Science.gov

Sample records for 2013-this study investigated

  1. The ten-ecosystem study investigation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kan, E. P.

    1976-01-01

    With the continental United States divided into ten forest and grassland ecosystems, the Ten Ecosystem Study (TES) is designed to investigate the feasibility and applicability of state-of-the-art automatic data processing remote sensing technology to inventory forest, grassland, and water resources by using Land Satellite data. The study will serve as a prelude to a possible future nationwide remote sensing application to inventory forest and rangeland renewable resources. This plan describes project design and phases, the ten ecosystem, data utilization and output, personnel organization, resource requirements, and schedules and milestones.

  2. Neuroscience Investigations: An Overview of Studies Conducted

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.

    1999-01-01

    The neural processes that mediate human spatial orientation and adaptive changes occurring in response to the sensory rearrangement encountered during orbital flight are primarily studied through second and third order responses. In the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) neuroscience investigations, the following were measured: (1) eye movements during acquisition of either static or moving visual targets, (2) postural and locomotor responses provoked by unexpected movement of the support surface, changes in the interaction of visual, proprioceptive, and vestibular information, changes in the major postural muscles via descending pathways, or changes in locomotor pathways, and (3) verbal reports of perceived self-orientation and self-motion which enhance and complement conclusions drawn from the analysis of oculomotor, postural, and locomotor responses. In spaceflight operations, spatial orientation can be defined as situational awareness, where crew member perception of attitude, position, or motion of the spacecraft or other objects in three-dimensional space, including orientation of one's own body, is congruent with actual physical events. Perception of spatial orientation is determined by integrating information from several sensory modalities. This involves higher levels of processing within the central nervous system that control eye movements, locomotion, and stable posture. Spaceflight operational problems occur when responses to the incorrectly perceived spatial orientation are compensatory in nature. Neuroscience investigations were conducted in conjunction with U. S. Space Shuttle flights to evaluate possible changes in the ability of an astronaut to land the Shuttle or effectively perform an emergency post-landing egress following microgravity adaptation during space flights of variable length. While the results of various sensory motor and spatial orientation tests could have an impact on future space flights, our knowledge of

  3. Investigative study of holographic recording materials development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The potential of certain cis-trans isomers and doped LiNbO3 for the holographic read/write/erase memory application was investigated. The cis-trans work involved the photochemical investigation of a number of potential materials as well as specific molecular engineering efforts on alpha-methyl stilbene and its derivatives. These efforts resulted in an increase in the change in index of refraction, and thereby, in potential recording utility, of an order of magnitude. The work on LiNbO3 was directed toward a preliminary investigation of the dynamics of the writing process. Several samples and a variety of writing conditions were investigated. An unexpected and as yet unexplained improvement in material behavior with continued recycling was observed. In addition, some effort was devoted to an analysis of the physical conditions under which several current theories of the optical damage process are valid.

  4. Home Economist Image Study: A Qualitative Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yankelovich, Skelly and White, Inc., New York, NY.

    The study was made in order to provide background for a planned public relations program sponsored by the American Home Economics Association (AHEA). A total of 26 personal and 79 telephone interviews were conducted of persons in business, education, communications and media, and government. The study found that: there is need for a public…

  5. Nanostructured surfaces investigated by quantitative morphological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perani, Martina; Carapezzi, Stefania; Rani Mutta, Geeta; Cavalcoli, Daniela

    2016-05-01

    The morphology of different surfaces has been investigated by atomic force microscopy and quantitatively analyzed in this paper. Two different tools have been employed to this scope: the analysis of the height-height correlation function and the determination of the mean grain size, which have been combined to obtain a complete characterization of the surfaces. Different materials have been analyzed: SiO x N y , InGaN/GaN quantum wells and Si nanowires, grown with different techniques. Notwithstanding the presence of grain-like structures on all the samples analyzed, they present very diverse surface design, underlying that this procedure can be of general use. Our results show that the quantitative analysis of nanostructured surfaces allows us to obtain interesting information, such as grain clustering, from the comparison of the lateral correlation length and the grain size.

  6. Investigating Adaptive Grieving Styles: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doughty, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    There has been an evolution in the understanding of the nature of grief since S. Freud's initial work, Mourning and Melancholia (1917/1953). Mental health practitioners and researchers have established new models to aid in the conceptualization and treatment of grief issues. The purpose of this study was to examine the opinions of experts in the…

  7. The Translatability of Metaphor: Study and Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alghbban, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    The appropriate handling of the metaphorical meaning during translation, along with maximizing its level of equivalence in the target language, is going to be my central focus through the course of this dissertation. Unlike many contributions that attempt to reconcile the problem of translating metaphor, this study has come to approach the subject…

  8. Investigating adaptive grieving styles: a Delphi study.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Elizabeth A

    2009-05-01

    There has been an evolution in the understanding of the nature of grief since S. Freud's initial work, Mourning and Melancholia (1917/1953). Mental health practitioners and researchers have established new models to aid in the conceptualization and treatment of grief issues. The purpose of this study was to examine the opinions of experts in the field of grief regarding elements of a new model of adult bereavement, Martin and Doka's (2000) adaptive grieving styles, using the Delphi Method to identify points of consensus. A survey of 20 experts in the field of thanatology reached consensus on 21 items in which the panelists addressed the uniqueness of the griever, recognized there are multiple factors that influence the grieving process (i.e., culture, personality, and gender), that most bereaved individuals use both cognitive and affective strategies in adapting to bereavement, and that bereaved individuals experience both internal and external pressures to grieve in particular ways.

  9. Watching MOOCs Together: Investigating Co-Located MOOC Study Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Nan; Verma, Himanshu; Skevi, Afroditi; Zufferey, Guillaume; Blom, Jan; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Research suggests that massive open online course (MOOC) students prefer to study in groups, and that social facilitation within the study groups may render the learning of difficult concepts a pleasing experience. We report on a longitudinal study that investigates how co-located study groups watch and study MOOC videos together. The study was…

  10. NASA selects scientific investigations for Earth dynamics studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Forty two domestic investigators affiliated with U.S. universities, governmental agencies, or private concerns and 14 investigators from France, West Germany, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Spain, Sweden, Australia, New Zealand, Venezuela, and Canada were selected to use precise geodetic data obtained by laser ranging and very long base interferometry in a study of the Earth's tectonic plate movement, crustal deformation, and rotational dynamics. The studies to be made and the principal investigators for each are listed.

  11. 42 CFR 431.713 - Continuing study and investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.713 Continuing study and investigation. The agency or board must conduct a continuing study of nursing homes and administrators within the State...

  12. 42 CFR 431.713 - Continuing study and investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.713 Continuing study and investigation. The agency or board must conduct a continuing study of nursing homes and administrators within the State...

  13. 42 CFR 431.713 - Continuing study and investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.713 Continuing study and investigation. The agency or board must conduct a continuing study of nursing homes and administrators within the State...

  14. 42 CFR 431.713 - Continuing study and investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.713 Continuing study and investigation. The agency or board must conduct a continuing study of nursing homes and administrators within the State...

  15. 42 CFR 431.713 - Continuing study and investigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Programs for Licensing Nursing Home Administrators § 431.713 Continuing study and investigation. The agency or board must conduct a continuing study of nursing homes and administrators within the State...

  16. Using Baseline Studies in the Investigation of Test Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Dianne; Horak, Tania

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss the role of "baseline studies" in investigations of test impact and to illustrate the type of thinking underlying the design and implementation of such studies by reference to a recent study relating to a high-stakes test of English language proficiency. Baseline studies are used to describe an educational…

  17. Investigating Sexual Abuse: Findings of a 15-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Bob; Kavanagh, Denise; Caffrey, Shay; Power, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Background: There is a lack of longitudinal large-scale studies of sexual abuse in intellectual disability services. Such studies offer opportunities to examine patterns in disclosure, investigation and outcomes, and to report on incidence and trends. Methods: All allegations of sexual abuse (n = 250) involving service users as victims or…

  18. Investigation of Transmission Line Models for Switching Overvoltages Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghkhani, Iman; Ketabi, Abbas; Feuillet, Rene

    2013-06-01

    Overvoltages caused by switching operation of power system equipments might damage some equipment and delay power system restoration. This paper presents a comparison between transmission line (TL) models for overvoltages study and investigates which TL model is most proper for every case study. Both simulation time and accuracy factors of TL models are considered for selecting best TL model. Various cases of switching of transformer, shunt reactor, capacitor bank, and transmission line are investigated and simulation results for a partial of 39-bus New England test system, show that the proposed TL model evaluation increase accuracy and reduce simulation time (accelerate power system restoration) properly.

  19. Local Studies Collections Online: An Investigation in Irish Public Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Lara; Tedd, Lucy A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate how public libraries in Ireland are using their websites to present local studies collections online. Design/methodology/approach: All the websites of public libraries in Ireland were evaluated against a checklist of 50 criteria by one of the authors. An analytic description was provided of the four…

  20. Electrical resistivity tomography investigations on a paleoseismological trenching study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Meriç Aziz

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) investigation was performed in a paleoseismological trenching study. Data acquisition strategies such as the selection of electrode configuration and electrode intervals of ERT application were investigated in this paper. The ERT results showed that the Wenner and Wenner-Schlumberger arrays yielded similar results for subsurface characteristics whereas the DD array provided slightly different results. The combined usage of these arrays produced satisfactory images of the subsurface resistivity distribution. In addition, the electrode spacing tests revealed that a suitable interpretation of subsurface geology can be obtained from a 5 m electrode interval. However, a suitable trenching location defined by successful 2D resistivity models was obtained for 1 m electrode spacing. Therefore, the comparison of the trench and ERT results was also possible. The results of trenching and ERT studies substantially support each other.

  1. How knowledgeable are investigators studying therapies of traditional medicines?

    PubMed Central

    Narahari, Saravu R.; Aggithaya, Madhur G.; Thamban, Chendalam; Muralidharan, Kunnathody; Kanjarpane, Aniruddha B.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Research methodology in traditional Indian system of medicine. Aim: To determine the knowledge level of investigators conducting clinical trials in traditional medicines (TMs) including Ayurveda. Materials and Methods: This was a questionnaire survey conducted for selected researchers trained in any specialty and working in TM. 2087 researchers were selected based on selection criteria. A validated and pretested questionnaire containing the questions regarding regulatory issues, literature search, evidence-based medicine, clinical trial design, patient selection, and study reporting were sent either through E-mail or post. The answered questionnaires were analyzed. The parameters were analyzed based on median and interquartile range (IQR). Results: Forty two responses were received through E-mail and 21 researchers responded through post. Out of 63, six researchers sent incomplete responses. Among the remaining 57 respondents; 34 (59.6%) investigators had postdoctoral degree, 43 investigators (75.4%) did not receive any structured training on research methodology, 23 (40.4%) had two decades of research experience. Thirty three (74%) of investigators who received government funding didn’t have any training on research methodology. Ayurveda experts group had better knowledge compared to pharmaceutical sciences and basic science group although they had a dilemma about conducting clinical evaluation of TM within the specific framework of rigorous clinical pharmacological principles without ignoring the Ayurvedic concepts such as Dosha, Prakruti etc., Investigators below 30 years possessed higher knowledge of research methodology when analyzed based on the age. The respondents working in research organizations, government organizations, and academic institutions had lower knowledge compared to those who were in private organizations/practice. Conclusions: It is recommend that investigators, peer reviewers, and fund managers involved in traditional medicine

  2. Electrophysiological studies in patients with pulmonary hypertension: a retrospective investigation.

    PubMed

    Bandorski, Dirk; Schmitt, Jörn; Kurzlechner, Claudia; Erkapic, Damir; Hamm, Christian W; Seeger, Werner; Ghofrani, Ardeschir; Höltgen, Reinhard; Gall, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated patients with pulmonary hypertension and arrhythmias. Data on electrophysiological studies in these patients are rare. In a retrospective dual-centre design, we analysed data from patients with indications for electrophysiological study. Fifty-five patients with pulmonary hypertension were included (Dana Point Classification: group 1: 14, group 2: 23, group 3: 4, group 4: 8, group 5: 2, and 4 patients with exercised-induced pulmonary hypertension). Clinical data, 6-minute walk distance, laboratory values, and echocardiography were collected/performed. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was the most frequent indication (n = 15) for an electrophysiological study, followed by atrial flutter (n = 14). In summary 36 ablations were performed and 25 of them were successful (atrial flutter 12 of 14 and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia 4 of 4). Fluoroscopy time was 16 ± 14.4 minutes. Electrophysiological studies in patients with pulmonary hypertension are feasible and safe. Ablation procedures are as effective in these patients as in non-PAH patients with atrial flutter and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia and should be performed likewise. The prognostic relevance of ventricular stimulations and inducible ventricular tachycardias in these patients is still unclear and requires further investigation.

  3. Electrophysiological Studies in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension: A Retrospective Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Bandorski, Dirk; Schmitt, Jörn; Kurzlechner, Claudia; Erkapic, Damir; Hamm, Christian W.; Seeger, Werner; Ghofrani, Ardeschir; Höltgen, Reinhard; Gall, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have investigated patients with pulmonary hypertension and arrhythmias. Data on electrophysiological studies in these patients are rare. In a retrospective dual-centre design, we analysed data from patients with indications for electrophysiological study. Fifty-five patients with pulmonary hypertension were included (Dana Point Classification: group 1: 14, group 2: 23, group 3: 4, group 4: 8, group 5: 2, and 4 patients with exercised-induced pulmonary hypertension). Clinical data, 6-minute walk distance, laboratory values, and echocardiography were collected/performed. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was the most frequent indication (n = 15) for an electrophysiological study, followed by atrial flutter (n = 14). In summary 36 ablations were performed and 25 of them were successful (atrial flutter 12 of 14 and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia 4 of 4). Fluoroscopy time was 16 ± 14.4 minutes. Electrophysiological studies in patients with pulmonary hypertension are feasible and safe. Ablation procedures are as effective in these patients as in non-PAH patients with atrial flutter and atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia and should be performed likewise. The prognostic relevance of ventricular stimulations and inducible ventricular tachycardias in these patients is still unclear and requires further investigation. PMID:24977152

  4. [Combination of imaging studies and autopsy in death investigations].

    PubMed

    Gips, Hadas; Zaitsev, Konstantin; Tal, Siga; Vasserman, Margarita; Hiss, Jehuda

    2013-10-01

    The progress in quality and availability of imaging studies has made them an invaluable part of the clinical diagnostic process, so much so that the forensic medical community had to acknowledge their importance and to implement them in death investigations. Since 2011 roughly 200 post-mortem radiographic examinations were conducted, mostly followed by full autopsies. Four of those cases are given as an example of the benefits and limitations of these methods. A review of the literature and our experience so far, show that computed tomography provides better visualization and 3D reconstruction of traumatic bone injuries, as well as good assessment of air in the tissues and vascular system, gunshot wound tracts, and anthropological characteristics for identification. Imaging methods are relatively limited in definite diagnostic findings in cases of sudden death from natural causes, such as pneumonia, pulmonary embolism, acute myocardial infarction or meningitis, problems which can be partially solved with the aid of angiographic studies. These methods also do not allow for sampling of tissues for microscopic examination, nor fluid samples for cultures and toxicology. In the current cultural and social reality in Israel, imaging studies enable minimization of the autopsy and, in certain cases, its relinquishment serves as a compromise between the necessity of death investigation and beliefs in the wholeness of the body. In light of the advantages of imaging, no autopsy of a trauma-related death can be complete without it.

  5. Toxicological investigations on silicon carbide. 1. Inhalation studies.

    PubMed Central

    Bruch, J; Rehn, B; Song, H; Gono, E; Malkusch, W

    1993-01-01

    The question of lung damage as a result of exposure to silicon carbide (SiC) was investigated by inhalation experiments to obtain information on the qualitative response of lung tissue to the test substance (SiC). For comparison, quartz, kaolinite, and tempered clay dusts were used. The indices for the effects of the dusts studied were organ weights, numbers of bronchoalveolar cells, lung surfactant phospholipid concentrations including subfractions, and lung clearance. Exposure to the test samples was carried out according to the Essen inhalation model in two independent series. The results of the two series were similar: Compared with sham controls, exposure to SiC did not affect the indices studied. Even at a low dose (a quarter of the SiC dose) quartz gave pronounced deviations in all indices. In particular, an increase in granulocytes indicated toxic properties of the dust. The long term elimination of quartz from the lung was worse than that of SiC. The kaolinite and tempered clay dusts were intermediate between SiC and quartz based on several of the indices studied. It is concluded that SiC is deposited practically inert in the lung. PMID:8398873

  6. Learning to Do Through Investigative Projects: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Pratibha

    2005-10-01

    In India, the likelihood of a girl student opting out of a physics course only because of gender issues is remote. Even though no special care is taken to attract women, a large percentage of the top-ranking students opt to major in physics. However, subtle forces operate in higher academia. The number of women in teaching and research institutes continues to be dismally low. The confidence and motivation of women students shows a distinct attenuation at the tertiary level. Inasmuch as the undergraduate years lay the foundation for a career in physics, there is a critical need to create learning experiences for women students that would enhance their motivation, nurture talent, and generate confidence in their capacity to make a creative contribution. The author has spent several years teaching at a women's college and in a university department with few women on the faculty. She has coordinated the Learning Through Investigative Projects program for undergraduate students of both genders. In a dual-pronged strategy, students are constructively engaged in open-ended investigative projects and assigned specific tasks. The touchstone of this program is the ambience in which the projects are carried out and the cognitive changes it effects in students as they are weaned away from the prevalent transmissionist mode of teaching and led to a constructivist paradigm of learning. They acquire an ability to work independently. The program and the underpinning pedagogic model have been very successful in capacity building and have influenced many students to choose careers in physics and academia. I present a case study of the work carried out under Project Science Online, in which students helped develop a microcomputer-based laboratory.

  7. A study to investigate the importance of purses as fomites

    PubMed Central

    Biranjia-Hurdoyal, Susheela D; Deerpaul, Shailendra; Permal, G. Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background: Purses hardly get washed and are discarded, mostly, when they are no longer usable. This study aims to investigate whether women's and men's purses can serve as fomites. Materials and Methods: A total of 145 purses from 80 women and 65 men were swabbed and cultured. The bacteria were identified by gram staining and with the standard biochemical tests. Results: A total of 138 purses (95.2%) showed bacterial contamination, out of which 49.4% had a single growth and 50.7% had mixed growth. The material of the purse was found to affect bacterial growth. Synthetic purses showed higher mean colony-forming unit (CFU) counts (P < 0.05). Micrococcus (64.8%) and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (64.1%) were the most common bacteria isolated, followed by Bacillus spp. (13.8%). Micrococcus was found with a higher prevalence on men's purses, while Bacillus spp. were more prominent on women's purses (P < 0.05). The difference between the rates of bacterial growth from the purses of women and of men was found to be statistically significant (57.2% and 44.7%; P < 0.05). Furthermore, the mean CFU count was higher for men's purses than for women's purses (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Purses from both men and women are potential vectors for transmission of diseases across the community. The use of synthetic purses should be discouraged, as they contribute to increased bacterial colonization. PMID:26261804

  8. A limited flight study for investigating hyperstereo vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalich, Melvyn E.; Rash, Clarence E.; McLean, William E.; Ramiccio, John G.

    2007-04-01

    A number of currently proposed helmet-mounted display (HMD) designs relocate image intensification (I2) tubes to the sides of the helmet. Such a design approach induces a visual condition referred to as hyperstereo vision (or hyperstereopsis). This condition manifests itself to the user as an exaggerated sense of depth perception, causing near- to mid-range objects to appear closer than they actually are. Hyperstereopsis is potentially a major concern for helicopter operations that are conducted at low altitudes. As part of a limited flight study to investigate this phenomenon, five rated U.S. Army aviators, as technical observers, wore a hyperstereo HMD during the conduct of a series if 13 standard maneuvers. Two subject aviators acquired a total of eight hours and three aviators a single hour of flight. Using a post-flight questionnaire, these aviators were asked to compare their visual experiences to that of normal I2-aided flight. Depth perception at distances below 300 feet was identified as the greatest challenge. The two 8-hour aviators reported a 5-8 hour "adaptation" period for most maneuvers.

  9. A gender study investigating physics self-efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. My dissertation focuses on understanding the role self-efficacy plays in retaining students, particularly women, in introductory physics. I use an explanatory mixed methods approach to first investigate quantitatively the influence of self-efficacy in predicting success and then to qualitatively explore the development of self-efficacy. In the initial quantitative studies, I explore the utility of self-efficacy in predicting the success of introductory physics students, both women and men. Results indicate that self-efficacy is a significant predictor of success for all students. I then disaggregate the data to examine how self-efficacy develops differently for women and men in the introductory physics course. Results show women rely on different sources of self-efficacy than do men, and that a particular instructional environment, Modeling Instruction, has a positive impact on these sources of self-efficacy. In the qualitative phase of the project, this dissertation focuses on the development of self-efficacy. Using the qualitative tool of microanalysis, I introduce a methodology for understanding how self-efficacy develops moment-by-moment using the lens of self-efficacy opportunities. I then use the characterizations of self-efficacy opportunities to focus on a particular course environment and to identify and describe a mechanism by which Modeling Instruction impacts student self-efficacy. Results indicate that the emphasizing the development and deployment of models affords opportunities to impact self-efficacy. The findings of this dissertation indicate that introducing key elements into the classroom, such as cooperative group work, model development and deployment, and interaction with the instructor, create a mechanism by which instructors can impact the self-efficacy of their students. Results from this study indicate that

  10. Guest investigator program study: Physics of equatorial plasma bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    -shaped plasma bubbles. The second topic was pursued because the inability to predict the day-to-day occurrence of plasma bubbles indicated inadequate knowledge of the physics of plasma bubbles. An understanding of bubble formation requires an understanding of the roles of the various terms in the linearized growth rate of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In our study, we examined electric-field perturbations found in SM-D EFI data and found that the seeding is more likely to be produced in the E region rather than the F region. The results of this investigation are presented in the Appendix of this report and will be submitted for publication in the Journal of Geophysical Research.

  11. Seismic investigations of antrim shale fracturing-ground motion studies

    SciTech Connect

    Turpening, R.M.; Frolich, C.

    1980-09-01

    The Dow Chemical Company contract with the Department of Energy to investigate the feasiblity of recovering energy from Antrim shale by an in situ process required the investigation of several fracturing techniques. One of these included the use of explosives detonated in wellbores at a depth of 1200 to 1400 feet. This report summarizes the seismic monitoring of several of these explosions and the analysis of the data obtained.

  12. Investigating the Use of Coherence Analysis on Mandibular Electromyograms to Investigate Neural Control of Early Oromandibular Behaviours: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeve, Roger W.; Price, Christiana M.

    2010-01-01

    An empirical method for investigating differences in neural control of jaw movement across oromandibular behaviours is to compute the coherence function for electromyographic signals obtained from mandibular muscle groups. This procedure has been used with adults but not extended to children. This pilot study investigated if coherence analysis…

  13. Investigation of Students' Epistemological Beliefs and Attitudes towards Studying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onen, Aysem Seda

    2011-01-01

    This study consists of the analysis on the relationship between the epistemological beliefs of secondary level students and their attitudes towards studying. The sampling of the study was formed by 440 students studying at Grade 10, 11 and 12 in secondary schools. The Epistemological Belief Questionnaire and the Attitudes towards Studying Scale,…

  14. A Gender Study Investigating Physics Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawtelle, Vashti

    2011-01-01

    The underrepresentation of women in physics has been well documented and a source of concern for both policy makers and educators. My dissertation focuses on understanding the role self-efficacy plays in retaining students, particularly women, in introductory physics. I use an explanatory mixed methods approach to first investigate quantitatively…

  15. An Exploratory Investigation of Study-Abroad Online Information Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teng, Shasha; Khong, Kok Wei

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous studies on the factors involved in the decision-making process on study abroad, little attention has been paid to the initial stage when students process information. This qualitative study aims to map out the cues involved when Chinese students process study-abroad information from an information-processing perspective. Findings…

  16. Investigation of Poultry Waste for Anaerobic Digestion: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Christopher R.

    Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological conversion technology which is being used to produce bioenergy all over the world. This energy is created from biological feedstocks, and can often use waste products from various food and agricultural processors. Biogas from AD can be used as a fuel for heating or for co-generation of electricity and heat and is a renewable substitute to using fossil fuels. Nutrient recycling and waste reduction are additional benefits, creating a final product that can be used as a fertilizer in addition to energy benefits. This project was conducted to investigate the viability of three turkey production wastes as AD feedstock: two turkey litters and a material separated from the turkey processing wastewater using dissolved air flotation (DAF) process. The DAF waste contained greases, oils and other non-commodity portions of the turkey. Using a variety of different process methods, types of bacteria, loading rates and food-to-microorganism ratios, optimal loading rates for the digestion of these three materials were obtained. In addition, the co-digestion of these materials revealed additional energy benefits. In this study, batch digestion tests were carried out to treat these three feedstocks, using mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria, using loading rates of 3 and 6 gVS/L They were tested separately and also as a mixture for co-digestion. The batch reactor used in this study had total and working volumes of 1130 mL and 500 mL, respectively. The initial organic loading was set to be 3 gVS/L, and the food to microorganism ratio was either 0.6 or 1.0 for different treatments based on the characteristics of each material. Only thermophilic (50 +/- 2ºC) temperatures were tested for the litter and DAF wastes in continuous digestion, but mesophilic and thermophilic batch digestion experiments were conducted. The optimum digestion time for all experiments was 14 days. The biogas yields of top litter, mixed litter, and DAF waste under

  17. The investigation of supply chain's reliability measure: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghizadeh, Houshang; Hafezi, Ehsan

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, using supply chain operational reference, the reliability evaluation of available relationships in supply chain is investigated. For this purpose, in the first step, the chain under investigation is divided into several stages including first and second suppliers, initial and final customers, and the producing company. Based on the formed relationships between these stages, the supply chain system is then broken down into different subsystem parts. The formed relationships between the stages are based on the transportation of the orders between stages. Paying attention to the system elements' location, which can be in one of the five forms of series namely parallel, series/parallel, parallel/series, or their combinations, we determine the structure of relationships in the divided subsystems. According to reliability evaluation scales on the three levels of supply chain, the reliability of each chain is then calculated. Finally, using the formulas of calculating the reliability in combined systems, the reliability of each system and ultimately the whole system is investigated.

  18. Investigation of Poultry Waste for Anaerobic Digestion: A Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salam, Christopher R.

    Anaerobic Digestion (AD) is a biological conversion technology which is being used to produce bioenergy all over the world. This energy is created from biological feedstocks, and can often use waste products from various food and agricultural processors. Biogas from AD can be used as a fuel for heating or for co-generation of electricity and heat and is a renewable substitute to using fossil fuels. Nutrient recycling and waste reduction are additional benefits, creating a final product that can be used as a fertilizer in addition to energy benefits. This project was conducted to investigate the viability of three turkey production wastes as AD feedstock: two turkey litters and a material separated from the turkey processing wastewater using dissolved air flotation (DAF) process. The DAF waste contained greases, oils and other non-commodity portions of the turkey. Using a variety of different process methods, types of bacteria, loading rates and food-to-microorganism ratios, optimal loading rates for the digestion of these three materials were obtained. In addition, the co-digestion of these materials revealed additional energy benefits. In this study, batch digestion tests were carried out to treat these three feedstocks, using mesophilic and thermophilic bacteria, using loading rates of 3 and 6 gVS/L They were tested separately and also as a mixture for co-digestion. The batch reactor used in this study had total and working volumes of 1130 mL and 500 mL, respectively. The initial organic loading was set to be 3 gVS/L, and the food to microorganism ratio was either 0.6 or 1.0 for different treatments based on the characteristics of each material. Only thermophilic (50 +/- 2ºC) temperatures were tested for the litter and DAF wastes in continuous digestion, but mesophilic and thermophilic batch digestion experiments were conducted. The optimum digestion time for all experiments was 14 days. The biogas yields of top litter, mixed litter, and DAF waste under

  19. An Investigation on Teaching Materials Used in Social Studies Lesson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saglam, Halil Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the teaching materials employed during social studies lessons on the basis of certain variables. Specifically, the researcher tried to find out whether teachers' gender, service length, having a personal computer, receiving an in-service training regarding the use of teaching materials, having an interest on…

  20. Investigating the Effectiveness of a Study Skills Training Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikhwari, T. D.; Pillay, J.

    2012-01-01

    Various studies have shown that the school system in South Africa is continually producing learners who are inadequately prepared for higher education studies, particularly schools in disadvantaged environments. The University of Venda (UNIVEN) is situated in an educationally disadvantaged environment. Most of the students who enroll at this…

  1. An Investigation of Factors Determining the Study Abroad Destination Choice: A Case Study of Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cheng-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on the field of education abroad have mainly focused on the factors influencing the mobility of international students from developing to developed countries and very few have been conducted to investigate the factors influencing the flow of international students to the Asia Pacific region. As a piece of country-specific…

  2. Tularemia Outbreak Investigation in Kosovo: Case Control and Environmental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Dedushaj, Isuf; Gjini, Ardiana; Jorgensen, Tine Rikke; Cotter, Benvon; Lieftucht, Alfons; D’Ancona, Fortunato; Dennis, David T.; Kosoy, Michael A.; Mulliqi-Osmani, Gjyle; Grunow, Roland; Kalaveshi, Ariana; Gashi, Luljeta; Humolli, Isme

    2002-01-01

    A large outbreak of tularemia occurred in Kosovo in the early postwar period, 1999-2000. Epidemiologic and environmental investigations were conducted to identify sources of infection, modes of transmission, and household risk factors. Case and control status was verified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot, and microagglutination assay. A total of 327 serologically confirmed cases of tularemia pharyngitis and cervical lymphadenitis were identified in 21 of 29 Kosovo municipalities. Matched analysis of 46 case households and 76 control households suggested that infection was transmitted through contaminated food or water and that the source of infection was rodents. Environmental circumstances in war-torn Kosovo led to epizootic rodent tularemia and its spread to resettled rural populations living under circumstances of substandard housing, hygiene, and sanitation. PMID:11749751

  3. Investigation of bias in a study of nuclear shipyard workers

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, E.R.; Rosner, B.; Hennekens, C.; Rinsky, R.; Colton, T.

    1985-02-01

    The authors examined discrepant findings between a 1978 proportional mortality study and a 1981 cohort study of workers at the Portsmouth, New Hampshire Naval Shipyard to determine whether the healthy worker effect, selection bias, or measurement bias could explain why only the proportional mortality study found excess cancer deaths among nuclear workers. Lower mortality from noncancer causes in nuclear workers (the healthy worker effect) partly accounted for the observed elevated cancer proportional mortality. More important, however, was measurement bias which occurred in the proportional mortality study when nuclear workers who had not died of cancer were misclassified as not being nuclear workers based on information from their next of kin, thereby, creating a spurious association. Although the proportional mortality study was based on a small sample of all deaths occuring in the cohort, selection bias did not contribute materially to the discrepant results for total cancer deaths. With regard to leukemia, misclassification of occupation in the proportional mortality study and disagreement about cause of death accounted for some of the reported excess deaths. 16 references, 4 tables.

  4. An investigative study of polymer adsorption onto montmorillonite clay

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, C.L.; Lochhead, R.Y.

    1996-10-01

    Few studies have been geared towards the study of the mechanisms governing stabilization and flocculation of polymers and clay particles. The overall goal of this research is to relate these mechanisms to properties above and below the critical overlap concentration, c*, of the polymer/clay species. Initially, phase behavior and sedimentation studies were conducted to screen for anionic, cationic and nonionic polymers capable of both flocculation and restabilization. As a result three polymers were selected for further testing: polyacrylamide, poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) and poly(acrylamide-co-diallyldimethylammonium chloride). Polyacrylamide and poly(acrylamide-co-acrylic acid) have been synthesized and characterized by viscometry and {sup 13}C NMR. C* of the polymers was determined by viscometry via Huggins` plots and dynamic light scattering measurements have shown variations in the mean particle size as a function of polymer concentration.

  5. Jason 1 Investigation: Altimetric Studies of Ocean Tidal Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egbert, Gary D.

    2004-01-01

    Two papers on tidal dissipation were completed and published. The first of these extended our earlier work, which focused on the dominant M2 constituent, to include 7 additional constituents. In addition to confirming a total deep water dissipation total very close to 1 TW, this study demonstrated significant differences in the distribution of dissipation between diurnal and semi-diurnal constituents. The second paper involved an extensive modeling study of tides in the present day and the last glacial maximum. In this study we showed that accuracy of tidal solutions for the present day Ocean were significantly improved by including a parameterization of internal tide drag over rough topography in the deep ocean. It was also demonstrated that a complete self-consistent treatment of Ocean self attraction and tidal loading was required for accurate solutions.

  6. CCD photometric study and period investigation of V508 Oph

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Yu, Yun-Xia; Xiao, Ting-Yu

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, new CCD photometric observations of V508 Oph obtained in 2009 and 2010 at the Xinglong Observatory are presented. From the new observations, six new times of minimum light were derived. The light curves were analyzed by using the 2003 version of the Wilson–Devinney program. It is found that the asymmetric light curves can be modeled by a hot spot on the secondary component. The degree of overcontact is 15.4%, implying that the system is a shallow-contact binary. Combining the new times of minimum light with the photoelectric and CCD data compiled from the database, we investigate its orbital period. The results show that the orbital period may be undergoing multiple changes: a long-term decrease at a rate of dP/dt=−(1.502±0.063)×10{sup −7} days year{sup −1}, and a small periodic variation with a period of 24.27(±0.34) years. Since V508 Oph is an overcontact system and both components are late-type stars, we discuss the possible connection between the mass transfer, magnetic activity, the third body, and the orbital period changes.

  7. CCD Photometric Study and Period Investigation of AH Tauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Fu-Yuan; Xiao, Ting-Yu; Yu, Yun-Xia

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we present new CCD photometric observations of AH Tauri in the R band observed in 2006 at the Yunnan Observatory. Two new times of light minima were derived from these observations. We modeled the light curves using the 2003 version of the Wilson-Devinney program. The results show that the variations of the light curves can be expained by a cool spot on the primary star. The fill-out factor is about 6.6%, indicating that AH Tauri is a shallow-contact system. The mass ratio was determined to be about 0.505. In addition, the orbital period variations of AH Tauri were investigated based on all of the photoelectric and CCD light minimum times, including our two new data. It was found that the orbital period exhibits a possible periodic variation with a period of {P}{mod}=54.62\\(+/- 0.20) years and a secular period decrease of {dP}/{dt}=-(1.823+/- 0.215)× {10}-7 {days} {{yr}}-1. Since AH Tauri is an overcontact solar-like system, we discuss three mechanisms of the mass transfer, the light-time effect of the third body, and magnetic activity responsible for the orbital period changes.

  8. Investigating Cooperative Behavior in Ecological Settings: An EEG Hyperscanning Study

    PubMed Central

    Petti, Manuela; He, Eric J.; De Giusti, Vittorio; He, Bin; Astolfi, Laura; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated interactions between individuals are fundamental for the success of the activities in some professional categories. We reported on brain-to-brain cooperative interactions between civil pilots during a simulated flight. We demonstrated for the first time how the combination of neuroelectrical hyperscanning and intersubject connectivity could provide indicators sensitive to the humans’ degree of synchronization under a highly demanding task performed in an ecological environment. Our results showed how intersubject connectivity was able to i) characterize the degree of cooperation between pilots in different phases of the flight, and ii) to highlight the role of specific brain macro areas in cooperative behavior. During the most cooperative flight phases pilots showed, in fact, dense patterns of interbrain connectivity, mainly linking frontal and parietal brain areas. On the contrary, the amount of interbrain connections went close to zero in the non-cooperative phase. The reliability of the interbrain connectivity patterns was verified by means of a baseline condition represented by formal couples, i.e. pilots paired offline for the connectivity analysis but not simultaneously recorded during the flight. Interbrain density was, in fact, significantly higher in real couples with respect to formal couples in the cooperative flight phases. All the achieved results demonstrated how the description of brain networks at the basis of cooperation could effectively benefit from a hyperscanning approach. Interbrain connectivity was, in fact, more informative in the investigation of cooperative behavior with respect to established EEG signal processing methodologies applied at a single subject level. PMID:27124558

  9. Investigating Cooperative Behavior in Ecological Settings: An EEG Hyperscanning Study.

    PubMed

    Toppi, Jlenia; Borghini, Gianluca; Petti, Manuela; He, Eric J; De Giusti, Vittorio; He, Bin; Astolfi, Laura; Babiloni, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated interactions between individuals are fundamental for the success of the activities in some professional categories. We reported on brain-to-brain cooperative interactions between civil pilots during a simulated flight. We demonstrated for the first time how the combination of neuroelectrical hyperscanning and intersubject connectivity could provide indicators sensitive to the humans' degree of synchronization under a highly demanding task performed in an ecological environment. Our results showed how intersubject connectivity was able to i) characterize the degree of cooperation between pilots in different phases of the flight, and ii) to highlight the role of specific brain macro areas in cooperative behavior. During the most cooperative flight phases pilots showed, in fact, dense patterns of interbrain connectivity, mainly linking frontal and parietal brain areas. On the contrary, the amount of interbrain connections went close to zero in the non-cooperative phase. The reliability of the interbrain connectivity patterns was verified by means of a baseline condition represented by formal couples, i.e. pilots paired offline for the connectivity analysis but not simultaneously recorded during the flight. Interbrain density was, in fact, significantly higher in real couples with respect to formal couples in the cooperative flight phases. All the achieved results demonstrated how the description of brain networks at the basis of cooperation could effectively benefit from a hyperscanning approach. Interbrain connectivity was, in fact, more informative in the investigation of cooperative behavior with respect to established EEG signal processing methodologies applied at a single subject level.

  10. Novel study designs to investigate the placebo response

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Investigating the size and mechanisms of the placebo response in clinical trials have relied on experimental procedures that simulate the double-blind randomized placebo-controlled design. However, as the conventional design is thought to elucidate drug rather than placebo actions, different methodological procedures are needed for the placebo response. Methods We reviewed the respective literature for trials designs that may be used to elucidate the size of the placebo response and the mechanisms associated with it. Results In general, this can be done by either manipulation the information provided to the subjects, or by manipulation the timing of the drug applied. Two examples of each strategy are discussed: the "balanced placebo design" (BDP) and the "balanced cross-over design" (BCD) and their variants are based on false information, while the "hidden treatment" (HT) and the ""delayed response test" (DRT) are based on manipulating the time of drug action. Since most such approaches include deception or incomplete information of the subjects they are suitable for patient only with authorized deception. Conclusion Both manipulating the information provided to subjects (BDP, DCD) or manipulating the timing of drug application (HT, DRT) allows overcoming some of the restrictions of conventional drug trials in the assessment of the placebo response, but they are feasible mostly in healthy subjects for ethical reasons. PMID:21663609

  11. Investigating Reported Data Practices in Early Childhood: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brawley, Susan; Stormont, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of collecting and using data for educational decision making is clear. However, little information has been gathered about the systematic collection and use of data in early childhood. The purpose of this study was to explore teacher perceptions of data collection practices in early childhood. Participants included 137 early…

  12. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 6th Grade - River Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with elementary children in grade six prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  13. Investigation of the hybrid molecular probe for intracellular studies

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Karen; Medley, Colin D.; Yang, Chaoyong James; Tan, Weihong

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression in vivo is essential to the advancement of biological studies, medical diagnostics, and drug discovery. Adding to major efforts in developing molecular probes for mRNA monitoring, we have recently developed an alternative tool, the hybrid molecular probe (HMP). To optimize the probe, a series of experiments were performed to study the properties of HMP hybridization kinetics and stability. The results demonstrated the potential of the HMP as a prospective tool for use in both hybridization studies and in vitro and in vivo analyses. The HMP has shown no tendency to produce false positive signals, which is a major concern for living cell studies. Moreover, HMP has shown the ability to detect the mRNA expression of different genes inside single cells from both basal and stimulated genes. As an effective alternative to conventional molecular probes, the proven sensitivity, simplicity, and stability of HMPs show promise for their use in monitoring mRNA expression in living cells. PMID:18421445

  14. Sensitivity studies on sensor selection for crack growth investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Sunilkumar; Chattopadhyay, Aditi

    2010-10-01

    This work focuses on an unsupervised, data driven, modified k-nearest neighborhood technique to detect and monitor fatigue crack growth in lug joint samples using a surface mounted piezoelectric sensor network. A lug joint is an important structural hotspot in which damage initiates and progresses under fatigue loading. Early detection of fatigue cracks in a lug joint can help in taking preventive measures, thus avoiding any possible structural failure. The lug joint samples used in this study are prepared from an Al 6061 T6 plate with 0.25 inch thickness and are instrumented with a surface mounted piezoelectric actuator/sensor network. Experiments are conducted on lug samples with a single notch and multiple notches that are symmetrically placed. For early initiation of cracks, samples are notched at the shoulders. Under the influence of fatigue loading, the crack growth rate is different even when the notches are symmetrically placed. It is found that although cracks propagate from both the notches, the sample fails from one of the shoulders once the critical crack length is reached. For the given sensor architecture, which is symmetric, the objective of this study is to detect, isolate and monitor fatigue crack growth in each zone. The methodology presented helps in identifying sensors that are most sensitive to the presence of single and multiple cracks. Thus, the computational expense for damage localization studies can be reduced by not making use of redundant sensors.

  15. Investigation of crop canopy temperature in apple study orchard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tökei, L.; Dunkel, Z.

    2003-04-01

    The paper shows a sophisticated case study for the possible determination of transpiration of apple orchard. A 'Scheduler' type water stress instrument originally developed for crops was used in the study apple orchard of the university. The air and crop canopy temperatures, the relative humidity and the radiation were measured. The aim was to determine the influence of these factors at different level of the canopy, with various exposures of the tree crowns. The measurements were made on several trees in certain selected rows and on those planted in concentric rows in a round field. The relationship between crop canopy and sir temperatures appeared to depend primarily on illumination. This can be greatly affected by shading conditions, but air motion cannot be neglected, the effect of which increases when its direction is in agreement with the direction of the rows. Its efficiency also has a significant effect on air humidity conditions. The relative humidity and air temperature values were used to calculate the equivalent temperature, also considering latent heat flux, and finally the evapotranspiration of plantation. From differences in the equivalent and air temperatures, conclusions can be drawn on the intensity and daily course of transpiration. Using this method differences at given level could not be demonstrated in the relatively opera orchards studied. According to the results, transpiration is the strongest in the morning, after which it significantly decreases by the afternoon and becomes more intense again early at night.

