Science.gov

Sample records for 2012-10-01 false physician

  1. 42 CFR 412.46 - Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... diagnoses and major procedures performed, as evidenced by the physician's entries in the patient's medical... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Medical review requirements: Physician... Capital-Related Costs § 412.46 Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement. (a) Basis....

  2. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  3. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  4. 42 CFR 88.12 - Physician's determination of WTC-related health conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Physician's determination of WTC-related health... Physician's determination of WTC-related health conditions. (a) A physician in a Clinical Center of Excellence or a member of the nationwide provider network shall promptly transmit to the WTC...

  5. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  6. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  7. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  8. 42 CFR 415.130 - Conditions for payment: Physician pathology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... pathology services. (a) Definitions. The following definitions are used in this section. (1) Covered... technical component of physician pathology services to fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who...

  9. 42 CFR 415.70 - Limits on compensation for physician services in providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limits on compensation for physician services in providers. 415.70 Section 415.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS...

  10. 42 CFR 414.24 - Review, revision, and addition of RVUs for physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Review, revision, and addition of RVUs for physician services. 414.24 Section 414.24 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL...

  11. 42 CFR 410.26 - Services and supplies incident to a physician's professional services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to a physician's professional services: Conditions. 410.26 Section 410.26 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI)...

  12. 42 CFR 21.23 - False statements as disqualification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false False statements as disqualification. 21.23 Section 21.23 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES PERSONNEL COMMISSIONED OFFICERS Appointment § 21.23 False statements as disqualification. Willfully false...

  13. 48 CFR 52.214-4 - False Statements in Bids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false False Statements in Bids. 52.214-4 Section 52.214-4 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses...

  14. Behind the physician licensure numbers: false impressions, retirement crisis, and migration.

    PubMed

    Olchanski, V; Marsland, D W; Rossiter, L F; Johnson, R E

    1998-01-01

    This communication examines the supply of primary-care physicians at the state level. It shows that the number of actively practicing physicians is considerably less than the number of licensed physicians; the age distribution of primary-care physicians has a bulge in the ages younger than 50, and this bulge may lead in the near future to an unexpected increase in physician attrition due to retirement; and, at the state level, migration may be playing the dominant role in determining the total supply of primary-care physicians.

  15. 45 CFR 3.4 - False reports and reports of injury or damage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false False reports and reports of injury or damage. 3.4 Section 3.4 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONDUCT OF PERSONS AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE General § 3.4 False reports...

  16. 47 CFR 0.560 - Penalty for false representation of identity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Penalty for false representation of identity. 0.560 Section 0.560 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMISSION ORGANIZATION Privacy Act Regulations § 0.560 Penalty for false representation of identity. Any individual who...

  17. 47 CFR 11.45 - Prohibition of false or deceptive EAS transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prohibition of false or deceptive EAS transmissions. 11.45 Section 11.45 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Organization § 11.45 Prohibition of false or deceptive EAS transmissions. No person...

  18. 47 CFR 80.335 - Procedures for canceling false distress alerts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for canceling false distress alerts. 80.335 Section 80.335 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Safety Watch Requirements and Procedures...

  19. 42 CFR 5a.2 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Applicability. 5a.2 Section 5a.2 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS RURAL PHYSICIAN... Public Health Service Act....

  20. 42 CFR 414.64 - Payment for medical nutrition therapy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for medical nutrition therapy. 414.64... Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.64 Payment for medical nutrition therapy. (a) Payment under the physician fee schedule. Medicare payment for medical nutrition therapy is made under the physician...

  1. 42 CFR 415.120 - Conditions for payment: Radiology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Radiology services. 415.120... Physician Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.120 Conditions for payment: Radiology services. (a) Services to beneficiaries. The carrier pays for radiology services furnished by a physician to...

  2. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  3. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public... Anesthesia services. (a) General rule. (1) For services furnished prior to January 1, 2010, an unreduced physician fee schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia...

  4. False assumptions.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, M

    1997-01-01

    Indian women do not have to be told the benefits of breast feeding or "rescued from the clutches of wicked multinational companies" by international agencies. There is no proof that breast feeding has declined in India; in fact, a 1987 survey revealed that 98% of Indian women breast feed. Efforts to promote breast feeding among the middle classes rely on such initiatives as the "baby friendly" hospital where breast feeding is promoted immediately after birth. This ignores the 76% of Indian women who give birth at home. Blaming this unproved decline in breast feeding on multinational companies distracts attention from more far-reaching and intractable effects of social change. While the Infant Milk Substitutes Act is helpful, it also deflects attention from more pressing issues. Another false assumption is that Indian women are abandoning breast feeding to comply with the demands of employment, but research indicates that most women give up employment for breast feeding, despite the economic cost to their families. Women also seek work in the informal sector to secure the flexibility to meet their child care responsibilities. Instead of being concerned about "teaching" women what they already know about the benefits of breast feeding, efforts should be made to remove the constraints women face as a result of their multiple roles and to empower them with the support of families, governmental policies and legislation, employers, health professionals, and the media.

  5. 42 CFR 410.17 - Cardiovascular disease screening tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cardiovascular disease screening tests. 410.17... § 410.17 Cardiovascular disease screening tests. (a) Definition. For purposes of this subpart, the... Part B covers cardiovascular disease screening tests when ordered by the physician who is treating...

  6. 42 CFR 415.176 - Renal dialysis services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Renal dialysis services. 415.176 Section 415.176 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... § 415.176 Renal dialysis services. In the case of renal dialysis services, physicians who are not...

  7. 42 CFR 57.2206 - Grant award.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Grant award. 57.2206 Section 57.2206 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Physician Shortage Area...

  8. 42 CFR 411.389 - Range of the advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Range of the advisory opinion. 411.389 Section 411.389 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.389 Range of the...

  9. 42 CFR 411.380 - When CMS issues a formal advisory opinion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When CMS issues a formal advisory opinion. 411.380... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.380 When CMS issues a formal advisory opinion. (a) CMS considers an advisory opinion to be issued once it has received...

  10. 42 CFR 411.386 - CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS's advisory opinions as exclusive. 411.386... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.386 CMS's advisory... described in § 411.370. CMS has not and does not issue a binding advisory opinion on the subject matter...

  11. 42 CFR 411.379 - When CMS accepts a request.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false When CMS accepts a request. 411.379 Section 411.379... Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.379 When CMS accepts a request. (a) Upon receiving a request for an advisory opinion, CMS promptly makes an initial determination of whether...

  12. 42 CFR 411.382 - CMS's right to rescind advisory opinions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false CMS's right to rescind advisory opinions. 411.382... Relationships Between Physicians and Entities Furnishing Designated Health Services § 411.382 CMS's right to rescind advisory opinions. Any advice CMS gives in an opinion does not prejudice its right to...

  13. 42 CFR 414.56 - Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse... AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.56 Payment for nurse practitioners' and clinical nurse specialists' services. (a) Rural areas. For services furnished beginning January...

  14. 42 CFR 414.54 - Payment for certified nurse-midwives' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for certified nurse-midwives' services. 414... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.54 Payment for certified nurse-midwives' services. (a... under section 1833(a)(1)(K) of the Act for the payment of certified nurse-midwife services may...

  15. 45 CFR 51.1 - Purpose.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Purpose. 51.1 Section 51.1 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CRITERIA FOR EVALUATING COMPREHENSIVE PLAN TO REDUCE RELIANCE ON ALIEN PHYSICIANS § 51.1 Purpose. The purpose of this regulation is to...

  16. 42 CFR 57.2208 - Payment of scholarship grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment of scholarship grant. 57.2208 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Physician Shortage Area Scholarship Grants § 57.2208 Payment of scholarship grant. The portion of a scholarship...

  17. 42 CFR 57.2207 - Amount of scholarship grant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Amount of scholarship grant. 57.2207 Section 57... CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Physician Shortage Area Scholarship Grants § 57.2207 Amount of scholarship grant. (a) The amount of the...

  18. 42 CFR 57.2205 - Priority for selection of scholarship recipients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Priority for selection of scholarship recipients... GRANTS GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF TEACHING FACILITIES, EDUCATIONAL IMPROVEMENTS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND STUDENT LOANS Physician Shortage Area Scholarship Grants § 57.2205 Priority for selection of...

  19. 42 CFR 493.1850 - Laboratory registry.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Laboratory registry. 493.1850 Section 493.1850... registry. (a) Once a year CMS makes available to physicians and to the general public specific information...) The laboratory registry is compiled for the calendar year preceding the date the information is...

  20. 42 CFR 422.202 - Participation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Participation procedures. 422.202 Section 422.202... Participation procedures. (a) Notice and appeal rights. An MA organization that operates a coordinated care plan or network MSA plan must provide for the participation of individual physicians, and the...

  1. 42 CFR 414.46 - Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.46 Additional rules for payment of anesthesia services... the value for each anesthesia code that reflects all activities other than anesthesia time....

  2. 42 CFR 59a.5 - Awards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Awards. 59a.5 Section 59a.5 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE GRANTS Grants... number of graduate and undergraduate students, and physicians and other practitioners in...

  3. 42 CFR 415.190 - Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching hospitals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in... Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.190 Conditions of payment: Assistants at surgery in teaching... a fee schedule basis for the services of an assistant at surgery in a teaching hospital....

  4. 42 CFR 414.30 - Conversion factor update.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Conversion factor update. 414.30 Section 414.30 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians...

  5. 42 CFR 414.26 - Determining the GAF.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determining the GAF. 414.26 Section 414.26 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM (CONTINUED) PAYMENT FOR PART B MEDICAL AND OTHER HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and...

  6. 42 CFR 483.360 - Consultation with treatment team physician.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Consultation with treatment team physician. 483.360... treatment team physician. If a physician or other licensed practitioner permitted by the state and the... the resident's treatment team physician, unless the ordering physician is in fact the...

  7. 42 CFR 414.50 - Physician or other supplier billing for diagnostic tests performed or interpreted by a physician...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physician or other supplier billing for diagnostic tests performed or interpreted by a physician who does not share a practice with the billing physician... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.50 Physician or other supplier billing...

  8. 42 CFR 414.50 - Physician or other supplier billing for diagnostic tests performed or interpreted by a physician...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Physician or other supplier billing for diagnostic tests performed or interpreted by a physician who does not share a practice with the billing physician... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.50 Physician or other supplier billing...

  9. 22 CFR 62.27 - Alien physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alien physicians. 62.27 Section 62.27 Foreign... Provisions § 62.27 Alien physicians. (a) Purpose. Pursuant to the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange... Foreign Medical Graduates must sponsor alien physicians who wish to pursue programs of graduate...

  10. 22 CFR 62.27 - Alien physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Alien physicians. 62.27 Section 62.27 Foreign... Provisions § 62.27 Alien physicians. (a) Purpose. Pursuant to the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange... Foreign Medical Graduates must sponsor alien physicians who wish to pursue programs of graduate...

  11. 22 CFR 62.27 - Alien physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alien physicians. 62.27 Section 62.27 Foreign... Provisions § 62.27 Alien physicians. (a) Purpose. Pursuant to the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange... Foreign Medical Graduates must sponsor alien physicians who wish to pursue programs of graduate...

  12. 36 CFR 21.4 - Registration of physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Registration of physicians... INTERIOR HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK; BATHHOUSE REGULATIONS § 21.4 Registration of physicians. Physicians... office of the Superintendent. Any physician may make application for registration to the...

  13. 38 CFR 51.150 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Physician services. 51.150 Section 51.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.150 Physician services....

  14. 38 CFR 51.150 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Physician services. 51.150 Section 51.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.150 Physician services....

  15. 38 CFR 51.150 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Physician services. 51.150 Section 51.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.150 Physician services....

  16. 38 CFR 51.150 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Physician services. 51.150 Section 51.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.150 Physician services....

  17. 38 CFR 51.150 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Physician services. 51.150 Section 51.150 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.150 Physician services....

  18. 22 CFR 40.52 - Unqualified physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Unqualified physicians. 40.52 Section 40.52 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH NONIMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS... Immigrants § 40.52 Unqualified physicians. INA 212(a)(5)(B) applies only to immigrant aliens described in...

  19. 22 CFR 40.52 - Unqualified physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Unqualified physicians. 40.52 Section 40.52 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH NONIMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS... Immigrants § 40.52 Unqualified physicians. INA 212(a)(5)(B) applies only to immigrant aliens described in...

  20. 22 CFR 40.52 - Unqualified physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Unqualified physicians. 40.52 Section 40.52 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH NONIMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS... Immigrants § 40.52 Unqualified physicians. INA 212(a)(5)(B) applies only to immigrant aliens described in...

  1. 22 CFR 40.52 - Unqualified physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Unqualified physicians. 40.52 Section 40.52 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH NONIMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS... Immigrants § 40.52 Unqualified physicians. INA 212(a)(5)(B) applies only to immigrant aliens described in...

  2. 22 CFR 40.52 - Unqualified physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Unqualified physicians. 40.52 Section 40.52 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO BOTH NONIMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS... Immigrants § 40.52 Unqualified physicians. INA 212(a)(5)(B) applies only to immigrant aliens described in...

  3. 42 CFR 410.20 - Physicians' services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Physicians' services. 410.20 Section 410.20 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Medical and Other Health Services § 410.20 Physicians'...

  4. Physician transition plans: planning for physician slowdown.

    PubMed

    Walker Keegan, Deborah

    2008-01-01

    Transition is a natural progression for physicians in a medical practice. At some point, at least one physician will seek to deviate from the work norm of the group, either due to retirement, need for part-time status, or other reason. Medical practices that have a formal transition plan in place have a competitive advantage over other practices in terms of physician recruitment and retention. Not only do the formal transition plans permit physicians to proactively plan for work slowdown, but they also permit the medical practice to ensure its financial health and effectively position itself for the future. Key issues addressed in physician transition plans include governance, continuity of care, eligibility, time limits, on-call schedules, practice overhead, and physician compensation.

  5. 46 CFR 5.67 - Physician-patient privilege.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physician-patient privilege. 5.67 Section 5.67 Shipping... REGULATIONS-PERSONNEL ACTION Statement of Policy and Interpretation § 5.67 Physician-patient privilege. For the purpose of these proceedings, the physician-patient privilege does not exist between a...

  6. 42 CFR 412.46 - Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... diagnoses and major procedures performed, as evidenced by the physician's entries in the patient's medical... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Medical review requirements: Physician... Capital-Related Costs § 412.46 Medical review requirements: Physician acknowledgement. (a) Basis....

  7. Physician-assisted death.

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Physician-assisted death includes both euthanasia and assistance in suicide. The CMA urges its members to adhere to the principles of palliative care. It does not support euthanasia and assisted suicide. The following policy summary includes definitions of euthanasia and assisted suicide, background information, basic ethical principles and physician concerns about legalization of physician-assisted death. PMID:7632208

  8. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-10-20

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs.

  9. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  10. False color viewing device

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    This invention consists of a viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching, the user`s eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage.

  11. False Color Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    In a gray scale image, the suble variations seen in this false color image are almost impossible to identify. Note the orange band in the center of the frame, and the bluer bands to either side of it.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 87, Longitude 65.5 East (294.5 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. 42 CFR 415.130 - Conditions for payment: Physician pathology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... Physician Services to Beneficiaries in Providers § 415.130 Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... of physician pathology services to fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who were...

  13. Moon - False Color Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This false-color mosaic was constructed from a series of 53 images taken through three spectral filters by Galileo's imaging system as the spacecraft flew over the northern regions of the Moon on December 7, 1992. The part of the Moon visible from Earth is on the left side in this view. The color mosaic shows compositional variations in parts of the Moon's northern hemisphere. Bright pinkish areas are highlands materials, such as those surrounding the oval lava-filled Crisium impact basin toward the bottom of the picture. Blue to orange shades indicate volcanic lava flows. To the left of Crisium, the dark blue Mare Tranquillitatis is richer in titanium than the green and orange maria above it. Thin mineral-rich soils associated with relatively recent impacts are represented by light blue colors; the youngest craters have prominent blue rays extending from them. The Galileo project, whose primary mission is the exploration of the Jupiter system in 1995-97, is managed for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  14. North Polar False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This full resolution image contains dunes, and small areas of 'blue' which may represent fresh (ie. not dust covered) frost or ice.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 85, Longitude 235.8 East (124.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  15. False Color Aurora

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft were used to produce this false-color composite of Jupiter's northern aurora on the night side of the planet. The height of the aurora, the thickness of the auroral arc, and the small-scale structure are revealed for the first time. Images in Galileo's red, green, and clear filters are displayed in red, green, and blue respectively. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size, which is a ten-fold improvement over Hubble Space Telescope images and a hundred-fold improvement over ground-based images.

    The glow is caused by electrically charged particles impinging on the atmosphere from above. The particles travel along Jupiter's magnetic field lines, which are nearly vertical at this latitude. The auroral arc marks the boundary between the 'closed' field lines that are attached to the planet at both ends and the 'open' field lines that extend out into interplanetary space. At the boundary the particles have been accelerated over the greatest distances, and the glow is especially intense.

    The latitude-longitude lines refer to altitudes where the pressure is 1 bar. The image shows that the auroral emissions originate about 500 kilometers (about 310 miles) above this surface. The colored background is light scattered from Jupiter's bright crescent, which is out of view to the right. North is at the top. The images are centered at 57 degrees north and 184 degrees west and were taken on April 2, 1997 at a range of 1.7 million kilometers (1.05 million miles) by Galileo's Solid State Imaging (SSI) system.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at: http:// galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at: http:/ /www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  16. Confronting the disruptive physician.

    PubMed

    Linney, B J

    1997-01-01

    Ignoring disruptive behavior is no longer an option in today's changing health care environment. Competition and managed care have caused more organizations to deal with the disruptive physician, rather than look the other way as many did in years past. But it's not an easy task, possibly the toughest of your management career. How should you confront a disruptive physician? By having clearly stated expectations for physician behavior and policies in place for dealing with problem physicians, organizations have a context from which to address the situation.

  17. False Positive Mammograms and Detection Controlled Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kleit, Andrew N; Ruiz, James F

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the causes of false positive in mammograms. Data Sources Secondary data collected from extracts from computerized medical records from 1999 from five thousand patients at a single hospital in a medium-sized Southern city. Study Design Retrospective analysis of electronic medical data on screening and diagnostic mammograms. Detection-controlled estimation (DCE) was used to compare the efficacy of alternative readers of mammogram films. Analysis was also conducted on follow-up exams of women who tested positive in the first stage of investigation. Key variables included whether the patient had had a prior mammogram, age of the patient, and identifiers for the individual physicians. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Hospital maintains electronic medical records (EMR) on all patients. Extracts were performed on this EMR system under the guidance of clinical expertise. Data were collected for all women who had mammograms in 1999. Random samples were employed for screening mammograms, and all data was used for diagnostic mammograms. Principal Findings Study results imply that access to a previous mammogram greatly reduces the incidence of false positives readings. This has important consequences for benefit-cost, and cost-effectiveness analysis of mammography. Were previous mammograms always available, the results imply the number of false positives would decrease by at least half. The results here also indicate that there is no reason to believe this decrease in false positive would be accompanied by an increase in the number of false negatives. Other attributes also affected the number of false positives. Mondays and Wednesdays appear to be more prone to false positives than the other days in the week. There is also some disparity in false positive outcomes among the five physicians studied. With respect to detection-controlled estimation, the results are mixed. With follow-up data, the DCE estimator appears to generate reasonable, robust

  18. Negotiation for physicians.

    PubMed

    Hill, Micah J; DeCherney, Alan H

    2013-05-01

    Physicians are involved in negotiations on a daily basis. Interactions with patients, support staff, nurses, fellow physicians, administrators, lawyers, and third parties all can occur within the context of negotiation. This article reviews the basic principles of negotiation and negotiation styles, models, and practical tools.

  19. Marketing specialty physician services.

    PubMed

    Olson, E A

    1993-01-01

    Physicians take into account many factors when making referral decisions, primarily provider expertise, good communication and good patient care. This professional paper will show that provider expertise and patient care are the most important factors in referral decisions, and that physicians rely primarily on direct experience for the information necessary to make a referral choice.

  20. Legal examination of physician advertising on the internet.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jenny

    2006-02-01

    The Internet provides an invaluable resource to physicians seeking to market healthcare services to consumers. No longer considered an unethical practice, physician advertising has transformed over the years into an indispensable business tool in the medical community. While the Internet creates opportunities to reach vast numbers of individuals in a timely and cost-effective manner, physicians must be vigilant in adhering to laws, rules, and regulations designed to protect the public from false and deceptive practices.

  1. Physician collective bargaining.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Anthony Hunter

    2009-11-01

    Current antitrust enforcement policy unduly restricts physician collaboration, especially among small physician practices. Among other matters, current enforcement policy has hindered the ability of physicians to implement efficient healthcare delivery innovations, such as the acquisition and implementation of health information technology (HIT). Furthermore, the Federal Trade Commission and Department of Justice have unevenly enforced the antitrust laws, thereby fostering an increasingly severe imbalance in the healthcare market in which dominant health insurers enjoy the benefit of largely unfettered consolidation at the cost of both consumers and providers. This article traces the history of antitrust enforcement in healthcare, describe the current marketplace, and suggest the problems that must be addressed to restore balance to the healthcare market and help to ensure an innovative and efficient healthcare system capable of meeting the demands of the 21st century. Specifically, the writer explains how innovative physician collaborations have been improperly stifled by the policies of the federal antitrust enforcement agencies, and recommend that these policies be relaxed to permit physicians more latitude to bargain collectively with health insurers in conjunction with procompetitive clinical integration efforts. The article also explains how the unbridled consolidation of the health insurance industry has resulted in higher premiums to consumers and lower compensation to physicians, and recommends that further consolidation be prohibited. Finally, the writer discusses how health insurers with market power are improperly undermining the physician-patient relationship, and recommend federal antitrust enforcement agencies take appropriate steps to protect patients and their physicians from this anticompetitive conduct. The article also suggests such steps will require changes in three areas: (1) health insurers must be prohibited from engaging in anticompetitive

  2. Remembering More Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The history of medicine has been an intriguing topic for both authors. The modern relevance of past discoveries led both authors to take a closer look at the lives and contributions of persecuted physicians. The Jewish physicians who died in the Holocaust stand out as a stark example of those who merit being remembered. Many made important contributions to medicine which remain relevant to this day. Hence, this paper reviews the lives and important contributions of two persecuted Jewish physicians: Arthur Kessler (1903–2000) and Bronislawa Fejgin (1883–1943). PMID:27487308

  3. 49 CFR 386.48 - Medical records and physicians' reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Medical records and physicians' reports. 386.48... HAZARDOUS MATERIALS PROCEEDINGS General Rules and Hearings § 386.48 Medical records and physicians' reports... results, and other medical records that a party intends to rely upon shall be served on all other...

  4. Physician Assistant profession (PA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicine. The rest are involved in teaching, research, administration, or other nonclinical roles. PAs may practice in any setting in which a physician provides care. This allows doctors to focus their skills and knowledge in a more effective way. PAs ...

  5. [Physician--where to?].

    PubMed

    Luban-Plozza, B

    1993-06-08

    These questions are addressed: What does it mean to be a physician, and how can a physician continue his education? Where is his place in family crises? The psychosomatic point of view of diseases is not a specialty, but a concept, a basic attitude, a global principle encompassing all medical specialties. In particular, disorders of relations and basic needs are discussed in the context of a novel therapeutic access. The doctor as a 'drug' corresponds to a therapeutic alliance, also in group work. The problems of communication, even as a flash, influence the language of the patient and the physician. In the tension between anxiety and trust, psychosomatic thinking and medical intervention come to life also for the experience of disease and in the search for a meaning. The physician is not as much an achiever than a provider.

  6. Hitler's Jewish Physicians.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2014-07-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler.

  7. Positive consequences of false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Patel, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Previous research is replete with examples of the negative consequences of false memories. In the current research, we provide a different perspective on false memories and their development and demonstrate that false memories can have positive consequences. Specifically, we examined the role false memories play in subsequent problem-solving tasks. Children and adults studied and recalled neutral or survival-relevant lists of associated words. They then solved age-normed compound remote associates, some of whose solutions had been primed by false memories created when studying the previous lists. The results showed that regardless of age: (a) survival-related words were not only better recollected but were also more susceptible than neutral words to false memory illusions; and (b) survival-related false memories were better than neutral false memories as primes for problem-solving. These findings are discussed in the context of recent speculation concerning the positive consequences of false memories, and the adaptive nature of reconstructive memory.

  8. False Position, Double False Position and Cramer's Rule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Eugene

    2009-01-01

    We state and prove the methods of False Position (Regula Falsa) and Double False Position (Regula Duorum Falsorum). The history of both is traced from ancient Egypt and China through the work of Fibonacci, ending with a connection between Double False Position and Cramer's Rule.

  9. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed.

  10. The Kepler False Positive Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryson, Steve; Kepler False Positive Working Group

    2015-01-01

    The Kepler Space Telescope has detected thousands of candidate exoplanets by observing transit signals in a sample of more than 190,000 stars. Many of these transit signals are false positives, defined as a transit-like signal that is not due to a planet orbiting the target star (or a bound companion if the target is a multiple-star system). Astrophysical causes of false positives include background eclipsing binaries, planetary transits not associated with the target star, and non-planetary eclipses of the target star by stellar companions. The fraction of Kepler planet candidates that are false positives ranges from about 10% at high Galactic latitudes to 40% at low Galactic latitudes. Creating a high-reliability planet candidate catalog for statistical studies such as occurrence rate calculations requires removing clearly identified false positives.The Kepler Object of Interest (KOI) catalog at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive flags false positives, and will soon provide a high-level classification of false positives, but lacks detailed description of why a KOI was determined to be a false positive. The Kepler False Positive Working Group (FPWG) examines each false positive in detail to certify that it is correctly identified as a false positive, and determines the primary reason(s) a KOI is classified as a false positive. The work of the FPWG will be published as the Kepler False Positive Table, hosted at the NExScI NASA Exoplanet Archive.The Kepler False Positive Table provides detailed information on the evidence for background binaries, transits caused by stellar companions, and false alarms. In addition to providing insight into the Kepler false positive population, the false positive table gives information about the background binary population and other areas of astrophysical interest. Because a planet around a star not associated with the target star is considered a false positive, the false positive table likely contains further planet candidates

  11. Physician, heal thyself

    PubMed Central

    Blais, Régis; Safianyk, Catherine; Magnan, Anne; Lapierre, André

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To document the opinions of the users of the Quebec Physicians Health Program (QPHP) about the services they received. DESIGN Mailed questionnaire. SETTING Quebec. PARTICIPANTS A total of 126 physicians who used QPHP services between 1999 and 2004. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Users’ overall rating of the QPHP services, their opinions about the program, and whether their situations improved as a result of accessing QPHP services. RESULTS Ninety-two of the 126 physicians surveyed returned their completed questionnaires, providing a response rate of 73%. Most respondents thought that the QPHP services were good or excellent (90%), most would use the program again (86%) or recommend it (96%), and most thought the Quebec physician associations and the Collège des médecins du Québec should continue funding the QPHP (97%). Most respondents thought the service confidentiality was excellent (84%), as was staff professionalism (82%), and 62% thought the quality of the services they were referred to was excellent. However, only 57% believed their situations had improved with the help of the QPHP. CONCLUSION The QPHP received good marks from its users. Given the effects of physician burnout on patients and on the health care system, it is not only a personal problem, but also a collective problem. Thus, actions are needed not only to set up programs like the QPHP for those suffering from burnout, but also to prevent these types of problems. Because family physicians are likely to be the first ones consulted by their physician patients in distress, they play a key role in acknowledging these problems and referring those colleagues to the appropriate help programs when needed. PMID:20944027

  12. False positive reduction for lung nodule CAD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Luyin; Boroczky, Lilla; Drysdale, Jeremy; Agnihotri, Lalitha; Lee, Michael C.

    2007-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CAD) algorithms 'automatically' identify lung nodules on thoracic multi-slice CT scans (MSCT) thereby providing physicians with a computer-generated 'second opinion'. While CAD systems can achieve high sensitivity, their limited specificity has hindered clinical acceptance. To overcome this problem, we propose a false positive reduction (FPR) system based on image processing and machine learning to reduce the number of false positive lung nodules identified by CAD algorithms and thereby improve system specificity. To discriminate between true and false nodules, twenty-three 3D features were calculated from each candidate nodule's volume of interest (VOI). A genetic algorithm (GA) and support vector machine (SVM) were then used to select an optimal subset of features from this pool of candidate features. Using this feature subset, we trained an SVM classifier to eliminate as many false positives as possible while retaining all the true nodules. To overcome the imbalanced nature of typical datasets (significantly more false positives than true positives), an intelligent data selection algorithm was designed and integrated into the machine learning framework, thus further improving the FPR rate. Three independent datasets were used to train and validate the system. Using two datasets for training and the third for validation, we achieved a 59.4% FPR rate while removing one true nodule on the validation datasets. In a second experiment, 75% of the cases were randomly selected from each of the three datasets and the remaining cases were used for validation. A similar FPR rate and true positive retention rate was achieved. Additional experiments showed that the GA feature selection process integrated with the proposed data selection algorithm outperforms the one without it by 5%-10% FPR rate. The methods proposed can be also applied to other application areas, such as computer-aided diagnosis of lung nodules.

  13. Sleep deprivation and false memories.

    PubMed

    Frenda, Steven J; Patihis, Lawrence; Loftus, Elizabeth F; Lewis, Holly C; Fenn, Kimberly M

    2014-09-01

    Many studies have investigated factors that affect susceptibility to false memories. However, few have investigated the role of sleep deprivation in the formation of false memories, despite overwhelming evidence that sleep deprivation impairs cognitive function. We examined the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and false memories and the effect of 24 hr of total sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories. We found that under certain conditions, sleep deprivation can increase the risk of developing false memories. Specifically, sleep deprivation increased false memories in a misinformation task when participants were sleep deprived during event encoding, but did not have a significant effect when the deprivation occurred after event encoding. These experiments are the first to investigate the effect of sleep deprivation on susceptibility to false memories, which can have dire consequences.

