technology National Computer Systems LaboratoryREQUIREMENTS...Galthersburg, MD 208999 DOCUMENT, may 19. EXTENDED CGM Accesioro For NTIS CRA&I (CGEM) D,,’ ,i 1 r KI , |iI iu U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE93-03 667 Robert A...STANDARDS IN THE COMPUTER-AIDED ACQUISITION AND LOGISTIC SUPPORT (CALS) PROGRAM, Daniel R. BenigniEditor FISCAL YEAR 1989 U.S. DI[PAJ"TMDr Of COMM[EM[VOLUME 1

  15. Le traitement chirurgical des cals vicieux des deux os de l'avant-bras: à propos d'une série de 11 cas

    PubMed Central

    Elidrissi, Mohammed; Mechchat, Atif; Abid, Hatim; Shimi, Mohammed; Elibrahimi, Abdelhalim; Elmrini, Abdelmajid

    2013-01-01

    Le but de cette étude est de présenter l'expérience du service de chirurgie ostéoarticulaire B4, de CHU Hassan II de Fès Maroc, dans la prise en charge chirurgicale des cals vicieux des deux os de l'avant-bras. C'est une étude rétrospective étalée entre janvier 2008 et décembre 2011 incluant onze cas de cal vicieux de l'avant-bras chez des adultes, colligés au service de chirurgie ostéoarticulaire B4 du CHU Hassan II de Fès. Pour chaque patient nous avons étudié: Sur le plan clinique: la profession, la nature du traumatisme initial, le traitement initial, l'amplitude de pronosupination. Sur le plan radiologique: l'aspect radiologique du cal. La limitation de la pronosupination était le principal motif de consultation, trois patients ont consulté pour la déformation. Le recul moyen est de 18 mois, avec des extrêmes de 5 mois et 48 mois. La prise en charge chirurgicale avait permis d'améliorer de façon variable chez tous les patients les amplitudes de pronosupination de 58° en moyenne. Les résultats étaient bons chez 5 patients, moyens chez 5 et mauvais chez un patient. Le traitement conservateur des fractures des deux os de l'avant-bras est incriminé dans la genèse des cals vicieux de l'avant-bras. Le traitement chirurgical de ceux-ci fait appel à une ostéotomie de correction. Dans notre étude nous avons montré l'intérêt du rétablissement des axes du radius et de l'ulna pour la restauration de la fonction de pronosupination, grâce à cette ostéotomie. PMID:23560124

  16. Measurements of submicron aerosols at the California-Mexico border during the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Misti E.; Zhang, Renyi; Zheng, Jun; Tan, Haobo; Wang, Yuan; Molina, Luisa T.; Takahama, S.; Russell, L. M.; Li, Guohui

    2014-05-01

    We present measurements of submicron aerosols in Tijuana, Mexico during the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign. A suite of aerosol instrumentations were deployed, including a hygroscopic-volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (HV-TDMA), aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM), condensation particle counter (CPC), cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS), and nephelometer to measure the aerosol size distributions, effective density, hygroscopic growth factors (HGF), volatility growth factors (VGF), and optical properties. The average mass concentration of PM0.6 is 10.39 ± 7.61 μg m-3, and the derived average black carbon (BC) mass concentration is 2.87 ± 2.65 μg m-3. There is little new particle formation or particle growth during the day, and the mass loading is dominated by organic aerosols and BC, which on average are 37% and 27% of PM1.0, respectively. For four particle sizes of 46, 81, 151, and 240 nm, the measured particle effective density, HGFs, and VGFs exhibit distinct diurnal trends and size-dependence. For smaller particles (46 and 81 nm), the effective density distribution is unimodal during the day and night, signifying an internally mixed aerosol composition. In contrast, larger particles (151 and 240 nm) exhibit a bi-modal effective density distribution during the daytime, indicating an external mixture of fresh BC and organic aerosols, but a unimodal distribution during the night, corresponding to an internal mixture of BC and organic aerosols. The smaller particles show a noticeable diurnal trend in the effective density distribution, with the highest effective density (1.70 g cm-3) occurring shortly after midnight and the lowest value (0.90 g cm-3) occurring during the afternoon, corresponding most likely to primary organic aerosols and BC, respectively. Both HGFs and VGFs measured are strongly size-dependent. HGFs increase with increasing particle size, indicating that the largest particles are more hygroscopic. VGFs decrease with increasing

  17. Method for the hydrogenation of poly-si

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi

    2013-11-12

    A method for hydrogenating poly-si. Poly-si is placed into the interior of a chamber. A filament is placed into the interior of a chamber. The base pressure of the interior of the chamber is evacuated, preferably to 10.sup.-6 Torr or less. The poly-si is heated for a predetermined poly-si heating time. The filament is heated by providing an electrical power to the filament. Hydrogen is supplied into the pressurized interior of the chamber comprising the heated poly-si and the heated filament. Atomic hydrogen is produced by the filament at a rate whereby the atomic hydrogen surface density at the poly-si is less than the poly-si surface density. Preferably, the poly-si is covered from the atomic hydrogen produced by the heated filament for a first predetermined covering time. Preferably, the poly-si is then uncovered from the atomic hydrogen produced by the heated filament for a first hydrogenation time.

  18. The Protein Structure Context of PolyQ Regions

    PubMed Central

    Totzeck, Franziska; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2017-01-01

    Proteins containing glutamine repeats (polyQ) are known to be structurally unstable. Abnormal expansion of polyQ in some proteins exceeding a certain threshold leads to neurodegenerative disease, a symptom of which are protein aggregates. This has led to extensive research of the structure of polyQ stretches. However, the accumulation of contradictory results suggests that protein context might be of importance. Here we aimed to evaluate the structural context of polyQ regions in proteins by analysing the secondary structure of polyQ proteins and their homologs. The results revealed that the secondary structure in polyQ vicinity is predominantly random coil or helix. Importantly, the regions surrounding the polyQ are often not solved in 3D structures. In the few cases where the point of insertion of the polyQ was mapped to a full protein, we observed that these are always located in the surface of the protein. The findings support the hypothesis that polyQ might serve to extend coiled coils at their C-terminus in highly disordered regions involved in protein-protein interactions. PMID:28125688

  19. Preparation and in vitro characterization of dexamethasone-loaded poly(D,L-lactic acid) microspheres embedded in poly(ethylene glycol)-poly({varepsilon}-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel for orthopedic tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Fan, Min; Guo, QingFa; Luo, JingCong; Luo, Feng; Xie, Ping; Tang, XiaoHai; Qian, ZhiYong

    2013-08-01

    The corium is decreased to about half of its thickness in skin defects and wrinkles due to gravity and environment. In this study, dexamethasone/poly(d,l-lactic acid) (Mn = 160,000) microspheres were incorporated into poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (Mn = 3300) hydrogel to prepare an injectable hydrogel composite. The composite was designed to increase the thickness of the corium. Dexamethasone/poly(d,l-lactic acid) microspheres were prepared by oil-in-water emulsion/solvent evaporation technique. The properties of microspheres were investigated by size distribution measurement, scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. Drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, and drug delivery behavior of microspheres were also studied in detail. Cell adhesion of microspheres was investigated by NIH3T3 cell in vitro. The properties of hydrogel composite were investigated by scanning electron microscope, rheological measurements and methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Drug release from composite was determined by HPLC-UV analysis. These results suggested that poly(d,l-lactic acid) microspheres encapsulating dexamethasone embedded in poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogel might have prospective application in orthopedic tissue engineering field.

  20. Microbial degradation of poly(amino acid)s.

    PubMed

    Obst, Martin; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Natural poly(amino acid)s are a group of poly(ionic) molecules (ionomers) with various biological functions and putative technical applications and play, therefore, an important role both in nature and in human life. Because of their biocompatibility and their synthesis from renewable resources, poly(amino acid)s may be employed for many different purposes covering a broad spectrum of medical, pharmaceutical, and personal care applications as well as the domains of agriculture and of environmental applications. Biodegradability is one important advantage of naturally occurring poly(amino acid)s over many synthetic polymers. The intention of this review is to give an overview about the enzyme systems catalyzing the initial steps in poly(amino acid) degradation. The focus is on the naturally occurring poly(amino acid)s cyanophycin, poly(epsilon-L-lysine) and poly(gamma-glutamic acid); but biodegradation of structurally related synthetic polyamides such as poly(aspartic acid) and nylons, which are known from various technical applications, is also included.

  1. Multidimensional chromatographic techniques for hydrophilic copolymers II. Analysis of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(vinyl acetate) graft copolymers.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Daniela; Rittig, Frank; Lange, Ronald F M; Pasch, Harald

    2006-10-13

    A large variety of hydrophilic copolymers is applied in different fields of chemical industry including bio, pharma and pharmaceutical applications. For example, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(vinyl alcohol) graft copolymers that are used as tablet coatings are responsible for the controlled release of the active compounds. These copolymers are produced by grafting of vinyl acetate onto polyethylene glycol (PEG) and subsequent hydrolysis of the poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(vinyl acetate) graft copolymers. The poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(vinyl acetate) copolymers are distributed with regard to molar mass and chemical composition. In addition, they frequently contain the homopolymers polyethylene glycol and polyvinyl acetate. The comprehensive analysis of such complex systems requires hyphenated analytical techniques, including two-dimensional liquid chromatography and combined LC and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The development and application of these techniques are discussed in the present paper.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of an Alkaline Anion Exchange Membrane from Chlorinated Poly(propylene) Aminated with Branched Poly(ethyleneimine)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    was produced through amination of chlorinated poly(propylene) (PP) with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and quaternized with iodoethane. The synthesis of...PP) with poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and quaternized with iodoethane. The synthesis of the new polymer is confirmed by FTIR 1 H and 13 C NMR. The...Article history : Received 4 December 2012 Received in revised form 29 March 2013 Accepted 2 April 2013 Available online Keywords: Anion exchange

  3. Phenylethynyl-Terminated Poly(Arylene Ethers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Brian J.; Bryant, Robert G.; Hergenrother, Paul M.

    1994-01-01

    Phenylethynyl-terminated poly(arylene ethers) synthesized in wide range of molecular weights by adjusting monomer ratios and adding appropriate amounts of 4-phenylethynyl-4'-fluorobenzophenone to monomers to end-cap oligomers during polymerization. Have low molecular weights and low melt viscosities, and are easily processed as adhesives, composites, and moldings. Thermally cured to provide materials that are crosslinked and insoluble in common organic solvents. Exhibit increased resistance to solvents, greater tensile moduli, and better high-temperature properties. Useful as adhesives, composite matrices, and moldings, especially in applications in which combination of toughness and resistance to solvents needed.

  4. Cobalt - poly(amido amine) superparamagnetic nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Atwater, James E; Akse, James R; Holtsnider, John T

    2008-06-30

    Metallic cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were prepared using generation 5 Poly(amido amine) dendrimers with primary amino termini. Cobalt loading of ~38 atoms per dendrimer was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Magnetic properties of the cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were investigated across the temperature range from 2-300 K by SQUID magnetometry. Magnetization as a function of temperature and applied field strength was studied in zero field cooled samples. Magnetization-demagnetization curves (hysteresis loops) were also acquired at temperatures between 10 - 300 K. These results clearly indicate superparamagnetism for the nanocomposites with a characteristic blocking temperature of ~50 K.

  5. Cobalt - poly(amido amine) superparamagnetic nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Atwater, James E.; Akse, James R.; Holtsnider, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Metallic cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were prepared using generation 5 Poly(amido amine) dendrimers with primary amino termini. Cobalt loading of ~38 atoms per dendrimer was determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Magnetic properties of the cobalt-dendrimer nanocomposites were investigated across the temperature range from 2–300 K by SQUID magnetometry. Magnetization as a function of temperature and applied field strength was studied in zero field cooled samples. Magnetization-demagnetization curves (hysteresis loops) were also acquired at temperatures between 10 – 300 K. These results clearly indicate superparamagnetism for the nanocomposites with a characteristic blocking temperature of ~50 K. PMID:20352068

  6. Poly(vinylpyridine oxides) in pneumoconiosis research

    PubMed Central

    Holt, P. F.

    1971-01-01

    Holt, P. F. (1971). Brit. J. industr. Med., 28, 72-77. Poly(vinylpyridine oxides) in pneumoconiosis research. Schlipköter and Brockhaus of the Institut für Lufthygiene Düsseldorf found that poly(2-vinylpyridine 1-oxide) can inhibit the fibrosis normally produced by quartz dust in the lungs or other tissues of animals. Later research in Germany and elsewhere has confirmed the earlier observations. The polymer is active when the quartz is administered by intratracheal, intraperitoneal or intravenous injection or by inhalation. It is effective if given in aqueous solution by intraperitoneal or subcutaneous injection or if it is inhaled as an aerosol. The polymer also counteracts the cytotoxic effects of finely divided quartz in cultures of alveolar or peritoneal macrophages and a rapid method for comparing the activity is based on this observation. Although some solutions of this and other polymers which show activity against quartz in cultures are less active against quartz in the whole animal, a polymer which proves inactive against quartz in cultures is invariably inactive in the whole animal. The degree of activity of this polymer depends on the molecular weight, low molecular weight being associated with low activity. Methyl groups substituted in the pyridine ring may reduce the activity or may have no effect, depending on the position of the group in the ring. The isotactic and syndiotactic forms of the polymer do not have identical effects. Poly(2-vinylpyridine 1-oxide) is not unique; poly(dimethylaminostyrene N-oxide) is almost equally effective. Several theories seek to explain the activity of this polymer against quartz but there is uncertainty, particularly because the mechanism by which silica damages cells and produces fibrosis is still in doubt. Damage to the membrane of the cell or its ultrastructures by silica has been suggested as a possible cause of cytotoxicity; it has been suggested that the polymer may shield these structures. Other suggestions

  7. Radiolytic stabilization of poly(hydroxybutyrate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Renata F. S.; Araujo, Elmo S.; Ferreira, Carlas R. C.; Ribeiro, Abene S.

    2009-02-01

    Stabilization against gamma irradiation effects on Brazilian poly(hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) films was investigated by using commercial additives. With the most effective additive the G value of main chain scissions decreased from 8.6 to 1.5 scissions/100 eV in the absorbed dose range up to 35 kGy. Irradiation increased the biodegradability of the samples, whereas the additives-induced reduction in biodegradability. Irradiation treatment did not influence the degree of crystallinity. Protonic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR- 1H) analysis revealed formation of hydroxyl-terminal groups upon irradiation.

  8. Chemistry of bottom sediments from the Cal-Sag channel and the Des Plaines and Illinois Rivers between Joliet and Havana, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, W.; Kucera, E.T.; Tome, C.; Van Loon, L.S.; Van Luik, A.

    1981-02-01

    Cores were taken in 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging areas. Sixty-one core samples were analyzed to provide a data base for subsequent studies of the suitability of the potential dredged material for reclamation of abandoned surface-mined land bordering the Illinois Waterway. Samples were composited over 2-ft depth increments, up to a maximum 8-ft depth where possible. Parameters determined for each sample were: volatile solids, flash point, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), base/neutral organic compounds, pH, total phosphorus, total phenols, oil and grease, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), cyanide, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, zinc, silver, nickel, selenium, and sulfide. Results showed PCBs to be higher in the Cal-Sag Channel sediments (..mu..=7.0 mg/kg) than in the Des Plaines River (..mu..=1.6 mg/kg), or Illinois River (..mu..=0.5 mg/kg) sediments. Concentrations of metals including arsenic, barium, cadmium, copper, lead, nickel, and silver were higher in the Des Plaines River samples than in the Cal-Sag Channel or Illinois River samples. Illinois River sediments were, generally, the least contaminated in terms of the measured parameters. Leach tests for arsenic, chromium, copper, lead, nickel, and zinc indicated low leachate-metal concentrations relative to total metal concentrations; thus, these metals exist in relatively insoluble solid states in the sediments.

  9. Analysis of motor vehicle emissions over eastern Los Angeles, California from in-situ airborne measurements of trace gases and particulates during CalNex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.; Trainer, M.; Frost, G. J.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Peischl, J.; Fahey, D. W.; Perring, A.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    In-situ measurements of trace gases and particulates were acquired on the instrumented NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the CalNex (California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field study in May and June 2010. Multiple daytime research flights under similar meteorological conditions provide a sufficient data set for characterizing automobile emissions over the eastern Los Angeles (eLA) area of the South Coast air basin. Ratios of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and black carbon (BC) to carbon monoxide (CO) are used to isolate emissions of light duty vehicles from those of medium/heavy duty diesel trucks. Observations in the mixed boundary layer for the eLA area are separated according to latitude, longitude, and altitude. Industrial influences are eliminated by filtering the data according to SO2 mixing ratio and wind direction. The resulting correlations show weekday-to-weekend differences in enhancement ratios of NOx to CO and BC to CO, indicating a general tendency for higher emissions from heavy duty vehicles during the week. The CalNex data over eLA in 2010 will be compared to eLA data from a research flight in May 2002 by the WP-3D aircraft during the Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation (ITCT) field study.

  10. The Beginning of Metallurgy in the Southern Levant: A Late 6th Millennium CalBC Copper Awl from Tel Tsaf, Israel

    PubMed Central

    Garfinkel, Yosef; Klimscha, Florian; Shalev, Sariel; Rosenberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of metallurgy in the ancient Near East attracts much attention. The southern Levant, with the rich assemblage of copper artifacts from the Nahal Mishmar cave and the unique gold rings of the Nahal Qanah cave, is regarded as a main center of early metallurgy during the second half of the 5th millennium CalBC. However, a recently discovered copper awl from a Middle Chalcolithic burial at Tel Tsaf, Jordan Valley, Israel, suggests that cast metal technology was introduced to the region as early as the late 6th millennium CalBC. This paper examines the chemical composition of this item and reviews its context. The results indicate that it was exported from a distant source, probably in the Caucasus, and that the location where it was found is indicative of the social status of the buried individual. This rare finding indicates that metallurgy was first defused to the southern Levant through exchange networks and only centuries later involved local production. This copper awl, the earliest metal artifact found in the southern Levant, indicates that the elaborate Late Chalcolithic metallurgy developed from a more ancient tradition. PMID:24671185

  11. LED-CE-DOAS and MAX-DOAS measurements of glyoxal and NO2 at Milliken Library during CalNEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalman, R. M.; Waxman, E.; Coburn, S.; Ortega, I.; Volkamer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The University of Colorado Light Emitting Diode Cavity Enhanced Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU LED-CE-DOAS) and a CU Ground based MAX-DOAS instrument were deployed on top of Milliken Library at the CalNex-LA site (May.June 2010). The CU LED-CE-DOAS is a novel instrument that was deployed for the first time in the field to measure in-situ concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and glyoxal (CHOCHO) at roof top level. The CU Ground MAX-DOAS measured vertical column integral amounts of the same gases, along with formaldehyde (HCHO) among other gases. For a period of time two CE-DOAS instruments were operated simultaneously with one in closed and one in open cavity mode. Open cavity mode allows air to flow between the mirrors of the cavity and does not utilize an inlet or aerosol filter. NO2 measurements by the two instruments are compared. Here we present the diurnal profiles for glyoxal and NO2 measured by CE-DOAS for the duration of the Cal-NEX campaign. The temporal evolution of in situ CE-DOAS measurements of NO2 and glyoxal is used in combination with that of the vertical column density measured by MAX-DOAS to assess transport to the site, as well as to estimate the boundary layer height.

  12. Magnetic parameters and their palaeoclimatic implications—the sediment record of the last 15 500 cal. BP from Laguna Potrok Aike (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irurzun, M. A.; Orgeira, M. J.; Gogorza, C. S. G.; Sinito, A. M.; Compagnucci, R.; Zolitschka, B.

    2014-08-01

    Lake sediments are excellent sources of palaeoenvironmental and palaeoclimatic information because they provide continuous and high-resolution records. South America is of particular interest because it is the only landmass that stretches southward into the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans towards Antarctica. The aim of this study is to explore the relationship of magnetic parameters with elemental and palaeobiological data of Laguna Potrok Aike to develop a model of lake-level changes and related hydrological and climatic fluctuations. Magnetic measurements were performed on subsamples from 15 500 cal. BP to the present, and associated rock magnetic parameters were calculated to infer magnetic mineralogy, concentration and grain size. According to the model, parameters dependent on magnetic concentration and grain size are directly related to lake-level changes. During dry periods, the remanent coercivity displays high values, whereas the proportion of magnetite is relatively low. Low percentages of greigite are observed, indicating that the water of the lake was stratified at least four times during the studied period, at approximately 10 300, 8900, 8500 and 8300 cal. BP. The preservation of greigite by inhibiting its complete transformation into pyrite is associated with a rapid burial that occurs with high sedimentation rates. Thermal stratification could be caused by a slight cooling in the area triggered by a weakening of the Westerlies and/or low activity of the sun, sum to the effect of a flood of melt water in the North Atlantic.

  13. The beginning of metallurgy in the southern Levant: a late 6th millennium CalBC copper awl from Tel Tsaf, Israel.

    PubMed

    Garfinkel, Yosef; Klimscha, Florian; Shalev, Sariel; Rosenberg, Danny

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of metallurgy in the ancient Near East attracts much attention. The southern Levant, with the rich assemblage of copper artifacts from the Nahal Mishmar cave and the unique gold rings of the Nahal Qanah cave, is regarded as a main center of early metallurgy during the second half of the 5th millennium CalBC. However, a recently discovered copper awl from a Middle Chalcolithic burial at Tel Tsaf, Jordan Valley, Israel, suggests that cast metal technology was introduced to the region as early as the late 6th millennium CalBC. This paper examines the chemical composition of this item and reviews its context. The results indicate that it was exported from a distant source, probably in the Caucasus, and that the location where it was found is indicative of the social status of the buried individual. This rare finding indicates that metallurgy was first diffused [corrected] to the southern Levant through exchange networks and only centuries later involved local productionThis copper awl, the earliest metal artifact found in the southern Levant, indicates that the elaborate Late Chalcolithic metallurgy developed from a more ancient tradition.