  16. Bicycling crash characteristics: An in-depth crash investigation study.

    PubMed

    Beck, Ben; Stevenson, Mark; Newstead, Stuart; Cameron, Peter; Judson, Rodney; Edwards, Elton R; Bucknill, Andrew; Johnson, Marilyn; Gabbe, Belinda

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the crash characteristics and patient outcomes of a sample of patients admitted to hospital following bicycle crashes. Injured cyclists were recruited from the two major trauma services for the state of Victoria, Australia. Enrolled cyclists completed a structured interview, and injury details and patient outcomes were extracted from the Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR) and the Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry (VOTOR). 186 cyclists consented to participate in the study. Crashes commonly occurred during daylight hours and in clear weather conditions. Two-thirds of crashes occurred on-road (69%) and were a combination of single cyclist-only events (56%) and multi-vehicle crashes (44%). Of the multi-vehicle crashes, a motor vehicle was the most common impact partner (72%) and distinct pre-crash directional interactions were observed between the cyclist and motor vehicle. Nearly a quarter of on-road crashes occurred when the cyclist was in a marked bicycle lane. Of the 31% of crashes that were not on-road, 28 (15%) occurred on bicycle paths and 29 (16%) occurred in other locations. Crashes on bicycle paths commonly occurred on shared bicycle and pedestrian paths (83%) and did not involve another person or vehicle. Other crash locations included mountain bike trails (39%), BMX parks (21%) and footpaths (18%). While differences in impact partners and crash characteristics were observed between crashes occurring on-road, on bicycle paths and in other locations, injury patterns and severity were similar. Most cyclists had returned to work at 6 months post-injury, however only a third of participants reported a complete functional recovery. Further research is required to develop targeted countermeasures to address the risk factors identified in this study. PMID:27544886

  17. Bicycling crash characteristics: An in-depth crash investigation study.

    PubMed

    Beck, Ben; Stevenson, Mark; Newstead, Stuart; Cameron, Peter; Judson, Rodney; Edwards, Elton R; Bucknill, Andrew; Johnson, Marilyn; Gabbe, Belinda

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the crash characteristics and patient outcomes of a sample of patients admitted to hospital following bicycle crashes. Injured cyclists were recruited from the two major trauma services for the state of Victoria, Australia. Enrolled cyclists completed a structured interview, and injury details and patient outcomes were extracted from the Victorian State Trauma Registry (VSTR) and the Victorian Orthopaedic Trauma Outcomes Registry (VOTOR). 186 cyclists consented to participate in the study. Crashes commonly occurred during daylight hours and in clear weather conditions. Two-thirds of crashes occurred on-road (69%) and were a combination of single cyclist-only events (56%) and multi-vehicle crashes (44%). Of the multi-vehicle crashes, a motor vehicle was the most common impact partner (72%) and distinct pre-crash directional interactions were observed between the cyclist and motor vehicle. Nearly a quarter of on-road crashes occurred when the cyclist was in a marked bicycle lane. Of the 31% of crashes that were not on-road, 28 (15%) occurred on bicycle paths and 29 (16%) occurred in other locations. Crashes on bicycle paths commonly occurred on shared bicycle and pedestrian paths (83%) and did not involve another person or vehicle. Other crash locations included mountain bike trails (39%), BMX parks (21%) and footpaths (18%). While differences in impact partners and crash characteristics were observed between crashes occurring on-road, on bicycle paths and in other locations, injury patterns and severity were similar. Most cyclists had returned to work at 6 months post-injury, however only a third of participants reported a complete functional recovery. Further research is required to develop targeted countermeasures to address the risk factors identified in this study.

  18. Investigating internet use by mental health service users: interview study.

    PubMed

    Powell, John; Clarke, Aileen

    2007-01-01

    The internet is an increasingly important source of mental health-related information, and has the potential to be harnessed as a tool to support self-care and informed decision-making. Yet little is known about the motivations and attitudes of users. We therefore undertook a qualitative interview study with a purposive sample of mental health service users with internet experience, to explore issues with respect to mental health-related internet use. One of the prime motivations for online mental health seekers was to find experiential information from other people with similar problems. This information allowed users to know they were not alone, and to instill hope that others in the same situation had recovered. Benefits of the internet as an information source included convenience, privacy and anonymity. Problems related more to misuse of the internet rather than concerns over inaccuracy. Such qualitative work is important in an emerging research area to understand internet use better.

  19. [A STUDY INVESTIGATING THE FACTORS OF INTERNET ADDICTION].

    PubMed

    Puharić, Zrinka; Stašević, Ina; Ropac, Darko; Petričević, Nina; Jurišić, Irena

    2014-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the characteristics of Internet use among elementary school eighth-graders in the Bjelo- var-Bilogora County, to evaluate gender and sociodemographic differences, and to examine predictors for Internet addiction. The study included 437 (female 51%) eighth-graders, mean age 13.8 ± 0.5 years. An anonymous questionnaire was used to measure the participants' Internet use, the functions for which they used Internet, their parents' attitude towards the child's Internet use, and their signs of Internet addiction. Logistic regression was conducted to evaluate predictors for Internet addiction. The majority of children (71.5%) reported using Internet every day. Considering important risk factors of Internet addiction development, we found that 32% of children almost always stayed on-line longer than intended, 13% of boys and 4% of girls almost always neglected chores to spend more time on-line and 51.7% of children thought their life would be boring and uninteresting without the Internet. There was no significant difference between urban and rural students. In terms of the function for which they used the Internet, they were mostly engaged in on-line community/chat websites (70%), to listen to music and watch movies (81 %), and boys in gaming websites. Most of the students (43.4%) spent 1-2 hours daily on-line, 26.2% of students spent 3-4 hours on-line, and 9% spent more than 5 hours daily on-line. In conclusion, more public health preventive measures should be conducted to raise public awareness and concern about the negative effect of Internet use and Internet addiction, especially in the young population.

  20. Fibrinogen reduction and coagulation in cardiac surgery: an investigational study.

    PubMed

    Gielen, Chantal L I; Grimbergen, Jos; Klautz, Robert J M; Koopman, Jaap; Quax, Paul H A

    2015-09-01

    Fibrinogen as precursor of fibrin plays an essential role in clot formation. There are three main mechanisms associated with a reduction in fibrinogen concentration during cardiac surgery: hemodilution, consumption, and degradation. Moreover, early fibrinogen degradation products (FgDPs) can interfere with normal fibrin formation of intact fibrinogen. The aim of this study was to determine the relative contributions of hemodilution, consumption, and degradation to fibrinogen loss in cardiac surgery and to evaluate the effects fibrinogen degradation products on blood clot formation in vitro. First, fibrin and fibrinogen concentrations, their degradation products, hematocrit, and albumin concentrations were compared in 10 patients before and after isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Second, ex-vivo fibrinogen supplementation experiments were performed. Finally, the effects of purified FgDPs on clotting time and clot firmness were established in vitro in whole blood by ROTEM. Fibrinogen plasma concentration decreased 30% during surgery. This drop appears to be mainly caused by hemodilution, as both hematocrit and albumin levels decreased and no relevant increase in D-dimer levels and FgDPs was observed. Furthermore, the coagulation profile normalized after addition of purified fibrinogen. Early FgDPs demonstrated a significant impact on in-vitro whole blood clotting. Although early FgDPs have a pronounced effect on blood clot formation in vitro and therefore may induce or enhance in vivo coagulopathy, the drop of fibrinogen concentration seen after CABG surgery (using tranexamic acid) is primarily caused by hemodilution. PMID:26083991

  1. Dual-Mission Large Aircraft Feasibility Study and Aerodynamic Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavris, Dimitri

    1997-01-01

    A Dual-Mission Large Aircraft, or DMLA, represents the possibility of a single aircraft capable of fulfilling both a Global Reach Aircraft (GRA) and Very Large Transport (VLT) roles. The DMLA, by combining the GRA and VLT into a single new aircraft, could possibly lower the aircraft manufacturer's production costs through the resulting increase in production quantity. This translates into lower aircraft acquisition costs, a primary concern for both the Air Force and commercial airlines. This report outlines the first steps taken in this study, namely the assessment of technical and economic feasibility of the DMLA concept. In the course of this project, specialized GRA and VLT aircraft were sized for their respective missions, using baseline conventional (i.e., lacking advanced enabling technologies) aircraft models from previous work for the Air Force's Wright Laboratory and NASA-Langley. DMLA baseline aircraft were then also developed, by first sizing the aircraft for the more critical of the two missions and then analyzing the aircraft's performance over the other mission. The resulting aircraft performance values were then compared to assess technical feasibility. Finally, the life-cycle costs of each aircraft (GRA, VLT, and DMLA) were analyzed to quantify economic feasibility. These steps were applied to both a two-engine aircraft set, and a four-engine aircraft set.

  2. Scoping Study Investigating PWR Instrumentation during a Severe Accident Scenario

    SciTech Connect

    Rempe, J. L.; Knudson, D. L.; Lutz, R. J.

    2015-09-01

    significantly exceeded QE limits for extended time periods for the low frequency STSBO sequence evaluated in this study. It is recognized that the core damage frequency (CDF) of the sequence evaluated in this scoping effort would be considerably lower if evaluations considered new FLEX equipment being installed by industry. Nevertheless, because of uncertainties in instrumentation response when exposed to conditions beyond QE limits and alternate challenges associated with different sequences that may impact sensor performance, it is recommended that additional evaluations of instrumentation performance be completed to provide confidence that operators have access to accurate, relevant, and timely information on the status of reactor systems for a broad range of challenges associated with risk important severe accident sequences.

  3. A Meta-Analysis of Cross Sectional Studies Investigating Language in Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Jarrad A. G.; Powell, Martine; Timms, Lydia; Snow, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this review article, meta-analysis was used to summarize research investigating language skills in maltreated children. Method: A systematic search of published studies was undertaken. Studies were included in the meta-analysis if they investigated language skills in groups comprising maltreated and nonmaltreated children. Studies were…

  4. Understanding the investigators: a qualitative study investigating the barriers and enablers to the implementation of local investigator-initiated clinical trials in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Franzen, Samuel R P; Chandler, Clare; Enquselassie, Fikre; Siribaddana, Sisira; Atashili, Julius; Angus, Brian; Lang, Trudie

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical trials provide ‘gold standard’ evidence for policy, but insufficient locally relevant trials are conducted in low-income and middle-income countries. Local investigator-initiated trials could generate highly relevant data for national governments, but information is lacking on how to facilitate them. We aimed to identify barriers and enablers to investigator-initiated trials in Ethiopia to inform and direct capacity strengthening initiatives. Design Exploratory, qualitative study comprising of in-depth interviews (n=7) and focus group discussions (n=3). Setting Fieldwork took place in Ethiopia during March 2011. Participants Local health researchers with previous experiences of clinical trials or stakeholders with an interest in trials were recruited through snowball sampling (n=20). Outcome measures Detailed discussion notes were analysed using thematic coding analysis and key themes were identified. Results All participants perceived investigator-initiated trials as important for generating local evidence. System and organisational barriers included: limited funding allocation, weak regulatory and administrative systems, few learning opportunities, limited human and material capacity and poor incentives for conducting research. Operational hurdles were symptomatic of these barriers. Lack of awareness, confidence and motivation to undertake trials were important individual barriers. Training, knowledge sharing and experience exchange were key enablers to trial conduct and collaboration was unanimously regarded as important for improving capacity. Conclusions Barriers to trial conduct were found at individual, operational, organisational and system levels. These findings indicate that to increase locally led trial conduct in Ethiopia, system wide changes are needed to create a more receptive and enabling research environment. Crucially, the creation of research networks between potential trial groups could provide much needed practical

  5. Remedial investigation/feasibility study badger army ammunition plant Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 2. Feasibility study report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This Feasibility Study (FS) report for the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) in Baraboo, Wisconsin, was prepared by ABB Environmental Services, Inc. (ABB-ES) as a component of Task Order 1 of Contract DAAAl5-91-D-OOO8 with the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC). This report uses the results presented in the Final Remedial Investigation (RI) report (ABB-ES, 1993a) to develop and screen alternatives for remediation of contaminated media at BAAP. The purpose of this FS report is to develop, screen, and evaluate site-specific remedial alternatives to mitigate the impact of site-derived chemicals and ultimately provide protection of human health and the environment. Preferred alternatives for each site are included in this report. Based on previous environmental studies at BAAP, 11 potential hazardous waste sites were ranked according to potential contributions of hazardous chemicals to the environment. These sites were designated as Waste Management Areas because some of the sites contain multiple Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs). The sites selected to undergo facility assessment and corrective actions are: the Propellant Burning Ground (including Landfill), Deterrent Burning Ground, existing Landfill, Settling Ponds and Spoils Disposal Area, Rocket Paste Area, Oleum Plant and Oleum Plant Pond, Nitroglycerine Pond, old Acid Area, new Acid Area, and Ballistics Pond. The USAEC added an 11th site, the Old Fuel Oil Tank, to the list in October 1989 after discovery of fuel-contaminated soils during excavation of a water line in the vicinity of the old fuel oil tank foundation.

  6. Remedial investigation/feasibility study badger army ammunition plant Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 1. Feasibility study report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This Feasibility Study (FS) report for the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) in Baraboo, Wisconsin, was prepared by ABB Environmental Services, Inc. (ABB-ES) as a component of Task Order 1 of Contract DAAAl5-91-D-OOO8 with the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC). This report uses the results presented in the Final Remedial Investigation (RI) report (ABB-ES, 1993a) to develop and screen alternatives for remediation of contaminated media at BAAP. The purpose of this FS report is to develop, screen, and evaluate site-specific remedial alternatives to mitigate the impact of site-derived chemicals and ultimately provide protection of human health and the environment. Preferred alternatives for each site are included in this report. Based on previous environmental studies at BAAP, 11 potential hazardous waste sites were ranked according to potential contributions of hazardous chemicals to the environment. These sites were designated as Waste Management Areas because some of the sites contain multiple Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs). The sites selected to undergo facility assessment and corrective actions are: the Propellant Burning Ground (including Landfill), Deterrent Burning Ground, existing Landfill, Settling Ponds and Spoils Disposal Area, Rocket Paste Area, Oleum Plant and Oleum Plant Pond, Nitroglycerine Pond, old Acid Area, new Acid Area, and Ballistics Pond. The USAEC added an 11th site, the Old Fuel Oil Tank, to the list in October 1989 after discovery of fuel-contaminated soils during excavation of a water line in the vicinity of the old fuel oil tank foundation.

  7. A Mixed-Methods Study Investigating the Relationship between Media Multitasking Orientation and Grade Point Average

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The intent of this study was to examine the relationship between media multitasking orientation and grade point average. The study utilized a mixed-methods approach to investigate the research questions. In the quantitative section of the study, the primary method of statistical analyses was multiple regression. The independent variables for the…

  8. Investigating the Effectiveness of Individualized Feedback to Rating Behavior--A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knoch, Ute

    2011-01-01

    The effectiveness of individualized feedback on rater behavior has been investigated in several previous studies (e.g. Elder, Knoch, Barkhuizen, & von Randow, 2005; Lunt, Morton, & Wigglesworth, 1994; O'Sullivan & Rignall, 2007; Wigglesworth, 1993). The findings of these studies are somewhat inconclusive. However, all of these studies investigated…

  9. An Investigation of Higher-Order Thinking Skills in Smaller Learning Community Social Studies Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Christopher; Bol, Linda; Pribesh, Shana

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which higher-order thinking skills are promoted in social studies classes in high schools that are implementing smaller learning communities (SLCs). Data collection in this mixed-methods study included classroom observations and in-depth interviews. Findings indicated that higher-order thinking was rarely…

  10. A Longitudinal Investigation into L2 Learners' Cognitive Processes during Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ren, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The present study longitudinally investigates the cognitive processes of advanced L2 learners engaged in a multimedia task that elicited status-equal and status-unequal refusals in English during their study abroad. Data were collected three times by retrospective verbal report from 20 Chinese learners who were studying abroad over the course of…

  11. Investigating Trainee Music Teachers' Beliefs on Musical Abilities and Learning: A Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biasutti, Michele

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports a study investigating trainee teachers' beliefs about music abilities and learning. The study employed two questionnaires: the "Music abilities beliefs questionnaire" (MABQ) and the "Music learning beliefs questionnaire" (MLBQ) which were specially designed to reveal the beliefs of trainee teachers of primary and secondary…

  12. A Study of the Qualities Teachers Recommend in STS Issues Investigation and Action Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubba, Peter A.; Wiesenmayer, Randall L.

    This study was part of a project to develop science and technology (STS) issue investigation and action materials with the potential for use across science and social studies classes at the secondary level. Special emphasis was given to learning teachers' perspectives on the development of a unit on the impact of pesticides on society. Seven areas…

  13. 78 FR 60291 - Investigational Device Exemptions for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical Studies...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... comprehensive tutorial on best clinical practices for investigational medical device studies. Concurrent with the publication of this guidance in draft, November 10, 2011 (76 FR 70150), FDA initiated a pilot program for early feasibility study IDE applications (November 10, 2011, 76 FR 70152) to...

  14. Radionuclide disequilibria studies for investigating the integrity of potential nuclear waste disposal sites: subseabed studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Laul, J.C.; Thomas, C.W.; Petersen, M.R.; Perkins, R.W.

    1981-09-01

    This study of subseabed sediments indicates that natural radionuclides can be employed to define past long-term migration rates and thereby evaluate the integrity of potential disposal sites in ocean sediments. The study revealed the following conclusions: (1) the sedimentation rate of both the long and short cores collected in the North Pacific is 2.5 mm/1000 yr or 2.5 m/m.yr in the upper 3 meters; (2) the sedimentation rate has been rather constant over the last one million years; and (3) slow diffusive processes dominate within the sediment. Reworking of the sediment by physical processes or organisms is not observed.

  15. A School-Based Study on Situational Interest of Investigative Study in Senior Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Yat-yin

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the findings from the interview data of a research aiming at studying how to trigger students' situational interest in physics and its implications on learning and teaching in the New Senior Secondary (NSS) physics curriculum. 49 students from a boys' school were invited to write one to three learning experiences in physics that…

  16. Investigating the Reading Engagement of English Language Learners: A Case Study of Four Middle School ELLs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protacio, Maria Selena O.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the reading engagement of four middle school English Language Learners (ELLs) in their English or English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom. Engaged readers are those who address the four components of reading engagement--motivation, strategic knowledge, constructing meaning from texts, and social interactions. In this…

  17. Investigating Students' Critical Thinking in Weblogs: An Exploratory Study in a Singapore Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Qiyun; Woo, Huay Lit

    2010-01-01

    Critical thinking is an essential competency in the new information age. But research shows that students commonly lack critical thinking skills and hence promoting students' critical thinking becomes crucial. This exploratory study investigated the extent to which secondary school students' critical thinking could be promoted by writing…

  18. Investigating Lebanese Grade Seven Biology Teachers Mathematical Knowledge and Skills: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raad, Nawal Abou; Chatila, Hanadi

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates Lebanese grade 7 biology teachers' mathematical knowledge and skills, by exploring how they explain a visual representation in an activity depending on the mathematical concept "Function". Twenty Lebanese in-service biology teachers participated in the study, and were interviewed about their explanation for the…

  19. USE OF DISCUSSION GROUPS TO INVESTIGATE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION ISSUES FOR THE NATIONAL CHILDREN'S STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of Discussion Groups to Investigate Recruitment and Retention Issues for a Longitudinal Study of Children's Environmental Health
    DT Lobdell*, S Gutter+, P Mendola* (*US EPA, NHEERL; +UNC Chapel Hill)

    Much of what is known about successful recruitment and retention o...

  20. Super Saver Investigators: An Elementary, Interdisciplinary, Environmental Studies Activity Guidebook about Solid Waste and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, David; And Others

    This is an elementary, interdisciplinary, environmental studies activity guidebook about solid waste and natural resources. "Super Saver Investigators" what solid waste is, where it is generated, how we manage it and could manage it better, and the consequence of mismanagement. It contains many hands-on, skill enhancing activities for elementary…

  1. Meta-Analysis of Studies Investigating the Effects of Father Absence on Children's Cognitive Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzman, Stephanie A.

    A meta-analysis was conducted of 137 studies investigating the effects of father absence due to employment, military service, death, divorce, separation, or desertion on children's cognitive performance as assessed by scores on standardized intelligence, scholastic aptitude, and academic achievement tests and school grades. Aggregation of the…

  2. 77 FR 13343 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-06

    ... November 10, 2011 (76 FR 70150), FDA announced the availability of a draft guidance entitled... Pilot Program (76 FR 70152, November 10, 2011) intended to collect ] information and experience on the... Study Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Applications pilot program. This program allowed...

  3. The Power of Natural Selection: A Guided Investigation of Three Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachly, William

    2010-01-01

    I describe a quantitative approach to three case studies in evolution that can be used to challenge college freshmen to explore the power of natural selection and ask questions that foster a deeper understanding of its operation and relevance. Hemochromatosis, the peppered moth, and hominid cranial capacity are investigated with a common algebraic…

  4. Investigating Parents' Attitudes towards Digital Technology Use in Early Childhood: A Case Study from Croatia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikelic Preradovic, Nives; Lešin, Gordana; Šagud, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate perceptions of parents in Croatia towards advantages and disadvantages of computer use in general as well as their children's computer use and to reveal parents' concerns and opinions about digital technology (DT) education in kindergarten. The paper reports on research findings from one of the large public…

  5. Waste Management Plan for the Oak Ridge National Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-01

    In accordance with the requirements of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Project Quality Assurance Plan, this Waste Management Plan establishes clear lines of responsibility and authority, documentation requirements, and operational guidance for the collection, identification, segregation, classification, packaging, certification, and storage/disposal of wastes. These subjects are discussed in the subsequent sections of this document.

  6. Investigating Word Learning in Fragile X Syndrome: A Fast-Mapping Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDuffie, Andrea; Kover, Sara T.; Hagerman, Randi; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    Fast-mapping paradigms have not been used previously to examine the process of word learning in boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS), who are likely to have intellectual impairment, language delays, and symptoms of autism. In this study, a fast-mapping task was used to investigate associative word learning in 4- to 10-year-old boys with FXS relative…

  7. Wind Turbine Acoustic Investigation: Infrasound and Low-Frequency Noise--A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Stephen E.; Rand, Robert W.; Krogh, Carmen M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Wind turbines produce sound that is capable of disturbing local residents and is reported to cause annoyance, sleep disturbance, and other health-related impacts. An acoustical study was conducted to investigate the presence of infrasonic and low-frequency noise emissions from wind turbines located in Falmouth, Massachusetts, USA. During the…

  8. Investigation of Effects of Face Rotation on Race Processing: An ERPs Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montalan, Benoit; Veujoz, Mathieu; Boitout, Alexis; Leleu, Arnaud; Camus, Odile; Lalonde, Robert; Rebai, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Recent ERP research has indicated that the processing of faces of other races (OR) and same race (SR) as the perceiver differs at the perceptual level, more precisely for the N170 component. The purpose of the present study was to continue the investigation of the race-of-face processing across multiple orientations. Event-related brain potentials…

  9. Rumination and Depression in Adolescence: Investigating Symptom Specificity in a Multiwave Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hankin, Benjamin L.

    2008-01-01

    A ruminative response style has been shown to predict depressive symptoms among youth and adults, but it is unclear whether rumination is associated specifically with depression compared with co-occurring symptoms of anxiety and externalizing behaviors. This prospective, multiwave study investigated whether baseline rumination predicted…

  10. Investigation of University Students' Self-Acceptance and Learned Resourcefulness: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceyhan, A. Aykut; Ceyhan, Esra

    2011-01-01

    Self-acceptance and learned resourcefulness of university students are important concepts in coping with the environmental and developmental stressors and in the development of healthy personality. In this study, university students' self acceptance and learned resourcefulness levels were investigated longitudinally. 198 university students' self…

  11. The investigation and study about the influence of Mathematical Olympiad on the development of the students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xia; Yang, Yuanyuan

    2013-04-01

    The Mathematical Olympiad is the Championship Mathematics Competition for High School students. In china, to alleviate the burden of the students, some people argue the Mathematical Olympiad should be called off in this year. Others think that Mathematical Olympiad and further study should be completely separated, thus eliminating its utilitarian overtones. For this reason, we lead our students to investigate and study the influence of Mathematical Olympiad on the development of the students by questionnaires.

  12. A descriptive study of sexual homicide in Canada: implications for police investigation.

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Eric; Martineau, Melissa

    2013-12-01

    Few empirical studies have been conducted that examine the phenomenon of sexual homicide, and among these studies, many have been limited by small sample size. Although interesting and informative, these studies may not be representative of the greater phenomenon of sexual murder and may be subject to sampling bias that could have significant effects on results. The current study aims to provide a descriptive analysis of the largest sample of sexual homicide cases across Canada in the past 62 years. In doing so, the study aims to examine offender and victim characteristics, victim targeting and access, and modus operandi. Findings show that cases of sexual homicide and sexual murderers included in the current study differ in many aspects from the portrait of the sexual murderer and his or her crime depicted in previous studies. The authors' results may prove useful to the police officers responsible for the investigation of these crimes.

  13. Investigating How Streptococcus Responds to Their Environment: Bringing Together Current Research, a Case Study and Laboratory Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Quimby, B. Boots; McIver, Kevin S.; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Smith, Ann C.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the link between course work and unanswered authentic research questions being explored in the research lab is an important goal in undergraduate science teaching. The activity presented here focuses on current research regarding the virulence characteristics of Streptococcus pyogenes particularly targeting the control of sugar uptake regulated via catabolite repression. Students were challenged to formulate a research question and use higher-order thinking skills to analyze data, work collaboratively to solve problems, and pose and test a hypothesis in the laboratory setting. The activity employed an interrupted case study approach using both online and face-to-face settings. The case story and problems were distributed online and were followed by in-class discussions and lab work. Aspects of the activity required independent thinking, as well as collaborative work. Student learning gains were demonstrated via comparison of pre- and postscores on the Host Pathogen Interactions (HPI) concept inventory, results from an end of semester Student Perception Survey, and from analysis of students’ work. PMID:23653762

  14. Experimental investigation of solid by-product as sensible heat storage material: Characterization and corrosion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Fernández, Iñigo; Faik, Abdessamad; Mani, Karthik; Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, Javier; D'Aguanno, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    The experimental investigation of water cooled electrical arc furnace (EAF) slag used as filler material in the storage tank for sensible heat storage application was demonstrated in this study. The physicochemical and thermal properties of the tested slags were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microcopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and laser flash analysis, respectively. In addition, the chemical compatibility between slags and molten nitrate salt (60 wt. % NaNO3 and 40 wt. % KNO3) was investigated at 565 °C for 500 hrs. The obtained results were clearly demonstrated that the slags showed a good corrosion resistance in direct contact with molten salt at elevated temperature. The present study was clearly indicated that a low-cost filler material used in the storage tank can significantly reduce the overall required quantities of the relatively higher cost molten salt and consequently reduce the overall cost of the electricity production.

  15. Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2013-09-19

    The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

  16. Remedidal investigation and feasibility study report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Roeck, F.V.

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the remedial investigation (RI) is to collect data necessary to adequately characterize the site for the purpose of developing and evaluating effective remedial alternatives. To characterize the site, the lead agency shall, as appropriate, conduct field investigations, including treatability studies, and conduct a baseline risk assessment. The RI provides information to assess the risks to human health and the environment and to support the development, evaluation, and selection of appropriate response alternatives. The primary objective of the feasibility study (FS) is to ensure that appropriate remedial alternatives are developed and evaluated such that relevant information concerning the remedial action options can be presented to a decision-maker and an appropriate remedy selected. The lead agency may develop a feasibility study to address a specific site problem or the entire site. The development and evaluation of alternatives shall reflect the scope and complexity of the remedial action under consideration and the site problems being addressed. Development of alternatives shall be fully integrated with the site characterization activities of the remedial investigation described in paragraph (d) of this section. The lead agency shall include an alternatives screening step, when needed, to select a reasonable number of alternatives for detailed analysis.

  17. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 5

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This volume is in support of the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the Oak Ridge Reservation (for more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities there). It addresses the quality assurance objectives for measuring the data, presents selected historical data, contains data from several discrete water characterization studies, provides data supporting the sediment characterization, and contains data related to several biota characterization studies.

  18. An investigation into the demographics and motivations of students studying for a chiropractic degree

    PubMed Central

    Yalden, Philip; Cunliffe, Christina; Hunnisett, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Objective This research aimed to investigate motivations for studying chiropractic, and to determine what students look for in a course/college and potential barriers to studying chiropractic. Methods The study design was a cross-sectional survey. Following IRB/Ethical approval, a paper-based questionnaire was distributed to students at McTimoney College of Chiropractic. Demographic data were compared to another chiropractic college in the United Kingdom. Results The questionnaire response rate was 70.8% (n = 121). Motivating factors for studying chiropractic included a desire to help others (54.5%, n = 66), with 44.6% (n = 54) attracted by chiropractic's holistic, drugless approach to health. Previous help from chiropractic influenced 55.4% (n = 67) and 22.3% (n = 27) felt chiropractic had “changed their life.” Just over half of the respondents (55.4%, n = 67) viewed the ability to work while studying as extremely important and 73.6% (n = 89) said they could not have studied chiropractic without this. Conclusion Previous help from chiropractic care was a common motivation for studying chiropractic. The ability to work while studying was seen as vital by many students and, without it, the vast majority felt they could not have studied chiropractic. PMID:23957323

  19. Investigating the early-life determinants of illness in Africa: the Drakenstein Child Health Study.

    PubMed

    Zar, H J; Barnett, W; Myer, L; Stein, D J; Nicol, M P

    2015-06-01

    Respiratory disease is the predominant cause of illness in children globally. We describe a unique multidisciplinary South African birth cohort, the Drakenstein Child Health Study (DCHS), to investigate the incidence, risk factors, aetiology and long-term impact of early lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) on child health. Pregnant women from a poor, peri-urban community with high exposure to infectious diseases and environmental risk factors are enrolled with 1000 mother-child pairs followed for at least 5 years. Biomedical, environmental, psychosocial and demographic risk factors are longitudinally measured. Environmental exposures are measured using monitors placed at home visits. Lung function is measured in children at 6 weeks, annually and during LRTI episodes. Microbiological investigations including microbiome and multiplex PCR measures are done longitudinally and at LRTI episodes. The DCHS is a unique African birth cohort study that uses sophisticated measures to comprehensively investigate the early-life determinants of child health in an impoverished area of the world. PMID:25228292

  20. Investigating the early-life determinants of illness in Africa: the Drakenstein Child Health Study.

    PubMed

    Zar, H J; Barnett, W; Myer, L; Stein, D J; Nicol, M P

    2015-06-01

    Respiratory disease is the predominant cause of illness in children globally. We describe a unique multidisciplinary South African birth cohort, the Drakenstein Child Health Study (DCHS), to investigate the incidence, risk factors, aetiology and long-term impact of early lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) on child health. Pregnant women from a poor, peri-urban community with high exposure to infectious diseases and environmental risk factors are enrolled with 1000 mother-child pairs followed for at least 5 years. Biomedical, environmental, psychosocial and demographic risk factors are longitudinally measured. Environmental exposures are measured using monitors placed at home visits. Lung function is measured in children at 6 weeks, annually and during LRTI episodes. Microbiological investigations including microbiome and multiplex PCR measures are done longitudinally and at LRTI episodes. The DCHS is a unique African birth cohort study that uses sophisticated measures to comprehensively investigate the early-life determinants of child health in an impoverished area of the world.

  1. Investigation of indoor air quality at residential homes in Hong Kong—case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Shun Cheng; Li, Wai-Ming; Ao, Chio-Hang

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) has been a matter of public concern in Hong Kong. Recently, the Hong Kong Government has recognized the potential risk and problems related to indoor air pollution, and it is striving to establish IAQ objectives for different types of indoor environments. This study attempts to provide more information about the present IAQ of local resident flats. Air pollutants measured in this study included carbon dioxide (CO 2), respirable suspended particulate matter (PM 10), formaldehyde (HCHO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and airborne bacteria. The results of this study indicate that the 8-h average concentrations of CO 2 and PM 10 in the domestic kitchens investigated were 14% and 67% higher than those measured in the living rooms. The indoor air pollution caused by PM 10 was more serious in domestic kitchens than in living rooms as almost all of the kitchens investigated had higher indoor levels of PM 10. The majority of the domestic living rooms and kitchens studied had average concentrations of airborne bacteria higher than 500 CFU/m 3. The mean total bacteria count recorded in kitchens was greater than that obtained in living rooms by 23%. In homes where occupants smoke, the negative impact of benzene, toluene and m, p-xylene on the IAQ was greatly enhanced. The use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) stove has more significant impact on indoor VOCs than the use of cooking stoves with natural gas as cooking fuel.

  2. [Questionnaire for Investigating Therapeutic Alliance in Forensic Setting (FTBF): Results of a Pilot Study].

    PubMed

    Vasic, N; Dudeck, M; Knein, A M; Rasche, K; Mentel, R; Streb, J; Connemann, B J; Sosic-Vasic, Z; Otte, S

    2015-12-01

    The relation between patient and therapist has a substantial effect on the success of psychotherapy. So far, in German-speaking regions questionnaires translated from English have been used, particularly for studying outpatients. Studies investigating and concerned with specialised features of hospitalised forensic psychiatry patients are sparse. The preliminary results of this study evaluating a recently developed questionnaire aimed to investigate the quality of the therapeutic relationship in forensic psychiatry ("Fragebogen zur therapeutischen Beziehung in der Forensik, FTBF") are reported. The data were collected both in general and forensic psychiatry departments. Factor analyses yielded two essential factors, namely "positive emotional aspects" (12 items, main features trust, respect, helpfulness, harmony, and sympathy; Cronbach's α = .933) and "negative emotional aspects" (4 items, main features power divide and punishment; Cronbach's α = .805). Forensic patients experienced power divide and punishment tendencies more intensively than general psychiatry patients (p < 0.001). Our questionnaire therefore demonstrates not only excellent reliabilities but also differential validity, enabling a differentiation between general and forensic psychiatry patients. Studies with larger samples would enable conclusions about the impact of the therapists' perspective, specific diagnostic subgroups and different psychotherapeutic orientations, on the patient-therapist relationship in forensic psychiatry. PMID:26714250

  3. EXAFS investigations of metal organic molecules with the goal of studying homogeneously catalytic systems in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertel, T. S.; Hörner, W.; Hückmann, S.; Kolb, U.; Abraham, I.; Bertagnolli, H.

    1995-02-01

    The investigations of Grignard compounds are very instructive for understanding the principles of getting structural information on highly complex and simultaneously metal activated systems by means of EXAFS spectroscopy. The structural investigations of a model system for Friedel-Crafts alkylation and some metal complexes (metal = Zr, Mo, W, Re), which activate carbonyl groups selectively with respect to the subsequent ring cleavage of axially prosterogenic biaryl lactones, are reported. As an actual field of metal organic research temperature dependent in situ EXAFS studies of the CH-activation of substituted olefins are presented. It was possible to observe the course of the rearrangement reaction of an iridium olefin complex to the corresponding hydrido (vinyl) iridium complex.

  4. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This remedial investigation (RI)/feasibility study (FS) supports the selection of remedial actions for the David Witherspoon, Inc. 901 Maryville Pike Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. Operations at the site, used as a recycling center, have resulted in past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances in to the environment. This Site is a Tennessee Superfund site. A phased approach was planned to (1) gather existing data from previous investigations managed by the Tenn. Dept. of Environment and Conservation; (2) perform a preliminary RI, including risk assessments, and an FS with existing data to identify areas where remedial action may be necessary; (3) gather additional field data to adequately define the nature and extent of risk-based contaminants that present identifiable threats to human and/or ecological receptors; and (4) develop remedial action alternatives to reduce risks to acceptable levels.

  5. The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES): A UAV-based Investigation of Thunderstorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard; Arnold, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Altus Cumulus Electrification Study (ACES) is a NASA-sponsored and -led science investigation that utilizes an uninhabited aerial vehicle (UAV) to investigate thunderstorms in the vicinity of the NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida. As part of NASA's UAV-based science demonstration program, ACES will provide a scientifically useful demonstration of the utility and promise of UAV platforms for Earth science and applications observations. ACES will employ the Altus 11 aircraft, built by General Atomics-Aeronautical Systems, Inc. By taking advantage of its slow flight speed (70 to 100 knots), long endurance, and high-altitude flight (up to 55,000 feet), the Altus will be flown near, and when possible, above (but never into) thunderstorms for long periods of time, allowing investigations to be conducted over entire storm life cycles. Key science objectives simultaneously addressed by ACES are to: (1) investigate lightning-storm relationships, (2) study storm electrical budgets, and (3) provide Lightning Imaging Sensor validation. The ACES payload, already developed and flown on Altus, includes electrical, magnetic, and optical sensors to remotely characterize the lightning activity and the electrical environment within and around thunderstorms. The ACES field campaign will be conducted during July 2002 with a goal of performing 8 to 10 UAV flights. Each flight will require about 4 to 5 hours on station at altitudes from 40,000 ft to 55,000 ft. The ACES team is comprised of scientists from the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and NASA Goddard Space Flight Centers partnered with General Atomics and IDEA, LLC.

  6. Reliability study of Piezoelectric Structures Dedicated to Energy Harvesting by the Way of Blocking Force Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaroufi, S.; Parrain, F.; Lefeuvre, E.; Boutaud, B.; Dal Molin, R.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose an approach to study the reliability of piezoelectric structures and more precisely energy harvesting micro-devices dedicated to autonomous active medical implants (new generation pacemakers). The structure under test is designed as a bimorph piezoelectric cantilever with a seismic mass at its tip. Good understanding of material aging and mechanical failure is critical for this kind of system. To study the reliability and durability of the piezoelectric part we propose to establish a new accelerated methodology and an associated test bench where the environment and stimuli can be precisely controlled over a wide period of time. This will allow the identification of potential failure modes and the study of their impacts by the way of direct mechanical investigation based on stiffness and blocking force measurements performed periodically.

  7. Punctuation and Implicit Prosody in Silent Reading: An ERP Study Investigating English Garden-Path Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Drury, John E.; Baum, Shari R.; Valeriote, Hope; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first two ERP reading studies of comma-induced effects of covert (implicit) prosody on syntactic parsing decisions in English. The first experiment used a balanced 2 × 2 design in which the presence/absence of commas determined plausibility (e.g., John, said Mary, was the nicest boy at the party vs. John said Mary was the nicest boy at the party). The second reading experiment replicated a previous auditory study investigating the role of overt prosodic boundaries in closure ambiguities (Pauker et al., 2011). In both experiments, commas reliably elicited CPS components and generally played a dominant role in determining parsing decisions in the face of input ambiguity. The combined set of findings provides further evidence supporting the claim that mechanisms subserving speech processing play an active role during silent reading.

  8. Punctuation and Implicit Prosody in Silent Reading: An ERP Study Investigating English Garden-Path Sentences

    PubMed Central

    Drury, John E.; Baum, Shari R.; Valeriote, Hope; Steinhauer, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    This study presents the first two ERP reading studies of comma-induced effects of covert (implicit) prosody on syntactic parsing decisions in English. The first experiment used a balanced 2 × 2 design in which the presence/absence of commas determined plausibility (e.g., John, said Mary, was the nicest boy at the party vs. John said Mary was the nicest boy at the party). The second reading experiment replicated a previous auditory study investigating the role of overt prosodic boundaries in closure ambiguities (Pauker et al., 2011). In both experiments, commas reliably elicited CPS components and generally played a dominant role in determining parsing decisions in the face of input ambiguity. The combined set of findings provides further evidence supporting the claim that mechanisms subserving speech processing play an active role during silent reading. PMID:27695428

  9. The guanidine and benzoic acid (1:1) complex. The polarized vibrational studies and theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, M.; Dudzic, D.

    2015-03-01

    The structure of guanidinium benzoate was discovered by Silva et al. On the basis of these X-ray crystallographic studies the detailed DFT investigation are performed. According to this result the infrared spectrum for one theoretical molecule was calculated. On the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis the clear-cut assignments of observed bands were performed. For the calculated molecule with energy minimum the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were obtained. The energy difference between HOMO and LUMO was analyzed. According to theoretical calculations the direction of dipole moments (TDM) for bands observed in infrared spectra are analyzed. Verification of theoretical TDM behaviors is performed on the basis of experimental polarized specular reflection infrared spectra. The detailed assignments of observed bands is presented. Both theoretical and experimental spectra are compared. Crucial role of three different hydrogen bonds is studied in detail. Additionally, on the basis of differential scanning calorimetric study no phase transition was found in investigated crystal in the range 100-400 K.

  10. A Study to Investigate the Sleeping Comfort of Mattress using Finite Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Hiroaki; Kamijo, Masayoshi; Shimizu, Yoshio

    Sleep is an essential physiological activity for human beings and many studies have so far investigated sleeping comfort of mattresses. The appropriate measurement of stress distribution within the human body would provide valuable information to us. For the appropriate measurement to estimate stress distribution within the human body, numerical analysis is considered one of the most desirable techniques, and Finite Element Method (FEM), which is widely accepted as a useful numerical technique, was utilized in this study. Since human body dimensions have individual differences, however, it is presumed that the way of the internal stress distribution also changes due to the differences and that the mattress preference varies among different body forms. Thus, we developed three human FEM models reproducing the body forms of three types of male subjects, and investigated the sleeping comfort of mattress based on the relationship between FEM analysis findings and sensory testing results. In comparison with the results of both FEM analysis and sensory testing in the neck region, we found, the sensory testing results corresponded to the FEM analysis findings, and it was possible to estimate subjects' preferences of mattress and comfort in the neck region using the FEM analysis. In this study, we believe, the FEM analysis managed to quantify the subjects' preferences for mattress and to prove itself that it is the valuable tools to examine the sleeping comfort of mattress.

  11. Media Studies: An Investigation and Examination of Selected Media Studies on What Constitutes a Media Studies Program in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partovi, Parvis Paul

    2011-01-01

    The 21st century is rapidly becoming the age of new and oftentimes confusing innovations in media, so much so that it is frequently referred to as the "new media" (Beach, 2007). It has become evident that we live in an era with extremely complex, and rapidly changing media scenes. Media studies now appears in major institutions of higher education…

  12. Strength investigation of artificial substitutes for human teeth in in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Rosentritt, Martin; Reill, Margarete; Naumann, Michael; Nowak, Arnold; Handel, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether metals or resins can replace human teeth in in vitro fracture tests of endodontically treated teeth (ETT), as ETT show high heterogeneity and small availability. Eight incisor-shaped roots per group were adhesively restored with fiber-reinforced composite posts, composite core build-ups and Co-Cr-Mo crowns. Specimens were thermally cycled and mechanically loaded (TCML) and fracture strength was determined. The results varied between 0 N and 348 N. Extracted ETT may show comparable strength and survival during TCML to teeth in situ and therefore are the first choice for in vitro testing. Substitutes show comparable fracture patterns but different fracture values. PMID:19260430

  13. Reporting and referring research participants: ethical challenges for investigators studying children and youth.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Celia B

    1994-01-01

    Researchers studying at-risk and socially disenfranchised child and adolescent populations are facing ethical dilemmas not previously encountered in the laboratory or the clinic. One such set of ethical challenges involves whether to: (a) share with guardians research-derived information regarding participant risk, (b) provide participants with service referrals, or (c) report to local authorities problems uncovered during the course of investigation. The articles assembled for this special section address the complex issues of deciding if, when, and how to report or provide referrals for research participants who are minors (referred to hereafter as minor research participants). This paper focuses on two factors underlying these decisions: the validity of risk estimates and meta-ethical positions on scientific responsiblity. It is suggested that, before sharing information about minor research participants investigators should do the following: critically examine the diagnostic validity of developmental measures, include the scope and limitations of information sharing in informed consent procedures, and become familiar with state reporting laws. I discuss the impact of the traditionally accepted act utilitarian meta-ethical position on the investigator-participant relationship, and I recommend consideration of alternative positions as a step toward developing a research ethic of scientific responsibility and care.