  14. Dismembering the ethical physician

    PubMed Central

    Genuis, S J

    2006-01-01

    Physicians may experience ethical distress when they are caught in difficult clinical situations that demand ethical decision making, particularly when their preferred action may contravene the expectations of patients and established authorities. When principled and competent doctors succumb to patient wishes or establishment guidelines and participate in actions they perceive to be ethically inappropriate, or agree to refrain from interventions they believe to be in the best interests of patients, individual professional integrity may be diminished, and ethical reliability is potentially compromised. In a climate of ever‐proliferating ethical quandaries, it is essential for the medical community, health institutions, and governing bodies to pursue a judicious tension between the indispensable regulation of physicians necessary to maintain professional standards and preserve public safety, and the support for “freedom of conscience” that principled physicians require to practise medicine in keeping with their personal ethical orientation. PMID:16597808

  15. Leasing physician office space.

    PubMed

    Murray, Charles

    2009-01-01

    When leasing office space, physicians should determine the effective lease rate (ELR) for each building they are considering before making a selection. The ELR is based on a number of factors, including building quality, building location, basic form of lease agreement, rent escalators and add-on factors in the lease, tenant improvement allowance, method of square footage measurement, quality of building management, and other variables. The ELR enables prospective physician tenants to accurately compare lease rates being quoted by building owners and to make leasing decisions based on objective criteria.

  16. [Hippocrates' treatise physician].

    PubMed

    Frøland, Anders

    2005-01-01

    This small treatise does not appear to have been published in Danish in its entirety. It gives a vivid picture of the physician in ancient Greece. The well known first chapter describes the attitudes and attributes of the doctor. It goes on discussing in some detail how the light should be in the surgery, the instruments to be used, the preparations of bandages and drugs, and the use of cupping instruments. The author stresses both the needs of the patient and the necessity of the physician's dignity and integrity.

  17. Mobile physician order entry.

    PubMed

    Ying, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Because both computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems and mobile technologies such as handheld devices have the potential to greatly impact the industry's future, IT vendors, hospitals, and clinicians are simply merging them into a logical convergence--"CPOE on a handheld"--with an expectation of full functionality on all platforms: computer workstations, rolling laptops, tablet PCs, and handheld devices. For these trends to succeed together, however, this expectation must be revised to establish a distinct category--mobile physician order entry (MPOE)--that is different from CPOE in form, function, and implementation.

  18. 42 CFR 440.50 - Physicians' services and medical and surgical services of a dentist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Definitions § 440.50 Physicians' services and medical and surgical services of a dentist. (a) “Physicians... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physicians' services and medical and surgical services of a dentist. 440.50 Section 440.50 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID...

  19. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1) General...

  20. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  1. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1) General...

  2. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  3. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  4. 42 CFR 418.304 - Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for physician and nurse practitioner... § 418.304 Payment for physician and nurse practitioner services. (a) The following services performed by hospice physicians and nurse practitioners are included in the rates described in § 418.302: (1)...

  5. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Nurse practitioner and physician assistant services... Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414 Nurse practitioner and physician... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, nurse midwife, or specialized nurse practitioner who...

  6. 42 CFR 88.12 - Physician's determination of WTC-related health conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Physician's determination of WTC-related health... Physician's determination of WTC-related health conditions. (a) A physician in a Clinical Center of Excellence or a member of the nationwide provider network shall promptly transmit to the WTC...

  7. 42 CFR 88.12 - Physician's determination of WTC-related health conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Physician's determination of WTC-related health... Physician's determination of WTC-related health conditions. (a) A physician in a Clinical Center of Excellence or a member of the nationwide provider network shall promptly transmit to the WTC...

  8. 42 CFR 88.12 - Physician's determination of WTC-related health conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Physician's determination of WTC-related health... Physician's determination of WTC-related health conditions. (a) A physician in a Clinical Center of Excellence or a member of the nationwide provider network shall promptly transmit to the WTC...

  9. 42 CFR 417.560 - Apportionment: Part B physician and supplier services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Apportionment: Part B physician and supplier... B physician and supplier services. (a) Medical services furnished directly by the HMO or CMP. The total allowable cost of Part B physician and supplier services furnished by employees or partners of...

  10. 42 CFR 417.546 - Physicians' services and other Part B supplier services furnished under arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Physicians' services and other Part B supplier....546 Physicians' services and other Part B supplier services furnished under arrangements. General principle. The amount paid by an HMO or CMP for physicians' services and other Part B supplier...

  11. Reduced False Memory after Sleep

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenn, Kimberly M.; Gallo, David A.; Margoliash, Daniel; Roediger, Henry L., III; Nusbaum, Howard C.

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have shown that sleep contributes to the successful maintenance of previously encoded information. This research has focused exclusively on memory for studied events, as opposed to false memories. Here we report three experiments showing that sleep reduces false memories in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) memory illusion. False…

  12. Study modality and false recall.

    PubMed

    Smith, Rebekah E; Engle, Randall W

    2011-01-01

    False memories occur when individuals mistakenly report an event as having taken place when that event did not in fact occur. The DRM (Deese, 1959; Roediger & McDermott, 1995) paradigm provides an effective technique for creating and investigating false memories. In this paradigm participants study a list of words (e.g., SOUR, CANDY,…) that are highly associated to a non-presented critical item (e.g., SWEET). The study phase is followed by a test of memory for the study list words. Researchers typically find very high levels of false recall of the critical non-presented item. However, the likelihood of falsely remembering the non-presented critical items can be reduced by presenting studied associates visually rather than auditorally (e.g., Smith & Hunt, 1998). This is referred to as the modality effect in false memory. The current study investigated the role of resource availability in the expression of this modality effect in false recall. In Experiment 1 false recall was reduced in the visual study presentation condition relative to the auditory condition for participants with higher working memory capacity, but not for participants with lower working memory capacity. In Experiment 2 the effect of study modality on false recall was eliminated by the addition of a divided attention task at encoding. Both studies support the proposal that resource availability plays a role in the expression of the modality effect in the DRM paradigm (Smith, Lozito, & Bayen, 2005).

  13. Informational influences on physician referrals.

    PubMed

    Beltramini, R F; Sirsi, A K

    1992-01-01

    Today's health care marketers are devoting significant resources to increase physician referrals, an area vital to their continued survival. The goal of this investigation was to integrate the findings of previous research on physician referrals, and to provide an up-to-date assessment of those influences underlying physician referral behavior. A questionnaire was mailed to 1,800 physicians differing in specialty and years in practice. Three informational influences were found to affect physician referrals: Program Information, Patient Input, and Location. The results suggest a need for specialists and other organizations interested in managing physician referrals to (a) establish and maintain a network of relationships among those physicians referring patients and specialists being referred to through personal communication, (b) maintain a pool of knowledgeable professionals willing to supply relevant and current information to physicians, and (c) provide complete and prompt feedback information to the referring physician. Managerial implications and directions for future research are also discussed.

  14. Information for travellers' physicians.

    PubMed

    Allison, D J; Blinco, K

    1990-07-01

    Physicians can obtain advice about international travel for their patients from many different sources of information. The authors review some of the most common sources based on their experience at the International Travellers' Clinic operated by the New Brunswick Department of Health and Community Services in Fredericton. They identify readily available handbooks and periodicals and compare two computer software programs.

  15. Medication counselling: physicians' perspective.

    PubMed

    Bonnerup, Dorthe Krogsgaard; Lisby, Marianne; Eskildsen, Anette Gjetrup; Saedder, Eva Aggerholm; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2013-12-01

    Medication reviews have the potential to lower the incidence of prescribing errors. To benefit from a medication review, the prescriber must adhere to medication counselling. Adherence rates vary from 39 to 100%. The aim of this study was to examine counselling-naive hospital physicians' perspectives and demands to medication counselling as well as study factors that might increase adherence to the counselling. The study was conducted as a questionnaire survey among physicians at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. The questionnaire was developed based on focus group interviews and literature search, and was pilot-tested among 30 physicians before being sent to 669 physicians. The questionnaire consisted of 35 items divided into four categories: attitudes (19 items), behaviours (3 items), assessment (8 items) and demographics (5 items). The response rate was 60% (400/669). Respondents were employed at psychiatric, medical or surgical departments. Eighty-five per cent of respondents agreed that patients would benefit of an extra medication review, and 72% agreed that there was a need for external medication counselling. The most important factor that could increase adherence was the clinical relevance of the counselling as 78% rated it of major importance. The most favoured method for receiving counselling was via the electronic patient record.

  16. Physicians in transition.

    PubMed

    Bluestein, P

    1995-12-01

    The study of physicians as managed care executives has been relatively recent. Much of what was written in the past focused primarily on doctors who had taken hospital-based administrative positions, especially as medical directors or vice presidents of medical affairs.1 But the '80s brought rising health care costs and the emergence of the "O's"--HMOs, PPOs, UROs, EPOs, PHOs, H2Os, and Uh-Ohs--in response. It also brought a growing number of physicians who traded their white coats and their particular "ologies" for the blue suits of executive management. I am convinced that it is important now, and will be increasingly important in the future, to better understand that transition. That belief led me to undertake, with the help and support of ACPE, the survey that is reported in this article. A questionnaire was sent in 1994 to a random sample of 300 managed care physician executive members of ACPE. Responses were returned by 225 members, a response rate of better than 80 percent. Twenty-five of the responses were not applicable, having been returned by physicians who had never made a transition from clinical careers. The remaining 230 responses form the basis for this report.

  17. Physicians and Insider Trading.

    PubMed

    Kesselheim, Aaron S; Sinha, Michael S; Joffe, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Although insider trading is illegal, recent high-profile cases have involved physicians and scientists who are part of corporate governance or who have access to information about clinical trials of investigational products. Insider trading occurs when a person in possession of information that might affect the share price of a company's stock uses that information to buy or sell securities--or supplies that information to others who buy or sell--when the person is expected to keep such information confidential. The input that physicians and scientists provide to business leaders can serve legitimate social functions, but insider trading threatens to undermine any positive outcomes of these relationships. We review insider-trading rules and consider approaches to securities fraud in the health care field. Given the magnitude of the potential financial rewards, the ease of concealing illegal conduct, and the absence of identifiable victims, the temptation for physicians and scientists to engage in insider trading will always be present. Minimizing the occurrence of insider trading will require robust education, strictly enforced contractual provisions, and selective prohibitions against high-risk conduct, such as participation in expert consulting networks and online physician forums, by those individuals with access to valuable inside information.

  18. The aeromedical physician assistant.

    PubMed

    Radi, Joshua; Brisson, Michael; Line, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The US Army aeromedical physician assistant (PA) serves aviation units in regards to crewmember medical readiness. All PAs are graduates of a 6-week flight surgeon course. They are responsible for conducting nearly 40% of the annual US Army flight physicals. This unique training and deployment illustrates the growing adaptability of PAs to assume a greater role in military medicine.

  19. Burnout among physicians

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Maya; Ashkar, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Burnout is a common syndrome seen in healthcare workers, particularly physicians who are exposed to a high level of stress at work; it includes emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. Burnout among physicians has garnered significant attention because of the negative impact it renders on patient care and medical personnel. Physicians who had high burnout levels reportedly committed more medical errors. Stress management programs that range from relaxation to cognitive-behavioral and patient-centered therapy have been found to be of utmost significance when it comes to preventing and treating burnout. However, evidence is insufficient to support that stress management programs can help reducing job-related stress beyond the intervention period, and similarly mindfulness-based stress reduction interventions efficiently reduce psychological distress and negative vibes, and encourage empathy while significantly enhancing physicians’ quality of life. On the other hand, a few small studies have suggested that Balint sessions can have a promising positive effect in preventing burnout; moreover exercises can reduce anxiety levels and exhaustion symptoms while improving the mental and physical well-being of healthcare workers. Occupational interventions in the work settings can also improve the emotional and work-induced exhaustion. Combining both individual and organizational interventions can have a good impact in reducing burnout scores among physicians; therefore, multidisciplinary actions that include changes in the work environmental factors along with stress management programs that teach people how to cope better with stressful events showed promising solutions to manage burnout. However, until now there have been no rigorous studies to prove this. More interventional research targeting medical students, residents, and practicing physicians are needed in order to improve psychological well-being, professional careers, as well as

  20. Tunneling decay of false kinks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupuis, Éric; Gobeil, Yan; MacKenzie, Richard; Marleau, Luc; Paranjape, M. B.; Ung, Yvan

    2015-07-01

    We consider the decay of "false kinks," that is, kinks formed in a scalar field theory with a pair of degenerate symmetry-breaking false vacua in 1 +1 dimensions. The true vacuum is symmetric. A second scalar field and a peculiar potential are added in order for the kink to be classically stable. We find an expression for the decay rate of a false kink. As with any tunneling event, the rate is proportional to exp (-SE) where SE is the Euclidean action of the bounce describing the tunneling event. This factor varies wildly depending on the parameters of the model. Of interest is the fact that for certain parameters SE can get arbitrarily small, implying that the kink is only barely stable. Thus, while the false vacuum itself may be very long-lived, the presence of kinks can give rise to rapid vacuum decay.

  1. False allegation of child abduction.

    PubMed

    Canning, Kathleen E; Hilts, Mark A; Muirhead, Yvonne E

    2011-05-01

    Cases in which a child has been falsely reported as missing or abducted can be extremely challenging to the law enforcement agencies responsible for their investigation. In the absence of a witnessed abduction or an obvious crime scene, it is difficult to determine whether a child has actually been abducted or has become a victim of a homicide and a false allegation. The purpose of this study was to examine falsely alleged kidnapping cases and identify successful investigative strategies. Sixty-one adjudicated false allegation cases involving 66 victims were analyzed. The mean age of the victim was 5 years. Victims came from generally unstable, high-risk family situations and were killed primarily by biological parents. Victims were killed because they were unwanted or viewed as an obstacle to a desired goal, or they were victims of abuse or maltreatment that ended in fatality.

  2. A Physician's Guide to Radon

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This booklet has been developed for physicians by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in consultation with the American Medical Association (AMA). Its purpose is to enlist physicians in the national effort to inform the American public about radon.

  3. The future for physician assistants.

    PubMed

    Cawley, J F; Ott, J E; DeAtley, C A

    1983-06-01

    Physician assistants were intended to be assistants to primary care physicians. Physicians in private practice have only moderately responded to the availability of these professionals. Cutbacks in the numbers of foreign medical graduates entering American schools for graduate medical education, concern for overcrowding in some specialties, and the economic and clinical capabilities of physician assistants have lead to new uses for these persons. Physician assistants are employed in surgery and surgical subspecialties; in practice settings in institutions such as medical, pediatric, and surgical house staff; and in geriatric facilities, occupational medicine clinics, emergency rooms, and prison health systems. The projected surplus of physicians by 1990 may affect the use of physician assistants by private physicians in primary care.

  4. Physicians of ancient India

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Anu

    2016-01-01

    A survey of Indian medical historiography will reveal no dearth of work on the systems of medicine and medical literature of ancient India. However, the people who were responsible for the healing have not received much attention. This article traces the evolution of the physician as a professional in ancient India. This article reviews the secondary literature on healing and medical practice in India, specifically pertaining to the individual medical practitioner, drawing from varied sources. The healers of ancient India hailed from different castes and classes. They were well-respected and enjoyed state patronage. They were held to the highest ethical standards of the day and were bound by a strict code of conduct. They underwent rigorous training in both medicine and surgery. Most physicians were multi-skilled generalists, and expected to be skilled in elocution and debate. They were reasonably well-off financially. The paper also briefly traces the evolution of medicinal ideas in ancient India. PMID:27843823

  5. Physicians in literature: three portrayals.

    PubMed

    Cameron, I A

    1986-02-01

    Literature can provide an objective glimpse of how the public perceives physicians. Physicians have been recipients of the full range of human response in literature, from contempt to veneration. This article examines the impressions of three authors: Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Arthur Hailey. Their descriptions provide insight into the complex relationship physicians have with their colleagues and patients.

  6. Physicians in Literature: Three Portrayals

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Ian A.

    1986-01-01

    Literature can provide an objective glimpse of how the public perceives physicians. Physicians have been recipients of the full range of human response in literature, from contempt to veneration. This article examines the impressions of three authors: Mark Twain, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, and Arthur Hailey. Their descriptions provide insight into the complex relationship physicians have with their colleagues and patients. PMID:21267273

  7. [Professional ethics of physicians].

    PubMed

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Socrates is considered the great classic moralist, although he was not the first to take care of man and morality. Aristotle instituted ethics as an autonomous science and clearly defined its fields, its methods and its purposes, formulating the concept of "happy medium". In the Aristotelian methodology we find traces of Hippocrates, who believed that the physician must always consider the peculiar aspects and that the individual characteristics' determinations can be reached by sensitivity. Once these particularities have been proved, the physician must rely on the "happy medium". Only Stoics could discover, and gradually elaborate, the concept of natural law. Apparently they were the first to establish the classic distinction between the theorical or ideal morality and the practical morality, which is accessible to all people. They refused to compare wisdom, entirely turned inward, with the medical art, which does not constitute an aim by itself. Modern authors assert that, with stoicism, the notion we can denominated wisdom's humanism rised. Today it is admitted that "medicine is more than simply learning medical data.... Physicians must have a wisdom learned from human finitude. They will need this wisdom to tackle the health care policy debates in the next decades". This would be a major cultural undertaking.

  8. Physician nutrition education.

    PubMed

    Kiraly, Laszlo N; McClave, Stephen A; Neel, Dustin; Evans, David C; Martindale, Robert G; Hurt, Ryan T

    2014-06-01

    Nutrition education for physicians in the United States is limited in scope, quality, and duration due to a variety of factors. As new data and quality improvement initiatives highlight the importance of nutrition and a generation of nutrition experts retire, there is a need for new physician educators and leaders in clinical nutrition. Traditional nutrition fellowships and increased didactic lecture time in school and postgraduate training are not feasible strategies to develop the next generation of physician nutrition specialists in the current environment. One strategy is the development of short immersion courses for advanced trainees and junior attendings. The most promising courses include a combination of close mentorship and adult learning techniques such as lectures, clinical experiences, literature review, curricular development, research and writing, multidisciplinary interactions, and extensive group discussion. These courses also allow the opportunity for advanced discourse, development of long-term collaborative relationships, and continued longitudinal career development for alumni after the course ends. Despite these curricular developments, ultimately the field of nutrition will not mature until the American Board of Medical Specialties recognizes nutrition medicine with specialty board certification.

  9. Allergen immunotherapy and allergic rhinitis: false beliefs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last 100 years, several persistent misconceptions or ‘false beliefs’ have built up around allergen immunotherapy and its use in allergic rhinitis. This is perhaps because enthusiastic physicians administered complex allergen extracts to a diverse population of patients suffering from heterogeneous atopic conditions. Here, we review evidence that counters seven of these ‘false beliefs.’ Discussion 1. The symptoms of allergic rhinitis can be more heterogeneous, more severe and more troublesome in everyday life than many physicians believe. Large-scale epidemiological surveys show that the majority of allergic rhinitis patients have at least one symptom severe enough to interfere with sleep quality, productivity and/or well-being. 2. Allergen immunotherapy is not necessarily suitable for all allergic rhinitis patients (notably those with mild symptoms). Recent evidence from double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trials suggests that the more severe the disease, the greater the treatment effect. 3. Allergen immunotherapy is often accused of lack of efficacy (relative to pharmacotherapy, for example). However, there are now many meta-analyses, systematic reviews and high-quality clinical trials that find overwhelmingly in favor of the efficacy of allergen immunotherapy (including sublingual formulations) in allergic rhinitis induced by pollen and, increasingly, other allergens. 4. Natural-exposure and challenge-chamber trials have shown that symptom relief may become apparent within months or even weeks of the initiation of allergen immunotherapy. 5. In pollen-induced allergic rhinitis, several years of subcutaneous or sublingual allergen immunotherapy are associated with sustained clinical efficacy after subsequent treatment cessation – confirming the disease-modifying nature of this therapy. 6. Most patients seeking treatment for allergic rhinitis are polysensitized, and allergen immunotherapy has proven efficacy in large

  10. Physician-industry relations. Part 1: individual physicians.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Susan L

    2002-03-05

    This is part 1 of a 2-part paper on ethics and physician-industry relationships. Part 1 offers advice to individual physicians; part 2 gives recommendations to medical education providers and medical professional societies. Physicians and industry have a shared interest in advancing medical knowledge. Nonetheless, the primary ethic of the physician is to promote the patient's best interests, while the primary ethic of industry is to promote profitability. Although partnerships between physicians and industry can result in impressive medical advances, they also create opportunities for bias and can result in unfavorable public perceptions. Many physicians and physicians-in-training think they are impervious to commercial influence. However, recent studies show that accepting industry hospitality and gifts, even drug samples, can compromise judgment about medical information and subsequent decisions about patient care. It is up to the physician to judge whether a gift is acceptable. A very general guideline is that it is ethical to accept modest gifts that advance medical practice. It is clearly unethical to accept gifts or services that obligate the physician to reciprocate. Conflicts of interest can arise from other financial ties between physicians and industry, whether to outside companies or self-owned businesses. Such ties include honorariums for speaking or writing about a company's product, payment for participating in clinic-based research, and referrals to medical resources. All of these relationships have the potential to influence a physician's attitudes and practices. This paper explores the ethical quandaries involved and offers guidelines for ethical business relationships.

  11. Physician resource databank: numbers, distribution and activities of Canada's physicians

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Christel; Adams, Orvill

    1985-01-01

    The physician resource databank, compiled and maintained by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA), contains functional information from 41 599 of Canada's licensed physicians. The information was gathered from a 20-item questionnaire sent to 47 162 physicians. Of the total, 38 653 responses came from physicians who had completed their training and these were included in the analysis to produce a profile of the supply of physicians in Canada. The data from physicians younger than 35 years indicate some changes in the structure of the supply: 27% are women (compared with only about 9% of physicians older than 45 years). The implications of these statistics are not yet clear, but within the next decade the numbers in some specialties—surgery, anesthesia, obstetrics and gynecology, and radiology—may be too few to meet the demand as more than 20% of the current practitioners reach retirement age. Other findings are that [List: see text] PMID:3995440

  12. Bubbling the false vacuum away

    SciTech Connect

    Gleiser, M.; Rogers, B.; Thorarinson, J.

    2008-01-15

    We investigate the role of nonperturbative, bubblelike inhomogeneities on the decay rate of false-vacuum states in two- and three-dimensional scalar field theories. The inhomogeneities are induced by setting up large-amplitude oscillations of the field about the false vacuum, as, for example, after a rapid quench or in certain models of cosmological inflation. We show that, for a wide range of parameters, the presence of large-amplitude bubblelike inhomogeneities greatly accelerates the decay rate, changing it from the well-known exponential suppression of homogeneous nucleation to a power-law suppression. It is argued that this fast, power-law vacuum decay--known as resonant nucleation--is promoted by the presence of long-lived oscillons among the nonperturbative fluctuations about the false vacuum. A phase diagram is obtained distinguishing three possible mechanisms for vacuum decay: homogeneous nucleation, resonant nucleation, and crossover. Possible applications are briefly discussed.

  13. Physicians and American political leadership.

    PubMed

    Jameson, M G

    1983-02-18

    Physicians have actively participated in the political processes of American democracy throughout the nation's history. The purpose of this study was to compare physicians' participation in public office during the first and second centuries of American democracy. Following the commencement of the US Congress, physicians were active members of the legislative branch. However, physicians' membership in Congress has diminished significantly in modern times. The executive and judicial branches of the federal government have recorded only marginal representation by physicians and none during the 20th century.

  14. Managed care and physician disability.

    PubMed

    Fraunfelder, F T; Fraunfelder, N

    1999-07-01

    The number of disability claims by physicians has skyrocketed during the last decade. One of the primary reasons for this escalation is decreased job satisfaction brought about by managed care. Certain physician groups are more vulnerable to the stress of advanced managed care: solo practitioners, specialists and subspecialists, certain generalists, doctors with independent personalities, middle-aged or near-retirement physicians, impaired physicians, and those whose practices are almost solely contract driven. Based on analysis of physician disability claims, certain protective measures are recommended to relieve stress and promote survival in today's health care market.

  15. Role of the school physician.

    PubMed

    Devore, Cynthia DiLaura; Wheeler, Lani S M

    2013-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes the important role physicians play in promoting the optimal biopsychosocial well-being of children in the school setting. Although the concept of a school physician has existed for more than a century, uniformity among states and school districts regarding physicians in schools and the laws governing it are lacking. By understanding the roles and contributions physicians can make to schools, pediatricians can support and promote school physicians in their communities and improve health and safety for children.

  16. Apathy, empathy, physicians, and Chekhov.

    PubMed

    Gianakos, D

    1997-01-01

    Healing depends on a caring, involved physician. In his story "Ward Number Six," Anton Chekhov illustrated how patients suffer when physicians become apathetic. Reading this story may inspire physicians to resist apathy and assume greater responsibility for the social conditions that impact on their patients' well-being. It may also stimulate physicians' imagination in such a way as to improve their ability to empathize with their patients. Finally, the act of reading itself--particularly reading great literature such as "Ward Number Six," can help rejuvenate those physicians who struggle with their own apathy.

  17. Tunneling decay of false vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bum-Hoon; Lee, Wonwoo; MacKenzie, Richard; Paranjape, M. B.; Yajnik, U. A.; Yeom, Dong-han

    2013-10-01

    We consider the decay of vortices trapped in the false vacuum of a theory of scalar electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. The potential is inspired by models with intermediate symmetry breaking to a metastable vacuum that completely breaks a U(1) symmetry, while in the true vacuum, the symmetry is unbroken. The false vacuum is unstable through the formation of true vacuum bubbles; however, the rate of decay can be extremely long. On the other hand, the false vacuum can contain metastable vortex solutions. These vortices contain the true vacuum inside in addition to a unit of magnetic flux and the appropriate topologically nontrivial false vacuum outside. We numerically establish the existence of vortex solutions which are classically stable; however, they can decay via tunneling. In general terms, they tunnel to a configuration which is a large, thin-walled vortex configuration that is now classically unstable to the expansion of its radius. We compute an estimate for the tunneling amplitude in the semiclassical approximation. We believe our analysis would be relevant to superconducting thin films or superfluids.

  18. Sleep Loss Produces False Memories

    PubMed Central

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., “night”, “dark”, “coal”,…), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: “black”). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss. PMID:18946511

  19. The Danger of False Dichotomies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBoskey, Vicky Kubler

    1998-01-01

    Responds to an article that examined 10 dichotomies in teacher education (SP 527 128), suggesting that too much time and energy are spent debating false dichotomies and addressing two specific dichotomies (preservice versus inservice and campus versus school site). Recommends that professional educators pool their energy and collaborate (rather…

  20. Evolutionary Psychology and False Confession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bering, Jesse M.; Shackelford, Todd K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents comments on Kassin's review, (see record 2005-03019-002) of the psychology of false confessions. The authors note that Kassin's review makes a compelling argument for the need for legal reform in police interrogation practices. Because his work strikes at the heart of the American criminal justice system--its fairness--the…

  1. Sleep deprivation and false confessions

    PubMed Central

    Frenda, Steven J.; Berkowitz, Shari R.; Loftus, Elizabeth F.; Fenn, Kimberly M.

    2016-01-01

    False confession is a major contributor to the problem of wrongful convictions in the United States. Here, we provide direct evidence linking sleep deprivation and false confessions. In a procedure adapted from Kassin and Kiechel [(1996) Psychol Sci 7(3):125–128], participants completed computer tasks across multiple sessions and repeatedly received warnings that pressing the “Escape” key on their keyboard would cause the loss of study data. In their final session, participants either slept all night in laboratory bedrooms or remained awake all night. In the morning, all participants were asked to sign a statement, which summarized their activities in the laboratory and falsely alleged that they pressed the Escape key during an earlier session. After a single request, the odds of signing were 4.5 times higher for the sleep-deprived participants than for the rested participants. These findings have important implications and highlight the need for further research on factors affecting true and false confessions. PMID:26858426

  2. Sleep loss produces false memories.

    PubMed

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Lahl, Olaf; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2008-01-01

    People sometimes claim with high confidence to remember events that in fact never happened, typically due to strong semantic associations with actually encoded events. Sleep is known to provide optimal neurobiological conditions for consolidation of memories for long-term storage, whereas sleep deprivation acutely impairs retrieval of stored memories. Here, focusing on the role of sleep-related memory processes, we tested whether false memories can be created (a) as enduring memory representations due to a consolidation-associated reorganization of new memory representations during post-learning sleep and/or (b) as an acute retrieval-related phenomenon induced by sleep deprivation at memory testing. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal",...), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black"). Subjects either slept or stayed awake immediately after learning, and they were either sleep deprived or not at recognition testing 9, 33, or 44 hours after learning. Sleep deprivation at retrieval, but not sleep following learning, critically enhanced false memories of theme words. This effect was abolished by caffeine administration prior to retrieval, indicating that adenosinergic mechanisms can contribute to the generation of false memories associated with sleep loss.