  14. Production of octaketide polyenes by the calicheamicin polyketide synthase CalE8: implications for the biosynthesis of enediyne core structures.

    PubMed

    Belecki, Katherine; Crawford, Jason M; Townsend, Craig A

    2009-09-09

    Enediyne antibiotics are categorized according to the presence of either a 9- or 10-membered ring within their polyketide-derived core structures. Recent literature reports have favored the notion that biosynthetic divergence of the two structural families is determined by the enediyne polyketide synthases (PKSs) alone. We now disclose the simultaneous in vitro production of three octaketide polyenes by biosynthetic enzymes for the 10-membered enediyne calicheamicin gamma(1)(I), including the elusive beta-keto acid precursor to a previously described C15 methyl hexaenone. Alongside these two polyene products, we have additionally detected a hydrocarbon heptaene previously isolated only from 9-membered enediyne systems. The discovery of the heptaene in the calicheamicin system promotes a more convergent model for the early steps of enediyne biosynthesis. Furthermore, the synthesis of this set of octaketides by the enediyne PKS CalE8 and thioesterase CalE7 suggests, in contrast to recent biosynthetic proposals, that accessory enzymes may be necessary to initiate differentiation to 9- or 10-membered enediyne precursors, either by modulation of enediyne PKS activity or by interception and modification of polyketide chain-extension intermediates.

  15. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked (generic name). 721.6660 Section 721.6660... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone...

  16. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked (generic name). 721.6660 Section 721.6660... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone...

  17. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked (generic name). 721.6660 Section 721.6660... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone...

  18. Sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, methods for producing the same, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hofmann, Michael A.

    2006-11-14

    The present invention is directed to sulfonimide-containing polymers, specifically sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, and processes for making the sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether)s and sulfonimide-containing poly(arylene ether sulfone)s, for use conductive membranes and fuel cells.

  19. Patients' satisfaction with inpatient services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Makarem, Jalil; Larijani, Bagher; Joodaki, Kobra; Ghaderi, Sahar; Nayeri, Fatemeh; Mohammadpoor, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of patient feedback is considered as a critical part of effective and efficient management in developed countries. The main objectives of this study were to assess patient satisfaction with the services provided in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, identify areas of patient dissatisfaction, and find ways to improve patient satisfaction with hospital services. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 3 phases. After 2 initial preparation phases, the valid instrument was applied through telephone interviews with 21476 participants from 26 hospitals during August, 2011 to February, 2013.Using the Satisfaction Survey tool, information of patient's demographic characteristics were collected and patient satisfaction with 15 areas of hospital services and the intent to return the same hospitals were assessed. The mean score of overall satisfaction with hospital services was 16.86 ± 2.72 out of 20. It was found that 58% of participants were highly satisfied with the services provided. Comparison of mean scores showed physician and medical services (17.75 ± 4.02), laboratory and radiology services (17.67 ± 3.66), and privacy and religious issues (17.55 ± 4.32) had the highest satisfaction. The patients were the most dissatisfied with the food services (15.50 ± 5.54). It was also found that 83.7% of the participants intended to return to the same hospital in case of need, which supported the measured satisfaction level. Patient satisfaction in hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences was high. It seems that the present study, with its large sample size, has sufficient reliability to express the patient satisfaction status. Moreover, appropriate measures should be taken in some areas (food, cost, and etc.) to increase patient satisfaction. PMID:27471589

  20. Reporting measles case fatality due to complications from a tertiary care hospital of Kolkata, West Bengal 2011-2013

    PubMed Central

    Indwar, Pallavi; Debnath, Falguni; Sinha, Arijit

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Measles is affecting millions of people in the developing countries particularly in India with significant morbidity and responsible for thousands of death in spite of having a safe, effective, and cheap vaccine. Pulmonary complications account for 90% measles-related death. The objectives of this study were to describe age distribution, clinical features, complications, and clinical outcomes of measles cases in a referral infectious disease hospital of West Bengal. Methods: We conducted a retrospective descriptive study including 584 patients and collected information from record section on demographics, clinical features, complications, and clinical outcomes using data abstraction form. Results: The mean age of 584 measles cases was 3.7 years (±1.2 years). The most common complication was pneumonia (149 cases) followed by diarrhea and encephalopathy. Very severe pneumonia occurred in 34 cases requiring intensive care out of which 13 patients died. The average duration of stay in the hospital was 5.7 days (±3.2 days). Surprisingly, 45 cases admitted to this hospital were <9 months of age with subsequent death in 5 cases. Conclusion: Substantial number of measles cases was seen in zero to <9 months of age group and fatality due to complication was more among them.

  1. Delayed-onset hemolytic anemia in patients with travel-associated severe malaria treated with artesunate, France, 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Thellier, Marc; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Ader, Flavie; Roussel, Camille; Sonneville, Romain; Mayaux, Julien; Matheron, Sophie; Angoulvant, Adela; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Rapp, Christophe; Pistone, Thierry; Lebrun-Vignes, Bénédicte; Kendjo, Eric; Danis, Martin; Houzé, Sandrine; Bricaire, François; Mazier, Dominique; Buffet, Pierre; Caumes, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Artesunate is the most effective treatment for severe malaria. However, delayed-onset hemolytic anemia has been observed in ≈20% of travelers who receive artesunate, ≈60% of whom require transfusion. This finding could discourage physicians from using artesunate. We prospectively evaluated a cohort of 123 patients in France who had severe imported malaria that was treated with artesunate; our evaluation focused on outcome, adverse events, and postartesunate delayed-onset hemolysis (PADH). Of the 123 patients, 6 (5%) died. Overall, 97 adverse events occurred. Among the 78 patients who received follow-up for >8 days after treatment initiation, 76 (97%) had anemia, and 21 (27%) of the 78 cases were recorded as PADH. The median drop in hemoglobin levels was 1.3 g/dL; 15% of patients with PADH had hemoglobin levels of <7 g/dL, and 1 required transfusion. Despite the high incidence of PADH, the resulting anemia remained mild in 85% of cases. This reassuring result confirms the safety and therapeutic benefit of artesunate.

  2. Study of the 2011-2013 unrest at Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) through InSAR and 3D modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasatti, Elisa; Polcari, Marco; Bignami, Christian; Bonafede, Maurizio; Buongiorno, Fabrizia; Stramondo, Salvatore

    2014-05-01

    Campi Flegrei is a nested caldera in Italy, at the western edge of the Bay of Naples. Together with Vesuvius and Mt Etna, it is one of the Italian GeoHazard Supersites. The area is characterized by one of the highest volcanic hazard in the world, due to the very high density of inhabitants (1800/km2), the persistent activity of the system and the explosive character of volcanism. A major unrest episode took place in 1982-84, when the town of Pozzuoli, located at the caldera center, was uplifted by 1.80 m (~1 m/yr). Minor uplifts of few cm, seismic swarms and degassing episodes took place in 1989, 2000 and 2004-06. Since 2005 Campi Flegrei is uplifting, reaching a ground velocity of 9 cm/yr in 2012, showing that the caldera is in a critical state on the verge of instability. In the present work we consider InSAR time series of the recent activity (2010-2013) detected by COSMO SkyMed satellite. In particular, the time series show a progressive velocity increase of ground deformation during 2012, while it slowed down in 2013 approaching zero. The cumulative displacement from COSMO SkyMed descending orbit (March 2011 - March 2013) show a semicircular pattern centered in Pozzuoli with a maximum LoS (Line of Sight) displacement of 11 cm and maximum velocity 9 cm/yr reached along the coastline. The spatial distribution of the cumulative displacement from COSMO SkyMed ascending orbit show a similar behavior, confirming the bell-shaped pattern of the deformation at least inside the inner rim of the caldera. The cumulative ascending LoS displacement between March 2013 - September 2013 is 1-2 cm, confirming the stall of the unrest after the first few months of 2013 as observed by GPS. Initially, several source geometries are adopted (sphere, spheroid, sill) to model the cumulative deformation between 2011 and 2013. All the sources are located offshore Pozzuoli at a depth of about 2 km. The sphere and spheroid result to dilate at an annual volume variation rate of the order of 106 m3/yr. All the models show a general good agreement with geodetic data but systematic overestimates are found for the enhanced negative horizontal and vertical deformation across the South-West rim of Campi Flegrei. This suggests that an additional deformation mechanism may be active in that area. Numerical models including the structural characteristics of Campi Flegrei are also attempted in order to model the complete deformation pattern and to better define the source parameters. A deeper understanding of these characteristics, together with microgravity and geochemical data, may help to discern between magmatic (e.g., the large uplift episode during 1982-84, most probably due to deep magmatic source) and hydrothermal (e.g., mini-uplifts of 2000 and 2004-06 most probably due to pressure variations in the shallow aquifer) origin of the source responsible of the recent deformation. Source definition may have important implications in terms of civil protection.

  3. 78 FR 55679 - High Pressure Steel Cylinders From the People's Republic of China; Rescission of the 2011-2013...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... International Trade Administration High Pressure Steel Cylinders From the People's Republic of China; Rescission...'') is rescinding the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on high pressure steel... of opportunity to request an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on high...

  4. Different deformation patterns using GPS in the volcanic process of El Hierro (Canary Island) 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Cañada, Laura; José García-Arias, María; Pereda de Pablo, Jorge; Lamolda, Héctor; López, Carmen

    2014-05-01

    Ground deformation is one of the most important parameter in volcano monitoring. The detected deformations in volcanic areas can be precursors of a volcanic activity and contribute with useful information to study the evolution of an unrest, eruption or any volcanic process. GPS is the most common technique used to measure volcano deformations. It can be used to detect slow displacement rates or much larger and faster deformations associated with any volcanic process. In volcanoes the deformation is expected to be a mixed of nature; during periods of quiescence it will be slow or not present, while increased activity slow displacement rates can be detected or much larger and faster deformations can be measure due to magma intrusion, for example in the hours to days prior a eruption beginning. In response to the anomalous seismicity detected at El Hierro in July 2011, the Instituto Geográfico Nacional (IGN) improved its volcano monitoring network in the island with continuous GPS that had been used to measure the ground deformation associated with the precursory unrest since summer 2011, submarine eruption (October 2011-March 2012) and the following unrest periods (2012-2013). The continuous GPS time series, together with other techniques, had been used to evaluate the activity and to detect changes in the process. We investigate changes in the direction and module of the deformation obtained by GPS and they show different patterns in every unrest period, very close to the seismicity locations and migrations.

  5. Results of an Academic, Health Care Worksite Weight Loss Contest for Southeastern Americans: Scale Back Alabama 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Breaux-Shropshire, Tonya L; Whitt, Lauren; Oster, Robert A; Lewis, Dwight; Shropshire, Toneyell S; Calhoun, David A

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have assessed the effectiveness of competitive incentivized worksite weight loss programs. Scale Back Alabama (SBA) is a free, state-supported program designed to promote weight loss among overweight and obese citizens. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe the design and preliminary findings of SBA as a worksite intervention among employees at a collegiate institution and university hospital. In teams of 4 employees, SBA participants volunteered to engage in a 10-week competitive weight loss contest; both teams and individuals who lost significant weight were eligible for randomly drawn cash incentives. Trained staff objectively measured participants' weight before and at the conclusion of the contest. Preliminary analyses suggest that SBA as a worksite program can promote weight loss among employees, but future analyses are warranted to understand the context of these findings and determine if current results are confounded by unmeasured factors.

  6. Magma displacements under insular volcanic fields, applications to eruption forecasting: El Hierro, Canary Islands, 2011-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, A.; Fernández-Ros, A.; Berrocoso, M.; Marrero, J. M.; Prates, G.; De la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Ortiz, R.

    2014-04-01

    Significant deformations, followed by increased seismicity detected since 2011 July at El Hierro, Canary Islands, Spain, prompted the deployment of additional monitoring equipment. The climax of this unrest was a submarine eruption first detected on 2011 October 10, and located at about 2 km SW of La Restinga, southernmost village of El Hierro Island. The eruption ceased on 2012 March 5, after the volcanic tremor signals persistently weakened through 2012 February. However, the seismic activity did not end with the eruption, as several other seismic crises followed. The seismic episodes presented a characteristic pattern: over a few days the number and magnitude of seismic event increased persistently, culminating in seismic events severe enough to be felt all over the island. Those crises occurred in 2011 November, 2012 June and September, 2012 December to 2013 January and in 2013 March-April. In all cases the seismic unrest was preceded by significant deformations measured on the island's surface that continued during the whole episode. Analysis of the available GPS and seismic data suggests that several magma displacement processes occurred at depth from the beginning of the unrest. The first main magma movement or `injection' culminated with the 2011 October submarine eruption. A model combining the geometry of the magma injection process and the variations in seismic energy release has allowed successful forecasting of the new-vent opening.

  7. Circulation of Dirofilaria repens, Setaria tundra, and Onchocercidae species in Hungary during the period 2011-2013.

    PubMed

    Kemenesi, Gábor; Kurucz, Kornélia; Kepner, Anett; Dallos, Bianka; Oldal, Miklós; Herczeg, Róbert; Vajdovics, Péter; Bányai, Krisztián; Jakab, Ferenc

    2015-11-30

    Dirofilaria repens and recently Dirofilaria immitis are known to be endemic in Hungary. Since there is no related research on Dirofilaria carrier mosquito species from Hungary, we conducted a three-year mosquito surveillance study between 2011 and 2013. During the study period we examined 23,139 female mosquitoes with a generic filaria-specific TaqMan PCR assay, and characterized them by sequencing a 500 bp segment of 12S rRNA. An important result of our study was the detection of Setaria tundra and D. repens along with an unidentified Onchocercidae nematode. D. repens is known to be endemic in Hungary, however, the detection of S. tundra in all sampling sites throughout the study period indicates for the first time the endemicity of this parasite in Hungary. The Onchocercidae sp. nematode showed 95% nucleotide identity with previously detected unidentified nematodes from Germany, indicating a broader geographical distribution of this nematode in Europe. D. immitis specific DNA was not detected among the screened mosquitoes in this study. Here we report 11 mosquito species as potential vector organisms for local filarial infections, including Aedes vexans, Ochlerotatus annulipes, Ochlerotatus sticticus, Coquillettidia richiardii, Anopheles hyrcanus and Ochlerotatus rusticus. Dirofilaria development unit was calculated and the potential transmission period was estimated, which ranged between 65 and 113 days between sampling seasons. A relatively high infection rate (36.8%) was identified, which is a notable finding for veterinary and human health professionals. Moreover, the results of our study widen the group of possible mosquito vector species for D. repens and S. tundra in Central Europe.

  8. Z form of poly d(A-T).poly d(A-T) in solution studied by CD and UV spectroscopies.

    PubMed

    Bourtayre, P; Liquier, J; Pizzorni, L; Taillandier, E

    1987-08-01

    Near UV CD spectra, UV absorption spectra and their first derivatives have been recorded on poly d(A-T).poly d(A-T) solutions in presence of high NaCl concentration and various amounts of NiCl2. Comparison of the results presented here with those obtained for poly d(G-C).poly d(G-C) and poly d(A-C).poly d(G-T) in comparable conditions, and the I.R. and Raman data on poly d(A-T).poly d(A-T), allows us to assign the new spectra to the Z conformation of poly d(A-T).poly d(A-T) in solution. The mechanism by which nickel ions induce the B----Z interconversion in the presence of high NaCl concentration is discussed.

  9. Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Poly(3-nitratooxetane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Brian; Cruz, Aliza; Stoltz, Chad

    2009-06-01

    Poly(3-nitratooxetane), or PNO, is a new high-energy density polymer that is expected to increase formulation energy output without sacrificing binder stability. It is anticipated that using PNO in propellant formulations will be advantageous compared to other energetic binders such as its structural isomer poly(glycidyl nitrate) (PGN). In an effort to understand the combustion behavior of this new energetic polymer, thermal decomposition of PNO has been investigated. Differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermal gravimetric analysis shows that this material is thermally stable to at least 150^oC and that exothermic decomposition peaks near 203^oC. T- Jump/FTIR was used under various conditions to identify gas- phase thermal decomposition products, including H2O, CH2O, CO2, CO, N2O, NO, NO2, and HONO (cis and trans). Additional time- resolved T-Jump/FTIR experiments suggest immediate dissociation of NO2 as the obvious first step in PNO decomposition, while previous work on the PGN polymer system suggests that the entire CH2ONO2 side chain breaks from the PGN backbone before dissociation. It is likely that different decomposition pathways are followed for each binder system due to location of available C-O and N-O moieties on each polymer.

  10. New aspects of the interaction of the antibiotic coralyne with RNA: coralyne induces triple helix formation in poly(rA)•poly(rU)

    PubMed Central

    Biver, Tarita; Boggioni, Alessia; García, Begoña; Leal, José M.; Ruiz, Rebeca; Secco, Fernando; Venturini, Marcella

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of coralyne with poly(A)•poly(U), poly(A)•2poly(U), poly(A) and poly(A)•poly(A) is analysed using spectrophotometric, spectrofluorometric, circular dichroism (CD), viscometric, stopped-flow and temperature-jump techniques. It is shown for the first time that coralyne induces disproportionation of poly(A)•poly(U) to triplex poly(A)•2poly(U) and single-stranded poly(A) under suitable values of the [dye]/[polymer] ratio (CD/CP). Kinetic, CD and spectrofluorometric experiments reveal that this process requires that coralyne (D) binds to duplex. The resulting complex (AUD) reacts with free duplex giving triplex (UAUD) and free poly(A); moreover, ligand exchange between duplex and triplex occurs. A reaction mechanism is proposed and the reaction parameters are evaluated. For CD/CP> 0.8 poly(A)•poly(U) does not disproportionate at 25°C and dye intercalation into AU to give AUD is the only observed process. Melting experiments as well show that coralyne induces the duplex disproportionation. Effects of temperature, ionic strength and ethanol content are investigated. One concludes that triplex formation requires coralyne be only partially intercalated into AUD. Under suitable concentration conditions, this feature favours the interaction of free AU with AUD to give the AUDAU intermediate which evolves into triplex UAUD and single-stranded poly(A). Duplex poly(A)•poly(A) undergoes aggregation as well, but only at much higher polymer concentrations compared to poly(A)•poly(U). PMID:20008509

  11. Curcumin Encapsulated into Methoxy Poly(Ethylene Glycol) Poly(ε-Caprolactone) Nanoparticles Increases Cellular Uptake and Neuroprotective Effect in Glioma Cells.

    PubMed

    Marslin, Gregory; Sarmento, Bruno Filipe Carmelino Cardoso; Franklin, Gregory; Martins, José Alberto Ribeiro; Silva, Carlos Jorge Ribeiro; Gomes, Andreia Ferreira Castro; Sárria, Marisa Passos; Coutinho, Olga Maria Fernandes Pereira; Dias, Alberto Carlos Pires

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is a natural polyphenolic compound isolated from turmeric (Curcuma longa) with well-demonstrated neuroprotective and anticancer activities. Although curcumin is safe even at high doses in humans, it exhibits poor bioavailability, mainly due to poor absorption, fast metabolism, and rapid systemic elimination. To overcome these issues, several approaches, such as nanoparticle-mediated targeted delivery, have been undertaken with different degrees of success. The present study was conducted to compare the neuroprotective effect of curcumin encapsulated in poly(ε-caprolactone) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles in U251 glioblastoma cells. Prepared nanoparticles were physically characterized by laser doppler anemometry, transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results from laser doppler anemometry confirmed that the size of poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles ranged between 200-240 nm for poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles and 30-70 nm for poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles, and transmission electron microscopy images revealed their spherical shape. Treatment of U251 glioma cells and zebrafish embryos with poly(ε-caprolactone) and poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles loaded with curcumin revealed efficient cellular uptake. The cellular uptake of poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles was higher in comparison to poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles. Moreover, poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) di-block copolymer-loaded curcumin nanoparticles were able to protect the glioma cells against tBHP induced-oxidative damage better than free curcumin. Together, our results show that curcumin-loaded poly(ethylene glycol) poly(ε-caprolactone) di-block copolymer nanoparticles possess significantly stronger neuroprotective effect in U251 human glioma cells compared to free curcumin and curcumin

  12. Possible involvement of poly(A) in protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, A; Favreau, M

    1983-01-01

    The experiments of this paper have re-evaluated the possibility that poly(A) is involved in protein synthesis by testing whether purified poly(A) might competitively inhibit in vitro protein synthesis in rabbit reticulocyte extracts. We have found that poly(A) inhibits the rate of translation of many different poly(A)+ mRNAs and that comparable inhibition is not observed with other ribopolymers. Inhibition by poly(A) preferentially affects the translation of adenylated mRNAs and can be overcome by increased mRNA concentrations or by translating mRNPs instead of mRNA. The extent of inhibition is dependent on the size of the competitor poly(A) as well as on the translation activity which a lysate has for poly(A)+ RNA. In light of our results and numerous experiments in the literature, we propose that poly(A) has a function in protein synthesis and that any role in the determination of mRNA stability is indirect. Images PMID:6137807

  13. Syntheses of sugar poly(orthoesters) through reverse anomeric effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingyao; Wang, Jun; Obrinske, Melissa; Milligan, Ian; O'Hara, Kylie; Bitterman, Lindsay; Du, Wenjun

    2015-04-25

    High molecular weight sugar poly(orthoesters) were synthesized through reverse anomeric effect (RAE). We demonstrated that when RAE-enabled promoters, such as 4-(dimethylamino)pyridine (DMAP), triphenylphosphine (TPP) or imidazole, were employed, efficient polymerizations were achieved, giving sugar poly(orthoesters) with molecular weights up to 18 kDa.