  14. Age-related changes in ac-impedance spectroscopy studies of normal human dentine: further investigations.

    PubMed

    Eldarrat, A H; High, A S; Kale, G M

    2010-01-01

    One of the age-related changes occurring in dentine structure is the formation of peritubular dentine on the inner walls of dentinal tubules leading to complete closure of tubules. Ac-impedance is safe, fast and non-invasive technique. In the last decade, the popularity of the technique has increased in dental research. Several investigators have used the technique to detect tooth cracks and caries. The results of in vitro studies showed that ac-impedance technique was more advanced for caries detection than visual and radiographic methods. However, other studies demonstrated that the accuracy of impedance measurements can be affected by many factors such as remineralization after tooth eruption. A study has been published on effect of age on impedance measurements by the authors for two age groups by employing ac-impedance spectroscopy. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the importance of this technique by conducting further investigations on dentine samples of wider age groups. Dentine samples were prepared from extracted sound third molars of known patient age. The ac-impedance measurements were carried out over a wide range of frequency. After performing all electrical measurements, dentine samples were examined under SEM to correlate the electrical measurements with their structure. Impedance measurements showed that there were differences in impedance between young and old dentine. One-way ANOVA of the means of resistance and capacitance for all age groups (20, 25, 30, 40 and 50 years old dentine) revealed a significant difference (ANOVA, P < 0.0001) as a function of age. Applying Tukey's post hoc test, to the same data showed that this difference was due to the 50 years old dentine for resistance and was due to the 40 and 50 years old dentine for capacitance which were statistically different to all other groups. SEM investigation of dentine samples showed that young dentine is characterized by open dentinal tubules distributed all over the

  15. Work plan addendum for the remedial investigation and feasibility study of the Salmon Site

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This document is intended as an addendum to the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan for the Salmon Site (SS) (formerly the Tatum Dome Test Site) Lamar County, Mississippi. The original work plan - Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Tatum Dome Test Site, Lamar County, Mississippi (herein after called the Work Plan) was approved by the state of Mississippi in 1992 and was intended as the operative document for investigative activities at the Tatum Dome Test Site. Subsequent to the approval of the document a series of activities were undertaken under the auspices of the work plan. This document is organized in the same manner as the original work plan: (1) Introduction; (2) Site Background and History; (3) Initial Evaluation; (4) Data Quality Objectives; (5) RI/FS Tasks; (6) Project Schedule; (7) Project Management; and (8) Reference. This addendum will identify changes to the original work plan that are necessary because of additional information acquired at the SS. This document is not intended to replace the work plan, rather, it is intended to focus the remaining work in the context of additional site knowledge gained since the development of the original work plan. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting a focused and phased site characterization as a part, of the RI/FS. The RI/FS is the methodology under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) for evaluating hazardous waste sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The SS is not listed on the NPL, but DOE has voluntarily elected to conduct the evaluation of the SS in accordance with CERCLA.

  16. Computational Investigation of Ge Doped Au Nanoalloy Clusters: A DFT Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, P.; Kumar, A.; Chakraborty, T.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, electronic and optical properties of AunGe (n=1-9) nanoalloy clusters are systematically investigated in terms of the Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the Becke, three parameter, Lee-Yang-Parr (B3LYP) exchange correlation functional. Conceptual DFT based global descriptors have turned to be indispensable tools for correlating the experimental properties of compounds. In this study, experimental properties of AunGe (n=1-9) nanoalloy clusters are correlated in terms of DFT based descriptors viz. HOMO-LUMO gap, Global Hardness (n), Global Softness (S), Electronegativity (x) and Electrophilicity Index (ra). Our computed bond length exhibits a close agreement with experimental data. The high value of regression coefficient between global softness and HOMO-LUMO gap supports and validates our predicted model.

  17. Study on the conformation changes of Lysozyme induced by Hypocrellin A: The mechanism investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Fei; Huang, He-Yong; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Jia-Hong; Liu, Zheng-Ming

    2012-11-01

    The interactions between Lysozyme and Hypocrellin A are investigated in details using time-resolved fluorescence, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD), three-dimensional fluorescence spectra, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. The results of time-resolved fluorescence suggest that the quenching mechanism is static quenching. FTIR and CD spectroscopy provide evidences of the reducing of α-helix after interaction. Hypocrellin A could change the micro-environmental of Lysozyme according to hydrophobic interaction between the aromatic ring and the hydrophobic amino acid residues, and the altered polypeptide backbone structures induce the reduction of α-helical structures. Moreover, TGA study further demonstrates the structure changes of Lysozyme on the effect of Hypocrellin A. This study could provide some important information for the derivatives of HA in pharmacy, pharmacology and biochemistry.

  18. A microscopic study investigating the structure of SnSe surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-ui; Duong, Anh-Tuan; Cho, Sunglae; Rhim, S. H.; Kim, Jungdae

    2016-09-01

    SnSe has been widely studied due to its many potential applications that take advantage of its excellent thermoelectric, photovoltaic, and optoelectronic properties. However, experimental investigations into the microscopic structure of SnSe remain largely unexplored. Herein, for the first time, the atomic and electronic structures of SnSe surfaces are studied by a home-built low temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The cleaved surface of SnSe is comprised of covalently bonded Se and Sn atoms in zigzag patterns. However, rectangular periodicity was observed in the atomic images of SnSe surfaces for filled and empty state probing. Detailed atomic structures are analyzed by DFT calculations, indicating that the bright extrusions of both filled and empty state images are mostly located at the positions of Sn atoms.

  19. Speech research: Studies on the nature of speech, instrumentation for its investigation, and practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, A. M.

    1982-03-01

    This report is one of a regular series on the status and progress of studies on the nature of speech, instrumentation for its investigation and practical applications. Manuscripts cover the following topics: Speech perception and memory coding in relation to reading ability; The use of orthographic structure by deaf adults: Recognition of finger-spelled letters; Exploring the information support for speech; The stream of speech; Using the acoustic signal to make inferences about place and duration of tongue-palate contact. Patterns of human interlimb coordination emerge from the the properties of nonlinear limit cycle oscillatory processes: Theory and data; Motor control: Which themes do we orchestrate? Exploring the nature of motor control in Down's syndrome; Periodicity and auditory memory: A pilot study; Reading skill and language skill: On the role of sign order and morphological structure in memory for American Sign Language sentences; Perception of nasal consonants with special reference to Catalan; and Speech production Characteristics of the hearing impaired.

  20. An investigation of model forensic bone in soil environments studied using infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Howes, Johanna M; Stuart, Barbara H; Thomas, Paul S; Raja, Sophil; O'Brien, Christopher

    2012-09-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has been used to examine changes to bone chemistry as a result of soil burial. Pig carcasses were buried as part of a controlled field study, and pig bone was used in soil environments established in the laboratory. The variables of species type, bone pretreatment, soil type and pH, moisture content, temperature, and burial time were investigated. The crystallinity index (CI) and the organic and carbonate contents of the bones were monitored. The data revealed decreasing trends in the organic and carbonate contents and an increase in the CI of the bone with burial time. An acidic soil environment and soil type are the factors that have the most influence on bone chemistry as a result of burial. The study demonstrates the potential of infrared spectroscopy as a straightforward method of monitoring the changes associated with aging of bones in a variety of soil environments.

  1. Offpost operable unit remedial investigation/endangerment assessment/feasibility study, draft final work plan

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This document presents the scope of work for additional data collection activities and interpretive reports to be performed in the off-post operable unit (OU) for preparation of: (1) Addendum to the final remedial investigation report; (2)` Revision of the draft final endangerment assessment/feasibility study. The plan is divided into the following sections: (1) Requirements for the RI addendum - technical approach and data collection program for the RI addendum - technical approach and data collection program for ground water, soil, sediment, biota, air; (2) Revision of the endagerment assessment - items that need to be reevaluated; (3) Revision of the feasibility study - evaluation of different media and ARAR`s development of remedial alternatives; (4) Schedule and description of deliverables. Appendix a contains a detailed approach for the 96th avenue risk assessment.

  2. Site study plan for Playa investigations, Deaf Smith County, Texas: Salt Repository Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-02

    This plan defines the purpose and objectives of the Playa Investigation Study, presents a plan of work to provide the information necessary to resolve issues, and discusses the rationale for test method selection. The required information will be obtained from existing well drilling records, describing and testing of soil and rock samples recovered from project test holes, geophysical well logs, seismic surveys, and shallow test pits excavated at ground surface. There have been numerous, often conflicting, theories presented to explain the origin(s) of the playas of the Texas High Plains. The primary purpose of this study is to establish if existing playas and playa alignments are related to deeper subsurface structure, such as faulting or salt dissolution, the potential for future playa development, and the significance of existing and/or future playas on siting a repository in Deaf Smith County, Texas. 11 refs.

  3. Investigation of surface tension driven convection as a feasibility study for a micro-gravity experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschmieder, E. L.

    1988-01-01

    The work performed for the feasibility study of a microgravity surface tension driven convection experiment was reviewed. An experimental investigation of the onset of convection in shallow fluid layers heated uniformly from below and cooled from above by an air layer was made. Results are discussed in relation to the formation of Benard cells. The onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection in thin fluid layers heated uniformly from below were studied experimentally. It was found that in thin fluid layers the onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection is preceded by subcritical convective motions. Secondly, it was found that the onset of Rayleigh-Benard convection in non-Boussinesq fluid layers takes place in the form of hexagonal cells at Rayleigh numbers larger than the critical Rayleigh number R sub C = 1708 which determines the onset of convection in Boussinesq fluid layers.

  4. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) process, elements and techniques guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This manual provides detailed guidance on Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FSs) conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The purpose of the RI/FS, to assess the risk posed by a hazardous waste site and to determine the best way to reduce that risk, and its structure (site characterization, risk assessment, screening and detailed analysis of alternatives, etc.) is defined in the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) and further explained in the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Guidance for Conducting Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies Under CERCLA (Interim Final) 540/G-89/004, OSWER Directive 9355.3-01, October 1988. Though issued in 1988, the EPA guidance remains an excellent source of information on the conduct and structure of an RI/FS. This document makes use of supplemental RI/FS-related guidance that EPA has developed since its initial document was issued in 1988, incorporates practical lessons learned in more than 12 years of experience in CERCLA hazardous site remediation, and drawing on those lessons, introduces the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER), developed by DOE as a way to proceed quickly and efficiently through the RI/FS process at DOE facilities. Thus as its title implies, this guidance is intended to describe in detail the process and component elements of an RI/FS, as well as techniques to manage the RI/FS effectively.

  5. Studying the Permian cross-section (Volga region) using chemical and isotopic investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareev, Bulat; Georgii, Batalin; Nurgaliev, Danis; Nurgalieva, Nuriya

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a study of international important site: the cross-section of Permian system's Urzhumian Stage in the ravine "Pechischy". Outcrop is located on the right bank of the Volga River (about 10 km West of Kazan). It has local, regional and planetary correlation features and also footprints of different geographical scale events. The main objective in the research is the deep study of sediments using chemical and isotopic investigations. XRF spectrometer was used for chemical investigations of samples. Chemistry of carbonates and clastic rocks includes the analysis of chemical elements, compounds, petrochemical (lithogeochemical) modules for the interpretation of the genesis of lithotypes. For the review of the geochemistry of stable isotopes of carbon (oxygen) we used IRMS. The main objective is the nature of the isotope fractionation issues, to addressing the issues of stratigraphy and paleogeography. The measurements have shown the variability of chemical parameters in cross-section. It gives us opportunity to see small changes in sedimentation and recognize the factors that influence to the process. The work was carried out according to the Russian Government's Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University, supported by the grant provided to the Kazan State University for performing the state program in the field of scientific research.

  6. Theoretical investigation of loratadine reactivity in order to understand its degradation properties: DFT and MD study.

    PubMed

    Armaković, Stevan; Armaković, Sanja J; Abramović, Biljana F

    2016-10-01

    Antihistamines are frequently used pharmaceuticals that treat the symptoms of allergic reactions. Loratadine (LOR) is an active component of the second generation of selective antihistaminic pharmaceutical usually known as Claritin. Frequent usage of this type of pharmaceuticals imposes the need for understanding their fundamental reactive properties. In this study we have theoretically investigated reactive properties of LOR using both density functional theory (DFT) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. DFT study is used for collecting information related to the molecule stability, structure, frontier molecular orbitals, quantum molecular descriptors, charge distribution, molecular electrostatic potential surfaces, charge polarization, and local reactivity properties according to average local ionization energy surfaces. Based on these results, N24 atom of pyridine ring and oxygen atom O1 were identified with nucleophilic nature. In order to collect the information necessary for the proposition of degradation compounds we also calculated bond dissociation energies (BDE) for hydrogen abstraction and single acyclic bonds as well. According to BDE, the oxidation is likely to occur in the piperidine and cycloheptane rings. MD simulations were used in order to understand the interactions with water through radial distribution functions (RDF). Based on RDFs the most important interactions with solvent are determined for carbon atom C5, chlorine atom Cl15, and oxygen atom O1. Collected results based on DFT calculations and MD simulations provided information important for suggestion of possible degradation compounds. Covalent and noncovalent interactions between LOR and (•)OH have also been investigated. PMID:27640160

  7. Physiological and Proteomic Investigations to Study the Response of Tomato Graft Unions under Temperature Stress

    PubMed Central

    Muneer, Sowbiya; Ko, Chung Ho; Wei, Hao; Chen, Yuze; Jeong, Byoung Ryong

    2016-01-01

    Background Grafting is an established practice for asexual propagation in horticultural and agricultural crops. The study on graft unions has become of interest for horticulturists using proteomic and genomic techniques to observe transfer of genetic material and signal transduction pathways from root to shoot and shoot to root. Another reason to study the graft unions was potentially to observe resistance against abiotic stresses. Using physiological and proteomic analyses, we investigated graft unions (rootstock and scions) of tomato genotypes exposed to standard-normal (23/23 and 25/18°C day/night) and high-low temperatures (30/15°C day/night). Results Graft unions had varied responses to the diverse temperatures. High-low temperature, but not standard-normal temperature, induced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the form of H2O2 and O2-1 in rootstock and scions. However, the expression of many cell protection molecules was also induced, including antioxidant enzymes and their immunoblots, which also show an increase in their activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX). The graft interfaces thus actively defend against stress by modifying their physiological and proteomic responses to establish a new cellular homeostasis. As a result, many proteins for cellular defense were regulated in graft unions under diverse temperature, in addition to the regulation of photosynthetic proteins, ion binding/transport proteins, and protein synthesis. Moreover, biomass, hardness, and vascular transport activity were evaluated to investigate the basic connectivity between rootstock and scions. Conclusions Our study provides physiological evidence of the grafted plants’ response to diverse temperature. Most notably, our study provides novel insight into the mechanisms used to adapt the diverse temperature in graft unions (rootstock/scion). PMID:27310261

  8. Investigation of biomaterials by human epithelial gingiva cells: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In modern medicine and dentistry the use of biomaterials is a fast developing field of increasing interest. Especially in dentistry the interaction between biomaterials like implant materials and the soft tissue in the oral cavity is in the focus of daily research. In this context the high importance of testing materials and their surfaces concerning their biocompatibility towards corresponding cells is very likely. For this purpose this study investigates cells derived from human gingival biopsies on different materials and surfaces. Methods Cells in this study were cultivated out of human biopsies by a grow out explant technique and were sub cultivated on titanium, zirconium dioxide and collagen membrane specimens. To characterise the cells on the material surfaces used in this study immunohistochemical and histological staining techniques as well as different methods of microscopy (light microscopy and SEM) were applied. Results With the aid of the explant technique and the chosen cell cultivation method it was possible to investigate the human gingiva derived cells on different materials. The data of the present study show that the human gingival cells attach and proliferate on all three tested materials by exhibiting characteristic gingival keratinocyte protein expression even after long periods of culture e.g. up to 70 days. Conclusions It could be shown that the three tested materials titanium, zirconium dioxide and collagen membrane (and their special surfaces) are good candidates for the application as materials in the dental gingival environment or, in the case of the collagen membrane as scaffold/cell-carrier for human gingival cells in tissue engineering. PMID:23241143

  9. Studying global change through investigation of the plastic responses of xylem anatomy in tree rings.

    PubMed

    Fonti, Patrick; von Arx, Georg; García-González, Ignacio; Eilmann, Britta; Sass-Klaassen, Ute; Gärtner, Holger; Eckstein, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Variability in xylem anatomy is of interest to plant scientists because of the role water transport plays in plant performance and survival. Insights into plant adjustments to changing environmental conditions have mainly been obtained through structural and functional comparative studies between taxa or within taxa on contrasting sites or along environmental gradients. Yet, a gap exists regarding the study of hydraulic adjustments in response to environmental changes over the lifetimes of plants. In trees, dated tree-ring series are often exploited to reconstruct dynamics in ecological conditions, and recent work in which wood-anatomical variables have been used in dendrochronology has produced promising results. Environmental signals identified in water-conducting cells carry novel information reflecting changes in regional conditions and are mostly related to short, sub-annual intervals. Although the idea of investigating environmental signals through wood anatomical time series goes back to the 1960s, it is only recently that low-cost computerized image-analysis systems have enabled increased scientific output in this field. We believe that the study of tree-ring anatomy is emerging as a promising approach in tree biology and climate change research, particularly if complemented by physiological and ecological studies. This contribution presents the rationale, the potential, and the methodological challenges of this innovative approach.

  10. Studying global change through investigation of the plastic responses of xylem anatomy in tree rings.

    PubMed

    Fonti, Patrick; von Arx, Georg; García-González, Ignacio; Eilmann, Britta; Sass-Klaassen, Ute; Gärtner, Holger; Eckstein, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Variability in xylem anatomy is of interest to plant scientists because of the role water transport plays in plant performance and survival. Insights into plant adjustments to changing environmental conditions have mainly been obtained through structural and functional comparative studies between taxa or within taxa on contrasting sites or along environmental gradients. Yet, a gap exists regarding the study of hydraulic adjustments in response to environmental changes over the lifetimes of plants. In trees, dated tree-ring series are often exploited to reconstruct dynamics in ecological conditions, and recent work in which wood-anatomical variables have been used in dendrochronology has produced promising results. Environmental signals identified in water-conducting cells carry novel information reflecting changes in regional conditions and are mostly related to short, sub-annual intervals. Although the idea of investigating environmental signals through wood anatomical time series goes back to the 1960s, it is only recently that low-cost computerized image-analysis systems have enabled increased scientific output in this field. We believe that the study of tree-ring anatomy is emerging as a promising approach in tree biology and climate change research, particularly if complemented by physiological and ecological studies. This contribution presents the rationale, the potential, and the methodological challenges of this innovative approach. PMID:19780986

  11. Investigating the psychosocial determinants of child health in Africa: the Drakenstein Child Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Stein, DJ; Koen, N; Donald, KA; Adnams, CM; Koopowitz, S; Lund, C; Marais, A; Myers, B; Roos, A; Sorsdahl, K; Stern, M; Tomlinson, M; van der Westhuizen, C; Vythilingum, B; Myer, L; Barnett, W; Brittain, K; Zar, HJ

    2015-01-01

    Background Early life psychobiological and psychosocial factors play a key role in influencing child health outcomes. Longitudinal studies may help elucidate the relevant risk and resilience profiles, and the underlying mechanisms that impact on child health, but there is a paucity of birth cohort data from low and middle-income countries (LMIC). We describe the rationale for and present baseline findings from the psychosocial component of the Drakenstein Child Health Study (DCHS). Methods We review the psychosocial measures used in the DCHS, a multidisciplinary birth cohort study in a peri-urban area in South Africa, and provide initial data on psychological distress, depression, substance use, and exposure to traumatic stressors and intimate partner violence (IPV). These and other measures will be assessed longitudinally in mothers in order to investigate associations with child neurodevelopmental and health outcomes. Results Baseline psychosocial data is presented for mothers (n = 634) and fathers (n = 75) who have completed antenatal assessments to date. The sample of pregnant mothers is characterized by multiple psychosocial risk factors, including a high prevalence of psychological distress and depression, high levels of substance use, and high exposure to traumatic stressors and IPV. Discussion These data are consistent with prior South African studies which have documented a high prevalence of a multitude of risk factors during pregnancy. Further longitudinal assessment of mothers and children may clarify the underlying psychobiological and psychosocial mechanisms which impact on child health, and so inform clinical and public health interventions appropriate to the South African and other LMIC contexts. PMID:25797842

  12. Investigating the Relationship among Test Anxiety, Gender, Academic Achievement and Years of Study: A Case of Iranian EFL University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezazadeh, Mohsen; Tavakoli, Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    The construct of anxiety plays a major role in one's life. One of these anxieties is test anxiety or apprehension over academic evaluation. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between gender, academic achievement, years of study and levels of test anxiety. This investigation is a descriptive analytic study and was done…

  13. Investigating the cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanoparticles in in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Ghasempour, Sarieh; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Ghasempour, Roghayeh; Alipour, Mohsen

    2015-10-01

    In recent years, iron oxide nanorods find a lot of applications including drug delivery, cell separation, hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging. In this study the cytotoxicity of iron oxide nanorods was evaluated based on mouse fibroblast cell behavior and wistar rat's liver and kidney function. At first for modification, nanorods were added to Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) which contained a lot of sources of vitamins, amino acids, proteins in Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS). The MTT assay was employed for evaluating the toxic effects of 200 and 400 μg/mL modified and non-modified iron oxide nanorods on L929 mouse fibroblast cells in a 24h period. Changes in cell granularity and size as well as cell cycle were investigated using flow cytometry. Moreover liver and kidney function test and serum iron level measurement were performed 24h after the injection of modified iron oxide nanorods via the tail peripheral vein of wistar rats. Results indicated that greater concentration of modified iron oxide nanorods had no significant effect on cell viability while greater concentration of non-modified iron oxide nanorods significantly decreased cell viability. Modified iron oxide nanorods did not have significant effects on cell cycle. The results of liver and kidney function tests did not differ significantly while a significant increase in serum iron level was observed. After H&E staining of slices, there were no changes on morphology of rat's kidney and liver cells. This study suggests that short-time use of 200 and 400 μg/mL iron oxide nanorods are probably safe. Further studies are needed for investigation of toxic effects of different concentrations, coatings, and exposure time periods of iron oxide nanorods. PMID:26279467

  14. Pilot Study: Colostomy and Urine Collection Protocol for Investigating Potential Inciting Causes of Hen Diuresis Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jones, Kelli; Turner, Bradley; Brandão, João; Hubbard, Sue Ann; Magee, Danny; Baughman, Brittany; Wills, Robert; Tully, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Hen diuresis syndrome has emerged over the past 5 yr as a significant cause of mortality in the U.S. broiler breeder industry. The condition affects hens in production and is characterized by transient muscle weakness in the vent region, transient diuresis, and often urate deposits on the skin below the vent. Affected hens are often seen straining to lay an egg, which suggests oviduct contraction is also impaired. Related hen mortality, often reaching 1% or more a week, is believed to be primarily the result of male aggression of the vent region (Turner et al., "Investigating Causes of Excessive Urate Production in Broiler Breeder Hens Associated with Peritonitis and Cannibalism Mortality," Oral Presentation at The American Association of Avian Pathologists Annual Meeting, p. 139, 2010). The exact association between the cause of mortality and this syndrome is unknown, but it may be the consequence of transient partial to full oviduct prolapse, which predisposes or stimulates cannibalism and aggression. Based on unpublished work done prior to this study (Turner et al., ibid.), the evidence suggests the underlying problem is metabolic. We feel that urine collection and analysis is an essential component to understanding this condition. This study serves as a pilot study for future investigations that attempt to identify the nature and cause of the metabolic disturbance through paired urine and serum collection and analysis. For the purpose of this study, a small sample of 10 affected and 10 unaffected birds was used for sample collection. In order to collect pure urine, the birds were surgically colostomized. Colostomy did prove to be a useful means of collecting urine free of feces, and for the purposes of our study it yielded adequate urine samples for analysis. There were statistically relevant urine values observed. Affected birds had a higher presence of blood in the urine, a lower uric acid excretion rate (mg/hr), higher concentration (mEq/L) of urine Na+, and

  15. [Investigation of redox homeostasis of liver in experimental and human studies].

    PubMed

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Blázovics, Anna; Lengyel, Gabriella; Lugasi, Andrea; Fehér, János

    2004-01-01

    Great importance has been attributed to antioxidants in the treatment of conditions associated with oxidative stress for many years. At the same time the antioxidants can exert prooxidant activity. Combined antioxidant treatment is more favourable compared with monotherapy, because antioxidants have scavenger-, compartment- and tissue-specificity and they regenerate each other directly, too. Drugs of chronic liver diseases should be considered because of the role of liver in biotransformation. Our aim was to study the redox status of liver and investigate the effects of natural antioxidants (vegetable lyophilizates, silymarin, metadoxine) on liver redox status. Besides of clinical diagnosis, biochemical, analytical, histological methods were used to assess the free radical-antioxidant balance on the whole. Our in vitro methodological system is suitable for screening natural compounds for primary and secondary antioxidant property as well as membrane-stabilizing activity. A shift in free radical-antioxidant balance was proved in short-term extrahepatic cholestasis, antioxidant-type choleretic compounds can be investigated in this animal model. In human experiments redox status was investigated in the Gilbert's disease and in the most frequent chronic liver disorder in Hungary, in alcoholic liver disease. The improvement of non-enzymatic antioxidant defence system was found in Gilbert's disease without the alteration of free radical-antioxidant balance. Our results proved the role of free radical reactions in alcoholic liver disease and underlined the greater women vulnerability to alcohol toxicity. The chemiluminometric measurements in erythrocytes is suitable for the estimation of progression of alcoholic liver disease and of efficacy of antioxidant therapy. PMID:15524049

  16. Morphological study of human sweat ducts for the investigation of THz-wave interaction (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Kodo; Tripathi, Saroj R.

    2016-03-01

    Recently, some studies reported that the sweat ducts act as a low-Q-factor helical antenna due to their helical structure, and resonate in the terahertz frequency range according to their structural parameters. According to the antenna theory, when the duct works as a helical antenna, the dimension of the helix plays a key role to determine the frequency of resonance. Therefore, the accurate determination of structural parameters of sweat duct is crucially important to obtain the reliable frequency of resonance and modes of operations. Therefore, here we performed the optical coherence tomography (OCT) of human subjects on their palm and foot to investigate the density, distribution and morphological features of sweat ducts. Moreover, we measured the dielectric properties of stratum corneum using terahertz time domain spectroscopy and based upon this information, we determined the frequency of resonance. We recruited 32 subjects for the measurement and the average duct diameter was 95±11μm. Based upon this information on diameter of duct and THz dielectric properties of stratum corneum (ɛ=5.1±1.3), we have calculated the frequency of resonance of sweat duct. Finally, we determined that the center frequency of resonance was 442±76 GHz. We believe that these findings will facilitate further investigation of the THz-skin interaction and provide guidelines for safety levels with respect to human exposure. We will also report on the EEG measurement while being shined by micro watt order THz waves.

  17. Investigation of Halogenated Components Formed from Chlorination of Natural Waters: Preliminary Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, R. M.; Riley, R. G.

    1980-11-01

    Chlorination of power plant cooling water is extensively used as a means of controlling biofouling. This practice presents the potential for formation of halogenated organic compounds hazardous to man and his environment. Accordingly, the organic composition resulting from the chlorination of natural waters (northern Olympic Penn1sula sea water and the Columbia River in Washington State} has been investigated. Nonpolar lipophilic organic halogens were extracted by passing large volumes of water over columns of XAD-2 macroreticular resins. Examination of ether extracts from the resin columns using capillary gas chromatography revealed the presence of halogenated methanes, as well as other electron-capturing components~ that were not found when unchlorinated water was sampled. Examination of the chlorinated water extracts using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry revealed complex mixtures which generally were not separable into individual components~ even when high efficiency WCOT capillary columns were used. The samples were separated into fractions of increasing polarity using a water-deactivated silica gel column. Fractions were thus obtained which were more amenable to GC/MS investigation. Haloforms were identified as the major halogenated product from chlorination of the waters studied. Other halogenated products were found at much lower concentrations.

  18. Investigation of the influence of vanadium compounds treatment in NZO mice model--preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Krośniak, Mirosław; Francik, Renata; Kołodziejczyk, Katarzyna; Wojtanowska-Krośniak, Agnieszka; Tedeschi, Cinzia; Petrone, Veronica; Gryboś, Ryszard

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: New Zealand obese mice (NZO) are characterized by symptoms similar to human metabolic syndrome. Vanadium in different investigations showed anti-diabetic activity but until now an NZO mice model has not been tested with this element. The aim of this study was to investigate anti-diabetic activity of three vanadium compounds (VOSO4, VO(mal)2 and Na(VO(O2)2bpy) x 8H2O) in the NZO model. Metabolic syndrome was induced by special diet (1.5% of cholesterol and 15% of saturated fatty acids) during 8 weeks. In the next 5 weeks, the tested vanadium compounds were administered once daily, in a dose of 0.063 mmol/kg of body mass. At the end of the experiment, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and alanine transaminase were measured in the serum. The obtained results showed that the glucose level was decreased nearly to the healthy NZO mice in comparison to the NZO mice with metabolic syndrome. In all groups on the diet with cholesterol, the level of this parameter was statistically higher in comparison to the group without cholesterol addition. Vanadium treatment in a dose 0.063 mmol/kg of body mass does not influence cholesterol, triglycerides and alanine transaminase activity.

  19. Investigations on the fate of sulfadiazine in manured soil: laboratory experiments and test plot studies.

    PubMed

    Kreuzig, Robert; Höltge, Sibylla

    2005-04-01

    The fate of 14C-labeled sulfadiazine (SDZ) in manured soil has been investigated in laboratory test systems. In the first approach, stability of 14C-SDZ in liquid bovine manure has been tested. Only 1% of the initially applied radiotracer was mineralized to 14C-carbon dioxide and 82% were transferred to nonextractable residues within a 102-d incubation period. Test slurries with defined aged residues were prepared and, supplementary to standard solutions, applied to silty-clay soil samples. These tests showed the high affinity of 14C-SDZ residues to the soil matrix. In the second approach, basic data on microbial, chemical, and photoinduced degradability in soil were gathered. The data indicated the formation of nonextractable residues as the predominant process in soil, which was accelerated by the test slurry application. In the third approach, laboratory lysimeter tests were conducted to investigate leaching and degradation as simultaneously occurring processes. The 14C-SDZ residues (64%) mainly were retained in the surface layer as nonextractable residues. Although a high mobility in soil was revealed by a soil/water distribution coefficient of 2 L kg(-1), percolate contamination amounted to only 3% of the initially applied 14C-SDZ. The tendencies of leaching and degradability in soil also were observed in test plot studies under field conditions.

  20. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

  1. Investigating the relationship of lightning activity and rainfall: A case study for Crete Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidou, V.; Koutroulis, A. G.; Tsanis, I. K.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship of lightning activity and rainfall is investigated for rain events of variable intensity. Rain data from 22 gauging stations over the island of Crete and lightning activity from the Global Lightning Network including both cloud-to-ground and some cloud flashes are analyzed for the period September 2012 to June 2014. Local thunderstorms' characteristics are investigated both individually as well as in groups according to the results of k-means clustering algorithm in 3 dimensions (space (x, y) and time (t)) in which the number of clusters is decided by G-means algorithm. Correlation of non-zero pairs of rain intensity and number of flashes is examined at various time intervals, time lags and effective radii. Also, correlation of flash count within 50 km radius around the stations is examined for the rain events of maximum hourly intensity for each gauging station. The highest coincidence of lightning clusters with intense rain events reaches 60% when gauges are 25-30 km from the cluster center. Maximum correlation within non-zero pairs of rain intensity and flashes number is obtained for more intense rain (99th percentile) and for increased flash count within the searching area (more than 10 flashes). Also, correlation is stronger for shorter time windows. The findings of this study improve the understanding of thunderstorm events and could provide staple information for the improvement of forecasting extreme events.

  2. R&D Requirements, RF Gun Mode Studies, FEL-2 Steady-StateStudies, Preliminary FEL-1 Time-Dependent Studies, and Preliminary LayoutOption Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John; Corlett, John; Doolittle, Larry; Fawley, William; Lidia, Steven; Penn, Gregory; Ratti, Alex; Staples, John; Wilcox Russell; Wurtele, Jonathan; Zholents, Alexander

    2005-10-01

    This report constitutes the third deliverable of LBNLs contracted role in the FERMI {at} Elettra Technical Optimization study. It describes proposed R&D activities for the baseline design of the Technical Optimization Study, initial studies of the RF gun mode-coupling and potential effects on beam dynamics, steady-state studies of FEL-2 performance to 10 nm, preliminary studies of time-dependent FEL-1 performance using electron bunch distribution from the start-to-end studies, and a preliminary investigation of a configuration with FEL sinclined at a small angle from the line of the linac.

  3. Investigating the structure and properties of Fen clusters: a tight-binding/density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobadova-Parvanova, Petia; Horoi, Mihai; Jackson, Koblar; Srinivas, Sudha; Koehler, Christof; Seifert, Gotthard

    2001-03-01

    Combined density-functional tight-binding (DFTB) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to investigate Fen clusters with n=2,4, 7, 10 and 13. A new single parent genetic algorithm (see Rata et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 546 (2000)) was used with the DFTB to search the cluster configuration space for candidate ground-state structures. Separate searches were conducted for different total spin states. The ten lowest-energy DFTB structures for each spin were studied further using the DFT. The performance of the DFTB model for Fe clusters will be discussed and the structures and properties of the lowest-lying structures will be presented and compared to recent experimental results.

  4. Investigation of gender role behaviors in boys with hypospadias: comparative study with unaffected boys and girls.

    PubMed

    Sung, Ji Yean; Han, Sang Won; Chung, Kyong-Mee; Lee, Hyeyoung; Cho, Sang Hee

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was (1) to investigate gender role behaviors of boys with hypospadias compared with groups of unaffected boys and girls using parental reports and direct observations; and (2) to directly observe effects of socialization (mothers' presence) on children's gender role behaviors. Ages of 19 children with hypospadias ranged from 3 to 7 years, and each of them were matched to controls of unaffected boys and girls by age. All the children participated with their mothers. Children's gender role behaviors and their mothers' behaviors were evaluated using an observation coding system. Mothers also completed questionnaires regarding their children's gender role behaviors. Results indicated no atypical gender role behavior for the boys with hypospadias and no direct effects of socialization on their gender role behaviors. However, differences were found in negative communicative behaviors between boys with hypospadias and unaffected boys, suggesting a possible role of socialization.

  5. Functionally Optimized Neuritogenic Farinosone C Analogs: SAR-Study and Investigations on Their Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Several natural products derived from entomopathogenic fungi have been shown to initiate neuronal differentiation in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line. After the successful completion of the total synthesis program, the reduction of structural complexity while retaining biological activity was targeted. In this study, farinosone C served as a lead structure and inspired the preparation of small molecules with reduced complexity, of which several were able to induce neurite outgrowth. This allowed for the elaboration of a detailed structure–activity relationship. Investigations on the mode of action utilizing a computational similarity ensemble approach suggested the involvement of the endocannabinoid system as potential target for our analogs and also led to the discovery of four potent new endocannabinoid transport inhibitors. PMID:24900793

  6. Investigating the effects of ICT on innovation and performance of European hospitals: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Spyros; Loukis, Euripidis N

    2016-05-01

    Hospitals are making big investments in various types of ICT, so it is important to investigate their effects on innovation and performance. This paper presents an empirical study in this direction, based on data for 743 hospitals from 18 European countries. We specified and estimated econometrically five equations: one for product innovation, one for process innovation and three equations for the three different dimensions of (ICT-enabled) hospital performance. All five equations included various ICT-related variables reflecting ICT infrastructure and a series of important ICT applications, some of them hospital-specific, and some others of general business use, and also ICT personnel (viewed as a kind of 'soft' ICT investment), while the performance equations also included the two innovation measures.

  7. Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

  8. Final proposed plan, Army Materials Technology Laboratory, task order 1, remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Army is proposing a cleanup plan, referred to as a preferred alternative, to address outdoor contamination at the MTL Superfund site in Watertown, Massachusetts. The Proposed Plan recommends one of the cleanup options from among those that were evaluated during the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) performed for the site. The Army is publishing this Proposed Plan to provide opportunity for public review and comment on the cleanup alternatives, known as remedial alternatives, under consideration for the site. The Army is soliciting comments on the proposed level of cleanup and will consider public comments as part of the final decision-making process for selecting the cleanup remedy for the site.

  9. Relatives' attitudes towards medico-legal investigation and forensic autopsy: a study from South Delhi.

    PubMed

    Behera, C; Rautji, R; Dogra, T D

    2008-04-01

    Relatives of deceased persons on whose bodies a medico-legal autopsy had been performed at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India were personally asked to complete a questionnaire. The aim of study was to determine surviving family members' attitudes towards medico-legal investigation and forensic autopsy. The majority of the relatives showed a positive attitude towards forensic autopsy but were not aware of the detailed procedure of the autopsy. They wanted sufficient information to be provided before the autopsy. They showed a great interest in autopsy results i.e. the cause of death. It was concluded that sufficient relevant explanations given before the autopsy improves the relatives' acceptance and helps alleviate the suffering of the bereaved. The experience and opinions of relatives may help an autopsy surgeon in more effective management of medico-legal cases.

  10. AN EXPLORATORY STUDY INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF A TREATMENT MANUAL FOR VIDEO GAME ADDICTION.

    PubMed

    Pallesen, Ståle; Lorvik, Ingjerd Meen; Bu, Eli Hellandsjø; Molde, Helge

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of a manualized therapy for video game addiction in 12 males, ages 14-18 yr. The manual was based on cognitive-behavioral therapy, short-term strategic family therapy, solution-focused therapy, and motivational interviewing. Treatment response was reported by the patients, their mothers, and the therapists. The patients reported moderate (but statistically non-significant) improvement from pre- to post-treatment. The mothers, however, reported large effects and statistically significant improvement from pre- to post-treatment. The therapists reported marked or moderate treatment response in six of the 12 patients. The ratings of change by mothers converged well with the views of change of both the patients and therapists, whereas the convergence of views on change between the two latter sources was far lower.

  11. Investigating the neural basis of cooperative joint action. An EEG hyperscanning study.

    PubMed

    Astolfi, L; Toppi, J; Vogel, P; Mattia, D; Babiloni, F; Ciaramidaro, A; Siniatchkin, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to investigate the neurophysiological basis of the cognitive functions underlying the execution of joint actions, by means of the recent technique called hyperscanning. Neuroelectrical hyperscanning is based on the simultaneous recording of brain activity from multiple subjects and includes the analysis of the functional relation between the brain activity of all the interacting individuals. We recorded simultaneous high density electroencephalography (hdEEG) from 16 pairs of subjects involved in a computerized joint action paradigm, with controlled levels of cooperation. Results of cortical connectivity analysis returned significant differences, in terms of inter-brain functional causal links, between the condition of cooperative joint action and a condition in which the subjects were told they were interacting with a PC, while actually interacting with another human subject. Such differences, described by selected brain connectivity indices, point toward an integration between the two subjects' brain activity in the cooperative condition, with respect to control conditions.

  12. A Retrospective Study Investigating the Incidence and Predisposing Factors of Hospital-Acquired Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Kurniali, Peter C.; Curry, Stephanie; Brennan, Keith W.; Shaik, Mohammed; Schwartz, Kenneth A.; McCormack, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalized patients frequently have considerable volumes of blood removed for diagnostic testing which could lead to the development of hospital-acquired anemia. Low hemoglobin levels during hospitalization may result in significant morbidity for patients with underlying cardiorespiratory and other illnesses. We performed a retrospective study and data was collected using a chart review facilitated through an electronic medical record. A total of 479 patients who were not anemic during admission were included in analysis. In our study, we investigated the incidence of HAA and found that, between admission and discharge, 65% of patients dropped their hemoglobin by 1.0 g/dL or more, and 49% of patients developed anemia. We also found that the decrease in hemoglobin between admission and discharge did not differ significantly with smaller phlebotomy tubes. In multivariate analysis, we found that patients with longer hospitalization and those with lower BMI are at higher risk of developing HAA. In conclusion, our study confirms that hospital-acquired anemia is common. More aggressive strategies such as reducing the frequency of blood draws and expanding the use of smaller volume tubes for other laboratory panels may be helpful in reducing the incidence of HAA during hospitalization. PMID:25587440

  13. A retrospective study investigating the incidence and predisposing factors of hospital-acquired anemia.

    PubMed

    Kurniali, Peter C; Curry, Stephanie; Brennan, Keith W; Velletri, Kim; Shaik, Mohammed; Schwartz, Kenneth A; McCormack, Elise

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalized patients frequently have considerable volumes of blood removed for diagnostic testing which could lead to the development of hospital-acquired anemia. Low hemoglobin levels during hospitalization may result in significant morbidity for patients with underlying cardiorespiratory and other illnesses. We performed a retrospective study and data was collected using a chart review facilitated through an electronic medical record. A total of 479 patients who were not anemic during admission were included in analysis. In our study, we investigated the incidence of HAA and found that, between admission and discharge, 65% of patients dropped their hemoglobin by 1.0 g/dL or more, and 49% of patients developed anemia. We also found that the decrease in hemoglobin between admission and discharge did not differ significantly with smaller phlebotomy tubes. In multivariate analysis, we found that patients with longer hospitalization and those with lower BMI are at higher risk of developing HAA. In conclusion, our study confirms that hospital-acquired anemia is common. More aggressive strategies such as reducing the frequency of blood draws and expanding the use of smaller volume tubes for other laboratory panels may be helpful in reducing the incidence of HAA during hospitalization. PMID:25587440

  14. Synthesis, characterization, investigation of biological activity and theoretical studies of hydrazone compounds containing choloroacetyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukurovali, Alaaddin; Yilmaz, Engin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, three new hydrazide-hydrazone derivative compounds which contain choloroacetyl group have been synthesized and characterized. In the characterization, spectral techniques such as IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques were used. Antibacterial effects of the synthesized compounds were investigated against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. In the theoretical calculations Gaussian 09 software was used with the DFT/6-311+(d,p) basis set. Experimental X-ray analysis of compounds has not been studied. Theoretical bond lengths of synthesized compounds were compared with experimental bond lengths of a similar compound. Theoretical and experimental bond lengths are in good agreement with R2: 0.896, 0.899 and 0.900 for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For antibacterial activity, the most effective one was found to be N‧-(4-bromobenzylidene)-2-chloro-N-(4-(3-methyl-3-phenylcyclobutyl)-thiazol-2-yl) acetohydrazide against P.aeroginaosa ATTC 27853, among the studied compounds.