  3. MSPI False Indication Probability Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Dana Kelly; Kurt Vedros; Robert Youngblood

    2011-03-01

    This paper examines false indication probabilities in the context of the Mitigating System Performance Index (MSPI), in order to investigate the pros and cons of different approaches to resolving two coupled issues: (1) sensitivity to the prior distribution used in calculating the Bayesian-corrected unreliability contribution to the MSPI, and (2) whether (in a particular plant configuration) to model the fuel oil transfer pump (FOTP) as a separate component, or integrally to its emergency diesel generator (EDG). False indication probabilities were calculated for the following situations: (1) all component reliability parameters at their baseline values, so that the true indication is green, meaning that an indication of white or above would be false positive; (2) one or more components degraded to the extent that the true indication would be (mid) white, and “false” would be green (negative) or yellow (negative) or red (negative). In key respects, this was the approach taken in NUREG-1753. The prior distributions examined were the constrained noninformative (CNI) prior used currently by the MSPI, a mixture of conjugate priors, the Jeffreys noninformative prior, a nonconjugate log(istic)-normal prior, and the minimally informative prior investigated in (Kelly et al., 2010). The mid-white performance state was set at ?CDF = ?10 ? 10-6/yr. For each simulated time history, a check is made of whether the calculated ?CDF is above or below 10-6/yr. If the parameters were at their baseline values, and ?CDF > 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false positive. Conversely, if one or all of the parameters are set to values corresponding to ?CDF > 10-6/yr but that time history’s ?CDF < 10-6/yr, this is counted as a false negative indication. The false indication (positive or negative) probability is then estimated as the number of false positive or negative counts divided by the number of time histories (100,000). Results are presented for a set of base case parameter values

  4. Roles of the Team Physician.

    PubMed

    Kinderknecht, James

    2016-07-01

    The roles of the team physician are much more than providing medical coverage at a sport's event. The team physician has numerous administrative and medical responsibilities. The development of an emergency action plan is an essential administrative task as an example. The implementation of the components of this plan requires the team physician to have the necessary medical knowledge and skill. An expertise in returning an athlete to play after an injury or other medical condition is a unique attribute of the trained team physician. The athlete's return to participation needs to start with the athlete's safety and best medical interests but not inappropriately restrict the individual from play. The ability to communicate on numerous levels needs to be a characteristic of the team physician. There are several potential ethical conflicts the team physician needs to control. These conflicts can create unique medicolegal issues. The true emphasis of the team physician is to focus on what is best for the athlete.

  5. Soviet pilot-physician program.

    PubMed

    Vlassov, V; Ushakov, I

    1999-07-01

    The program for training pilot-physicians was started in 1952. It was the first and the only one in the history of the USSR/Russia. Young military physicians from different military forces and graduates of the Saratov Military Medical Faculty were invited to participate in the program. Selected military physicians were sent for 2 yr of flight training. Six graduates from Omsk School became bomber pilots, while eight graduates from Chuguev School were appointed instructor pilots. Special positions and regulations for pilot-physicians were not created. Some pilot-physicians continued their aviation career, and some returned to medicine. For a short time a limited number of pilot-physician positions existed in the research institute in Moscow. Two graduates from this program were appointed to these positions. One of the pilot-physicians became a cosmonaut; and at least six obtained scientific degrees in medicine and made significant contributions to the development of aerospace medicine.

  6. Patients' and physicians' attitudes regarding the physician's professional appearance.

    PubMed

    Gjerdingen, D K; Simpson, D E; Titus, S L

    1987-07-01

    Although physician appearance has been a topic of interest to medical historians for more than two centuries, little objective investigation has been made into patients' and physicians' attitudes toward the physician's appearance. This study analyzed responses from 404 patients, residents, and staff physicians regarding their attitudes toward various aspects of the male and female physician's professional appearance. Positive responses from all participants were associated with traditional items of dress such as the dress, shirt and tie, dress shoes, and nylons, and for physician-identifying items such as a white coat and a name tag. Negative responses were associated with casual items such as blue jeans, scrub suits, athletic shoes, clogs, and sport socks. Negative ratings were also associated with overly feminine items such as prominent ruffles and female dangling earrings and such temporarily fashionable items as long hair on men, male earrings, and patterned hose on women. Overall, patients were less discriminating in their attitude toward physician appearance than physicians. Patients rated traditional items less positively and casual items less negatively. This study confirms the importance of the physician's appearance in physician-patient communication.

  7. Accuracy of syndrome definitions based on diagnoses in physician claims

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Community clinics offer potential for timelier outbreak detection and monitoring than emergency departments. However, the accuracy of syndrome definitions used in surveillance has never been evaluated in community settings. This study's objective was to assess the accuracy of syndrome definitions based on diagnostic codes in physician claims for identifying 5 syndromes (fever, gastrointestinal, neurological, rash, and respiratory including influenza-like illness) in community clinics. Methods We selected a random sample of 3,600 community-based primary care physicians who practiced in the fee-for-service system in the province of Quebec, Canada in 2005-2007. We randomly selected 10 visits per physician from their claims, stratifying on syndrome type and presence, diagnosis, and month. Double-blinded chart reviews were conducted by telephone with consenting physicians to obtain information on patient diagnoses for each sampled visit. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value (PPV) of physician claims were estimated by comparison to chart review. Results 1,098 (30.5%) physicians completed the chart review. A chart entry on the date of the corresponding claim was found for 10,529 (95.9%) visits. The sensitivity of syndrome definitions based on diagnostic codes in physician claims was low, ranging from 0.11 (fever) to 0.44 (respiratory), the specificity was high, and the PPV was moderate to high, ranging from 0.59 (fever) to 0.85 (respiratory). We found that rarely used diagnostic codes had a higher probability of being false-positives, and that more commonly used diagnostic codes had a higher PPV. Conclusions Future research should identify physician, patient, and encounter characteristics associated with the accuracy of diagnostic codes in physician claims. This would enable public health to improve syndromic surveillance, either by focusing on physician claims whose diagnostic code is more likely to be accurate, or by using all physician

  8. Issues in physician contracting.

    PubMed

    Fanburg, John D; Leone, Alyson M

    2005-09-01

    Dermatologists will enter into a number of different contracts during their professional careers. It is important that in each agreement they enter, dermatologists reap the benefits that they aspire for and understand the consequences of each provision. This article addresses just a few of the different issues that arise in physician contracting, such as choosing the appropriate form of business entity; the importance of a writing; term and termination of the contract; compensation models; benefits, vacation and other time off included in the contract; malpractice insurance; and restrictive covenants. Each provision should be carefully analyzed to ensure that it will protect the best interests of the dermatologist in that situation.

  9. Negotiation skills for physicians.

    PubMed

    Anastakis, Dimitri J

    2003-01-01

    As stakeholders vie for increasingly limited resources in health care, physicians would be well advised to hone their skills of negotiation. Negotiation is defined as a strategy to resolve a divergence of interests, be they real or perceived, where common interests also exist. Negotiation requires effective communication of goals, needs, and wants. The "basic needs" model of negotiation is best suited to the current health care environment. In this model, negotiator must to be able to identify their needs in the negotiation, establish their best alternative to a negotiated agreement, and identify their strategies and tactics for the negotiation.

  10. Outcome Knowledge and False Belief

    PubMed Central

    Ghrear, Siba E.; Birch, Susan A. J.; Bernstein, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Virtually every social interaction involves reasoning about the perspectives of others, or ‘theory of mind (ToM).’ Previous research suggests that it is difficult to ignore our current knowledge when reasoning about a more naïve perspective (i.e., the curse of knowledge). In this Mini Review, we discuss the implications of the curse of knowledge for certain aspects of ToM. Particularly, we examine how the curse of knowledge influences key measurements of false belief reasoning. In closing, we touch on the need to develop new measurement tools to discern the mechanisms involved in the curse of knowledge and false belief reasoning, and how they develop across the lifespan. PMID:26903922

  11. Does sleep promote false memories?

    PubMed

    Darsaud, Annabelle; Dehon, Hedwige; Lahl, Olaf; Sterpenich, Virginie; Boly, Mélanie; Dang-Vu, Thanh; Desseilles, Martin; Gais, Stephen; Matarazzo, Luca; Peters, Frédéric; Schabus, Manuel; Schmidt, Christina; Tinguely, Gilberte; Vandewalle, Gilles; Luxen, André; Maquet, Pierre; Collette, Fabienne

    2011-01-01

    Memory is constructive in nature so that it may sometimes lead to the retrieval of distorted or illusory information. Sleep facilitates accurate declarative memory consolidation but might also promote such memory distortions. We examined the influence of sleep and lack of sleep on the cerebral correlates of accurate and false recollections using fMRI. After encoding lists of semantically related word associates, half of the participants were allowed to sleep, whereas the others were totally sleep deprived on the first postencoding night. During a subsequent retest fMRI session taking place 3 days later, participants made recognition memory judgments about the previously studied associates, critical theme words (which had not been previously presented during encoding), and new words unrelated to the studied items. Sleep, relative to sleep deprivation, enhanced accurate and false recollections. No significant difference was observed in brain responses to false or illusory recollection between sleep and sleep deprivation conditions. However, after sleep but not after sleep deprivation (exclusive masking), accurate and illusory recollections were both associated with responses in the hippocampus and retrosplenial cortex. The data suggest that sleep does not selectively enhance illusory memories but rather tends to promote systems-level consolidation in hippocampo-neocortical circuits of memories subsequently associated with both accurate and illusory recollections. We further observed that during encoding, hippocampal responses were selectively larger for items subsequently accurately retrieved than for material leading to illusory memories. The data indicate that the early organization of memory during encoding is a major factor influencing subsequent production of accurate or false memories.

  12. Physician Event Reporting: Training the Next Generation of Physicians

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    353 Physician Event Reporting: Training the Next Generation of Physicians Quang-Tuyen Nguyen, Joanna Weinberg, Lee H. Hilborne Abstract...and the quality of health care by explicitly educating and training the next generation of physicians in these areas. Although quality of care is...implicit in most medical and other professional school curricula, medical students generally are not given the training necessary to meet the specific

  13. False advertising in the greenhouse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, K.

    1991-12-01

    Most scientists are convinced of the importance of their own research subjects. Broecker [1991] has deplored the temptation, if not the tendency, to go overboard and exaggerate this importance once funding enters the mind. In particular, he alleges inflated or even false claims by biological (and other) oceanographers regarding the relevance of their research to the "greenhouse effect," caused by the anthropogenic enhancement of the atmospheric CO2 content. He writes [Broecker, 1991, p. 191]: "In my estimation, on any list of subjects requiring intense study with regard to the prediction of the consequences of CO2 buildup in the atmosphere, I would place marine biological cycles near the bottom."

  14. The physician-surrogate relationship.

    PubMed

    Torke, Alexia M; Alexander, G Caleb; Lantos, John; Siegler, Mark

    2007-06-11

    The physician-patient relationship is a cornerstone of the medical encounter and has been analyzed extensively. But in many cases, this relationship is altered because patients are unable to make decisions for themselves. In such cases, physicians rely on surrogates, who are often asked to "speak for the patient." This view overlooks the fundamental fact that the surrogate decision maker cannot be just a passive spokesperson for the patient but is also an active agent who develops a complex relationship with the physician. Although there has been much analysis of the ethical guidelines by which surrogates should make decisions, there has been little previous analysis of the special features of the physician-surrogate relationship. Such an analysis seems crucial as the population ages and life-sustaining technologies improve, which is likely to make surrogate decision making even more common. We outline key issues affecting the physician-surrogate relationship and provide guidance for physicians who are making decisions with surrogates.

  15. The physician leader as logotherapist.

    PubMed

    Washburn, E R

    1998-01-01

    Today's physicians feel helpless and angry about changing conditions in the medical landscape. This is due, in large part, to our postmodernist world view and the influence of corporations on medical practice. The life and work of existentialist psychiatrist Viktor Frankl is proposed as a role model for physicians to take back control of their profession. Physician leaders are in the best position to bring the teachings and insight of Frankl's logotherapy to rank-and-file physicians in all practice settings, as well as into the board rooms of large medical corporations. This article considers the spiritual and moral troubles of American medicine, Frankl's answer to that affliction, and the implications of logotherapy for physician organizations and leadership. Physician executives are challenged to take up this task.

  16. Family Violence and Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Carol P.

    1991-01-01

    The acronym IDEALS summarizes family physicians' obligations when violence is suspected: to identify family violence; document injuries; educate families and ensure safety for victims; access resources and coordinate care; co-operate in the legal process; and provide support for families. Failure to respond reflects personal and professional experience and attitudes, fear of legal involvement, and lack of knowledge. Risks of intervention include physician burnout, physician overfunctioning, escalation of violence, and family disruption. PMID:21228987

  17. Family Physicians and Exercise Counseling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Douglas M.C.; Ciliska, Donna; Singer, Joel; Williams, Kimberly; Alleyne, Julia; Lindsay, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    This trial took 22 volunteer family physicians and randomly exposed some to training intervention and some to no training to study the effect on frequency and quality of exercise prescription to ambulatory adults. During the 6 weeks after training, the trained physicians addressed the issue of exercise with 35.3% of patients. The untrained physicians discussed exercise with only 8.6% of their patients. PMID:21221270

  18. Physicians in Nursing Homes: Effectiveness of Physician Accountability and Communication

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Julie C; Intrator, Orna; Wetle, Terrie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a measure of the perceptions of nursing home (NH) Directors of Nursing (DON) on the adequacy of physician care and to examine its variation as well as its construct validity. Design A nationwide cross-sectional study with primary data collection Setting 2043 NHs surveyed August 2009 – April 2011 Participants Directors of Nursing (DONs) and NH Administrators responded to questions pertaining to their perceptions of the care provided by physicians in their NH. Measurements Ten items were used to create three domains: medical staff attentiveness, physician communication, and staff concerns about physician practice. These were combined into an overall summary score measure called “Effectiveness of Physician Accountability and Communication” (EPAC). EPAC construct validity was ascertained from other DON questions and from a complementary survey of NH Administrators. RESULTS The established EPAC score is the first measure to capture specific components of the adequacy of physician care in NHs. EPAC exhibited good construct validity: more effective practices were correlated with greater physician involvement in discussions of Do-Not-Resuscitate orders, the frequency that the Medical Director checked on the medical care delivered by attending physician, the tightness of nursing home's control of its physician resources, and the DON's perception of whether or not avoidable hospitalizations and ER visits could be reduced with greater physician attention to resident needs. Conclusion As increased attention is given to the quality of care provided to vulnerable elders, effective measures of processes of care are essential. The EPAC measure provides an important new metric that can be used in these efforts. The goal is that future studies could use EPAC and its individual domains to shed light on the manner through which physician presence is related to resident outcomes in the NH setting. PMID:25858283

  19. Chemical Dependency and the Physician

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Keith H.; Seppala, Marvin D.; Schipper, Agnes M.

    2009-01-01

    Although the nature and scope of addictive disease are commonly reported in the lay press, the problem of physician addiction has largely escaped the public's attention. This is not due to physician immunity from the problem, because physicians have been shown to have addiction at a rate similar to or higher than that of the general population. Additionally, physicians' addictive disease (when compared with the general public) is typically advanced before identification and intervention. This delay in diagnosis relates to physicians' tendency to protect their workplace performance and image well beyond the time when their life outside of work has deteriorated and become chaotic. We provide an overview of the scope and risks of physician addiction, the challenges of recognition and intervention, the treatment of the addicted physician, the ethical and legal implications of an addicted physician returning to the workplace, and their monitored aftercare. It is critical that written policies for dealing with workplace addiction are in place at every employment venue and that they are followed to minimize risk of an adverse medical or legal outcome and to provide appropriate care to the addicted physician. PMID:19567716

  20. Physician ownership of medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Reschovsky, James; Cassil, Alwyn; Pham, Hoangmai H

    2010-12-01

    This Data Bulletin presents findings from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) 2008 Health Tracking Physician Survey, a nationally rep­resentative mail survey of U.S. physicians providing at least 20 hours per week of direct patient care. The sample of physicians was drawn from the American Medical Association master file and included active, nonfederal, office- and hospital-based physicians. Residents and fellows were excluded, as well as radiologists, anesthesiologists and pathologists. The survey includes responses from more than 4,700 phy­sicians, and the response rate was 62 percent. Since this Data Bulletin examines the extent of physician practice ownership or leasing of medical equipment, the sample was limited to 2,750 physicians practic­ing in community-based, physician-owned practices, who represent 58 percent of all physicians surveyed. Physicians employed by hospitals, who practiced in hospital-based settings or who worked in hospital-owned practices were excluded.

  1. Fractals for physicians.

    PubMed

    Thamrin, Cindy; Stern, Georgette; Frey, Urs

    2010-06-01

    There is increasing interest in the study of fractals in medicine. In this review, we provide an overview of fractals, of techniques available to describe fractals in physiological data, and we propose some reasons why a physician might benefit from an understanding of fractals and fractal analysis, with an emphasis on paediatric respiratory medicine where possible. Among these reasons are the ubiquity of fractal organisation in nature and in the body, and how changes in this organisation over the lifespan provide insight into development and senescence. Fractal properties have also been shown to be altered in disease and even to predict the risk of worsening of disease. Finally, implications of a fractal organisation include robustness to errors during development, ability to adapt to surroundings, and the restoration of such organisation as targets for intervention and treatment.

  2. Arise the systems physician.

    PubMed

    Scott, I; Phelps, G; Dalton, S

    2014-12-01

    Healthcare in Australia faces significant challenges. Variations in care, suboptimal safety and reliability, fragmentation of care and unsustainable cost increases are compounded by substantial overuse and underuse of clinical interventions. These problems arise not from intentional actions of individual clinicians, but from deficiencies in the design, operations and governance of systems of care. Physicians play an important role in optimising systems of care and, in doing so, must rely on enhanced skills in a range of domains. These include: how to evaluate and improve quality and safety of clinical processes; analyse and interpret clinical and administrative data in ways that can be used to enhance care delivery; build and lead cohesive multidisciplinary teams capable of solving operational defects and inefficient workarounds; and implement new and effective innovations in clinical service delivery. While clinical skills are essential in individual patient care, skills that improve systems of care targeting whole patient populations will become increasingly desirable and recognised as core skills.

  3. Increasing physician engagement: start with what's important to physicians.

    PubMed

    Stark, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Physician engagement has never been more important in this environment of healthcare reform--yet few healthcare organizations can define it or identify the elements of engagement that make increasing it possible. This may explain why a recent survey of physicians on the specifics regarding engagement from their perspective found, among other things, that levels of engagement over the past three years have increased at a lukewarm pace, at best. The survey confirmed that feeling engaged was very important to physicians' job satisfaction. It delved into what was important to them--and where there are gaps between what they want and what they are currently experiencing in their organizations--at a granular level, as well as measuring their current levels of engagement with their organizations and their work. It also explored the impact that feelings of engagement have on physicians' decisions around accepting or leaving a job or practice. A companion survey with administrators pointed out areas where there were gaps between their perceptions and those of physicians. The results point to actions that healthcare organizations can take to increase engagement--and, by extension, participation and buy-in--among their physician populations to reach critical goals and achieve greater success with key initiatives at a time of increasing physician shortages and competition between health systems for top physician talent.

  4. Medicare physician payments: impacts of changes on rural physicians.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Keith J; MacKinney, A Clinton; McBride, Timothy D

    2006-09-01

    Medicare payment disproportionately impacts rural physicians compared to urban. For example, 51% of rural physicians, compared to 44% of urban physicians, receive at least 38% of their payments from Medicare.1 Thus, the Medicare physician payment system is of significant rural interest. In this policy brief, we present the effects of the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act (MMA) of 2003 on physician payment rates in rural areas. Specifically, we examine the impact of creating a floor of 1.00 in the geographic practice cost index (GPCI) for work expense. We also show the effects of the Medicare incentive payment (MIP) for providing services in shortage areas and of the bonus for practicing in a physician scarcity area. Our principal findings are the following: (1) Increases to the GPCI for work expense accounted for a substantial percentage of the two-year increases in total payment to physicians in rural payment areas. (2) Increases in the conversion factor (CF) (base payment) accounted for most of the increases in total payment in all but 6 of the 89 Medicare payment localities; in those 6 areas, the dominant factor was GPCI adjustment. (3) Bonus payments are a more direct means of targeting increased payments to physicians in specific areas than is a general increase in one part of the payment formula.

  5. Writing to Heal Thyself: Physician as Person & Person as Physician

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasman, Deborah L.

    2006-01-01

    An experienced physician-teacher shares her own experiences with loss in medicine and loss in her personal life. Through personal writings during her divorce, she exemplifies the healing effect writing can have during difficult transformations that occur in life. She shares her bias that physicians need to accept and own their emotions and can use…

  6. 42 CFR 414.316 - Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for physician services to patients in... Payment for physician services to patients in training for self-dialysis and home dialysis. (a) For each patient, the carrier pays a flat amount that covers all physician services required to create the...

  7. Cape Verde in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A promontory nicknamed 'Cape Verde' can be seen jutting out from the walls of Victoria Crater in this false-color picture taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity. The rover took this picture on martian day, or sol, 1329 (Oct. 20, 2007), more than a month after it began descending down the crater walls -- and just 9 sols shy of its second Martian birthday on sol 1338 (Oct. 29, 2007). Opportunity landed on the Red Planet on Jan. 25, 2004. That's nearly four years ago on Earth, but only two on Mars because Mars takes longer to travel around the sun than Earth. One Martian year equals 687 Earth days.

    This view was taken using three panoramic-camera filters, admitting light with wavelengths centered at 750 nanometers (near infrared), 530 nanometers (green) and 430 nanometers (violet).

  8. Dusty Crater In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This false color image of a crater rim illustrates just how complete the dust cover can be. The small white/blue regions on the rim are of areas where the dust cover has been removed - due to heating on sun facing slopes or by gravitational effects.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 70.1, Longitude 352.8 East (7.2 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  9. Kickbacks, self-referrals, and false claims: the hazy boundaries of health-care fraud.

    PubMed

    Krause, Joan H

    2013-09-01

    The fraud and abuse laws that govern conduct related to the federal health-care programs, such as Medicare and Medicaid, impose broad and complex limitations on billing practices and financial relationships among providers. Given the potential consequences of engaging in fraudulent behavior, it is crucial that physicians appreciate the types of activities that may run afoul of these laws. This article summarizes the major aspects of the fraud laws that are most likely to have a daily impact on physician practice: the Civil False Claims Act, the Medicare and Medicaid Anti-Kickback Statute, and the so-called Stark Law prohibition on physician self-referrals.

  10. Ethics, economics, and physician reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Baily, Mary Ann

    2004-09-01

    There has been much debate among health care professionals over how physicians should be paid for their services. This paper addresses the topic through an economic and ethical analysis. It starts from the premise that fairness and cost effectiveness should be the goals of a good physician reimbursement system. Using the goals of fairness and cost effectiveness as measures, it examines the current market model. Finding that the current model provides neither fairness nor cost effectiveness, the paper compares the structure of the physician services market to the assumptions made by economists in the idealized market model. Two major imperfections are found in the former. These imperfections are an asymmetry in information between patient and physician, and the uneven and unpredictable distribution of health needs. These two imperfections are examined in light of the goals set out in the beginning of the paper. The paper finds that, given the imperfections, physician reimbursement as it currently exists is incompatible with the goals of fairness and cost effectiveness. In conclusion, several recommendations are made, most significantly a broadening of the interpretation of physician agency, i.e., physician as "agent," and the switch from a fee-for-service physician payment system to a salaried medical practice.

  11. Abortion and compelled physician speech.

    PubMed

    Orentlicher, David

    2015-01-01

    Informed consent mandates for abortion providers may infringe the First Amendment's freedom of speech. On the other hand, they may reinforce the physician's duty to obtain informed consent. Courts can promote both doctrines by ensuring that compelled physician speech pertains to medical facts about abortion rather than abortion ideology and that compelled speech is truthful and not misleading.

  12. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  13. Communicating Drug Information to Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Colman M.; Rodowskas, Christopher A.

    1976-01-01

    Reviews the studies of researchers who have attempted to identify the sources of drug information, both professional and commercial, utilized by physicians, discussing relationship between physicians' sources and the choice of drugs and severity of conditions being treated. Also notes new sources of drug information being considered by the Food…

  14. How consumers view physician advertising.

    PubMed

    Johns, H E; Moser, H R

    1989-01-01

    In this study, it was found that consumers generally favor advertising by physicians. They felt that newspaper and professional magazines were more appropriate media for such advertising than television, radio, billboards, telephones, direct mail, and popular magazines. Finally, most consumers have not seen physicians advertise, but of those who have, most have noticed such advertising in a newspaper.

  15. Physician Labor Market in Croatia

    PubMed Central

    Bagat, Mario; Sekelj Kauzlarić, Katarina

    2006-01-01

    Aim To analyze the physician labor market in Croatia with respect to the internship and employment opportunities, Croatian needs for physicians and specialists, and trends in physician labor market in the European Union (EU) in the context of EU enlargement. Methods Data were collected from the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, the Croatian Employment Service, and the Croatian Institute for Public Health. We compared the number of physicians waiting for internship before and 14 months after the implementation of the State Program for Intern Employment Stimulation. Also, the number of employed specialists in internal medicine, general surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, and pediatrics was compared with estimated number of specialists that will have been needed by the end of 2007. Average age of hospital physicians in the four specialties was determined and the number of Croatian physicians compared with the number of physicians in EU countries. Results The number of unemployed physicians waiting for internship decreased from 335 in 2003 to 82 in 2004, while a total number of unemployed physicians decreased from 436 to 379 (χ2 = 338, P<0.001). In October 2004, 79.3% of unemployed physicians waited for internship <6 months; of them, 89.2% waited for internship <3 months. In February 2005, 365 unemployed physicians were registered at the Croatian Employment Service and that number has been decreasing in the last couple of years. The number of employed specialists was lower than the estimated number of specialists needed in the analyzed specialists, as defined by the prescribed standards. A shortage of 328 internists, 319 surgeons, 209 gynecologists, and 69 pediatricians in Croatian hospitals is expected in 2007. Conclusion The lack of employment incentive seems to be the main reason for the large number of unemployed physicians waiting for internship before the implementation of the Employment Stimulation Program. According to the number of physicians per 100

  16. Ice Surfaces In False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This full resolution image shows a marked difference in the 'blueness' of the ice surfaces. The lower (presumably older) surface is oranger and the top (presumably younger) surface is blue. This may represent the fresher ice of the upper surface which has not yet covered with as much dust as the lower surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.8, Longitude 302.1 East (57.9 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  17. Polar Layers in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image again illustrates the oranger/bluer nature of the polar layers.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 80.6, Longitude 70.2 East (289.8 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Sand Sea in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The theme for the weeks of 1/17 and 1/24 is the north polar region of Mars as seen in false color THEMIS images. Ice/frost will typically appear as bright blue in color; dust mantled ice will appear in tones of red/orange.

    This image is of part of the northern sand sea. The small dunes in the image are bluer than the ice/dust filled central crater.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 73.7, Longitude 323 East (37 West). 40 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Mimas Showing False Colors #2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This false color image of Saturn's moon Mimas reveals variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    This image is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined with a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences to create the final product.

    Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of the image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in the surface composition or the sizes of grains making up the icy soil.

    This image was obtained when the Cassini spacecraft was above 25 degrees south, 134 degrees west latitude and longitude. The Sun-Mimas-spacecraft angle was 45 degrees and north is at the top.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian

  20. Southern Spring in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The Odyssey spacecraft has completed a full Mars year of observations of the red planet. For the next several weeks the Image of the Day will look back over this first mars year. It will focus on four themes: 1) the poles - with the seasonal changes seen in the retreat and expansion of the caps; 2) craters - with a variety of morphologies relating to impact materials and later alteration, both infilling and exhumation; 3) channels - the clues to liquid surface flow; and 4) volcanic flow features. While some images have helped answer questions about the history of Mars, many have raised new questions that are still being investigated as Odyssey continues collecting data as it orbits Mars.

    This image was collected June 25, 2003 during the southern spring season. This false color image shows both the layered ice cap and darker 'spots' that are seen only when the sun first lights the polar surface.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -82.3, Longitude 306 East (54 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the

  1. White Rock in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image shows the wind eroded deposit in Pollack Crater called 'White Rock'. This image was collected during the Southern Fall Season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -8, Longitude 25.2 East (334.8 West). 0 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of

  2. Iani Chaos in False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image of a portion of the Iani Chaos region was collected during the Southern Fall season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -2.6 Longitude 342.4 East (17.6 West). 36 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The

  3. Effect of Physician Tutorials on Prescribing Patterns of Graduate Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Lawrence E.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Physicians in an experimental group were surveyed to assess their knowledge of the effectiveness, cost, and side effects of antibiotics, and a tutorial was developed to modify some prescribing patterns. Prescribing patterns were statistically different. (Author/MLW)

  4. 42 CFR 417.479 - Requirements for physician incentive plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for physician incentive plans. 417.479 Section 417.479 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS, AND HEALTH CARE PREPAYMENT PLANS...

  5. Mimas Showing False Colors #1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    False color images of Saturn's moon, Mimas, reveal variation in either the composition or texture across its surface.

    During its approach to Mimas on Aug. 2, 2005, the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera obtained multi-spectral views of the moon from a range of 228,000 kilometers (142,500 miles).

    The image at the left is a narrow angle clear-filter image, which was separately processed to enhance the contrast in brightness and sharpness of visible features. The image at the right is a color composite of narrow-angle ultraviolet, green, infrared and clear filter images, which have been specially processed to accentuate subtle changes in the spectral properties of Mimas' surface materials. To create this view, three color images (ultraviolet, green and infrared) were combined into a single black and white picture that isolates and maps regional color differences. This 'color map' was then superimposed over the clear-filter image at the left.

    The combination of color map and brightness image shows how the color differences across the Mimas surface materials are tied to geological features. Shades of blue and violet in the image at the right are used to identify surface materials that are bluer in color and have a weaker infrared brightness than average Mimas materials, which are represented by green.