  14. New nucleic acid triple helix, Poly(AAU)

    SciTech Connect

    Broitman, S.L.; Im, D.D.; Fresco, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    A polynucleotide helical structure containing two strands of poly(A) and one of poly(U) has been discovered. The stoichiometry of the complex was determined by continuous variation titrations and isosbestic wavelength analysis. Thermal denaturation profiles were used to examine complex stability over a wide range of conditions. The complex forms only when the poly(A) strands are of molecular weight between 9000-50,000 Daltons (dp approx. 28-150), whereas the size of the poly(U) strand has no effect. This limitation may explain why poly(AAU) was not observed in previous investigations. The complex shows inverse dependence of stability on ionic strength, but is not favored by decreasing pH. This behavior, together with the intermediate poly(A) size requirement suggest that the conformational entropy of the poly(A) strands is a critical determinant of the stability of this complex. The potential of the poly(A) tails of mRNA for formation of this triple helix, and of AAU/T triplet formation to contribute to the binding of unique sequence RNA strands to gene-encoding nucleic acid double helices are noted.

  15. Multifunctional poly(alkyl methacrylate) films for dental care.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Birthe V; Nevell, Thomas G; Barbu, Eugen; Smith, James R; Rees, Gareth D; Tsibouklis, John

    2011-02-01

    Towards the evaluation of non-permanent dental coatings for their capacity to impart dental-care benefits, thin films of a homologous series of comb-like poly(alkyl methacrylate)s (ethyl to octadecyl) have been deposited, from aqueous latex formulations, onto dentally relevant substrates. AFM studies have shown that the thickness (40-300 nm) and surface roughness (8-12 nm) of coherent polymer films are influenced by the degree of polymerization and by the length of the pendant chain. Of the polymers under consideration, poly(butyl methacrylate) formed a close-packed film that conferred to dental substrates a high degree of inhibition to acid-mediated erosion (about 27%), as evaluated by released-phosphate determinations. The potential utility of the coatings to act as anti-sensitivity barriers has been evaluated by determining the hydraulic conductance of coated bovine-dentine substrates; single treatments of dentine discs with poly(butyl methacrylate) or with poly(ethyl methacrylate) effected mean respective reductions in fluid flow of about 23% with respect to water-treated controls; repeated applications of the poly(butyl methacrylate) latex led to mean reductions in fluid flow of about 80%. Chromometric measurements have shown that pellicle-coated hydroxyapatite discs treated with poly(butyl methacrylate), poly(hexyl methacrylate) or poly(lauryl methacrylate) exhibit significant resistance to staining by food chromogens.

  16. Vaccine adjuvant uses of poly-IC and derivatives.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen A O; Bavari, Sina; Salazar, Andres M

    2015-03-01

    Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are stand-alone immunomodulators or 'danger signals,' that are increasingly recognized as critical components of many modern vaccines. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly-IC) is a synthetic dsRNA that can activate multiple elements of the host defense in a pattern that parallels that of a viral infection. When properly combined with an antigen, it can be utilized as a PAMP-adjuvant, resulting in modulation and optimization of the antigen-specific immune response. We briefly review the preclinical and clinical uses of poly-IC and two poly-IC derivatives, poly-IC12U (Ampligen) and poly-ICLC (Hiltonol), as vaccine adjuvants.

  17. Hierarchical Porous Polystyrene Monoliths from PolyHIPE.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xinjia; Tan, Liangxiao; Xia, Lingling; Wood, Colin D; Tan, Bien

    2015-09-01

    Hierarchical porous polystyrene monoliths (HCP-PolyHIPE) are obtained by hypercrosslinking poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) monoliths prepared by polymerization of high internal phase emulsions (PolyHIPEs). The hypercrosslinking is achieved using an approach known as knitting which employs formaldehyde dimethyl acetal (FDA) as an external crosslinker. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirms that the macroporous structure in the original monolith is retained during the knitting process. By increasing the amount of divinylbenzene (DVB) in PolyHIPE, the BET surface area and pore volume of the HCP-PolyHIPE decrease, while the micropore size increases. BET surface areas of 196-595 m(2) g(-1) are obtained. The presence of micropores, mesopores, and macropores is confirmed from the pore size distribution. With a hierarchical porous structure, the monoliths reveal comparable gas sorption properties and potential applications in oil spill clean-up.

  18. Cross-backbone templating; ribodinucleotides made on poly(C)

    PubMed Central

    Majerfeld, Irene; Puthenvedu, Deepa; Yarus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    G5′pp5′G synthesis from pG and chemically activated 2MeImpG is accelerated by the addition of complementary poly(C), but affected only slightly by poly(G) and not at all by poly(U) and poly(A). This suggests that 3′–5′ poly(C) is a template for uncatalyzed synthesis of 5′–5′ GppG, as was poly(U) for AppA synthesis, previously. The reaction occurs at 50 mM mono- and divalent ion concentrations, at moderate temperatures, and near pH 7. The reactive complex at the site of enhanced synthesis of 5′–5′ GppG seems to contain a single pG, a single phosphate-activated nucleotide 2MeImpG, and a single strand of poly(C). Most likely this structure is base-paired, as the poly(C)-enhanced reaction is completely disrupted between 30 and 37°C, whereas slower, untemplated synthesis of GppG accelerates. More specifically, the reactive center acts as would be expected for short, isolated G nucleotide stacks expanded and ordered by added poly(C). For example, poly(C)-mediated GppG production is very nonlinear in overall nucleotide concentration. Uncatalyzed NppN synthesis is now known for two polymers and their complementary free nucleotides. These data suggest that varied, simple, primordial 3′–5′ RNA sequences could express a specific chemical phenotype by encoding synthesis of complementary, reactive, coenzyme-like 5′–5′ ribodinucleotides. PMID:26759450

  19. Properties of electrospun pollock gelatin/poly(vinyl alcohol) and pollock gelatin/poly(lactic acid) fibers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pollock gelatin/poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) fibers were electrospun using deionized water as the solvent and pollock gelatin/poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fibers were electrospun using 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol (HFIP) as the solvent. The chemical, thermal, and thermal stability properties were exami...

  20. Relaxation kinetics of the interaction between RNA and metal-intercalators: the Poly(A).Poly(U)/platinum-proflavine system.

    PubMed

    Biver, Tarita; Secco, Fernando; Venturini, Marcella

    2005-05-15

    The interactions of Poly(A).Poly(U) with the cis-platinum derivative of proflavine [{PtCl(tmen)}(2){HNC(13)H(7)(NHCH(2)CH(2))(2)}](+) (PRPt) and proflavine (PR) are investigated by spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry and T-jump relaxation at I=0.2M, pH 7.0, and T=25 degrees C. Base-dye interactions prevail at high RNA/dye ratio and binding isotherms analysis reveals that both dyes bind to Poly(A).Poly(U) according to the excluded site model (n=2). Only one relaxation effect is observed for the Poly(A).Poly(U)/PRPt system, whereas two effects are observed with Poly(A).Poly(U)/PR. The results agree with the sequence D+S <==> D, S <==> DS(I) <==> DS(II), where D,S is an external complex, DS(I) is a partially intercalated species, and DS(II) is the fully intercalated complex. Formation of DS(II) could be observed in the case of proflavine only. This result is interpreted by assuming that the platinum-containing residue of PRPt hinders the full intercalation of the acridine residue.

  1. Impact of smoking on guided tissue regeneration using a biocomposite poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid/sub-micron size hydroxyapatite with a rubber dam as an alternative barrier.

    PubMed

    Stramazzotti, D; Coiana, C; Zizzi, A; Spazzafumo, L; Sauro, S; D'Angelo, A B; Rubini, C; Aspriello, S D

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to critically evaluate the results obtained from a guided tissue regeneration technique after 12 months using a bocomposite poly (lactic-co-glycolic) acid/sub-micron size hydroxyapatite (PLGA/HA) with a rubber dam as a barrier in smoking and non-smoking patients. We selected 36 patients (18 current smokers and 18 non-smokers) diagnosed with chronic advanced periodontitis with a periodontal site (probing depth [PD] >5) amenable to regenerative surgery. Twelve months after surgery, the periodontal parameters were found to have statistically improved, when non-smokers were compared with smokers, in: PD reduction (6.3 ± 2.1 mm vs. 3.6 ± 1.9 mm); CAL gain (4.4 ± 1.1 vs. 2.8 ± 2.2 mm); recession (1.8 ± 1.4 mm vs. 0.8 ± 0.9 mm); and hard tissue fill (4.7 ± 0.8 mm vs. 2.8 ± 2.1 mm). Furthermore, since we found PD baseline differences between groups, smoking seemed not to influence the outcomes achieved (CAL gain and ΔREC) 12 months post surgery with respect to PD baseline. The use of PLGA/HA with a rubber dam significantly improved the periodontal parameters in both smoking and non-smoking subjects. This improvement was nevertheless lower in smokers than the non-smokers, confirming the negative impact of smoking on periodontal regeneration.

  2. The geochemical and sedimentary imprint on the continental margin of the NW Gulf of Mexico during the last 20 cal ka: glacial melt-water floods and geochemical proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karageorgis, A. P.; Tripsanas, E. K.; Kanellopoulos, T. D.; Koutsopoulou, E.; Panagiotopoulos, I.; Bryant, W. R.; Slowey, N. C.

    2012-04-01

    The sedimentary stratigraphy of the last 21 cal ka of the NW continental slope of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) is recorded in detail in six cores; it is characterized by the widespread occurrence of discrete sedimentary beds (turbidites, nepheloid-layer deposits). They are interpreted as the depositional effect of six melt-water floods (MWFs) that were routed during the last deglaciation through the Mississippi River to the GOM. Geochemical, oxygen isotope analyses, and radiocarbon datings have been performed in core JPC-26 from to identify the geochemical signature of these MWFs. The history of JPC-26 may be portrayed in three distinct sedimentary units. Unit 3: Early deglaciation episode (16-21 cal ka). It is characterized by two series of red and green mud turbidites, with the red turbidites being the product MWF-1/a. Both mud turbidites display major peaks in the distributions of the terrigenous elements Si, Zr, Fe, Mg, as well as in P, and Mn ratios to Al. Exclusive occurrence of peaks of Ti, K, and Mg ratios to Al characterize the red turbidites. Subunits 2b, 2c, and subunit 2e: Melt-water floods during 10-16 cal ka. They are characterized by two successive, negative δ18O excursions indicating that they represent MWFs 2-4 of the Mississippi R. Distinct peaks in the ratios to Al profiles of the terrigenous elements Si, K, Ti, Cr, Fe, and Ni in subunits 2e and 2b indicate that enormous amounts of river-sourced sediment was delivered and dispersed throughout the NW continental slope of the GOM. Barium ratio to Al shows marked peaks in subunits 2e (15.3-15.9 cal ka), 2c (13.7-14.6 cal ka) and marginally in 2b, suggesting increasing flux of Ba during the MWFs (palaeoproductivity proxy). A sudden increase is observed from the uppermost section of subunit 2b in the Mn to Al ratio (125x10-4 at 13.26 cal ka to 254x10-4 at 11.46 cal ka). Calcium to Al ratio exhibits similar behavior, thus the Mn enrichment is probably related to the formation of manganese carbonates. The

  3. Ostracods and sediment geochemistry as indicators of hydrologic and climatic variability in the central part of the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert over the last 27 ka cal BP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chávez Lara, C. M.; Roy, P. D.; Lozano Santa Cruz, R.; López Balbiaux, N.

    2013-12-01

    The paleolake Santiaguillo (Durango State) is located in the central part of the Chihuahuan Desert (Mexico). The lacustrine basin covers an area of approximately 1,964 km2 and is surrounded by mountains up to ca. 2,700 masl. This basin was formed by tectonic processes and the basement is formed by volcanic felsic rocks of Tertiary age. Four sediment cores were obtained from central and western part of the basin to reconstruct hydrologic and climate variability during the late Pleistocene and Holocene. In this work, we present paleo-ecology of ostracods and sedimentary geochemistry from two sediment cores (300 cm and 200 cm long) collected from the western basin margin. The age model was constructed from 8 AMS radiocarbon dates and the longest profile represents the last 27 cal ka BP. The ostracode faunal content consists of 4 different species: Limnocythere bradburyi, Cadona patzcuaro, Cypridopsis vidua and Limnocythere ceriotuberosa (listed from highest to lowest abundance) and total abundance varies between 0 and 125 valves/g. Paleo-environmental conditions were reconstructed from the Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Total Inorganic Carbon (TIC), Carbon/Nitrogen ratios (C/N), Chemical Index of Alteration (CIA) and concentrations of Ti, Ca, Si and Al. The results were divided into two zones for interpretation. Zone 1 covers ca. 27-17 cal ka BP (300-191 cm) and is characterized by higher Ti concentrations and above average CIA values. This suggests greater interaction between water and sediment, lower evaporation and relatively higher lake level in the basin. During this interval of higher lakestand, the deposited organic matter was autochthonous (lacustrine origin) and ostracodes suggest presence of a warm and dilute water column (>13 °C and >100 ppm). Sediments of the last 17 cal ka BP (191-0 cm) (Zone 2) are characterized by below average water-sediment interaction, higher carbonate precipitation and deposition of allochthonous organic matter (terrestrial origin

  4. Poly(vinyl alcohol) reinforced and toughened with poly(dopamine)-treated graphene oxide, and its use for humidity sensing.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sang-Ha; Kang, Dongwoo; Ruoff, Rodney S; Shin, Hyeon Suk; Park, Young-Bin

    2014-07-22

    Poly(dopamine)-treated graphene oxide/poly(vinyl alcohol) ("dG-O/PVA") composite films were made and characterized. G-O was modified with poly(dopamine) in aqueous solution and then chemically reduced to yield poly(dopamine)-treated reduced G-O. A combination of hydrogen bonding, strong adhesion of poly(dopamine) at the interface of PVA and G-O sheets, and reinforcement by G-O resulted in increases in tensile modulus, ultimate tensile strength, and strain-to-failure by 39, 100, and 89%, respectively, at 0.5 wt % dG-O loading of the PVA. The dG-O serves as a moisture barrier for water-soluble PVA, and the dG-O/PVA composite films were shown to be effective humidity sensors over the relative humidity range 40-100%.

  5. Protein-resistant polymer coatings based on surface-adsorbed poly(aminoethyl methacrylate)/poly(ethylene glycol) copolymers.

    PubMed

    Ionov, Leonid; Synytska, Alla; Kaul, Elisabeth; Diez, Stefan

    2010-01-11

    We report on the protein-resistant properties of glass substrates coated with novel copolymers of 2-aminoethyl methacrylate hydrochloride and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (AEM-PEG). In comparison to currently available protein-blocking polymer systems, such as poly-l-lysine-poly(ethylene glycol), silane-based poly(ethylene glycol), and poly(ethylene glycol) brushes prepared by surface-initiated polymerization, the proposed AEM-PEG offers the combined advantages of low cost, simplicity of use, and applicability in aqueous solutions. We demonstrate the capability of AEM-PEG to block the surface binding of globular proteins (tubulin), their assemblies (microtubules), and functional motor proteins (kinesin-1). Moreover, we demonstrate the applicability of AEM-PEG for surface patterning of proteins in microfluidic devices.

  6. Poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) block polymers for metal oxide templating

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Morgan W.; Sinturel, Christophe

    2015-09-01

    A series of poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (CEO) diblock copolymers were synthesized through tandem anionic polymerizations and heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation. Solvent-annealed CEO diblock films were used to template dense arrays of inorganic oxide nanodots via simple spin coating of an inorganic precursor solution atop the ordered film. The substantial chemical dissimilarity of the two blocks enables (i) selective inclusion of the inorganic precursor within the PEO domain and (ii) the formation of exceptionally small feature sizes due to a relatively large interaction parameter estimated from mean-field analysis of the order–disorder transition temperatures of compositionally symmetric samples. UV/ozone treatment following incorporation produces an ordered arrangement of oxide nanodots and simultaneously removes the block polymer template. However, we report the smallest particles (6 ± 1 nm) templated from a selective precursor insertion method to date using a block polymer scaffold.

  7. Synthesis and Properties of Poly(l-lactide)-b-poly (l-phenylalanine) Hybrid Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Planellas, Marc; Puiggalí, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    Hybrid materials constituted by peptides and synthetic polymers have nowadays a great interest since they can combine the properties and functions of each constitutive block, being also possible to modify the final characteristics by using different topologies. Poly(l-lactide-b-l-phenylalanine) copolymers with various block lengths were synthesized by sequential ring-opening polymerization of l-lactide and the N-carboxyanhydride of l-phenylalanine. The resulting block copolymers were characterized by NMR spectrometry, IR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, MALDI-TOF and UV-vis, revealing the successful incorporation of the polyphenylalanine (PPhe) peptide into the previously formed poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) polymer chain. X-ray diffraction and DSC data also suggested that the copolymers were phase-separated in domains containing either crystalline PLLA or PPhe phases. A peculiar thermal behavior was also found by thermogravimetric analysis when polyphenylalanine blocks were incorporated into polylactide. PMID:25075980

  8. The adhesion of oxygen-plasma treated poly(ethylene) and poly(ethylene terephthlate) films

    SciTech Connect

    Holton, S.L.; Kinloch, A.J.; Watts, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    The effects of low-pressure oxygen-plasma treatment on the surfaces of poly(ethylene) (PE) and poly(ethylene terephthlate) (PET) films and its influence on the adhesion of PE/PET laminates were assessed. The 90{degree} peel test was used to estimate the adhesive fracture energy, G{sub c} for the laminates. XPS, SEM and AFM were used to analyse the treated films and fracture surfaces. Significant improvements in bond strength occurred within very short treatment times (5s at 50W) with the maximum adhesion occurring after 300s. For longer treatment times the bond strengths decrease slightly. G{sub c} values were found to be low when PET was the peel arm. When PE was the peel arm, the G{sub c} values were substantially larger using the current analysis.

  9. Tensile behaviour of blends of poly(vinylidene fluoride) with poly(methyl methacrylate)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebe, Peggy; Chung, Shirley Y.

    1990-01-01

    Blends of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVF2) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) were prepared over a wide concentration range and tested in tension at the same relative temperature below the glass transition. In nearly all blends, under conditions favoring disentanglement, (decrease in strain rate, or increase in test temperature), the yield stress and drawing stress decreased while the breaking strain increased. For materials with about the same degree of crystallinity, those with a higher proportion of amorphous PVF2 exhibited brittle-like behavior as a result of interlamellar tie molecules. In the semicrystalline blends, yield stress remains high as the test temperature approaches Tg, whereas in the amorphous blends the yield stress falls to zero near Tg. Results of physical aging support the role of interlamellar ties which cause semicrystalline blends to exhibit aging at temperatures above Tg.

  10. Poly(vinyl alcohol)/poly(vinyl chloride) composite polymer membranes for secondary zinc electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chun-Chen; Yang, Jen Ming; Wu, Cheng-Yeou

    A microporous composite polymer membrane composed of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC), was prepared by a solution casting method and a partial dissolution process. The characteristic properties of microporous PVA/PVC composite polymer membranes containing 2.5-10 wt.% PVC polymers as fillers were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), capillary flow porometry (CFP), micro-Raman spectroscopy, dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and the AC impedance method. The electrochemical properties of a secondary Zn electrode with the PVA/PVC composite polymer membrane were studied using the galvanostatic charge/discharge method. The PVA/PVC composite polymer membrane showed good thermal, mechanical and electrochemical properties. As a result, the PVA/PVC composite polymer membrane appears to be a good candidate for use on the secondary Zn electrodes.

  11. Broadband Dielectric Study on Dynamics of Poly(vinyl pyrrolidone)-Poly(ethylene glycol) Blend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubotani, S.; Sudo, S.; Nakamura, H.; Shinyashiki, N.; Yagihara, S.; Sengwa, R. J.

    2004-04-01

    Dielectric measurements for blends of poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) (Mw=40,000) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) (Mw=400) with various compositions were carried out in the frequency range of 1μHz to 10GHz and temperatures range between 298 and 173K. Three relaxation processes were observed above 298K. The high frequency process (h1 process) is caused by the chain motion of PEG, the middle frequency process (m process) is caused by the segmental motion of PVP chains, and the low frequency process is caused by ionic impurities in the mixture. The relaxation time of h1 process increased with decreasing temperature and separated into two processes at 253K. Moreover h1 process was separated again at 223K. The relaxation time of h1 process was 100s at 208K. The glass transition is attributed to the motion of unfrozen PEG molecules.

  12. Poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) block polymers for metal oxide templating

    DOE PAGES

    Schulze, Morgan W.; Sinturel, Christophe; Hillmyer, Marc A.

    2015-09-01

    A series of poly(cyclohexylethylene)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (CEO) diblock copolymers were synthesized through tandem anionic polymerizations and heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation. Solvent-annealed CEO diblock films were used to template dense arrays of inorganic oxide nanodots via simple spin coating of an inorganic precursor solution atop the ordered film. The substantial chemical dissimilarity of the two blocks enables (i) selective inclusion of the inorganic precursor within the PEO domain and (ii) the formation of exceptionally small feature sizes due to a relatively large interaction parameter estimated from mean-field analysis of the order–disorder transition temperatures of compositionally symmetric samples. UV/ozone treatment following incorporation produces anmore » ordered arrangement of oxide nanodots and simultaneously removes the block polymer template. However, we report the smallest particles (6 ± 1 nm) templated from a selective precursor insertion method to date using a block polymer scaffold.« less

  13. Electronic transport in double-strand poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA segments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmento, R. G.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Sesion, P. D.; Fulco, U. L.; de Oliveira, B. P. W.