  15. Droplet hysteresis investigation on non-wetting striped textured surfaces: A lattice Boltzmann study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Rongye; Liu, Haihu; Sun, Jinju; Ba, Yan

    2014-10-01

    The Cassie-Baxter model is widely used to predict the apparent contact angles on textured super-hydrophobic surfaces. However, it has been challenged by some recent studies, since it does not consider contact angle hysteresis and surface structure characteristics near the contact line. The present study is to investigate the contact angle hysteresis on striped textured surfaces, and its elimination through vibrating the substrate. The two-phase flow is simulated by a recently proposed lattice Boltzmann model for high-density-ratio flows. Droplet evolutions under various initial contact angles are simulated, and it is found that different contact angles exist for the same textured surface. The importance of the contact line structure for droplet pinning is underlined via a study of droplet behavior on a composite substrate, with striped textured structure inside and flat structure outside. A “stick-jump” motion is found for the advancing contact line on the striped textured surface. Due to hysteresis, the contact angles after advancing are not consistent with the Cassie-Baxter model. The stable equilibrium is obtained through properly vibrating the substrate, and the resulted contact angles are consistent with Cassie's predictions.

  16. Clinical study on thermography, as modern investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis.

    PubMed

    Iosif, Laura; Preoteasa, Cristina Teodora; Murariu-Măgureanu, Cătălina; Preoteasa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Candida-associated denture stomatitis is an infectious inflammatory condition of the oral mucosa, with frequent recurrences. The aim of this study was to assess the use of infrared thermography as investigation method for Candida-associated denture stomatitis (as inflammatory disorder of the maxillary denture bearing area), by comparing disease and non-disease groups. An observational study was conducted on maxillary edentulous patients treated by acrylic dentures, with and without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Diagnostic test methods used were clinical examination for denture stomatitis and conventional microbiological culture method for oral candidiasis. Thermography analysis of the maxillary denture bearing area was made using the ThermaCAM PM350 infrared camera (Inframetrics, Flir Systems) and ThermaGram Pro 95 software, data being acquired by usage of standard protocol of thermographic registrations. The sample included 52 patients, 21 with and 31 without Candida-associated denture stomatitis. The temperature of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area was found to be statistically significantly higher in Candida-associated denture stomatitis (mean 36.20°C), compared to healthy oral mucosa (mean 34.85°C). The thermal threshold value of 35.44°C was identified as best differentiating a pathological from normal state of the maxillary mucosa corresponding to the denture bearing area. In conclusion, infrared thermography, a rapid non-invasive investigation method, has the premises to bring valuable data in inflammatory disorders of the maxillary denture bearing area, as Candida-associated denture stomatitis that may be used for screening, diagnostic or monitoring purposes.

  17. A Case Study Investigating Secondary Science Teachers' Perceptions of Science Literacy Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Phyllis Ann

    This project study addressed the lack of inclusion of discipline literacy pedagogy in secondary classrooms in a rural school district in eastern North Carolina. Discipline literacy practices are recommended in the Common Core Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. The district had implemented content area reading strategies across content areas, yet no significant progress in secondary students' reading abilities had been demonstrated in statewide or national assessments. The conceptual framework that drove this study was disciplinary literacy, founded by the literacy research of Shanahan, Shanahan, and Zygouris-Coe. Within a qualitative case study method, this investigation of 8 secondary science teachers' experiences teaching literacy during content instruction focused on practices of embedding science-specific reading strategies into lessons and factors that influence teachers' decisions to participate in professional development to advance their learning of discipline-specific literacy methods. Data were collected and triangulated using a focus group and 8 individual interviews. Data from both methods were analyzed into codes and categories that developed into emergent themes. Findings from the focus group and individual interviews revealed that the science teachers possessed limited knowledge of science-specific reading strategies; used random, general literacy practices; and had completed inadequate professional development on science-related topics. Positive change may occur if district leaders support teachers in expanding their knowledge and application of discipline literacy strategies through participation in discipline literacy-focused professional development. The study may provide educators and researchers a deeper understanding of disciplinary literacy and increase research on the topic.

  18. MO-G-BRF-09: Investigating Magnetic Field Dose Effects in Mice: A Monte Carlo Study

    SciTech Connect

    Rubinstein, A; Guindani, M; Followill, D; Melancon, A; Hazle, J; Court, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In MRI-linac treatments, radiation dose distributions are affected by magnetic fields, especially at high-density/low-density interfaces. Radiobiological consequences of magnetic field dose effects are presently unknown; therefore, preclinical studies are needed to ensure the safe clinical use of MRI-linacs. This study investigates the optimal combination of beam energy and magnetic field strength needed for preclinical murine studies. Methods: The Monte Carlo code MCNP6 was used to simulate the effects of a magnetic field when irradiating a mouse-sized lung phantom with a 1.0cmx1.0cm photon beam. Magnetic field effects were examined using various beam energies (225kVp, 662keV[Cs-137], and 1.25MeV[Co-60]) and magnetic field strengths (0.75T, 1.5T, and 3T). The resulting dose distributions were compared to Monte Carlo results for humans with various field sizes and patient geometries using a 6MV/1.5T MRI-linac. Results: In human simulations, the addition of a 1.5T magnetic field caused an average dose increase of 49% (range:36%–60%) to lung at the soft tissue-to-lung interface and an average dose decrease of 30% (range:25%–36%) at the lung-to-soft tissue interface. In mouse simulations, the magnetic fields had no effect on the 225kVp dose distribution. The dose increases for the Cs-137 beam were 12%, 33%, and 49% for 0.75T, 1.5T, and 3.0T magnetic fields, respectively while the dose decreases were 7%, 23%, and 33%. For the Co-60 beam, the dose increases were 14%, 45%, and 41%, and the dose decreases were 18%, 35%, and 35%. Conclusion: The magnetic field dose effects observed in mouse phantoms using a Co-60 beam with 1.5T or 3T fields and a Cs-137 beam with a 3T field compare well with those seen in simulated human treatments with an MRI-linac. These irradiator/magnet combinations are suitable for preclinical studies investigating potential biological effects of delivering radiation therapy in the presence of a magnetic field. Partially funded by Elekta.

  19. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the ecological assessment task, Kingfisher Study

    SciTech Connect

    Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    This report provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation Ecological Assessment Task, Kingfisher Study, including information that will contribute to safe completion of the project. The report includes historical background; a site map; project organization; task descriptions and hazard evaluations; controls; and monitoring, personal protective equipment, decontamination, and medical surveillance program requirements. The report also includes descriptions of site personnel and their certifications as well as suspected WAG 2 contaminants and their characteristics. The primary objective of the WAG 2 Kingfisher Study is to assess the feasibility of using kingfishers as biological monitors of contaminants on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Kingfisher sample collection will be used to determine the levels of contaminants and degree of bioaccumulation within a common piscivorous bird feeding on contaminated fish from streams on the ORR.

  20. Investigating the Interaction of Fe Nanoparticles with Lysozyme by Biophysical and Molecular Docking Studies

    PubMed Central

    Aghili, Zahra; Taheri, Saba; Zeinabad, Hojjat Alizadeh; Pishkar, Leila; Saboury, Ali Akbar; Rahimi, Arash; Falahati, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Herein, the interaction of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) with iron nanoparticle (Fe NP) was investigated by spectroscopic and docking studies. The zeta potential analysis revealed that addition of Fe NP (6.45±1.03 mV) to HEWL (8.57±0.54 mV) can cause to greater charge distribution of nanoparticle-protein system (17.33±1.84 mV). In addition, dynamic light scattering (DLS) study revealed that addition of Fe NP (92.95±6.11 nm) to HEWL (2.68±0.37 nm) increases suspension potential of protein/nanoparticle system (51.17±3.19 nm). Fluorescence quenching studies reveled that both static and dynamic quenching mechanism occur and hydrogen bond and van der Waals interaction give rise to protein-NP system. Synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy of HEWL in the presence of Fe NP showed that the emission maximum wavelength of tryptophan (Trp) residues undergoes a red-shift. ANS fluorescence data indicated a dramatic exposure of hydrophobic residues to the solvent. The considerable reduction in melting temperature (T(m)) of HEWL after addition of Fe NP determines an unfavorable interaction system. Furthermore circular dichoroism (CD) experiments demonstrated that, the secondary structure of HEWL has not changed with increasing Fe NP concentrations; however, some conformational changes occur in tertiary structure of HEWL. Moreover, protein–ligand docking study confirmed that the Fe NP forms hydrogen bond contacts with HEWL. PMID:27776180

  1. The solution, solid state stability and kinetic investigation in degradation studies of lercanidipine: study of excipients compatibility of lercanidipine.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Nitin; Amin, Saima; Singla, Neelam; Kohli, Kanchan

    2012-01-01

    The objectives of this research were to evaluate the stability of lercanidipine in solution state and solid state and explore the compatibility of drug with oils, surfactants and cosurfactants as excipients. The effect of pH on the degradation in solution state was studied through pH-rate profile of lercanidipine in constant ionic strength buffer solutions in pH range 1-8 which gives the pH of maximum stability. Powdered lercanidipine was stored under 40°C/0%~75% relative humidities (RH) or 0% RH/5~50°C to study the influence of RH and temperature on the stability of lercanidipine in solid state. Binary mixtures of lercanidipine and different excipients were stored at 40°C/75% RH, 40°C and at room temperature for excipient compatibility evaluation. The degradation of lercanidipine at different pH appears to fit a typical first-order reaction, but in solid state, it does not fit any obvious reaction model. Moisture content and temperature both play important roles affecting the degradation rate. Lercanidipine exhibits good compatibility with surfactants, cosurfactants and oils as excipients under stressed conditions of different storage temperature in a 3-week screening study. Moreover, the proposed high-performance liquid chromatography method was utilized to investigate the kinetics of the acidic and alkaline degradation processes of lercanidipine at different temperatures.

  2. Investigating silent strokes in hypertensives: a magnetic resonance imaging study (ISSYS): rationale and protocol design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Silent brain infarcts are detected by neuroimaging in up to 20% of asymptomatic patients based on population studies. They are five times more frequent than stroke in general population, and increase significantly both with advancing age and hypertension. Moreover, they are independently associated with the risk of future stroke and cognitive decline. Despite these numbers and the clinical consequences of silent brain infarcts, their prevalence in Mediterranean populations is not well known and their role as predictors of future cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events in hypertensive remains to be determined. ISSYS (Investigating Silent Strokes in Hypertensives: a magnetic resonance imaging study) is an observational cross-sectional and longitudinal study aimed to: 1- determine the prevalence of silent cerebrovascular infarcts in a large cohort of 1000 hypertensives and to study their associated factors and 2-to study their relationship with the risk of future stroke and cognitive decline. Methods/Design Cohort study in a randomly selected sample of 1000 participants, hypertensive aged 50 to 70 years old, with no history of previous stroke or dementia. On baseline all participants will undergo a brain MRI to determine the presence of brain infarcts and other cerebrovascular lesions (brain microbleeds, white matter changes and enlarged perivascular spaces) and will be also tested to determine other than brain organ damage (heart-left ventricular hypertrophy, kidney-urine albumin to creatinine ratio, vessels-pulse wave velocity, ankle brachial index), in order to establish the contribution of other subclinical conditions to the risk of further vascular events. Several sub-studies assessing the role of 24 hour ambulatory BP monitoring and plasma or genetic biomarkers will be performed. Follow-up will last for at least 3 years, to assess the rate of further stroke/transient ischemic attack, other cardiovascular events and cognitive decline, and their

  3. Design and Reporting of Targeted Anticancer Preclinical Studies: A Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies Investigating Sorafenib Antitumor Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mattina, James; MacKinnon, Nathalie; Henderson, Valerie C; Fergusson, Dean; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-08-15

    The validity of preclinical studies of candidate therapeutic agents has been questioned given their limited ability to predict their fate in clinical development, including due to design flaws and reporting bias. In this study, we examined this issue in depth by conducting a meta-analysis of animal studies investigating the efficacy of the clinically approved kinase inhibitor, sorafenib. MEDLINE, Embase, and BIOSIS databases were searched for all animal experiments testing tumor volume response to sorafenib monotherapy in any cancer published until April 20, 2012. We estimated effect sizes from experiments assessing changes in tumor volume and conducted subgroup analyses based on prespecified experimental design elements associated with internal, construct, and external validity. The meta-analysis included 97 experiments involving 1,761 animals. We excluded 94 experiments due to inadequate reporting of data. Design elements aimed at reducing internal validity threats were implemented only sporadically, with 66% reporting animal attrition and none reporting blinded outcome assessment or concealed allocation. Anticancer activity against various malignancies was typically tested in only a small number of model systems. Effect sizes were significantly smaller when sorafenib was tested against either a different active agent or combination arm. Trim and fill suggested a 37% overestimation of effect sizes across all malignancies due to publication bias. We detected a moderate dose-response in one clinically approved indication, hepatocellular carcinoma, but not in another approved malignancy, renal cell carcinoma, or when data were pooled across all malignancies tested. In support of other reports, we found that few preclinical cancer studies addressed important internal, construct, and external validity threats, limiting their clinical generalizability. Our findings reinforce the need to improve guidelines for the design and reporting of preclinical cancer studies

  4. Investigating risk factors for psychological morbidity three months after intensive care: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction There is growing evidence of poor mental health and quality of life among survivors of intensive care. However, it is not yet clear to what extent the trauma of life-threatening illness, associated drugs and treatments, or patients' psychological reactions during intensive care contribute to poor psychosocial outcomes. Our aim was to investigate the relative contributions of a broader set of risk factors and outcomes than had previously been considered in a single study. Methods A prospective cohort study of 157 mixed-diagnosis highest acuity patients was conducted in a large general intensive care unit (ICU). Data on four groups of risk factors (clinical, acute psychological, socio-demographic and chronic health) were collected during ICU admissions. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, anxiety and quality of life were assessed using validated questionnaires at three months (n =100). Multivariable analysis was used. Results At follow-up, 55% of patients had psychological morbidity: 27.1% (95% CI: 18.3%, 35.9%) had probable PTSD; 46.3% (95% CI: 36.5%, 56.1%) probable depression, and 44.4% (95% CI: 34.6%, 54.2%) anxiety. The strongest clinical risk factor for PTSD was longer duration of sedation (regression coefficient = 0.69 points (95% CI: 0.12, 1.27) per day, scale = 0 to 51). There was a strong association between depression at three months and receiving benzodiazepines in the ICU (mean difference between groups = 6.73 points (95% CI: 1.42, 12.06), scale = 0 to 60). Use of inotropes or vasopressors was correlated with anxiety, and corticosteroids with better physical quality of life. The effects of these clinical risk factors on outcomes were mediated (partially explained) by acute psychological reactions in the ICU. In fully adjusted models, the strongest independent risk factors for PTSD were mood in ICU, intrusive memories in ICU and psychological history. ICU mood, psychological history and socio-economic position were the

  5. An exploratory investigation of a wake disruption technique for studying wake reestablishment time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, L. E.; Jones, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    An exploratory investigation was made of a wake disruption technique for studying the hypersonic-wake reestablishment time in a blowdown wind tunnel. In this technique, a highly underexpanded jet issuing from the base of a 10 deg half-angle cone totally disrupts and displaces the conventional wake. The jet was rapidly shut off by an explosively actuated valve and the time for wake reestablishment was measured. The tests were conducted in the Mach 6 high Reynolds number tunnel at a stagnation temperature of 506 K and stagnation pressure of 2.86 MPa. The model base jet stagnation pressure was 3.55 MPa at room temperature. High-speed schlieren motion pictures indicated that disappearance of the disrupting jet and reestablishment of the wake-recompression shock were probably occurring simultaneously and that the time disruptive-jet-air shutoff to wake recompression shock reestablishment was probably between 200 and 450 microseconds (flow lengths from 1.8 to 4.2). The values of flow lengths are about one-thord to one-half the values measured in impulse facilities in a previous study. This shorter time is believed to be largely due to difference in flow conditions between the jet disruption technique and impulse facilities.

  6. Investigating brain connectivity heritability in a twin study using diffusion imaging data

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Kai-Kai; Rose, Stephen; Fripp, Jurgen; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Thompson, Paul M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Salvado, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Heritability of brain anatomical connectivity has been studied with diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) mainly by modeling each voxel's diffusion pattern as a tensor (e.g., to compute fractional anisotropy), but this method cannot accurately represent the many crossing connections present in the brain. We hypothesized that different brain networks (i.e., their component fibers) might have different heritability and we investigated brain connectivity using High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging (HARDI) in a cohort of twins comprising 328 subjects that included 70 pairs of monozygotic and 91 pairs of dizygotic twins. Water diffusion was modeled in each voxel with a Fiber Orientation Distribution (FOD) function to study heritability for multiple fiber orientations in each voxel. Precision was estimated in a test–retest experiment on a sub-cohort of 39 subjects. This was taken into account when computing heritability of FOD peaks using an ACE model on the monozygotic and dizygotic twins. Our results confirmed the overall heritability of the major white matter tracts but also identified differences in heritability between connectivity networks. Inter-hemispheric connections tended to be more heritable than intra-hemispheric and cortico-spinal connections. The highly heritable tracts were found to connect particular cortical regions, such as medial frontal cortices, postcentral, paracentral gyri, and the right hippocampus. PMID:24973604

  7. INVESTIGATION OF EXISTING POLICIES CONTRIBUTION TO PROMOTING CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION -A CASE STUDY IN TOKYO-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijioka, Yasuaki; Oka, Kazutaka; Takano, Saneyuki; Yoshikawa, Minoru; Ichihashi, Arata

    The impacts of global warming are already appearing in various regions of the world. Therefore, in addition to strongly promoting mitigation policies, it is an urgent need to study and implement adaptation policies from a long-term perspective in preparation for some possible negative impacts. The Japanese Government has long promoted various countermeasures for disaster prevention, environmental management, food production and protection of the nation's health. These counterm easures are considered to have potential effects asclimate change adaptation. This study investigated to what extent the existing policies for Tokyo can contribute to its climate change adaptation on the basis of comprehensively organizing targeted fields an dindicators in which adaptation policies should be taken. Research results indicated that the existing policies could be useful as climate change adaptation in many fields and indicators. Furthermore, the present problems were clarified accompanied with implementation of climate change adaptation at the municipalities' level, and solutions were proposed on how to use scientific knowledge to solve the problems.

  8. Investigation of the molecular similarity in closely related protein systems: The PrP case study.

    PubMed

    Storchi, Loriano; Paciotti, Roberto; Re, Nazzareno; Marrone, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    The amyloid conversion is a massive detrimental modification affecting several proteins upon specific physical or chemical stimuli characterizing a plethora of diseases. In many cases, the amyloidogenic stimuli induce specific structural features to the protein conferring the propensity to misfold and form amyloid deposits. The investigation of mutants, structurally similar to their native isoform but inherently prone to amyloid conversion, may be a viable strategy to elucidate the structural features connected with amyloidogenesis. In this article, we present a computational protocol based on the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) and grid-based approaches suited for the pairwise comparison of closely related protein structures. This method was applied on the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) as a case study and, in particular, addressed to the quali/quantification of the structural features conferred by either E200K mutations and treatment with CaCl(2), both able to induce the scrapie conversion of PrP. Several schemes of comparison were developed and applied to this case study, and made up suitable of application to other protein systems. At this purpose an in-house python codes has been implemented that, together with the parallelization of the GRID force fields program, will spread the applicability of the proposed computational procedure. PMID:26018750

  9. Ecological risk assessment guidance for preparation of remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans

    SciTech Connect

    Pentecost, E.D.; Vinikour, W.S.

    1993-08-01

    This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial assessment investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfired Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), an RI/FS work plan win have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping the process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites. An overview analysis of early ecological risk assessment methods (i.e., in the 1980s) at Superfund sites was conducted by the EPA (1989a). That review provided a perspective of attention given to ecological issues in some of the first RI/FS studies. By itself, that reference is of somewhat limited value; it does, however, establish a basis for comparison of past practices in ecological risk with current, more refined methods.

  10. Motor response investigation in individuals with cerebral palsy using near infrared spectroscopy: pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ujwal; Hall, Michael; Gonzalez, Jean; Elbaum, Leonard; Bloyer, Martha; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2014-01-20

    Cerebral palsy (CP) describes a group of motor impairment syndromes secondary to genetic that may be due to acquired disorders of the developing brain. In this study, near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is used to investigate the prefrontal cortical activation and lateralization in response to the planning and execution of motor skills in controls and individuals with CP. The prefrontal cortex, which plays a dominant role in the planning and execution of motor skill stimulus, is noninvasively imaged using a continuous wave-based NIRS system. During the study, 7 controls (4 right-handed and 3 left-handed) and 2 individuals with CP (1 right-handed and 1 left-handed) over 18 years of age performed 30 s of a ball throwing task followed by 30 s rest in a 5-block paradigm. The optical signal acquired from the NIRS system was processed to elucidate the activation and lateralization in the prefrontal region of controls and individuals with CP. The preliminary result indicated a difference in activation between the task and rest conditions in all the participant types. Bilateral dominance was observed in the prefrontal cortex of controls in response to planning and execution of motor skill tasks, while an ipsilateral dominance was observed in individuals with CP. In conjunction, similar contralateral dominance was observed during rest periods, both in controls and individuals with CP.

  11. Mars Topography Investigated Through the Wavelet Leaders Method: a Multidimensional Study of its Fractal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deliège, Adrien; Kleyntssens, Thomas; Nicolay, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    This work examines the scaling properties of Mars topography through a wavelet-based formalism. We conduct exhaustive one-dimensional (both longitudinal and latitudinal) and two-dimensional studies based on Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) data using the multifractal formalism called Wavelet Leaders Method (WLM). This approach shows that a scale break occurs at approximately 15 km, giving two scaling regimes in both 1D and 2D cases. At small scales, these topographic profiles mostly display a monofractal behavior while a switch to multifractality is observed in several areas at larger scales. The scaling exponents extracted from this framework tend to be greater at small scales. In the 1D context, these observations are in agreement with previous works and thus suggest that the WLM is well-suited for examining scaling properties of topographic fields. Moreover, the 2D analysis is the first such complete study to our knowledge. It gives both a local and global insight on the scaling regimes of the surface of Mars and allows to exhibit the link between the scaling exponents and several famous features of the Martian topography. These results may be used as a solid basis for further investigations of the scaling laws of the Red planet and show that the WLM could be used to perform systematic analyses of the surface roughness of other celestial bodies.

  12. Investigation of negative BOLD responses in human brain through NIRS technique. A visual stimulation study.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Eleonora; Molteni, Erika; Zucca, Claudio; Reni, Gianluigi; Cerutti, Sergio; Triulzi, Fabio M; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bianchi, Anna M

    2015-03-01

    Despite negative blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses to visual stimuli have recently gained considerable interest, the explanation for their underlying neuronal and vascular mechanisms is still controversial. In the present study, a multimodal experimental approach is presented to shed light on the negative BOLD phenomenon in the human brain. In particular, information from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was integrated to confirm and gain insight into the phenomenon of negative BOLD responses (NBRs) to unpatterned intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) in healthy subjects. Eight healthy subjects participated in the study. Consistent findings emerged from the activation analysis of fMRI and NIRS data and the comparison of BOLD and hemoglobin responses at the single channel level showed that NBRs are related to a decrease in oxyhemoglobin (HbO) combined with a lower increase in deoxyhemoglobin (HHb), corresponding to a decrease in total hemoglobin (THb) and estimated cerebral blood volume (CBV). The HbO and HHb variations were significant in at least one channel in six subjects out of eight (p<0.05). The NIRS technique allowed obtaining valuable information on the vascular determinants of the NBRs, since the discrimination between HbO, HHb and THb information provided a more comprehensive view of the negative BOLD phenomenon. The within and between subject heterogeneous BOLD-Hb temporal relations pave the way to further investigations into the neurovascular properties of NBRs.

  13. XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl contests the paradigm from small molecule studies

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Richard T.; Piechowicz, Marek; Lin, Zekai; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Lin, Wenbin; Abney, C. W.; Bryantsev, V. S.

    2015-11-12

    In this study, limited resource availability and population growth have motivated interest in harvesting valuable metals from unconventional reserves, but developing selective adsorbents for this task requires structural knowledge of metal binding environments. Amidoxime polymers have been identified as the most promising platform for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater. However, despite more than 30 years of research, the uranyl coordination environment on these adsorbents has not been positively identified. We report the first XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl, with EXAFS fits suggesting a cooperative chelating model, rather than the tridentate or η2 motifs proposed by small molecule and computational studies. Samples exposed to environmental seawater also display a feature consistent with a μ2-oxo-bridged transition metal in the uranyl coordination sphere, suggesting in situ formation of a specific binding site or mineralization of uranium on the polymer surface. These unexpected findings challenge several long-held assumptions and have significant implications for development of polymer adsorbents with high selectivity.

  14. Investigating Greek consumers' attitudes towards low-fat food products: a segmentation study.

    PubMed

    Krystallis, Athanasios; Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S; Kapirti, A

    2003-05-01

    The present study aims at gaining a first insight into Greek consumers' attitudes towards low-fat food products. Although Greece, and in particular Crete, have enjoyed a great popularity in terms of the Mediterranean diet, there has been an almost complete lack of low-fat-related surveys concerning the Greek food consumer. Using this as a research trigger, the current investigation evolves around the conflict between 'sensory appeal' and 'healthiness' of low-fat products, widely described in the international literature. Other crucial factors examined are consumers' awareness, occasional use and conscious purchase of, and willingness to pay for, food products with the 'low-fat' claim. Overall, the study has the objective to segment the Greek market in terms of users' perceptions of light products and to identify a number of well-described clusters with clear-cut socio-demographic and behavioural profile. Three clusters are identified, comprised of consumers with favourable attitudes towards low-fat foods and willing to pay premiums to purchase them.

  15. An investigation into the kerbside recycling behaviour of two Welsh case study authorities.

    PubMed

    Woollam, Thomas; Williams, Keith W; Griffiths, Anthony

    2006-08-01

    This paper investigates the number of observed households setting out their containers for kerbside recyclable collection in two Welsh kerbside recycling programmes; namely, Rhondda Cynon Taf County Borough Council and Caerphilly County Borough Council. Analysed data from the monitoring of approximately 114 000 households in the two separate kerbside programmes are presented, making this the largest study of kerbside recycling behaviour in the UK. The average household set-out rates of individual households per electoral division and per street in each programme were compared. Average household set-out rate for a particular electoral division and street was then related to certain socio-economic indicators. The study was performed using the 'ArcView' geographical information systems (GIS) package. The model identified a moderate link between household set-out rate (%) and socio-economic status at electoral division level. However, there was no correlation between socio-economic status and average household set-out rate in a street. Household set-out rates for both programmes fluctuated significantly in streets with similar socio-economic status. Another significant factor affecting set-out rate, herein named the 'Nant-y-Gwyddon effect', is also described.

  16. XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl contests the paradigm from small molecule studies

    DOE PAGES

    Mayes, Richard T.; Piechowicz, Marek; Lin, Zekai; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dai, Sheng; Lin, Wenbin; Abney, C. W.; Bryantsev, V. S.

    2015-11-12

    In this study, limited resource availability and population growth have motivated interest in harvesting valuable metals from unconventional reserves, but developing selective adsorbents for this task requires structural knowledge of metal binding environments. Amidoxime polymers have been identified as the most promising platform for large-scale extraction of uranium from seawater. However, despite more than 30 years of research, the uranyl coordination environment on these adsorbents has not been positively identified. We report the first XAFS investigation of polyamidoxime-bound uranyl, with EXAFS fits suggesting a cooperative chelating model, rather than the tridentate or η2 motifs proposed by small molecule and computationalmore » studies. Samples exposed to environmental seawater also display a feature consistent with a μ2-oxo-bridged transition metal in the uranyl coordination sphere, suggesting in situ formation of a specific binding site or mineralization of uranium on the polymer surface. These unexpected findings challenge several long-held assumptions and have significant implications for development of polymer adsorbents with high selectivity.« less

  17. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES INVESTIGATING THE RATE OF STRONTIUM AND ACTINIDE ADSORPTION BY MONOSODIUM TITANATE

    SciTech Connect

    Hobbs, D.

    2010-10-01

    A number of laboratory studies have been conducted to determine the influence of mixing and mixing intensity, solution ionic strength, initial sorbate concentrations, temperature, and monosodium titanate (MST) concentration on the rates of sorbate removal by MST in high-level nuclear waste solutions. Of these parameters, initial sorbate concentrations, ionic strength, and MST concentration have the greater impact on sorbate removal rates. The lack of a significant influence of mixing and mixing intensity on sorbate removal rates indicates that bulk solution transport is not the rate controlling step in the removal of strontium and actinides over the range of conditions and laboratory-scales investigated. However, bulk solution transport may be a significant parameter upon use of MST in a 1.3 million-gallon waste tank such as that planned for the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) program. Thus, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recommends completing the experiments in progress to determine if mixing intensity influences sorption rates under conditions appropriate for this program. Adsorption models have been developed from these experimental studies that allow prediction of strontium (Sr), plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np) and uranium (U) concentrations as a function of contact time with MST. Fairly good agreement has been observed between the predicted and measured sorbate concentrations in the laboratory-scale experiments.

  18. 25 CFR 900.196 - Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and the provision...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... studies and investigations and the provision of emergency services, including the operation of emergency motor vehicles? 900.196 Section 900.196 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Claims § 900.196 Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and...

  19. 25 CFR 900.196 - Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and the provision...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... studies and investigations and the provision of emergency services, including the operation of emergency motor vehicles? 900.196 Section 900.196 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Claims § 900.196 Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and...

  20. 25 CFR 900.196 - Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and the provision...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... studies and investigations and the provision of emergency services, including the operation of emergency motor vehicles? 900.196 Section 900.196 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Claims § 900.196 Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and...

  1. 25 CFR 900.196 - Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and the provision...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... studies and investigations and the provision of emergency services, including the operation of emergency motor vehicles? 900.196 Section 900.196 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Claims § 900.196 Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and...

  2. 25 CFR 900.196 - Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and the provision...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... studies and investigations and the provision of emergency services, including the operation of emergency motor vehicles? 900.196 Section 900.196 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR... Claims § 900.196 Do covered services include the conduct of clinical studies and investigations and...

  3. Investigations related to scientific deep drilling to study reservoir-triggered earthquakes at Koyna, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Harsh; Purnachandra Rao, N.; Roy, Sukanta; Arora, Kusumita; Tiwari, V. M.; Patro, Prasanta K.; Satyanarayana, H. V. S.; Shashidhar, D.; Mallika, K.; Akkiraju, Vyasulu V.; Goswami, Deepjyoti; Vyas, Digant; Ravi, G.; Srinivas, K. N. S. S. S.; Srihari, M.; Mishra, S.; Dubey, C. P.; Raju, D. Ch. V.; Borah, Ujjal; Chinna Reddy, K.; Babu, Narendra; Rohilla, Sunil; Dhar, Upasana; Sen, Mrinal; Bhaskar Rao, Y. J.; Bansal, B. K.; Nayak, Shailesh

    2015-09-01

    Artificial water reservoir-triggered earthquakes have continued at Koyna in the Deccan Traps province, India, since the impoundment of the Shivaji Sagar reservoir in 1962. Existing models, to comprehend the genesis of triggered earthquakes, suffer from lack of observations in the near field. To investigate further, scientific deep drilling and setting up a fault zone observatory at depth of 5-7 km is planned in the Koyna area. Prior to undertaking deep drilling, an exploratory phase of investigations has been launched to constrain subsurface geology, structure and heat flow regime in the area that provide critical inputs for the design of the deep borehole observatory. Two core boreholes drilled to depths of 1,522 and 1,196 m have penetrated the Deccan Traps and sampled the granitic basement in the region for the first time. Studies on cores provide new and direct information regarding the thickness of the Deccan Traps, the absence of infra-Trappean sediments and the nature of the underlying basement rocks. Temperatures estimated at a depth of 6 km in the area, made on the basis of heat flow and thermal properties data sets, do not exceed 150 °C. Low-elevation airborne gravity gradient and magnetic data sets covering 5,012 line km, together with high-quality magnetotelluric data at 100 stations, provide both regional information about the thickness of the Deccan Traps and the occurrence of localized density heterogeneities and anomalous conductive zones in the vicinity of the hypocentral zone. Acquisition of airborne LiDAR data to obtain a high-resolution topographic model of the region has been completed over an area of 1,064 km2 centred on the Koyna seismic zone. Seismometers have been deployed in the granitic basement inside two boreholes and are planned in another set of six boreholes to obtain accurate hypocentral locations and constrain the disposition of fault zones.

  4. The Use of Mass Balance Investigations in the Study of the Biogeochemical Cycle of Sulfur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, H. E.; Dillon, P. J.; Molot, L. A.

    1997-06-01

    The use of mass balances in the investigation of the biogeochemical cycle of sulfur is reviewed for three systems: 1) upland catchments, 2) wetlands, and 3) lakes. In upland catchments, the major inputs of sulfur are via wet and dry atmospheric deposition, whereas outputs or losses occur primarily through volatilization and/or runoff. In addition, sulfur may be stored in vegetation and in the forest floor. In wetlands (particularly peatlands), a large proportion of the sulfur inputs are derived from surface and groundwater originating in the upland system. Because of the fluctuating water table in wetlands, they can act as a source or sink for sulfate, depending on the redox conditions. Wetlands, therefore, can significantly affect input-output budgets for lakes. In most lakes, only a small portion of the sulfate input is retained, (i.e. not lost from the lake via outflow), indicating that there is an excess of sulfate relative to biological needs. Seepage lakes are exceptions to this generalization. Although the reactivity of the sulfate input to many lakes is low, sulfate levels, especially in regions receiving substantial atmospheric sulfur deposition, are high enough that the portion reduced results in substantial in-lake alkalinity production; in fact, in many cases, alkalinity production from sulfate reduction is greater than that resulting from not only other in-lake processes but from external sources (the catchment) as well.The importance of mass balance investigations in elucidating the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur is stressed and the need for additional studies on a whole-system basis stressed.

  5. Investigating sex-specific dynamics using uniparental markers: West New Guinea as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Mona, Stefano; Mordret, Ernest; Veuille, Michel; Tommaseo-Ponzetta, Mila

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y chromosome (NRY) genetic markers have been often contrasted to investigate sex-specific dynamics. Traditionally, isolation by distance, intrapopulation genetic diversity and population differentiation are estimated from both markers and compared. Two possible sources of bias are often neglected. First, kilometric distances are frequently used as predictor of the connectivity between groups, hiding the role played by environmental features at a microgeographic scale. Second, the comparison of intrapopulation diversity and population differentiation between mtDNA and NRY is hampered by their different mutational mechanisms and rates. Here, we show how to account for these biases by analyzing from a different perspective a published dataset of eight West New Guinea (WNG) populations for which mtDNA control region sequences and seven linked NRY microsatellites had been typed. First, we modeled the connectivity among sampled populations by computing the number of days required to travel between groups. Then, we investigated the differences between the two sexes accounting for the molecular characteristics of the markers examined to obtain estimates on the product of the effective population size and the migration rate among demes (Nm). We achieved this goal by studying the shape of the gene genealogy at several sampling levels and using spatial explicit simulations. Both the direction and the rate of migration differ between male and females, with an Nm estimated to be >6 times higher in the latter under many evolutionary scenarios. We finally highlight the importance of applying metapopulation models when analyzing the genetic diversity of a species. We have applied the prediction of the sampling theory in a meta-population and we have corroborated our finding using spatial explicit simulations. Both approaches are fundamentally meant to deal with structured populations: we strongly believe in the importance of tacking structure

  6. Injury-related mortality in South Africa: a retrospective descriptive study of postmortem investigations

    PubMed Central

    Prinsloo, Megan; Pillay-van Wyk, Victoria; Gwebushe, Nomonde; Mathews, Shanaaz; Martin, Lorna J; Laubscher, Ria; Abrahams, Naeemah; Msemburi, William; Lombard, Carl; Bradshaw, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate injury-related mortality in South Africa using a nationally representative sample and compare the results with previous estimates. Methods We conducted a retrospective descriptive study of medico-legal postmortem investigation data from mortuaries using a multistage random sample, stratified by urban and non-urban areas and mortuary size. We calculated age-specific and age-standardized mortality rates for external causes of death. Findings Postmortem reports revealed 52 493 injury-related deaths in 2009 (95% confidence interval, CI: 46 930–58 057). Almost half (25 499) were intentionally inflicted. Age-standardized mortality rates per 100 000 population were as follows: all injuries: 109.0 (95% CI: 97.1–121.0); homicide 38.4 (95% CI: 33.8–43.0; suicide 13.4 (95% CI: 11.6–15.2) and road-traffic injury 36.1 (95% CI: 30.9–41.3). Using postmortem reports, we found more than three times as many deaths from homicide and road-traffic injury than had been recorded by vital registration for this period. The homicide rate was similar to the estimate for South Africa from a global analysis, but road-traffic and suicide rates were almost fourfold higher. Conclusion This is the first nationally representative sample of injury-related mortality in South Africa. It provides more accurate estimates and cause-specific profiles that are not available from other sources. PMID:26229201

  7. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Wohletz, K.H.; Vaniman, D.T.; Gladney, E.; Bower, N.

    1986-01-01

    Volcanic hazard investigations during FY 1984 focused on five topics: the emplacement mechanism of shallow basalt intrusions, geochemical trends through time for volcanic fields of the Death Valley-Pancake Range volcanic zone, the possibility of bimodal basalt-rhyolite volcanism, the age and process of enrichment for incompatible elements in young basalts of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region, and the possibility of hydrovolcanic activity. The stress regime of Yucca Mountain may favor formation of shallow basalt intrusions. However, combined field and drill-hole studies suggest shallow basalt intrusions are rare in the geologic record of the southern Great Basin. The geochemical patterns of basaltic volcanism through time in the NTS region provide no evidence for evolution toward a large-volume volcanic field or increases in future rates of volcanism. Existing data are consistent with a declining volcanic system comparable to the late stages of the southern Death Valley volcanic field. The hazards of bimodal volcanism in this area are judged to be low. The source of a 6-Myr pumice discovered in alluvial deposits of Crater Flat has not been found. Geochemical studies show that the enrichment of trace elements in the younger rift basalts must be related to an enrichment of their mantle source rocks. This geochemical enrichment event, which may have been metasomatic alteration, predates the basalts of the silicic episode and is, therefore, not a young event. Studies of crater dimensions of hydrovolcanic landforms indicate that the worst case scenario (exhumation of a repository at Yucca Mountain by hydrovolcanic explosions) is unlikely. Theoretical models of melt-water vapor explosions, particularly the thermal detonation model, suggest hydrovolcanic explosion are possible at Yucca Mountain. 80 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Investigation of Inquiry-based Science Pedagogy among Middle Level Science Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Sunny Minelli

    This study implemented a qualitative approach to examine the phenomenon of "inquiry-based science pedagogy or inquiry instruction" as it has been experienced by individuals. Data was collected through online open-ended surveys, focus groups, and teacher reported self-reflections to answer the research questions: 1) How do middle level science teachers conceptualize "inquiry-based instruction?" 2) What are preferred instructional strategies for implementation in middle level science classrooms? And 3) How do middle level science teachers perceive the connection between science instruction and student learning? The participants within this research study represent 33 percent of teachers in grades 5 through 9 within six school districts in northeastern Pennsylvania. Of the 12 consent forms originally obtained, 10 teachers completed all three phases of the data collection, including the online survey, participation in focus groups, and teacher self-reflection. 60 percent of the participants taught only science, and 40 percent taught all content areas. Of the ten participants, 50 percent were certified teachers of science and 50 percent were certified as teachers of elementary education. 70 percent of the research participants reflected having obtained a master's, with 60 percent of these degrees being received in areas of education, and 10 percent in the area of science. The research participants have a total of 85 collective years of experience as professional educators, with the average years of experience being 8.5 years. Analysis of data revealed three themes related to research question #1) How do middle-level science teachers conceptualize inquiry-based instruction? and sub-question #1) How do middle-level science teachers characterize effective instruction? The themes that capture the essence of teachers' formulation of inquiry-based instruction that emerged in this study were student centered, problem solving, and hands-on . Analysis of data revealed one theme

  9. An Investigation of Cancer Rates in the Argentia Region, Newfoundland and Labrador: An Ecological Study

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Pauline; Godwin, Marshall; Peach, Mandy; Fortier, Jacqueline; Bornstein, Stephen; Buehler, Sharon; McCrate, Farah; Pike, Andrea; Wang, Peizhong Peter; Cullen, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Argentia region of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, was home to a US naval base during a 40-year period between the 1940s and the 1990s. Activities on the base resulted in contamination of the soil and groundwater in the region with chemicals such as heavy metals and dioxins, and residents have expressed concern about higher rates of cancer in their community. This study investigated the rate of cancer diagnosis that is disproportionately high in the Argentia region. Methods. Cases of cancer diagnosed between 1985 and 2011 were obtained for the Argentia region, two comparison communities, and the province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Crude and age-standardized incidence rates of cancer diagnosis were calculated and compared. The crude incidence rate was adjusted for differences in age demographics using census data, and age-standardized incidence rates were compared. Results. Although the Argentia region had a higher crude rate of cancer diagnosis, the age-standardized incidence rate did not differ significantly from the comparison communities or the provincial average. Argentia has an aging population, which may have influenced the perception of increased cancer diagnosis in the community. Conclusions. We did not detect an increased burden of cancer in the Argentia region. PMID:26633979

  10. A Penalized Likelihood Approach for Investigating Gene-Drug Interactions in Pharmacogenetic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Megan L.; Bondell, Howard D.; Tzeng, Jung-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pharmacogenetics investigates the relationship between heritable genetic variation and the variation in how individuals respond to drug therapies. Often, gene-drug interactions play a primary role in this response, and identifying these effects can aid in the development of individualized treatment regimes. Haplotypes can hold key information in understanding the association between genetic variation and drug response. However, the standard approach for haplotype-based association analysis does not directly address the research questions dictated by individualized medicine. A complementary post-hoc analysis is required, and this post-hoc analysis is usually under powered after adjusting for multiple comparisons and may lead to seemingly contradictory conclusions. In this work, we propose a penalized likelihood approach that is able to overcome the drawbacks of the standard approach and yield the desired personalized output. We demonstrate the utility of our method by applying it to the Scottish Randomized Trial in Ovarian Cancer. We also conducted simulation studies and showed that the proposed penalized method has comparable or more power than the standard approach and maintains low Type I error rates for both binary and quantitative drug responses. The largest performance gains are seen when the haplotype frequency is low, the difference in effect sizes are small, or the true relationship among the drugs is more complex. PMID:25604216

  11. A simulator study investigating how motorcyclists approach side-road hazards.

    PubMed

    Crundall, Elizabeth; Stedmon, Alex W; Saikayasit, Rossukorn; Crundall, David

    2013-03-01

    The most common form of motorcycle collision in the UK occurs when another road user fails to give way and pulls out from a side road in front of an oncoming motorcyclist. While research has considered these collisions from the car driver's perspective, no research to date has addressed how motorcyclists approach these potential hazards. This study conducted a detailed analysis of motorcyclist speed and road position on approach to side-roads in a simulated suburban setting. Novice, Experienced and Advanced riders rode two laps of a simulated route, encountering five side-roads on each lap. On the second lap, a car emerged from the first side-road in a typical 'looked but failed to see' accident scenario. Three Experienced riders and one Novice rider collided with the hazard. The Advanced rider group adopted the safest strategy when approaching side-roads, with a lane position closer to the centre of the road and slower speeds. In contrast, Experienced riders chose faster speeds, often over the speed limit, especially when approaching junctions with good visibility. Rider behaviour at non-hazard junctions was compared between laps, to investigate if riders modified their behaviour after experiencing the hazard. Whilst all riders were generally more cautious after the hazard, the Advanced riders modified their behaviour more than the other groups after the hazard vehicle had pulled out. The results suggest that advanced training can lead to safer riding styles that are not acquired by experience alone.