    Herschel crater, a 140-kilometer-wide (88-mile) impact feature with a prominent central peak, is visible in the upper right of each image. The unusual bluer materials are seen to broadly surround Herschel crater. However, the bluer material is not uniformly distributed in and around the crater. Instead, it appears to be concentrated on the outside of the crater and more to the west than to the north or south. The origin of the color differences is not yet understood. It may represent ejecta material that was excavated from inside Mimas when the Herschel impact occurred. The bluer color of these materials may be caused by subtle differences in

  6. Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Hudon, Catherine; Lambert, Mireille; Almirall, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the reliability and validity of the newly developed Physician Enabling Skills Questionnaire (PESQ) by assessing its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, concurrent validity with patient-centred care, and predictive validity with patient activation and patient enablement. Design Validation study. Setting Saguenay, Que. Participants One hundred patients with at least 1 chronic disease who presented in a waiting room of a regional health centre family medicine unit. Main outcome measures Family physicians’ enabling skills, measured with the PESQ at 2 points in time (ie, while in the waiting room at the family medicine unit and 2 weeks later through a mail survey); patient-centred care, assessed with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument; patient activation, assessed with the Patient Activation Measure; and patient enablement, assessed with the Patient Enablement Instrument. Results The internal consistency of the 6 subscales of the PESQ was adequate (Cronbach α = .69 to .92). The test-retest reliability was very good (r = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84 to 0.93). Concurrent validity with the Patient Perception of Patient-Centredness instrument was good (r = −0.67; 95% CI −0.78 to −0.53; P < .001). The PESQ accounts for 11% of the total variance with the Patient Activation Measure (r2 = 0.11; P = .002) and 19% of the variance with the Patient Enablement Instrument (r2 = 0.19; P < .001). Conclusion The newly developed PESQ presents good psychometric properties, allowing for its use in practice and research. PMID:26889507

  7. Physician assistants in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ian W.; Hooker, Roderick S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To analyze the health policies related to physician assistants (PAs) and to understand the factors influencing this medical work force movement. Quality of evidence This work combines a review of the literature and qualitative information, and it serves as a historical bookmark. The approach was selected when attempts to obtain reports or literature using customary electronic bibliography (PubMed, CINAHL, Google Scholar, EBSCO, and MEDLINE) searches in English and French, from 1970 through 2010, identified only 14 documents (including gray literature) of relevance. Reports, provincial documents, and information from developers of the PA movement supplemented the literature base. Main message The historical development of the role of PAs in Canada spans 2 decades. There are now more than 250 PAs, most working in family medicine and emergency medicine. Enabling legislation for PAs has been formalized in Manitoba, and 3 provinces have recognized PAs in various policy statements or initiatives. Three universities and 1 military training centre have enrolled more than 120 students in PA programs. Retired PAs of the Canadian Forces, returning ex-patriot Canadians who had trained as PAs in PA programs in the United States, and American immigrants are working as PAs in Canada. Demonstration projects are under way to better understand the usefulness of PAs in various medical settings. Conclusion For a public health policy enactment of this size and effect, the literature on PAs in Canada is sparse and limited. In spite of this, PA employment is expanding, family medicine practices are using PAs, and there is enabling legislation planned. The result will likely be increased use of PAs. Documentation about PAs, review of their use, and outcomes research are needed to evaluate this new type of clinician in Canadian society. PMID:21402955

  8. Multispecialty physician networks in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    Stukel, Therese A; Glazier, Richard H; Schultz, Susan E; Guan, Jun; Zagorski, Brandon M; Gozdyra, Peter; Henry, David A

    2013-01-01

    Background Large multispecialty physician group practices, with a central role for primary care practitioners, have been shown to achieve high-quality, low-cost care for patients with chronic disease. We assessed the extent to which informal multispecialty physician networks in Ontario could be identified by using health administrative data to exploit natural linkages among patients, physicians, and hospitals based on existing patient flow. Methods We linked each Ontario resident to his or her usual provider of primary care over the period from fiscal year 2008/2009 to fiscal year 2010/2011. We linked each specialist to the hospital where he or she performed the most inpatient services. We linked each primary care physician to the hospital where most of his or her ambulatory patients were admitted for non-maternal medical care. Each resident was then linked to the same hospital as his or her usual provider of primary care. We computed “loyalty” as the proportion of care to network residents provided by physicians and hospitals within their network. Smaller clusters were aggregated to create networks based on a minimum population size, distance, and loyalty. Networks were not constrained geographically. Results We identified 78 multispecialty physician networks, comprising 12 410 primary care physicians, 14 687 specialists, and 175 acute care hospitals serving a total of 12 917 178 people. Median network size was 134 723 residents, 125 primary care physicians, and 143 specialists. Virtually all eligible residents were linked to a usual provider of primary care and to a network. Most specialists (93.5%) and primary care physicians (98.2%) were linked to a hospital. Median network physician loyalty was 68.4% for all physician visits and 81.1% for primary care visits. Median non-maternal admission loyalty was 67.4%. Urban networks had lower loyalties and were less self-contained but had more health care resources. Interpretation We demonstrated the feasibility

  9. Physician wellness: a missing quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jean E; Lemaire, Jane B; Ghali, William A

    2009-11-14

    When physicians are unwell, the performance of health-care systems can be suboptimum. Physician wellness might not only benefit the individual physician, it could also be vital to the delivery of high-quality health care. We review the work stresses faced by physicians, the barriers to attending to wellness, and the consequences of unwell physicians to the individual and to health-care systems. We show that health systems should routinely measure physician wellness, and discuss the challenges associated with implementation.

  10. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  11. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  12. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  13. 20 CFR 410.471 - Conclusion by physician regarding miner's disability or death.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Conclusion by physician regarding miner's... to Pneumoconiosis § 410.471 Conclusion by physician regarding miner's disability or death. The... statement of similar import, being a conclusion upon the ultimate issue to be decided by the...

  14. 20 CFR 220.58 - Objections to the designated physician or psychologist.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Objections to the designated physician or psychologist. 220.58 Section 220.58 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT DETERMINING DISABILITY Consultative Examinations § 220.58 Objections to the designated physician or psychologist. A...

  15. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  16. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  17. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  18. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  19. 42 CFR Appendix B to Part 130 - Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit B Appendix B to Part 130 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... 130—Confidential Physician or Nurse Practitioner Affidavit ER31MY00.002 ER31MY00.003...

  20. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or clinical social worker... nurse practitioner, physician assistant, certified nurse midwife, clinical psychologist, or...

  1. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  2. 42 CFR 405.2415 - Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to nurse... Services and supplies incident to nurse practitioner and physician assistant services. (a) Services and supplies incident to a nurse practitioner's or physician assistant's services are reimbursable under...

  3. 42 CFR 405.520 - Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse practitioner's, and clinical nurse specialists' services and services furnished incident to their professional... for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.520 Payment for a physician assistant's, nurse...

  4. 42 CFR 415.130 - Conditions for payment: Physician pathology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... pathology services. (a) Definitions. The following definitions are used in this section. (1) Covered... technical component of physician pathology services to fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who...

  5. 42 CFR 415.130 - Conditions for payment: Physician pathology services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Conditions for payment: Physician pathology... pathology services. (a) Definitions. The following definitions are used in this section. (1) Covered... technical component of physician pathology services to fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who...

  6. 38 CFR 17.96 - Medication prescribed by non-VA physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medication prescribed by non-VA physicians. 17.96 Section 17.96 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Outpatient Treatment § 17.96 Medication prescribed by non-VA physicians. Any...

  7. 42 CFR 415.70 - Limits on compensation for physician services in providers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limits on compensation for physician services in providers. 415.70 Section 415.70 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM SERVICES FURNISHED BY PHYSICIANS IN...

  8. Role of the Physician Anesthesiologist

    MedlinePlus

    ... range of knowledge about medications and how the human body works and responds to the stress of surgery at all stages of a procedure. Think of physician anesthesiologists as your seat belt during ...

  9. Medicare physician payments and spending.

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2006-10-09

    The Medicare program's physician payment method is intended to control spending while ensuring beneficiary access to physician services, but there are signs that it may not be working. The physician's role in the health care delivery system as the primary source of information and treatment options, together with growing demand for services and the imperfect state of knowledge about appropriate service use, challenge Medicare's ability to achieve these two goals. This issue brief describes the history of physician spending and the contribution of escalating service use and intensity of services to the rise in Medicare outlays, setting the stage for further discussion about the use of the Medicare payment system to control spending and ensure access.

  10. ERISA litigation and physician autonomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, P D; Pomfret, S D

    2000-02-16

    The Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA), enacted in 1974 to regulate pension and health benefit plans, is a complex statute that dominates the managed care environment. Physicians must understand ERISA's role in the relationship between themselves and managed care organizations (MCOs), including how it can influence clinical decision making and physician autonomy. This article describes ERISA's central provisions and how ERISA influences health care delivery in MCOs. We analyze ERISA litigation trends in 4 areas: professional liability, utilization management, state legislative initiatives, and compensation arrangements. This analysis demonstrates how courts have interpreted ERISA to limit physician autonomy and subordinate clinical decision making to MCOs' cost containment decisions. Physicians should support efforts to amend ERISA, thus allowing greater state regulatory oversight of MCOs and permitting courts to hold MCOs accountable for their role in medical decision making.

  11. [Collaboration between occupational physicians and other specialists including insurance physicians].

    PubMed

    Rijkenberg, A M; van Sprundel, M; Stassijns, G

    2013-09-01

    Collaboration between various stakeholders is essential for a well-operating vocational rehabilitation process. Researchers have mentioned, among other players, insurance physicians, the curative sector and employers. In 2011 the WHO organised the congress "Connecting Health and Labour: What role for occupational health in primary care". The congress was also attended by representatives of the WONCA (World Organisations of Family Medicine). In general, everyone agreed that occupational health aspects should continue to be seen as an integral part of primary health care. However, it is not easy to find literature on this subject. For this reason we conducted a review. We searched for literature relating to collaboration with occupational physicians in Dutch, English and German between 2001 and autumn 2011. Our attention focused on cooperation with specialists and insurance physicians. Therefore, we searched PUBMED using MeSH terms and made use of the database from the "Tijdschrift voor bedrijfs- en verzekeringsgeneeskunde (TBV) [Dutch Journal for Occupational - and Insurance Medicine]". We also checked the database from the "Deutsches Arzteblatt [German Medical Journal]" and made use of the online catalogue from THIEME - eJOURNALS. Last but not least, I used the online catalogue from the German paper "Arbeits -, Sozial -, Umweltmedizin [Occupational -, Social -, Milieu Medicine]". Additionally, we made use of the "snowball - method" to find relevant literature. We found many references to this subject. The Netherlands in particular has done a lot of research in this field. However, there is little research on the cooperation between occupational physicians and specialists; in particular insurance physicians. This is interesting, because several authors have mentioned its importance. However, cooperation with other specialists seems not to be the norm. Therefore, cooperation between curative physicians (specialists but also family doctors), insurance physicians and

  12. Sex role ideology among physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Leichner, P.; Harper, D.

    1982-01-01

    Physicians have been accused by some feminist writers of having traditional views on sex roles that make them part of society's oppressive power structure and therefore responsible in part for the high incidence of psychologic problems and drug dependency among women. To assess whether physicians' attitudes towards women are indeed polarized in a traditional fashion, a sex role ideology questionnaire was given to all practising physicians belonging to the Manitoba Medical Association. Overall the physicians were found to be more feminist than male college students and a group of women with traditional beliefs. Psychiatrists, who had the highest adjusted group mean score on a sex role ideology scale (high indicating feminist beliefs), were found to be significantly more feminist than family practitioners, surgeons, and obstetricians and gynecologists, although not more so than internists, radiologists, pediatricians and anesthesiologists. These findings do not support the assumption that physicians have traditional views that reflect those of society. However, the significant differences between specialties emphasize the need for educating physicians and medical students in the behaviour of women. PMID:7104916

  13. 49 CFR 520.2 - Policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Policy. 520.2 Section 520.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... affect the quality of the human environment....

  14. 48 CFR 7.300 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 7.300 Section 7.300 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING ACQUISITION PLANNING Contractor Versus Government Performance 7.300...

  15. 48 CFR 232.502 - Preaward matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preaward matters. 232.502 Section 232.502 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT....502 Preaward matters....

  16. 48 CFR 232.503 - Postaward matters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Postaward matters. 232.503 Section 232.503 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT....503 Postaward matters....

  17. 48 CFR 225.7703 - Acquisition of products or services other than small arms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Acquisition of products or services other than small arms. 225.7703 Section 225.7703 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... than small arms....

  18. 49 CFR 220.2 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 220.2 Section 220.2 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD COMMUNICATIONS General § 220.2...

  19. 47 CFR 10.310 - Federal alert gateway. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal alert gateway. 10.310 Section 10.310 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.310 Federal alert gateway....

  20. 47 CFR 10.300 - Alert aggregator. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alert aggregator. 10.300 Section 10.300 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL COMMERCIAL MOBILE ALERT SYSTEM System Architecture § 10.300 Alert aggregator....

  1. 48 CFR 628.309 - Contract clauses for workers' compensation insurance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contract clauses for workers' compensation insurance. 628.309 Section 628.309 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT... workers' compensation insurance....

  2. 48 CFR 53.301-1423 - Inventory Verification Survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Inventory Verification Survey. 53.301-1423 Section 53.301-1423 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Survey. ER05AP04.000...

  3. 49 CFR 178.347 - Specification DOT 407; cargo tank motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification DOT 407; cargo tank motor vehicle...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation §...

  4. 49 CFR 178.348 - Specification DOT 412; cargo tank motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification DOT 412; cargo tank motor vehicle...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation §...

  5. 49 CFR 178.346 - Specification DOT 406; cargo tank motor vehicle.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification DOT 406; cargo tank motor vehicle...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SPECIFICATIONS FOR PACKAGINGS Specifications for Containers for Motor Vehicle Transportation §...

  6. 48 CFR 970.0370 - Management Controls and Improvements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0370 Management Controls and Improvements. ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Management Controls...

  7. 48 CFR 1327.201 - Patent and copyright infringement liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patent and copyright... GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 1327.201 Patent and copyright infringement liability....

  8. 48 CFR 27.201 - Patent and copyright infringement liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patent and copyright... REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 27.201 Patent and copyright infringement liability....

  9. 48 CFR 1427.201 - Patent and copyright infringement liability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patent and copyright... INTERIOR GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Patents and Copyrights 1427.201 Patent and copyright infringement liability....

  10. 47 CFR 22.703 - Separate rural subscriber station authorization not required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... or base station from which they receive service. ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Separate rural subscriber station authorization... subscriber station authorization not required. A separate authorization is not required for rural...

  11. 48 CFR 1850.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 1850.104 Section 1850.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION... 1850.104 Residual powers....

  12. 48 CFR 970.5001 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 970.5001 Section 970.5001 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY SUPPLEMENTARY....5001 Residual powers....

  13. 48 CFR 250.104 - Residual powers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Residual powers. 250.104 Section 250.104 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Contractual Actions 250.104 Residual powers....

  14. 48 CFR 206.302-3 - Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research capability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Industrial mobilization; or engineering, development, or research capability. 206.302-3 Section 206.302-3 Federal Acquisition... engineering, development, or research capability....

  15. 48 CFR 1815.609 - Limited use of data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limited use of data. 1815.609 Section 1815.609 Federal Acquisition Regulations System NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... Limited use of data....

  16. 48 CFR 27.204 - Patented technology under trade agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Patented technology under trade agreements. 27.204 Section 27.204 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Patented technology under trade agreements....

  17. 43 CFR 2912.1 - Nature of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Nature of interest. 2912.1 Section 2912.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Nature of interest....

  18. 49 CFR 236.764 - Locking, lever operated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Locking, lever operated. 236.764 Section 236.764... Locking, lever operated. The mechanical locking of an interlocking machine which is actuated by means of the lever....

  19. 48 CFR 25.702 - Prohibition on contracting with entities that conduct restricted business operations in Sudan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prohibition on contracting with entities that conduct restricted business operations in Sudan. 25.702 Section 25.702 Federal... operations in Sudan....

  20. 46 CFR Appendix D to Subpart C of... - Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form [FMC-69

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean Transportation Intermediary (OTI) Group Bond Form... OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE LICENSING, FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS, AND GENERAL DUTIES FOR OCEAN TRANSPORTATION INTERMEDIARIES Financial Responsibility Requirements; Claims Against...

  1. 47 CFR 76.227 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 76.227 Section 76.227 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cablecasting § 76.227...

  2. 42 CFR 422.672 - Appointment of representatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Appointment of representatives. 422.672 Section 422.672 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... prohibited by law....

  3. 47 CFR 27.59 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 27.59 Section 27.59 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.59...

  4. 48 CFR 25.703 - Prohibition on contracting with entities that engage in certain activities relating to Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Prohibition on contracting with entities that engage in certain activities relating to Iran. 25.703 Section 25.703 Federal... to Iran....

  5. 48 CFR 803.570 - Commercial advertising.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commercial advertising. 803.570 Section 803.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL... Commercial advertising....

  6. 48 CFR 225.7009 - Restriction on ball and roller bearings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restriction on ball and roller bearings. 225.7009 Section 225.7009 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... roller bearings....

  7. 48 CFR 4.501 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 4.501 Section 4.501 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 4.501...

  8. 48 CFR 504.570 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 504.570 Section 504.570 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 504.570...

  9. 48 CFR 504.500 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 504.500 Section 504.500 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS Electronic Commerce in Contracting 504.500...

  10. 48 CFR 970.3770 - Facilities management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Facilities management. 970... REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Facilities Management Contracting 970.3770 Facilities management....

  11. 48 CFR 970.2201-2 - Overtime management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Overtime management. 970... SUPPLEMENTARY REGULATIONS DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Application of Labor Policies 970.2201-2 Overtime management....

  12. 47 CFR 5.81 - Discontinuance of station operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discontinuance of station operation. 5.81 Section 5.81 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE (OTHER... Commission's Office of Engineering and Technology for cancellation....

  13. 49 CFR 37.169 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 37.169 Section 37.169 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Provision of Service § 37.169...

  14. 49 CFR 37.39 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 37.39 Section 37.39 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation TRANSPORTATION SERVICES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Applicability § 37.39...

  15. 48 CFR 219.502 - Setting aside acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Setting aside acquisitions..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS Set-Asides for Small Business 219.502 Setting aside acquisitions....

  16. 48 CFR 225.7004 - Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restriction on acquisition of foreign buses. 225.7004 Section 225.7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on acquisition of foreign buses....

  17. 48 CFR 3032.006 - Reduction or suspension of contract payments upon finding of fraud.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Reduction or suspension of contract payments upon finding of fraud. 3032.006 Section 3032.006 Federal Acquisition Regulations System... finding of fraud....

  18. 46 CFR 308.305 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 308.305 Section 308.305 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.305...

  19. 46 CFR 308.301 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 308.301 Section 308.301 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION EMERGENCY OPERATIONS WAR RISK INSURANCE Second Seamen's War Risk Insurance § 308.301...

  20. 48 CFR 1524.104 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Solicitation provisions....104 Solicitation provisions. The Contracting Officer shall insert the provision at 1552.224-70, Social... solicitations....

  1. 48 CFR 245.201 - Solicitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Solicitation. 245.201... OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Solicitation and Evaluation Procedures 245.201 Solicitation....

  2. 48 CFR 239.7201 - Solicitation requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Solicitation requirements... Standards 239.7201 Solicitation requirements. Contracting officers shall ensure that all applicable Federal Information Processing Standards are incorporated into solicitations....

  3. 48 CFR 2116.105 - Solicitation provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Solicitation provision... TYPES TYPES OF CONTRACTS Selecting Contract Types 2116.105 Solicitation provision. FAR 16.105 has no... solicitations....

  4. 48 CFR 606.570 - Solicitation provision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Solicitation provision... ACQUISITION PLANNING COMPETITION REQUIREMENTS Competition Advocates 606.570 Solicitation provision. The... solicitations exceeding the simplified acquisition threshold....

  5. 48 CFR 514.201-6 - Solicitation provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Solicitation provisions... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Solicitation of Bids 514.201-6 Solicitation provisions... solicitation....

  6. 48 CFR 970.0470 - Department of Energy Directives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Department of Energy Directives. 970.0470 Section 970.0470 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AGENCY... Energy Directives....

  7. 49 CFR 178.33b - Specification 2S; inner nonrefillable plastic receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 2S; inner nonrefillable plastic receptacles. 178.33b Section 178.33b Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... nonrefillable plastic receptacles....

  8. 50 CFR 600.735 - Penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Penalties. 600.735 Section 600.735 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... applicable law....

  9. 43 CFR 2650.3 - Lawful entries, lawful settlements, and mining claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lawful entries, lawful settlements, and mining claims. 2650.3 Section 2650.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... mining claims....

  10. 48 CFR 3017.204 - Contracts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contracts. 3017.204... ACQUISITION REGULATION (HSAR) CONTRACT METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SPECIAL CONTRACTING METHODS Options 3017.204 Contracts....

  11. 49 CFR 195.452 - Pipeline integrity management in high consequence areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pipeline integrity management in high consequence...) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) PIPELINE SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE Operation and Maintenance Pipeline...

  12. 47 CFR 24.710 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24.710 Section 24.710 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for Broadband PCS §...

  13. 47 CFR 22.961-22.967 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 22.961-22.967 Section 22.961-22.967 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Cellular Radiotelephone Service §§...

  14. 47 CFR 24.832 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24.832 Section 24.832 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Interim Application, Licensing, and Processing Rules for Broadband PCS §...

  15. 47 CFR 24.101 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24.101 Section 24.101 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Narrowband PCS §...

  16. 47 CFR 24.130 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24.130 Section 24.130 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Narrowband PCS §...

  17. 47 CFR 24.320 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24.320 Section 24.320 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for Narrowband PCS §...

  18. 49 CFR 580.6 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 580.6 Section 580.6 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ODOMETER DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS §...

  19. 47 CFR 24.713 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 24.713 Section 24.713 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Competitive Bidding Procedures for Broadband PCS §...

  20. 47 CFR 22.215 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 22.215 Section 22.215 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Competitive Bidding Procedures §...

  1. 47 CFR 32.15 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 32.15 Section 32.15 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions §...

  2. 48 CFR 1511.011-79 - Information resources management.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Information resources... AGENCY ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS 1511.011-79 Information resources management. The... Resource Management, in all solicitations and contracts....

  3. 43 CFR 1784.4 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Public participation. 1784.4 Section 1784.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT... Public participation....

  4. 48 CFR 5416.203 - Fixed-price contracts with economic price adjustment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fixed-price contracts with economic price adjustment. 5416.203 Section 5416.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... contracts with economic price adjustment....

  5. 48 CFR 225.7005 - Restriction on certain chemical weapons antidote.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restriction on certain chemical weapons antidote. 225.7005 Section 225.7005 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... on certain chemical weapons antidote....

  6. 48 CFR 225.7017 - Utilization of domestic photovoltaic devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Utilization of domestic photovoltaic devices. 225.7017 Section 225.7017 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... photovoltaic devices....

  7. 46 CFR 8.320 - Classification society authorization to issue international certificates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Classification society authorization to issue... Classification society authorization to issue international certificates. (a) The Commandant may authorize a recognized classification society to issue certain international convention certificates. Authorization...

  8. 47 CFR 73.6023 - Distributed transmission systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Distributed transmission systems. 73.6023... RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Class A Television Broadcast Stations § 73.6023 Distributed transmission... distributed transmission system....

  9. 46 CFR 154.516 - Piping: Hull protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Piping: Hull protection. 154.516 Section 154.516 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY... manifolds; and (c) Pump seals....

  10. 48 CFR 215.404 - Proposal analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Proposal analysis. 215.404 Section 215.404 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT... Proposal analysis....

  11. 47 CFR 74.643 - Interference to geostationary-satellites.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interference to geostationary-satellites. 74... Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.643 Interference to geostationary-satellites. Applicants and... geostationary-satellites....

  12. 47 CFR 80.333 - Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite..., Alarm, Urgency and Safety Procedures § 80.333 Stations in the maritime mobile-satellite service. The...-satellite service....

  13. 47 CFR 25.219 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 25.219 Section 25.219 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.219...

  14. 47 CFR 2.1055 - Measurements required: Frequency stability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measurements required: Frequency stability. 2.1055 Section 2.1055 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization...

  15. 49 CFR 236.731 - Controller, circuit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Controller, circuit. A device for opening and closing electric circuits. ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Controller, circuit. 236.731 Section 236.731 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD...

  16. 49 CFR 236.720 - Circuit, common return.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Circuit, common return. A term applied where one wire is used for the return of more than one electric circuit. ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Circuit, common return. 236.720 Section...

  17. 45 CFR 1627.7 - Tax sheltered annuities, retirement accounts and pensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tax sheltered annuities, retirement accounts and... SERVICES CORPORATION SUBGRANTS AND MEMBERSHIP FEES OR DUES § 1627.7 Tax sheltered annuities, retirement..., retirement account, or pension fund....

  18. 49 CFR 236.206 - Battery or power supply with respect to relay; location.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Battery or power supply with respect to relay... to relay; location. The battery or power supply for each signal control relay circuit, where an open... from the relay....

  19. 47 CFR 25.402 - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false 25.402 Section 25.402 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Competitive Bidding Procedures for DARS § 25.402...

  20. 48 CFR 1616.7002 - Clause-contracts based on cost analysis (experience rated).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Clause-contracts based on... FEHBP contracts based on cost analysis (experience rated). ... OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS ACQUISITION REGULATION...

  1. 48 CFR 219.401 - General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false General. 219.401 Section 219.401 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF... point for interface with the SBA....

  2. 48 CFR 225.7003 - Restrictions on acquisition of specialty metals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Restrictions on acquisition of specialty metals. 225.7003 Section 225.7003 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... Restrictions on acquisition of specialty metals....

  3. 49 CFR 178.33 - Specification 2P; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 2P; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles. 178.33 Section 178.33 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... nonrefillable metal receptacles....

  4. 49 CFR 178.33a - Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specification 2Q; inner nonrefillable metal receptacles. 178.33a Section 178.33a Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... nonrefillable metal receptacles....

  5. 49 CFR 229.303 - Applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Applicability. 229.303 Section 229.303 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics §...

  6. 49 CFR 229.305 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definitions. 229.305 Section 229.305 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics §...

  7. 50 CFR 38.5 - Emergency authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM MIDWAY ATOLL NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE Executive Authority; Authorized... Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency authority. 38.5 Section...

  8. 19 CFR 111.32 - False information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False information. 111.32 Section 111.32 Customs... CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.32 False information. A broker must... procure the giving of, any false or misleading information or testimony in any matter pending before...

  9. Physician recruitment success: how to acquire top physician talent.

    PubMed

    Rosman, Judy

    2011-01-01

    This article provides step-by-step instructions on how to complete the strategic planning needed to ensure success in physician recruitment efforts, outlines how to build a successful recruitment team, and provides helpful advice to avoid common recruiting mistakes that can sabotage the recruitment efforts of even the best practices. This article discusses the role of the in-house hospital recruiter in the recruitment process, how to evaluate independent search firms, how to make use of the physicians in your group to ensure success during a site visit, and how to ensure that your new hire will be able to successfully develop a practice. The article also discusses how to find and use benchmarking data to ensure that your compensation package is competitive, and provides advice on how to help your new physician hit the ground running.

  10. Find a Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Physician

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physiatry About AAPM&R Loading Find a PM&R Physician Welcome to Find a PM&R Physician, ... Find Physicians by Name Loading FieldSet Find PM&R Physicians Near Me Starting Zip/Postal Code Distance ( ...

  11. [Erasmian influences among renaissance physicians].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of Erasmus's ethic humanism consisted of ideals of universal peace and tolerance. These ideals are exposed in the great works of his maturity Colloquia and Adagia read and meditated on by renaissance physicians in England, Spain, Germany, Italy, and also in the New Spain. Erasmus's readers were learned and numerous. Among his pupils and supporters in Spain were humanist physicians of Madrid such as Doctors Suárez and Juan de Jarava. Other supporters were in the group of the Sevillian physicians and naturalists. Among the Erasmist physicians, residing in other regions was doctor Andrés Laguna, who translated into Spanish the Dioscorides treatise on medical botany. Many physicians living in New Spain owned copies of Erasmian works, such as Doctors Pedro López (the second) and Juan de la Fuente, who was in charge of the first medical chair at the University of Mexico. The protophysician Francisco Hernández, in response to a petition of Archbishop Pedro Moya de Contreras, wrote a Christian catechism of Erasmian influence, destined for humanists in NewSpain. As asserted by Johan Huizinga, Erasmus was the sole humanist who really wrote for everyone, i.e. for all cultured people.