    2009-04-01

    We study the electronic properties of a double-strand quasiperiodic DNA molecule modeled by a one-dimensional effective Hamiltonian, which includes contributions from the nucleobasis system as well as the sugar-phosphate backbone. Our theoretical approach makes use of Dyson's equation together with a transfer-matrix treatment, considering an electronic tight-binding Hamiltonian model to investigate the electronic density of states (DOS) and the electronic transmissivity of sequences of DNA finite segments. To mimic the DNA segments, we consider the finite quasiperiodic sequences of Fibonacci's type, in a poly(dG)-poly(dC) configuration, whose building blocks are the bases guanine G and cytosine C. We compared the electronic transport found for the quasiperiodic structure to those using a sequence of natural DNA, as part of the human chromosome Ch22.

  14. Conductivity enhancement of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) films post-spincasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farah, Abdiaziz A.; Rutledge, Steven A.; Schaarschmidt, Antje; Lai, Roger; Freedman, Justin P.; Helmy, Amr S.

    2012-12-01

    Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) thin films on indium tin oxide and glass substrates have been fabricated and subjected to a non-adiabatic annealing process. The films showed subtle changes in their structure and optical properties as well as an increase in conductivity due to the effects of rapid thermal annealing. Through a combination of Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy studies in conjunction with electrical characterization, and four-point probe measurements, material enrichment of conductive PEDOT domains at the polymer-metal interface have been demonstrated, which well explains the surface conductivity improvement of a thin film of PEDOT:PSS after annealing.

  15. Fabrication of Poly (methyl methacrylate) and Poly(vinyl alcohol) Thin Film Capacitors on Flexible Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Bindu; Meenaa Pria KNJ, Jaisree; Alagappan, M.; Kandaswamy, A.

    2015-11-01

    Flexible electronics is becoming more popular with introduction of more and more organic conducting materials and processes for making thin films. The use of polymers as gate dielectric has over ruled the usage of conventional inorganic oxides in Organic Thin Film Transistors (OTFTs) on account of its solution process ability and ease of making highly insulating thin film. In this work Capacitance is fabricated with polymeric dielectrics namely poly (methyl methacrylate) - PMMA and poly (vinyl alcohol) - PVA. The electrodes used for these capacitors are Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) and Aluminium. Capacitance value of 9.5nF/cm2 and 33.12nF/cm2 is achieved for thickness of 510 nm of PMMA and 80 nm of PVA respectively. This study on capacitance can be used for assessing the suitability of these polymers as gate insulators in OTFTs.

  16. Collective motion in Poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(methylmethacrylate) blends

    SciTech Connect

    Farago, Bela; Chen Chunxia; Maranas, Janna K.; Kamath, Sudesh; Colby, Ralph H.; Pasquale, Anthony J.; Long, Timothy E.

    2005-09-01

    We present neutron spin echo and structural measurements on a perdeutereted miscible polymer blend: poly(ethylene oxide)[PEO]/poly(methyl methacrylate)[PMMA], characterized by a large difference in component glass transition temperatures and minimal interactions. The measurements cover the q range 0.35 to 1.66 A{sup -1} and the temperature range T{sub g}-75 to T{sub g}+89 K, where T{sub g} is the blend glass transition. The spectra, obtained directly in the time domain, are very broad with stretching parameters {beta}{approx}0.30. The relaxation times vary considerably over the spatial range considered however at none of the q values do we see two distinct relaxation times. At small spatial scales relaxations are still detectable at temperatures far below T{sub g}. The temperature dependence of these relaxation times strongly resembles the {beta}-relaxation process observed in pure PMMA.

  17. Measurements and sensitivities of LWR in poly spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayal, Guy; Shauly, Eitan; Levi, Shimon; Siany, Amit; Adan, Ofer; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi

    2010-03-01

    LER and LWR have long been considered a primary issue in process development and monitoring. Development of a low power process flavors emphasizes the effect of LER, LWR on different aspects of the device. Gate level performance, particularly leakage current at the front end of line, resistance and reliability in the back-end layers. Traditionally as can be seen in many publications, for the front end of line the focus is mainly on Poly and Active area layers. Poly spacers contribution to the gate leakage, for example, is rarely discussed. Following our research done on sources of gate leakage, we found leakage current (Ioff) in some processes to be highly sensitive to changes in the width of the Poly spacers - even more strongly to the actual Poly gate CDs. Therefore we decided to measure Poly spacers LWR, its correlation to the LWR in the poly, and its sensitivity to changes in layout and OPC. In our last year publication, we defined the terms LLER (Local Line Edge Roughness) and LLWR (Local Line Width Roughness). The local roughness is measured as the 3-sigma value of the line edge/width in a 5-nm segment around the measurement point. We will use these terms in this paper to evaluate the Poly roughness impact on Poly spacer's roughness. A dedicated test chip was designed for the experiments, having various transistors layout configurations with different densities to cover the all range of process design rules. Applied Materials LER and LWR innovative algorithms were used to measure and characterize the spacer roughness relative to the distance from the active edges and from other spaces. To accurately measure all structures in a reasonable time, the recipes were automatically generated from CAD. On silicon, after poly spacers generation, the transistors no longer resemble the Poly layer CAD layout, their morphology is different compared with Photo/Etch traditional structures , and dimensions vary significantly. In this paper we present metrology and

  18. Poly(ethyl Acrylate) and Poly(Gamma-Benzyl-L-Glutamate): An Interpenetrating Polymer System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-13

    when American scientists developed styrene - butadiene rubber (SBR) as a substitute for natural rubber , research on polymer synthesis and properties has...as films, then cured to form the IPN. Later, they studied PBA with poly( styrene - butadiene ) (PSB) and polychloroprene [59]. Other work on IPN’s...found that the Young’s modulus seems to fit Takayanagi’s Model 2. Kraus et al. [1191 studied the dynamic behavior of PS reinforced styrene - butadiene

  19. Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome: An Updated Overview.

    PubMed

    El Hayek, Samer; Bitar, Lynn; Hamdar, Layal H; Mirza, Fadi G; Daoud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common metabolic and reproductive disorders among women of reproductive age. Women suffering from PCOS present with a constellation of symptoms associated with menstrual dysfunction and androgen excess, which significantly impacts their quality of life. They may be at increased risk of multiple morbidities, including obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease (CVD), infertility, cancer, and psychological disorders. This review summarizes what the literature has so far provided from guidelines to diagnosis of PCOS. It will also present a general overview about the morbidities associated with this disease, specifically with its more severe classic form. Finally, the review will stress on the various aspects of treatment and screening recommendations currently used in the management of this condition.

  20. Poly(vinyl chloride) processes and products.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, R N

    1981-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) resins are produced by four basic processes: suspension, emulsion, bulk and solution polymerization. PVC suspensions resins are usually relatively dust-free and granular with varying degrees of particle porosity. PVC emulsion resins are small particle powders containing very little free monomer. Bulk PVC resins are similar to suspension PVC resins, though the particles tend to be more porous. Solution PVC resins are smaller in particle size than suspension PVC with high porosity particles containing essentially no free monomer. The variety of PVC resin products does not lend itself to broad generalizations concerning health hazards. In studying occupational hazards the particular PVC process and the product must be considered and identified in the study. PMID:7333230

  1. Polymorphism Control of Poly(vinylidene fluoride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jianfen; He, Aihua; Li, Junxing; Han, Charles C.

    2008-03-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) is well-known for its polymorphism, and can exhibit five different polymorphs depending on its processing conditions. The α-phase is the most common and stable polymorph and the β-phase is the most important one due to its piezoelectric and pyroelectric properties. Polymorphism control of PVDF has been realized through electrospinning. PVDF fibrous membranes with fiber diameter in the range of 100 nm to several micrometers were produced by electrospinning and the crystal phase of electrospun PVDF fibers can be adjusted at the same time. Through the control of electrospinning parameters such as the solvent and electrospinning temperature, PVDF fibrous membranes containing mainly α- or β- or γ-phase could be fabricated successfully.

  2. Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome: An Updated Overview

    PubMed Central

    El Hayek, Samer; Bitar, Lynn; Hamdar, Layal H.; Mirza, Fadi G.; Daoud, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Poly Cystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common metabolic and reproductive disorders among women of reproductive age. Women suffering from PCOS present with a constellation of symptoms associated with menstrual dysfunction and androgen excess, which significantly impacts their quality of life. They may be at increased risk of multiple morbidities, including obesity, insulin resistance, type II diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease (CVD), infertility, cancer, and psychological disorders. This review summarizes what the literature has so far provided from guidelines to diagnosis of PCOS. It will also present a general overview about the morbidities associated with this disease, specifically with its more severe classic form. Finally, the review will stress on the various aspects of treatment and screening recommendations currently used in the management of this condition. PMID:27092084

  3. Noise dependence with pile-up in the ATLAS Tile Calorimeter. Pile-up noise studies in the ATLAS TileCal calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Araque, J.P.

    2015-07-01

    The Tile Calorimeter, TileCal, is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment, positioned between the electromagnetic calorimeter and the muon chambers. It comprises alternating layers of steel (as absorber material) and plastic (as active material), known as tiles. Between 2009 and 2012, the LHC has performed better than expected producing proton-proton collisions at a very high rate. These conditions are really challenging when dealing with the energy measurements in the calorimeter since not only the energy from an interesting event will be measured but a component coming from other collisions, which are difficult to distinguish from the interesting one, will also be present. This component is referred to as pile-up noise. Studies carried out to better understand how pile-up affects calorimeter noise under different circumstances are described. (author)

  4. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission - Algorithm and Cal/Val Activities and Synergies with SMOS and Other L-Band Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Jackson, Tom; Kellogg, Kent; Entin, Jared

    2011-01-01

    applicable to soil moisture measurement, such as Aquarius, SAO COM, and ALOS-2. The algorithms and data products for SMAP are being developed in the SMAP Science Data System (SDS) Testbed. The algorithms are developed and evaluated in the SDS Testbed using simulated SMAP observations as well as observational data from current airborne and spaceborne L-band sensors including SMOS. The SMAP project is developing a Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) Plan that is designed to support algorithm development (pre-launch) and data product validation (post-launch). A key component of the Cal/Val Plan is the identification, characterization, and instrumentation of sites that can be used to calibrate and validate the sensor data (Level I) and derived geophysical products (Level 2 and higher). In this presentation we report on the development status of the SMAP data product algorithms, and the planning and implementation of the SMAP Cal/Val program. Several components of the SMAP algorithm development and Cal/Val plans have commonality with those of SMOS, and for this reason there are shared activities and resources that can be utilized between the missions, including in situ networks, ancillary data sets, and long-term monitoring sites.

  5. Microviscosity in Pluronic and Tetronic poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymer micelles

    SciTech Connect

    Nivaggioli, T.; Tsao, B.; Alexandridis, P.; Hatton, T.A. )

    1995-01-01

    The micellar microviscosity afforded by Pluronic and Tetronic poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) block copolymer aqueous solutions has been investigated by fluorescence and NMR spectroscopy. Comparison is made with bulk poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) samples of different molecular weights. The microviscosity in Pluronic PEO-PPO-PEO copolymer micelles is much larger than that observed in conventional surfactant micelles and depends strongly on the size of the hydrophobic PPO block: the larger this block, the higher the viscosity. Above the critical micellar temperature (CMT), as temperature increases, the microviscosity decreases. However, this decrease is not as important as that observed in bulk PPO. Hence, the relative microviscosity, defined as the ratio of the two observed phenomena, increases. This suggests structural transformation of the micelles resulting in a core becoming more and more compact as temperature increases. Such results have been confirmed by NMR studies that showed broadening of the PPO peak and relatively constant spin-lattice relaxation time, T[sub i], with increasing temperature while the PEO signal remained relatively sharp with an exponential increase in T[sub 1]. 30 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The effect of soxhlet extraction on morphology and mechanical properties of Poly(DVB)polyHIPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakeyangkoon, Pornsri; Nithitanakul, Manit

    2007-03-01

    PolyHIPE (Polymerized High Internal Phase Emulsion) is a novel porous polymer, which is microporous materials and produce by polymerization of the continuous phase of system. Poly(DVB)PolyHIPE using two different system of three-component surfactant (S20M and S80M) with various porogenic solvents including T, CB, CB/T and PE has been successfully prepared. The phase morphology, mechanical properties and surface area measurement were investigated. After polymerization of continuous phase, the porous materials with interconnected were obtained. The cell size and surface area were found to improve by using various solvent, this is due to the ability of porogenic solvent and mixture of surfactant which prevent the Ostwald ripening (coalescence) of system. Moreover, the surface area and mechanical properties of the resulting materials were found to be depended on the soxhlet time. It can be concluded that the suitable soxhlet time for extraction was 6-12 hours and at this condition, high surface area with highest mechanical properties was obtained as compare to others conditions.

  7. Superabsorbent biphasic system based on poly(lactic acid) and poly(acrylic acid)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartore, Luciana; Pandini, Stefano; Baldi, Francesco; Bignotti, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    In this research work, biocomposites based on crosslinked particles of poly(acrylic acid), commonly used as superabsorbent polymer (SAP), and poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) were developed to elucidate the role of the filler (i.e., polymeric crosslinked particles) on the overall physico-mechanical behavior and to obtain superabsorbent thermoplastic products. Samples prepared by melt-blending of components in different ratios showed a biphasic system with a regular distribution of particles, with diameter ranging from 5 to 10 μm, within the PLLA polymeric matrix. The polymeric biphasic system, coded PLASA i.e. superabsorbent poly(lactic acid), showed excellent swelling properties, demonstrating that cross-linked particles retain their superabsorbent ability, as in their free counterparts, even if distributed in a thermoplastic polymeric matrix. The thermal characteristics of the biocomposites evidence enhanced thermal stability in comparison with neat PLLA and also mechanical properties are markedly modified by addition of crosslinked particles which induce regular stiffening effect. Furthermore, in aqueous environments the particles swell and are leached from PLLA matrix generating very high porosity. These new open-pore PLLA foams, produced in absence of organic solvents and chemical foaming agents, with good physico-mechanical properties appear very promising for several applications, for instance in tissue engineering for scaffold production.

  8. [Interaction of Dystamycin Dimeric Analog with Poly(dA) x poly(dT), Poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)] and Duplex O23 at Origin of Replication of the Herpes Simplex Virus].

    PubMed

    Surovaya, A N; Bazhulina, N P; Lepehina, S Yu; Andronova, V L; Galegov, G A; Moiseeva, E D; Grokhovsky, S L; Gursky, G V

    2016-01-01

    The binding of distamycin dimeric analog (Pt-bis-Dst) to poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)1, poly(dA) x poly(dT) and duplex O23 with the sequence 5'-GCCAATATATATATATTATTAGG-3' which is present at the origin of replication of herpes simplex virus OriS is investigated with the use of UV and CD spectroscopy. The distinction of the synthetic polyamide from a natural antibiotic lies in the fact that in the synthetic polyamide there are two distamycin moieties bound via a glycine cis-diamino platinum group. It was shown that the binding of Pt-bis-Dst to poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)] and poly(dA) x poly(dT) reaches saturation if one molecule of the ligand occurs at approximately every 8 bp. With further increase in the ratio of the added ligand to the base pairs in CD spectra of complexes with poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)], we observed that the maximum wavelength band tend to be shifted towards longer wavelengths, while in the spectral region of 290-310 nm a "shoulder", that was absent in the spectra of the complexes obtained at low polymer coverages by the ligand, appeared. At high molar concentration ratios of ligand to oligonucleotide Pt-bis-Dst can bind to poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)] in the form of hairpins or may form associates by the interaction between the distamycin moieties of neighboring molecules of Pt-bis-Dst. The structure of the complexes is stabilized by interactions between pirrolcarboxamide moieties of two molecules of Pt-bis-Dst adsorbed on adjacent overlapping binding sites. These interactions are probably also responsible for the concentration-dependent spectral changes observed during the formation of a complex between Pt-bis-Dst and poly[d(A-T)] x poly[d(A-T)]. Spectral changes are almost absent in binding of Pt-bis-Dst to poly(dA) x poly(dT). Binding of Pt-bis-Dst to duplex O23 reaches saturation if two ligand molecules occur in a duplex that contains a cluster of 18 AT pairs. With increasing the molar concentration ratio of the ligand to the duplex CD

  9. The data acquisition system for a fixed target experiment at NICA complex at JINR and its connection to the ATLAS TileCal readout electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiwa, K. G.; Slepnev, I.; Bazylev, S.

    2015-10-01

    Today's large-scale science projects have always encountered challenges in processing large data flow from the experiments, the ATLAS detector records proton-proton collisions provided by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN every 50 ns which results in a total data flow of 10 Pb/s. These data must be reduced to the science data product for further analysis, thus a very fast decisions need to be executed, to modify this large amounts of data at high rates. The capabilities required to support this scale of data movement is development and improvement of high-throughput electronics. The upgraded LHC will provide collisions at rates that will be at least 10 times higher than those of today due to it's luminosity by 2022. This will require a complete redesign of the read-out electronics and Processing Units (PU) in the Tile-calorimeter (TileCal) of the ATLAS experiment. A general purpose, high-throughput PU has been developed for the TileCal at CERN, by using several ARM-processors in cluster configuration. The PU is capable of handling large data throughput and apply advanced operations at high rates. This system has been proposed for the fixed target experiment at NICA complex to handle the first level processes and event building. The aim of this work is to have a look at the architecture of the data acquisition system (DAQ) of the fixed target experiment at the NICA complex at JINR, by compiling the data-flow requirements of all the subcomponents. Furthermore, the VME DAQ modules characteristics to control, triggering and data acquisition will be described in order to define the DAQ with maximum readout efficiency, no dead time and data selection and compression.

  10. Overview of the chemistry and physics of the Los Angeles aerosol from CIRPAS Twin Otter deployment during CalNex 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hersey, S. P.; Craven, J. S.; Sorooshian, A.; Metcalf, A. R.; Lathem, T. L.; Lin, J. J.; Duong, H. T.; Nenes, A.; Jonsson, H. H.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Calnex Twin Otter

    2010-12-01

    The Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Twin Otter aircraft participated in the 2010 CalNex field experiment, conducting 18 research flights between 4- and 28-May. The aircraft payload included an Aerosol Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS, UC San Diego), Aerodyne Compact Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer (c-ToF-AMS, Caltech), Particle-into-Liquid Sampler coupled with Total Organic Carbon measurement (PILS-TOC, U. of Arizona), Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2), Differential Aerosol Sizing and Hygroscopicity Spectrometer Probe (DASH-SP, Caltech), and a Scanning Flow Condensation Nuclei Analyzer (SF-CCN, Georgia Tech), as well as a suite of Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs, CIRPAS) and Differential Mobility Analyzers (DMAs, Caltech). Flights focused on characterizing aerosol in the Los Angeles (LA) basin, with special attention to the evolution of the aerosol from source-rich to downwind areas. Two flights also probed the aerosol in the agricultural San Joaquin/Bakersfield area. Results indicate that organics and nitrate constitute the majority of the LA aerosol, with sulfate dominating near certain point sources. Aging is evident from AMS and PILS-TOC measurements of the organic aerosol, and nitrate is significantly enhanced in downwind areas. DMA and CPC data suggest that nucleation may occur as the LA plume is transported through basin outflow areas. Hygroscopicity is strongly correlated with incidence of morning marine layer and nitrate mass fraction, suggesting a connection between cloud processing, aerosol aging, and aerosol water uptake characteristics. This talk will present an overview of the CIRPAS Twin Otter deployment during CalNex. The audience is directed to more detailed posters and talks for the Twin Otter platform.

  11. Atmospheric River impacts in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest on 22-24 January 2015 during the CalWater 2015 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaggini, N. G.; Spackman, J. R.; Neiman, P. J.; White, A. B.; Fairall, C. W.; Barnet, C.; Gambacorta, A.; Hughes, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over 30 dropsonde transects were performed across atmospheric rivers (ARs) over the eastern Pacific during CalWater 2015. An event in late January allowed first-of-its-kind coordinated dropsonde transects of an AR using the NOAA G-IV aircraft in tandem with the NOAA Ronald H. Brown (RHB), which observed the marine boundary layer during the passage of this major AR. Dropsonde data collected on 22 January 2015 sampled the early stages of the AR, when the AR began making landfall near Vancouver Island, British Columbia. At the same time the RHB collected precipitation and oceanic moisture flux measurements on the warm side of the AR. A second flight on 24 January 2015 sampled the later stages of the AR, again passing over the RHB stationed beneath the AR. During this later period, the AR axis of moisture shifted north-northeast and fanned out along the coast, affecting regions from Northern Washington to Southern Alaska. Multi-day landfalling AR conditions led to flooding in British Columbia and northern Washington. The influence of the coastal orography combined with the shift in AR orientation is examined to understand the orographic control of precipitation that triggered the flooding. In addition, cross section analysis of the AR using dropsonde and reanalysis data are used to better understand the synoptic influences, water vapor transport, and moisture evolution during the lifecycle of the AR. To gain greater insight into AR development and prolonged AR conditions that led to enhanced flooding, a comparison of aircraft and ship data from CalWater 2015 and NOAA Unique CrIS/ATMS Processing System (NUCAPS) retrievals (integrated water vapor, vertical temperature and moisture profiles, and an experimental ATMS-only rain rate product) will be compared for the 22-24 January period.