  12. Investigating Word Learning in Fragile X Syndrome: A Fast-Mapping Study

    PubMed Central

    McDuffie, Andrea; Kover, Sara T.; Hagerman, Randi; Abbeduto, Leonard

    2012-01-01

    Fast-mapping paradigms have not been used previously to examine the process of word learning in boys with fragile X syndrome (FXS), who are likely to have intellectual impairment, language delays, and symptoms of autism. In this study, a fast-mapping task was used to investigate associative word learning in 4- to 10-year-old boys with FXS relative to younger typically developing boys and age-matched boys with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Task performance exceeded chance levels for all groups; however, boys with FXS outperformed boys with ASD, despite having lower levels of nonverbal cognition. Memory task demands significantly impacted performance only for boys with typical development. For boys with FXS or ASD, fast-mapping uniquely accounted for small but significant variance in concurrent levels of vocabulary comprehension as did chronological age and nonverbal IQ, but not autism severity. Understanding the fast-mapping process has implications for designing interventions to support word learning and language acquisition in these populations. PMID:23179343

  13. Doxorubicin liposomes as an investigative model to study the skin permeation of nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Boakye, Cedar H A; Patel, Ketan; Singh, Mandip

    2015-07-15

    The objectives of this study were to develop an innovative investigative model using doxorubicin as a fluorophore to evaluate the skin permeation of nanocarriers and the impact of size and surface characteristics on their permeability. Different doxorubicin-loaded liposomes with mean particle size <130 nm and different surface chemistry were prepared by ammonium acetate gradient method using DPPC, DOPE, Cholesterol, DSPE-PEG 2000 and 1,1-Di-((Z)-octadec-9-en-1-yl) pyrrolidin-1-ium chloride (CY5)/DOTAP/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphate (DOPA) as the charge modifier. There was minimal release of doxorubicin from the liposomes up to 8h; indicating that fluorescence observed within the skin layers was due to the intact liposomes. Liposomes with particle sizes >600 nm were restricted within the stratum corneum. DOTAP (p<0.01) and CY5 (p<0.05) liposomes demonstrated significant permeation into the skin than DOPA and PEG liposomes. Tape stripping significantly (p<0.01) enhanced the skin permeation of doxorubicin liposomes but TAT-decorated doxorubicin liposomes permeated better (p<0.005). Blockage of the hair follicles resulted in significant reduction in the extent and intensity of fluorescence observed within the skin layers. Overall, doxorubicin liposomes proved to be an ideal fluorophore-based model. The hair follicles were the major route utilized by the liposomes to permeate skin. Surface charge and particle size played vital roles in the extent of permeation. PMID:25910414

  14. Motor control investigation of dystonic cerebral palsy: A pilot study of passive knee trajectory.

    PubMed

    Androwis, Ghaith J; Michael, Peter A; Jewaid, Darine; Nolan, Karen J; Strongwater, Allan; Foulds, Richard A

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to better understand dystonia in CP and be able to objectively distinguish between individuals who experience spasticity, dystonia, or a combination of these conditions while evaluating the effect of 2Hz vestibular stimulation. Selected outcome measures included knee ROM, angular velocity and acceleration and all measures increased post vestibular stimulation; these results are indications of a possible reduction in the level of disability. The current investigation also identified an unexpected and unique behavior of the knee in children with dystonic cerebral palsy (CP) that was noticed while administering the Pendulum Knee Drop test (PKD) at approximately 0.4 rad (a mid-angle between full extension and zero vertical). There was a catch-like phenomenon at the described mid-angle in dystonic individuals. These results may suggest that dystonia is not a velocity dependent hypersensitivity of reflexes, but may include position dependent muscle reflexes and co-contractions. This reinforces the need for a more precise objective measure or perhaps a modified measure such as a mid-angle PKD test. Furthermore, based on the results obtained through the modified technique, beneficial alterations can be made to the form of treatment such as: robotic therapy or physical therapy that specifically accommodates the unique motor control disorder in individuals with dystonic CP. PMID:26737309

  15. Investigations On Limestone Weathering Of El-Tuba Minaret El Mehalla, Egypt: A Case Study.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Gohary; A, M.

    The weathering phenomena that have affected El-TUBA Minaret, one of the most important Islamic stone minarets in middle delta in Egypt; that has suffered from several factors of deterioration due to weathering phenomenon. The present investigations concern the weathering factors that may have affected the minaret via the following methods and techniques: a) Contact-free methods used to study the chemical and mineralogical composition of building materials before and after weathering effects such as SEM-EDX and XRD, b) Non-destructive methods to find out percentage of range of decay which has affected these materials as well as the deteriorating roles of the surrounding environment. This method has been used to make an anatomical scheme of these features especially to specific deteriorated parts by GIS and other digital imaging techniques. All results confirm that the degradation factors affecting the minaret building materials are essentially attributed to direct effects of weathering phenomena. These weathering phenomena arise from physical and chemical mechanisms which have lead to many deterioration forms on the following two scales: a) Macro scale of weathering phenomena (e.g. structural damages, crakes, loss of plumb and walls bulging), b) Micro scale of weathering phenomena (e.g. hydrated salts, bursting, flaking, coloration, scaling, skinning, exfoliation and soiling). Discussion on the management and rehabilitation of this monument is made, since it is one of the religious shrines in Egypt.

  16. Underground geotechnical and geological investigations at Ekati Mine-Koala North: case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubec, Jaroslav; Long, Larry; Nowicki, Tom; Dyck, Darren

    2004-09-01

    Since 1998, BHP Billiton has mined diamonds at the Ekati Diamond Mine™ near Lac de Gras in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Current operations are based on mining multiple pipes by the open-pit method, but as some pits deepen, converting to underground mining is being considered. As a test of underground mining methods and to provide access to the lower elevations of the Panda and Koala pipes, the Koala North pipe is being developed for underground mining. Initially, the top 40 m of the pipe were mined as an open pit to provide grade information and a prepared surface for the transition to underground mining. Currently, Koala North is being developed as an open-benching, mechanized, trackless operation. Although the method was successfully used at several De Beers diamond operations in South Africa, it has never been tested in an Arctic environment. This case study describes basic geology, mining method layout and ongoing geological and geotechnical investigation. From the beginning of underground development, geotechnical daily routines have been fully integrated within the technical services department, which supports the operation. Geotechnical, geological and structural information obtained from underground mapping and core logging is compiled, processed, reviewed and analyzed on site by the geotechnical staff. Conclusions and recommendations are implemented as part of the operations in a timely manner. This ongoing "live" process enables the operators to make the most efficient use of resources both for ground support and excavations as well as to address safety issues, which are the top priority.

  17. Characterizing semantic mappings adaptation via biomedical KOS evolution: a case study investigating SNOMED CT and ICD.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Julio Cesar; Pruski, Cédric; Da Silveira, Marcos; Reynaud-Delaître, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Mappings established between Knowledge Organization Systems (KOS) increase semantic interoperability between biomedical information systems. However, biomedical knowledge is highly dynamic and changes affecting KOS entities can potentially invalidate part or the totality of existing mappings. Understanding how mappings evolve and what the impacts of KOS evolution on mappings are is therefore crucial for the definition of an automatic approach to maintain mappings valid and up-to-date over time. In this article, we study variations of a specific KOS complex change (split) for two biomedical KOS (SNOMED CT and ICD-9-CM) through a rigorous method of investigation for identifying and refining complex changes, and for selecting representative cases. We empirically analyze and explain their influence on the evolution of associated mappings. Results point out the importance of considering various dimensions of the information described in KOS, like the semantic structure of concepts, the set of relevant information used to define the mappings and the change operations interfering with this set of information. PMID:24551341

  18. A Density Functional Theory Study of a Calcium- Montmorillonite: A First Investigation for Medicine Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewi Kencana Wungu, Triati; Fauzan, Muhammad Rifqi Al; Widayani; Suprijadi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we performed structural geometry and electronic properties calculations of calcium - based clay mineral for medicine application using first principles calculation by means of Density Functional Theory. Here, a kind of clay mineral used was Ca- montmorillonite and it is applied as an absorber of dangerous metal contained in a human body, such as Pb, which causes osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a disease associated with bone mass decreases. Since montmorillonite has ability to exchange its cation (Ca+2), therefore, it plays an important role in preventing or/and cure human bone from osteoporosis. In order to understand how Ca-montmorillonite can do detoxification in the human body, we firstly investigated the mechanism of Pb adsorption on the surface of Ca-montmorillonite in an atomic level point of view. We found that the repulsive interactions between H of OH groups with Ca and Pb yielding the rotation of the H of OH groups of montmorillonite. A relatively small movement of Ca was observed when Pb is adsorbed and the band gap of Ca- montmorillonite becomes 1.87 eV narrow.

  19. Investigations on Synperiplanar and Antiperiplanar Isomers of Losartan: Theoretical and Experimental NMR Studies.

    PubMed

    Kujawski, Jacek; Czaja, Kornelia; Ratajczak, Tomasz; Jodłowska, Elżbieta; Chmielewski, Marcin K

    2015-06-29

    Losartan inhibits the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by blocking the angiotensin II receptor. It is commonly used in cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension. Several publications applied the ab initio and density functional theory methods to investigate the molecule of losartan. Only in one of them were the nuclear magnetic resonance spectra calculations carried out, and their results were correlated with the experimental values. The authors focused their attention on calculations of the anion form of losartan, taking into consideration both its synperiplanar and antiperiplanar configurations. Coefficients of determination and mean absolute deviation parameters were calculated for the experimental and calculated chemical shifts for every used basis set. They showed a noticeably stronger correlation for the anti-isomers than for the syn-isomers. Moreover, the solvation model increased the value of this parameter. The results of calculations confirmed that an anti-conformation of the analyte seems to be the preferred one, and such an orientation might be most potent within the receptor cavity, which is in agreement with the results of previous studies.

  20. Investigating Women’s Experiences of Asthma Care in Pregnancy: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Chervonne; Williamson, Graham R; Knight, Beatrice; Daly, Mark; Halpin, David M.G

    2014-01-01

    Background : Most asthmatic women have normal pregnancies and complications are infrequent when their asthma is well-controlled. Symptom control and medical treatment are concerning to pregnant asthma suffers, as is the impact that their illness and treatment might have on their unborn baby. The aim was to investigate in a qualitative study the thoughts and feelings of women’s experiences of asthma in pregnancy. Twenty-two women with asthma who had a pregnancy within two years were asked to participate. Seven women were interviewed when data saturation was achieved. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using the ‘Framework’ Method, independently analysed by two researchers and consensus reached concerning the construction of themes. The key themes that emerged were Asthma and pregnancy; Pregnancy and post-natal experiences; and Health professionals. These findings are globally interesting because of the prevalence of maternal asthma and they illustrate participants’ experiences concerning their asthma care and their views on its improvement. Pregnant asthmatic women have concerns about their care and treatment which might be alleviated by outreach, joint working between respiratory doctors and nurse specialists, midwives and General Practice nurses. Targeted educational activities could form a part of this care delivery. PMID:25538796

  1. Investigating graph comprehension in students with dyslexia: an eye tracking study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunjung; Lombardino, Linda J; Cowles, Wind; Altmann, Lori J

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine graph comprehension in college students with developmental dyslexia. We investigated how graph types (line, vertical bar, and horizontal bar graphs), graphic patterns (single and double graphic patterns), and question types (point locating and comparison questions) differentially affect graph comprehension of students with and without dyslexia. Groups were compared for (1) reaction times for answering comprehension questions based on graphed data and (2) eye gaze times for specific graph subregions (x-axis, y-axis, pattern, legend, question, and answer). Dyslexic readers were significantly slower in their graph comprehension than their peers with group differences becoming more robust with the increasing complexity of graphs and tasks. In addition, dyslexic readers' initial eye gaze viewing times for linguistic subregions (question and answer) and total viewing times for both linguistic (question and answer) and nonlinguistic (pattern) subregions were significantly longer than their control peers' times. In spite of using elementary-level paragraphs for comprehension and simple graph forms, young adults with dyslexia needed more time to process linguistic and nonlinguistic stimuli. These findings are discussed relative to theories proposed to address fundamental processing deficits in individuals with dyslexia.

  2. Experimental Guidelines for Studies Designed to Investigate the Impact of Antioxidant Supplementation on Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Scott K.; Smuder, Ashley J.; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Hudson, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    Research interest in the effects of antioxidants on exercise-induced oxidative stress and human performance continues to grow as new scientists enter this field. Consequently, there is a need to establish an acceptable set of criteria for monitoring antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage in tissues. Numerous reports have described a wide range of assays to detect both antioxidant capacity and oxidative damage to biomolecules, but many techniques are not appropriate in all experimental conditions. Here, the authors present guidelines for selecting and interpreting methods that can be used by scientists to investigate the impact of antioxidants on both exercise performance and the redox status of tissues. Moreover, these guidelines will be useful for reviewers who are assigned the task of evaluating studies on this topic. The set of guidelines contained in this report is not designed to be a strict set of rules, because often the appropriate procedures depend on the question being addressed and the experimental model. Furthermore, because no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate in every experimental situation, the authors strongly recommend using multiple assays to verify a change in biomarkers of oxidative stress or redox balance. PMID:20190346

  3. Critical role of bioanalytical strategies in investigation of clinical PK observations, a Phase I case study.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kun; Xu, Keyang; Liu, Luna; Hendricks, Robert; Delarosa, Reginald; Erickson, Rich; Budha, Nageshwar; Leabman, Maya; Song, An; Kaur, Surinder; Fischer, Saloumeh K

    2014-01-01

    RG7652 is a human immunoglobulin 1 (IgG1) monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) and is designed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. A target-binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to measure RG7652 levels in human serum in a Phase I study. Although target-binding assay formats are generally used to quantify free therapeutic, the actual therapeutic species being measured are affected by assay conditions, such as sample dilution and incubation time, and levels of soluble target in the samples. Therefore, in the presence of high concentrations of circulating target, the choice of reagents and assay conditions can have a significant effect on the observed pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles. Phase I RG7652 PK analysis using the ELISA data resulted in a nonlinear dose normalized exposure. An investigation was conducted to characterize the ELISA to determine whether the assay format and reagents may have contributed to the PK observation. In addition, to confirm the ELISA results, a second orthogonal method, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using a signature peptide as surrogate, was developed and implemented. A subset of PK samples, randomly selected from half of the subjects in the 6 single ascending dose (SAD) cohorts in the Phase I clinical study, was analyzed with the LC-MS/MS assay, and the data were found to be comparable to the ELISA data. This paper illustrates the importance of reagent characterization, as well as the benefits of using an orthogonal approach to eliminate bioanalytical contributions when encountering unexpected observations.

  4. Integrating Multiple Subsurface Exploration Technologies in Slope Hydrogeologic Investigation: A Case Study in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, H.-C.; Hsu, S.-M.; Jeng, D.-I.; Ku, C.-Y.

    2009-04-01

    Taiwan is an island located at a tectonically active collision zone between the Eurasian Plate and the Pacific Plate. Also, the island is in the subtropical climate region with frequent typhoon events that are always accompanied by intense rainfalls within a short period of time. These seismic and climatic elements frequently trigger, directly or indirectly, natural disasters such as landslides on the island with casualties and property damages. Prompted by the urge for minimizing the detrimental effects of such natural disasters, Taiwan government has initiated and funded a series of investigations and studies aimed at better understanding the causes of the natural disasters that may lead to the formulation of more effective disaster contingency plans and possibly some forecasts system. The hydrogeology of a landslide site can help unveil the detention condition of storm water entering the aquifer system of the slope as well as its groundwater condition which, in turn, plays a critical role in slope stability. In this study, a hydrogeologic investigation employing a series of subsurface exploration technologies was conducted at an active landslide site in the vicinity of Hwa Yuan Village in northern Taiwan. The site, which covers an area of approximately 0.14 km2 (35 acres) and generally ranges between 25 to 36 degree in slope, was initially investigated with ground resistivity image profiling (RIP) and electrical logging in order to determine the lithology and possibly the water-bearing capacity of the geologic units beneath the slope surface. Subsequently, both acoustic and optical borehole loggings were then applied to identify potentially significant fracture features at depth and their hydrogeologic implications. In addition, flowmeter loggings and hydraulic packer tests were conducted to further characterize the hydrogeologic system of the site and quantitatively determine the hydraulic properties of major hydrogeologic units. According to the ground

  5. Frequency and pattern of radiological and laboratory investigations in patients with mental illnesses: A study from North Rajasthan

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Dhanesh K.; Suthar, Navratan; Singh, Vikram; Bihari, Mitesh; Kumar, Vijay; Verma, Kamal K.; Sidana, Roop; Sengupta, Somnath; Bhadoriya, Mahender Singh

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are widespread perceptions that excessive and unnecessary investigations are done in many patients with mental illnesses. There are no studies from India looking into this issue. Aims: (i) To study the frequency and pattern of various investigations such as electroencephalography (EEG), computerized tomography (CT) scan of head, magnetic resolution imaging (MRI) scan of brain, and blood investigations carried out by the previous doctors on patients seeking treatment in three different settings. (ii) To study the socio-demographic and clinical correlates of investigations carried out on these patients. Study Design and Settings: A cross-sectional study in a community outreach clinic, a district level psychiatric hospital, and psychiatry outpatient clinic of a medical college. Materials and Methods: 160 newly registered patients seeking treatment at these settings were assessed using a semi-structured pro forma regarding various investigations that they had undergone before seeking the current consultation. Frequency of investigations was analyzed. Results: About 47.5% of patients had at least one of the three brain investigations done. EEG, CT head, and MRI brain had been done in 37.5%, 20.0%, and 8.8% of the patients, respectively. Only 1.8% of the patients had blood tests done before current consultation. Conclusion: This study results raise question whether certain investigations such as EEG and CT head were carried out excessively and blood investigations were done infrequently. Further studies on larger samples with prospective study design to evaluate the appropriateness of current practices of carrying out investigations in patients presenting with psychiatric symptoms are required. PMID:27385852

  6. Investigating the dopaminergic synapse in vivo. I. Molecular imaging studies in humans.

    PubMed

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Antke, Christina; Kley, Konstantin; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Hautzel, Hubertus; Schmidt, Daniela; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm

    2007-01-01

    Dopaminergic synaptic function may be assessed either at the presynaptic terminal or at the postsynaptic binding sites using molecular in vivo imaging methods. Apart from the density of binding sites, parameters such as alterations in dopamine synthesis, dopamine storage or dopamine release can be quantified either by application of specific radiotracers or by assessing the competition between the exogenous radioligand and endogenous dopamine. Investigations of humans in both clinical and experimental settings have yielded evidence that disturbances of dopaminergic function may be associated with numerous neurological and psychiatric conditions, among which are movement disorders, schizophrenia, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and drug abuse. This article gives an overview of those studies, which so far have been performed on dopaminergic neurotransmission in humans using in vivo imaging methods. We focus on disease-related deficiencies within the functional entity of the dopaminergic synapse. Taken together, in vivo findings yield evidence of presynaptic dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease with decreases in striatal dopamine synthesis, dopamine storage, dopamine release and dopamine transporter binding. In contrast, 'Parkinson plus' syndromes (multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, dementia with Lewy bodies) are characterized by both pre- and postsynaptic deficiencies with reductions in striatal dopamine synthesis, dopamine storage, dopamine release, and dopamine transporter, as well as D, and D, receptor binding. In patients with Huntington's disease, postsynaptic dysfunctions with reductions of striatal D1 and D2 receptor binding have become apparent, whereas attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder is mainly characterized by presynaptic deficits with increases in dopamine transporter binding. Interestingly, findings are also consistent with respect to drug abuse: cocaine, amphetamine

  7. An Investigation of Teacher Candidates' Metagocnitive Skills According to Their Year of Study at Canakkale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çetin,Baris

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the differences in teacher candidates' metacognitive skills analyzed according to the year of study in their undergraduate program they were in. The research methodology in the study was survey. Among survey types, the cross-sectional design was used. The sample of the study included a total of…

  8. Investigation of a Particle into Liquid Sampler to Study the Formation & Ageing of Secondary Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, K. L.; Hamilton, J. F.; Rickard, A. R.; Bloss, W. J.; Alam, M. S.; Camredon, M.; Munoz, A.; Vazquez, M.; Rodenas, M.; Vera, T.; Borrás, E.

    2012-12-01

    The atmospheric oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx results in the formation of tropospheric ozone and Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) [Hallquist et al., 2009]. Whilst SOA is known to affect both climate and human health, the VOC oxidation pathways leading to SOA formation are poorly understood [Solomon et al., 2007]. This is in part due to the vast number and the low concentration of SOA species present in the ambient atmosphere. It has been estimated as many as 10,000 to 100,000 VOCs have been detected in the atmosphere, all of which can undergo photo-chemical oxidation and contribute to SOA formation [Goldstein and Galbally, 2007]. Atmospheric simulation chambers such as the EUropean PHOtoREactor (EUPHORE) in Valencia, Spain, are often used to study SOA formation from a single VOC precursor under controlled conditions. SOA composition and formation can be studied using online techniques such as Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS), which provide high time resolution but limited structural information [Zhang et al., 2007]. Offline techniques, such as collection onto filters, extraction and subsequent analysis, provide detailed SOA composition but only usually one or two samples per experiment. In this work we report time resolved SOA composition analysis using a Particle into Liquid Sampler (PILS) followed by Liquid Chromatography Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometry (LC-IT-MS/MS) and Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS/MS). Experiments were performed at EUPHORE investigating the formation and composition of Methyl Chavicol SOA. Methyl Chavicol (also known as Estragole) was identified as the highest floral emission from an oil palm plantation in Malaysian Borneo and has also been observed in US pine forests [Bouvier-Brown et al., 2009; Misztal et al., 2010]. Previous studies indicate a high SOA yield from Methyl Chavicol at around 40 % [Lee et al., 2006], however currently there have been very few literature

  9. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements, standard operating procedures, and a contingency plan that conforms with 29 CFR 1910... with 28 CFR 50.7. (d) Remedial investigation. (1) The purpose of the remedial investigation (RI) is to... characteristics of the site, including important surface features, soils, geology, hydrogeology, meteorology,...

  10. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements, standard operating procedures, and a contingency plan that conforms with 29 CFR 1910... with 28 CFR 50.7. (d) Remedial investigation. (1) The purpose of the remedial investigation (RI) is to... characteristics of the site, including important surface features, soils, geology, hydrogeology, meteorology,...

  11. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surveillance requirements, standard operating procedures, and a contingency plan that conforms with 29 CFR 1910... with 28 CFR 50.7. (d) Remedial investigation. (1) The purpose of the remedial investigation (RI) is to... characteristics of the site, including important surface features, soils, geology, hydrogeology, meteorology,...

  12. Seniors Falls Investigative Methodology (SFIM): A Systems Approach to the Study of Falls in Seniors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zecevic, Aleksandra A.; Salmoni, Alan W.; Lewko, John H.; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

    2007-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of human factors and human error is lacking in current research on seniors' falls. Additional knowledge is needed to understand why seniors are falling. The purpose of this article is to describe the adapting of the Integrated Safety Investigation Methodology (ISIM) (used for investigating transportation and industrial…

  13. 40 CFR 300.430 - Remedial investigation/feasibility study and selection of remedy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... substances, pollutants, or contaminants. Institutional controls may be used during the conduct of the...: (i) The field sampling plan, which describes the number, type, and location of samples and the type... with 28 CFR 50.7. (d) Remedial investigation. (1) The purpose of the remedial investigation......

  14. Prospective study investigating transplacental transmission of equine piroplasmosis in thoroughbred foals in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Sant, Candice; d'Abadie, Roger; Pargass, Indira; Basu, Asoke K; Asgarali, Zinora; Charles, Roxanne A; Georges, Karla C

    2016-08-15

    Equine piroplasmosis caused by Theileria equi and Babesia caballi is endemic in Trinidad and Tobago. Transmission occurs by ticks of the family Ixodidae. T. equi can also be transmitted transplacentally; however transplacental transmission of B. caballi is unknown. This study aims to investigate transplacental transmission of equine piroplasmosis from thoroughbred mares naturally infected via the tick vector. Whole blood and serum samples were collected from 117 mares in the fifth month of pregnancy. Blood samples were also collected from each of their foals (89 in total) within the first 36h of birth. Additionally, all foals were observed for clinical signs within 30days post - partum. All samples were examined microscopically for intra-erythrocytic piroplasms. Serum ELISA tests and PCR analysis on whole blood were performed to determine the presence of T. equi and B. caballi. Thirty-four (30.6%) mares and 14 (15.7%) of their foals were seropositive for T. equi. Twenty-seven (24.3%) mares were positive for T. equi by conventional (c) PCR. Real time (q) PCR analysis based on the ema - 1 gene revealed that seven (8%) foals were positive for T. equi. Eighty-nine (76.1%) mares and 38 (42.7%) foals were seropositive for B. caballi. Four (3.4%) mares were positive for B. caballi by cPCR. Three out of the four cPCR positive mares either had resorptions, or stillbirths for that pregnancy. From this study, there is strong evidence that transplacental transmission of B. caballi can occur leading to foetal losses. Six foals (7%) were positive for B. caballi by qPCR. Of these six, four were born to B. caballi seropositive mares. In this study a foal born of a T. equi seropositive mare was 55.7 times more likely to be serologically positive for T. equi than a foal born to a T. equi seronegative mare. Similarly a foal born of a B. caballi seropositive mare was 39.4 times more likely to be serologically positive for B. caballi than a foal born to a mare that was serologically

  15. Remedial investigation/feasibility study badger army ammunition plant Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 3. Feasibility study report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This Feasibility Study (FS) report for the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) in Baraboo, Wisconsin, was prepared by ABB Environmental Services, Inc. (ABB-ES) as a component of Task Order 1 of Contract DAAAl5-91-D-OOO8 with the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC). This report uses the results presented in the Final Remedial Investigation (RI) report (ABB-ES, 1993a) to develop and screen alternatives for remediation of contaminated media at BAAP. The purpose of this FS report is to develop, screen, and evaluate site-specific remedial alternatives to mitigate the impact of site-derived chemicals and ultimately provide protection of human health and the environment. Preferred alternatives for each site are included in this report. Based on previous environmental studies at BAAP, 11 potential hazardous waste sites were ranked according to potential contributions of hazardous chemicals to the environment. These sites were designated as Waste Management Areas because some of the sites contain multiple Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs). The sites selected to undergo facility assessment and corrective actions are: the Propellant Burning Ground (including Landfill), Deterrent Burning Ground, existing Landfill, Settling Ponds and Spoils Disposal Area, Rocket Paste Area, Oleum Plant and Oleum Plant Pond, Nitroglycerine Pond, old Acid Area, new Acid Area, and Ballistics Pond. The USAEC added an 11th site, the Old Fuel Oil Tank, to the list in October 1989 after discovery of fuel-contaminated soils during excavation of a water line in the vicinity of the old fuel oil tank foundation.

  16. Investigating ethnic inequalities in the incidence of sexually transmitted infections: mathematical modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, K; Garnett, G; Ghani, A; Sterne, J; Low, N

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate ethnic differences in rates of gonorrhoea using empirical sexual behaviour data in a simple mathematical model. To explore the impact of different intervention strategies in this simulated population. Methods: The findings from cross sectional studies of gonorrhoea rates and sexual behaviour in three ethnic groups in south east London were used to determine the parameters for a deterministic, mathematical model of gonorrhoea transmission dynamics, in a population stratified by sex, sexual activity (rate of partner change), and ethnic group (white, black African, and black Caribbean). We compared predicted and observed rates of infection and simulated the effects of targeted and population-wide intervention strategies. Results: In model simulations the reported sexual behaviours and mixing patterns generated major differences in the rates of gonorrhoea experienced by each subpopulation. The fit of the model to observed data was sensitive to assumptions about the degree of mixing by level of sexual activity, the numbers of sexual partnerships reported by men and women, and the degree to which observed data underestimate female infection rates. Interventions to reduce duration of infection were most effective when targeted at black Caribbeans. Conclusions: Average measures of sexual behaviour in large populations are inadequate descriptors for the epidemiology of gonorrhoea. The consistency between the model results and empirical data shows that profound differences in gonorrhoea rates between ethnic groups can be explained by modest differences in a limited number of sexual behaviours and mixing patterns. Targeting effective services to particular ethnic groups can have a disproportionate influence on disease reduction in the whole community. PMID:15459406

  17. Investigation of ionospheric effects on SAR Interferometry (InSAR): A case study of Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wu; Ding, Xiao-Li; Jung, Hyung-Sup; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Bo-Chen; Qu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has demonstrated its potential for high-density spatial mapping of ground displacement associated with earthquakes, volcanoes, and other geologic processes. However, this technique may be affected by the ionosphere, which can result in the distortions of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, phases, and polarization. Moreover, ionospheric effect has become and is becoming further significant with the increasing interest in low-frequency SAR systems, limiting the further development of InSAR technique. Although some research has been carried out, thorough analysis of ionospheric influence on true SAR imagery is still limited. Based on this background, this study performs a thorough investigation of ionospheric effect on InSAR through processing L-band ALOS-1/PALSAR-1 images and dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) data over Hong Kong, where the phenomenon of ionospheric irregularities often occurs. The result shows that the small-scale ionospheric irregularities can cause the azimuth pixel shifts and phase advance errors on interferograms. Meanwhile, it is found that these two effects result in the stripe-shaped features in InSAR images. The direction of the stripe-shaped effects keep approximately constant in space for our InSAR dataset. Moreover, the GPS-derived rate of total electron content change index (ROTI), an index to reflect the level of ionospheric disturbances, may be a useful indicator for predicting the ionospheric effect for SAR images. This finding can help us evaluate the quality of SAR images when considering the ionospheric effect.

  18. Investigating the provenance of thermal groundwater using compositional multivariate statistical analysis: a hydrogeochemical study from Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Sarah; Henry, Tiernan; Murray, John; Flood, Rory; Muller, Mark R.; Jones, Alan G.; Rath, Volker

    2016-04-01

    The geothermal energy of thermal groundwater is currently being exploited for district-scale heating in many locations world-wide. The chemical compositions of these thermal waters reflect the provenance and hydrothermal circulation patterns of the groundwater, which are controlled by recharge, rock type and geological structure. Exploring the provenance of these waters using multivariate statistical analysis (MSA) techniques increases our understanding of the hydrothermal circulation systems, and provides a reliable tool for assessing these resources. Hydrochemical data from thermal springs situated in the Carboniferous Dublin Basin in east-central Ireland were explored using MSA, including hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), to investigate the source aquifers of the thermal groundwaters. To take into account the compositional nature of the hydrochemical data, compositional data analysis (CoDa) techniques were used to process the data prior to the MSA. The results of the MSA were examined alongside detailed time-lapse temperature measurements from several of the springs, and indicate the influence of three important hydrogeological processes on the hydrochemistry of the thermal waters: 1) increased salinity due to evaporite dissolution and increased water-rock-interaction; 2) dissolution of carbonates; and 3) dissolution of metal sulfides and oxides associated with mineral deposits. The use of MSA within the CoDa framework identified subtle temporal variations in the hydrochemistry of the thermal springs, which could not be identified with more traditional graphing methods (e.g., Piper diagrams), or with a standard statistical approach. The MSA was successful in distinguishing different geological settings and different annual behaviours within the group of springs. This study demonstrates the usefulness of the application of MSA within the CoDa framework in order to better understand the underlying controlling processes

  19. Investigating Inhibitory Control in Children with Epilepsy: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Regina L.; Velanova, Katerina; Luna, Beatriz; Padmanabhan, Aarthi; Gaillard, William D.; Asato, Miya R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective Deficits in executive function are increasingly noted in children with epilepsy and have been associated with poor academic and psychosocial outcomes. Impaired inhibitory control contributes to executive dysfunction in children with epilepsy; however, its neuroanatomic basis has not yet been investigated. We used functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to probe the integrity of activation in brain regions underlying inhibitory control in children with epilepsy. Methods This cross-sectional study consisted of 34 children aged 8 to 17 years: 17 with well-controlled epilepsy and 17 age-and sex-matched controls. Participants performed the antisaccade (AS) task, representative of inhibitory control, during fMRI scanning. We compared AS performance during neutral and reward task conditions and evaluated task-related blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activation. Results Children with epilepsy demonstrated impaired AS performance compared to controls during both neutral (non-reward) and reward trials, but exhibited significant task improvement during reward trials. Post-hoc analysis revealed that younger patients made more errors than older patients and all controls. fMRI results showed preserved activation in task-relevant regions in patients and controls, with the exception of increased activation in the left posterior cingulate gyrus in patients specifically with generalized epilepsy across neutral and reward trials. Significance Despite impaired inhibitory control, children with epilepsy accessed typical neural pathways as did their peers without epilepsy. Children with epilepsy showed improved behavioral performance in response to the reward condition, suggesting potential benefits of the use of incentives in cognitive remediation. PMID:25223606

  20. A phase II study of an investigational tetravalent influenza vaccine formulation combining MF59®

    PubMed Central

    Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; von Sonnenburg, Frank; Nothdurft, Hans Dieter; Perona, Pamela; Borkowski, Astrid; Fragapane, Elena; Nicolay, Uwe; Clemens, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    An investigational tetravalent vaccine combining pre-pandemic, MF59®-adjuvanted A/H5N1 vaccine with non-adjuvanted, trivalent, seasonal influenza vaccine has been developed, which has the potential to be used for pre-pandemic priming and to improve levels of compliance and coverage. It is important to determine whether the safety and immunogenicity of the combination vaccine is equivalent to that of the two separate vaccines when administered concomitantly. Healthy adults (n = 601) were randomly assigned to three vaccination groups to receive either: (1) tetravalent vaccine and placebo concomitantly (in separate arms) on Day 1, followed by A/H5N1 vaccine on Day 22; (2) A/H5N1 vaccine and placebo concomitantly on Day 1, followed by tetravalent vaccine on Day 22; or (3) A/H5N1 and seasonal vaccines concomitantly on Day 1, followed by A/H5N1 vaccine on Day 22. Antibody responses were measured using single radial hemolysis (SRH), haemagglutination inhibition (HI), and microneutralization (MN) assays on Days 1, 22, and 43. Solicited adverse reactions were recorded for seven days after vaccination. Spontaneous adverse events were recorded throughout the study. The tetravalent vaccine elicited antibody titers equivalent to those for separate A/H5N1 and seasonal vaccines, and sufficient to meet the European licensure criteria against A/H5N1 and all three seasonal strains. Local and systemic reactions were mainly mild to moderate. No vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. These findings demonstrate that MF59-adjuvanted A/H5N1 and seasonal influenza vaccines had an acceptable safety profile and could be effectively administered as a tetravalent formulation, supporting the possibility of integrating pre-pandemic priming into seasonal influenza vaccination programs. PMID:24047817

  1. Feasibility Study of Ex Ovo Chick Chorioallantoic Artery Model for Investigating Pulsatile Variation of Arterial Geometry.

    PubMed

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Kim, Juho; Ra, Gicheol; Lee, Chong Hyun; Paeng, Dong-Guk

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable research efforts on the relationship between arterial geometry and cardiovascular pathology, information is lacking on the pulsatile geometrical variation caused by arterial distensibility and cardiomotility because of the lack of suitable in vivo experimental models and the methodological difficulties in examining the arterial dynamics. We aimed to investigate the feasibility of using a chick embryo system as an experimental model for basic research on the pulsatile variation of arterial geometry. Optical microscope video images of various arterial shapes in chick chorioallantoic circulation were recorded from different locations and different embryo samples. The high optical transparency of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) allowed clear observation of tiny vessels and their movements. Systolic and diastolic changes in arterial geometry were visualized by detecting the wall boundaries from binary images. Several to hundreds of microns of wall displacement variations were recognized during a pulsatile cycle. The spatial maps of the wall motion harmonics and magnitude ratio of harmonic components were obtained by analyzing the temporal brightness variation at each pixel in sequential grayscale images using spectral analysis techniques. The local variations in the spectral characteristics of the arterial wall motion were reflected well in the analysis results. In addition, mapping the phase angle of the fundamental frequency identified the regional variations in the wall motion directivity and phase shift. Regional variations in wall motion phase angle and fundamental-to-second harmonic ratio were remarkable near the bifurcation area. In summary, wall motion in various arterial geometry including straight, curved and bifurcated shapes was well observed in the CAM artery model, and their local and cyclic variations could be characterized by Fourier and wavelet transforms of the acquired video images. The CAM artery model with the spectral

  2. Conducting subsurface soil and groundwater radiological investigations: a case study from the University of Rochester.

    PubMed

    Karam, P A

    2001-08-01

    The University of Rochester performed subsurface soil and groundwater radiological assessments in the vicinity of a research building to investigate for contamination from possible past releases of licensed radioactive materials. During the course of this investigation, our contractors developed candidate well drilling and sampling plans. The University of Rochester selected one of these plans, which was subsequently modified due to unexpected costs associated with the local geology. This paper describes the factors that were considered during the development and implementation of the drilling and sampling plan, as well as other considerations and concepts that are inherent in many environmental investigations.

  3. Investigation of Inquiry-based Science Pedagogy among Middle Level Science Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Sunny Minelli

    This study implemented a qualitative approach to examine the phenomenon of "inquiry-based science pedagogy or inquiry instruction" as it has been experienced by individuals. Data was collected through online open-ended surveys, focus groups, and teacher reported self-reflections to answer the research questions: 1) How do middle level science teachers conceptualize "inquiry-based instruction?" 2) What are preferred instructional strategies for implementation in middle level science classrooms? And 3) How do middle level science teachers perceive the connection between science instruction and student learning? The participants within this research study represent 33 percent of teachers in grades 5 through 9 within six school districts in northeastern Pennsylvania. Of the 12 consent forms originally obtained, 10 teachers completed all three phases of the data collection, including the online survey, participation in focus groups, and teacher self-reflection. 60 percent of the participants taught only science, and 40 percent taught all content areas. Of the ten participants, 50 percent were certified teachers of science and 50 percent were certified as teachers of elementary education. 70 percent of the research participants reflected having obtained a master's, with 60 percent of these degrees being received in areas of education, and 10 percent in the area of science. The research participants have a total of 85 collective years of experience as professional educators, with the average years of experience being 8.5 years. Analysis of data revealed three themes related to research question #1) How do middle-level science teachers conceptualize inquiry-based instruction? and sub-question #1) How do middle-level science teachers characterize effective instruction? The themes that capture the essence of teachers' formulation of inquiry-based instruction that emerged in this study were student centered, problem solving, and hands-on . Analysis of data revealed one theme

  4. Investigating Predictors of Visiting, Using, and Revisiting an Online Health-Communication Program: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Crutzen, Rik; De Vries, Hein

    2010-01-01

    Background Online health communication has the potential to reach large audiences, with the additional advantages that it can be operational at all times and that the costs per visitor are low. Furthermore, research shows that Internet-delivered interventions can be effective in changing health behaviors. However, exposure to Internet-delivered health-communication programs is generally low. Research investigating predictors of exposure is needed to be able to effectively disseminate online interventions. Objective In the present study, the authors used a longitudinal design with the aim of identifying demographic, psychological, and behavioral predictors of visiting, using, and revisiting an online program promoting physical activity in the general population. Methods A webpage was created providing the public with information about health and healthy behavior. The website included a “physical activity check,” which consisted of a physical activity computer-tailoring expert system where visitors could check whether their physical activity levels were in line with recommendations. Visitors who consented to participate in the present study (n = 489) filled in a questionnaire that assessed demographics, mode of recruitment, current physical activity levels, and health motivation. Immediately after, participants received tailored feedback concerning their current physical activity levels and completed a questionnaire assessing affective and cognitive user experience, attitude toward being sufficiently physically active, and intention to be sufficiently physically active. Three months later, participants received an email inviting them once more to check whether their physical activity level had changed. Results Analyses of visiting showed that more women (67.5%) than men (32.5%) visited the program. With regard to continued use, native Dutch participants (odds ratio [OR] = 2.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.16-6.81, P = .02) and participants with a strong

  5. [A study on relapse of schizophrenic patients--10-year-follow-up investigation after initial admission].