  12. Career changes among Saskatchewan physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S; Goplen, G; Houston, D S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine how often Saskatchewan physicians changed career paths during medical training and practice. DESIGN: Population survey (mailed questionnaire). SETTING: Saskatchewan. PARTICIPANTS: All 1077 active members of the Saskatchewan Medical Association were sent a questionnaire; 493 (45.8%) responded. OUTCOME MEASURES: Long-term career goal or plan in next-to-last year of undergraduate medical school, probable choice of career if forced to choose at that time, and number of physicians who changed their field of training or practice at any time since graduation. RESULTS: In all, 57.8% (237/410) of the respondents were currently practising in a field different from that planned in their next-to-last year of medical school, 63.5% (275/436) were not practising in the field they would have chosen if forced to at that time, and 42.9% (211/492) had changed their field of training or practice at some time since graduation. Older physicians, those who graduated outside of Canada and specialists were the most likely to have changed career paths, family physicians, and those who graduated in Saskatchewan were the least likely to have changed. CONCLUSION: The current system of postgraduate training in Canada does not permit career changes of the sort made by most of the practising Saskatchewan physicians in the survey sample. The implications of this new system are as yet unknown but require careful monitoring. PMID:8625024

  13. Psychiatric rehabilitation education for physicians.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Abraham; Eastwood, Diane

    2013-06-01

    As part of a rapidly spreading reform toward recovery-oriented services, mental health care systems are adopting Psychiatric/Psychosocial Rehabilitation (PSR). Accordingly, PSR education and training programs are now available and accessible. Although psychiatrists and sometimes other physicians (such as family physicians) provide important services to people with serious mental illnesses and may, therefore, need knowledge and skill in PSR, it seems that the medical profession has been slow to participate in PSR education. Based on our experience working in Canada as academic psychiatrists who are also Certified Psychiatric Rehabilitation Practitioners (CPRPs), we offer descriptions of several Canadian initiatives that involve physicians in PSR education. Multiple frameworks guide PSR education for physicians. First, guidance is provided by published PSR principles, such as the importance of self-determination (www.psrrpscanada.ca). Second, guidance is provided by adult education (andragogy) principles, emphasizing the importance of addressing attitudes in addition to knowledge and skills (Knowles, Holton, & Swanson, 2011). Third, guidance in Canada is provided by Canadian Medical Education Directives for Specialists (CanMEDS) principles, which delineate the multiple roles of physicians beyond that of medical expert (Frank, 2005) and have recently been adopted in Australia (Boyce, Spratt, Davies, & McEvoy, 2011).

  14. Physician business deals: surveying the new landscape.

    PubMed

    Harris, John M; Kaplan, Karin Chernoff

    2009-05-01

    Strong hospitals and health systems should be on the lookout for opportunities today to acquire physician businesses at depressed fair market values. In some instances, an outright purchase of physicians' interest in a physician-hospital joint venture may be preferable; in others, the hospital may benefit more from simply increasing its interest in the venture. A critical part of the strategy should be taking steps to ensure the physicians remain engaged, including addressing physicians' income goals and need for control.

  15. Physician liability and non-invasive prenatal testing.

    PubMed

    Toews, Maeghan; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    Although non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) marks a notable development in the field of prenatal genetic testing, there are some physician liability considerations raised by this technology. As NIPT is still emerging as the standard of care and is just starting to receive provincial funding, the question arises of whether physicians are obligated to disclose the availability of NIPT to eligible patients as part of the physician-patient discussion about prenatal screening and diagnosis. If NIPT is discussed with patients, it is important to disclose the limitations of this technology with respect to its accuracy and the number of disorders that it can detect when compared with invasive diagnostic options. A failure to sufficiently disclose these limitations could leave patients with false assurances about the health of their fetuses and could raise informed consent and liability issues, particularly if a child is born with a disability as a result.

  16. Selection of the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Christ, L. W. A. C.; Harris, A. L.; Korchinski, E. D.

    1976-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the characteristics of ‘initial visits’ by patients, contrasted with ‘average visits’, to discover what is needed to establish a satisfactory patient-physician relationship leading to long term continuous care. In the initial visit, the patient presents with a relatively simple problem which will enable the physician to demonstrate his ability without unduly taxing his skills. This suggests that patients create an opportunity for a thorough face-to-face contact to provide an opportunity for the physician to display his ability so that the patient's desire for a long term relationship can be achieved. The study also suggests that patients' expectations have changed in proportion to changes in the mode of medical practice. PMID:21308071

  17. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  18. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians....

  19. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  20. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians....

  1. 42 CFR 415.172 - Physician fee schedule payment for services of teaching physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... teaching physicians. 415.172 Section 415.172 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... PHYSICIANS IN PROVIDERS, SUPERVISING PHYSICIANS IN TEACHING SETTINGS, AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.172 Physician fee schedule payment for services of...

  2. [Sherlock Holmes as amateur physician].

    PubMed

    Madsen, S

    1998-03-30

    The medical literature contains numerous articles dealing with Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson. Some of the articles are concerned with the medical and scientific aspects of his cases. Other articles adopt a more philosophical view: They compare the methods of the master detective with those of the physician--the ideal clinician should be as astute in his profession as the detective must be in his. It this article the author briefly reviews the abilities of Sherlock Holmes as an amateur physician. Often Holmes was brilliant, but sometimes he made serious mistakes. In one of his cases (The Adventure of the Lion's Mane) he misinterpreted common medical signs.

  3. How Is Physician Work Valued?

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Lahey, Stephen J; Nichols, Francis C; Levett, James M; Johnston, George Gilbert; Freeman, Richard K; St Louis, James D; Painter, Julie; Yohe, Courtney; Wright, Cameron D; Kanter, Kirk R; Mayer, John E; Naunheim, Keith S; Rich, Jeffrey B; Bavaria, Joseph E

    2017-02-01

    Strategies to value physician work continue to evolve. The Society of Thoracic Surgeons and The Society of Thoracic Surgeons National Database have an increasingly important role in this evolution. An understanding of the Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) system (American Medical Association [AMA], Chicago, IL) and the Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC) is necessary to comprehend how physician work is valued. In 1965, with the dawn of increasingly complex medical care, immense innovation, and the rollout of Medicare, the need for a common language describing medical services and procedures was recognized as being of critical importance. In 1966, the AMA, in cooperation with multiple major medical specialty societies, developed the CPT system, which is a coding system for the description of medical procedures and medical services. The RUC was created by the AMA in response to the passage of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989, legislation of the United States of America Federal government that mandated that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services adopt a relative value methodology for Medicare physician payment. The role of the RUC is to develop relative value recommendations for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. These recommendations include relative value recommendations for new procedures or services and also updates to relative value recommendations for previously valued procedures or services. These recommendations pertain to all physician work delivered to Medicare beneficiaries and propose relative values for all physician services, including updates to those based on the original resource-based relative value scale developed by Hsaio and colleagues. In so doing, widely differing work and services provided can be reviewed and comparisons of their relative value (to each other) can be established. The resource-based relative value scale assigns value to physician services using relative value units (RVUs), which consist

  4. An Association Account of False Belief Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Bruin, L. C.; Newen, A.

    2012-01-01

    The elicited-response false belief task has traditionally been considered as reliably indicating that children acquire an understanding of false belief around 4 years of age. However, recent investigations using spontaneous-response tasks suggest that false belief understanding emerges much earlier. This leads to a developmental paradox: if young…

  5. 20 CFR 356.3 - False claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false False claims. 356.3 Section 356.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 356.3 False claims. In the case of penalties assessed under 31...

  6. 20 CFR 356.3 - False claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False claims. 356.3 Section 356.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE REMEDIES FOR FRAUDULENT CLAIMS OR STATEMENTS CIVIL MONETARY PENALTY INFLATION ADJUSTMENT § 356.3 False claims. In the case of penalties assessed under 31...

  7. 30 CFR 281.5 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false False statements. 281.5 Section 281.5 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General § 281.5 False statements. Under...

  8. Costs of Physician-Hospital Integration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Na-Eun

    2015-10-01

    Given that the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is expected to generate forces toward physician-hospital integration, this study examined an understudied, albeit important, area of costs incurred in physician-hospital integration. Such costs were analyzed through 24 semi-structured interviews with physicians and hospital administrators in a multiple-case, inductive study. Two extreme types of physician-hospital arrangements were examined: an employed model (ie, integrated salary model, a group of physicians integrated by a hospital system) and a private practice (ie, a physician or group of physicians who are independent of economic or policy control). Interviews noted that integration leads to 3 evident costs, namely, monitoring, coordination, and cooperation costs. Improving our understanding of the kinds of costs that are incurred after physician-hospital integration will help hospitals and physicians to avoid common failures after integration.

  9. A physician assistant rheumatology fellowship.

    PubMed

    Hooker, Roderick S

    2013-06-01

    A rheumatology postgraduate fellowship for physician assistants was inaugurated in 2004 as a pilot initiative to supplement shortages in rheumatologists. An administrative analysis documented that each PA trainee achieved a high level of rheumatology exposure and proficiency. Classes in immunology, rheumatology, and internal medicine augmented clinical training. Faculty and trainees considered PA postgraduate training in rheumatology worthwhile.

  10. Physician Requirements-1990. For Nephrology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbach, Joan K.

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in nephrology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. In estimating service requirements for nephrology, a nephrology Delphi panel reviewed reference and incidence-prevalence and utilization data for 34 conditions that are treated in the…

  11. The Mindful Physician and Pooh

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Robin O.

    2013-01-01

    Resident physicians are particularly susceptible to burnout due to the stresses of residency training. They also experience the added pressures of multitasking because of the increased use of computers and mobile devices while delivering patient care. Our Family Medicine residency program addresses these problems by teaching residents about the…

  12. Individual Physician Profile. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin Univ., Madison. Dept. of Postgraduate Medical Education.

    This document reports the procedures and data of a study designed to examine the hypotheses that medical practices do vary significantly. Detailed data on 76 participants were collected; three mechanisms were developed to determine the needs of primary care physicians. These mechanism were: subjective analysis by both participants and study staff,…

  13. Information Searching Behavior of Physicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trueswell, R.W.; Rubenstein, A.H.

    The purpose of this study was to provide some preliminary data about the information-searching behavior of the physician in order to (1) facilitate the development of models describing the search behavior and (2) provide the behavioral data necessary for the development of effective information retrieval systems for use by the medical profession.…

  14. Training Physicians in Palliative Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, J. Cameron; Krammer, Lisa M.; von Gunten, Charles F.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the elements of a program in hospice and palliative medicine that may serve as a model of an effective system of physician education. Topics for the palliative-care curriculum include hospice medicine, breaking bad news, pain management, the process of dying, and managing personal stress. (JOW)

  15. Choosing among the physician databases.

    PubMed

    Heller, R H

    1988-04-01

    Prudent examination and knowing how to ask the "right questions" can enable hospital marketers and planners to find the most accurate and appropriate database. The author compares the comprehensive AMA physician database with the less expensive MEDEC database to determine their strengths and weaknesses.

  16. Marketer's forgotten challenge: physician recruitment.

    PubMed

    Plank, D

    1997-01-01

    As marketing department missions continue to expand, more and more people are finding themselves not just recruiting customers, but doctors. The good news: May of the tips and tricks of direct marketing can be used to reach out to in-demand physicians.

  17. Business plan writing for physicians.

    PubMed

    Cohn, Kenneth H; Schwartz, Richard W

    2002-08-01

    Physicians are practicing in an era in which they are often expected to write business plans in order to acquire, develop, and implement new technology or programs. This task is yet another reminder of the importance of business principles in providing quality patient care amid allocation of increasingly scarce resources. Unfortunately, few physicians receive training during medical school, residencies, or fellowships in performing such tasks. The process of writing business plans follows an established format similar to writing a consultation, in which the risks, benefits, and alternatives to a treatment option are presented. Although administrative assistance may be available in compiling business plans, it is important for physicians to understand the rationale, process, and pitfalls of business planning. Writing a business plan will serve to focus, clarify, and justify a request for scarce resources, and thus, increase its chance of success, both in terms of funding and implementation. A well-written business plan offers a plausible, coherent story of an uncertain future. Therefore, a business plan is not merely an exercise to obtain funding but also a rationale for investment that can help physicians reestablish leadership in health care.

  18. Hitler’s Jewish Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Weisz, George M.

    2014-01-01

    The mystery behind the behavior of infamous personalities leaves many open questions, particularly when related to the practice of medicine. This paper takes a brief look at two Jewish physicians who played memorable roles in the life of Adolf Hitler. PMID:25120923

  19. Nurses' and Physicians' Perceptions of Nurse-Physician Collaboration: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    House, Sherita; Havens, Donna

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to explore nurses' and physicians' perceptions of nurse-physician collaboration and the factors that influence their perceptions. Overall, nurses and physicians held different perceptions of nurse-physician collaboration. Shared decision making, teamwork, and communication were reoccurring themes in reports of perceptions about nurse-physician collaboration. These findings have implications for more interprofessional educational courses and more intervention studies that focus on ways to improve nurse-physician collaboration.

  20. Physician stress: is it inevitable?

    PubMed

    Orman, M C

    1989-01-01

    Early attempts to understand the causes of physician stress focused almost exclusively upon the role of external stressors and demands. Recent psychosocial and behavioral research, however, suggests that individual attitudes, beliefs, personality factors, and learned coping strategies probably play a more important role. In addition, such cognitive and behavioral tendencies are within the control of each individual, and clinical experience has shown that these factors can indeed be modified. Freudenberger noted that most health professionals who are experiencing high levels of stress fail to identify the role that they themselves play in generating such symptoms. Instead, they tend to blame others as the cause of their problems and tend to react cynically toward suggestions that they could benefit from help. A large-scale study of family physicians in North Carolina, conducted by May, Revicki, and Jones in 1983, confirmed the fact that most physicians who reported a high level of professional stress also tended to score high on measures of external locus of control--i.e. the perception that external or environmental factors are mainly responsible for one's problems or successes. My own experience in treating physicians and other people with stress tends to confirm these findings. More importantly, I have found that once individuals are helped to identify the role that their own cognitive and behavioral tendencies play in the origin of their stress, they can usually bring about impressive reductions in stress and tension without significant changes in environmental factors or demands. While many people advocate stress-releasing and other relaxation skills for physicians, I have found that such approaches are often counterproductive.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. [An international comparison of physician control systems].

    PubMed

    Jian, Wei-yan; Xiong, Xian-jun; Li, Jing-hu; Ding, Yang; Wang, Li-li; Guo, Yan

    2011-04-18

    This study compares physicians' regulations set by the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada and Germany which have typical healthcare systems. Physicians' regulations are defined in this study as four aspects: physicians' training and qualifications, career pathways, payment methods and behavior regulations. Strict access rules, practicing with freedom, different training models between general and special practitioners, health services priced by negotiations and regulations by professional organizations are the common features of physicians' regulations in these four western countries. Three aspects--introducing contract mechanism, enhancing the roles of professional organizations and extending physicians' practice space should be taken into account in China's future reform of physicians' regulations.

  2. Financial implications of serving as team physician.

    PubMed

    Lemak, Larry

    2007-04-01

    Time is the greatest negative financial burden that you accept as a sports medicine physician, because the only way to produce revenue as a physician is with your time. This cost measured in time of doing business as a team physician can be high. Unless being a team physician is very rewarding to you through personal satisfaction or the other intangible indirect benefits associated with the role, being a team physician may not be a good financial decision for you as a person and a physician, or for your practice and your family.

  3. False discoveries and models for gene discovery.

    PubMed

    van den Oord, Edwin J C G; Sullivan, Patrick F

    2003-10-01

    In the search for genes underlying complex traits, there is a tendency to impose increasingly stringent criteria to avoid false discoveries. These stringent criteria make it hard to find true effects, and we argue that it might be better to optimize our procedures for eliminating and controlling false discoveries. Focusing on achieving an acceptable ratio of true- and false-positives, we show that false discoveries could be eliminated much more efficiently using a stepwise approach. To avoid a relatively high false discovery rate, corrections for 'multiple testing' might also be needed in candidate gene studies. If the appropriate methods are used, detecting the proportion of true effects appears to be a more important determinant of the genotyping burden than the desired false discovery rate. This raises the question of whether current models for gene discovery are shaped excessively by a fear of false discoveries.

  4. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  5. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  6. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  7. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  8. 19 CFR 11.13 - False designations of origin and false descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... descriptions; false marking of articles of gold or silver. 11.13 Section 11.13 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND... gold or silver. (a) Articles which bear, or the containers which bear, false designations of origin, or.... 1405q, and shall be detained. (b) Articles made in whole or in part of gold or silver or alloys...

  9. AMA Physician Select: Online Doctor Finder

    MedlinePlus

    ... Membership | JAMA Network | AMA Store DoctorFinder This online physician Locator helps you find a perfect match for ... with basic professional information on virtually every licensed physician in the United States. This includes more than ...

  10. AMA launches partnership to lease physician database.

    PubMed

    2000-12-01

    A joint venture is allowing the AMA to refine the physician data it sells to marketers. Physicians in the organization's heavily used database get some latitude in how information about them is distributed.

  11. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  12. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  13. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  14. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  15. 20 CFR 702.404 - Physician defined.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... correct a subluxation shown by X-ray or clinical findings. Physicians defined in this part may interpret their own X-rays. All physicians in these categories are authorized by the Director to render...

  16. The Crucible of Physician Performance Reports

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Individualized physician performance reports are an emerging phenomena. The narrative piece examines one physician’s experience with individualized physician performance reports. Reforming the data collection process could enhance the value of the reports to stakeholders. PMID:20838915

  17. Constructing rich false memories of committing crime.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julia; Porter, Stephen

    2015-03-01

    Memory researchers long have speculated that certain tactics may lead people to recall crimes that never occurred, and thus could potentially lead to false confessions. This is the first study to provide evidence suggesting that full episodic false memories of committing crime can be generated in a controlled experimental setting. With suggestive memory-retrieval techniques, participants were induced to generate criminal and noncriminal emotional false memories, and we compared these false memories with true memories of emotional events. After three interviews, 70% of participants were classified as having false memories of committing a crime (theft, assault, or assault with a weapon) that led to police contact in early adolescence and volunteered a detailed false account. These reported false memories of crime were similar to false memories of noncriminal events and to true memory accounts, having the same kinds of complex descriptive and multisensory components. It appears that in the context of a highly suggestive interview, people can quite readily generate rich false memories of committing crime.

  18. Transitioning to value-based physician compensation.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Johanna

    2014-12-01

    An effective strategy for creating a viable physician compensation plan should include nine key steps or tactics: Get physicians on board early. Engage a physician champion. Create a compensation committee. Address department-level issues and differences. Verify the plan's affordability. Adopt a routine review schedule. Understand the payer environment and keep in contact with payers. Stay abreast of industry trends. Maintain an ongoing dialogue with physicians.

  19. Expansion of Physician Assistant Education.

    PubMed

    Cawley, James F; Eugene Jones, P; Miller, Anthony A; Orcutt, Venetia L

    2016-12-01

    Physician assistant (PA) educational programs were created in the 1960s to prepare a new type of health care practitioner. Physician assistant programs began as experiments in medical education, and later, they proved to be highly successful in preparing capable, flexible, and productive clinicians. The growth of PA educational programs in US medical education-stimulated by grants, public policy, and anticipated shortages of providers-has gone through 3 distinct phases. At present, such programs are in the midst of the third growth spurt that is expected to continue beyond 2020, as a large number of colleges and universities seek to sponsor PA programs and attain accreditation status. Characteristics of these new programs are described, and the implications of the current expansion of PA education are examined.

  20. Organizational commitment of military physicians.

    PubMed

    Demir, Cesim; Sahin, Bayram; Teke, Kadir; Ucar, Muharrem; Kursun, Olcay

    2009-09-01

    An individual's loyalty or bond to his or her employing organization, referred to as organizational commitment, influences various organizational outcomes such as employee motivation, job satisfaction, performance, accomplishment of organizational goals, employee turnover, and absenteeism. Therefore, as in other sectors, employee commitment is crucial also in the healthcare market. This study investigates the effects of organizational factors and personal characteristics on organizational commitment of military physicians using structural equation modeling (SEM) on a self-report, cross-sectional survey that consisted of 635 physicians working in the 2 biggest military hospitals in Turkey. The results of this study indicate that professional commitment and organizational incentives contribute positively to organizational commitment, whereas conflict with organizational goals makes a significantly negative contribution to it. These results might help develop strategies to increase employee commitment, especially in healthcare organizations, because job-related factors have been found to possess greater impact on organizational commitment than personal characteristics.

  1. Colonoscopy: Perspectives for Family Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, R. D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber-optic endoscopy is an important investigation of the lower gastrointestinal tract, whether or not the radiologist has discovered a lesion. Colonoscopy affords a unique opportunity to visualize the entire colonic mucosa. At the same time, the physician can obtain biopsy specimens, remove polyps, and decompress volvuli. Most experienced endoscopists can reach the cecum in over 90% of patients. If colonoscopy is properly performed, it has a low risk of complications, such as perforation and bleeding. The few absolute contraindications include serious illnesses such as acute myocardial infarction and severe acute inflammatory bowel diseases. Family physicians referring patients for investigations of lower gastrointestinal problems should explain that colonoscopy is an adjunct to, not a replacement for, a barium enema examination. If possible they should find out what preparation the patient will require. PMID:21283399

  2. Empowering Physicians with Financial Literacy.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Yuval

    2015-01-01

    Most doctors complete their medical training without sufficient knowledge of business and finance. This leads to inefficient financial decisions, avoidable losses, and unnecessary anxiety. A big part of the problem is that the existing options for gaining financial knowledge are flawed. The ideal solution is to provide a simple framework of financial literacy to all students: one that can be adapted to their specific circumstances. That framework must be delivered by an objective expert to young physicians before they complete medical training.

  3. Revealing a Child's Pathology: Physicians' Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scelles, Regine; Aubert-Godard, Anne; Gargiulo, Marcela; Avant, Monique; Gortais, Jean

    2010-01-01

    In this study, 12 physicians and 12 care-givers were interviewed using semi-structured interviews. We explored physicians' experiences when they revealed a diagnosis. We also tried to understand which family members the physician was thinking of, with whom they identified themselves, and their first choice of the person to whom they prefer to…

  4. Opinion and Special Articles: "Physician debtor".

    PubMed

    Scharf, Eugene L; Jones, Lyell K

    2016-01-19

    The increasing cost of attending medical school has contributed to increasing physician indebtedness. The burden of medical school debt has implications for physician career choice, professional satisfaction, and burnout. This opinion discusses the impact of physician indebtedness, the importance of improving debt awareness among neurology trainees, and program- and policy-level solutions to the debt crisis.

  5. Mentoring to Help Prevent Physician Burnout.

    PubMed

    Herring, Malcolm; Forbes Kaufman, Rachel; Bogue, Richard

    2016-07-01

    The importance of a person's spirit and eternal destiny are eclipsed in American medi- cine. The most alarming effect of this eclipse is that the prevalence of burnout among physicians is high (about 46 percent) and growing.' It is alarming because trends that deplete the physician's spirit tragically impair the physician's capacity as a healer and as one who renews the spirit.

  6. Training of aerospace medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Mohler, S R

    1985-03-01

    In the U. S. there are 23 recognized medical specialty boards. One of these is preventive medicine. Within preventive medicine there are three areas: Aerospace Medicine, Occupational Medicine, and Public Health/General Preventive Medicine. The preventive medicine specialties have a common core of required training including biostatistics, epidemiology, health services administration and environmental health. These, plus associated topics are covered during year one of training. Year two of training involves clinical rotations specifically tailored to the eye, ear, heart, lungs and brain, plus flight training to the private pilot level, and a Masters Degree research project for the required thesis. During year three the physicians in aerospace medicine practice full-time aerospace medicine in a NASA or other government laboratory or a private facility. To date, more than 40 physicians have received aerospace medicine training through the Wright State University School of Medicine program. Among these are physicians from Japan, Australia, Taiwan, Canada and Mexico. In addition to the civilian program at Wright State University, there are programs conducted by the U. S. Air Force and Navy. The Wright State program has been privileged to have officers from the U. S. Army, Navy and Air Force. A substantial supporter of the Wright State program is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and a strong space component is contained in the program.

  7. Explaining the Development of False Memories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Valerie F.; Holliday, Robyn; Marche, Tammy

    2002-01-01

    Reviews explanatory dimensions of children's false memory relevant to forensic practice: measurement, development, social factors, individual differences, varieties of memories and memory judgments, and varieties of procedures inducing false memories. Asserts that recent studies fail to use techniques that separate acquiescence from memory…

  8. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  9. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  10. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  11. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  12. 15 CFR 80.6 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false False statements. 80.6 Section 80.6 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade BUREAU OF THE CENSUS, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FURNISHING PERSONAL CENSUS DATA FROM CENSUS OF POPULATION SCHEDULES § 80.6...

  13. How Does Distinctive Processing Reduce False Recall?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, R. Reed; Smith, Rebekah E.; Dunlap, Kathryn R.

    2011-01-01

    False memories arising from associatively related lists are a robust phenomenon that resists many efforts to prevent it. However, a few variables have been shown to reduce this form of false memory. Explanations for how the reduction is accomplished have focused on either output monitoring processes or constraints on access, but neither idea alone…

  14. Can False Memories Prime Problem Solutions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Mark L.; Garner, Sarah R.; Dewhurst, Stephen A.; Ball, Linden J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that false memories can prime performance on related implicit and explicit memory tasks. The present research examined whether false memories can also be used to prime higher order cognitive processes, namely, insight-based problem solving. Participants were asked to solve a number of compound remote associate task…

  15. 30 CFR 281.5 - False statements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false False statements. 281.5 Section 281.5 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General §...

  16. Item method directed forgetting diminishes false memory.

    PubMed

    Marche, Tammy A; Brainerd, Charles J; Lane, David G; Loehr, Janeen D

    2005-10-01

    Directed forgetting may reduce DRM false memory illusion by interfering with meaning processing. Participants were presented with a list composed of six 10-word semantically associated sub-lists, and they were either (a) asked to remember all list items of (b) asked to remember all associates from sub-lists and to forget all associates from other sub-lists. All participants were requested to recall and recognise list items. Although directed forgetting effects have been previously reported only for true responses in the DRM paradigm with the list method, we also found directed forgetting for false responses with the item method. Such forgetting instructions reduced both verbatim and meaning processing, decreasing both the intrusion and the false alarm rate. These results are consistent with two-process explanations of DRM false memories, such as fuzzy-trace theory, and add to our understanding of false memory editing.

  17. Emotional content of true and false memories.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Loftus, Elizabeth F

    2008-01-01

    Many people believe that emotional memories (including those that arise in therapy) are particularly likely to represent true events because of their emotional content. But is emotional content a reliable indicator of memory accuracy? The current research assessed the emotional content of participants' pre-existing (true) and manipulated (false) memories for childhood events. False memories for one of three emotional childhood events were planted using a suggestive manipulation and then compared, along several subjective dimensions, with other participants' true memories. On most emotional dimensions (e.g., how emotional was this event for you?), true and false memories were indistinguishable. On a few measures (e.g., intensity of feelings at the time of the event), true memories were more emotional than false memories in the aggregate, yet true and false memories were equally likely to be rated as uniformly emotional. These results suggest that even substantial emotional content may not reliably indicate memory accuracy.

  18. Priming analogical reasoning with false memories.

    PubMed

    Howe, Mark L; Garner, Sarah R; Threadgold, Emma; Ball, Linden J

    2015-08-01

    Like true memories, false memories are capable of priming answers to insight-based problems. Recent research has attempted to extend this paradigm to more advanced problem-solving tasks, including those involving verbal analogical reasoning. However, these experiments are constrained inasmuch as problem solutions could be generated via spreading activation mechanisms (much like false memories themselves) rather than using complex reasoning processes. In three experiments we examined false memory priming of complex analogical reasoning tasks in the absence of simple semantic associations. In Experiment 1, we demonstrated the robustness of false memory priming in analogical reasoning when backward associative strength among the problem terms was eliminated. In Experiments 2a and 2b, we extended these findings by demonstrating priming on newly created homonym analogies that can only be solved by inhibiting semantic associations within the analogy. Overall, the findings of the present experiments provide evidence that the efficacy of false memory priming extends to complex analogical reasoning problems.

  19. Rapid induction of false memory for pictures.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Yana; Shanks, David R

    2010-07-01

    Recognition of pictures is typically extremely accurate, and it is thus unclear whether the reconstructive nature of memory can yield substantial false recognition of highly individuated stimuli. A procedure for the rapid induction of false memories for distinctive colour photographs is proposed. Participants studied a set of object pictures followed by a list of words naming those objects, but embedded in the list were names of unseen objects. When subsequently shown full colour pictures of these unseen objects, participants consistently claimed that they had seen them, while discriminating with high accuracy between studied pictures and new pictures whose names did not appear in the misleading word list. These false memories can be reported with high confidence as well as the feeling of recollection. This new procedure allows the investigation of factors that influence false memory reports with ecologically valid stimuli and of the similarities and differences between true and false memories.

  20. Social influence and mental routes to the production of authentic false memories and inauthentic false memories.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Michael F; Skowronski, John J

    2017-03-09

    Two studies assessed the extent to which people incorporated false facts provided by bogus others into their own recognition memory reports, and how these false memory reports were affected by: (a) truth of the information in others' summaries supporting the false facts, (b) motivation to process stories and summaries, (c) source credibility, and (d) ease of remembering original facts. False memory report frequency increased when false facts in a summary were supported by true information and varied inversely with the ease with which original facts could be remembered. Results from a measure probing participants' memory perceptions suggest that some false memories are authentic: People sometimes lack awareness of both the incorporation of false facts into their memory reports and where the false facts came from. However, many false memories are inauthentic: Despite reporting a false memory, people sometimes retain knowledge of the original stimulus and/or the origin of false facts.

  1. Viscoelastic properties of the false vocal fold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Roger W.

    2004-05-01

    The biomechanical properties of vocal fold tissues have been the focus of many previous studies, as vocal fold viscoelasticity critically dictates the acoustics and biomechanics of phonation. However, not much is known about the viscoelastic response of the ventricular fold or false vocal fold. It has been shown both clinically and in computer simulations that the false vocal fold may contribute significantly to the aerodynamics and sound generation processes of human voice production, with or without flow-induced oscillation of the false fold. To better understand the potential role of the false fold in phonation, this paper reports some preliminary measurements on the linear and nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of false vocal fold tissues. Linear viscoelastic shear properties of human false fold tissue samples were measured by a high-frequency controlled-strain rheometer as a function of frequency, and passive uniaxial tensile stress-strain response of the tissue samples was measured by a muscle lever system as a function of strain and loading rate. Elastic moduli (Young's modulus and shear modulus) of the false fold tissues were calculated from the measured data. [Work supported by NIH.