  12. Osteoinductive PolyHIPE Foams as Injectable Bone Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer L.; McEnery, Madison A.P.; Pearce, Hannah; Whitely, Michael E.; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J.; Hahn, Mariah S.; Li, Huinan; Sears, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently fabricated biodegradable polyHIPEs as injectable bone grafts and characterized the mechanical properties, pore architecture, and cure rates. In this study, calcium phosphate nanoparticles and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles were incorporated into injectable polyHIPE foams to promote osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Upon incorporation of each type of particle, stable monoliths were formed with compressive properties comparable to control polyHIPEs. Pore size quantification indicated a negligible effect of all particles on emulsion stability and resulting pore architecture. Alizarin red calcium staining illustrated the incorporation of calcium phosphate particles at the pore surface, while picrosirius red collagen staining illustrated collagen-rich DBM particles within the monoliths. Osteoinductive particles had a negligible effect on the compressive modulus (∼30 MPa), which remained comparable to human cancellous bone values. All polyHIPE compositions promoted human MSC viability (∼90%) through 2 weeks. Furthermore, gene expression analysis indicated the ability of all polyHIPE compositions to promote osteogenic differentiation through the upregulation of bone-specific markers compared to a time zero control. These findings illustrate the potential for these osteoinductive polyHIPEs to promote osteogenesis and validate future in vivo evaluation. Overall, this work demonstrates the ability to incorporate a range of bioactive components into propylene fumarate dimethacrylate-based injectable polyHIPEs to increase cellular interactions and direct specific behavior without compromising scaffold architecture and resulting properties for various tissue engineering applications. PMID:26739120

  13. Osteoinductive PolyHIPE Foams as Injectable Bone Grafts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer L; McEnery, Madison A P; Pearce, Hannah; Whitely, Michael E; Munoz-Pinto, Dany J; Hahn, Mariah S; Li, Huinan; Sears, Nicholas A; Cosgriff-Hernandez, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    We have recently fabricated biodegradable polyHIPEs as injectable bone grafts and characterized the mechanical properties, pore architecture, and cure rates. In this study, calcium phosphate nanoparticles and demineralized bone matrix (DBM) particles were incorporated into injectable polyHIPE foams to promote osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Upon incorporation of each type of particle, stable monoliths were formed with compressive properties comparable to control polyHIPEs. Pore size quantification indicated a negligible effect of all particles on emulsion stability and resulting pore architecture. Alizarin red calcium staining illustrated the incorporation of calcium phosphate particles at the pore surface, while picrosirius red collagen staining illustrated collagen-rich DBM particles within the monoliths. Osteoinductive particles had a negligible effect on the compressive modulus (∼30 MPa), which remained comparable to human cancellous bone values. All polyHIPE compositions promoted human MSC viability (∼90%) through 2 weeks. Furthermore, gene expression analysis indicated the ability of all polyHIPE compositions to promote osteogenic differentiation through the upregulation of bone-specific markers compared to a time zero control. These findings illustrate the potential for these osteoinductive polyHIPEs to promote osteogenesis and validate future in vivo evaluation. Overall, this work demonstrates the ability to incorporate a range of bioactive components into propylene fumarate dimethacrylate-based injectable polyHIPEs to increase cellular interactions and direct specific behavior without compromising scaffold architecture and resulting properties for various tissue engineering applications.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of poly(silyl ether)s and modified poly(siloxane)s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabry, Joseph Mark

    Activated dihydridocarbonyltris(triphenylphosphine)ruthenium ( Ru) catalyzes the dehydrogenative silylation condensation copolymerization of ortho-quinones with alpha,o-dihydrido-oligodimethylsiloxanes to give high molecular weight copoly(arylene-1,2-dioxy/oligodimethylsiloxanylene)s in good chemical yield. The hydrosilylation polymerization of aliphatic o-dimethylsilyloxy ketones is also catalyzed by activated Ru to yield unsymmetrical poly(silyl ether)s. Likewise, Ru catalyzes the copolymerization of alpha,o-diketones with alpha,o-dihydrido-oligodimethylsiloxanes to yield symmetrical poly(silyl ether)s. A mechanism of the copolymerizations is proposed, in which beta-hydride elimination is favored over reductive elimination in the reaction of the ortho-quinones. Chiral centers affect the NMR spectra of the poly(silyl ether)s produced by hydrosilylation. The photoluminescence properties of the polymers were studied along with those of model compounds. The decrease in Tgs with increase in siloxane chain length as well as fluorescence spectra is discussed. RuH2(CO)(PPh3)3 (Ru), activated with a stoichiometric amount of styrene, catalyzes the anti-Markovnikov addition of an ortho C-H bond of benzophenone across the C-C double bonds of alpha,o-bis(trimethylsilyloxy)copoly(dimethylsiloxane/vinylmethylsiloxane), alpha,o-bis(vinyldimethsilyloxy)poly(dimethylsiloxane)s, and 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane to yield alpha,o-bis(trimethylsilyloxy)copoly[dimethylsiloxane/2-(2 '-benzophenonyl)ethylmethylsiloxane]s, alpha,o-bis[2-(2 '-benzophenonyl)ethyldimethylsilyloxy]poly(dimethylsiloxane)s, and 1,3-bis[2-(2'-benzophenonyl)ethyl]tetramethyldisiloxane, respectively. While the Mw/Mn and Tgs of the modified polysiloxanes are similar to those of the precursor polymers, an increase in molecular weight is observed upon heating. 1,3-bis[2-(2 '-Benzophenonyl)ethyl]tetramethyldisiloxane, a model compound, was utilized to test a mechanism for the increase in molecular weight. A

  15. Thermal Decomposition and Stabilisation of Poly(vinyl Chloride)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troitskii, B. B.; Troitskaya, L. S.

    1985-08-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the thermal dehydrochlorination of poly(vinyl chloride) and low-molecular-weight chlorohydrocarbons which model various fragments of the polymer molecule, are discussed. Studies designed to determine the qualitative and quantitative compositions of the unstable fragments in poly(vinyl chloride) macromolecules by 13C NMR are examined. Attention is concentrated on the consideration of the mechanism of the action of the most effective thermostabilisers for the polymer - organotin compounds. The principal features of synergism in the stabilisation of poly(vinyl chloride) and the mechanism of the action of synergistic mixtures are analysed. The bibliography includes 107 references.

  16. Biocompatible Bacterial Cellulose-Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) Nanocomposite Films

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Andrea G. P. R.; Figueiredo, Ana R. P.; Alonso-Varona, Ana; Fernandes, Susana C. M.; Palomares, Teodoro; Rubio-Azpeitia, Eva; Barros-Timmons, Ana; Silvestre, Armando J. D.; Pascoal Neto, Carlos; Freire, Carmen S. R.

    2013-01-01

    A series of bacterial cellulose-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films was prepared by in situ radical polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), using variable amounts of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker. Thin films were obtained, and their physical, chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties were evaluated. The films showed improved translucency compared to BC and enhanced thermal stability and mechanical performance when compared to poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA). Finally, BC/PHEMA nanocomposites proved to be nontoxic to human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) and thus are pointed as potential dry dressings for biomedical applications. PMID:24093101

  17. Accumulation of Poly (beta-Hydroxybutyrate) by Halobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Castillo, R; Rodriguez-Valera, F; Gonzalez-Ramos, J; Ruiz-Berraquero, F

    1986-01-01

    Some species of extremely halophilic archaebacteria, Halobacteriaceae, have been shown to accumulate large amounts of poly (beta-hydroxybutyrate) under conditions of nitrogen limitation and abundant carbon source. The production of poly (beta-hydroxybutyrate), at least in large quantities, was restricted to two carbohydrate-utilizing species, Halobacterium mediterranei and H. volcanii. In addition to the nutrients in the media, the salt concentration also influenced poly (beta-hydroxybutyrate) accumulation, which was greater at lower salt concentrations. The possible application of these microorganisms for the production of biodegradable plastics is discussed.

  18. Biocompatible bacterial cellulose-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Andrea G P R; Figueiredo, Ana R P; Alonso-Varona, Ana; Fernandes, Susana C M; Palomares, Teodoro; Rubio-Azpeitia, Eva; Barros-Timmons, Ana; Silvestre, Armando J D; Pascoal Neto, Carlos; Freire, Carmen S R

    2013-01-01

    A series of bacterial cellulose-poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) nanocomposite films was prepared by in situ radical polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), using variable amounts of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) as cross-linker. Thin films were obtained, and their physical, chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties were evaluated. The films showed improved translucency compared to BC and enhanced thermal stability and mechanical performance when compared to poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA). Finally, BC/PHEMA nanocomposites proved to be nontoxic to human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSCs) and thus are pointed as potential dry dressings for biomedical applications.

  19. Behavior of adsorbed Poly-A onto sodium montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Palomino-Aquino, Nayeli; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2015-07-23

    The adsorption of Poly-A (a polynucleotide consisting of adenine, ribose and a phosphate group), onto a clay mineral, was studied to investigate the extent of adsorption, the site of binding, and the capacity of the clay to protect Poly-A, while it is adsorbed onto the clay, from external sources of energy. The results showed that Poly-A presented a high percentage of adsorption at the edges of the clay and that the survival of the polynucleotide was superior to irradiating the polymer in the absence of the clay.

  20. Serological analysis of idiotypic determinants on monoclonal antibodies specific to poly(Tyr,Glu)-poly(DLAla)--poly(Lys) and its ordered analogue (Tyr-Tyr-Glu-Glu)-poly(DLAla)--poly(Lys).

    PubMed Central

    Parhami-Seren, B; Eshhar, Z; Mozes, E

    1984-01-01

    Anti-idiotypic sera (aIds) were raised in C57BL/6 mice against monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) which bind poly(Tyr,Glu)-poly(DLAla)--poly(Lys)--abbreviated to (T,G)-A--L--and (Tyr-Tyr-Glu-Glu)-poly(DLAla)--poly(Lys)--abbreviated to (T-T-G-G)-A--L--(nos. 103 and 160) and McAbs which react only with (T-T-G-G)-A--L (nos. 100 and 114). Anti-Id antibodies against 103 McAb reacted with (T,G)-A--L specific antibodies and specifically inhibited their binding to iodinated antigen. Similarly, conventional antibodies against the major idiotypes of (T,G)-A--L-specific antibodies inhibited the binding of 103 McAb to antigen. It is therefore suggested that 103 McAb shares major idiotypes with (T,G)-A--L-specific polyclonal antibodies of C3H.SW origin. Anti-Ids against 114 McAb also inhibited the binding of (T,G)-A--L-specific antibodies to antigen, but the binding of 114 McAb could not be inhibited by conventional aIds. Therefore, idiotypes of 103 and 114 McAbs define idiotypic determinants expressed on two different subpopulations of (T,G)-A--L-specific antibodies: those that carry major idiotypes and those which express idiotypic determinants other than the major one (minor Ids). Anti-idiotypic sera against McAbs nos. 100 and 160 reacted with the homologous idiotypes and not with the major idiotypes of (T,G)-A--L-specific antibodies. In addition to the aforementioned specificities we could define cross-reactive idiotypes (private) shared by McAbs nos. 100, 103 and 114 McAbs nos. 160 and 114. The analysis of idiotypes expressed on anti-(T,G)-A--L McAbs enabled the detection of new antigen binding site related idiotypic determinants in addition to the major idiotypes which were immunodominant in the polyclonal anti-(T,G)-A--L antibodies. PMID:6198270

  1. Corrigendum to Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust published in Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 81–101, 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; DeMott, Paul J.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Singh, Balwinder; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Tomlinson, Jason M.; White, A.; Prather, Kimberly; Minnis, Patrick; Ayers, J. K.; Min, Qilong

    2014-05-01

    In the paper “Aerosol impacts on California winter clouds and precipitation during CalWater 2011: local pollution versus long-range transported dust” by J. Fan et al., wrong versions of Fig. 8 and Fig. 12 were published. Please find the correct figures below.

  2. Landscape transformations at the dawn of agriculture in southern Syria (10.7-9.9 ka cal. BP): Plant-specific responses to the impact of human activities and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arranz-Otaegui, Amaia; López-Sáez, José Antonio; Araus, José Luis; Portillo, Marta; Balbo, Andrea; Iriarte, Eneko; Gourichon, Lionel; Braemer, Frank; Zapata, Lydia; Ibáñez, Juan José

    2017-02-01

    In southwest Asia, the accelerated impact of human activities on the landscape has often been linked to the development of fully agricultural societies during the middle and late Pre-Pottery Neolithic B (PPNB) period (around 10.2-7.9 ka cal. BP). This work contributes to the debate on the environmental impact of the so-called Neolitisation process by identifying the climatic and anthropogenic factors that contributed to change local and regional vegetation at the time when domesticated plants appeared and developed in southern Syria (around 10.7-9.9 ka cal. BP). In this work a multidisciplinary analysis of plant microremains (pollen and phytoliths) and macroremains (wood charcoal) is carried out along with stable carbon isotope discrimination of wood charcoals in an early PPNB site (Tell Qarassa North, west of the Jabal al-Arab area). Prior to 10.5 ka cal. BP, the results indicate a dynamic equilibrium in the local and regional vegetation, which comprised woodland-steppe, Mediterranean evergreen oak-woodlands, wetland vegetation and coniferous forests. Around 10.5-9.9 ka cal. BP, the elements that regulated the vegetation system changed, resulting in reduced proportions of arboreal cover and the spread of cold-tolerant and wetlands species. Our data show that reinforcing interaction between the elements of the anthropogenic (e.g. herding, fire-related activities) and climatic systems (e.g. temperature, rainfall) contributed to the transformation of early Holocene vegetation during the emergence of fully agricultural societies in southern Syria.

  3. Poly(ionic liquid) superabsorbent for polar organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Horne, W Jeffrey; Andrews, Mary A; Terrill, Kelsey L; Hayward, Spenser S; Marshall, Jeannie; Belmore, Kenneth A; Shannon, Matthew S; Bara, Jason E

    2015-05-06

    A simple, polymerized ionic liquid (poly(IL)) based on methylimidazolium cations tethered to a polystyrene backbone exhibits superabsorbent behavior toward polar organic solvents, most notably propylene carbonate (PC) and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), wherein the poly(IL) was observed to swell more than 390 and 200 times (w/w) its original mass, yet absorbs negligible quantities of water, hexanes, and other solvents, many of which were miscible with the IL monomer. Although solubility parameters and dielectric constants are typically used to rationalize such behaviors, we find that poly(IL)-solvent compatibility is most clearly correlated to solvent dipole moment. Poly(IL) superabsorbency is not reliant upon the addition of a cross-linking agent.

  4. Poly(silyl silane)homo and copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Zeigler, J.M.

    1989-04-11

    Poly(silyl silanes) have been prepared. They have high photosensitivity and show excellent resistance to oxygen-reactive ion etching processes. They are useful as photodepolymerizable photoresists, barrier layers, etc.

  5. Poly(arylene)-based anion exchange polymer electrolytes

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Bae, Chulsung

    2015-06-09

    Poly(arylene) electrolytes including copolymers lacking ether groups in the polymer may be used as membranes and binders for electrocatalysts in preparation of anodes for electrochemical cells such as solid alkaline fuel cells.

  6. Nanomechanics of Poly(catecholamine) Coatings in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chanoong; Huang, Jun; Kim, Sunjin; Lee, Haeshin; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-03-01

    Mussel-inspired self-polymerized catecholamine coatings have been widely utilized as a versatile coating strategy that can be applied to a variety of substrates. For the first time, nanomechanical measurements and an evaluation of the contribution of primary amine groups to poly(catecholamine) coatings have been conducted using a surface-forces apparatus. The adhesive strength between the poly(catecholamine) layers is 30-times higher than that of a poly(catechol) coating. The origin of the strong attraction between the poly(catecholamine) layers is probably due to surface salt displacement by the primary amine, π-π stacking (the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction of indolic crosslinks), and cation-π interactions (the monopole-quadrupole interaction between positively charged amine groups and the indolic crosslinks). The contribution of the primary amine group to the catecholamine coating is vital for the design and development of mussel-inspired catechol-based coating materials.

  7. Novel Synthetic (Poly)Glycerolphosphate-Based Antistaphylococcal Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Quanyi; Dintaman, Jay; Lees, Andrew; Sen, Goutam; Schwartz, David; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Park, Saeyoung; Lee, Jean C.; Mond, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcal infections are a major source of global morbidity and mortality. Currently there exists no antistaphylococcal vaccine in clinical use. Previous animal studies suggested a possible role for purified lipoteichoic acid as a vaccine target for eliciting protective IgG to several Gram-positive pathogens. Since the highly conserved (poly)glycerolphosphate backbone of lipoteichoic acid is a major antigenic target of the humoral immune system during staphylococcal infections, we developed a synthetic method for producing glycerol phosphoramidites to create a covalent 10-mer of (poly)glycerolphosphate for potential use in a conjugate vaccine. We initially demonstrated that intact Staphylococcus aureus elicits murine CD4+ T cell-dependent (poly)glycerolphosphate-specific IgM and IgG responses in vivo. Naive mice immunized with a covalent conjugate of (poly)glycerolphosphate and tetanus toxoid in alum plus CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides produced high secondary titers of serum (poly)glycerolphosphate-specific IgG. Sera from immunized mice enhanced opsonophagocytic killing of live Staphylococcus aureus in vitro. Mice actively immunized with the (poly)glycerolphosphate conjugate vaccine showed rapid clearance of staphylococcal bacteremia in vivo relative to mice similarly immunized with an irrelevant conjugate vaccine. In contrast to purified, natural lipoteichoic acid, the (poly)glycerolphosphate conjugate vaccine itself exhibited no detectable inflammatory activity. These data suggest that a synthetic (poly)glycerolphosphate-based conjugate vaccine will contribute to active protection against extracellular Gram-positive pathogens expressing this highly conserved backbone structure in their membrane-associated lipoteichoic acid. PMID:23649092

  8. Lateglacial vegetation dynamics in the eastern Baltic region between 14,500 and 11,400 cal yr BP: A complete record since the Bølling (GI-1e) to the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veski, Siim; Amon, Leeli; Heinsalu, Atko; Reitalu, Triin; Saarse, Leili; Stivrins, Normunds; Vassiljev, Jüri

    2012-04-01

    This paper discusses a complete record of vegetation history since the Bølling (GI-1e) warming (14,500 cal yr BP) up to the Holocene in Latvia. To date, this is the only complete record of such age in the eastern Baltic area and the northernmost area for which Bølling records are present. Combining pollen evidence, pollen accumulation rates (PAR) and plant macrofossil data, we assess the local and regional vegetation development, and we attempt to separate the true Lateglacial vegetation signal by removing the obviously redeposited thermophilous pollen; however, we remove not only their signal, we discuss the possibilities of separating the redeposition signal of the so-called "local Lateglacial trees", pine and birch, by looking at their corrosion and degradation. The results show that the Bølling warming in the eastern Baltic area was a treeless tundra community consisting of the shrubs Betula nana, Dryas octopetala and Salix polaris. The Older Dryas cold spell is clearly recognised as a decline in the total concentration of plant macrofossils and PARs at between 14,200 and 13,500 cal yr BP. At 13,460 cal yr BP, the B. nana macrofossils disappear, and tree birch (Betula sect. Albae) appears, marking the start of tree birch forest. The presence of pine forest is confirmed by a variety of macrofossils, including bark, wood, needles and seeds, since 13,400 cal yr BP, at the same time at which pine stomata are found. The first identified pine stomata finds are associated with a Pinus PAR over 3000 grains cm-2 yr-1 and pine macrofossil finds with a Pinus PAR over 4000 grains cm-2 yr-1. During the warmest period of the GI-1a (Allerød) at 13,000-12,700 cal yr BP, a pine forest with deciduous trees (birch -Betula pendula and aspen -Populus tremula) developed in the study area. The Younger Dryas (GS-1) cooling strongly affected the floral composition in eastern Latvia. The PAR of the tree taxa declined abruptly from a maximum value at 12,700 to below 1000 grains cm-2

  9. Poly(dA).poly(dT) rich sequences are not sufficient to exclude nucleosome formation in a constitutive yeast promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Losa, R; Omari, S; Thoma, F

    1990-01-01

    It was suggested that poly(dA).poly(dT) rich sequences in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae act as elements of constitutive promoters by exclusion of nucleosomes (Struhl, K. (1985). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 8419-8423). We have mapped the chromatin structure of the pet56-his3-ded1 region in minichromosomes and show that the poly(dA).poly(dT) sequences are located in nuclease sensitive regions. DNA fragments from the nuclease sensitive promoter region of DED1 were used for nucleosome reconstitution in vitro. We show that all sequences can form nucleosome cores and that the poly(dA).poly(dT) sequence can be incorporated in nucleosome cores. The results suggest that the nuclease sensitivity found in vivo is not established by poly(dA).poly(dT) mediated exclusion of nucleosomes. Images PMID:2194162

  10. Unusual Morphologies of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Thin Films Adsorbed on Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Karki, Akchheta; Nguyen, Lien; Sharma, Bhanushee; Yan, Yan; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-05

    Adsorption of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH), 99% and 88% hydrolyzed poly(vinyl acetate), to poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates was studied. The substrates were prepared by covalently attaching linear PDMS polymers of 2, 9, 17, 49, and 116 kDa onto silicon wafers. As the PDMS molecular weight/thickness increases, the adsorbed PVOH thin films progressively transition from continuous to discontinuous morphologies, including honeycomb and fractal/droplet. The structures are the result of thin film dewetting that occurs upon exposure to air. The PVOH film thickness does not vary significantly on these PDMS substrates, implicating the PDMS thickness as the cause for the morphology differences. The adsorbed PVOH thin films are less stable and have a stronger tendency to dewet on thicker, more liquid-like PDMS layers. When PVOH(99%) and PVOH(88%) thin films are compared, fractal and droplet morphologies are observed on high molecular weight PDMS substrates, respectively. The formation of the unique fractal features in the PVOH(99%) thin films as well as other crystalline and semicrystalline thin films is most likely driven by crystallization during the dehydration process in a diffusion-limited aggregation fashion. The only significant enhancement in hydrophilicity via PVOH adsorption was obtained on PDMS(2k), which is completely covered with a PVOH thin film. To mimic the lower receding contact angle and less liquid-like character of the PDMS(2k) substrate, light plasma treatment of the higher molecular weight PDMS substrates was carried out. On the treated PDMS substrates, the adsorbed PVOH thin films are in the more continuous honeycomb morphology, giving rise to significantly enhanced wettability. Furthermore, hydrophobic recovery of the hydrophilized PDMS substrates was not observed during a 1 week period. Thus, light plasma oxidation and subsequent PVOH adsorption can be utilized as a means to effectively hydrophilize conventional PDMS substrates. This study

  11. Initial strength of highpressed extrusion poly-L-lactide screw.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, T; Nakamura, K; Shiro, R; Takazawa, H; Tsuji, K; Kurokawa, T

    2000-01-01

    We developed a poly-L-lactide material strengthened by a highpressed extrusion technique. The bending strength of a rod made of that material is higher than that of the same size rods made of poly-L-lactide strengthened by drawing technique, which has been used in clinical cases. The purposes of this study were, first to clarify if the initial strength of extrusion-strengthened poly-L-lactide screws is higher than that of draw-strengthened poly-L-lactide screws, and, secondly to investigate the safe torque for driving the screws in clinical usage. In accordance with AO screw design, five kinds of screws were manufactured. In a pull-out test and a twisting test using a DYRACON blocks, the strength of the highpressed extrusion-strengthened poly-L-lactide material was also higher than that of the draw-strengthened poly-L-lactide material after milling into screws. In the simulation using minipig bones and the 4.5 mm psi cortical screws, when the thickness was below 0.5 mm, between 0.5 and 2 mm or over 3 mm, the break locations were in the cortical bone, the thread of the screw and the under head fillet respectively. In the simulation using minipig bones and the 4.0 mm psi cancellous screws, breakage occurred not on the screws but on the cancellous bone in all screws.