    PubMed

    Uchida, S

    1996-01-01

    Ten year prognosis of schizophrenic patients after their initial admission was studied. The subjects of the present investigation were 106 schizophrenic patients who fulfilled the criteria for schizophrenia of DSM-III-R and were initially admitted to a hospital between January 1979 and December 1984. They were classified into following five groups: 1) a discontinuing group (39 patients who could not be followed up because of changing the hospital or ceasing outpatient treatment), 2) an unrelapsing group (29 patients who had no relapse in continuing medication), 3) an A group (13 patients who relapsed in spite of continuing medication), 4) a B group (22 patients who relapsed only after discontinuing medication), and 5) a C group (3 patients who relapsed in continuing medication as well as after discontinuing medication). These groups were compared in multiple domains such as age at onset, age on initial admission, duration from onset to initial admission, etc. The average age at onset was significantly older in the unrelapsing group (29.0 years) than in the A group (22.1 years) (p < 0.05). The average age on initial admission was significantly older in the unrelapsing group (35.2 years) than in the A group (25.0 years) (p < 0.01). Furthermore the average duration from onset to initial admission was significantly longer in the unrelapsing group (70.9 months) than in the A group (23.8 months) (p < 0.05). Assuming theoretical groups considered in points of tendency of relapse and the effect of neuroleptics on the prevention in each patient, as well as theoretical subgroups considered in points of biological pathology and nonbiological pathology as factors of relapse, the following two subgroups were abstracted from the groups of this study: a subgroup with a high effect of medication on the prevention of relapse and the other with a low effect. There were significant differences in the average age at onset, age on initial admission, duration from onset to initial

  6. Children with Disabilities in the Child Protective Services System: An Analog Study of Investigation and Case Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manders, Jeanette E.; Stoneman, Zolinda

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The study used a series of vignettes to investigate how the presence of three disabilities (cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, emotional/behavioral disabilities) affects the processes and outcomes of child abuse investigations at two levels of child injury severity (moderate, severe). Method: Seventy-five CPS case workers…

  7. Differences between High and Low Academic Achieving University Students in Learning and Study Strategies: A Further Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Michael C. W.

    2009-01-01

    Following up on the general framework of the research study of Yip (2007), this article sets out a similar research question, investigating the differences between high and low academic achieving Hong Kong university students based on their different learning and study strategies. In this study, we recruited 100 university students who pursued…

  8. Helping Students Soar to Success on Computers: An Investigation of the Soar Study Method for Computer-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jairam, Dharmananda; Kiewra, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    This study used self-report and observation techniques to investigate how students study computer-based materials. In addition, it examined if a study method called SOAR can facilitate computer-based learning. SOAR is an acronym that stands for the method's 4 theoretically driven and empirically supported components: select (S), organize (O),…

  9. Investigating the Unit of Study Approach as a Way to Teach Writing to Early Childhood Education Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchelor, Katherine E.; Morgan, Denise N.; Kidder-Brown, Melanie K.; Zimmerman, Belinda S.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand the learning opportunities within a university writing methods course centering on a unit of study experience. Specifically, we wanted to investigate what early childhood education preservice teachers (PSTs) learn about poetry and the writing process when engaged in a poetry unit of study. Our…

  10. Investigating the Effect of Academic Procrastination on the Frequency and Variety of Academic Misconduct: A Panel Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patrzek, Justine; Sattler, Sebastian; van Veen, Floris; Grunschel, Carola; Fries, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In prior studies, academic procrastination has been discussed as an influencing factor of academic misconduct. However, empirical studies were conducted solely cross-sectionally and investigated only a few forms of academic misconduct. This large scale web-based study examined the responses of between 1359 and 2207 participants from different…

  11. A planning study investigating dual-gated volumetric arc stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Supple, Jeremy; Siva, Shankar

    2015-04-01

    This is a planning study investigating the dosimetric advantages of gated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the end-exhale and end-inhale breathing phases for patients undergoing stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma. VMAT plans were developed from the end-inhale (VMATinh) and the end-exhale (VMATexh) phases of the breathing cycle as well as a VMAT plan and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy plan based on an internal target volume (ITV) (VMATitv). An additional VMAT plan was created by giving the respective gated VMAT plan a 50% weighting and summing the inhale and exhale plans together to create a summed gated plan. Dose to organs at risk (OARs) as well as comparison of intermediate and low-dose conformity was evaluated. There was no difference in the volume of healthy tissue receiving the prescribed dose for the planned target volume (PTV) (CI100%) for all the VMAT plans; however, the mean volume of healthy tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose for the PTV (CI50%) values were 4.7 (± 0.2), 4.6 (± 0.2), and 4.7 (± 0.6) for the VMATitv, VMATinh, and VMATexh plans, respectively. The VMAT plans based on the exhale and inhale breathing phases showed a 4.8% and 2.4% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel, respectively, compared with that of the ITV-based VMAT plan. The summed gated VMAT plans showed a 6.2% reduction in dose to 30 cm{sup 3} of the small bowel compared with that of the VMAT plans based on the ITV. Additionally, when compared with the inhale and the exhale VMAT plans, a 4% and 1.5%, respectively, reduction was observed. Gating VMAT was able to reduce the amount of prescribed, intermediate, and integral dose to healthy tissue when compared with VMAT plans based on an ITV. When summing the inhale and exhale plans together, dose to healthy tissue and OARs was optimized. However, gating VMAT plans would take longer to treat and is a factor that needs to be considered.

  12. Biodiversity of European grasslands - gradient studies to investigate impacts of atmospheric nitrogen deposition on grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, C. J.; Gowing, D. J.

    2009-04-01

    Experiments have suggested that reactive nitrogen deposition may reduce species richness in plant communities. However, until recently there was no clear evidence that regional air pollution was actually reducing biodiversity on a regional scale.. An extensive field survey of acidic grasslands along a gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition in the UK showed a dramatic decline in plant-species richness with increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition [1, 2]. Changes in soil chemistry were also observed [3]. Combining the results of this gradient study with experimental manipulations allowed us to estimate the timescale of the observed change in species richness. The BEGIN project (Biodiversity of European Grasslands - the Impact of Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition) is a collaborative EUROCORES project between The Open University (UK), Manchester Metropolitan University (UK), Bordeaux University (France), Utrecht University (The Netherlands) and The University of Bremen (Germany). This project builds on the results collected in the UK survey to investigate changes in species richness further. In addition to the 68 acid grasslands already surveyed in the UK, the BEGIN project has surveyed 70 acidic grassland sites throughout the Atlantic biogeographic region of Europe. At each site, data were collected on species composition, soil chemistry and plant-tissue chemistry. This data set is being combined with a field experiment replicated across three grasslands (Norway, Wales and Aquitaine) of the same community and an analysis of historical changes in species composition. Surveys have also been conducted in a contrasting grassland system; calcareous grasslands belonging to the Mesobromion alliance. Initial results of the BEGIN project will be presented, demonstrating declines in species richness and changes in species composition across the Atlantic Biogeographic Zone of Europe during the last 70 years that can be related to nitrogen deposition. We will also report

  13. A planning study investigating dual-gated volumetric arc stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Kron, Tomas; Foroudi, Farshad; Supple, Jeremy; Siva, Shankar

    2015-01-01

    This is a planning study investigating the dosimetric advantages of gated volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the end-exhale and end-inhale breathing phases for patients undergoing stereotactic treatment of primary renal cell carcinoma. VMAT plans were developed from the end-inhale (VMATinh) and the end-exhale (VMATexh) phases of the breathing cycle as well as a VMAT plan and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy plan based on an internal target volume (ITV) (VMATitv). An additional VMAT plan was created by giving the respective gated VMAT plan a 50% weighting and summing the inhale and exhale plans together to create a summed gated plan. Dose to organs at risk (OARs) as well as comparison of intermediate and low-dose conformity was evaluated. There was no difference in the volume of healthy tissue receiving the prescribed dose for the planned target volume (PTV) (CI100%) for all the VMAT plans; however, the mean volume of healthy tissue receiving 50% of the prescribed dose for the PTV (CI50%) values were 4.7 (± 0.2), 4.6 (± 0.2), and 4.7 (± 0.6) for the VMATitv, VMATinh, and VMATexh plans, respectively. The VMAT plans based on the exhale and inhale breathing phases showed a 4.8% and 2.4% reduction in dose to 30cm(3) of the small bowel, respectively, compared with that of the ITV-based VMAT plan. The summed gated VMAT plans showed a 6.2% reduction in dose to 30cm(3) of the small bowel compared with that of the VMAT plans based on the ITV. Additionally, when compared with the inhale and the exhale VMAT plans, a 4% and 1.5%, respectively, reduction was observed. Gating VMAT was able to reduce the amount of prescribed, intermediate, and integral dose to healthy tissue when compared with VMAT plans based on an ITV. When summing the inhale and exhale plans together, dose to healthy tissue and OARs was optimized. However, gating VMAT plans would take longer to treat and is a factor that needs to be considered.

  14. AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    SMOOT JL

    2010-11-05

    (199-H3-2C, 199-H4-12C, and 199-H4-15CS) exhibit hexavalent chromium contamination in confined aquifer groundwater that may be the result of one of the mechanisms described above. The purpose of the aquifer testing was to gather data to help refine the conceptual model for the source of deep contamination, examine the potential hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined aquifer, evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined layer within the RUM, and indicate the extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in the RUM. The results of this study, in conjunction with the recent Hom area investigation (DOE/RL-2008-42, Hydrogeological Summary Report for 600 Area Between 100-D and 100-H for the 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit), suggest that the first hypothesis is the most reasonable explanation. The results indicate persistent chromium concentrations over the duration of the tests, suggesting a large-scale emplacement of chromium.

  15. Investigation of chronic diarrhoea in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A prospective study of 155 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Blanshard, C; Francis, N; Gazzard, B G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The optimum diagnostic investigation for patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and diarrhoea is not known. Often no pathogen is detected and it is unclear whether this is because pathogens are absent in some patients or the investigations used fail to detect them. The hypothesis that AIDS related diarrhoea is usually due to an infection, which can be identified by a simple diagnostic strategy based on the results of intensive investigation of a cohort of such patients, was investigated. METHODS: 155 patients with AIDS and chronic diarrhoea underwent contemporaneous examination of stools, duodenal, jejunal, and rectal biopsy specimens and duodenal aspirate for bacterial, protozoal, and viral pathogens. A decision tree analysis was used to determine the best sequential diagnostic strategy for clinicians. RESULTS: 128 of 155 patients investigated (83%) had at least one potential pathogen. The presenting clinical features could not predict the presence or site of the pathogens. Stool analysis identified the most pathogens (93 of 199, 47%). Rectal biopsy was essential for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus and adenovirus. Duodenal biopsy was as helpful as jejunal biopsy and detected some treatable pathogens missed by other methods. Electron microscopy, impression smears, and duodenal aspirate yielded little extra information. If gut biopsy was reserved for patients without a stool pathogen, some treatable pathogens would have been missed. CONCLUSION: Most patients with AIDS and chronic diarrhoea have at least one gut pathogen, which can be identified by stool analysis and light microscopic examination of duodenal and rectal biopsies. Some pathogens will be missed unless all these investigations are done on all such patients. PMID:9038664

  16. Report of an Investigation: A Study of Student Protest-Suggestions for University Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Education Association, Washington, DC.

    This document reports the National Education Association (NEA) investigation of the student protests at Southern University, Baton Rouge in 1971. Sections I and II indicate the chronology of the conflict and the initiation, procedures, and scope of the NEA hearings and follow-up interviews on the University campus. In section V the NEA…

  17. A Case Study Investigating an Initiative Seeking to Increase Collaboration in Learning among University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivett, Stanley W.

    2012-01-01

    Many established theoretical reasons exist for pursuing student centered learning. However, the investigation of student centered classrooms is often based in the observation of classroom experiences rather than interviewing the individuals involved. Therefore, local knowledge of lived experiences with student centered learning practices like…

  18. Case Study Investigation of a Videoconferencing Experiment in Primary Schools, Teaching Modern Foreign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchard, Alan; Hunt, Marilyn; Barnes, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The "MustLearnIT" European-funded research project with partners in Greece, Poland, Cyprus, Finland and the UK aimed to investigate ways of teaching and learning modern foreign languages (MFL) to early learners in small/remote primary schools where there were no specialist MFL teachers. This was to be carried out through new technologies such as…

  19. INVESTIGATION OF HYDROGEOLOGIC MAPPING TO DELINEATE PROTECTION ZONES AROUND SPRINGS: REPORT OF TWO CASE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods commonly used to delineate protection zones for water-supply wells are often not directly applicable for springs. This investigation focuses on the use of hydrogeologic mapping methods to identify physical and hydrologic features that control ground-water flow to springs...

  20. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study, exhibit C. Volume 6: In-depth element investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, G.

    1979-01-01

    Computer assisted design of a gallium arsenide solid state dc-to-RF converter with supportive fabrication data was investigated. Specific tasks performed include: computer program checkout; amplifier comparisons; computer design analysis of GaSa solar cells; and GaAs diode evaluation. Results obtained in the design and evaluation of transistors for the microwave space power system are presented.

  1. Investigating the Role of Cultural Capital and Organisational Habitus in Architectural Education: A Case Study Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Jennifer Chamberlin

    2015-01-01

    Compared to other professions in recent years, architecture has lagged woefully behind in attracting and retaining a diverse population, as defined by class, race and gender. This research investigates the extent to which architecture culturally reproduces itself, specifically examining the socialisation process of students into the subculture of…

  2. Remedial investigation and feasibility study for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Taffet, M.J. ); Oberdorfer, J.A. ); McIlvride, W.A. )

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results and conclusions of the investigation of tritium and other compounds in ground water in the vicinity of landfills at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. 91 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  3. A Study of Teacher Candidates' Experiences Investigating Global Climate Change within an Elementary Science Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hestness, Emily; McGinnis, J. Randy; Riedinger, Kelly; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the inclusion of a curricular module on global climate change in an Elementary Science Methods course. Using complementary research methods, we analyzed findings from 63 teacher candidates' drawings, questionnaires, and journal entries collected throughout their participation in the module. We highlighted three focal cases to…

  4. Investigation of Bias in Job Evaluation Ratings of Comparable Worth Study Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount, Michael K.; Ellis, Rebecca A.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated the effects of knowledge of current pay levels and perceived job gender on subsequent job evaluations. Confirmed the hypothesis that jobs with high pay levels would receive higher evaluations than jobs with low pay levels. Found evidence of a pro-female bias in the job evaluation ratings of 53 job evaluators. (Author/ABB)

  5. Investigating Organizational Culture Perception of Students Studying in School of Physical Education and Sports in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutlu, T. Osman

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine organisational culture of the students studying in School of Physical Education and Sports (SPES) in Turkey. The study group of the research is composed of 216 students studying in the third and fourth year of Physical Education and Sports Teaching, Sports Administration, Coaching Education and Recreation…

  6. The "RG Sausage's" Missing Ingredients: Investigating the Validity of Reliability Generalization Study Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romano, Jeanine; Kromrey, Jeffrey D.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the potential impact of selected methodological factors on the validity of conclusions from reliability generalization (RG) studies. The study focused on four factors; (1) missing data in the primary studies; (2) transformation of sample reliability estimates; (3) use of sample weights for estimating mean…

  7. Imaging techniques in digital forensic investigation: a study using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Godfried

    2006-09-01

    Imaging techniques have been applied to a number of applications, such as translation and classification problems in medicine and defence. This paper examines the application of imaging techniques in digital forensics investigation using neural networks. A review of applications of digital image processing is presented, whiles a Pedagogical analysis of computer forensics is also highlighted. A data set describing selected images in different forms are used in the simulation and experimentation.

  8. Investigating How and What Prospective Teachers Learn through Microteaching Lesson Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Maria Lorelei

    2010-01-01

    Microteaching Lesson Study [MLS] combines elements of Japanese lesson study and microteaching. A case study of MLS was conducted with 18 prospective teachers in an initial course on learning to teach. Various data sources (i.e., pre- and post-lesson plans, MLS lesson plans, videotaped lessons, transcripts of group discussions, observation field…

  9. A Curriculum Activities Guide to Watershed Investigations and Environmental Studies, Volume 6. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gail, Peter A.; And Others

    This curriculum activities guide provides the teacher with a model for a comprehensive program in watershed studies. With increased concern over water pollution, a study of the watershed is important to complete an understanding of water drainage problems. This guide includes a rationale for the study of watersheds and develops methods of…

  10. Investigating Religion and Computing: A Case for Using Standpoint Theory in Technology Evaluation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyche, Susan Porter

    2010-01-01

    This research focuses on the development and study of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) that support religious practices and the use of standpoint theory in ICT evaluation studies. Three phases makeup this work: formative studies to understand how megachurches, their members and leaders use ICT in ways tied to their Protestant…

  11. Do Learning and Study Skills Affect Academic Performance?--An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Richard; MacKewn, Angie; Moser, Ernest; VanVuren, Ken W.

    2012-01-01

    Universities and colleges are very interested in understanding the factors that influence their students' academic performance. This paper describes a study that was conducted at a mid-sized public university in the mid-south, USA, to examine this issue. In this study, the 10-scale, Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) (Weinstein et…

  12. Blended Learning in Anatomy Education: A Study Investigating Medical Students' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ocak, Mehmet Akif; Topal, Arzu Deveci

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines levels of satisfaction and perceptions of the students taking the blended anatomy course in Turkish Higher Education System. 15 students selected from 213 medical students participated in the study. An interview form was designed to identify the views of the students about the present study. The interview results were…

  13. Investigating Lifelong Learning Dispositions of Students Studying English Language and Literature in Terms of Different Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elaldi, Senel

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to determine lifelong learning dispositions of English Language and Literature students in terms of gender, grade levels, and age variables. Descriptive research design was used. The study group consisted of 402 students studying English Language and Literature at Cumhuriyet University in Sivas, Turkey. Research data were collected…

  14. [Participation and support of clinical studies and other scientific investigations. Statement of the German Society for Pathology].

    PubMed

    Röcken, C; Höfler, H; Hummel, M; Meyermann, R; Zietz, C; Schirmacher, P

    2013-09-01

    Clinical studies and preclinical investigations are essential in order to test new therapies and diagnostics with the aim of sustained improvement in the treatment of patients. Fortunately, the number of clinical studies is continuously increasing and pathology and tissue-based research are included more often. The German Society for Pathology (DGP) and the pathologists it represents want to and can support this process and our clinical partners as best as possible as an equal partner. With our technologies and our specific expertise we can make a substantial contribution to the quality and the success of preclinical investigations, clinical studies and implementation of the results into clinical pathological diagnostics. In order to support this process the DGP has formulated a statement on the participation and support of clinical studies and other scientific investigations.

  15. Case Study: Investigating the Impact of the Child Development Associate Credentialing Process on Child Care Provider Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Vickie

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to investigate what impact the child development associate (CDA) credential has on the performance of childcare providers in the 6 CDA competency areas. Each participant was interviewed using 9 open-ended questions regarding their experience. Over the past few years, a number of studies have examined the effects…

  16. Investigating the Status of Tablet Computers and E-Books Use of Open Education Faculty Students: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koçak, Ömer; Yildirim, Önder; Kursun, Engin; Yildirim, Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    The increase in tablet computers and e-books use brings to mind the question of how users benefited from these technologies. In this sense, the present study investigated the status of students' tablet computers and e-books use and the reasons why students prefer to use and not use of tablet computers and e-books. Students' study habits while…

  17. Students Leaving the STEM Pipeline: An Investigation of Their Attitudes and the Influence of Significant Others on Their Study Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korpershoek, Hanke; Kuyper, Hans; Bosker, Roel; van der Werf, Greetje

    2013-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to investigate why some students do not continue in science-oriented studies in higher education despite that their previous career in secondary education proved that they were interested and suitably qualified to do so. We introduced a new approach to deal with these students' attitudes towards science,…

  18. An Investigation into How Female Teachers Manage Stress and Teacher Burnout: A Case Study of West Akim Municipality of Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addison, Asonaba Kofi; Yankyera, George

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate into how female teachers in Asamankese Circuit II in West Akim Municipality of Ghana Education Service manage stress and teacher burnout, and explore the causes, effects, and ways of improving work-related stress for better standard of education. The study was conducted with qualitative research…

  19. Barbiturate bearing aroylhydrazine derivatives: Synthesis, NMR investigations, single crystal X-ray studies and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giziroglu, Emrah; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Aygün, Muhittin; Basbulbul, Gamze; Soyleyici, H. Can; Firinci, Erkan; Kirkan, Bulent; Alkis, Ayse; Saylica, Tayfur; Biyik, Halil

    2016-03-01

    A series of barbituric acid aroylhydrazine derivatives have been prepared from their corresponding 1,3-dimethyl-5-acetyl barbituric acid and aroylhydrazines. All compounds have been fully characterized by using FT-IR, multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C) and Mass (MS) spectrometry. We also describe the X-ray crystal structure of 3a, which crystallizes in the monoclinic P21/n space group. The crystal structure is stabilized with infinite linear chains of dimeric units. Furthermore, all compounds were investigated for their tyrosinase inhibition, antioxidative and antimicrobial activies. The results from biological activity assays have shown that all of compounds have excellent antioxidant, significant tyrosinase inhibition and moderate antimicrobial activity.

  20. An Investigative Study on the Effects of Block Scheduling on Georgia High School Graduation Test Performance in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, Tracy Shea

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there was an effect on student performance on the Georgia High School Graduation Test Subtest-Social Studies (GHSGT-SS) depending on the type of instructional scheduling students received. There were no specific studies that observed any differences, but literature reviews concerning the traditional…

  1. Effect of Calcifications on Breast Ultrasound Shear Wave Elastography: An Investigational Study

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Adriana; Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Denis, Max; Bayat, Mahdi; Stan, Daniela L.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of macrocalcifications and clustered microcalcifications associated with benign breast masses on shear wave elastography (SWE). Methods SuperSonic Imagine (SSI) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on three sets of phantoms to investigate how calcifications of different sizes and distributions influence measured elasticity. To demonstrate the effect in vivo, three female patients with benign breast masses associated with mammographically-identified calcifications were evaluated by CUSE. Results Apparent maximum elasticity (Emax) estimates resulting from individual macrocalcifications (with diameters of 2mm, 3mm, 5mm, 6mm, 9mm, 11mm, and 15mm) showed values over 50 kPa for all cases, which represents more than 100% increase over background (~21kPa). We considered a 2cm-diameter circular region of interest for all phantom experiments. Mean elasticity (Emean) values varied from 26 kPa to 73 kPa, depending on the macrocalcification size. Highly dense clusters of microcalcifications showed higher Emax values than clusters of microcalcification with low concentrations, but the difference in Emean values was not significant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the presence of large isolated macrocalcifications and highly concentrated clusters of microcalcifications can introduce areas with apparent high elasticity in SWE. Considering that benign breast masses normally have significantly lower elasticity values than malignant tumors, such areas with high elasticity appearing due to presence of calcification in benign breast masses may lead to misdiagnosis. PMID:26368939

  2. Investigating hexameric helicases: Single-molecule studies of DnaB and T4 gp41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Omar; Ribeck, Noah; Berezney, John

    2011-03-01

    Hexameric, ring-shaped motor proteins serve as replicative helicases in many systems. They function by encircling and translocating along ssDNA, denaturing dsDNA in advance of its motion by sterically occluding the complementary strand to the outside of the ring. We investigate the helicase activity of two such motors using single-molecule measurements with magnetic tweezers. First, we measure the activity of the E. coli helicase DnaB complexed with the tau subunit of the Pol III holoenzyme. Tau is known from bulk measurements to stimulate DnaB activity (Kim et al., Cell, 1996); we investigate the means of this stimulation. Second, we measure helicase activity of the T4 phage helicase gp41 in multiple tethered DNA geometries. Previous work on DnaB showed a dependence of helicase activity on DNA geometry (Ribeck et al., Biophys. J., 2010); here, we test gp41 for similar behavior to see whether it is a common characteristic of hexameric helicases.

  3. Investigation of the Latent Structure for the Learning and Study Strategies Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finch, W. Holmes; Cassady, Jerrell C.; Jones, James A.

    2016-01-01

    The Learning and Study Strategies Inventory (LASSI) is a very popular tool for measuring the learning and study strategies of high school and college students. Prior research with the LASSI has supported the originally proposed model with three latent traits, with minor variations among the contributing subtests contributing to those traits.…

  4. Investigating Factors That Influence Students' Management of Study Environment in Online Collaborative Groupwork

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Jianxia; Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines empirical models of students' management of the learning environment in the context of online collaborative groupwork. Such environment management is an important component of students' overall self-regulated learning strategy for effective learning. Student- and group-level predictors for study environment management in…

  5. The Impact of Studying Abroad on Male Preservice Teachers: A Phenomenological Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGaha, Julie M.; Linder, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe changes in preservice teachers' perceptions of and attitudes regarding diversity following a semester-long study abroad experience. Phenomenological methods were used to analyze data collected from five male preservice teachers during a study abroad to Brussels, Belgium in the Fall of 2010. Changes in…

  6. A REPLICATIVE INVESTIGATION OF THE BUCKINGHAM-DOLCH FREE-ASSOCIATION WORD STUDY. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JACOBS, HUGH DONALD

    PUBLISHED CHILDREN'S VOCABULARY LISTS BASED ON ACTUAL USAGE ARE ALL DRAWN FROM RESEARCH DONE PRIOR TO 1930. THE PRESENT STUDY REPLICATED THE 1926 BUCKINGHAM-DOLCH STUDY TO DETERMINE ANY VOCABULARY CHANGES. THE 2 HYPOTHESES TESTED WERE (1) THERE IS NO SIGNIFICANT VOCABULARY SHIFT, AND (2) COMMON WORDS DID NOT DIFFER IN GRADE-PLACEMENT (THE EARLIEST…

  7. A Study Investigating Relationships between Elementary Principals' and Teachers' Self-Efficacy and Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domsch, Gayle D.

    2009-01-01

    In order to examine effective behaviors and efficacy, this study examined the relationships between the self-reflection of effective practices by principals and teachers, as assessed by self-efficacy scales, and student achievement, as evaluated by the state assessment program. Other studies determined that effective behaviors preceded and…

  8. Brain-Based Learning and Classroom Practice: A Study Investigating Instructional Methodologies of Urban School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Lajuana Trezette

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the implementation of brain-based instructional strategies by teachers serving at Title I elementary, middle, and high schools within the Memphis City School District. This study was designed to determine: (a) the extent to which Title I teachers applied brain-based strategies, (b) the differences in…

  9. An Investigation of Strategic Decision Making in Service Marketing through Case Study Development and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosetti, Joseph L.; Maceiko, Meghan

    2009-01-01

    Through the collaborative efforts of an undergraduate student and a professor of marketing, this paper focuses on a case study and corresponding teaching notes developed as a final component of an independent study in service marketing. The case utilizes the hospitality industry as the template for analysis of the appropriateness of marketing…

  10. A Sociocultural Investigation of Identity: How Students Navigate the Study Abroad Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gieser, James D.

    2015-01-01

    From the recruitment of international students and the establishment of cross-border research partnerships to study abroad programs, internationalization is viewed as a necessary means to prepare students for thoughtful action in a globalized world. In particular, studying abroad is regarded as a powerful vehicle for increasing students' global…

  11. Investigation of Social Studies Teachers' Intended Uses of Social Networks in Terms of Various Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akgün, Ismail Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine Social Studies teacher candidates' intended uses of social networks in terms of various variables. The research was carried out by using screening model of quantitative research methods. In the study, "The Social Network Intended Use Scale" was used as a data collection tool. As a result of the…

  12. Survey Study Investigating the Significance of Conference Participation to Undergraduate Research Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabrouk, Patricia Ann

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings of a survey study of undergraduate research (UR) students presenting their research at the fall 2007 and fall 2008 American Chemical Society (ACS) National Meetings. The purpose of the study is to probe the perceived benefits of conference participation to UR students. Results suggest that participation in…

  13. A Longitudinal Investigation of Project-Based Instruction and Student Achievement in High School Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Emily J.; Dickinson, Gail

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study focused on how project-based instruction (PBI) influenced secondary social studies students' academic achievement and promoted College and Career Readiness (CCR). We explored and compared student achievement in a PBI high school versus a traditional instruction high school within the same rural school district. While…

  14. A novel bi-layer ascending release osmotic pump tablet: in vitro investigation and in vivo investigation in pharmacokinetic study and IVIVC evaluation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heming; Li, Zhao; Pan, Hao; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Dandan; Tian, Baocheng; Ma, Shilin; Song, Shilong; Pan, Weisan

    2013-12-15

    This study was aimed to develop an ascending release push-pull osmotic pump (APOP) system with a novel mechanism and an easy manufacture process. Theoretical analysis showed that the key to obtain the non-zero order drug release was to break the balance between the drug suspension release rate in the drug layer and the swelling rate of the core, and an ascending drug release rate was achieved when the former was slower than the latter. A polymer (Polyox WSR N-12K) was introduced as a suspension agent in drug layer to slow down the hydration rate of drug layer. Influence of the composition of drug layer (PEO category, total amount, drug loading and fraction of NaCl), push layer (NaCl amount), and also the level of coating weight gain on the drug release profiles was investigated. Observation of hydration state was estimated by taking photos, and also was confirmed by the theories. Paliperidone was delivered successfully by APOP at an ascending release rate up to 20 h in vitro. The in vivo plasma concentration of paliperidone in beagle dogs increased gradually up to 19 h. The APOP with an easy manufacture process was a promising strategy to deliver drug at an ascending rate.

  15. Investigation on the use of optimization techniques for helicopter airframe vibrations design studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sreekanta Murthy, T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of the investigation of formal nonlinear programming-based numerical optimization techniques of helicopter airframe vibration reduction are summarized. The objective and constraint function and the sensitivity expressions used in the formulation of airframe vibration optimization problems are presented and discussed. Implementation of a new computational procedure based on MSC/NASTRAN and CONMIN in a computer program system called DYNOPT for optimizing airframes subject to strength, frequency, dynamic response, and dynamic stress constraints is described. An optimization methodology is proposed which is thought to provide a new way of applying formal optimization techniques during the various phases of the airframe design process. Numerical results obtained from the application of the DYNOPT optimization code to a helicopter airframe are discussed.

  16. Growth mechanism, electronic spectral investigation and molecular orbital studies of L-prolinium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojing; Sun, Xin; Xu, Xijin; Sun, Ping

    2015-01-01

    By using atomic force microscopy, birth and spread has proved to be the primary growth mechanism for L-prolinium phosphate (LPP). The phenomenon of newly formed islands expanding to the edge of the preceding terrace was observed. The optimized molecular structure and the molecular properties were calculated by density functional theory method. Natural bond orbital analysis was carried out to demonstrate the various inter and intramolecular interactions that are responsible for the stabilization of LPP leading to high NLO activity. Molecular electrostatic potential, frontier molecular orbital analysis and thermodynamic properties were investigated to get a better insight of the molecular properties. Global and local reactivity descriptors were computed to predict the reactivity and reactive sites on the molecules. Non-linear optical (NLO) properties such as the total dipole moment (μ) and first order hyperopolarizability (β) were also calculated to predict NLO behavior.

  17. Investigation of Praseodymium Fluorides: A Combined Matrix-Isolation and Quantum-Chemical Study.

    PubMed

    Vent-Schmidt, Thomas; Riedel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of the lanthanides is mostly dominated by compounds in the oxidation state +III. Only few compounds of Ce, Pr, and Tb are known with the metal in the +IV oxidation state. Removal of the last f-electron on praseodymium +IV would lead to a closed-shell system with formal oxidation state V. In this work we investigated the stability of the PrF5 molecule by theory and matrix-isolation techniques through the reaction of laser-ablated praseodymium atoms with fluorine in excess of neon, argon, krypton, or neat fluorine. Besides the known PrF3 molecule, unreported IR bands for PrF4 could be observed, and there is evidence for the formation of PrF and PrF2 but not for the formation of PrF5.

  18. Numerical investigation of airflow in an idealised human extra-thoracic airway: a comparison study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Gutmark, Ephraim

    2013-01-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) technique is employed to numerically investigate the airflow through an idealised human extra-thoracic airway under different breathing conditions, 10 l/min, 30 l/min, and 120 l/min. The computational results are compared with single and cross hot-wire measurements, and with time-averaged flow field computed by standard k-ω and k-ω-SST Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models and the Lattice-Boltzmann method (LBM). The LES results are also compared to root-mean-square (RMS) flow field computed by the Reynolds stress model (RSM) and LBM. LES generally gives better prediction of the time-averaged flow field than RANS models and LBM. LES also provides better estimation of the RMS flow field than both the RSM and the LBM. PMID:23619907

  19. Cytochemical investigation on lipids in human major salivary glands. A light and electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Sirigu, P; Diaz, G; Lantini, M S; Del Fiacco, M

    1976-01-01

    The localization of lipids in the secretion of human parotid and submandibular glands has been here investigated. Ultrastructural observations following lipid extraction and histochemical data showed that lipid components are not present in the secretory granules. In fact, while histochemical reactions are completely negative, secretory granules from lipid-depleted glands retain all their morphological characters. These results led us to emphasize that, at least in human seromucous cells, lipids are not directly involved in the salivary secretion. This conclusion, which is supported by the biochemical data concerning the lipid content in human saliva, disagrees with the findings obtained in rat and guinea pig salivary glands. However, this discrepancy may be ascribed to the specific biochemical and ultrastructural differences found in the salivary glands of the various mammalian species. PMID:1023331

  20. Investigation of Praseodymium Fluorides: A Combined Matrix-Isolation and Quantum-Chemical Study.

    PubMed

    Vent-Schmidt, Thomas; Riedel, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    The chemistry of the lanthanides is mostly dominated by compounds in the oxidation state +III. Only few compounds of Ce, Pr, and Tb are known with the metal in the +IV oxidation state. Removal of the last f-electron on praseodymium +IV would lead to a closed-shell system with formal oxidation state V. In this work we investigated the stability of the PrF5 molecule by theory and matrix-isolation techniques through the reaction of laser-ablated praseodymium atoms with fluorine in excess of neon, argon, krypton, or neat fluorine. Besides the known PrF3 molecule, unreported IR bands for PrF4 could be observed, and there is evidence for the formation of PrF and PrF2 but not for the formation of PrF5. PMID:26544761

  1. Methodology guideline for clinical studies investigating traditional Chinese medicine and integrative medicine: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2015-10-01

    This guideline aims to provide a methodological guidance for clinical studies in TCM and integrative medicine in terms of study design, execution, and reporting. The commonly used methods including experimental and observational methods were introduced in this guideline such as randomized clinical trials, cohort study, case-control study, case series, and qualitative method which can be incorporated into above quantitative methods. The guideline can be used for the evaluation of therapeutic effect of TCM therapies or their combination with conventional therapy. TCM therapy refers to one of the followings or their combination: herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, Taichi/Qigong, and Guasha,Tuina (therapeutic massage). It is also suitable for research and development of ethnopharmaceuticals or folk medicine.

  2. 49 CFR 171.21 - Assistance in investigations and special studies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... GENERAL INFORMATION, REGULATIONS, AND DEFINITIONS Incident Reporting, Notification, BOE Approvals and... Transportation makes an inquiry of a person required to complete an incident report in connection with a study...

  3. Methodology guideline for clinical studies investigating traditional Chinese medicine and integrative medicine: executive summary.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Ping; Chen, Ke-Ji

    2015-10-01

    This guideline aims to provide a methodological guidance for clinical studies in TCM and integrative medicine in terms of study design, execution, and reporting. The commonly used methods including experimental and observational methods were introduced in this guideline such as randomized clinical trials, cohort study, case-control study, case series, and qualitative method which can be incorporated into above quantitative methods. The guideline can be used for the evaluation of therapeutic effect of TCM therapies or their combination with conventional therapy. TCM therapy refers to one of the followings or their combination: herbal medicine, acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, Taichi/Qigong, and Guasha,Tuina (therapeutic massage). It is also suitable for research and development of ethnopharmaceuticals or folk medicine. PMID:26615617

  4. 3D MR Sialography as a Tool to Investigate Radiation-Induced Xerostomia: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Astreinidou, Eleftheria . E-mail: E.Astreinidou@umcutrecht.nl; Roesink, Judith M.; Raaijmakers, Cornelis P.J.; Bartels, Lambertus W.; Witkamp, Theo D.; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.; Terhaard, Chris H.J.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether magnetic-resonance (MR) sialography can be used to investigate radiation-induced xerostomia. Preradiotherapy (pre-RT) and postradiotherapy (post-RT) MR sialographic images of the major salivary ducts (parotid and submandibular) were compared. Methods and Materials: Magnetic-resonance sialography was performed pre-RT, and 6 weeks and 6 months post-RT on 9 patients with T1-4N0-2M0 naso- or oropharyngeal tumors, on a 1.5-T MR scanner. Patients were positioned in the scanner, using a radiotherapy immobilization mask. Image registration of the MR sialograms pre- and post-RT with each other and with the CT and consequently the dose distribution was performed. A categorical scoring system was used to compare the visibility of ducts pre-RT and post-RT. Results: Good-quality MR sialographic images were obtained, and image registration was successful in all cases. The visibility score of the parotid ducts and submandibular ducts was reduced at 6 weeks post-RT, which means that the full trajectory of the salivary ducts, from the intraglandular space to the mouth cavity, was only partially visualized. For some of the parotid ducts, the visibility score improved at 6 months post-RT, but not for the submandibular ducts. The mean dose for the parotid glands was 35 Gy (1 standard deviation [SD] 3 Gy), and for the submandibular glands it was 62 Gy (SD, 8 Gy). Conclusion: Three-dimensional MR sialography is a promising approach for investigating xerostomia, because radiation-induced changes to the saliva content of the ducts can be visualized.

  5. Accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for nucleobases: A combined computational - microwave investigation of 2-thiouracil as a case study

    PubMed Central

    Puzzarini, Cristina; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Barone, Vincenzo; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2015-01-01

    The computational composite scheme purposely set up for accurately describing the electronic structure and spectroscopic properties of small biomolecules has been applied to the first study of the rotational spectrum of 2-thiouracil. The experimental investigation was made possible thanks to the combination of the laser ablation technique with Fourier Transform Microwave spectrometers. The joint experimental – computational study allowed us to determine accurate molecular structure and spectroscopic properties for the title molecule, but more important, it demonstrates a reliable approach for the accurate investigation of isolated small biomolecules. PMID:24002739

  6. Methods for Investigating Gene-Environment Interactions in Candidate Pathway and Genome-Wide Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Duncan

    2010-01-01

    Despite the considerable enthusiasm about the yield of novel and replicated discoveries of genetic associations from the new generation of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), the proportion of the heritability of most complex diseases that have been studied to date remains small. Some of this “dark matter” could be due to gene-environment (G×E) interactions or more complex pathways involving multiple genes and exposures. We review the basic epidemiologic study design and statistical analysis approaches to studying G×E interactions individually and then consider more comprehensive approaches to studying entire pathways or GWAS data. In addition to the usual issues in genetic association studies, particular care is needed in exposure assessment and very large sample sizes are required. Although hypothesis-driven pathway-based and “agnostic” GWAS approaches are generally viewed as opposite poles, we suggest that the two can be usefully married using hierarchical modeling strategies that exploit external pathway knowledge in mining genome-wide data. PMID:20070199

  7. Adolescent sunscreen use in springtime: a prospective predictive study informed by a belief elicitation investigation.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Soares, V; Rodrigues, A; Presseau, J; Sniehotta, F F

    2013-04-01

    Two studies aimed to understand springtime sunscreen use amongst adolescents and to compare the predictive utility of the theory of planned behavior, descriptive norms, prototype perceptions and planning. In Study 1, a belief elicitation study with N = 67 adolescents identified beliefs about, and strategies for, sunscreen use. In Study 2, N = 177 adolescents completed measures of direct and belief-based theory of planned behavior measures prototype evaluation and similarity, descriptive norms and planning. Sunscreen use was reported 2 months later. In Study 1, sunburn prevention and skin care emerged as the most relevant consequences of sunscreen use. Facilitators were supportive family norms. Sunscreen properties, costs and forgetting were main barriers which were commonly addressed with preparatory actions such as carrying sunscreen. In Study 2, gender, intention and prototype evaluation were predictive of sunscreen use. Positive evaluations of those who use sunscreen were related to lower sunscreen use when controlling for intention, descriptive norm and gender. Belief-based measures were the best predictors of intention. Behavioral, normative and control beliefs are crucial for understanding sunscreen. Future interventions should focus on these beliefs to change intentions.

  8. Approaches to Investigating Complex Genetic Traits in a Large-Scale Inbred Mouse Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Sundberg, J P; Berndt, A; Sundberg, B A; Silva, K A; Kennedy, V; Smith, R S; Cooper, T K; Schofield, P N

    2016-03-01

    Inbred mice are a unique model system for studying aging because of the genetic homogeneity within inbred strains, the short life span of mice relative to humans, and the rich array of analytic tools that are available. A large-scale aging study was conducted on 28 inbred strains representing great genetic diversity to determine, via histopathology, the type and diversity of spontaneous diseases that aging mice develop. A total of 20 885 different diagnoses were made, with an average of 12 diagnoses per mouse in the study. Eighteen inbred strains have had their genomes sequenced, and many others have been partially sequenced to provide large repositories of data on genetic variation among the strains. This vast amount of genomic information can be utilized in genome-wide association studies to find candidate genes that are involved in the pathogenesis of spontaneous diseases. As an illustration, this article presents a genome-wide association study of the genetic associations of age-related intestinal amyloidosis, which implicated 3 candidate genes: translocating chain-associated membrane protein 1 (Tram1); splicing factor 3b, subunit 5 (Sf3b5); and syntaxin 11 (Stx11). Representative photomicrographs are available on the Mouse Tumor Biology Database and Pathbase to serve as a reference when evaluating inbred mice used in other genetic or experimental studies to rule out strain background lesions. Many of the age-related mouse diseases are similar, if not identical, to human diseases; therefore, the genetic discoveries have direct translational benefit. PMID:26936752

  9. Investigation of an online, problem-based introduction to nuclear sciences: A case study

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, M.; Easter, M.; Jiazhen, W.; Jonassen, D.

    2006-07-01

    An online, grant-funded course on nuclear engineering in society was developed at a large Midwestern university with the goal of providing non-majors a meaningful introduction to the many applications of nuclear science in a modern society and to stimulate learner interest in academic studies and/or professional involvement in nuclear science. Using a within-site case study approach, the current study focused on the efficacy of the online learning environment's support of learners' acquisition of knowledge and the impact of the environment on learners' interest in and beliefs about nuclear sciences in society. Findings suggest the environment successfully promoted learning and had a positive impact on learners' interests and beliefs. (authors)

  10. Hydroacoustic investigation of the emissions of gas from the seabed in fieldwork and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, M.; Bohrmann, G.; Wright, I. C.; Sahling, H.; Waldmann, C.