  2. False recognition of instruction-set lures.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Evan T; Chubala, Chrissy M; Spear, Jackie; Jamieson, Randall K; Hockley, William E; Crump, Matthew J C

    2016-01-01

    False remembering has been examined using a variety of procedures, including the Deese-Roediger-McDermott procedure, the false fame procedure and the two-list recognition procedure. We present six experiments in a different empirical framework examining false recognition of words included in the experimental instructions (instruction-set lures). The data show that participants' false alarm rate to instruction-set lures was twice their false alarm rate to standard lures. That result was statistically robust even when (1) the relative strength of targets to instruction-set lures was increased, (2) participants were warned about the instruction-set lures, (3) the instruction-set lures were camouflaged in the study instructions and (4) the instruction-set lures were presented verbally at study but visually at test. False recognition of instruction-set lures was only mitigated when participants were distracted between encountering the instruction-set lures and studying the training list. The results confirm the ease with which recognition succumbs to familiarity and demonstrate the robustness of false recognition.

  3. Physicians' attitudes about their professional appearance.

    PubMed

    Gjerdingen, D K; Simpson, D E

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-five residents and 77 staff physicians from three residency programs in Minnesota and Wisconsin completed questionnaires about their attitudes toward various components of the physician's appearance. Most participants showed positive responses to traditional physician attire such as white coat, name tag, shirt and tie, dress pants, skirt or dress, nylons, and dress shoes. Negative responses were associated with casual items such as sandals, clogs, athletic shoes, scrub suits, and blue jeans. Cronbach's alpha analysis identified four cohesive appearance scales: traditional male appearance, casual male appearance, traditional female appearance, and casual female appearance. Older physician participants favored a more traditional appearance than did younger physicians, and of the physicians who were 35 years and younger, staff physicians tended to show more conservative views toward professional appearance than did residents.

  4. Improving physician-patient interactions: a review.

    PubMed

    Strecher, V J

    1983-01-01

    The interaction between physician and patient comprises aspects of communication common to any two human beings and other aspects peculiar to the roles exclusively adopted by physicians and patients. In this review, nonverbal and verbal elements of general communication are discussed, detailing important aspects of vocal tone, body postures, appearance, and verbal cues that may influence attributions made of physicians by patients. Role-related elements of physician-patient interactions are discussed in light of findings from research on interactions between physicians and patients. Developmental elements of general communication are discussed, relating stages tht evolve in interactions to physician-patient interactions. Finally, an examination is made of how interpersonal skills are taught to physicians and medical students. Discussion of what skills are specified for teaching, whether they are effectively taught, and whether the learning of these skills produces desired patient health-related outcomes is presented.

  5. Justifying all the fuss about false belief.

    PubMed

    Russell, James

    2005-07-01

    The classic study by Wimmer and Perner showed that children below the age of about 4 years of age fail to appreciate others' false beliefs. This opened the floodgates to the theory-of-mind research programme. Recently, a study by Riggs and Simpson has called the central challenge of false belief into question, reporting similar difficulties with true belief. I would argue, however, that not only should the acquisition of false belief remain a central concern but that we should think harder about it and its earlier manifestations.

  6. HMO employment and African-American physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Briscoe, Forrest; Konrad, Thomas R.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the level and determinants of African-American physicians' employment in health maintenance organizations (HMOs), particularly early in their careers. METHODS: We analyzed data from the 1991 and 1996 Young Physicians Surveys to assess racial differences in the likelihood of HMO employment (n = 3,705). Using multinomial logistic regression, we evaluated four explanations for an observed relationship between African-American physicians and HMO employment: human capital stratification among organizations, race-based affinity between physicians and patients, financial constraints due to debt burden, and different organizational hiring practices. Using binomial logistic regression, we also evaluated differences in the odds of being turned down for a prior practice position, of subsequently leaving the current practice organization and of later having career doubts. RESULTS: Without any controls, African-American physicians were 4.52 times more likely to practice in HMOs than Caucasian physicians. After controlling for human capital stratification, racial concordance and financial constraints, African-American physicians remained 2.48 times more likely to practice in HMOs than Caucasian physicians. In addition, 19.2% of African-American physicians in HMOs reported being turned down for another job, far more than any other racial/ethnic group in the HMO setting and any racial/ethnic group, including African-American physicians in the non-HMO setting (including all other practice locations). Five years later, those same African-American physicians from HMOs also reported significantly more turnover (7.50 times more likely than non-HMO African-American physicians to leave their current practice) and doubt about their careers (2.17 times more likely than non-HMO African-American physicians to express serious career doubts). CONCLUSIONS: African-American physicians were disproportionately hired into HMO settings, impacting their subsequent careers. PMID

  7. Wanted: Well-Rounded Physicians.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-10-01

    The Association of American Medical Colleges has revamped the MCAT for the first time in nearly three decades. While the new exam retains the science-based testing historically included, it adds new topics and approaches meant to keep up with a rapidly changing health care delivery system. It aims to test and train aspiring physicians based less on memorizing scientific facts and more on competency: putting that scientific knowledge into practice. Questions on the new MCAT pertain to concepts such as self-identity, social stratification, and multiculturalism and ask students to apply them to certain scenarios.

  8. [Pharmacological knowledge among general physicians].

    PubMed

    López-Valpuesta, F J; Hevia, A; Castellanos, A; Vázquez, J A

    1993-07-01

    We inquired to 200 physicians about the 50 pharmaceutical products most dispensed in Seville during 1989. The most significative results were: 68.5% of the inquired answered the questionnaire. 98.5% knew the product, but only 80.3% prescribed it. The principal sources of information to know the drug were books and scientific journals (67.3%), followed by detailers (62%). 86.1% knew the composition of the product, and 94.9% knew its indications. 71.5% described the side effects, 66.4% the contraindications, and 25.5% the interactions with other drugs. Only 56.9% mentioned a therapeutic alternative.

  9. Adding flexibility to physician training.

    PubMed

    Mahady, Suzanne E

    2011-05-02

    Demographic changes among junior doctors are driving demand for increased flexibility in advanced physician training, but flexible training posts are lacking. Suitable flexible training models include flexible full-time, job-share and part-time positions. Major barriers to establishing flexible training positions include difficulty in finding job-share partners, lack of funding for creating supernumerary positions, and concern over equivalence of educational quality compared with full-time training. Pilot flexible training positions should be introduced across the medical specialties and educational outcomes examined prospectively.

  10. [Human rights of the physician].

    PubMed

    García-Romero, H

    1995-01-01

    The physician rights may be classified in those related with his quality as a person, and those derived from his relationship with his patients and the institution to which he belongs. Among the first, liberty of expression, legal security, right of free association, the right of a dignified social position and neutral attitude towards the commitment of giving medical attention to whomever the patient may be. He has the right to receive a full and up-to-date training oriented to serve the community, supported by health institutions, and to have the means of utmost quality to give medical attention of the highest standard.

  11. December financial checkup for physicians.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rita

    2014-01-01

    December is a busy month for holiday fun, but don't neglect your financial health! Physicians should review their business and personal finances at year end to ensure they are on target both for income generated and taxes paid. Preparing for the April 15 tax filing is aided by a thorough review in December. Payroll items such as W2s, 1099s, and employee benefits need to be reviewed. Retirement savings should be analyzed. Make sure to look at your business profit/loss statement and balance sheet. Personal contributions and other tax planning strategies need to be completed by the end of the year. Your CPA can help!

  12. Communication and the laboratory physician

    PubMed Central

    Penistan, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    A clinical laboratory documentation system is described, suitable for community hospitals without computer services. The system is cumulative and is designed to provide the laboratory physician with the clinical information necessary for intelligent review and comment on the laboratory's findings. The mode of presentation of requests to the laboratory and lay-out of the reports to the clinicians are designed to make the two-way communication as close and personal as possible; to encourage the selection of those investigations likely to prove rewarding, and to discourage unnecessary investigation. The possibility of important data escaping notice is minimized. The system is economical in capital equipment, labour and supplies. PMID:4758594

  13. Visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali Reza; Heydari, Ali Hosain; Abdollahi, Mohammad Hossain; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Dalgleish, Tim; Jobson, Laura

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated visual false memories in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The Scenic False Memory paradigm (SFM, Hauschildt, Peters, Jelinek, & Moritz, 2012) was administered to male Iranian military personnel who had participated in the Iran-Iraq war and were diagnosed with (n = 21) or without (n = 21) PTSD and a sample of healthy male non-trauma-exposed controls (n = 21). Trauma-exposed participants recalled and recognized a significantly lower percentage of hits and a significantly greater percentage of false memories for both trauma-related and non-trauma-related video scenes, than non-trauma-exposed controls. Among the trauma-exposed participants, those with and without PTSD did not differ significantly in terms of percentage of hits and false memories recalled on the SFM. Those with PTSD were found to recognize significantly fewer hits for both the trauma-related and non-trauma-related videos than those without PTSD. Those with PTSD also recognized significantly more false memories for the trauma video scene than the non-PTSD group. The findings suggest that those with trauma exposure, and in particular those with PTSD, may have a greater susceptibility to visual false memory.

  14. Interpretation of Computed Tomography of the Head: Emergency Physicians versus Radiologists

    PubMed Central

    Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Baratloo, Alireza; Rouhipour, Alaleh; Abdalvand, Ali; Hatamabadi, Hamidreza; Forouzanfar, Mohammadmehdi; Shojaee, Majid; Hashemi, Behrooz

    2013-01-01

    Background Many patients are brought to crowded emergency departments (ED) of hospitals every day for evaluation of head injuries, headaches, neurologic deficits etc. CT scan of the head is the most common diagnostic measure used to search for pathologies. In many EDs the initial interpretation of images are performed by emergency physicians (EP). Since most decisions are made based on the initial interpretation of the images by emergency physicians and not the radiologists, it is necessary to assess the accuracy of interpretations made by the former group. Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the findings reported in the interpretation of head CTs by emergency physicians and compare to radiologists (the gold standard). Materials and Methods This was a prospective cross sectional study conducted from March to May 2009 in a teaching hospital in Tehran, Iran. All non-contrast head CTs obtained during the study period were copied on DVDs and sent separately to a radiologist, 6 emergency medicine (EM) attending physicians and 14 senior EM residents for interpretation. Clinical information pertaining to each patient was also sent with each CT. The radiologist’s interpretation was considered as the gold standard and reference for comparison. Data from EM physicians and residents were compared with the reference as well as with each other and statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 18.5. Results Out of 544 CT scans, EM physicians had 35 false negatives and 53 false positives compared with radiologist’s interpretations (P < 0.0001). EM residents had 74 false negatives and 12 false positives compared with radiologist’s interpretations (P < 0.0001). Conclusions Both EPs and ER residents either missed or falsely called a significant number of pathologies in their interpretations. The interpretations of EPs and ER residents were more sensitive and more specific, respectively. These findings revealed the need for increased training time in head CT

  15. Physician professionalism for a new century.

    PubMed

    Holsinger, James W; Beaton, Benjamin

    2006-07-01

    During the past 50 years, physicians have become increasingly dissatisfied with certain aspects of their profession. Dissatisfaction has intensified with the advent of managed care in the late 20th century, the medical liability crisis, and the growing divergence between the professional and personal expectations placed upon physicians and their practical ability to meet these expectations. These and other factors have encroached on physician autonomy, the formerly ascendant professional value within medicine. As the underlying values and practical realities of the broader American health care system have changed, the professional values and practices of physicians have failed to adapt correspondingly, resulting in a "professionalism gap" that contributes to physician dissatisfaction. To improve the outlook and efficacy of modern American physicians, the profession must adopt a new values framework that conforms to today's health care system. This means foregoing the 20th century's preferred "independent physician" model in favor of a new professional structure based on teamwork and collaboration. Convincing established physicians to embrace such a model will be difficult, but opportunities exist for significant progress among a new generation of physicians accustomed to the realities of managed care, flexible practice models, and health information technology. The teaching of clinical anatomy, given its incorporation of student collaboration at the earliest stages of medical education, offers a prime opportunity to introduce this generation to a reinvigorated code of professionalism that should reduce physician dissatisfaction and benefit society.

  16. Perspective: Physician leadership in quality.

    PubMed

    Pronovost, Peter J; Miller, Marlene R; Wachter, Robert M; Meyer, Gregg S

    2009-12-01

    While advances in biomedicine are awesome, progress in patient safety and quality of care has proven slow and arduous. One factor contributing to the labored progress is the paucity of physician-leaders who can help advance the science and practice of quality and safety. This limited talent pool, which has particularly serious consequences in academic medical centers (AMCs), stems from insufficient training in quality and safety, which in turn owes to our collective failure to view the delivery of health care as a science. Even when AMCs have trained and skilled quality and safety leaders, the infrastructure to support their work is deficient, with poorly defined job descriptions, competing responsibilities, and limited formal roles in the medical school compared with the hospital. Though there is limited empiric evidence to guide recommendations, the authors support four initiatives to accelerate national progress on quality and safety: (1) invest in quality and safety science, (2) revise quality and safety governance in AMCs, and (3) integrate roles within the hospital and medical school. Many of these shortcomings can be addressed by creating a newly integrated role: the vice dean for quality and hospital director of quality and safety. For AMCs to achieve significant improvements in quality and safety, they must invest in physician-leaders and in the support these leaders need to carry out their educational and operational roles.

  17. False Memories for Affective Information in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fairfield, Beth; Altamura, Mario; Padalino, Flavia A.; Balzotti, Angela; Di Domenico, Alberto; Mammarella, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown a direct link between memory for emotionally salient experiences and false memories. In particular, emotionally arousing material of negative and positive valence enhanced reality monitoring compared to neutral material since emotional stimuli can be encoded with more contextual details and thereby facilitate the distinction between presented and imagined stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia appear to be impaired in both reality monitoring and memory for emotional experiences. However, the relationship between the emotionality of the to-be-remembered material and false memory occurrence has not yet been studied. In this study, 24 patients and 24 healthy adults completed a false memory task with everyday episodes composed of 12 photographs that depicted positive, negative, or neutral outcomes. Results showed how patients with schizophrenia made a higher number of false memories than normal controls (p < 0.05) when remembering episodes with positive or negative outcomes. The effect of valence was apparent in the patient group. For example, it did not affect the production causal false memories (p > 0.05) resulting from erroneous inferences but did interact with plausible, script consistent errors in patients (i.e., neutral episodes yielded a higher degree of errors than positive and negative episodes). Affective information reduces the probability of generating causal errors in healthy adults but not in patients suggesting that emotional memory impairments may contribute to deficits in reality monitoring in schizophrenia when affective information is involved. PMID:27965600

  18. False Memories for Affective Information in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fairfield, Beth; Altamura, Mario; Padalino, Flavia A; Balzotti, Angela; Di Domenico, Alberto; Mammarella, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown a direct link between memory for emotionally salient experiences and false memories. In particular, emotionally arousing material of negative and positive valence enhanced reality monitoring compared to neutral material since emotional stimuli can be encoded with more contextual details and thereby facilitate the distinction between presented and imagined stimuli. Individuals with schizophrenia appear to be impaired in both reality monitoring and memory for emotional experiences. However, the relationship between the emotionality of the to-be-remembered material and false memory occurrence has not yet been studied. In this study, 24 patients and 24 healthy adults completed a false memory task with everyday episodes composed of 12 photographs that depicted positive, negative, or neutral outcomes. Results showed how patients with schizophrenia made a higher number of false memories than normal controls (p < 0.05) when remembering episodes with positive or negative outcomes. The effect of valence was apparent in the patient group. For example, it did not affect the production causal false memories (p > 0.05) resulting from erroneous inferences but did interact with plausible, script consistent errors in patients (i.e., neutral episodes yielded a higher degree of errors than positive and negative episodes). Affective information reduces the probability of generating causal errors in healthy adults but not in patients suggesting that emotional memory impairments may contribute to deficits in reality monitoring in schizophrenia when affective information is involved.

  19. Views of United States Physicians and Members of the American Medical Association House of Delegates on Physician-assisted Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitney, Simon N.; Brown, Byron W.; Brody, Howard; Alcser, Kirsten H.; Bachman, Jerald G.; Greely, Henry T.

    2001-01-01

    Ascertained the views of physicians and physician leaders toward legalization of physician-assisted suicide. Results indicated members of AMA House of Delegates strongly oppose physician-assisted suicide, but rank-and-file physicians show no consensus either for or against its legalization. Although the debate is adversarial, most physicians are…

  20. Physician-Assisted Dying: Acceptance by Physicians Only for Patients Close to Death.

    PubMed

    Zenz, Julia; Tryba, Michael; Zenz, Michael

    2014-12-01

    This study reports on German physicians' views on legalization of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide, comparing this with a similar survey of UK doctors. A questionnaire was handed out to attendants of a palliative care and a pain symposium. Complete answers were obtained from 137 physicians. Similar to the UK study, about 30% of the physicians surveyed support euthanasia in case of terminal illness and more support physician-assisted suicide. In contrast, in both countries, a great majority of physicians oppose medical involvement in hastening death in non-terminal illnesses. The public and parliamentary discussion should face this opposition to assisted suicide by pain and palliative specialists.

  1. Learning words from speakers with false beliefs.

    PubMed

    Papafragou, Anna; Fairchild, Sarah; Cohen, Matthew L; Friedberg, Carlyn

    2016-06-21

    During communication, hearers try to infer the speaker's intentions to be able to understand what the speaker means. Nevertheless, whether (and how early) preschoolers track their interlocutors' mental states is still a matter of debate. Furthermore, there is disagreement about how children's ability to consult a speaker's belief in communicative contexts relates to their ability to track someone's belief in non-communicative contexts. Here, we study young children's ability to successfully acquire a word from a speaker with a false belief; we also assess the same children's success on a traditional false belief attribution task. We show that the ability to consult the epistemic state of a speaker during word learning develops between the ages of three and five. We also show that false belief understanding in word-learning contexts proceeds similarly to standard belief-attribution contexts when the tasks are equated. Our data offer evidence for the development of mind-reading abilities during language acquisition.

  2. FALSE MEMORY AND OBSESSIVE–COMPULSIVE SYMPTOMS

    PubMed Central

    Klumpp, Heide; Amir, Nader; Garfinkel, Sarah N.

    2013-01-01

    Background The memory deficit hypothesis has been used to explain the maintenance of repetitive behavior in individuals with obsessive–compulsive disorder, yet the majority of studies focusing on verbal memory show mixed results. These studies primarily evaluated memory accuracy via the inclusion or omission of previously encountered material, as opposed to false recognition (i.e., the inclusion of erroneous material). We evaluated false memories and memory processes in individuals with obsessive–compulsive washing symptoms (OC), individuals matched on depression and anxiety without OC symptoms (D/A), and in nonanxious individuals (NAC). Methods Twenty-eight OC, 28 D/A, and 29 NAC individuals read OC-threat relevant, positive, and neutral scenarios and then performed a recognition test. Erroneous recognition of words associated to encoded, but not previously viewed, scenarios were classified as false memories. To evaluate processes underlying memory, participants completed a modified remember/know task to examine whether the OC individuals differed from the other individuals in recollective clarity for false memories of OC-relevant (e.g., germs), positive (e.g., lottery), and neutral (e.g., bread) material. Results The OC individuals used “know” more than the D/A and NAC individuals for false memories of threat. For veridical memories, the OC individuals used “know” more than the NAC, but not, D/A individuals. Conclusions The greater reliance on “know” (i.e., feelings of familiarity) in general and false threat memories in particular in individuals with OC symptoms may add to feelings of uncertainty for threat-relevant material, which may contribute to compulsive behavior. PMID:18839404

  3. Physicians' "right of conscience"- beyond politics.

    PubMed

    Gold, Azgad

    2010-01-01

    During the past few months, the discussion over the physicians' "Right of Conscience" (ROC) has been on the rise. The intervention of politics in this issue shifts the discussion to a very specific and narrow area, namely the "reproductive health laws" which bear well-known predisposing attitudes. In this article, the physician's ROC is discussed in the context in which it naturally belongs: the Patient Physician Relationship (PPR). I suggest that the physicians' rights demand is a comprehensible, predictable, and even inevitable step as part of the "evolution" of the PPR. Thus, the most appropriate way to comprehend and tackle the demand for physicians' ROC is within the context of medical professionalism. While searching for practical solutions to the "reproductive health" problems, there is a need to recognize the ethical and practical implications of the change in the PPR and balance between patient and physician rights.

  4. Physicians in transition: practice due diligence.

    PubMed

    Paterick, Timothy E

    2013-01-01

    The landscape of healthcare is changing rapidly. That landscape is now a business model of medicine. That rapid change resulting in a business model is affecting physicians professionally and personally. The new business model of medicine has led to large healthcare organizations hiring physicians as employees. The role of a physician as an employee has many limitations in terms of practice and personal autonomy. Employed physicians sign legally binding employment agreements that are written by the legal team working for the healthcare organization. Thus physicians should practice due diligence before signing the employment agreement. "Due diligence" refers to the care a reasonable person should take before entering into an agreement with another party. That reasonable person should seek expertise to represent his or her interests when searching a balanced agreement between the physician and organization.

  5. Implications of Good Samaritan laws for physicians.

    PubMed

    Paterick, Timothy J; Paterick, Barbara B; Paterick, Timothy E

    2008-01-01

    Good Samaritan laws are designed to encourage individuals, including physicians, to gratuitously render medical care in emergency situations. Through these laws, immunity from civil liability is provided to physicians who act in good faith to provide emergency care gratis. Historically, emergency care involved medical assistance given to persons in motor vehicle crashes or other emergency situations in which bystanders were present. Protection of physicians from allegations of negligence was a tactic of the legislative and judicial systems to encourage active clinical participation, rather than cautious nonparticipation, in emergency care. In some states and under defined circumstances, the immunity may apply in the hospital setting, as well as in the physician's office. Legislatures have continued to amend the statutes to expand the protection provided to physicians who offer emergency care. Judicial construction of the nature and scope of physician immunity has similarly expanded.

  6. Preparing for the physician payment sunshine act.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, David M; Naidu, Ramana K

    2014-01-01

    In March of 2010, President Barack Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, ushering in an era of health care reform. Section 6002 of the bill, the Physician Payment Sunshine Act, requires manufacturers of drugs, devices, biological therapeutics, and medical supplies to disclose to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services any payments or transfers of value to physicians. These reports are not meant to prohibit relationships between physicians and industry, but rather to generate a searchable public database illustrating the purpose of the payment, the entities involved, and the timing of each occurrence. Although the bill is meant to reveal physician-industry relationships, the question of how society at large and the medical field will interpret these data are unknown. The purpose of this article is to inform physicians of the components of the Physician Payment Sunshine Act. We discuss several resultant challenges and suggest a framework for preparing for transparency reporting and its potential effects.

  7. Physician communication in the operating room.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, Kristin A; Rask, John P; Fortner, Sally A; Kulesher, Robert; Nelson, Michael T; Yen, Tony; Brennan, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    In this study, communication research was conducted with multidisciplinary groups of operating-room physicians. Theoretical frameworks from intercultural communication and rhetoric were used to (a) measure latent cultural communication variables and (b) conduct communication training with the physicians. A six-step protocol guided the research with teams of physicians from different surgical specialties: anesthesiologists, general surgeons, and obstetrician-gynecologists (n = 85). Latent cultural communication variables were measured by surveys administered to physicians before and after completion of the protocol. The centerpiece of the 2-hour research protocol was an instructional session that informed the surgical physicians about rhetorical choices that support participatory communication. Post-training results demonstrated scores increased on communication variables that contribute to collaborative communication and teamwork among the physicians. This study expands health communication research through application of combined intercultural and rhetorical frameworks, and establishes new ways communication theory can contribute to medical education.

  8. Addressing the phenomenon of disruptive physician behavior.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2003-01-01

    This timely article provides current information on an age-old issue of disruptive physician behavior within the hospital setting. Documented in medical literature over 100 years ago, disruptive physician behavior has been an ongoing challenge to the hospital staff and the quality of patient care in the hospital. Covered in this article are the negative consequences of disruptive physician behavior and the call to respond. If allowed to go unchecked, a physician exhibiting disruptive behavior may threaten a hospital's image, staff morale, finance, and quality of care. Failure to respond undermines the leadership of the hospital and the trust of the community in the hospital's mission. Included in this article are suggestions obtained from the literature and from the author's experience in responding to disruptive physician behavior. Of emphasis is a methodology that includes supporting bylaws and policies to manage disruptive physician behavior.

  9. [Regional distribution of physicians in Croatia].

    PubMed

    Drakulić, Velibor; Bagat, Mario; Golem, Ante-Zvonimir

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show regional distribution of physicians in Croatia. Number of physicians members of the Croatian medical chamber and number of physicians in the system of mandatory health insurance were compared between the counties. In 2006 in Croatia there were 276 physicians per 100,000 inhabitants, i.e., 215 physicians per 100,000 inhabitants in the system of mandatory health insurance. The fewer number of physicians per 100,000 inhabitants in the system of mandatory health insurance, less then 150, were in Koprivnica-Krizevci County, Lika-Senj County and Vukovar-Srijem County, while the greatest number of physicians, more than 250 per 100,000 inhabitants, were in the City of Zagreb and Zagreb County, and Primorje-Gorski kotar County. There were significant differences in the number of physicians per 100,000 inhabitants between the counties (chi2 = 148.7, DF = 19, P < 0.001, chi2-test). Number of general practitioners (GPs) per 100,000 inhabitants in Croatia were 54.2, with range from 47.1 in Pozega-Slavonia County to 61.8 in Primorje-Gorski kotar County. Number of physician specialties in four basic specialties per 100,000 inhabitants in Croatian hospitals were for internal medicine 19.1, general surgery 11.0, gynecology and obstetrics 6.7 and pediatrics 7.8. There were significant differences in the number of physicians in four specialties (internal medicine, general surgery, gynecology and obstetrics and pediatrics) per 100,000 inhabitants between the counties (chi2 = 76.0, DF = 19, P < 0.001, chi2-test). Apart from the insufficient number of physicians in Croatia, an inadequate allocation of physicians in certain counties is also evident.

  10. No exodus: physicians and managed care networks.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ann S; Reschovsky, James D

    2006-05-01

    After remaining stable since 1996-97, the percentage of U.S. physicians who do not contract with managed care plans rose from 9.2 percent in 2000-01 to 11.5 percent in 2004-05, according to a national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). While physicians have not left managed care networks in large numbers, this small but statistically significant increase could signal a trend toward greater out-of-pocket costs for patients and a decline in patient access to physicians. The increase in physicians without managed care contracts was broad-based across specialties and other physician and practice characteristics. Compared with physicians who have one or more managed care contracts, physicians without managed care contracts are more likely to have practiced for more than 20 years, work part time, lack board certification, practice solo or in two-physician groups, and live in the western United States. The study also found substantial variation in the proportion of physicians without managed care contracts across communities, suggesting that local market conditions influence decisions to contract with managed care plans.

  11. Disaggregating ethnoracial disparities in physician trust.

    PubMed

    Sewell, Abigail A

    2015-11-01

    Past research yields mixed evidence regarding whether ethnoracial minorities trust physicians less than Whites. Using the 2002 and 2006 General Social Surveys, variegated ethnoracial differences in trust in physicians are identified by disaggregating a multidimensional physician trust scale. Compared to Whites, Blacks are less likely to trust the technical judgment and interpersonal competence of doctors. Latinos are less likely than Whites to trust the fiduciary ethic, technical judgment, and interpersonal competence of doctors. Black-Latino differences in physician trust are a function of ethnoracial differences in parental nativity. The ways ethnoracial hierarchies are inscribed into power-imbalanced clinical exchanges are discussed.

  12. Infants' Reasoning about Others' False Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Hyun-joo; Baillargeon, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Prior research suggests that children younger than age 3 or 4 do not understand that an agent may be deceived by an object's misleading appearance. The authors asked whether 14.5-month-olds would give evidence in a violation-of-expectation task that they understand that agents may form false perceptions. Infants first watched events in which an…

  13. Development of the False-Memory Illusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brainerd, C. J.; Forrest, T. J.; Karibian, D.; Reyna, V. F.

    2006-01-01

    The counterintuitive developmental trend in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) illusion (that false-memory responses increase with age) was investigated in learning-disabled and nondisabled children from the 6- to 14-year-old age range. Fuzzy-trace theory predicts that because there are qualitative differences in how younger versus older children…

  14. False Accusations of Nosocomial Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Money, John

    1992-01-01

    Practitioners performing routine physical examination may be falsely accused of sexual abuse. Criminal justice system is incompatible with biomedical system of prevention. It is responsible for establishment of sexual abuse industry, practitioners of which have vested interest in maintaining status quo of sexual criminalization. They themselves…

  15. Vendor cited for false PFC savings claim

    SciTech Connect

    Greenstein, I.

    1983-08-29

    A Cynex power factor controller (PFC) vendor claiming a 60% saving was cited by the Better Business Bureau for false advertising after a user survey revealed that savings were only 20% at best. The company plans no future advertising claims, although it insists that 60% savings are possible. The inventor disagrees. (DCK)

  16. How to Justify Teaching False Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Matthew H.

    2008-01-01

    We often knowingly teach false science. Such a practice conflicts with a prima facie pedagogical value placed on teaching only what is true. I argue that only a partial dissolution of the conflict is possible: the proper aim of instruction in science is not to provide an armory of facts about what things the world contains, how they interact, and…

  17. Memory distrust syndrome, confabulation and false confession.

    PubMed

    Gudjonsson, Gisli

    2017-02-01

    There are three types of false confessions: 'voluntary', 'pressured-compliant' and 'pressured-internalized'. On the basis of case studies, in the early 1980s Gudjonsson and MacKeith coined the term 'memory distrust syndrome (MDS)' to describe a condition where people develop profound distrust of their memory and become susceptible to relying on external cues and suggestions from others. Memory distrust can, under certain circumstances, lead to a false confession, particularly of the pressured-internalized type, described as 'confabulation'. This article reviews the evidence for the condition and the psychological mechanism and processes involved. A heuristic model is then presented of a 32 year old man who falsely confessed to murder whilst in police custody. The key elements of the model involve the impact of 'contextual risk factors' (i.e., isolation, long and persistent guilt presumptive interrogation, and high emotional intensity) on 'enduring' vulnerability and 'acute state' factors. The detainee had kept a detailed diary whilst in solitary confinement that provided a unique insight into the gradual development of a MDS, his mental state, and thinking process. This type of false confession is apparently quite rare, but it can occur in intellectually able and educated individuals and involves 'delayed' rather than 'immediate' suggestibility.