  12. Improvement of biochemical methods of polyP quantification

    PubMed Central

    Bru, Samuel; Jiménez, Javier; Canadell, David; Ariño, Joaquín; Clotet, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is an abundant and physiologically important biomolecule for virtually any living cell. Therefore, determination of changes in cellular content of polyP is crucial for its functional characterization. Determination of cellular polyP has been performed by many different methods, and the lack of a standardized procedure is possibly responsible for the large dispersion of results found in the relevant literature. For a relatively simple organism, such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this variation can be up to 12-fold. polyP extraction and determination of free phosphate released by enzymatic degradation of the polymer is a method quite common and relatively straightforward for polyP determination. By using the yeast S. cerevisiae as model, we have experimentally evaluated the different steps in this procedure in order to identify critical issues that might explain the disparate reported results. As the main output of this evaluation we propose a straightforward and robust procedure that can be used as gold standard protocol for cellular polyP purification and determination from unicellular organisms, thus providing consistency to measurements and facilitating inter-laboratory comparisons and biological interpretation of the results. PMID:28357384

  13. Preparation of curcumin loaded poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) nanofibers and their in vitro antitumor activity against Glioma 9L cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Gang; Fu, Shaozhi; Zhou, Liangxue; Liang, Hang; Fan, Min; Luo, Feng; Qian, Zhiyong; Wei, Yuquan

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop implantable curcumin-loaded poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL-PEG-PCL, PCEC) nanofibers, which might have potential application in cancer therapy. Curcumin was incorporated into biodegradable PCEC nanofibers by electrospinning method. The surface morphology of the composite nanofibers was characterized on Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The average diameter of the nanofibers was 2.3-4.5μm. In vitro release behavior of curcumin from the fiber mats was also studied in detail. The in vitro cytotoxicity assay showed that the PCEC fibers themselves did not affect the growth of rat Glioma 9L cells. Antitumor activity of the curcumin-loaded fibers against the cells was kept over the whole experiment process, while the antitumor activity of pure curcumin disappeared within 48 h. These results strongly suggested that the curcumin/PCEC composite nanofibers might have potential application for postoperative chemotherapy of brain cancers.

  14. Reactive Poly(Amic Acid)/ Poly(Glycidyl Methacrylate-r-Poly(ethylene Glycol) Methyl Ether Methacrylate) Blends as Gas Permeation Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaulieu, Michael; Watkins, James

    2012-02-01

    Polymers containing polar moieties, such as ether groups show an affinity for acidic gases, such as CO2 due to dipole-quadrapole interactions. Polymer blends in which one of the components is poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) have been studied extensively in literature as a CO2/light gas permeation membrane, but due to the crystallization and poor mechanical properties have been difficult to incorporate PEG above 60wt%. In this study, a series of random copolymers containing both glycidyl methacrylate and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate in different ratios are blended with a poly(amic acid) prepolymer made from 4, 4'-oxydianiline and pyromellitic dianhydride to create gas permeation membranes. By using a reactive blend PEG loadings above 70% have been realized with sufficient mechanical properties, and since the side chain on the PEGMA is short these blends do not suffer from crystallization.

  15. Thermally Switchable Thin Films of an ABC Triblock Copolymer of Poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(2-fluoroethyl methacrylate)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shanju; Liu, Zhan; Bucknall, David G.; He, Lihong; Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy; Allen, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The thermo-responsive behavior of polymer films consisting of novel linear triblock copolymers of poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(2-fluoroethyl methacrylate) (PnBuMA-PMMA-P2FEMA) are reported using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), atomic forcing microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contacting angle (CA) measurements. The surface morphology, wettability and chemical structure of thin films of these triblock copolymers on silicon wafers as a function of temperature have been investigated. It has been shown that the wettability of the films is thermally switchable. Detailed structural analysis shows that thermo-responsive surface composition changes are produced. The underlying mechanism of the thermoresponsive behavior is discussed.

  16. Preparation and characterization of reactive blends of poly(lactic acid), poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol), and poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate)

    SciTech Connect

    Warangkhana, Phromma; Rathanawan, Magaraphan; Jana Sadhan, C.

    2015-05-22

    The ternary blends of poly(lactic acid) (PLA), poly(ethylene-co-vinyl alcohol) (EVOH), and poly(ethylene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) (EGMA) were prepared. The role of EGMA as a compatibilizer was evaluated. The weight ratio of PLA:EVOH was 80:20 and the EGMA loadings were varied from 5-20 phr. The blends were characterized as follows: thermal properties by differential scanning calorimetry, morphology by scanning electron microscopy, and mechanical properties by pendulum impact tester, and universal testing machine. The glass transition temperature of PLA blends did not change much when compared with that of PLA. The blends of PLA/EGMA and EVOH/EGMA showed EGMA dispersed droplets where the latter led to poor impact properties. However, the tensile elongation at break and tensile toughness substantially increased upon addition of EGMA to blends of PLA and EVOH. It was noted in tensile test samples that both PLA and EVOH domains fibrillated significantly to produce toughness.

  17. Preparation of magnetic microspheres based on poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) copolymers by modified solvent diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Men, Ke; Zeng, Shi; Gou, MaLing; Guo, Gang; Gu, Ying Chun; Luo, Feng; Zhao, Xia; Wei, YuQuan; Qian, ZhiYong

    2010-06-01

    Magnetic microspheres have promising application in biomedical field. In this paper, biodegradable poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCEC) triblock copolymers were synthesized by ring-opening polymerization method. Through adjusting the epsilon-CL/PEG weight ratio in feed, PCEC copolymers with different block ratio were obtained. A novel modified solvent diffusion method was described to prepare magnetic PCEC composite microspheres containing magnetite nanoparticles. The particle size of microsphere decreased with increase in the PEG/PCL block ratio. The obtained microspheres could response to external magnetic field. This study described a novel method to prepare magnetic microspheres. The obtained magnetic polymeric microspheres might have potential application in drug delivery system or disease diagnosis field.

  18. Thermally switchable thin films of an ABC triblock copolymer of poly( n -butyl methacrylate)-poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(2-fluoroethyl methacrylate)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shanju; Liu, Zhan; Bucknall, David G.; He, Lihong; Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy W.; Allen, Mark G.

    2011-09-01

    The thermo-responsive behavior of polymer films consisting of novel linear triblock copolymers of poly( n-butyl methacrylate)-poly(methyl methacrylate)-poly(2-fluoroethyl methacrylate) (PnBuMA-PMMA-P2FEMA) are reported using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), atomic forcing microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contacting angle (CA) measurements. The surface morphology, wettability and chemical structure of thin films of these triblock copolymers on silicon wafers as a function of temperature have been investigated. It has been shown that the wettability of the films is thermally switchable. Detailed structural analysis shows that thermo-responsive surface composition changes are produced. The underlying mechanism of the thermoresponsive behavior is discussed.

  19. Inhibition of invasion and migration by newly synthesized quinazolinone MJ-29 in human oral cancer CAL 27 cells through suppression of MMP-2/9 expression and combined down-regulation of MAPK and AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Hour, Mann-Jen; Amagaya, Sakae; Lu, Kung-Wen; Lin, Jing-Pin; Tang, Nou-Ying; Lee, Tsung-Han; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-07-01

    Anti-metastasis by reducing cellular migration and invasion and by deregulating the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) is a therapeutic approach for cancer treatment. The objective of this study focused on the effects of the novel compound 6-pyrrolidinyl-2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-4-quinazolinone (MJ-29) regarding anti-metastatic actions on human oral squamous cell carcinoma CAL 27 cells and on the verification of the underlying related molecular mechanisms of this event. MJ-29 concentration- and time-dependently caused a suppression of cell adhesive ability utilizing cell adhesion assay; it also inhibited the migration and invasion of CAL 27 cells using scratch wound closure and transwell invasion assays in a concentration-dependent response. Importantly, we confirmed that the applied concentration range of MJ-29 exhibited no dramatic influence of cytotoxicity on CAL 27 cells using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. MJ-29 also attenuated the enzymatic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Furthermore, we found that activation of their upstream protein kinases, by MJ-29, potentially exerted an inhibitory effect on the phosphorylated protein levels of extracellular regulated protein kinase 1/2, p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, as well as serine/threonine kinase AKT by MJ-29 in CAL 27 cells. The expression of RAS and focal adhesion kinase was also down-regulated in MJ-29-treated CAL 27 cells. Collectively, these findings provide further evidence for the molecular signaling basis of the effects of MJ-29 on suppression of migration and invasion which might be useful as a therapeutic strategy to treat human oral cancer.

  20. Topological characterization of nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) bionanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, A. H.; Dasan, Y. K.; Khan, Ihsan Ullah; Ahmad, Faiz; Ayoub, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the morphological and barrier properties of nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) bionanocomposites. Nanocrystalline cellulose was isolated from waste oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber using Sulphuric acid hydrolysis. Chemical modifications of nanocrystalline cellulose was performed to allow good compatibilization between fiber and the polymer matrices and also to improve dispersion of fillers. Bionanocomposite materials were produced from these nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) using solvent casting and evaporation techniques. The properties of extracted nanocrystalline cellulose were examined using FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer, TEM and AFM. Besides that, the properties of bionanocomposites were examined through FESEM and oxygen permeability properties analysis. Better barrier and morphological properties were obtained for nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced bionanocomposites than for neat polymer blend.

  1. Poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) particles as versatile carrier platforms for vaccine delivery.

    PubMed

    Pavot, Vincent; Berthet, Morgane; Rességuier, Julien; Legaz, Sophie; Handké, Nadège; Gilbert, Sarah C; Paul, Stéphane; Verrier, Bernard

    2014-12-01

    The development of safe and effective vaccines for cancer and infectious diseases remains a major goal in public health. Over the last two decades, controlled release of vaccine antigens and immunostimulant molecules has been achieved using nanometer or micron-sized delivery vehicles synthesized using biodegradable polymers. In addition to achieving a depot effect, enhanced vaccine efficacy using such delivery vehicles has been attributed to efficient targeting of antigen presenting cells such as dendritic cells. Biodegradable and biocompatible poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymers belong to one such family of polymers that have been a popular choice of material used in the design of these delivery vehicles. This review summarizes research findings from ourselves and others highlighting the promise of poly(lactic acid)- and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-based vaccine carriers in enhancing immune responses.

  2. Predictive model for segmented poly(urea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, P. J.; Cornish, R.; Frankl, P.; Lewtas, I.

    2012-08-01

    Segmented poly(urea) has been shown to be of significant benefit in protecting vehicles from blast and impact and there have been several experimental studies to determine the mechanisms by which this protective function might occur. One suggested route is by mechanical activation of the glass transition. In order to enable design of protective structures using this material a constitutive model and equation of state are needed for numerical simulation hydrocodes. Determination of such a predictive model may also help elucidate the beneficial mechanisms that occur in polyurea during high rate loading. The tool deployed to do this has been Group Interaction Modelling (GIM) - a mean field technique that has been shown to predict the mechanical and physical properties of polymers from their structure alone. The structure of polyurea has been used to characterise the parameters in the GIM scheme without recourse to experimental data and the equation of state and constitutive model predicts response over a wide range of temperatures and strain rates. The shock Hugoniot has been predicted and validated against existing data. Mechanical response in tensile tests has also been predicted and validated.

  3. Poly(phenylene alkylene)-based lonomers

    DOEpatents

    Hibbs, Michael R.

    2017-01-03

    A composition and method of forming a composition including a compound including a poly(phenylene) backbone represented by the following formula: ##STR00001## wherein each of R.sub.1, R.sub.2 and R.sub.3 may be the same or different and is H or an unsubstituted or inertly-substituted aromatic moiety; wherein Ar.sub.1 is an unsubstituted or inertly-substituted aromatic moiety; wherein R.sub.4 is an alkylene, perfluoroalkyl, polyethylene glycol, or polypropylene glycol moiety; wherein each of R.sub.6, R.sub.7, R.sub.8, R.sub.9, R.sub.10 and R.sub.11 is H or a monovalent hydrocarbon group including two to 18 carbon atoms, with the proviso that each R.sub.6, R.sub.7, R.sub.8, R.sub.9, R.sub.10 and R.sub.11 cannot be H; and wherein each of Y.sub.6, Y.sub.7, Y.sub.8, Y.sub.9, Y.sub.10 and Y.sub.11 may be the same or different and is H or a functional group are disclosed. The composition can be used as anion-exchange membranes and as an electrode binder material in anion exchange membrane fuel cells.

  4. Poly-L-histidine downregulates fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Chu, Arthur J; Mathews, Suresh T

    2003-10-01

    The elevated level of histidine-rich glycoprotein was considered a risk factor of inherited thrombophilia. However, the mode of action remains largely unclear. In the current study, we employ poly-l-histidine (PLH) mimicking the histidine-rich region and determine whether PLH modulates urokinase (uPA)-dependent fibrinolysis. In an in vitro model, turbidity appearance and clearance monitored fibrin polymer formation and lysis, respectively. Fibrin polymer formed upon fibrinogen incubation with thrombin. In the presence of uPA or plasmin, fibrin polymer lysis took place in a dose-dependent manner as a function of time. We demonstrated that PLH significantly downregulated uPA-dependent fibrinolysis. PLH had no effect on plasminogen activation, as evidenced by no inhibitions on either uPA amidolytic activity or plasmin formation derived from its zymogen. Nor did PLH show any inhibition on plasmin amidolytic activity. PLH caused a profound delay of plasmin-dependent fibrinolysis upon pre-incubation of either plasmin or fibrinogen with PLH. The observations taken together suggest that the complex [plasmin-PLH-fibrin] formation significantly delayed plasmin-dependent fibrinolysis.

  5. Hydrothermal carbonization of poly(vinyl chloride).

    PubMed

    Poerschmann, J; Weiner, B; Woszidlo, S; Koehler, R; Kopinke, F-D

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization in subcritical water at 180-260 °C. Dehydrochlorination increased with increasing reaction temperature. The release of chlorine was almost quantitative above ∼235 °C. The fraction of organic carbon (OC) recovered in the hydrochar decreased with increasing operating temperature from 93% at 180 °C to 75% at 250 °C. A wide array of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) could be detected in the aqueous phase, but their combined concentration amounted to only ∼140 μg g(-1) PVC-substrate at 240 °C. A pathway for the formation of cyclic hydrocarbons and O-functionalized organics was proposed. Chlorinated hydrocarbons including chlorophenols could only be identified at trace levels (low ppb). Polychlorinated dibenzodioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) could not be detected. The sorption potential of the hydrochar turned out to be very low, in particular for polar organic pollutants. Our results provide strong evidence that hydrothermal carbonization of household organic wastes which can be tied to co-discarded PVC-plastic residues is environmentally sound regarding the formation of toxic organic products. Following these findings, hydrothermal treatment of PVC-waste beyond operating temperatures of ∼235 °C to allow complete release of organic chlorine should be further pursued.

  6. Degradation behavior of poly(glycerol sebacate).

    PubMed

    Pomerantseva, Irina; Krebs, Nicholas; Hart, Alison; Neville, Craig M; Huang, Albert Y; Sundback, Cathryn A

    2009-12-15

    Poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS), a promising scaffold material for soft tissue engineering applications, is a soft, tough elastomer with excellent biocompatibility. However, the rapid in vivo degradation rate of PGS limits its use as a scaffold material. To determine the impact of crosslink density on degradation rate, a family of PGS materials was synthesized by incrementally increasing the curing time from 42 to 144 h, at 120 degrees C and 10 mTorr vacuum. As expected, PGS became a stiffer, tougher, and stronger elastomer with increasing curing time. PGS disks were subcutaneously implanted into rats and periodically harvested; only mild tissue responses were observed and the biocompatibility remained excellent. Regardless of crosslink density, surface erosion degradation was observed. The sample dimensions linearly decreased with implantation time, and the mass loss rates were constant after 1-week implantation. As surface erosion degradation frequently correlates with enzymatic digestion, parallel in vitro digestion studies were conducted in lipase solutions which hydrolyze ester bonds. Enzymatic digestion played a significant role in degrading PGS, and the mass loss rates were not a function of curing time. Alternative chemistry approaches will be required to decrease the enzymatic hydrolysis rate of the ester bonds in PGS polymers.

  7. Block poly(ester-urethane)s based on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) and poly(3-hydroxyhexanoate-co-3-hydroxyoctanoate).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhifei; Cheng, Shaoting; Xu, Kaitian

    2009-04-01

    A series of block poly(ester-urethane) poly(3/4HB-HHxHO) urethanes (abbreviated as PUHO) based on poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-4-hydroxybutyrate) (P3/4HB-diol) and poly(3-hydroxyhexanoate-co-3-hydroxyoctanoate) (PHHxHO-diol) segments were synthesized by a facile way of melting polymerization using 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) as the coupling agent, with different 3HB, 4HB, HHxHO compositions and segment lengths. The chemical structure, molecular weight and distribution were systematically characterized by (1)H, (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum (NMR), two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (COSY ((1)H, (13)C) NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The thermal property was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The hydrophilicity was investigated by static contact angle of water and CH(2)I(2). DSC revealed that the poly(3/4HB-HHxHO) urethanes are almost amorphous with a little crystallinity (less than 6%) and T(g) from -23 degrees C to -3 degrees C. The polyurethanes are more hydrophobic (water contact angle 88 degrees -117 degrees ) than the P3/4HB and PHHxHO raw materials. The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and platelet adhesion determination showed that the obtained polyurethanes have much higher platelet adhesion property than raw materials and common biodegradable polymers polylactic acid (PLA) and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB). Hydrophobicity and crystallinity degree are important factors to affect the platelet adhesion. All the properties can be tailored by changing the composition and segment length of prepolymers P3/4HB-diol and PHHxHO-diol.

  8. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked... substance identified generically as a polymer of alkane-polyol and polyalkylpolyisocyanatocarbomonocy-...

  9. 40 CFR 721.6660 - Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl... Polymer of alkanepolyol and poly-alkyl-poly-iso-cyan-ato-car-bo-mo-no-cycle, acetone oxime-blocked... substance identified generically as a polymer of alkane-polyol and polyalkylpolyisocyanatocarbomonocy-...

  10. Surface-exposure ages of Front Range moraines that may have formed during the Younger Dryas, 8.2 cal ka, and Little Ice Age events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benson, L.; Madole, R.; Kubik, P.; McDonald, R.