    2012-04-01

    The investigation of the fate of rising bubbles from the seabed is of increasing importance, to be able to quantify the potential input to atmospheric methane (CH4). Hydroacoustic methods seem to be the most sensitive and reliable way to remotely determine bubble fluxes over a large area. The advantage of noninvasive remote sensing methods can be used to better understand the role of cold seep sites in global climate changes. During two cruises in 2011 (R/V Meteor cruise M84/2 in the Black Sea in February and RSS James Ross Clark JCR253 arctic cruise in August) a combination of several techniques was evaluated for detection, localization and classification of gas emissions from natural cold seeps, including a detailed hydroacoustic survey of investigated areas and data analysis with the use of specialized software. Acoustic data were collected using different echosounders and platforms: two multibeam systems EM122 and EM710, multifrequency echosounder EK60, and parametric narrow-beam Parasound echosunder. Detailed location maps of gas seeps, and 3D visualization models showing the registered flares were obtained. All hydroacoustic intruments provided evidence of acoustic anomalies in the water column, related to the strong impedance step between the free gas (bubbles) and the surrounding water. On echograms, rising bubbles often appear as flare-shaped reflections, simply called "flares". Most of these flares do not reach the sea-surface, nevertheless, some of gas bubble plumes rising up to several hundred meters above the seabed. Flares do not rise straight upwards but are deflected in a direction of current, which can be seen after processing multibeam echosounder data. Matlab codes were used in order to process data coming from EK60 fish-finder echosunder. These data can be used for quantification of gas bubble emissions. Bathymetry data sets exported from MB-System with 2 m horizontal resolution were examined in Fledermaus software for further cleaning

  11. Investigation of the β-cyclodextrin-quinine inclusion complex in aqueous solution by spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue-Mei; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    1995-03-01

    The effect of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) on the spectral properties of quinine molecules has been specifically studied by absorption/fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In particular, FTIR studies of the complexation of aqueous quinine hydrochloride with β-CD provide fresh insight into the molecular structure of the complex and reveal some important information in relation to the molecular interactions of the cyclodextrin complex system. Nuclear magnetic resonance data support the inclusion conformation of the interaction sites and the presence of hydrogen bonds which stabilize the complexes.

  12. Forensic investigation of plutonium metal: a case study of CRM 126

    DOE PAGES

    Byerly, Benjamin L.; Stanley, Floyd; Spencer, Khal; Colletti, Lisa; Garduno, Katherine; Kuhn, Kevin; Lujan, Elmer; Martinez, Alex; Porterfield, Donivan; Rim, Jung; et al

    2016-06-27

    In our study, a certified plutonium metal reference material (CRM 126) with a known production history is examined using analytical methods that are commonly employed in nuclear forensics for provenancing and attribution. Moreover, the measured plutonium isotopic composition and actinide assay are consistent with values reported on the reference material certificate. Model ages from U/Pu and Am/Pu chronometers agree with the documented production timeline. Finally, these results confirm the utility of these analytical methods and highlight the importance of a holistic approach for forensic study of unknown materials.

  13. Case Study Investigations of Large-Amplitude Inertia-Gravity Wave Environments and Mesoscale Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosart, Lance F.

    2001-01-01

    The research effort supported by NASA Grant NAG5-7469, awarded to the University at Albany, State University of New York (UA/SUNY), comprises the following two projects: (1) the observational study of large-amplitude inertia-gravity wave environments over the continental United States; and (2) the definition of opportunities and issues in extratropical cyclone dynamics and related phenomenological studies that may be addressed using high-resolution global datasets produced by the Data Assimilation Office (DAO) at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

  14. An observational cohort study on pre-operative investigations and referrals: How far are we following recommendations?

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Habib Md Reazaul; Yunus, Md; Bhattacharyya, Prithwis

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Pre-operative investigations are often required to supplement information for risk stratification and assessing reserve for undergoing surgery. Although there are evidence-based recommendations for which investigations should be done, clinical practice varies. The present study aimed to assess the pre-operative investigations and referral practices and compare it with the standard guidelines. Methods: The present observational study was carried out during 2014–appen2015 in a teaching institute after the approval from Institute Ethical Committee. A designated anaesthesiologist collected data from the completed pre-anaesthetic check-up (PAC) sheets. Investigations already done, asked by anaesthesiologists as well as referral services sought were noted and compared with an adapted master table prepared from standard recommendations and guidelines. Data were expressed in frequencies, percentage and statistically analysed using INSTAT software (GraphPad Prism software Inc., La Zolla, USA). Results: Seventy-five out of 352 patients (42.67% male, 57.33% female; American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I to III) were included in this study. Nearly, all patients attended PAC with at least 5 investigations done. Of them, 89.33% were subjected to at least one unnecessary investigation and 91.67% of the referral services were not required which lead to 3.5 ( SD ±1.64) days loss. Anaesthesiologist-ordered testing was more focused than surgeons. Conclusion: More than two-third of pre-operative investigations and referral services are unnecessary. Anaesthesiologists are relatively more rational in ordering pre-operative tests yet; a lot can be done to rationalise the practice as well as reducing healthcare cost. PMID:27601737

  15. Investigation of interaction between U(VI) and carbonaceous nanofibers by batch experiments and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Chen, Changlun; Li, Jie; Wang, Xiangke

    2015-12-15

    Carbonaceous nanofibers (CNFs) were synthesized using tellurium nanowires as a template and using glucose as carbon source by the hydrothermal carbonization method. The sorption capacity and mechanism of U(VI) on CNFs were investigated by a combination of batch sorption experiments, the double layer model (DLM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The sorption edges were modeled well by considering the following surface complexes: SOUO2(+), SOUO2OH, SOUO2(OH)2(-) and SOUO2(OH)3(2-) on the strong site as well as XOUO2OH and XOUO2(+) on the weak one (S and X represent surface). The sorption isotherms could be well fitted by the DLM parameters. The difference between type A (SOUO2OH and XOUO2OH) and type B (SOUO2(+) and XOUO2(+)) was observed in XPS because the former species are of low binding energy while the latter are of high one. Desorption and recycle experiments showed that CNFs had good reusability and stability in the present of common sodium salts within five rounds. When co-existing with montmorillonite, CNFs could extract the sorbed uranium onto their surface by a pseudo-second order kinetic process. As a new sort of environmental functional nanomaterials, CNFs should be paid more attention in the area of separation and wastewater remediation. PMID:26342973

  16. Mapping to Support Fine Scale Epidemiological Cholera Investigations: A Case Study of Spatial Video in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Andrew; Blackburn, Jason K; Smiley, Sarah L; Yen, Minmin; Camilli, Andrew; Alam, Meer Taifur; Ali, Afsar; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-02-03

    The cartographic challenge in many developing world environments suffering a high disease burden is a lack of granular environmental covariates suitable for modeling disease outcomes. As a result, epidemiological questions, such as how disease diffuses at intra urban scales are extremely difficult to answer. This paper presents a novel geospatial methodology, spatial video, which can be used to collect and map environmental covariates, while also supporting field epidemiology. An example of epidemic cholera in a coastal town of Haiti is used to illustrate the potential of this new method. Water risks from a 2012 spatial video collection are used to guide a 2014 survey, which concurrently included the collection of water samples, two of which resulted in positive lab results "of interest" (bacteriophage specific for clinical cholera strains) to the current cholera situation. By overlaying sample sites on 2012 water risk maps, a further fifteen proposed water sample locations are suggested. These resulted in a third spatial video survey and an additional "of interest" positive water sample. A potential spatial connection between the "of interest" water samples is suggested. The paper concludes with how spatial video can be an integral part of future fine-scale epidemiological investigations for different pathogens.

  17. Mapping to Support Fine Scale Epidemiological Cholera Investigations: A Case Study of Spatial Video in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Andrew; Blackburn, Jason K.; Smiley, Sarah L.; Yen, Minmin; Camilli, Andrew; Alam, Meer Taifur; Ali, Afsar; Morris, J. Glenn

    2016-01-01

    The cartographic challenge in many developing world environments suffering a high disease burden is a lack of granular environmental covariates suitable for modeling disease outcomes. As a result, epidemiological questions, such as how disease diffuses at intra urban scales are extremely difficult to answer. This paper presents a novel geospatial methodology, spatial video, which can be used to collect and map environmental covariates, while also supporting field epidemiology. An example of epidemic cholera in a coastal town of Haiti is used to illustrate the potential of this new method. Water risks from a 2012 spatial video collection are used to guide a 2014 survey, which concurrently included the collection of water samples, two of which resulted in positive lab results “of interest” (bacteriophage specific for clinical cholera strains) to the current cholera situation. By overlaying sample sites on 2012 water risk maps, a further fifteen proposed water sample locations are suggested. These resulted in a third spatial video survey and an additional “of interest” positive water sample. A potential spatial connection between the “of interest” water samples is suggested. The paper concludes with how spatial video can be an integral part of future fine-scale epidemiological investigations for different pathogens. PMID:26848672

  18. Bacteria as a new model system for aging studies: investigations using light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Aging-the decline in an individual's condition over time-is at the center of an active research field in medicine and biology. Some very basic questions have, however, remained unresolved, the most fundamental being: do all organisms age? Or are there organisms that would continue to live forever if not killed by external forces? For a long time it was believed that aging only affected organisms such as animals, plants, and fungi. Bacteria, in contrast, were assumed to be potentially immortal and until recently this assertion remained untested. We used phase-contrast microscopy (on an Olympus BX61) to follow individual bacterial cells over many divisions to prove that some bacteria show a distinction between an aging mother cell and a rejuvenated daughter, and that these bacteria thus age. This indicates that aging is a more fundamental property of organisms than was previously assumed. Bacteria can now be used as very simple model system for investigating why and how organisms age. PMID:18476823

  19. EPR investigation of gamma irradiated single crystal guaifenesin: A combined experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasdemir, Halil Ugur; Sayin, Ulku; Türkkan, Ercan; Ozmen, Ayhan

    2016-04-01

    Gamma irradiated single crystal of Guaifenesin (Glyceryl Guaiacolate), an important expectorant drug, were investigated with Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy between 123 and 333 K temperature at different orientations in the magnetic field. Considering the chemical structure and the experimental spectra of the gamma irradiated single crystal of guaifenesin sample, we assumed that alkoxy or alkyl-type paramagnetic species may be produced by irradiation. Depending on this assumption, eight possible alkoxy and alkyl-type radicals were modeled and EPR parameters of these modeled radicals were calculated using the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)-level of density functional theory (DFT). Theoretically calculated values of alkyl-type modeled radical(R3) are in good agreement with experimentally determined EPR parameters of single crystal. Furthermore, simulation spectra which are obtained by using the theoretical initial values are well matched with the experimental spectra. It was determined that a stable Cα •H2αCβHβCγH2γ (R3) alkyl radical was produced in the host crystal as a result of gamma irradiation.

  20. Mapping to Support Fine Scale Epidemiological Cholera Investigations: A Case Study of Spatial Video in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Andrew; Blackburn, Jason K; Smiley, Sarah L; Yen, Minmin; Camilli, Andrew; Alam, Meer Taifur; Ali, Afsar; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-02-01

    The cartographic challenge in many developing world environments suffering a high disease burden is a lack of granular environmental covariates suitable for modeling disease outcomes. As a result, epidemiological questions, such as how disease diffuses at intra urban scales are extremely difficult to answer. This paper presents a novel geospatial methodology, spatial video, which can be used to collect and map environmental covariates, while also supporting field epidemiology. An example of epidemic cholera in a coastal town of Haiti is used to illustrate the potential of this new method. Water risks from a 2012 spatial video collection are used to guide a 2014 survey, which concurrently included the collection of water samples, two of which resulted in positive lab results "of interest" (bacteriophage specific for clinical cholera strains) to the current cholera situation. By overlaying sample sites on 2012 water risk maps, a further fifteen proposed water sample locations are suggested. These resulted in a third spatial video survey and an additional "of interest" positive water sample. A potential spatial connection between the "of interest" water samples is suggested. The paper concludes with how spatial video can be an integral part of future fine-scale epidemiological investigations for different pathogens. PMID:26848672

  1. Investigating the effects of majority voting on CAD systems: a LIDC case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrazza, Miguel; Kennedy, Brendan; Rasin, Alexander; Furst, Jacob; Raicu, Daniela

    2016-03-01

    Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) systems can provide a second opinion for either identifying suspicious regions on a medical image or predicting the degree of malignancy for a detected suspicious region. To develop a predictive model, CAD systems are trained on low-level image features extracted from image data and the class labels acquired through radiologists' interpretations or a gold standard (e.g., a biopsy). While the opinion of an expert radiologist is still an estimate of the answer, the ground truth may be extremely expensive to acquire. In such cases, CAD systems are trained on input data that contains multiple expert opinions per case with the expectation that the aggregate of labels will closely approximate the ground truth. Using multiple labels to solve this problem has its own challenges because of the inherent label uncertainty introduced by the variability in the radiologists' interpretations. Most CAD systems use majority voting (e.g., average, mode) to handle label uncertainty. This paper investigates the effects that majority voting can have on a CAD system by classifying and analyzing different semantic characteristics supplied with the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) dataset. Using a decision tree based iterative predictive model, we show that majority voting with labels that exhibit certain types of skewed distribution can have a significant negative impact on the performance of a CAD system; therefore, alternative strategies for label integration are required when handling multiple interpretations.

  2. Spectroscopic studies and density functional theory investigations of a cobalt phthalocyanine derivative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, Roberto; Pérez-Manríquez, Liliana; Sánchez-Vergara, M. E.

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal solutions at room temperature were used to obtain various polymorphic forms of a [PcCoCN]n and double potassium salt from 1,8 dihydroxyanthraquinone derivative. Nanocrystals in the form α and β were characterized using IR and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques. Likewise in this context, an energy doublet in the absorption spectra of the monoclinic form at 1.8 and 2 eV was observed. The complex structure inherent to the spectra of the CoPc derivative is attributed to the simultaneous presence of both crystalline and molecular phases in the samples. The optical absorption of the compound was also investigated in order to evaluate changes in the electronic structure of these metal organic nanostructures. The absorption spectra of the CoPc derivative recorded in the UV-Vis region manifested two absorption bands, namely the Q- and B- bands. DFT calculations of this structure help to establish the source of the spectroscopic behavior and also lead to a particular phenomenon not known previously in this kind of complex, because the optimized structure of the cobalt complex manifests a very strange deformation of the bond between the anthraquinone derivative and the cobalt atom; the origin of this deformation is also discussed.

  3. Infrared Spectroscopic Study For Structural Investigation Of Lithium Lead Silicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlawat, Navneet; Aghamkar, Praveen; Ahlawat, Neetu; Agarwal, Ashish; Monica

    2011-12-12

    Lithium lead silicate glasses with composition 30Li{sub 2}O{center_dot}(70-x)PbO{center_dot}xSiO{sub 2}(where, x = 10, 20, 30, 40, 50 mol %)(LPS glasses) were prepared by normal melt quench technique at 1373 K for half an hour in air to understand their structure. Compositional dependence of density, molar volume and glass transition temperature of these glasses indicates more compactness of the glass structure with increasing SiO{sub 2} content. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic data obtained for these glasses was used to investigate the changes induced in the local structure of samples as the ratio between PbO and SiO{sub 2} content changes from 6.0 to 0.4. The observed absorption band around 450-510 cm{sup -1} in IR spectra of these glasses indicates the presence of network forming PbO{sub 4} tetrahedral units in glass structure. The increase in intensity with increasing SiO{sub 2} content (upto x = 30 mol %) suggests superposition of Pb-O and Si-O bond vibrations in absorption band around 450-510 cm{sup -1}. The values of optical basicity in these glasses were found to be dependent directly on PbO/SiO{sub 2} ratio.

  4. Investigation of the Dynamic Gait Index in Children: A Pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Lubetzky-Vilnai, Anat; Jirikowic, Tracy L; McCoy, Sarah Westcott

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the feasibility and construct validity of the Dynamic Gait Index (DGI) in children and explored inter-rater and test-retest reliability. Methods: DGI performance of 10 children with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) aged 8 - 15 years was compared to 10 age and sex matched children with typical development (TD). Inter-rater reliability was evaluated for 16 children (10 TD, 6 FASD); 11 children returned for a retest (5 TD, 6 FASD). Results The DGI is simple for raters to learn and easy to administer in children. A Mann-Whitney U test identified a significant difference on the DGI total score between children with FASD and TD (P=0.01). Inter-rater and test-retest reliability were promising but need to be further explored. Conclusions: The DGI was feasible and valid in a population of children aged 8-15 years with FASD and TD. Some modifications are suggested for administration of the DGI in children. PMID:21829122

  5. Investigation of the intraseasonal oscillations over a Brazilian equatorial station: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Amitava; Batista, Paulo Prado; Clemesha, Barclay Robert; Sarkhel, Sumanta; Buriti, Ricardo Arlen

    2014-12-01

    Characteristics of the intraseasonal oscillations (ISO) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) are investigated using meteor radar wind observations from a South American, equatorial station, São João do Cariri (7.4°S, 36.5°W) during 2008. A prominent ISO signature is observed during January-May in the period band approximately 40 to 70 days in the MLT zonal wind. In the lower atmosphere, a dominant ISO is observed in the period band approximately 30 to 60 days in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) (a proxy for convection), total columnar water vapor (a proxy for tides), and zonal wind. Considerable high correlation of the ISO between the MLT and lower atmosphere indicates significant dynamical coupling between the lower and middle atmosphere during the observational period. The MLT-ISO shows conspicuous downward propagation of the peak amplitude indicating the role of the dissipating upward propagating waves for its generation. The amplitudes in the zonal wind of the dominant tidal components in the MLT exhibit conspicuous ISO modulation. The eastward propagating waves and tides are surmised to be responsible for communicating the ISO signature from the lower atmosphere to the MLT. The origin of the MLT-ISO is believed to take place in the lower troposphere, below 4 km. The MLT-ISO is believed to be the imprint of the lower atmospheric Madden-Julian oscillation which travels eastward from the Indian Ocean-western Pacific Ocean to the present location.

  6. Bridging the Divide: A Case Study Investigating Digitally-Wise Teacher Perceptions of Middle School Cyberbullying

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Tiffany Nicole

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to explore the perceptions of middle school, technologically proficient, or digitally-wise teachers, regarding how they defined, prevented, recognized, and handled incidences of cyberbullying in four middle schools located in Southern Virginia. Data was collected using an open-ended questionnaire,…

  7. Reading Achievement in the Middle School Years: A Study Investigating Growth Patterns by High Incidence Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakimowski, Mary E.; Faggella-Luby, Michael; Kim, Yujin; Wei, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Numerous research studies (e.g., Anderson, Kutash, & Duchnowski, 2001; Lane, Carter, Pierson, & Glaeser, 2006; Volpe, Dupaul, Jitendra, & Tresco, 2009; Wei, Blackorby, & Schiller, 2011) have shown that students with disabilities generally exhibit lower reading scores than their peers without disabilities. However, questions remain…

  8. Investigating the Representation of African American Student Affairs Administrators: A Preliminary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Lamont A.

    2003-01-01

    Study applied the theory of representative bureaucracy to examine the representation of African American student affairs administrators in postsecondary institutions. Results showed African American student affairs administrators were underrepresented among student affairs administrators. Also, survey data showed that the percentage of African…

  9. A Self-Study Investigation of Using Inquiry Groups in a Professional Development School Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garin, Eva; Harper, Mya

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry Group participation for PDS teachers and teacher candidates is one of the signature programs of the Bowie State University PDS Network and provides PDS teachers and teacher candidates the opportunity to collaborate on teaching strategies and methodologies to use in their classrooms. This article uses self-study methodology to explore the…

  10. Yellowstone grizzly bear investigations: Annual report of the Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, Charles C.; Haroldson, Mark A.; West, Karrie K.

    2007-01-01

    The annual reports of the IGBST summarize annual data collection. Because additional information can be obtained after publication, data summaries are subject to change. For that reason, data analyses and summaries presented in this report supersede all previously published data. The study area and sampling techniques are reported by Blanchard (1985), Mattson et al. (1991 a), and Haroldson et al. (1998).

  11. Investigating the Double-Deficit Hypothesis in Greek: Findings from a Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C.; Georgiou, George K.; Kendeou, Panayiota

    2009-01-01

    This study examined longitudinally the double-deficit hypothesis in Greek, an orthographically consistent language, following a group of children from kindergarten to Grade 2. Four groups were formed on the basis of two composite scores of phonological and naming-speed criterion measures: a double-deficit group (DD; n = 17), a phonological deficit…

  12. An investigation of gait in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: a case controlled study.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Nicole; McGinley, Jennifer L; Bradshaw, John L; Rinehart, Nicole J

    2014-08-30

    This study aimed to compare the gait of children with ADHD - Combined Type (ADHD-CT) to typically developing (TD) children. Children with ADHD-CT (n=14; mean age 10 years 4 months) and a TD group (n=13; mean age 10 years 9 months) walked at self-selected slow, preferred and fast speed on an electronic walkway system. Participants completed a total of 15 walking trials; 5 trials per walking condition. Groups were matched on age, intellectual functioning, height and weight. In the preferred walking condition, there was no difference in spatio-temporal gait variables between the ADHD-CT and TD control groups. At self-selected fast speed, children with ADHD-CT were faster and walked with a higher cadence. The subtle alterations in gait pattern that may reflect a timing deficit is consistent with previous ADHD motor studies. In addition, this study extends previous studies in characterising the unique gait profile of non-medicated children with ADHD-CT where a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder has been ruled out. PMID:24837426

  13. Investigating the Efficacy of Practical Skill Teaching: A Pilot-Study Comparing Three Educational Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloney, Stephen; Storr, Michael; Paynter, Sophie; Morgan, Prue; Ilic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Effective education of practical skills can alter clinician behaviour, positively influence patient outcomes, and reduce the risk of patient harm. This study compares the efficacy of two innovative practical skill teaching methods, against a traditional teaching method. Year three pre-clinical physiotherapy students consented to participate in a…

  14. An investigation of gait in children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: a case controlled study.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Nicole; McGinley, Jennifer L; Bradshaw, John L; Rinehart, Nicole J

    2014-08-30

    This study aimed to compare the gait of children with ADHD - Combined Type (ADHD-CT) to typically developing (TD) children. Children with ADHD-CT (n=14; mean age 10 years 4 months) and a TD group (n=13; mean age 10 years 9 months) walked at self-selected slow, preferred and fast speed on an electronic walkway system. Participants completed a total of 15 walking trials; 5 trials per walking condition. Groups were matched on age, intellectual functioning, height and weight. In the preferred walking condition, there was no difference in spatio-temporal gait variables between the ADHD-CT and TD control groups. At self-selected fast speed, children with ADHD-CT were faster and walked with a higher cadence. The subtle alterations in gait pattern that may reflect a timing deficit is consistent with previous ADHD motor studies. In addition, this study extends previous studies in characterising the unique gait profile of non-medicated children with ADHD-CT where a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder has been ruled out.

  15. A Case Study Investigating Teachers' Knowledge and Implementation of Response to Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Regina

    2013-01-01

    The local school district in the current study was struggling to meet adequate yearly progress (AYP) targets in reading because secondary students were scoring below the basic level in reading and their content area teachers had little or no training in reading deficiencies. What had been speculated, yet never tested, was the utility of teacher…

  16. An Exploratory Investigation of Online Forum Mediated Collaborative Learning of Speech Writing: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lata, Pushp; Luhach, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) are being integrated in the curriculum by many educational institutions to extend teaching and learning beyond classroom. This paper is based on a case study exploring the integration of LMS Nalanda created on Moodle in Effective Public Speaking (EPS) classroom to give students an additional platform to practice,…

  17. Investigating Women's Ways of Knowing: An Exploratory Study in the UAE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khine, Myint Swe; Hayes, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Personal epistemological beliefs, one's beliefs about the nature and acquisition of knowledge, and their role in the learning process have become a focus of a growing body of research in recent years. Studies show that a person's epistemological beliefs play an important role in their intellectual development as well as in learning specific…

  18. Investigation of the Appropriateness of the Anchor Test Study Equating Results for Selected Subgroups. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, John C.; Vale, Carol A.

    The Anchor Test Study (ATS) yielded equating tables for vocabulary, reading comprehension, and total reading scores for eight commonly used reading tests at the 4th, 5th, and 6th grade levels. Because of the original ATS sampling design which resulted in a nationally representative sample of school children at those grades, the equating tables…

  19. A Prospective Study Investigating the Impact of School Belonging Factors on Negative Affect in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shochet, Ian M.; Smith, Coral L.; Furlong, Michael J.; Homel, Ross

    2011-01-01

    School belonging, measured as a unidimensional construct, is an important predictor of negative affective problems in adolescents, including depression and anxiety symptoms. A recent study found that one such measure, the Psychological Sense of School Membership scale, actually comprises three factors: Caring Relations, Acceptance, and Rejection.…

  20. Investigation of exposure to Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields: Ongoing animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. Many of the observed effects appear to be directly or indirectly associated with the neural or neuroendocrine systems. Such effects include increased neuronal excitability, chemical and hormonal changes in the nervous system, altered behavioral responses, some of which are related to sensing the presence of the field, and changes in endogenous biological rhythms. Additional indices of general physiological status appear relatively unaffected by exposure, although effects have occasionally been described in bone growth and fracture repair, reproduction and development, and immune system function. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Three major challenges exist for ongoing research: (1) knowledge about the mechanisms underlying observed bioeffects is incomplete, (2) researchers do not as yet understand what physical aspects of exposure produce biological responses, and (3) health consequences resulting from ELF exposure are unknown. Although no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, several are suggestive of potential health impacts. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss biological responses to ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposures.

  1. Learning and Teaching Science as Inquiry: A Case Study of Elementary School Teachers' Investigations of Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Zee, Emily H.; Hammer, David; Bell, Mary; Roy, Patricia; Peter, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This case study documents an example of inquiry learning and teaching during a summer institute for elementary and middle school teachers. A small group constructed an explanatory model for an intriguing optical phenomenon that they were observing. Research questions included: What physics thinking did the learners express? What aspects of…

  2. Study report on guidelines and test procedures for investigating stability of nonlinear cardiovascular control system models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzjerrell, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A general study of the stability of nonlinear as compared to linear control systems is presented. The analysis is general and, therefore, applies to other types of nonlinear biological control systems as well as the cardiovascular control system models. Both inherent and numerical stability are discussed for corresponding analytical and graphic methods and numerical methods.

  3. A Monte Carlo Study Investigating Missing Data, Differential Item Functioning, and Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Phyllis

    2009-01-01

    The use of polytomous items in assessments has increased over the years, and as a result, the validity of these assessments has been a concern. Differential item functioning (DIF) and missing data are two factors that may adversely affect assessment validity. Both factors have been studied separately, but DIF and missing data are likely to occur…

  4. 76 FR 70152 - Pilot Program for Early Feasibility Study Investigational Device Exemption Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ..., which are outlined in the early feasibility study draft guidance. The information learned and... based on a thorough device evaluation strategy that describes the device and procedure-related... mitigation strategies must also be identified. This policy is intended to facilitate initiation of...

  5. Investigating Personality in Stuttering: Results of a Case Control Study Using the NEO-FFI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleek, Benjamin; Montag, Christian; Faber, Jennifer; Reuter, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A recent study by Iverach et al. ("Journal of Communication Disorders," 2010) compared persons who stutter with two normative samples in the context of the five-factor model of personality measured by the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI). Persons who stutter were characterized by higher "Neuroticism," lower "Conscientiousness" and lower…

  6. Seismic investigations in Wyoming as part of the Wagon Wheel definition studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayer, Kenneth C.; Wuollet, Geraldine M.

    1974-01-01

    One hundred and twenty nine (129) natural and man -made events identifiable as located within a radius of 100 km from the station were recorded during tile eleven-month study. Calculated magnitudes ranged from ML - 0. 6 toML 2.6.

  7. Investigating the Knowledge Needed for Teaching Mathematics: An Exploratory Validation Study Focusing on Teaching Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charalambous, Charalambos Y.

    2016-01-01

    Central in the frameworks proposed to capture the knowledge needed for teaching mathematics is the assumption that teachers need more than pure subject-matter knowledge. Validation studies exploring this assumption by recruiting contrasting populations are relatively scarce. Drawing on a sample of 644 Greek-Cypriots preservice and inservice…

  8. A Global Investigation of Child Labor: Case Studies from India, Uganda, and the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Selena

    This curriculum guide was developed to help students gain a broader perspective about child labor and become more familiar with the issues, controversies, and debates that surround it. Three case studies are highlighted: (1) a street child in India; (2) child soldiers in Uganda; and (3) a migrant farm worker child in the United States. Each case…

  9. Should the Dead Sea Be Sustainable?: Investigating Environmental Issues Using a Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Cheston Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Many students leave the environmental science classroom with misconceptions centered on the availability of natural resources such as water. This article presents a case study where students assume the roles of various stakeholders and articulate their position on whether or not to pipe water from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea. Additionally,…

  10. Investigating the File Drawer Problem in Causal Effects Studies in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Joseph; Kowalski, Susan; Stuhlsatz, Molly; Wilson, Christopher; Spybrook, Jessaca

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to use both conceptual and statistical approaches to explore publication bias in recent causal effects studies in science education, and to draw from this exploration implications for researchers, journal reviewers, and journal editors. This paper fills a void in the "science education" literature as no…

  11. Creating Critical Conversations: Investigating the Utility of Socratic Dialogues in Elementary Social Studies Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Lisa Brown

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the utility of Socratic dialogues in the elementary social studies methods course. Findings include preservice teachers' behaviors during dialogues, perceived strengths and challenges of using Socratic dialogues in teacher education, and the impact on student learning. Challenges and apprehensions encountered by the teacher…

  12. Environmental Studies Center Teacher Books. 7th Grade - Spoil Island Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin County Schools, Jensen Beach, FL. Environmental Studies Center.

    This teacher's guide, one of nine teacher packages developed for use in the sequential, hands-on, field-oriented, K-8 environmental education program of the Martin County Schools in Florida, was developed for use with secondary students in grade seven prior to and after a visit to an environmental studies center located near an estuarine area. The…

  13. All-Day Recordings to Investigate Vocabulary Development: A Case Study of a Trilingual Toddler

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oller, D. Kimbrough

    2010-01-01

    Major innovations are becoming available for research in language development and disorders. Among these innovations, recent tools allow naturalistic recording in children's homes and automated analysis to facilitate representative sampling. This study employed all-day recordings during the 2nd year of life in a child exposed to three languages,…

  14. Adapting "Lesson Study" to Investigate Classroom Pedagogy in Initial Teacher Education: What Student-Teachers Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cajkler, Wasyl; Wood, Phil

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports findings from a project that explored the use of a modified form of "lesson study" in a one-year programme of secondary school initial teacher education (ITE). Twelve mentors and student-teachers worked in pairs to design and teach two "research lessons" in the course of two eight-week teaching practice…

  15. CALL Teacher Professional Growth through Lesson Study Practice: An Investigation into EFL Teachers' Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nami, Fatemeh; Marandi, S. Susan; Sotoudehnama, Elaheh

    2016-01-01

    Despite the abundance of research on the potential of lesson study for promoting teachers' professional growth through practice and collaboration, little is known on how language teachers perceive this strategy for their computer assisted language learning (CALL) professional development. In an attempt to contribute to this research base, this…

  16. Investigations of aerosol impacts on MCSs convection and precipitation: a modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavner, M.; Cotton, W. R.

    2014-12-01

    Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) are important contributors to rainfall in the High Plains of the United States. It is therefore of interest to understand how different vertical distributions and concentrations of aerosols serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) may impact the amount, intensity, and spatial distribution of precipitation produced by MCSs. Unlike ordinary cumulonimbi, MCSs are organized convection systems composed of convective upright updrafts and downdrafts, as well as slowly ascending and descending slantwise motions. These motions can supply moisture to the stratiform-anvil of the MCS without passing through the convective cores. Moreover, the slantwise ascending motions originate some 3-5km above ground level thereby consisting of air with different properties than upright convective updrafts. In order to study the impact of enhanced potential CCN concentrations on MCS precipitation, it is important to understand aerosol microphysical impacts on the dynamics of the different modes of convection within the MCS. In this study, different aerosol concentrations and their effects on the dynamics of the different modes of MCS convection are examined by simulating a case study using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Four simulations were conducted, where each simulation differed in the initial aerosol concentrations as well as their vertical distributions. Previous studies have shown that enhanced aerosols invigorate upright convective updrafts, however, the microphysical effects of increased aerosols and their impact on the dynamics of the slow ascending slantwise motion within an MCS, as of yet, have not been studied. In this presentation, the effects of aerosols on the upright convection, slantwise convection and the resulting impacts on precipitation will be discussed.

  17. [Fusion of field and laboratory studies on the investigation of arsenic].

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yoshito

    2009-10-01

    Arsenic is ubiquitously distributed in nature throughout Earth's crust and thus the major source of exposure to this metalloid for the general population is naturally polluted drinking water from wells. In East Asia, more than 30 million people are chronically exposed to arsenic. Interestingly, the manifestations of vascular diseases caused by prolonged exposure to arsenic are consistent with those induced by impaired production of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO). However, no information has been available on the relation between NO synthesis and chronic arsenic poisoning in humans. A cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning in Inner Mongolia and experimental animal studies indicated that long-term exposure to arsenic by drinking water causes reduction of NO production in endothelial cells. Subsequent examinations with rabbits showed that decreased NO production during arsenic exposure is, at least in part, due to an "uncoupling" of endothelial NO synthase evoked by decreased levels of (6R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin (BH(4)), a cofactor of the enzyme, leading to endothelial dysfunction. Furthermore, an intervention study in the area of chronic arsenic poisoning in Inner Mongolia suggested that decreased NO levels and peripheral vascular disease in arsenosis patients can be reversed by exposure cessation. In our cellular experiments, we found that arsenic exposure causes adaptive responses against oxidative stress and arsenic cytotoxicity through Nrf2 activation. This review summarizes the results of our recent studies on a fusion of field and laboratory studies on the chronic arsenic poisoning and cellular protection against the metalloid.

  18. All-day recordings to investigate vocabulary development: A case study of a trilingual toddler

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Major innovations are becoming available for research in language development and disorders. Among these innovations, recent tools allow naturalistic recording in children’s homes and automated analysis to facilitate representative sampling. The present study employed all-day recordings during the second year of life in a child exposed to three languages, using a fully-wearable battery-powered recorder, with automated analysis to locate appropriate time periods for coding. This method made representative sampling possible, and afforded the opportunity for a case study indicating that language spoken directly to the child had dramatically more effect on vocabulary learning than audible language not spoken to the child, as indicated by chi-square analyses of the child’s verbal output and input in each of the languages. The work provides perspective on the role of learning words by overhearing in childhood, and suggests the value of representative naturalistic sampling as a means of research on vocabulary acquisition. PMID:21037965

  19. An investigation into the JE epidemic of 2000 in Upper Assam--a perspective study.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Raminder; Agarwal, C S; Das, Dipankar

    2002-06-01

    The viral encephalitis epidemic during 2000 involved all the seven districts of Upper Assam (with 96.4% cases). The epidemiological, serological, clinical and entomological observations of the epidemic confirmed it to be due to JE. These were analysed, presented and discussed in the light of past history/records of the disease in the state. The epidemic was confined to the peak monsoon months of July and August (96% of the cases in the past). Serologically, 75-90% cases were confirmed to be due to JE. Case fatality Rate was 42.11% (overall average of the state in the past). There was no difference in case incidence among children or adults. Male to female ratio was 1:0.6. Based on the abundance and host preferences during the transmission period as well as virus isolation studies (as per past studies in the area) the main vectors Culex vishnui and Mansonia annulifera were susceptible to 4% DDT. PMID:14768832

  20. Investigation of biosecurity risks associated with the feed delivery: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bottoms, Kate; Dewey, Cate; Richardson, Karen; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2015-05-01

    This study explored potential biosecurity issues related to the delivery of feed to commercial farms. A pilot study was conducted to collect information about the day-to-day feed delivery, including biosecurity concerns at the level of the feed truck, the driver, and the farm. In addition, a reusable rubber boot was tested in an effort to increase the proportion of farms at which truck drivers wore clean footwear, and to explore an alternative to the standard plastic disposable boots that may be unsafe in winter conditions. Most farms did well in terms of proper dead-stock management and keeping the farm lane and feed bin areas clean. The provision of reusable rubber boots significantly increased the proportion of deliveries in which the driver wore clean footwear.

  1. Investigation of biosecurity risks associated with the feed delivery: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Bottoms, Kate; Dewey, Cate; Richardson, Karen; Poljak, Zvonimir

    2015-01-01

    This study explored potential biosecurity issues related to the delivery of feed to commercial farms. A pilot study was conducted to collect information about the day-to-day feed delivery, including biosecurity concerns at the level of the feed truck, the driver, and the farm. In addition, a reusable rubber boot was tested in an effort to increase the proportion of farms at which truck drivers wore clean footwear, and to explore an alternative to the standard plastic disposable boots that may be unsafe in winter conditions. Most farms did well in terms of proper dead-stock management and keeping the farm lane and feed bin areas clean. The provision of reusable rubber boots significantly increased the proportion of deliveries in which the driver wore clean footwear. PMID:25969585

  2. A Hypothesis-Testing Framework for Studies Investigating Ontogenetic Niche Shifts Using Stable Isotope Ratios

    PubMed Central

    Hammerschlag-Peyer, Caroline M.; Yeager, Lauren A.; Araújo, Márcio S.; Layman, Craig A.

    2011-01-01

    Ontogenetic niche shifts occur across diverse taxonomic groups, and can have critical implications for population dynamics, community structure, and ecosystem function. In this study, we provide a hypothesis-testing framework combining univariate and multivariate analyses to examine ontogenetic niche shifts using stable isotope ratios. This framework is based on three distinct ontogenetic niche shift scenarios, i.e., (1) no niche shift, (2) niche expansion/reduction, and (3) discrete niche shift between size classes. We developed criteria for identifying each scenario, as based on three important resource use characteristics, i.e., niche width, niche position, and niche overlap. We provide an empirical example for each ontogenetic niche shift scenario, illustrating differences in resource use characteristics among different organisms. The present framework provides a foundation for future studies on ontogenetic niche shifts, and also can be applied to examine resource variability among other population sub-groupings (e.g., by sex or phenotype). PMID:22073265

  3. Regulatory issues surrounding the use of companion animals in clinical investigations, trials, and studies.

    PubMed

    Hampshire, Victoria A

    2003-01-01

    Laboratory animal veterinarians sometimes encounter animals with rare conditions and may subsequently become involved in the performance of related animal research outside the laboratory, in homes, in veterinary clinics, or in universities to which owners have donated their animals for study. Similarly, veterinarians may monitor animal companion vaccination studies, performed to optimize preventive health care or minimize physiological variability and research confounders associated with a preventive medicine program for dogs and cats utilized for research procedures. These nontraditional uses of dogs, cats, and other companion animals in research have spurred the establishment of regulations to ensure that the animals benefit from clinical veterinary products and techniques. Included and described are the 2002 Public Health Service Policy, the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, and the regulations of the US Department of Agriculture in response to the AWA. The complexities of clinical research with companion animals outside standard biomedical research facilities are discussed.

  4. Application of stable carbon isotopes in long term mesocosm studies for carbon cycle investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is an effective greenhouse gas. The Oceans absorb ca. 30% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions and thereby partly attenuate deleterious climate effects. A consequence of the oceanic CO2 uptake is a decreased seawater pH and planktonic community shifts. The quantification of the anthropogenic perturbation was investigated through stable carbon isotope analysis in three "long term" mesocosm experiments (Sweden 2013, Gran Canaria 2014, Norway 2015) which reproduced near natural ecosystem conditions under both controlled and modified future CO2 level (up to 2000 ppm) scenarios. Parallel measurements of the stable isotope composition of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) dissolved organic carbon (δ13CDOC) and particulate carbon (δ13CTPC) both from the mesocosms water column and sediment traps showed similar trends in all the three experiments. A CO2 response was noticeable in the isotopic dataset, but increased CO2 levels had only a subtle effect on the concentrations of the dissolved and particulate organic carbon pool. Distinctive δ13C signatures of the particulate carbon pool both in the water column and the sediments were detectable for the different CO2 treatments and they were strongly correlated with the δ13CDIC signatures but not with the δ13CDOC pool. The validity of the isotopic data was verified by cross-analyses of multiple substances of known isotopic signatures on a GasBench, Elemental Analyser (EA) and on an in-house TOC-IRMS setup for the analysis of δ13CDIC, δ13CTPC and δ13CDOC, respectively. Results from these mesocosm experiments proved the stable carbon isotope approach to be an effective tool for quantifying the uptake and carbon transfer among the various compartments of the marine carbon system.

  5. Investigation of diesel ash particulate matter: A scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liati, A.; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, P.; Müller Gubler, E.; Schreiber, D.; Aguirre, M.

    2012-03-01

    Investigation of ash PM deposited in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) operating on a light truck by means of SEM and TEM reveals the following: ash inside the DPF occurs in form of chemically very inhomogeneous, mostly brittle agglomerates accumulated at the plugged ends of inlet channels and deposited directly on the inlet channel walls all along the filter length. Ash agglomerates occur within pores of the channel walls. A minor part of ash PM may escape to the atmosphere. The individual ash phases are mostly crystalline with round outlines and sizes between ca. 170 and 60 nm, down to 7-12 nm, that is far below the breathable size range PM10. Aggregation of the predominantly finest fraction of ash particles leads to densification, which may translate to fewer breakouts from the DPF. EDX mapping and chemical analyses of the bulk ash reveal that ash consists mainly of Ca, Mg, P, Zn, S, O and minor Fe, Al and Si. Based on TEM diffraction data of ash single phases, combined with data on their chemistry, the diversity of ash phases is higher than previously presumed. Comparison with the ash particles of a heavily used DPF from a passenger car operating with Fe-based fuel-borne additives reveals characteristics very similar to those found for the light truck DPF with a tendency to generally lower sizes of the participating phases, mostly between 30 and 60 nm. 4-40 nm large, locally abundant Pt particles deriving from the coating material of the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) upstream the DPF occur within ash agglomerates of both DPFs. Ash collected from the exhaust gas at the exit of the light truck DPF under normal engine operation reveals that some fine particles, as well as a few of the larger (200-600 nm) ash-bearing agglomerates escape filtration. Very fine ash particles are reaching the atmosphere also attached onto soot agglomerates.