  18. Analysis of False Starts in Spontaneous Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Shaughnessy, Douglas

    A primary difference between spontaneous speech and read speech concerns the use of false starts, where a speaker interrupts the flow of speech to restart his or her utterance. A study examined the acoustic aspects of such restarts in a widely-used speech database, examining approximately 1000 utterances, about 10% of which contained a restart.…

  19. Underpowered samples, false negatives, and unconscious learning.

    PubMed

    Vadillo, Miguel A; Konstantinidis, Emmanouil; Shanks, David R

    2016-02-01

    The scientific community has witnessed growing concern about the high rate of false positives and unreliable results within the psychological literature, but the harmful impact of false negatives has been largely ignored. False negatives are particularly concerning in research areas where demonstrating the absence of an effect is crucial, such as studies of unconscious or implicit processing. Research on implicit processes seeks evidence of above-chance performance on some implicit behavioral measure at the same time as chance-level performance (that is, a null result) on an explicit measure of awareness. A systematic review of 73 studies of contextual cuing, a popular implicit learning paradigm, involving 181 statistical analyses of awareness tests, reveals how underpowered studies can lead to failure to reject a false null hypothesis. Among the studies that reported sufficient information, the meta-analytic effect size across awareness tests was d z = 0.31 (95 % CI 0.24-0.37), showing that participants' learning in these experiments was conscious. The unusually large number of positive results in this literature cannot be explained by selective publication. Instead, our analyses demonstrate that these tests are typically insensitive and underpowered to detect medium to small, but true, effects in awareness tests. These findings challenge a widespread and theoretically important claim about the extent of unconscious human cognition.

  20. A Synchronization Account of False Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Brendan T.; Jones, Michael N.; Mewhort, Douglas J. K.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a computational model to explain a variety of results in both standard and false recognition. A key attribute of the model is that it uses plausible semantic representations for words, built through exposure to a linguistic corpus. A study list is encoded in the model as a gist trace, similar to the proposal of fuzzy trace theory…

  1. [Comments on the Confucian physician].

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-xiang

    2009-09-01

    Confucianism gradually permeated and influenced the development of TCM from the Song dynasty, and the term "Confucian physician" is still in use today. With the impact of Confucianism, whether in the compilation of the medical classics or the explanation and conclusion of the medical theories as well as in medical education and ethics, all developed dramatically. But the Confucianism had also a negative effect on the development of medicine. For example, SU Dong-po cured the epidemics with "Sheng san zi", but he exaggerated its action and recorded it. The later intellectuals learnt from him without differentiation and many people suffered. Another example is, with the influence of ideas of "serve the parents" and "help the public", adult children treated their parents by cutting their own thigh. Even some wealthy and intelligent people blindly applied the prescription without differentiation.

  2. The Physician of the Future

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Edward Llewellyn

    1966-01-01

    The good physician of the future will need to master not only the basic and traditional medical skills but many new concepts and techniques as well. He will need to be, as always, a compassionate and intelligent man. If he is to retain his status as a healer in the eyes of his patients, he will have to be fully aware of what is happening in the social and technological environment, or he will run the risk of being relegated to the position of a high-grade technician. He will have new physical tools and new thinking tools to help him. To understand and use these, and also to understand the technical world of the future, he will need a sound knowledge of the physical sciences and some fluency in the language of modern mathematics. PMID:5908727

  3. Childhood bullying: implications for physicians.

    PubMed

    Lyznicki, James M; McCaffree, Mary Anne; Robinowitz, Carolyn B

    2004-11-01

    Childhood bullying has potentially serious implications for bullies and their targets. Bullying involves a pattern of repeated aggression, a deliberate intent to harm or disturb a victim despite the victim's apparent distress, and a real or perceived imbalance of power. Bullying can lead to serious academic, social, emotional, and legal problems. Studies of successful antibullying programs suggest that a comprehensive approach in schools can change student behaviors and attitudes, and increase adults' willingness to intervene. Efforts to prevent bullying must address individual, familial, and community risk factors, as well as promote an understanding of the severity of the problem. Parents, teachers, and health care professionals must become more adept at identifying possible victims and bullies. Physicians have important roles in identifying at-risk patients, screening for psychiatric comorbidities, counseling families about the problem, and advocating for bullying prevention in their communities.

  4. PCBs and the Family Physician

    PubMed Central

    Cappon, I.D.

    1986-01-01

    Pcbs are widespread environmental contaminants present in virtually every mammal on earth. Great controversy and debate has been evoked over the past two decades concerning their potential toxicity. They, along with other organochlorine compounds such as DDT, have been reasonably well studied in field and experimental situations. In general, PCBs are not very toxic, especially in concentrations to which most people are exposed, even those who work in the industrial setting or who eat contaminated fish. In terms of environmental hazards to health, PCBs should be considered as relatively low on the list. The public cannot depend on media information as a source of objective knowledge on controversial compounds like PCBs. The family physician should be able to provide to concerned individuals objective information on the definition, sources and relative toxicity of PCBs. PMID:21267326

  5. The physician of the future.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E L

    1966-04-09

    The good physician of the future will need to master not only the basic and traditional medical skills but many new concepts and techniques as well. He will need to be, as always, a compassionate and intelligent man. If he is to retain his status as a healer in the eyes of his patients, he will have to be fully aware of what is happening in the social and technological environment, or he will run the risk of being relegated to the position of a high-grade technician.He will have new physical tools and new thinking tools to help him. To understand and use these, and also to understand the technical world of the future, he will need a sound knowledge of the physical sciences and some fluency in the language of modern mathematics.

  6. Producing physicians for south Texas.

    PubMed

    Thomson, W A; Denk, J P; Ferry, P G; Martinez-Wedig, C; Michael, L H

    1999-01-01

    South Texas, one of the fastest growing regions in the country, remains among the most medically underserved, in part, because few students from South Texas enter medical school. To address this issue and to increase the diversity of the matriculant pool, Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) and The University of Texas-Pan American (UT-PA) established in 1994 the Premedical Honors College (PHC), a rigorous undergraduate program at UT-PA for students from South Texas high schools. Students who complete all PHC requirements and BCM prerequisites are accepted into BCM upon graduation from UT-PA. Those in good standing receive counseling, enrichment experiences, and tuition and fee waivers from UT-PA and BCM. The program is increasing the number of students from South Texas universities matriculating into medical school, and is expanding the involvement of local physicians in undergraduate education, heightening visibility for partner institutions, and becoming an effective, replicable bachelor of science/doctor of medicine model.

  7. False alarm reduction in critical care.

    PubMed

    Clifford, Gari D; Silva, Ikaro; Moody, Benjamin; Li, Qiao; Kella, Danesh; Chahin, Abdullah; Kooistra, Tristan; Perry, Diane; Mark, Roger G

    2016-08-01

    High false alarm rates in the ICU decrease quality of care by slowing staff response times while increasing patient delirium through noise pollution. The 2015 PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge provides a set of 1250 multi-parameter ICU data segments associated with critical arrhythmia alarms, and challenges the general research community to address the issue of false alarm suppression using all available signals. Each data segment was 5 minutes long (for real time analysis), ending at the time of the alarm. For retrospective analysis, we provided a further 30 seconds of data after the alarm was triggered. A total of 750 data segments were made available for training and 500 were held back for testing. Each alarm was reviewed by expert annotators, at least two of whom agreed that the alarm was either true or false. Challenge participants were invited to submit a complete, working algorithm to distinguish true from false alarms, and received a score based on their program's performance on the hidden test set. This score was based on the percentage of alarms correct, but with a penalty that weights the suppression of true alarms five times more heavily than acceptance of false alarms. We provided three example entries based on well-known, open source signal processing algorithms, to serve as a basis for comparison and as a starting point for participants to develop their own code. A total of 38 teams submitted a total of 215 entries in this year's Challenge. This editorial reviews the background issues for this challenge, the design of the challenge itself, the key achievements, and the follow-up research generated as a result of the Challenge, published in the concurrent special issue of Physiological Measurement. Additionally we make some recommendations for future changes in the field of patient monitoring as a result of the Challenge.

  8. False Belief vs. False Photographs: A Test of Theory of Mind or Working Memory?

    PubMed

    Callejas, Alicia; Shulman, Gordon L; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Theory of mind (ToM), the ability to reason about other people's thoughts and beliefs, has been traditionally studied in behavioral and neuroimaging experiments by comparing performance in "false belief" and "false photograph" (control) stories. However, some evidence suggests that these stories are not matched in difficulty, complicating the interpretation of results. Here, we more fully evaluated the relative difficulty of comprehending these stories and drawing inferences from them. Subjects read false belief and false photograph stories followed by comprehension questions that probed true ("reality" questions) or false beliefs ("representation" questions) appropriate to the stories. Stories and comprehension questions were read and answered, respectively, more slowly in the false photograph than false belief conditions, indicating their greater difficulty. Interestingly, accuracy on representation questions for false photograph stories was significantly lower than for all other conditions and correlated positively with participants' working memory span scores. These results suggest that drawing representational inferences from false photo stories is particularly difficult and places heavy demands on working memory. Extensive naturalistic practice with ToM reasoning may enable a more flexible and efficient mental representation of false belief stories, resulting in lower memory load requirements. An important implication of these results is that the differential modulation of right temporal-parietal junction (RTPJ) during ToM and "false photo" control conditions may reflect the documented negative correlation of RTPJ activity with working memory load rather than a specialized involvement in ToM processes.

  9. Trade-off between false positives and false negatives in the linkage analysis of complex traits.

    PubMed

    Todorov, A A; Rao, D C

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the issue of false positives in genomic scans for detecting complex trait loci using subpair linkage methods and investigates the trade-off between the rate of false positives and the rate of false negatives. It highlights the tremendous cost in terms of power brought about by an excessive control of type I error and, at the same time, confirms that a larger number of false positives can occur otherwise in the course of a genomic scan. Finally, it compares the power and rate of false positives obtained in preplanned replicated studies conducted using a liberal significance level to those for single-step studies that use the same total sample size but stricter levels of significance. For the models considered here, replicate studies were found more attractive as long as one is willing to accept a trade-off, exchanging a much lower rate of false negatives for a slight increase in the rate of false positives.

  10. Physicians on board: an examination of physician financial interests in ASCs using longitudinal data.

    PubMed

    Yee, Christine A

    2011-09-01

    This paper investigates physician financial interests in ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) using novel, longitudinal data that identify board members (directors) of ASCs in Florida. Improving on prior research, the estimated models in this paper disentangle physician director selection effects from the causal impact of these financial interests. The data suggest that even prior to their financial interest, physician directors had larger procedure volumes than non-directors. Physician directors also referred more lower-risk patients. On average, ASC board membership led to a 27% increase in a physician's procedure volume and a 16% increase in a physician's colonoscopy volume. Simulations suggest that 5% of the colonoscopies performed in Florida between 1997 and 2004 may have been due to physician ASC board membership. The evidence also suggests that physician directors steered patients from hospitals to their affiliate ASCs. In addition, they referred and/or treated more lower-risk patients as a result of board membership.

  11. Primary care physician supply, physician compensation, and Medicare fees: what is the connection?

    PubMed

    Dummit, Laura A

    2008-11-03

    Primary care, a cornerstone of several health reform efforts, is believed by many to be in a crisis because of inadequate supply to meet future demand. This belief has focused attention on the adequacy of primary care physician supply and ways to boost access to primary care. One suggested approach is to raise Medicare fees for primary care services. Whether higher Medicare fees would increase physician interest in primary care specialties by reducing compensation disparities between primary care and other specialties has not been established. Further, many questions remain about the assumptions underlying these policy concerns. Is there really a primary care physician crisis? Why does compensation across physician specialties vary so widely? Can Medicare physician fee changes affect access to primary care? These questions defy simple answers. This issue brief lays out the latest information on physician workforce, compensation differences across physician specialties, and Medicare's physician fee-setting process.

  12. Communicating laboratory test results for rheumatoid factor: what do patients and physicians want?

    PubMed Central

    Kelman, Ariella; Robinson, Caroline O; Cochin, Elisenda; Ahluwalia, Nina J; Braverman, Julia; Chiauzzi, Emil; Simacek, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to explore patient and physician perspectives on current laboratory test reporting practices and to elicit ideas for improvement. Methods Two independent studies were conducted. The first solicited members of an online physician community for opinions on current laboratory test reporting practices and possible improvements. The second addressed the same topic, but solicited patient feedback, and included an evaluation of a mock laboratory test report for the rheumatoid factor blood test. Results Both physicians and patients expressed a desire for patient-friendly information on laboratory reports. Physicians expressed a need for education for patients around false-positive and false-negative results within laboratory reports, while patients sought context around the meaning of results, relevance to other tests, and follow-up steps. Conclusion Physicians and patients see value in enhancing laboratory test reports to improve communication. While reports should include the context that patients value, they should also contain cautionary interpretation emphasized by physicians. Patient consultation on improving laboratory reports may help improve such patient-focused communication and promote greater patient understanding of health information, thereby increasing patient participation in their own health care and improving outcomes. Practice implications Laboratory reports are typically designed by experts. Including patients in laboratory report design may facilitate communication and improve outcomes through better patient engagement. PMID:28008236

  13. The problem with false vacuum Higgs inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairbairn, Malcolm; Grothaus, Philipp; Hogan, Robert

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the possibility of using the only known fundamental scalar, the Higgs, as an inflaton with minimal coupling to gravity. The peculiar appearance of a plateau or a false vacuum in the renormalised effective scalar potential suggests that the Higgs might drive inflation. For the case of a false vacuum we use an additional singlet scalar field, motivated by the strong CP problem, and its coupling to the Higgs to lift the barrier allowing for a graceful exit from inflation by mimicking hybrid inflation. We find that this scenario is incompatible with current measurements of the Higgs mass and the QCD coupling constant and conclude that the Higgs can only be the inflaton in more complicated scenarios.

  14. Accounting for false negatives in hotspot detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sego, Landon H.; Wilson, John E.

    2007-08-28

    Hotspot sampling designs are used in environmental sampling to identify the location of one (or more) contiguous regions of elevated contamination. These regions are known as hotspots. The problem of how to calculate the probability of detecting an elliptical hotspot using a rectangular or triangular grid of sampling points was addressed by Singer and Wickman in 1969. This approach presumed that any sample which coincided with a hotspot would detect the hotspot without error. However, for many sampling methodologies, there is a chance that the hotspot will not be detected even though it has been sampled directly--a false negative. We present a mathematical solution and a numerical algorithm which account for false negatives when calculating the probability of detecting hotspots that are circular in shape.

  15. Cosmic chirality both true and false.

    PubMed

    Barron, Laurence D

    2012-12-01

    The discrete symmetries of parity P, time reversal T, and charge conjugation C may be used to characterize the properties of chiral systems. It is well known that parity violation infiltrates into ordinary matter via an interaction between the nucleons and electrons, mediated by the Z(0) particle, that lifts the degeneracy of the mirror-image enantiomers of a chiral molecule. Being odd under P but even under T, this P-violating interaction exhibits true chirality and so may induce absolute enantioselection under all circumstances. It has been suggested that CP violation may also infiltrate into ordinary matter via a P-odd, T-odd interaction mediated by the (as yet undetected) axion. This CP-violating interaction exhibits false chirality and so may induce absolute enantioselection in processes far from equilibrium. Both true and false cosmic chirality should be considered together as possible sources of homochirality in the molecules of life.

  16. Spirit Beholds Bumpy Boulder (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    As NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit began collecting images for a 360-degree panorama of new terrain, the rover captured this view of a dark boulder with an interesting surface texture. The boulder sits about 40 centimeters (16 inches) tall on Martian sand about 5 meters (16 feet) away from Spirit. It is one of many dark, volcanic rock fragments -- many pocked with rounded holes called vesicles -- littering the slope of 'Low Ridge.' The rock surface facing the rover is similar in appearance to the surface texture on the outside of lava flows on Earth.

    Spirit took this false-color image with the panoramic camera on the rover's 810th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 13, 2006). This image is a false-color rendering using camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

  17. Recruitment and Retention of Rural Physicians: Outcomes from the Rural Physician Associate Program of Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halaas, Gwen Wagstrom; Zink, Therese; Finstad, Deborah; Bolin, Keli; Center, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Context: Founded in 1971 with state funding to increase the number of primary care physicians in rural Minnesota, the Rural Physician Associate Program (RPAP) has graduated 1,175 students. Third-year medical students are assigned to primary care physicians in rural communities for 9 months where they experience the realities of rural practice with…

  18. Computerized Physician Order Entry: Reluctance of Physician Adoption of Technology Linked to Improving Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ulinski, Don

    2013-01-01

    Physicians are the influential force in the complex field of patient care delivery. Physicians determine when and where patient healthcare is delivered and affect 80% of the money spent on it. Computerized systems used in the delivery of healthcare information have become an integral part that physicians use to provide patient care. This study…

  19. Education to Return Nonpracticing Physicians to Clinical Activity: A Case Study in Physician Reentry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bower, Elizabeth A.; English, Clea; Choi, Dongseok; Cedfeldt, Andrea S.; Girard, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Physician shortages in the United States are estimated to reach as high as 85 000 by 2020. One strategy for addressing the shortage is to encourage physicians who left clinical practice to return to work, but few programs exist to prepare physicians to reenter practice. The Divisions of Continuing Medical Education and Graduate…

  20. Constrained potential method for false vacuum decays

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jae-hyeon

    2011-02-01

    A procedure is reported for numerical analysis of false vacuum transition in a model with multiple scalar fields. It is a refined version of the approach by Konstandin and Huber. The alteration makes it possible to tackle a class of problems that was difficult or unsolvable with the original method, i.e. those with a distant or nonexistent true vacuum. An example with an unbounded-from-below direction is presented.

  1. False Context Fear Memory in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Sarah; Holmes, Nathan M.; Westbrook, R. Frederick

    2015-01-01

    Four experiments used rats to study false context fear memories. In Experiment 1, rats were pre-exposed to a distinctive chamber (context A) or to a control environment (context C), shocked after a delay in a second chamber (context B) and tested either in B or A. Rats pre-exposed to A froze just as much as control rats in B but more than control…

  2. False memories in Lewy-body disease.

    PubMed

    Algarabel, Salvador; Pitarque, Alfonso; Sales, Alicia; Meléndez, Juan Carlos; Escudero, Joaquín

    2015-12-01

    Recently, de Boysson, Belleville, Phillips et al. (2011) found that patients with Lewy-body disease (LBD) showed significantly lower rates of false memories than healthy controls, using the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) experimental procedure. Given that this result could be explained by the practically null rate of true recognition in the LBD group (0.09), we decided to replicate the study by de Boysson et al. (2011), but including a new condition that would maximize the true recognition rate (and analyze its effect on the rate of false memories). Specifically, in a DRM experiment, we manipulated (within subjects) two study and recognition conditions: in the "immediate" condition, both the LBD patients and the control group of healthy older people received a different recognition test after each study list (containing twelve words associated with a non-presented critical word), while in the "delayed" condition (similar to the one in de Boysson et al., 2011), the participants received the entire series of study lists and then took only one recognition test. The results showed that, in both samples, the "immediate" condition produced higher corrected rates of both true and false recognition than the "delayed" condition, although they were both lower in the LBD patients, which shows that these patients are capable of encoding and recognizing the general similitude underlying information (gist memory) in the right conditions.

  3. Infants’ Reasoning About Others’ False Perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-joo; Baillargeon, Renée

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that children younger than age 3 or 4 do not understand that an agent may be deceived by an object’s misleading appearance. The authors asked whether 14.5-month-olds would give evidence in a violation-of-expectation task that they understand that agents may form false perceptions. Infants first watched events in which an agent faced a stuffed skunk and a doll with blue pigtails; the agent consistently reached for the doll, suggesting that she preferred it over the skunk. Next, while the agent was absent, the doll was hidden in a plain box, and the skunk was hidden in a box with a tuft of blue hair protruding from under its lid. Infants expected the agent to be misled by the tuft’s resemblance to the doll’s hair and to falsely perceive it as belonging to the doll. These and other results indicate that 14.5-month-old infants can already reason about agents’ false perceptions. PMID:18999340

  4. False Beliefs in Unreliable Knowledge Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidis, Evangelos; Varsakelis, Nikos; Antoniou, Ioannis

    2017-03-01

    The aims of this work are: (1) to extend knowledge dynamics analysis in order to assess the influence of false beliefs and unreliable communication channels, (2) to investigate the impact of selection rule-policy for knowledge acquisition, (3) to investigate the impact of targeted link attacks ("breaks" or "infections") of certain "healthy" communication channels. We examine the knowledge dynamics analytically, as well as by simulations on both artificial and real organizational knowledge networks. The main findings are: (1) False beliefs have no significant influence on knowledge dynamics, while unreliable communication channels result in non-monotonic knowledge updates ("wild" knowledge fluctuations may appear) and in significant elongation of knowledge attainment. Moreover, false beliefs may emerge during knowledge evolution, due to the presence of unreliable communication channels, even if they were not present initially, (2) Changing the selection rule-policy, by raising the awareness of agents to avoid the selection of unreliable communication channels, results in monotonic knowledge upgrade and in faster knowledge attainment, (3) "Infecting" links is more harmful than "breaking" links, due to "wild" knowledge fluctuations and due to the elongation of knowledge attainment. Moreover, attacking even a "small" percentage of links (≤5%) with high knowledge transfer, may result in dramatic elongation of knowledge attainment (over 100%), as well as in delays of the onset of knowledge attainment. Hence, links of high knowledge transfer should be protected, because in Information Warfare and Disinformation, these links are the "best targets".

  5. A closer look at self-reported suicide attempts: false positives and false negatives.

    PubMed

    Plöderl, Martin; Kralovec, Karl; Yazdi, Kurosch; Fartacek, Reinhold

    2011-02-01

    The validity of self-reported suicide attempt information is undermined by false positives (e.g., incidences without intent to die), or by unreported suicide attempts, referred to as false negatives. In a sample of 1,385 Austrian adults, we explored the occurrence of false positives and false negatives with detailed, probing questions. Removing false positives decreased the rate of suicide attempters from 4.3% to 2.7%. Probing questions also revealed 0.8% false negatives. We recommend using probing questions with both those who report a suicide attempt and those who do not report a suicide attempt to increase the validity of self-reported suicide-related information.

  6. Tailoring hospital marketing efforts to physicians' needs.

    PubMed

    Mackay, J M; Lamb, C W

    1988-12-01

    Marketing has become widely recognized as an important component of hospital management (Kotler and Clarke 1987; Ludke, Curry, and Saywell 1983). Physicians are becoming recognized as an important target market that warrants more marketing attention than it has received in the past (Super 1987; Wotruba, Haas, and Hartman 1982). Some experts predict that hospitals will begin focusing more marketing attention on physicians and less on consumers (Super 1986). Much of this attention is likely to take the form of practice management assistance, such as computer-based information system support or consulting services. The survey results reported here are illustrative only of how one hospital addressed the problem of physician need assessment. Other potential target markets include physicians who admit patients only to competitor hospitals and physicians who admit to multiple hospitals. The market might be segmented by individual versus group practice, area of specialization, or possibly even physician practice life cycle stage (Wotruba, Haas, and Hartman 1982). The questions included on the survey and the survey format are likely to be situation-specific. The key is the process, not the procedure. It is important for hospital marketers to recognize that practice management assistance needs will vary among markets (Jensen 1987). Therefore, hospitals must carefully identify their target physician market(s) and survey them about their specific needs before developing and implementing new physician marketing programs. Only then can they be reasonably confident that their marketing programs match their customers' needs.

  7. Physician Knowledge of Child Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Socolar, Rebecca R. S.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of physicians (n=113) concerning their knowledge about child sexual abuse found several areas of inadequate knowledge, including assessment of chlamydia infection, Tanner staging, and documentation of historical and physical exam findings. Factors associated with better knowledge scores were physician participation in continuing medical…

  8. Patient–physician communication regarding electronic cigarettes

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Michael B.; Giovenco, Daniel P.; Delnevo, Cristine D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Smokers are likely asking their physicians about the safety of e-cigarettes and their potential role as a cessation tool; however, the research literature on this communication is scant. A pilot study of physicians in the United States was conducted to investigate physician–patient communication regarding e-cigarettes. Methods A total of 158 physicians were recruited from a direct marketing e-mail list and completed a short, web-based survey between January and April 2014. The survey addressed demographics, physician specialty, patient–provider e-cigarette communication, and attitudes towards tobacco harm reduction. Results Nearly two-thirds (65%) of physicians reported being asked about e-cigarettes by their patients, and almost a third (30%) reported that they have recommended e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation tool. Male physicians were significantly more likely to endorse a harm reduction approach. Discussion Physician communication about e-cigarettes may shape patients' perceptions about the products. More research is needed to explore the type of information that physicians share with their patients regarding e-cigarettes and harm reduction. PMID:26844056

  9. A history of physician suicide in America.

    PubMed

    Legha, Rupinder K

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of the last century, physicians have written a number of articles about suicide among their own. These articles reveal how physicians have fundamentally conceived of themselves, how they have addressed vulnerability among their own, and how their self-identification has changed over time, due, in part, to larger historical changes in the profession, psychiatry, and suicidology. The suicidal physician of the Golden Age (1900-1970), an expendable deviant, represents the antithesis of that era's image of strength and invincibility. In contrast, the suicidal physician of the modern era (1970 onwards), a vulnerable human being deserving of support, reflects that era's frustration with bearing these unattainable ideals and its growing emphasis on physician health and well-being. Despite this key transition, specifically the acknowledgment of physicians' limitations, more recent articles about physician suicide indicate that Golden Age values have endured. These persistent emphases on perfection and discomfort with vulnerability have hindered a comprehensive consideration of physician suicide, despite one hundred years of dialogue in the medical literature.

  10. A Study of the Educationally Influential Physician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, David M.; Ryan, Kurt; Hodder, Ian

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 172 family doctors found that they approached educationally influential (EI) physicians they knew through their hospitals; only 20% used e-mail and 40% the Internet for medical information; EI physicians helped extend their knowledge and validate innovations found in the literature; and health care reform was negatively affecting…

  11. Administrative competencies for physician organizations with capitation.

    PubMed

    Penner, M

    1999-01-01

    In California, it is common for HMOs to capitate physician organizations (e.g., independent practice organizations and multispecialty medical groups) for all professional and outpatient ancillary services (and to share risk for inpatient care) under professional risk capitation contracts. This arrangement exports most of the financial risk from the HMO to the physician organization. When HMOs and physician organizations contract under these arrangements, HMOs delegate many of their administrative functions to physician organizations--giving the physician organization authority to make the decisions needed to manage capitated risk. As a result, administrators of physician organizations must be competent in such areas as provider network development, financial forecasting, utilization and quality management, contract negotiation, and establishing systems for claims, reporting, authorizations, and the like. In this study four HMO and 22 physician organization administrators were interviewed concerning key administrative competencies for managing capitation contracts. The competencies were assessed as key administrative work activities that required specific knowledge, skill, or ability to perform. Identifying these competencies is important for physician organizations preparing for capitated risk and will be essential for organizations preparing for HMO or Medicare capitation.

  12. 42 CFR 483.40 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... may alternate between personal visits by the physician and visits by a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section. (d) Availability..., nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist who— (i) Meets the applicable definition in § 491.2...

  13. 42 CFR 483.40 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... may alternate between personal visits by the physician and visits by a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section. (d) Availability..., nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist who— (i) Meets the applicable definition in § 491.2...

  14. The Physician-Scientist: An Endangered Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legato, Marianne, J.

    1983-01-01

    The number of physician-scientists in training decreased below the recommended level in 1976. Reasons young doctors are not attracted to research training and why these academic physicians are needed are discussed. The demise of the academic medical community will begin an ice age in American medicine. (SR)

  15. Physician Performance Assessment: Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipner, Rebecca S.; Weng, Weifeng; Caverzagie, Kelly J.; Hess, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Given the rising burden of healthcare costs, both patients and healthcare purchasers are interested in discerning which physicians deliver quality care. We proposed a methodology to assess physician clinical performance in preventive cardiology care, and determined a benchmark for minimally acceptable performance. We used data on eight…

  16. Rural Idaho Family Physicians' Scope of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Ed; Schmitz, David; Epperly, Ted; Nukui, Ayaka; Miller, Carissa Moffat

    2010-01-01

    Context: Scope of practice is an important factor in both training and recruiting rural family physicians. Purpose: To assess rural Idaho family physicians' scope of practice and to examine variations in scope of practice across variables such as gender, age and employment status. Methods: A survey instrument was developed based on a literature…

  17. Peseshet--the first female physician?

    PubMed

    Harer, W B; el-Dawakhly, Z

    1989-12-01

    Excavation of the tomb of Akhet-Hetep at Giza revealed a monument dedicated to his mother Peseshet, who is identified by many important titles including "Overseer of Women Physicians." She is probably the world's earliest known woman physician. She practiced at the time of the building of the great pyramids in Egypt, about 2500 BC.