    2007-01-01

    Surface-exposure (10Be) ages have been obtained on boulders from three post-Pinedale end-moraine complexes in the Front Range, Colorado. Boulder rounding appears related to the cirque-to-moraine transport distance at each site with subrounded boulders being typical of the 2-km-long Chicago Lakes Glacier, subangular boulders being typical of the 1-km-long Butler Gulch Glacier, and angular boulders being typical of the few-hundred-m-long Isabelle Glacier. Surface-exposure ages of angular boulders from the Isabelle Glacier moraine, which formed during the Little Ice Age (LIA) according to previous lichenometric dating, indicate cosmogenic inheritance values ranging from 0 to ???3.0 10Be ka.11Surface-exposure ages in this paper are labeled 10Be; radiocarbon ages are labeled 14C ka, calendar and calibrated radiocarbon ages are labeled cal ka, and layer-based ice-core ages are labeled ka. 14C ages, calibrated 14C ages, and ice core ages are given relative to AD 1950, whereas 10Be ages are given relative to the sampling date. Radiocarbon ages were calibrated using CALIB 5.01 and the INTCAL04 data base Stuiver et al. (2005). Ages estimated using CALIB 5.01 are shown in terms of their 1-sigma range. Subangular boulders from the Butler Gulch end moraine yielded surface-exposure ages ranging from 5 to 10.2 10Be ka. We suggest that this moraine was deposited during the 8.2 cal ka event, which has been associated with outburst floods from Lake Agassiz and Lake Ojibway, and that the large age range associated with the Butler Gulch end moraine is caused by cosmogenic shielding of and(or) spalling from boulders that have ages in the younger part of the range and by cosmogenic inheritance in boulders that have ages in the older part of the range. The surface-exposure ages of eight of nine subrounded boulders from the Chicago Lakes area fall within the 13.0-11.7 10Be ka age range, and appear to have been deposited during the Younger Dryas interval. The general lack of inheritance in

  11. Comparison of Mixed Layer Heights from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar, Ground-based Measurements, and the WRP-Chem Model during CalNex and CARES

    SciTech Connect

    Scarino, Amy Jo; Obland, Michael; Fast, Jerome D.; Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Berg, Larry K.; Lefer, Barry; Haman, C.; Hair, John; Rogers, Ray; Butler, Carolyn; Cook, A. L.; Harper, David

    2014-06-05

    The California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) and Carbonaceous Aerosol and Radiative Effects Study (CARES) field campaigns during May and June 2010 provided a data set appropriate for studying characteristics of the planetary boundary layer (PBL). The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) was deployed to California onboard the NASA LaRC B-200 aircraft to aid incharacterizing aerosol properties during these two field campaigns. Measurements of aerosol extinction (532 nm), backscatter (532 and 1064 nm), and depolarization (532 and 1064 nm) profiles during 31 flights, many in coordination with other research aircraft and ground sites, constitute a diverse data set for use in characterizing the spatial and temporal distribution of aerosols, as well as the depth and variability of the daytime mixed layer (ML), which is a subset within the PBL. This work illustrates the temporal and spatial variability of the ML in the vicinity of Los Angeles and Sacramento, CA. ML heights derived from HSRL measurements are compared to PBL heights derived from radiosonde profiles, ML heights measured from ceilometers, and simulated PBL heights from the Weather Research and Forecasting Chemistry (WRF-Chem) community model. Comparisons between the HSRL ML heights and the radiosonde profiles in Sacramento result in a correlation coefficient value (R) of 0.93 (root7 mean-square (RMS) difference of 157 m and bias difference (HSRL radiosonde) of 5 m). HSRL ML heights compare well with those from the ceilometer in the LA Basin with an R of 0.89 (RMS difference of 108 m and bias difference (HSRL Ceilometer) of -9.7 m) for distances of up to 30 km between the B-200 flight track and the ceilometer site. Simulated PBL heights from WRF-Chem were compared with those obtained from all flights for each campaign, producing an R of 0.58 (RMS difference of 604 m and a bias difference (WRF-Chem HSRL) of -157 m) for CalNex and 0

  12. In-Situ observations of speciated organics in gas and particle phases: CalNex2010 Bakersfield and Los Angeles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, A. H.; Gentner, D. R.; Isaacman, G. A.; Worton, D. R.; Zhao, Y.; Weber, R.; Kreisberg, N. M.; Hering, S. V.; Williams, B. J.; Hohaus, T.; Jayne, J.; Lambe, A.; Williams, L. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; CalNex Bakersfield Science Team

    2010-12-01

    To identify the major sources and formation mechanisms of organic aerosol in polluted urban regions, we measured a wide range of gas phase and particle phase organics during the Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) 2010 experiment at the Bakersfield and Pasadena supersites. The CalNex supersites included an extensive array of co-located observations with cutting edge measurement technologies. This talk will highlight the observations of speciated organics and how they can be used to 1) identify the main emission sources linked with primary and secondary organic aerosol (SOA), 2) identify individual and classes of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs) indicative of specific source categories and transformation processes, and 3) examine the gas/particle partitioning of specific SVOCs and the parameters which influence their uptake into SOA, such as meteorological (T, RH, etc), or chemical composition (aerosol organic carbon mass, aerosol acidity, etc.). The complex chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols, particularly the organic carbon portion, presents unique measurement challenges. We developed the Thermal Desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (TAG) system for hourly in-situ speciation of a wide range of primary and secondary species including alkanes, aldehydes, ketones, PAHs, monocarboxylic acids, and many more. Recently, we incorporated two-dimensional chromatography (GC×GC) into TAG (2DTAG) enhancing our chromatographic separation power by including polarity separation following volatility separation. We have also developed a combined TAG-AMS (Aerosol Mass Spectrometer) instrument for simultaneous measurements of the total and speciated aerosol composition. Observations reported from Bakersfield include ambient concentrations of ~250 species of VOCs measured hourly via in-situ gas chromatography containing 1-17 C atoms and a variety of functional groups (e.g. aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, halogens, sulfur

  13. Millennial-Scale Climate Variability during the Last 28 cal. ka BP in the Tyrrhenian Sea (central Sector of Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amore, F. Ornella; Palumbo, Eliana; Elderfield, Henry; Perugia, Carmen; Emanuele, Dario; Petrillo, Zaccaria

    2014-05-01

    High resolution reconstructions of coccolithophore assemblages and plankton carbon and oxygen stable isotope data from Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Hole 974D have been studied to investigate climate variability in the Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean) during the last 28 cal. ka BP. The main climatic signal is showed by coccolithophore assemblages and isotopic records at glacial/interglacial timescale. Through the application of statistical analyses, a possible role of half and fourth precession cycles was hypothesised, more likely linked to the influence of the Equator insolation on central sector of Western Mediterranean circulation. The occurrence of abrupt coolings, more likely connected to Northern Hemisphere global climatic changes, was hypothesised also in the Tyrrhenian Sea during the Last Glacial (LG) and the Holocene, highlighted by the occurrence of the subpolar species Coccolithus pelagicus pelagicus. The events of the LG occurred in correspondence of the Dansgaard/Oeschger (D/O) stadial at 28 cal. ka BP and Heinrich event 2. The Holocene events were quite synchronous with several Bond Cycles and Rapid Climate Changes. In addition, marine warm phases, coincident with the D/O interstadial 2 and the Bølling-Allerød interval, were recognised at ODP Hole 974D by increases of warm species. Furthermore, during the Younger Dryas, oxygen stable isotope record indicates the occurrence of a cooling while coccolithophore assemblages testify increased nutrient conditions, highlighted by the group of small Gephyrocapsa. During the transition to the Holocene a latitudinal warming was observed, through the comparison of available data from coccolithophore assemblages of other sites of the Tyrrhenian Sea (Sbaffi et al., 2001; Buccheri et al., 2002; Amore et al., 2004). The latitudinal warming moved northward versus the central part of the basin, reaching the maximum amplitude in correspondence of Tyrrhenian Holocene Climatic Optimum (Buccheri et al., 2002). Other

  14. Three-dimensional structure and evolution of the Sierra Barrier Jet: A CalWater case study from 14-16 February 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingsmill, D.; Neiman, P. J.; Yuter, S. E.; Hughes, M. R.; Moore, B.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are narrow corridors of enhanced water vapor transport within extratropical cyclones. Although focused research during the last few years has yielded quantitative linkages between ARs and both the regional water supply and extreme precipitation events, questions remain regarding the modification and redistribution of precipitation in ARs by California's coastal mountains and Sierra Nevada. For example, rain rates are strongly correlated with the magnitude of the cross-barrier flow (and hence water vapor flux and uplift) at upper windward slope locations. However, at lowland locations they are poorly correlated due to the influence of low-level barrier airflows within the atmosphere. The most important of these barrier airflows is likely the Sierra Barrier Jet (SBJ), which is a dominant feature in Sierra Nevada storms. Winds reaching the mountain range often are partially stalled and, in part, diverted along the range rather than directed up and over. Knowledge of the impact of the resulting terrain-parallel barrier jets on orographic storms remains elusive. An incomplete understanding of the physics of and joint interactions between ARs and blocked flows limits our ability to identify the factors affecting the distribution and intensity of precipitation in California's Central Valley and along the Sierra's windward slopes. This study addresses these issues. The most recent CalWater field campaign took place in northern California during the winter of 2011. A wide array of aerosol, cloud physics and meteorological measurements were collected. Documentation of SBJs and associated ARs was facilitated by a suite of scanning and profiling Doppler radars (wind retrievals and precipitation structure), balloon soundings (in situ thermodynamic and wind measurements) and GPS receivers (integrated water vapor retrievals). This presentation will provide an overview of the three-dimensional structure and evolution of the SBJ and AR observed during 14

  15. Aerosol Impacts on California Winter Clouds and Precipitation during CalWater 2011: Local Pollution versus Long-Range Transported Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Leung, L.; DeMott, P. J.; Comstock, J. M.; Singh, B.; Rosenfeld, D.; Tomlinson, J. M.; White, A. B.; Prather, K. A.; Minnis, P.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust aerosols often observed over California in winter/spring, associated with long-range transport from Asia and Sahara, have been linked to enhanced precipitation based on observations. Local anthropogenic pollution, on the other hand, was shown in previous observational and modeling studies to reduce precipitation. Here we incorporate recent developments in ice nucleation parameterizations to link aerosols with ice crystal formation in a spectral-bin cloud microphysical model coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, to examine the relative and combined impacts of dust and local pollution particles on cloud properties and precipitation type and intensity. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. Simulations are carried out for two cloud cases with contrasting meteorology and cloud dynamics that occurred on February 16 (FEB16) and March 02 (MAR02) from the CalWater 2011 field campaign. In both cases, observations show the presence of dust or dust/biological particles in a relative pristine environment. The simulated cloud microphysical properties and precipitation show reasonable agreement with aircraft and surface measurements. Model sensitivity experiments indicate that in the pristine environment, the dust/biological aerosol layers increase the accumulated precipitation by 10-20% from the Central Valley to the Sierra Nevada Mountains for both FEB06 and MAR02 due to a ~40% increase in snow formation, validating the observational hypothesis. Model results show that local pollution increases precipitation over the windward slope of the mountains by few percent due to increased snow formation when dust is present but reduces precipitation by 5-8% if dust is removed on FEB16. The effects of local pollution on cloud microphysics and precipitation strongly depend on meteorology including

  16. Solid-state synthesis of poly(3',4'-dimethoxy-2,2':5',2"- terthiophene): comparison with poly(terthiophene) and poly(3',4'-ethylenedioxy-2,2':5',2"- terthiophene).

    PubMed

    Abdiryim, Tursun; Jamal, Ruxangul; Ubul, Aminam; Nurulla, Ismayil

    2012-07-23

    A new terthiophene monomer: 3',4'-dimethoxy-2,2':5',2"-terthiophene (TMT) was synthesized and characterized by ¹H-NMR, ¹³C-NMR and FTIR. The solid-state oxidative polymerizations of TMT were performed in various ratios of oxidant (FeCl₃) to monomer (TMT). The resulting polymers were characterized by ¹H-NMR, FTIR, UV-vis-NIR, GPC, X-ray diffraction, CV, as well as TGA and conductivity measurements. The structure and properties of poly (TMT) were compared with those of polyterthiophene [poly(TT)] and poly (3',4'-ethylenedioxy-2,2':5',2"-terthiophene) [poly(TET)] prepared under the same polymerization conditions. After comparative analysis with poly(TT) and poly(TET), the effects of the dimethoxy substituent and FeCl₃ on the structural and physicochemical properties of the poly(TMT)s were discussed in depth. The comparison suggested that the dimethoxy-substituted polymer did not display higher crystallinity, thermal stability, conductivity and electrochemical activity than ethylenedioxy substituted one. The results also showed that the effect of FeCl₃ on poly(TMT) was similar that seen with the poly(TT), in which the oxidation degree, electrochemical activity and conductivity increased steadily with increasing [FeCl₃/[TT] ratio. Furthermore, the poly(TMT) and poly(TT) are mostly made up of dimers with a small amount of higher molecular weight components.

  17. Anisotropic Poly (glycerol sebacate)-Poly (ε-caprolactone) Electrospun Fibers Promote Endothelial Cell Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K.; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Sant, Shilpa; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Topographical cell guidance is utilized to engineer highly organized and aligned cellular constructs for numerous tissue engineering applications. Recently, electrospun scaffolds fabricated using poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) have shown a great promise to support valvular interstitial cell functions for the development of tissue engineered heart valves. However, one of the major drawbacks of PGS-PCL scaffolds is the lack of control over cellular alignment. In this work we investigate the role of scaffold architecture on the endothelial cell alignment, proliferation and formation of organized cellular structures. In particular, PGS-PCL scaffolds with randomly oriented and highly aligned fibers with tunable mechanical properties were fabricated using electrospinning technique. After one week of culture, endothelial cells on the aligned scaffolds exhibit higher proliferation compared to those cultures on randomly oriented fibrous scaffolds. Furthermore, the endothelial cells reorganize in response to the topographical features of anisotropic scaffolds forming highly organize cellular constructs. Thus, the topographical contact guidance, provided by aligned PGS-PCL scaffolds, is envisioned to be useful in developing aligned cellular structures for vascular tissue engineering. PMID:25516556

  18. Preparation and characterization of poly(L-lactide)-co-poly(trimethylene carbonate)/talc film.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiyi; Qin, Yuyue; Yuan, Minglong; Xue, Jing; Cao, Jianxin; Wu, Yan; Yuan, Mingwei

    2013-11-01

    Poly(L-lactide)-co-poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PLLA-PTMC) composites with various talc content as food packaging materials were prepared by solvent casting method. The effect of talc filler loading (0, 1, 2, and 3 wt%) on phase morphology of PLLA-PTMC/Talc composites and improvement in resulting properties were reported. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curves indicated that the crystallinity of PLLA-PTMC/Talc composites increased. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) suggested that there were strong interactions between PLLA-PTMC copolymer and talc filler. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) image of composite films revealed certain homogeneity between PLLA-PTMC and Talc, when the talc filler did not exceed 3 wt%. The elongation at break of composite films significantly (p<0.05) improved with the addition of talc filler. Furthermore, there were 23%, 31%, and 14% improvement in water vapor barrier properties at 1, 2, and 3 wt% of talc in PLLA-PTMC/Talc composites, respectively. This had been confirmed by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  19. Insulin/poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) Complexes: Physicochemical Properties and Protein Encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Pippa, Natassa; Kalinova, Radostina; Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Pispas, Stergios; Demetzos, Costas

    2015-06-04

    Insulin (INS) was encapsulated into complexes with poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(L-lysine) (PEG-b-PLys), which is a polypeptide-based block copolymer (a neutral-cationic block polyelectrolyte). The particular cationic-neutral block copolymer can complex INS molecules in aqueous media via electrostatic interactions. Light-scattering techniques are used to study the complexation process and structure of the hybrid nanoparticles in a series of buffers, as a function of protein concentration. The physicochemical and structural characteristics of the complexes depend on the ionic strength of the aqueous medium, while the concentration of PEG-b-PLys was constant through the series of solutions. As INS concentration increased the size distribution of the complexes decreased, especially at the highest ionic strength. The size/structure of complexes diluted in biological medium indicated that the copolymer imparts stealth properties and colloidal and biological stability to the complexes, features that could in turn affect the clearance properties in vivo. Therefore, these studies could be a rational roadmap for designing the optimum complexes/effective nanocarriers for proteins and peptides.

  20. GaAs nanowire/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) hybrid solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jiun-Jie; Shiu, Shu-Chia; Hung, Shih-Che; Lin, Ching-Fuh

    2010-07-16

    In this paper, a new type of hybrid solar cell based on a heterojunction between poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and vertically aligned n-type GaAs nanowire (NW) arrays is investigated. The GaAs NW arrays are fabricated by directly performing the nano-etching of GaAs wafer with spun-on SiO(2) nanospheres as the etch mask through inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etching. The PEDOT:PSS adheres to the surface of the GaAs NW arrays to form a p-n junction. The morphology of GaAs NW arrays strongly influences the characteristics of the GaAs NW/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cells. The suppression of reflectance and the interpenetrating heterojunction interface of GaAs NW arrays offers great improvements in efficiency relative to a conventional planar cell. Compared to the planar GaAs/PEDOT:PSS cells, the power conversion efficiency under AM 1.5 global one sun illumination is improved from 0.29% to 5.8%.

  1. Anisotropic poly (glycerol sebacate)-poly (ϵ-caprolactone) electrospun fibers promote endothelial cell guidance.

    PubMed

    Gaharwar, Akhilesh K; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Sant, Shilpa; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-12-17

    Topographical cell guidance is utilized to engineer highly organized and aligned cellular constructs for numerous tissue engineering applications. Recently, electrospun scaffolds fabricated using poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) and poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) have shown a great promise to support valvular interstitial cell functions for the development of tissue engineered heart valves. However, one of the major drawbacks of PGS-PCL scaffolds is the lack of control over cellular alignment. In this work, we investigate the role of scaffold architecture on the endothelial cell alignment, proliferation and formation of organized cellular structures. In particular, PGS-PCL scaffolds with randomly oriented and highly aligned fibers with tunable mechanical properties were fabricated using electrospinning technique. After one week of culture, endothelial cells on the aligned scaffolds exhibited higher proliferation compared to those cultures on randomly oriented fibrous scaffolds. Furthermore, the endothelial cells reorganized in response to the topographical features of aligned scaffolds forming highly organized cellular constructs. Thus, topographical contact guidance, provided by aligned PGS-PCL scaffolds, is envisioned to be useful in developing cellular structures for vascular tissue engineering.

  2. Pulse Responses of the Conducting Polymer Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): Poly(styrenesulfonate)-Based Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fei; Li, Xiaojun; Li, Sizhao; Chang, Chiating; Hu, Yuandong

    2017-03-01

    Pulse responses were studied for the heterojunctions within the structure of Ti/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)/Ti. The pulse response was found to resemble that of the action potential after the pulse width was modulated to a time scale of nanoseconds. Using the pulse as a stimulation protocol to simulate synaptic plasticity produced spike rate-dependent plasticity-like phenomena. Thus, the application scope of this conducting polymer-based memristor can be extended from a time scale of milliseconds to one of nanoseconds, depending on the requirement of neuromorphic circuits. Current oscillations were observed with a period within 100 ns. The mechanisms of the behavior response were analyzed according to memristor protocol. An interface barrier is thought to primarily account for the origin of the capacitive feature and the charge q, i.e., one of the basic characteristic of the memristor. The chain structure of this conducting polymer should primarily account for the origin of its inductive feature and the flux φ, i.e., another basic characteristic of the memristor.

  3. Poly(ɛ-caprolactone) composites reinforced by biodegradable poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) fiber.

    PubMed

    Ju, Dandan; Han, Lijing; Li, Fan; Chen, Shan; Dong, Lisong

    2014-06-01

    Biodegradable and biosourced poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) fiber was used as a reinforcing agent, and environment friendly poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) composites were prepared by melt compounding. The mechanical properties, rheological properties, and enzymatic degradation of the PCL composites were investigated in detail. With the addition of PHBV fibers, the PCL composites showed increased tensile yielding strength and modulus. Especially, the storage modulus from the results of dynamic mechanical analysis was increased significantly, suggesting that PCL was obviously reinforced by adding PHBV fibers. With increasing the PHBV fiber content, the complex viscosity and modulus of PCL increased, especially at low frequencies, indicating that a network structure was formed in the composites. The network structure resulted in evident solid-like response due to the restriction of the chain mobility of PCL matrix, which was further confirmed by the Han and Cole-Cole plots. The morphology, evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, indicated PCL and PHBV fiber were not highly incompatible and the interfacial adhesion was good, which was beneficial to the reinforcement effect. The biodegradability of the PCL was significantly promoted after composites preparation. Such studies are of great interest in the development of environment friendly composites from biodegradable polymers.

  4. Mixed poly(dopamine)/poly(L-lysine) (composite) coatings: from assembly to interaction with endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lynge, Martin E; Teo, Boon M; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Städler, Brigitte

    2015-08-01

    Engineered polymer films are of significant importance in the field of biomedicine. Poly(dopamine) (PDA) is becoming more and more a key player in this context. Herein, we deposited mixed films consisting of PDA and poly(L-lysine) (PLL) of different molecular weights. The coatings were characterized by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The protein adsorption to the mixed films was found to decrease with increasing amounts of PLL. PDA/PLL capsules were also successfully assembled. Higher PLL content in the membranes reduced their thickness while the ζ-potential increased. Further, endothelial cell adhesion and proliferation over 96 h were found to be independent of the type of coating. Using PDA/PLL in liposome-containing composite coatings showed that sequential deposition of the layers yielded higher liposome trapping compared to one-step adsorption except for negatively charged liposomes. Association/uptake of fluorescent cargo by adherent endothelial cells was found to be different for PDA and PDA/PLL films. Taken together, our findings illustrate the potential of PDA/PLL mixed films as coatings for biomedical applications.

  5. Highly-branched poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) as a component in poly(dopamine) films.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Teo, Boon M; Postma, Almar; Ercole, Francesca; Ogaki, Ryosuke; Zhu, Meifang; Städler, Brigitte

    2013-09-12

    Mixed one-step poly(dopamine) (PDA)/highly branched poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNiPAAm) coatings have been assembled and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) depending on the deposition temperature below and above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the pNiPAAm. Mixed films were confirmed. The protein adsorption at 24 °C was found to be reduced with increasing amount of pNiPAAm in the mixed coatings, while there was no difference observed for proteins deposition at 39 °C. Further, the ability of these mixed coatings in comparison to the pure PDA and pNiPAAm films to serve as capping layer for surface-immobilized zwitterionic or positively charged liposomes has been assessed by QCM-D. The adhesion of hepatocytes, macrophages, and myoblast to these liposomes-containing hybrid coatings and the uptake of fluorescent lipids from the surface by the adhering cells depending on the capping layers were compared. The latter aspect was found to be dependent on the used capping layer and the type of liposome as carrier for the fluorescent lipid, with the highest uptake found for positive liposomes and pure pNiPAAm as capping layer. Taken together, the assembled hybrid coatings have the potential to be used as functional coatings toward surface-mediated drug delivery.

  6. On the Electrical Conductivity of Poly(vinylchloride)/poly(ethylene Oxide) Blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasr, G. M.; El-Wahab, S. M. Abd; El-Athem, A. Abd

    2013-03-01

    Physical blending of different polymers is a very popular, simple and economical method of preparing composite with desirable and useful properties. The electrical conductivity of blends of amorphous poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) with semicrystalline poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in the form of thin films has been measured by studying the I-V characteristics at room temperature and temperature dependence of the sample conductivity. The results are presented in the form of I-V characteristics and analysis has been made by interpretation of Poole Frenkel, Fowler-Nordheim and Schottky-Richardson plots. The analysis of these results suggests that Schottky - Richardson mechanism are primarily responsible for the observed conduction. Meanwhile, the percolation concentration of PEO in PVC matrix was found to be round 10%. Furthermore, the mechanism of electrical transport in this system is examined in temperature range 300-350K. The temperature dependence of conductivity gives evidence for the charge carriers transport mechanism via the occurred agreement of experimental results with the employed hopping models.

  7. Multiphase blends from poly(L-lactide) and poly(methyl mathacrylate).

    PubMed

    Le, Kim-Phuong; Lehman, Richard; Remmert, Jessica; Vanness, Kenneth; Ward, Paula Marie L; Idol, James D

    2006-01-01

    Melt processing of poly(L-lactide) (PLLA) and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) was conducted over a targeted range of compositions with PLLAs of 118 and 316 kDa in molecular mass to identify morphologies and the phase relationships in these blends. These blends are of interest for use in biomaterials and the morphologies are critical for tissue-engineering studies where biodegradability, pore connectivity and surface texture control tissue viability and adhesion. Simple extrusion of the two polymers produced multiphase blends with an average domain size near 25 microm. Scanning electron microscopy and dynamic mechanical analysis demonstrated that these blends are immiscible, at least in a metastable sense, and regions of co-continuous structures were identified. Such co-continuous, which occurred generally in accordance with rheology prediction models, exhibit a fine interconnected structure that appears effective for fabricating certain biomaterials. A broad and unexpected transition appears in these blends, as measured by modulated differential scanning calorimetry between 70 and 100 degrees C, which may be the glass transition temperature of an alloy phase. The magnitude of this transition is greatest in the fine-structured co-continuous composition region of blends, suggesting the presence of a complex or other derivative of the two primary phases.

  8. Biologic activities of poly (2-azaadenylic acid) and poly (2-azainosinic acid).

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, E; Huang, G F; Torrence, P F; Fukui, T; Kakiuchi, N; Ikehara, M

    1977-01-01

    Poly (2-azaadenylic acid) [(aza2A)n] and poly(2-azainosinic acid [(aza2I)n], two newly synthesized analogues of (A)n and (I)n, in which CH-2 of the purine ring is replaced by a nitrogen atom, have been evaluated in various biological assay systems. (Aza2A) n formed a complex with (U)n and (br5U)n, and (aza2I)n formed a complex with (C)n and (br5C)n, but these complexes were markedly destabilized relative to the corresponding (A)n or (I)n complexes. The (aza2A)n-and (aza2I)n-derived complexes failed to stimulate the production of interferon in primary rabbit kidney cells and human diploid fibroblasts, under conditions (A)n. (U)n, (I)n. (C)n and (I)n. (br5C)n induced high amounts of interferon. both (aza2A)n and (aza2I)n exerted a marked inhibitory effect on the endogenous RNA directed DNA polymerase (reverse transcriptase) activity associated with murine leukemia virus. They caused a relatively mild inhibition of complement activity in an hemolytic assay system. PMID:73166

  9. Megaporous poly(hydroxy ethylmethacrylate) based poly(glycidylmethacrylate-N-methacryloly-(L)-tryptophan) embedded composite cryogel.

    PubMed

    Türkmen, Deniz; Bereli, Nilay; Derazshamshir, Ali; Perçin, Işık; Shaikh, Huma; Yılmaz, Fatma

    2015-06-01

    One-step activation, purification, and stabilization of lipase enzyme were performed by using composite hydrophobic support at low ionic strength with increased surface area during embedding process. A novel hydrophobic poly(hydroxyethylmethacrylate) [PHEMA] based, poly(glycidyl methacrylate-N-methacryloly-(L)-tryptophan) [PGMATrp] bead embedded composite cryogel membrane having specific surface area of 195m(2)/g was used as hydrophobic matrix for adsorption of commercial Candida Rugosa lipase in a continuous system. PGMATrp embedded PHEMA cryogel membrane with 60-100 μm pore size was obtained by dispersion polymerization of GMA and MATrp to form PGMATrp beads followed by embedding of PGMATrp to HEMA via APS and TEMED redox pair. The introduction of hydrophobic MATrp monomer into bead structure aiming to increase interaction between lipase and composite membrane was estimated using nitrogen stoichiometry of elemental analysis and found to be 239 μmol/g of polymer. Hydophobicity increment due to embedding process was confirmed by measuring contact angle, it was found 42° and 48.4° for the PHEMA and PHEMA/PGMATrp composite cryogel respectively. Some parameters i.e. pH, flow-rate, protein concentration, temperature, salt type and ionic intensity were evaluated on the adsorption capacity in a continuous system. Fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) studies were performed for specific adsorption of lipase onto the PHEMA/PGMATrp embedded composite cryogel membrane.

  10. Accelerated Amidization of Branched Poly(ethylenimine)/Poly(acrylic acid) Multilayer Films by Microwave Heating.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kehua; Gu, Yuanqing; Zhang, Huan; Qiang, Zhe; Vogt, Bryan D; Zacharia, Nicole S

    2016-09-13

    Chemical cross-linking of layer-by-layer assembled films promotes mechanical stability and robustness in a wide variety of environments, which can be a challenge for polyelectrolyte multilayers in saline environments or for multilayers made from weak polyelectrolytes in environments with extreme pHs. Heating branched poly(ethylenimine)/poly(acrylic acid) (BPEI/PAA) multilayers at sufficiently high temperatures drives amidization and dehydration to covalently cross-link the film, but this reaction is rather slow, typically requiring heating for hours for appreciable cross-linking to occur. Here, a more than one order of magnitude increase in the amidization kinetics is realized through microwave heating of BPEI/PAA multilayers on indium tin oxide (ITO)/glass substrates. The cross-linking reaction is tracked using infrared spectroscopic ellipsometry to monitor the development of the cross-linking products. For thick films (∼1500 nm), gradients in cross-link density can be readily identified by infrared ellipsometry. Such gradients in cross-link density are driven by the temperature gradient developed by the localized heating of ITO by microwaves. This significant acceleration of reactions using microwaves to generate a well-defined cross-link network as well as being a simple method for developing graded materials should open new applications for these polymer films and coatings.

  11. Longitudinal acoustic properties of poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Parker, N G; Mather, M L; Morgan, S P; Povey, M J W

    2010-10-01

    Acoustics offers rich possibilities for characterizing and monitoring the biopolymer structures being employed in the field of biomedical engineering. Here we explore the rudimentary acoustic properties of two common biodegradable polymers: poly(lactic acid) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid). A pulse-echo technique is developed to reveal the bulk speed of sound, acoustic impedance and acoustic attenuation of small samples of the polymer across a pertinent temperature range of 0-70 °C. The glass transition appears markedly as both a discontinuity in the first derivative of the speed of sound and a sharp increase in the acoustic attenuation. We further extend our analysis to consider the role of ethanol, whose presence is observed to dramatically modify the acoustic properties and reduce the glass transition temperature of the polymers. Our results highlight the sensitivity of acoustic properties to a range of bulk properties, including visco-elasticity, molecular weight, co-polymer ratio, crystallinity and the presence of plasticizers.

  12. Crystal Morphology of Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) on Amorphous Poly(vinylphenol) Substrate.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Gao, Nan; Li, Quan; Zhang, Jidong; Yang, Xiaoqiu; Ren, Zhongjie; Yan, Shouke

    2016-04-26

    The crystalline morphology and orientation of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) thin film on the poly(vinylphenol) (PVPh) sublayer with different thickness was studied by atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy. PVPh sublayer influences the morphology of PHB greatly. Although edge-on lamellae form on both Si and PVPh surfaces at relatively lower crystallization temperature, the morphology of them is quite different. It appears as sheaflike edge-on lamellar morphology on PVPh sublayer. In addition, the edge-on lamellae prefer to form on the PVPh sublayers at much higher crystallization temperature compared with that on Si wafer. The PVPh layer thickness also influences the crystalline morphology of PHB. On a 30 nm thick PVPh layer, sheaflike edge-on lamellae form in a wide range of crystallization temperatures. When the PVPh thickness increases to 65 nm, fingerlike morphology is observed when the crystallization temperature is lower than 95 °C. The fingerlike morphology is caused by a diffusion-limited aggregation process, and it requires an optimum condition. Thickness ratio between PHB and PVPh sublayer and temperature are two key factors for the formation of fingerlike morphology.

  13. Immiscible poly(lactic acid)/poly(ε-caprolactone) for temporary implants: Compatibility and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Finotti, Pablo F M; Costa, Lidiane C; Capote, Ticiana S O; Scarel-Caminaga, Raquel M; Chinelatto, Marcelo A

    2017-01-31

    This manuscript focuses on the effect of the addition of a low molecular weight triblock copolymer derived from ε-caprolactone and tetrahydrofuran (CT) on the compatibility and cytotoxicity of immiscible poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) blends. Binary and tertiary PLA/PCL blends were prepared by melt mixing in a twin-screw extruder and their morphological, mechanical and thermal behaviors were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), tensile and Izod impact test, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). SEM micrographs showed the CT copolymer suppressed the coalescence phenomena and maintained the size of dispersed PCL domains at approximately 0.35µm. Bioresorbable PLA/PCL blends containing 5wt% of CT copolymer exhibited a remarkable increase in ductility and improved toughness at room temperature. Although the CT copolymer increased the interfacial adhesion, the DMA results suggest it also acts as a plasticizer exclusively for the PCL phase. The cell viability evaluated by the XTT assay confirmed PLA/PCL blends compatibilized by CT copolymer exerted no cytotoxic effect.

  14. Surface dilational moduli of poly (ethylene oxide), poly (methyl methacrylate), and their blend films.

    PubMed

    Kato, Satoaki; Kawaguchi, Masami

    2012-10-15

    Surface dilational moduli of poly (ethylene oxide) (PEO), poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), and compatible PEO/PMMA blend films spread at the air-water interface were investigated as a function of surface concentration. The surface dilational modulus of an expanded PEO film increased as the surface concentration increased to 0.4 mg/m(2), which corresponds to the limiting surface area of PEO. After peaking at this value, the surface dilational modulus decreased with an increase in the PEO concentration. Lissajous orbits of PEO films exhibited positive hysteresis loops for all surface concentration ranges. On the other hand, the surface dilational modulus of a condensed PMMA film steeply increased as the surface concentration increased. Lissajous orbits of PMMA films changed from positive hysteresis loops to negative loops at the surface concentration at which the surface pressure reached in the plateau region. The magnitude of the surface dilational modulus of PMMA was larger than that of PEO at a fixed surface concentration. The surface dilational moduli of the PEO/PMMA blend films increased with the total surface concentration and their magnitudes were less than those of the individual PMMA films and larger than those of the individual PEO films at fixed surface concentrations. Lissajous orbits of the PEO/PMMA blend films also changed from positive hysteresis loops to negative loops beyond the surface concentration at which the plateau surface pressure of PEO was attained.

  15. Poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) depolymerase of Pseudomonas lemoignei.

    PubMed

    Schöber, U; Thiel, C; Jendrossek, D

    2000-04-01

    Pseudomonas lemoignei is equipped with at least five polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) depolymerase structural genes (phaZ1 to phaZ5) which enable the bacterium to utilize extracellular poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB), poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHV), and related polyesters consisting of short-chain-length hxdroxyalkanoates (PHA(SCL)) as the sole sources of carbon and energy. Four genes (phaZ1, phaZ2, phaZ3, and phaZ5) encode PHB depolymerases C, B, D, and A, respectively. It was speculated that the remaining gene, phaZ4, encodes the PHV depolymerase (D. Jendrossek, A. Frisse, A. Behrends, M. Andermann, H. D. Kratzin, T. Stanislawski, and H. G. Schlegel, J. Bacteriol. 177:596-607, 1995). However, in this study, we show that phaZ4 codes for another PHB depolymeraes (i) by disagreement of 5 out of 41 amino acids that had been determined by Edman degradation of the PHV depolymerase and of four endoproteinase GluC-generated internal peptides with the DNA-deduced sequence of phaZ4, (ii) by the lack of immunological reaction of purified recombinant PhaZ4 with PHV depolymerase-specific antibodies, and (iii) by the low activity of the PhaZ4 depolymerase with PHV as a substrate. The true PHV depolymerase-encoding structural gene, phaZ6, was identified by screening a genomic library of P. lemoignei in Escherichia coli for clearing zone formation on PHV agar. The DNA sequence of phaZ6 contained all 41 amino acids of the GluC-generated peptide fragments of the PHV depolymerase. PhaZ6 was expressed and purified from recombinant E. coli and showed immunological identity to the wild-type PHV depolymerase and had high specific activities with PHB and PHV as substrates. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a PHA(SCL) depolymerase gene that is expressed during growth on PHV or odd-numbered carbon sources and that encodes a protein with high PHV depolymerase activity. Amino acid analysis revealed that PhaZ6 (relative molecular mass [M(r)], 43,610 Da) resembles precursors of other

  16. Heat capacity of poly(trimethylene terephthalate)

    SciTech Connect

    Pyda, M.; Boller, A.; Wunderlich, B. |; Grebowicz, J.; Chuah, H.

    1997-12-01

    Thermal analysis of poly(trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) has been carried out using standard differential scanning calorimetry and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry. Heat capacities of the solid and liquid states of semicrystalline PTT are reported from 190 K to 570 K. The semicrystalline PTT has a glass transition temperature of about 331 K. Between 460 K and 480 K, PTT shows an exothermic ordering. The melting endotherm occurs between 480 K and 505 K with an onset temperature of 489.15 K (216 C). The heat of fusion of typical semicrystalline samples is 13.8 kJ/mol. For 100% crystalline PTT the heat of fusion is estimated to be 28--30 kJ/mol. The heat capacity of solid PTT is linked to an approximate group vibrational spectrum, and the Tarasov equation is used to estimate the skeletal vibrational heat capacity ({Theta}{sub 1} = 542 K and {Theta}{sub 3} = 42 K). A comparison of calculation and experimental heat capacities show agreement of better than {+-}2% between 190--300 K. The experimental heat capacity of liquid PTT can be expressed as a linear function of temperature: C{sub p} {sup L}(exp) = 211.6 + 0.434 T J/(K mol) and compares well with estimations from the ATHAS data bank using group contributions of other polymers with the same constituent groups ({+-} 0.5%). The change of heat capacity at T{sub g} of amorphous PTT has been estimated from the heat capacities of liquid and solid to be 86.4 J/(K mol). Knowing C{sub p} of the solid, liquid, and the transition parameters, the thermodynamic functions: enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs function were obtained.

  17. Zwitterionic Poly(amino acid methacrylate) Brushes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A new cysteine-based methacrylic monomer (CysMA) was conveniently synthesized via selective thia-Michael addition of a commercially available methacrylate-acrylate precursor in aqueous solution without recourse to protecting group chemistry. Poly(cysteine methacrylate) (PCysMA) brushes were grown from the surface of silicon wafers by atom-transfer radical polymerization. Brush thicknesses of ca. 27 nm were achieved within 270 min at 20 °C. Each CysMA residue comprises a primary amine and a carboxylic acid. Surface zeta potential and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies of the pH-responsive PCysMA brushes confirm that they are highly extended either below pH 2 or above pH 9.5, since they possess either cationic or anionic character, respectively. At intermediate pH, PCysMA brushes are zwitterionic. At physiological pH, they exhibit excellent resistance to biofouling and negligible cytotoxicity. PCysMA brushes undergo photodegradation: AFM topographical imaging indicates significant mass loss from the brush layer, while XPS studies confirm that exposure to UV radiation produces surface aldehyde sites that can be subsequently derivatized with amines. UV exposure using a photomask yielded sharp, well-defined micropatterned PCysMA brushes functionalized with aldehyde groups that enable conjugation to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Nanopatterned PCysMA brushes were obtained using interference lithography, and confocal microscopy again confirmed the selective conjugation of GFP. Finally, PCysMA undergoes complex base-catalyzed degradation in alkaline solution, leading to the elimination of several small molecules. However, good long-term chemical stability was observed when PCysMA brushes were immersed in aqueous solution at physiological pH. PMID:24884533

  18. Bayesian chronological analyses consistent with synchronous age of 12,835–12,735 Cal B.P. for Younger Dryas boundary on four continents

    PubMed Central

    Kennett, James P.; Kennett, Douglas J.; Culleton, Brendan J.; Aura Tortosa, J. Emili; Bischoff, James L.; Bunch, Ted E.; Daniel, I. Randolph; Erlandson, Jon M.; Ferraro, David; Firestone, Richard B.; Goodyear, Albert C.; Israde-Alcántara, Isabel; Johnson, John R.; Jordá Pardo, Jesús F.; Kimbel, David R.; LeCompte, Malcolm A.; Lopinot, Neal H.; Mahaney, William C.; Moore, Andrew M. T.; Moore, Christopher R.; Ray, Jack H.; Stafford, Thomas W.; Tankersley, Kenneth Barnett; Wittke, James H.; Wolbach, Wendy S.; West, Allen

    2015-01-01

    The Younger Dryas impact hypothesis posits that a cosmic impact across much of the Northern Hemisphere deposited the Younger Dryas boundary (YDB) layer, containing peak abundances in a variable assemblage of proxies, including magnetic and glassy impact-related spherules, high-temperature minerals and melt glass, nanodiamonds, carbon spherules, aciniform carbon, platinum, and osmium. Bayesian chronological modeling was applied to 354 dates from 23 stratigraphic sections in 12 countries on four continents to establish a modeled YDB age range for this event of 12,835–12,735 Cal B.P. at 95% probability. This range overlaps that of a peak in extraterrestrial platinum in the Greenland Ice Sheet and of the earliest age of the Younger Dryas climate episode in six proxy records, suggesting a causal connection between the YDB impact event and the Younger Dryas. Two statistical tests indicate that both modeled and unmodeled ages in the 30 records are consistent with synchronous deposition of the YDB layer within the limits of dating uncertainty (∼100 y). The widespread distribution of the YDB layer suggests that it may serve as a datum layer. PMID:26216981

  19. On the Temperature Dependence and Decadal Trends of Ozone in the San Joaquin Valley: Constraints from Measurements at the CalNex-Bakersfield Supersite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusede, S. E.; Gentner, D. R.; Wooldridge, P. J.; Browne, E. C.; Guha, A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Thomas, J.; Brune, W. H.; DiGangi, J. P.; Henry, S. B.; Keutsch, F. N.; Beaver, M. R.; St Clair, J. M.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cohen, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    Emissions and concentrations of organic molecules and nitrogen oxides (NOx) associated with passenger vehicles have been dramatically reduced over the last decade. In a recent analysis, Pusede and Cohen (2012) show that in California's San Joaquin Valley ozone has decreased in response to reductions in the organic reactivity (VOCR) at moderate temperatures throughout the Valley, but that at the hottest temperatures the effects of VOCR changes are modest or not at all apparent, particularly in the southern San Joaquin. To identify and quantify this uncontrolled, high-temperature VOCR source, we combine PAMS network measurements from six sites in the southern and central San Joaquin and the extensive suite of radical, trace gas, and reactivity observations collected in the summer of 2010 in Bakersfield during the CalNex field intensive. We find alcohols and aldehydes increase dramatically with temperature, becoming the largest contribution to VOCR of the observed organics. We also find evidence for a high-temperature VOCR source that is not accounted for by the available measurements of alcohols, aldehydes, and other organic molecules. Observations of total alkyl nitrates imply a very low nitrate yield per unit VOCR and provide an additional constraint on possible sources of this missing reactivity. We use these results to interpret inter-annual and temperature dependent trends in the frequency of ozone exceedances in the San Joaquin and to predict the response to additional VOCR and/or NOx emission controls in the region.

  20. PI3Kδ inhibitor, GS-1101 (CAL-101), attenuates pathway signaling, induces apoptosis, and overcomes signals from the microenvironment in cellular models of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Meadows, Sarah A; Vega, Francisco; Kashishian, Adam; Johnson, Dave; Diehl, Volker; Miller, Langdon L; Younes, Anas; Lannutti, Brian J

    2012-02-23

    GS-1101 (CAL-101) is an oral PI3Kδ-specific inhibitor that has shown preclinical and clinical activity in non-Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. To investigate the potential role of PI3Kδ in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), we screened 5 HL cell lines and primary samples from patients with HL for PI3Kδ isoform expression and constitutive PI3K pathway activation. Inhibition of PI3Kδ by GS-1101 resulted in the inhibition of Akt phosphorylation. Cocultures with stroma cells induced Akt activation in HL cells, and this effect was blocked by GS-1101. Conversely, production of the stroma-stimulating chemokine, CCL5, by HL cells was reduced by GS-1101. GS-1101 also induced dose-dependent apoptosis of HL cells at 48 hours. Reductions in cell viability and apoptosis were enhanced when combining GS-1101 with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. Our findings suggest that excessive PI3Kδ activity is characteristic in HL and support clinical evaluation of GS-1101, alone and in combination, as targeted therapy for HL.