  18. Navigating physician resources on the Internet.

    PubMed Central

    Ellenberger, B

    1995-01-01

    By providing everything from electronic mail to "virtual patients," computer technology and the Internet have made enormous resources available to physicians. Science writer Beth Ellenberger gives an overview of the different levels of Internet access, as well as the e-mail addresses of some medical resources that will be useful to physicians. Images p1305-a PMID:7736378

  19. 42 CFR 483.40 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term... may alternate between personal visits by the physician and visits by a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section. (d)...

  20. 42 CFR 483.40 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term... may alternate between personal visits by the physician and visits by a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section. (d)...

  1. 42 CFR 483.40 - Physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term... may alternate between personal visits by the physician and visits by a physician assistant, nurse practitioner, or clinical nurse specialist in accordance with paragraph (e) of this section. (d)...

  2. Construction of a Physician Skills Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, George V.; Zarconi, Joseph; Savickas, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    The current study applied Holland's RIASEC typology to develop a "Physician Skills Inventory". We identified the transferable skills and abilities that are critical to effective performance in medicine and had 140 physicians in 25 different specialties rate the importance of those skills. Principal component analysis of their responses produced…

  3. Urban-Rural Flows of Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricketts, Thomas C.; Randolph, Randy

    2007-01-01

    Context: Physician supply is anticipated to fall short of national requirements over the next 20 years. Rural areas are likely to lose relatively more physicians. Policy makers must know how to anticipate what changes in distribution are likely to happen to better target policies. Purpose: To determine whether there was a significant flow of…

  4. Physician perceptions of prescription drug information.

    PubMed

    Evans, K R; Beltramini, R F

    1986-01-01

    This study reports the findings of an investigation designed to explore the importance of prescription drug information source characteristics among physicians. Differences were found to exist among the importance ratings both in aggregate, and between, categories of physician specialty and years in practice. Conclusions for pharmaceutical marketers and the implications for future research efforts are discussed.

  5. Physician Migration, Education, and Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norcini, John J.; Mazmanian, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    Physician migration is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon that is intimately intertwined with medical education. Imbalances in the production of physicians lead to workforce shortages and surpluses that compromise the ability to deliver adequate and equitable health care to large parts of the world's population. In this overview, we address a…

  6. Physicians' Internet Information-Seeking Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Nancy L.; Casebeer, Linda L.; Kristofco, Robert E.; Strasser, Sheryl M.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Our understanding about the role of the Internet as a resource for physicians has improved in the past several years with reports of patterns for use and measures of impact on medical practice. The purpose of this study was to begin to shape a theory base for more fully describing physicians' information-seeking behaviors as they…

  7. Foreign Trained Physicians and American Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Rosemary; Vermeulen, Joan

    The purpose of the study was to bring together available materials on the location, activity, and function of more than 63,000 foreign trained physicians in the United States; to review the political, economic, and organizational factors which have led to the current manpower situation; and to analyze these data in terms of physician manpower,…

  8. [Geographical distribution of physicians in Chile].

    PubMed

    Goic, A

    1995-03-01

    In 1994, Chile had 15,451 active physicians (less than 70 years old) for a population of 14,027,344 with a ratio of 1 physician per 908 inhabitants, a satisfactory figure compared to other countries of similar socio-economical development. Ratios of 1:880 and 1:843 are projected for 1999 and 2004 respectively. The annual rate of physician's population growth (2.2%), that is superior to the general population's growth rate (1.6%), will increase to about 2.5% per annum in 2001 as a consequence of the creation of three new medical schools. However, the distribution of physicians along the country is unsatisfactory. While the capital (Metropolitan Region) has a ratio of 1 physician per 629 inhabitants, the figure for the Region of Maule is 1:2,113. Only two of ten regions, excepting the capital, have a ratio lower than 1:1,000. Sixty percent of physicians live in Santiago while only 40% of the general population does so, illustrating their high concentration. Median ratio in Chile, that better reflects the reality than the mean, is 1:1,280. The heterogeneous distribution of physicians in Chile is a sign of social inequity that must be corrected. In a free society a better physician distribution is achieved with economical and professional incentives given by health institutions.

  9. Place Matters in Physician Practice and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervero, Ronald M.

    2003-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, most discussions about the improvement of continuing medical education (CME) have begun by seeking a better understanding of how physicians learn. The goal of this movement has been to put physician learners and their learning needs, not new research findings, at the center of the educational process. This has led CME away…

  10. 22 CFR 62.27 - Alien physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Examiners Examination, the Foreign Medical Graduate Examination in the Medical Sciences, the United States... physician will be under the direct supervision of a physician who is a U.S. citizen or resident alien and... activities involving direct patient care. Under these circumstances, the special eligibility...

  11. Attitudes of women and men physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Heins, M; Hendricks, J; Martindale, L; Smock, S; Stein, M; Jacobs, J

    1979-01-01

    Attitudinal data obtained from interviewing random samples of women and men physicians in metropolitan Detroit indicated that women were generally more liberal and egalitarian than men. Older women were more liberal/egalitarian than older men while younger men were closer in attitudes to younger women. Within specialities, women and men physicians frequently held similar attitudinal scores; however, controlling for age, sex accounted for more variation than did specialty. A weighted combination of variables which together most significantly discriminated between age and sex subgroups pointed to a sensitivity dimension. This was stronger in the women; yet men demonstrating a similar sensitivity were found in almost every age and specialty grouping. Although younger men physicians are less conservative than older men physicians, both younger and older women physicians demonstrated strong liberalism/egalitarianism. PMID:507244

  12. Pharmaceutical marketing research and the prescribing physician.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jeremy A

    2007-05-15

    Surveillance of physicians' prescribing patterns and the accumulation and sale of these data for pharmaceutical marketing are currently the subjects of legislation in several states and action by state and national medical associations. Contrary to common perception, the growth of the health care information organization industry has not been limited to the past decade but has been building slowly over the past 50 years, beginning in the 1940s when growth in the prescription drug market fueled industry interest in understanding and influencing prescribing patterns. The development of this surveillance system was not simply imposed on the medical profession by the pharmaceutical industry but was developed through the interactions of pharmaceutical salesmen, pharmaceutical marketers, academic researchers, individual physicians, and physician organizations. Examination of the role of physicians and physician organizations in the development of prescriber profiling is directly relevant to the contemporary policy debate surrounding this issue.

  13. Mental health activities of family physicians.

    PubMed

    Cassata, D M; Kirkman-Liff, B L

    1981-04-01

    A questionnaire survey of residency trained graduates and nonresidency trained family physicians showed both groups reporting relatively infrequent practice of behavioral medicine. Referrals and counseling sessions/visits produce a combined total of 20 activities per month, or two to four percent of all patient encounters, even though the physicians in the sample reported that 33 percent of their diagnoses were behavioral/psychological. More than 85 percent of the physicians reported access to more than one mental health provider. The six most common health problems encountered in the office were depression, anxiety, obesity, marital discord, alcohol abuse, and sexual problems. Physicians responding to this survey expressed an interest in continuing education programs that emphasize individual, marital, and parenting counseling, and psychopharmacology. There is a major need to improve the mental health component of residency training, which will enable physicians to better manage psychosocial problems in practice settings.

  14. Liability of physicians supervising nonphysician clinicians.

    PubMed

    Paterick, Barbara B; Waterhouse, Blake E; Paterick, Timothy E; Sanbar, Sandy S

    2014-01-01

    Physicians confront a variety of liability issues when supervising nonphysician clinicians (NPC) including: (1) direct liability resulting from a failure to meet the state-defined standards of supervision/collaboration with NPCs; (2) vicarious liability, arising from agency law, where physicians are held accountable for NPC clinical care that does not meet the national standard of care; and (3) responsibility for medical errors when the NPC and physician are co-employees of the corporate enterprise. Physician-NPC co-employee relationships are highlighted because they are new and becoming predominant in existing healthcare models. Because of their novelty, there is a paucity of judicial decisions determining liability for NPC errors in this setting. Knowledge of the existence of these risks will allow physicians to make informed decisions on what relationships they will enter with NPCs and how these relationships will be structured and monitored.

  15. Physician partnering: a provider network primer.

    PubMed

    Tortolani, A J; Cascardo-Weissman, D

    1999-01-01

    The face of health care is changing daily due to pressures brought about by dissatisfied consumers, physicians, and employers. The authors of this article believe that the only way to bring about a better health care system is for physicians to take back the administration of the medical profession from the insurers. Physicians must take the financial risks necessary to innovate a medical system that will benefit themselves, their patients, and their patients' employers. This article presents the basic business concepts needed to establish physician provider networks (PPNs) as well as the benefits and pitfalls of the various types of associations into which a PPN can enter. Clearly, the future will belong to those physicians who have the foresight to invest their talents and their finances in the business aspects of managed care.

  16. Factors affecting the valuation of physician practices.

    PubMed

    Cleverley, W O

    1997-12-01

    Valuation of physician practices provides physicians with a benchmark of their business success and helps purchasers negotiate a purchase price. The Center for Healthcare Industry Performance Studies (CHIPS) recently conducted a survey of physician practice acquisitions. The survey collected data on salaries and benefits paid to physicians after practice acquisition, historical profitability of the acquired practice, and specific values assigned to both tangible and intangible assets in the practice. Some of the survey's critical conclusions include: hospitals tend to acquire unprofitable practices, value is based on historical revenues rather than historical profits, the importance of valuation methodology and payer mix is underestimated, tangible assets represent a large part of the purchase price, and hospitals tend to pay higher physician compensation than do other purchasers.

  17. Physician use of disease management programs.

    PubMed

    Wholey, Douglas R; Michail, Nina; Christianson, Jon; Knutson, David

    2005-02-01

    This paper examines differences in availability, use, and perceived usefulness of disease management programs as reported by generalist and specialist physicians functioning as primary care providers in health plans. Implications of these differences are discussed in terms of the three types of purchasers: private insurers, Medicare, and Medicaid. The design is a cross-sectional mail and telephone mixed-mode survey. The data come from 23 health plans in five states (Florida, New York, Colorado, Pennsylvania, and Washington), including six metropolitan areas: Seattle, New York City, Miami, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, and Denver. The study participants are 1,244 generalist and specialist physicians who contracted with health plans as primary care providers. They were drawn from a 2001 mail and telephone survey of 2,105 generalist and 1,693 specialist physicians serving commercial, Medicaid, and Medicare patients. Physician responses about use of disease management for their patients in the health plan and how useful they thought it was were regressed on physician, physician organization, and physician-health plan relationship characteristics. While generalist physicians are likely to report having disease management programs available and using them, specialists vary greatly in their response to the disease management programs. In contrast to physicians associated with commercial plans, implementation of disease management programs among physicians associated with Medicaid plans varied across states. Primary care providers trained in generalist areas of practice are more likely than specialists functioning as primary care providers to report that disease management programs are available and to use them. They also find them more useful than do specialists.

  18. False negative clinical diagnoses of malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Osborne, J E; Bourke, J F; Graham-Brown, R A; Hutchinson, P E

    1999-05-01

    The false negative rate for the clinical diagnosis (FNR) for malignant melanoma is reported to be of the order of 20-50%. The aim of this study was to investigate possible predictor variables for FNR, with particular reference to the features and score of the seven-point check-list within the total population (778) of histologically proved malignant melanomas presenting in Leicestershire between 1982 and 1996. The FNR was 18.5%. The check-list would have failed as a referral indication in only 0.8-1. 1% of the lesions. The major check-list features occurred more commonly than the minor features, excepting size >/= 7 mm, confirming the diagnostic importance of the major criteria. The FNR was unaffected by age or sex. More rarely involved sites had higher rates (31-42%), and the face was a particularly difficult diagnostic site. Clinical features of lesions associated with a higher FNR were lack of irregular pigmentation and shape, altered sensation, the presence of inflammation and size < 7 mm. The FNR was inversely related to the total score and major feature score, but directly related to the minor score. The minor features, in addition to the major features, are potentially valuable in avoiding false negative diagnoses and we suggest their retention as part of the check-list. There was only one patient, in whom the diagnosis of melanoma was initially missed and who was not biopsied on presentation to hospital, who re-presented after 1 year. However, the study illustrates the importance of avoiding a false negative diagnosis as there was marked delay in the excision of such lesions.

  19. Uranus in True and False Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    These two pictures of Uranus -- one in true color (left) and the other in false color -- were compiled from images returned Jan. 17, 1986, by the narrow-angle camera of Voyager 2. The spacecraft was 9.1 million kilometers (5.7 million miles) from the planet, several days from closest approach. The picture at left has been processed to show Uranus as human eyes would see it from the vantage point of the spacecraft. The picture is a composite of images taken through blue, green and orange filters. The darker shadings at the upper right of the disk correspond to the day-night boundary on the planet. Beyond this boundary lies the hidden northern hemisphere of Uranus, which currently remains in total darkness as the planet rotates. The blue-green color results from the absorption of red light by methane gas in Uranus' deep, cold and remarkably clear atmosphere. The picture at right uses false color and extreme contrast enhancement to bring out subtle details in the polar region of Uranus. Images obtained through ultraviolet, violet and orange filters were respectively converted to the same blue, green and red colors used to produce the picture at left. The very slight contrasts visible in true color are greatly exaggerated here. In this false-color picture, Uranus reveals a dark polar hood surrounded by a series of progressively lighter concentric bands. One possible explanation is that a brownish haze or smog, concentrated over the pole, is arranged into bands by zonal motions of the upper atmosphere. The bright orange and yellow strip at the lower edge of the planet's limb is an artifact of the image enhancement. In fact, the limb is dark and uniform in color around the planet. The Voyager project is manages for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  20. False discovery rates in spectral identification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Kyowon; Kim, Sangtae; Bandeira, Nuno

    2012-01-01

    Automated database search engines are one of the fundamental engines of high-throughput proteomics enabling daily identifications of hundreds of thousands of peptides and proteins from tandem mass (MS/MS) spectrometry data. Nevertheless, this automation also makes it humanly impossible to manually validate the vast lists of resulting identifications from such high-throughput searches. This challenge is usually addressed by using a Target-Decoy Approach (TDA) to impose an empirical False Discovery Rate (FDR) at a pre-determined threshold x% with the expectation that at most x% of the returned identifications would be false positives. But despite the fundamental importance of FDR estimates in ensuring the utility of large lists of identifications, there is surprisingly little consensus on exactly how TDA should be applied to minimize the chances of biased FDR estimates. In fact, since less rigorous TDA/FDR estimates tend to result in more identifications (at higher 'true' FDR), there is often little incentive to enforce strict TDA/FDR procedures in studies where the major metric of success is the size of the list of identifications and there are no follow up studies imposing hard cost constraints on the number of reported false positives. Here we address the problem of the accuracy of TDA estimates of empirical FDR. Using MS/MS spectra from samples where we were able to define a factual FDR estimator of 'true' FDR we evaluate several popular variants of the TDA procedure in a variety of database search contexts. We show that the fraction of false identifications can sometimes be over 10× higher than reported and may be unavoidably high for certain types of searches. In addition, we further report that the two-pass search strategy seems the most promising database search strategy. While unavoidably constrained by the particulars of any specific evaluation dataset, our observations support a series of recommendations towards maximizing the number of resulting

  1. Walter sutton: physician, scientist, inventor.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Gregory J; Hulston, Nancy J; Kovac, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Walter S. Sutton (1877-1916) was a physician, scientist, and inventor. Most of the work on Sutton has focused on his recognition that chromosomes carry genetic material and are the basis for Mendelian inheritance. Perhaps less well known is his work on rectal administration of ether. After Sutton's work on genetics, he completed his medical degree in 1907 and began a 2-year surgical fellowship at Roosevelt Hospital, New York City, NY, where he was introduced to the technique of rectal administration of ether. Sutton modified the work of others and documented 100 cases that were reported in his 1910 landmark paper "Anaesthesia by Colonic Absorption of Ether". Sutton had several deaths in his study, but he did not blame the rectal method. He felt that his use of rectal anesthesia was safe when administered appropriately and believed that it offered a distinct advantage over traditional pulmonary ether administration. His indications for its use included (1) head and neck surgery; (2) operations when ether absorption must be minimized due to heart, lung, or kidney problems; and (3) preoperative pulmonary complications. His contraindications included (1) cases involving alimentary tract or weakened colon; (2) laparotomies, except when the peritoneal cavity was not opened; (3) incompetent sphincter or anal fistula; (4) orthopnea; and (5) emergency cases. Sutton wrote the chapter on "Rectal Anesthesia" in one of the first comprehensive textbooks in anesthesia, James Tayloe Gwathmey's Anesthesia. Walter Sutton died of a ruptured appendix in 1916 at age 39.

  2. [The occupational physician in France].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shinya

    2013-10-01

    The French Labor law defines the role and its allocation criteria of the occupational physician (OP) the same as in Japan. In France, occupational medicine is one of the medical specialties. The OP resident must follow the 4 years clinical training before certification. After having finished their residency, they are entitled to work for the occupational health service office of a company or company association (in the case of small and medium sized companies). The most important characteristics of the French system is that they cover all workers regardless of company size. The main role of the OP is prevention of work related diseases and accidents. They are not allowed to do clinical services except for emergency cases. Their main activities are health examinations, health education, patrol and advice for better working condition. Formerly, it was rather difficult to attract the medical students for OP resident course because of its prevention oriented characteristics. A growing concern about the importance of health management at the work site, however, has changed the situation. Now, the number of candidates for OP resident course is increasing. Their task has expanded to cover mental health and other life style related diseases. The 2011 modification of law redefines the role of the OP as a director of an occupational health service office who has a total responsibility of multidisciplinary services. The French and Japanese occupational health systems have many of similarities. A comparative study by researchers of UOEH is expected to yield useful information.

  3. John Keats: poet, patient, physician.

    PubMed

    Smith, H

    1984-01-01

    John Keats, son of an ostler , was born in London in 1795. Despite an early interest in literature he was, surprisingly, apprenticed to an apothecary and continued his medical training at Guy's Hospital, obtaining the Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1816. He never practiced medicine. His early poems were not well received, and for the young poet with very slender means, life was difficult. Tragedy was added to difficulty when tuberculosis, which had already caused the death of his mother and uncle, became apparent in his brother Tom, whom Keats nursed through his illness when the brothers were living together in Hampstead . Subsequently Keats developed the disease, but despite its rapid progress, he managed in a single year - 1819 - to produce some of the finest lyrical poetry in the language. He went to Italy in the hope of obtaining a cure but died in Rome in 1821, aged 25. Medicine certainly contributed to the man, but also something to the poet, Keats; his training and his family and personal experience of tuberculosis speak for themselves. More subtly , his medical experience influenced in some degree his ideas and even his choice of words. The interrelations of poet-patient and trainee-physician are examined in this essay.

  4. Maltreatment increases spontaneous false memories but decreases suggestion-induced false memories in children.

    PubMed

    Otgaar, Henry; Howe, Mark L; Muris, Peter

    2017-01-17

    We examined the creation of spontaneous and suggestion-induced false memories in maltreated and non-maltreated children. Maltreated and non-maltreated children were involved in a Deese-Roediger-McDermott false memory paradigm where they studied and remembered negative and neutral word lists. Suggestion-induced false memories were created using a misinformation procedure during which both maltreated and non-maltreated children viewed a negative video (i.e., bank robbery) and later received suggestive misinformation concerning the event. Our results showed that maltreated children had higher levels of spontaneous negative false memories but lower levels of suggestion-induced false memories as compared to non-maltreated children. Collectively, our study demonstrates that maltreatment both increases and decreases susceptibility to memory illusions depending on the type of false memory being induced. Statement of contribution What is already known on this subject? Trauma affects memory. It is unclear how trauma affects false memory. What does this study add? This study focuses on two types of false memories.

  5. On False-Positive and False-Negative Decisions with a Mastery Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Rand R.

    Wilcox (1977) examines two methods of estimating the probability of a false-positive on false-negative decision with a mastery test. Both procedures make assumptions about the form of the true score distribution which might not give good results in all situations. In this paper, upper and lower bounds on the two possible error types are described…

  6. Nurse practitioners, certified nurse midwives, and physician assistants in physician offices.

    PubMed

    Park, Melissa; Cherry, Donald; Decker, Sandra L

    2011-08-01

    The expansion of health insurance coverage through health care reform, along with the aging of the population, are expected to strain the capacity for providing health care. Projections of the future physician workforce predict declines in the supply of physicians and decreasing physician work hours for primary care. An expansion of care delivered by nurse practitioners (NPs), certified nurse midwives (CNMs), and physician assistants (PAs) is often cited as a solution to the predicted surge in demand for health care services and calls for an examination of current reliance on these providers. Using a nationally based physician survey, we have described the employment of NPs, CNMs, and PAs among office-based physicians by selected physician and practice characteristics.

  7. False alarm reduction during landmine detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prado, P. J.; Chongpison, A.; Doraisamy, L.

    2007-04-01

    Quadrupole Resonance sensors have the unique capability of detecting explosives from buried, plastic-cased antipersonnel and antitank landmines. The chemical specificity of this radio-frequency technique provides the potential to deliver remarkably low false alarm rates during landmine detection. This is of particular importance to deminers, who frequently come across numerous clutter items before uncovering a mine. Quadrupole Resonance is typically utilized in a confirmation mode; preceded by rapid primary scans carried out by, for example, metal detectors, ground penetrating radars or a fusion of these. Significant technical and scientific advances have resulted in the fabrication of handheld and vehicle mounted Quadrupole Resonance landmine detectors in compact, power-efficient configurations. The development work is focused on baseline sensitivity increase, as well as the achievement of high detection performance under field conditions. The mine detection capability of Quadrupole Resonance detectors has been evaluated during various blind tests. A modular handheld unit, combining primary and confirmation sensors, was designed to be operated by a single person. A series of field tests demonstrate the unique capability of Quadrupole Resonance for significant false alarm reduction.

  8. Patient–physician mistrust and violence against physicians in Guangdong Province, China: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Joseph D; Cheng, Yu; Wong, Bonnie; Gong, Ni; Nie, Jing-Bao; Zhu, Wei; McLaughlin, Megan M; Xie, Ruishi; Deng, Yinghui; Huang, Meijin; Wong, William C W; Lan, Ping; Liu, Huanliang; Miao, Wei; Kleinman, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Objective To better understand the origins, manifestations and current policy responses to patient–physician mistrust in China. Design Qualitative study using in-depth interviews focused on personal experiences of patient–physician mistrust and trust. Setting Guangdong Province, China. Participants One hundred and sixty patients, patient family members, physicians, nurses and hospital administrators at seven hospitals varying in type, geography and stages of achieving goals of health reform. These interviews included purposive selection of individuals who had experienced both trustful and mistrustful patient–physician relationships. Results One of the most prominent forces driving patient–physician mistrust was a patient perception of injustice within the medical sphere, related to profit mongering, knowledge imbalances and physician conflicts of interest. Individual physicians, departments and hospitals were explicitly incentivised to generate revenue without evaluation of caregiving. Physicians did not receive training in negotiating medical disputes or humanistic principles that underpin caregiving. Patient–physician mistrust precipitated medical disputes leading to the following outcomes: non-resolution with patient resentment towards physicians; violent resolution such as physical and verbal attacks against physicians; and non-violent resolution such as hospital-mediated dispute resolution. Policy responses to violence included increased hospital security forces, which inadvertently fuelled mistrust. Instead of encouraging communication that facilitated resolution, medical disputes sometimes ignited a vicious cycle leading to mob violence. However, patient–physician interactions at one hospital that has implemented a primary care model embodying health reform goals showed improved patient–physician trust. Conclusions The blind pursuit of financial profits at a systems level has eroded patient–physician trust in China. Restructuring incentives

  9. In defense of industry-physician relationships.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Don K

    2010-09-01

    The objective was to examine the economic, ethical, and legal foundations for conflict of interest restrictions between physicians and pharmaceutical and medical device industries ("industry"). Recently academic medical centers and professional organizations have adopted policies that restrict permissible interactions between industry and physicians. The motive is to avoid financial conflicts of interest that compromise core values of altruism and fiduciary relationships. Productive relationships between industry and physicians provide novel drugs and devices of immense benefit to society. The issues are opposing views of medical economics, profit motives, medical professionalism, and extent to which interactions should be lawfully restricted. Industry goals are congruent with those of physicians: patient welfare, safety, and running a profitable business. Profits are necessary to develop drugs and devices. Physician collaborators invent products, refine them, and provide feedback and so are appropriately paid. Marketing is necessary to bring approved products to patients. Economic realities limit the extent to which physicians treat their patients altruistically and as fiduciaries. Providing excellent service to patients may be a more realistic standard. Statements from industry and the American College of Surgeons appropriately guide professional behavior. Preservation of industry-physician relationships is vital to maintain medical innovation and progress.

  10. Hospitals' marketing challenge: influencing physician behavior.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R C

    1985-05-01

    Physicians' referring and admitting behavior as well as their clinical management practices are major determinants of hospitals' profitability under prospective payment. Four techniques are available to hospitals that seek to increase market share: Recruitment and retention strategies. In planning the mix of specialties represented on staff, hospitals should consider the effects of a physician's practice on the hospital's case mix. Peer pressure. Peer review programs in hospitals as well as through medical or specialty societies may help persuade physicians to alter their use of services. Education and information programs. Hospitals can assist physicians in patient management by conducting economic grand rounds, developing committees to study and communicate cost data to physicians, and providing information on alternatives to hospitalization. Incentives. Putting physicians at risk by linking planned expenditures to hospital financial performance can influence practice patterns. Other techniques include offering limited partnerships to medical staff members and merging the hospital and medical staff into one corporation. Hospitals may also need to influence physicians away from ventures that compete directly with the institution, such as ambulatory surgery centers.

  11. Physicians, social media, and conflict of interest.

    PubMed

    Decamp, Matthew

    2013-02-01

    Physicians and patients increasingly use social media technologies, such as Facebook, Twitter, and weblogs (blogs), both professionally and personally. Amidst recent reports of physician misbehavior online, as well as concerns about social media's potential negative effect on trust in the medical profession, several national-level physician organizations have created professional guidelines on social media use by physicians. Missing from these guidelines is adequate attention to conflict of interest. Some guidelines do not explicitly mention conflict of interest; others recommend only disclosure. Recommending disclosure fails to appreciate the unique features of social media that make adequate disclosure difficult to accomplish. Moreover, in emphasizing disclosure alone, current guidelines are inconsistent with medicine's general trend toward management or elimination, not just disclosure, of potential conflicts. Because social media sites typically rely on physicians' voluntary compliance with professional norms, physicians necessarily play a major role in shaping these norms' content and scope. To achieve the benefits of social media and ensure the veracity of social media content while preserving trust in the profession, physicians must reaffirm their commitment to disclose potential conflicts; advocate for better electronic disclosure mechanisms; and develop concrete management strategies-including, where necessary, the elimination of conflicts altogether.

  12. Psychoactive drugs and false memory: comparison of dextroamphetamine and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol on false recognition

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Gallo, David A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Several psychoactive drugs are known to influence episodic memory. However, these drugs’ effects on false memory, or the tendency to incorrectly remember nonstudied information, remain poorly understood. Objectives Here, we examined the effects of two commonly used psychoactive drugs, one with memory-enhancing properties (dextroamphetamine; AMP), and another with memory-impairing properties (Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol; THC), on false memory using the Deese/Roediger–McDermott (DRM) illusion. Methods Two parallel studies were conducted in which healthy volunteers received either AMP (0, 10, and 20 mg) or THC (0, 7.5, and 15 mg) in within-subjects, randomized, double-blind designs. Participants studied DRM word lists under the influence of the drugs, and their recognition memory for the studied words was tested 2 days later, under sober conditions. Results As expected, AMP increased memory of studied words relative to placebo, and THC reduced memory of studied words. Although neither drug significantly affected false memory relative to placebo, AMP increased false memory relative to THC. Across participants, both drugs’ effects on true memory were positively correlated with their effects on false memory. Conclusions Our results indicate that AMP and THC have opposing effects on true memory, and these effects appear to correspond to similar, albeit more subtle, effects on false memory. These findings are consistent with previous research using the DRM illusion and provide further evidence that psychoactive drugs can affect the encoding processes that ultimately result in the creation of false memories. PMID:21647577

  13. 42 CFR 405.2413 - Services and supplies incident to a physician's services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to a physician's services. 405.2413 Section 405.2413 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM FEDERAL HEALTH INSURANCE FOR THE AGED AND DISABLED...

  14. 42 CFR 414.24 - Review, revision, and addition of RVUs for physician services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Review, revision, and addition of RVUs for physician services. 414.24 Section 414.24 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... Federal Register to announce changes in RVUs for established codes and provides an opportunity for...

  15. 42 CFR 447.520 - FFP: Conditions relating to physician-administered drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP: Conditions relating to physician-administered drugs. 447.520 Section 447.520 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment for...

  16. 42 CFR 447.520 - FFP: Conditions relating to physician-administered drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false FFP: Conditions relating to physician-administered drugs. 447.520 Section 447.520 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS PAYMENTS FOR SERVICES Payment for...

  17. 42 CFR 405.2414 - Nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and certified nurse midwife services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Nurse practitioner, physician assistant, and certified nurse midwife services. 405.2414 Section 405.2414 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID... AND DISABLED Rural Health Clinic and Federally Qualified Health Center Services § 405.2414...

  18. 42 CFR 405.515 - Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services billed by physicians.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services... Criteria for Determining Reasonable Charges § 405.515 Reimbursement for clinical laboratory services billed... limitation on reimbursement for markups on clinical laboratory services billed by physicians. If a...

  19. 42 CFR 410.26 - Services and supplies incident to a physician's professional services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to a physician's professional services: Conditions. 410.26 Section 410.26 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI)...

  20. 42 CFR 410.26 - Services and supplies incident to a physician's professional services: Conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Services and supplies incident to a physician's professional services: Conditions. 410.26 Section 410.26 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI)...