  6. Laboratory studies investigating the processes leading to discolouration in water distribution networks.

    PubMed

    Husband, P S; Boxall, J B; Saul, A J

    2008-10-01

    Results are reported from laboratory experiments conducted to investigate the processes of discolouration within a water distribution system and specifically the concepts underpinning an empirical model proposed by Boxall et al. [Boxall, J.B., Saul, A.J., Skipworth, P.J., 2001. A novel approach to modelling sediment movement in distribution mains based on particle characteristics. Water Software Systems 1, 263-273.] and field validated by Boxall and Saul [Boxall, J.B., Saul, A.J., 2005. Modelling discolouration in potable water distribution systems. Journal of Environmental Engineering ASCE 131(5).]. The model is based on the hypothesis that discolouration is caused by the erosion and transport of fine particles, typically dominated by iron and manganese in the UK, that are attached to the pipe walls of the system by forces in addition to self-weight. These particles display cohesive-like properties and build up in layers on the pipe wall, conditioned by the usual daily flow patterns within the system. Discolouration events are caused by erosion of these layers due to changes in the system hydraulics and specifically changes in shear stress at the pipe wall, for example due to change in demand, a burst or the opening of a fire hydrant. Once cleaned from the pipe walls the layers re-accumulate under the usual conditions within the system. Experiments to determine cohesive layer behaviour and strength characteristics involved development periods followed by the measurement of the resultant discolouration when accumulated material was eroded by an increase in pipe-wall shear stress. The results support the empirical model concepts and hence its application. The results also suggest that the generation of material layers is influenced by the range of daily flow patterns, with greater variability reducing material accumulation, but not by the magnitude of steady state hydraulic conditions. PMID:18775550

  7. Laboratory studies investigating the processes leading to discolouration in water distribution networks.

    PubMed

    Husband, P S; Boxall, J B; Saul, A J

    2008-10-01

    Results are reported from laboratory experiments conducted to investigate the processes of discolouration within a water distribution system and specifically the concepts underpinning an empirical model proposed by Boxall et al. [Boxall, J.B., Saul, A.J., Skipworth, P.J., 2001. A novel approach to modelling sediment movement in distribution mains based on particle characteristics. Water Software Systems 1, 263-273.] and field validated by Boxall and Saul [Boxall, J.B., Saul, A.J., 2005. Modelling discolouration in potable water distribution systems. Journal of Environmental Engineering ASCE 131(5).]. The model is based on the hypothesis that discolouration is caused by the erosion and transport of fine particles, typically dominated by iron and manganese in the UK, that are attached to the pipe walls of the system by forces in addition to self-weight. These particles display cohesive-like properties and build up in layers on the pipe wall, conditioned by the usual daily flow patterns within the system. Discolouration events are caused by erosion of these layers due to changes in the system hydraulics and specifically changes in shear stress at the pipe wall, for example due to change in demand, a burst or the opening of a fire hydrant. Once cleaned from the pipe walls the layers re-accumulate under the usual conditions within the system. Experiments to determine cohesive layer behaviour and strength characteristics involved development periods followed by the measurement of the resultant discolouration when accumulated material was eroded by an increase in pipe-wall shear stress. The results support the empirical model concepts and hence its application. The results also suggest that the generation of material layers is influenced by the range of daily flow patterns, with greater variability reducing material accumulation, but not by the magnitude of steady state hydraulic conditions.

  8. Investigation of Interdiffusion Behavior in the Mo-Zr Binary System via Diffusion Couple Studies

    SciTech Connect

    A. Paz y Puente; J. Dickson; D.D. Keiser, Jr.; Y.H. Sohn

    2014-03-01

    Zirconium has recently garnered attention for use as a diffusion barrier between U–Mo metallic nuclear fuels and Al alloy cladding. In order to gain a fundamental understanding of the diffusional interactions, the interdiffusion behavior in the binary Mo–Zr system was investigated via solid-to-solid diffusion couples annealed in the temperature range of 750 to 1050 degrees C. A combination of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, and electron probe microanalysis were used to examine the microstructure and concentration profiles across the interdiffusion zone. A large __-Zr (cI2) solid solution layer and a thin (approximately 1–2 um) layer of Mo2Zr (cF24) developed in all couples. Parabolic growth constants and concentration dependent interdiffusion coefficients were calculated for the Mo2Zr and Zr solid solution phases, respectively. The pre-exponential factor and activation energy for growth of the Mo2Zr phase were determined to be approximately 6.5 × 10- 15 m2/s and 90 kJ/mol, respectively. The interdiffusion coefficient in ___-Zr solid solution decreased with an increase in Mo concentration. Both the pre-exponential factors (2 × 10- 8 m2/s at 2 at.% Mo to near 5 × 10- 8 m2/s at 9 at.% Mo) and activation energies (140 kJ/mol at 2 at.% Mo to approximately 155 kJ/mol at 9 at.% Mo) of interdiffusion coefficients were determined to increase with an increase in Mo concentration.

  9. Thermal stability investigation and the kinetic study of Folnak degradation process under nonisothermal conditions.

    PubMed

    Jankovi, Bojan

    2010-03-01

    The nonisothermal degradation process of Folnak drug samples was investigated by simultaneous thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis in the temperature range from an ambient one up to 810 degrees C. It was established that the degradation proceeds through the five degradation stages (designated as I, II, III, IV, and V), which include: the dehydration (I), the melting process of excipients (II), as well as the decomposition of folic acid (III), corn starch (IV), and saccharose (V), respectively. It was established that the presented excipients show a different behavior from that of the pure materials. During degradation, all excipients increase their thermal stability, and some kind of solid-solid and/or solid-gas interaction occurs. The kinetic parameters and reaction mechanism for the folic acid decomposition were established using different calculation procedures. It was concluded that the folic acid decomposition mechanism cannot be explained by the simple reaction order (ROn) model (n = 1) but with the complex reaction mechanism which includes the higher reaction orders (RO, n > 1), with average value of = 1.91. The isothermal predictions of the third (III) degradation stage of Folnak sample, at four different temperatures (T (iso) = 180 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 220 degrees C, and 260 degrees C), were established. It was concluded that the shapes of the isothermal conversion curves at lower temperatures (180-200 degrees C) were similar, whereas became more complex with further temperature increase due to the pterin and p-amino benzoic acid decomposition behavior, which brings the additional complexity in the overall folic acid decomposition process. PMID:20063077

  10. Investigation into the efficacy and safety of octreotide LAR in Japanese patients with acromegaly: Shizuoka study.

    PubMed

    Oki, Yutaka; Inoue, Tatsuhide; Imura, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Tokutaro; Genma, Rieko; Iwabuchi, Masayasu; Hataya, Yuji; Matsuzawa, Yuji; Iino, Kazumi; Nishizawa, Shigeru; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of the long-acting repeatable formulation of octreotide (OCT-LAR) treatment in patients suffering from acromegaly was investigated retrospectively in Shizuoka prefecture, Japan. Thirty patients (11 male, 19 female; average age, 48.9 years old), 29 of whom had undergone transsphenoidal surgery previously, were treated with OCT-LAR. OCT-LAR was injected i.m. every 4 weeks with an intended protocol of 20 mg over 24 months, however, 46.7% of patients required the dose of OCT-LAR to be increased. The final average dose of OCT-LAR was 25.0 +/- 6.8 mg. Administering OCT-LAR significantly decreased serum GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) levels (from 13.7 +/- 11.9 to 5.8 +/- 7.3 microg/L and from 585 +/- 263 to 339 +/- 193.7 microg/L after 3 months, respectively). Among patients treated with OCT-LAR, 56.7% expressed

  11. The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study: objectives and methods of a study investigating causality, course, and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    De Win, Maartje M L; Jager, Gerry; Vervaeke, Hylke K E; Schilt, Thelma; Reneman, Liesbeth; Booij, Jan; Verhulst, Frank C; Den Heeten, Gerard J; Ramsey, Nick F; Korf, Dirk J; Van den Brink, Wim

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the objectives and methods of The Netherlands XTC Toxicity (NeXT) study focussing on the causality, course, and clinical relevance of ecstasy neurotoxicity. Previous studies suggest that ecstasy (3,4 methylene-dioxymethamphetamine, MDMA, XTC) is toxic toward brain serotonin axons, but most of these studies have serious methodological limitations. The current study is a combination of different approaches with three substudies: (1) a crosssectional substudy among heavy ecstasy users and controls with variation in drug use, which will provide information about potential neurotoxic consequences of ecstasy in relation to other drugs; (2) a prospective cohort substudy in ecstasy-naive subjects with high risk for future ecstasy use, which will provide information on the causality and short-term course of ecstasy use and potential neurotoxicity, and (3) a retrospective cohort substudy in lifetime ecstasy users and matched controls of an existing epidemiological sample that will provide information on long-term course and outcome of ecstasy use in the general population. Neurotoxicity is studied using (a) different imaging techniques (beta-CIT SPECT, 1H-MR spectroscopy, diffusion tensor imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging), and (b) neuropsychological and psychiatric assessments of memory, depression, and personality. The combined results will lead to conclusions that can be used in prevention messages, clinical decision making, and the development of an (inter)national ecstasy policy.

  12. RACORO Continental Boundary Layer Cloud Investigations: 1. Case Study Development and Ensemble Large-Scale Forcings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Toto, Tami; Endo, Satoshi; Lin, Wuyin; Wang, Jian; Feng, Sha; Zhang, Yunyan; Turner, David D.; Liu, Yangang; Li, Zhijin; Xie, Shaocheng; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Zhang, Minghua; Khairoutdinov, Marat

    2015-01-01

    Observation-based modeling case studies of continental boundary layer clouds have been developed to study cloudy boundary layers, aerosol influences upon them, and their representation in cloud- and global-scale models. Three 60 h case study periods span the temporal evolution of cumulus, stratiform, and drizzling boundary layer cloud systems, representing mixed and transitional states rather than idealized or canonical cases. Based on in situ measurements from the Routine AAF (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility) CLOWD (Clouds with Low Optical Water Depth) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) field campaign and remote sensing observations, the cases are designed with a modular configuration to simplify use in large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column models. Aircraft measurements of aerosol number size distribution are fit to lognormal functions for concise representation in models. Values of the aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, kappa, are derived from observations to be approximately 0.10, which are lower than the 0.3 typical over continents and suggestive of a large aerosol organic fraction. Ensemble large-scale forcing data sets are derived from the ARM variational analysis, European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, and a multiscale data assimilation system. The forcings are assessed through comparison of measured bulk atmospheric and cloud properties to those computed in "trial" large-eddy simulations, where more efficient run times are enabled through modest reductions in grid resolution and domain size compared to the full-sized LES grid. Simulations capture many of the general features observed, but the state-of-the-art forcings were limited at representing details of cloud onset, and tight gradients and high-resolution transients of importance. Methods for improving the initial conditions and forcings are discussed. The cases developed are available to the general modeling community for studying continental boundary

  13. Environmental assessment of the Alaskan Continental Shelf. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 11. Biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume of final reports includes the following: Toxicity of Oil-Well Drilling Muds to Alaska Larval Shrimp and Crabs; Trophic Relationships Among Ice-Inhabiting Phocid Seals and Functionally Related Marine Mammals in the Chukchi Sea; Trophic Relationships Among Ice-Inhabiting Phocid Seals and Functionally Related Marine Mammals in the Bering Sea; Ecological Studies in the Bering Strait Region; and The Relationships of Marine Mammal Distributions, Densities and Activities to Sea Ice Conditions.

  14. A Qualitative Study Investigating Gender Differences in Primary Work Stressors and Levels of Job Satisfaction in Greek Junior Hospital Doctors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antoniou, Alexander-Stamatios; Cooper, Cary L.; Davidson, Marilyn J.

    2008-01-01

    Primary work stressors and job satisfaction/dissatisfaction in Greek Junior Hospital Doctors (JHDs) are investigated to identify similarities and differences in the reports obtained from male and female hospital doctors. Participants in the study included 32 male and 28 female Greek hospital doctors who provided information through…

  15. A Quasi-Experimental Study Investigating the Effect of Scent on Students' Memory of Multiplication Facts and Math Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leap, Evelyn M.

    2013-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study was conducted with two fifth grade classrooms to investigate the effect of scent on students' acquisition and retention of multiplication facts and math anxiety. Forty participants received daily instruction for nine weeks, using a strategy-rich multiplication program called Factivation. Students in the Double Smencil…

  16. A Study of NSF Teacher Enhancement Program (TEP) Participants and Principal Investigators: 1984-1989. Volume I: Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt Associates, Inc., Cambridge, MA.

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) supported more than 600 inservice teacher training programs between 1984 and 1989 under its Teacher Enhancement Program (TEP). Two studies were undertaken of TEP: the first was a survey of the 600 Principal Investigators (PIs) who had operated inservice teacher enhancement projects and the second, a survey of…

  17. Investigation of Problems of Implementing Curriculum in Primary Schools in Somalia. African Studies in Curriculum Development & Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Ibrahim Jeylani

    The aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of modern mathematics in the primary schools of Somalia. In particular, three concerns were addressed: (1) teachers' confidence and ability in teaching mathematics; (2) students' interest in mathematics; and (3) students' examination performance in mathematics. Subjects were 30 teachers…

  18. Teachers' Awareness of the Learner-Teacher Interaction: Preliminary Communication of a Study Investigating the Teaching Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Vanessa; Solis, S. Lynneth

    2013-01-01

    A new phase of research on teaching is under way that seeks to understand the teaching brain. In this vein, this study investigated the cognitive processes employed by master teachers. Using an interview protocol influenced by microgenetic techniques, 23 master teachers used the Self-in-Relation-to-Teaching (SiR2T) tool to answer "What are…

  19. A Study of Children's Conceptions of School Rules by Investigating Their Judgements of Transgressions in the Absence of Rules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornberg, Robert

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated 202 elementary school children's judgements and reasoning about transgressions when school rules regulating these transgressions have been removed in hypothetical school situations. As expected, moral transgressions were judged as more wrong and less accepted than structuring, protecting and etiquette transgressions. In…

  20. Arsenic Fate, Transport And Stability Study: Groundwater, Surface Water, Soil And Sediment Investigation At Fort Devens Superfund Site

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field investigation was conducted to examine the distribution of arsenic in groundwater, surface water, and sediments at the Fort Devens Superfund Site. The study area encompassed a portion of plow Shop Pond (Red Cove), which receives groundwater discharge from the aquifer und...

  1. Investigating the Place and Meaning of "Physical Education" to Preschool Children: Methodological Lessons from a Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEvilly, Nollaig

    2015-01-01

    Preschool physical education has not been extensively researched. Furthermore, research in physical activity and physical education rarely seeks young children's perspectives. The current paper focuses on one aspect of a post-structural study concerned with investigating the place and meaning of "physical education" to practitioners…

  2. Investigating facial affect processing in psychosis: a study using the Comprehensive Affective Testing System.

    PubMed

    Rossell, Susan L; Van Rheenen, Tamsyn E; Joshua, Nicole R; O'Regan, Alison; Gogos, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Facial affect processing (FAP) deficits in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD) have been widely reported; although effect sizes vary across studies, and there are limited direct comparisons of the two groups. Further, there is debate as to the influence of both psychotic and mood symptoms on FAP. This study aimed to address these limitations by recruiting groups of psychosis patients with either a diagnosis of SZ or BD and comparing them to healthy controls (HC) on a well validated battery of four FAP subtests: affect discrimination, name affect, select affect and match affect. Overall, both groups performed more poorly than controls in terms of accuracy. In SZ, this was largely driven by impairments on three of the four subtests. The BD patients showed impaired performance specifically on the match affect subtest, a task that had a high cognitive load. FAP performance in the psychosis patients was correlated with severity of positive symptoms and mania. This study confirmed that FAP deficits are a consistent finding in SZ that occur independent of task specific methodology; whilst FAP deficits in BD are more subtle. Further work in this group is needed to replicate these results.

  3. An Ongoing Investigation of Science Literacy: Results of a 22-Year Study Probing Students' Knowledge and Attitude Towards Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, C.; Buxner, S.; Antonellis, J.; CATS

    2013-04-01

    This talk presents findings related to our ongoing work investigating students' knowledge and attitudes towards science and technology. We present an overview of research studies and findings including a comparison of the science literacy measures of University of Arizona students compared to national studies, conceptions related to astrology, views of radiation, and students' pseudoscience and religious beliefs. We discuss implications for instructors and researchers interested in improving students' science literacy scores and diagnosing alternative beliefs.

  4. Investigation on the use of 0.3% tacrolimus lotion for canine atopic dermatitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Marsella, Rosanna; Nicklin, Constance F

    2002-08-01

    The efficacy of 0.3% tacrolimus lotion (maximum dosage: 0.3 mg kg-1 per day) for treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) was evaluated. Systemic absorption and effects on complete blood cell counts (CBC) and chemistry panels were also investigated. Eight dogs were assigned randomly to either a tacrolimus or a vehicle lotion treatment group. Both owners and investigator were blinded to the treatment. After 4 weeks, there was a 2-week wash-out period and treatments were reversed. Owners scored pruritus weekly while the investigator scored pruritus and erythema at the beginning and end of each treatment period. Investigator scores for pruritus in the tacrolimus group significantly decreased by the end of the study (P = 0.03). Investigator scores for erythema in the tacrolimus group were significantly lower than those in the placebo group at the end of the study (P = 0.005). There was no difference between groups with respect to owner scores for pruritus. No changes in the CBC and chemistry panels were noted. Mean blood concentrations of tacrolimus were below toxic levels.

  5. Investigation of the geochemical evolution of groundwater under agricultural land: A case study in northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledesma-Ruiz, Rogelio; Pastén-Zapata, Ernesto; Parra, Roberto; Harter, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Zona Citrícola is an important area for Mexico due to its citriculture activity. Situated in a sub-humid to humid climate adjacent to the Sierra Madre Oriental, this valley hosts an aquifer system that represents sequences of shales, marls, conglomerates, and alluvial deposits. Groundwater flows from mountainous recharge areas to the basin-fill deposits and provides base flows to supply drinking water to the adjacent metropolitan area of Monterrey. Recent studies examining the groundwater quality of the study area urge the mitigation of groundwater pollution. The objective of this study was to characterize the physical and chemical properties of the groundwater and to assess the processes controlling the groundwater's chemistry. Correlation was used to identify associations among various geochemical constituents. Factor analysis was applied to identify the water's chemical characteristics that were responsible for generating most of the variability within the dataset. Hierarchical cluster analysis was employed in combination with a post-hoc analysis of variance to partition the water samples into hydrochemical water groups: recharge waters (Ca-HCO3), transition zone waters (Ca-HCO3-SO4 to Ca-SO4-HCO3) and discharge waters (Ca-SO4). Inverse geochemical models of these groups were developed and constrained using PHREEQC to elucidate the chemical reactions controlling the water's chemistry between an initial (recharge) and final water. The primary reactions contributing to salinity were the following: (1) water-rock interactions, including the weathering of evaporitic rocks and dedolomitization; (2) dissolution of soil gas carbon dioxide; and (3) input from animal/human wastewater and manure in combination with by denitrification processes. Contributions from silicate weathering to salinity ranged from less important to insignificant. The findings suggest that it may not be cost-effective to regulate manure application to mitigate groundwater pollution.

  6. Investigation of risk factors for mortality in aged guide dogs: A retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hoummady, S; Hua, J; Muller, C; Pouchelon, J L; Blondot, M; Gilbert, C; Desquilbet, L

    2016-09-15

    The overall median lifespan of domestic dogs has been estimated to 9-12 years, but little is known about risk factors for mortality in aged and a priori healthy dogs. The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to determine which characteristics are associated with mortality in aged and a priori healthy guide dogs, in a retrospective cohort study of 116 guide dogs followed from a systematic geriatric examination at the age of 8-10 years old. A geriatric grid collected the clinical data and usual biological parameters were measured at the time of examination. Univariate (Kaplan-Meier estimates) and multivariable (Cox proportional hazard model) survival analyses were used to assess the associations with time to all-cause death. The majority of dogs were Golden Retrievers (n=48) and Labrador Retrievers (n=27). Median age at geriatric examination was 8.9 years. A total of 76 dogs died during follow-up, leading to a median survival time from geriatric examination of 4.4 years. After adjustment for demographic and biological variables, an increased alanine amionotransferase level (adjusted Hazard Ratio (adjusted HR), 6.2; 95% confidence interval [95%CI], 2.0-19.0; P<0.01), presenting skin nodules (adjusted HR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0-3.4; P=0.04), and not being a Labrador Retriever (adjusted HR, 3.3; 95%CI, 1.4-10; P<0.01) were independently associated with a shorter time to death. This study documents independent associations of alanine aminotransferase level, skin nodules and breed with mortality in aged guide dogs. These results may be useful for preventive medical care when conducting a geriatric examination in working dogs. PMID:27616361

  7. Investigation of anodized titanium implants coated with triterpenoids extracted from black cohosh: an animal study

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Phill; Kang, Tae-Joo; Heo, Seong-Joo; Koak, Jai-Young; Kim, Ju-Han; Lee, Joo-Hee; Lee, Shin-Jae

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to evaluate bone response to anodized titanium implants coated with the extract of black cohosh, Asarum Sieboldii, and pharbitis semen. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty anodized titanium implants were prepared as follows: group 1 was for control; group 2 were implants soaked in a solution containing triterpenoids extracted from black cohosh for 24 hours; group 3 were implants soaked in a solution containing extracts of black cohosh and Asarum Sieboldii for 24 hours; group 4 were implants soaked in a solution containing extracts of pharbitis semen for 24 hours. The implants from these groups were randomly and surgically implanted into the tibiae of ten rabbits. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks of healing, the nondecalcified ground sections were subjected to histological observation, and the percentage of bone-to-implant contact (BIC%) was calculated. RESULTS All groups exhibited good bone healing with the bone tissue in direct contact with the surface of the implant. Group 2 (52.44 ± 10.98, 25.54 ± 5.56) showed a significantly greater BIC% compared to that of group 3 (45.34 ± 5.00, 22.24 ± 2.20) with respect to the four consecutive threads and total length, respectively. The BIC% of group 1 (25.22 ± 6.00) was significantly greater than that of group 3 (22.24 ± 2.20) only for total length. CONCLUSION This study did not show any remarkable effects of the extract of black coshosh and the other natural products on osseointegration of anodized titanium implants as coating agents. Further studies about the application method of the natural products on to the surface of implants are required. PMID:24605201

  8. Investigation of an Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Mat Community Located near Aarhus, Denmark: Field Studies

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, David; Revsbech, Niels Peter

    1994-01-01

    We investigated the microbial community that developed at an iron seep where anoxic groundwater containing up to 250 μM Fe2+ flowed out of a rock wall and dense, mat-like aggregations of ferric hydroxides formed at the oxic-anoxic interface. In situ analysis with oxygen microelectrodes revealed that the oxygen concentrations in the mat were rarely more than 50% of air saturation and that the oxygen penetration depth was quite variable, ranging from <0.05 cm to several centimeters. The bulk pH of the mat ranged from 7.1 to 7.6. There appeared to be a correlation between the flow rates at different subsites of the mat and the morphotypes of the microorganisms and Fe oxides that developed. In subsites with low flow rates (<2 ml/s), the iron-encrusted sheaths of Leptothrix ochracea predominated. Miniature cores revealed that the top few millimeters of the mat consisted primarily of L. ochracea sheaths, only about 7% of which contained filaments of cells. Deeper in the mat, large particulate oxides developed, which were often heavily colonized by unicellular bacteria that were made visible by staining with acridine orange. Direct cell counts revealed that the number of bacteria increased from approximately 108 to 109 cells per cm3 and the total iron concentration increased from approximately 0.5 to 3 mmol/cm3 with depth in the mat. Primarily because of the growth of L. ochracea, the mat could accrete at rates of up to 3.1 mm/day at these subsites. The iron-encrusted stalks of Gallionella spp. prevailed in localized zones of the same low-flow-rate subsites, usually close to where the source water emanated from the wall. These latter zones had the lowest O2 concentrations (<10% of the ambient concentration), confirming the microaerobic nature of Gallionella spp. In subsites with high flow rates (>6 ml/s) particulate Fe oxides were dominant; direct counts revealed that up to 109 cells of primarily unicellular bacteria per cm3 were associated with these particulate oxides

  9. Investigation of an Iron-Oxidizing Microbial Mat Community Located near Aarhus, Denmark: Field Studies.

    PubMed

    Emerson, D; Revsbech, N P

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the microbial community that developed at an iron seep where anoxic groundwater containing up to 250 muM Fe flowed out of a rock wall and dense, mat-like aggregations of ferric hydroxides formed at the oxic-anoxic interface. In situ analysis with oxygen microelectrodes revealed that the oxygen concentrations in the mat were rarely more than 50% of air saturation and that the oxygen penetration depth was quite variable, ranging from <0.05 cm to several centimeters. The bulk pH of the mat ranged from 7.1 to 7.6. There appeared to be a correlation between the flow rates at different subsites of the mat and the morphotypes of the microorganisms and Fe oxides that developed. In subsites with low flow rates (<2 ml/s), the iron-encrusted sheaths of Leptothrix ochracea predominated. Miniature cores revealed that the top few millimeters of the mat consisted primarily of L. ochracea sheaths, only about 7% of which contained filaments of cells. Deeper in the mat, large particulate oxides developed, which were often heavily colonized by unicellular bacteria that were made visible by staining with acridine orange. Direct cell counts revealed that the number of bacteria increased from approximately 10 to 10 cells per cm and the total iron concentration increased from approximately 0.5 to 3 mmol/cm with depth in the mat. Primarily because of the growth of L. ochracea, the mat could accrete at rates of up to 3.1 mm/day at these subsites. The iron-encrusted stalks of Gallionella spp. prevailed in localized zones of the same low-flow-rate subsites, usually close to where the source water emanated from the wall. These latter zones had the lowest O(2) concentrations (<10% of the ambient concentration), confirming the microaerobic nature of Gallionella spp. In subsites with high flow rates (>6 ml/s) particulate Fe oxides were dominant; direct counts revealed that up to 10 cells of primarily unicellular bacteria per cm were associated with these particulate oxides. These

  10. Investigation of the interior of Mercury through the study of its gravity, topography, and tidal response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovan, Sebastiano

    With the goal of furthering our understanding of the interior structure of Mercury, this work tries to answer the following two questions. What can the response of the planet to solar tides reveal about the interior structure? What is the thickness of the crust and what are the implications for the interior? By comparing the models developed here for the tidal response of Mercury with the response measured by the MErcury Surface Space ENvironment GEochemistry and Ranging spacecraft (MESSENGER), the rheology of the mantle of the innermost planet is investigated. The measured tidal deformation indicates that, unless the rigidity of mantle materials is unexpectedly high, the mantle is relatively cold. Geochemical arguments based on the composition of the surface of Mercury as measured by MESSENGER have been used to put forward the hypothesis of the existence of a solid FeS layer at the bottom of the mantle. The tidal modeling indicates that the presence of the FeS layer is unlikely. To further constrain the interior structure of Mercury the thickness of the crust is calculated by computing geoid-to-topography ratios over the surface of the planet. The inferred crustal thickness, 35±18 km, has three interesting implications. First, this relatively thin crust allows for the possibility that basin-forming events excavated mantle material from Mercury's mantle. If this material is still exposed on the surface it can potentially be observed by instruments onboard MESSENGER and future missions at Mercury. Second, the volume of silicate materials present in the crust of Mercury represents about 10% of the total silicate materials in the planet, the largest value among the terrestrial planets. This implies that Mercury had the highest efficiency of crustal production. Finally, by combining the estimate of the crustal thickness with the measured abundances of heat-producing elements on the surface of Mercury a lower bound can be placed on the amount of heat production in the

  11. A solution study of silica condensation and speciation with relevance to in vitro investigations of biosilicification.

    PubMed

    Belton, David J; Deschaume, Olivier; Patwardhan, Siddharth V; Perry, Carole C

    2010-08-12

    Requiring mild synthesis conditions and possessing a high level of organization and functionality, biosilicas constitute a source of wonder and inspiration for both materials scientists and biologists. In order to understand how such biomaterials are formed and to apply this knowledge to the generation of novel bioinspired materials, a detailed study of the materials, as formed under biologically relevant conditions, is required. In this contribution, data from a detailed study of silica speciation and condensation using a model bioinspired silica precursor (silicon catechol complex, SCC) is presented. The silicon complex quickly and controllably dissociates under neutral pH conditions to well-defined, metastable solutions of orthosilicic acid. The formation of silicomolybdous (blue) complexes was used to monitor and study different stages of silicic acid condensation. In parallel, the rates of silicomolybdic (yellow) complex formation, with mathematical modeling of the species present, was used to follow the solution speciation of polysilicic acids. The results obtained from the two assays correlate well. Monomeric silicic acid, trimeric silicic acids, and different classes of oligomeric polysilicic acids and silica nuclei can be identified and their periods of stability during the early stages of silica condensation measured. For experiments performed at a range of temperatures (273-323 K), an activation energy of 77 kJ.mol(-1) was obtained for the formation of trimers. The activation energies for the forward and reverse condensation reactions for addition of monomers to polysilicic acids (273-293 +/- 1 K) were 55.0 and 58.6 kJ.mol(-1), respectively. For temperatures above 293 K, these energies were reduced to 6.1 and 7.3 kJ.mol(-1), indicating a probable change in the prevailing condensation mechanism. The impact of pH on the rates of condensation were measured. There was a direct correlation between the apparent third-order rate constant for trimer formation

  12. Investigation on the interaction behavior between curcumin and PAMAM dendrimer by spectral and docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Yanqing; Yang, Jinming; Jiang, Fuguang

    2013-05-01

    The interactions between PAMAM-C12 25% and curcumin were studied by UV/vis, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular modeling methods. The experimental results showed that the formation of PAMAM-C12 25%@curcumin non-covalent adduct induced the fluorescence quenching of PAMAM-C12 25%; Curcumin entered the interface of PAMAM-C12 25% with mainly five classes of binding sites by hydrophobic, hydrogen bonds, and van der Waals forces interactions. The bigger values of binding constants indicated that PAMAM-C12 25% hold the curcumin tightly.

  13. Investigation of problems associated with solid encapsulation of high voltage electronic assemblies; also Reynolds connector study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bever, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    Electric breakdown prevention in vacuum and encapsulation of high voltage electronic circuits was studied. The lap shear method was used to measure adhesive strengths. The permeation constants of air at ambient room temperature through four different space-grade encapsulants was measured. Order of magnitude was calculated for the time that air bubble pressures drop to the corona region. High voltage connectors with L-type cable attached were tested in a vacuum system at various pressures. The cable system was shown to suppress catastrophic breakdown when filled with and surrounded by gas in the corona region of pressures, but did not prove to be completely noise free.

  14. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject.

  15. Investigation on the interaction behavior between bisphenol A and pepsin by spectral and docking studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Cao, Jian; Fei, Zhenghao; Wang, Yanqing

    2012-08-01

    In this report, the binding interaction of BPA with pepsin has been explored by spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. Quenching of fluorescence of pepsin with increasing BPA concentration is a useful tool in the analysis of thermodynamic parameters. The results showed that the hydrophobic, steric contacts and hydrogen bonds interactions played major roles in stabilizing the complex. The binding of BPA to pepsin induced some micro-environmental and conformational changes in pepsin. The docking studies results showed that BPA entered into the hydrophobic cavity of pepsin. The interaction of pepsin with BPA occurs in the area between domain I and domain III.

  16. Spectral investigations, DFT computations and molecular docking studies of the antimicrobial 5-nitroisatin dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaula, T. Joselin; Joe, I. Hubert; Rastogi, V. K.; Jothy, V. Bena

    2015-03-01

    5-Nitroisatin is used for the treatment of fungal and bacterial strains exploring antimicrobial activity. Structural and vibrational spectroscopic studies were carried out by using FT-IR, FT Raman, UV and NMR spectral analysis together with DFT method using GAUSSIAN'09 software. Assignments of vibrational spectra have been carried out with the aid of NCA. NBO analysis, Charge Analysis, HOMO LUMO, ESP, aromaticity and thermodynamic properties have been analyzed. Thermal stability has been analyzed by TG/DTA method. 5NI has been screened for its antimicrobial activity and found to exhibit antifungal and antibacterial effects. Docking simulation has been performed.

  17. Investigating the emotional response to room acoustics: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Lawless, M S; Vigeant, M C

    2015-10-01

    While previous research has demonstrated the powerful influence of pleasant and unpleasant music on emotions, the present study utilizes functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess the positive and negative emotional responses as demonstrated in the brain when listening to music convolved with varying room acoustic conditions. During fMRI scans, subjects rated auralizations created in a simulated concert hall with varying reverberation times. The analysis detected activations in the dorsal striatum, a region associated with anticipation of reward, for two individuals for the highest rated stimulus, though no activations were found for regions associated with negative emotions in any subject. PMID:26520354

  18. Structural investigations of bismuth lead borosilicate glasses under the influence of gamma irradiation through ultrasonic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bootjomchai, Cherdsak; Laopaiboon, Jintana; Laopaiboon, Raewat

    2012-04-01

    The ultrasonic velocity measurements for different compositions of irradiated bismuth lead borosilicate glasses xBi2O3-(50-x)PbO-20B2O3-30SiO2 (x=2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mol.%) were performed at room temperature using pulse-echo technique. Densities of glass samples were measured by Archimedes' principle using n-hexane as the immersion liquid. The results from the studies show that ultrasonic velocity, elastic moduli, Poisson's ratio, microhardness, and the Debye temperature increase with increasing bismuth oxide content and increasing gamma-radiation dose (3-12 Gy).

  19. Tether-Based Investigation of the Ionosphere and Lower Thermosphere Concept Definition Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, L. (Editor); Herrmann, M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    Understanding the plasma and atmosphere around the Earth in the lower altitude regions of the mesosphere, lower thermosphere, and ionosphere is important in the global electric system. An upper atmosphere tether has been proposed to NASA that would collect much-needed data to further our knowledge of the regions. The mission is proposed as a shuttle experiment that would lower a tethered probe into certain regions of Earth's atmosphere, collecting data over a 6-day period. This report is a summary of the results of a concept definition study to design engineering system that will achieve the scientific objectives of this mission.

  20. Preliminary juvenile Lost River and shortnose sucker investigations in Clear Lake, California--2011 pilot study summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burdick, Summer M.; Rasmussen, Josh

    2012-01-01

    Poor recruitment appears to limit the recovery of Lost River and shortnose sucker populations in Clear Lake Reservoir, California, but the cause is unknown. Adult suckers migrate up Willow Creek and its tributaries to spawn in some years, but low flow in Willow Creek may inhibit spawning migrations in other years. It is unclear whether spawning is successful, larvae survive, or juveniles persist to adulthood. Environmental variables associated with successful spawning or young-of-year survival have not been identified and early life history for these populations is poorly understood. The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Ruby Pipeline L.L.C. Corporation (El Paso, Tex.) initiated a study in 2011 to better understand juvenile sucker life history in Clear Lake Reservoir, and to identify constraints in the early life history that may limit recruitment to the adult spawning populations. This is a report on the 2011 pilot study for this project.

  1. Epidemiologic investigation of tuberculosis in a Mexican population from Chihuahua State, Mexico: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chittoor, Geetha; Arya, Rector; Farook, Vidya S; David, Randy; Puppala, Sobha; Resendez, Roy G; Rivera-Chavira, Blanca E; Leal-Berumen, Irene; Zenteno-Cuevas, Roberto; López-Alvarenga, Juan Carlos; Bastarrachea, Raul A; Curran, Joanne E; Dhandayuthapani, Subramanian; Gonzalez, Lupe; Blangero, John; Crawford, Michael H; Vlasich, Esteban M; Escobedo, Luis G; Duggirala, Ravindranath

    2013-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and its co-morbid conditions have become a burden on global health economies. It is well understood that susceptibility of the host to TB infection/disease is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors and their interactions. The aims of this pilot case-control study are to characterize the sociodemographic and environmental factors related to active TB disease (TB/case) and latent TB infection (LTBI/control) status, and to identify risk factors associated with progression from LTBI to TB. We recruited 75 cases with TB (mean age=46.3y; females=41%) and 75 controls with LTBI (mean age=39.0y; females=37%), from the Mestizo population of Cuidad Juárez, Mexico. In addition to the determination of case/control status, information on environmental variables was collected (e.g., socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol consumption, substance abuse, nutritional status, household demographics, medical histories and presence of type 2 diabetes [T2DM]). The data were analyzed to identify the environmental correlates of TB and LTBI using univariate and multivariate statistical approaches. Following multivariate logistic regression analysis, TB was associated with poor nutrition, T2DM, family history of TB, and non-Chihuahua state of birth. These preliminary findings have relevance to TB control at the Mexico-United States border, and contribute to our future genetic study of TB in Mexicans.

  2. Chlorine-36 investigations of groundwater infiltration in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.S.; Fabryka-Martin, J.T.; Dixon, P.R.; Liu, B.; Turin, H.J.; Wolfsberg, A.V.

    1997-12-31

    Chlorine-36, including the natural cosmogenic component and the component produced during atmospheric nuclear testing in the 1950`s and 1960`s (bomb pulse), is being used as an isotopic tracer for groundwater infiltration studies at Yucca Mountain, a potential nuclear waste repository. Rock samples have been collected systematically in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), and samples were also collected from fractures, faults, and breccia zones. Isotopic ratios indicative of bomb-pulse components in the water ({sup 36}Cl/Cl values > 1,250 {times} 10{sup {minus}15}), signifying less than 40-yr travel times from the surface, have been detected at a few locations within the Topopah Spring Tuff, the candidate host rock for the repository. The specific features associated with the high {sup 36}Cl/Cl values are predominantly cooling joints and syngenetic breccias, but most of the sites are in the general vicinity of faults. The non-bomb pulse samples have {sup 36}Cl/Cl values interpreted to indicate groundwater travel times of at least a few thousand to possibly several hundred thousand years. Preliminary numerical solute-travel experiments using the FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer) code demonstrate consistency between these interpreted ages and the observed {sup 36}Cl/Cl values but do not validate the interpretations.

  3. Chlorine-36 investigations of groundwater infiltration in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, S.S.; Fabryka-Martin, J.T.; Dixon, P.R.; Liu, B.; Turin, H.J.; Wolfsberg, A.V.

    1997-12-01

    Chlorine-36, including the natural cosmogenic component and the component produced during atmospheric nuclear testing in the 1950`s and 1960`s (bomb pulse), is being used as an isotopic tracer for groundwater infiltration studies at Yucca Mountain, a potential nuclear waste repository. Rock samples have been collected systematically in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), and samples were also collected from fractures, faults, and breccia zones. Isotopic ratios indicative of bomb-pulse components in the water ({sup 36}Cl/Cl values > 1,250 x 10{sup {minus}15}), signifying less than 40-yr travel times from the surface, have been detected at a few locations within the Topopah Spring Tuff, the candidate host rock for the repository. The specific features associated with the high {sup 36}Cl/Cl values are predominantly cooling joints and syngenetic breccias, but most of the sites are in the general vicinity of faults. The non-bomb pulse samples have {sup 36}Cl/Cl values interpreted to indicate groundwater travel times of at least a few thousand to possibly several hundred thousand years. Preliminary numerical solute-travel experiments using the FEHM (Finite Element Heat and Mass transfer) code demonstrate consistency between these interpreted ages and the observed {sup 36}Cl/Cl values but do not validate the interpretations.

  4. Spectral investigation and theoretical study of zwitterionic and neutral forms of quinolinic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, M.; Sinha, L.; Prasad, O.; Bilgili, S.; Sachan, Alok K.; Asiri, A. M.; Atac, A.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, molecular structure and vibrational analysis of quinolinic acid (2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid), in zwitterionic and neutral forms, were presented using FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR, UV experimental techniques and quantum chemical calculations. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 2,3-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,3-PDCA) in the solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm-1 and 3500-0 cm-1, respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies were obtained for zwitter and neutral forms by using density functional theory (DFT) at B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. 3D potential energy scan was performed by varying the selected dihedral angles using M06-2X and B3LYP functionals at 6-31G(d) level of theory and thus the most stable conformer of the title compound was determined. The most stable conformer was further optimized at higher level and vibrational wavenumbers were calculated. Theoretical vibrational assignment of 2,3-PDCA, using percentage potential energy distribution (PED) was done with MOLVIB program. 13C and 1H NMR spectra were recorded in DMSO. Chemical shifts were calculated at the same level of theory. The UV absorption spectra of the studied compound in ethanol and water were recorded in the range of 200-400 nm. The optimized geometric parameters were compared with experimental data.

  5. Investigating the vertical dimension of Singapore's urban heat island through quadcopter platforms: an pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Winston; Ho, Dawn

    2016-04-01

    In numerous cities, measurements of urban warmth in most urban heat island (UHI) studies are generally constrained towards surface or near-surface (<2 m above surface level) levels across horizontal variations in land use and land cover. However, there has been hitherto limited attention towards the measurement of vertical temperature profiles extending from the urban surface, urban canopy layer through to the urban boundary layer. Knowledge of these profiles, through (a.) how they vary over different local urban morphologies, and (b.) develop with respect to synoptic meteorological conditions, are important towards several aspects of UHI research; these include validating modelling urban canopy lapse rate profiles or estimating the growth of urban plumes. In this novel study, we utilised temperature sensor-loggers attached onto remote controlled aerial quadcopter platforms to measure urban temperature profiles up to 100 m above ground level in Singapore, which is a rapidly urbanizing major tropical metropolis. Three different land use/land cover categories were sampled; a high-rise residential estate, a university campus, and an urban park/green-space. Sorties were flown repeatedly at four different times - sunrise, noon, sunset and midnight. Initial results indicate significant variations in intra-site stability and inversion development between the urban canopy and boundary layers. These profiles are also temporally dynamic, depending on the time of day and larger-scale weather conditions.

  6. Study on the interaction of the toxic food additive carmoisine with serum albumins: a microcalorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-30

    The interaction of the synthetic azo dye and food colorant carmoisine with human and bovine serum albumins was studied by microcalorimetric techniques. A complete thermodynamic profile of the interaction was obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. The equilibrium constant of the complexation process was of the order of 10(6)M(-1) and the binding stoichiometry was found to be 1:1 with both the serum albumins. The binding was driven by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropy contributions. The binding affinity was lower at higher salt concentrations in both cases but the same was dominated by mostly non-electrostatic forces at all salt concentrations. The polyelectrolytic forces contributed only 5-8% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy change. The standard molar enthalpy change enhanced whereas the standard molar entropic contribution decreased with rise in temperature but they compensated each other to keep the standard molar Gibbs energy change almost invariant. The negative standard molar heat capacity values suggested the involvement of a significant hydrophobic contribution in the complexation process. Besides, enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon was also observed in both the systems. The thermal stability of the serum proteins was found to be remarkably enhanced on binding to carmoisine. PMID:24742664

  7. An investigation of Forex market efficiency based on detrended fluctuation analysis: A case study for Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abounoori, Esmaiel; Shahrazi, Mahdi; Rasekhi, Saeed

    2012-06-01

    The efficient market hypothesis (EMH) states that asset prices fully reflect all available information. As a result, speculators cannot predict the future behavior of asset prices and earn excess profits at least after adjusting for risk. Although initial tests of the EMH were performed on stock market data, the EMH was soon applied to other markets including foreign exchange (FX). This study uses the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) technique to test 01:12:2005-18:04:2010 Iranian Rial/US Dollar exchange rate time series data to see if it can be explained by the weak form of the EMH. Moreover, to determine changes in the degree of inefficiency over time, the whole period has been divided into four subperiods. The study shows that the Iranian Forex market (the Rial/Dollar case) is weak-form inefficient over the whole period and in each of the subperiods. However, the degree of inefficiency is not constant over time. The findings suggest that profitable risk-adjusted trades could be made using past data.

  8. Study on the interaction of the toxic food additive carmoisine with serum albumins: a microcalorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-30

    The interaction of the synthetic azo dye and food colorant carmoisine with human and bovine serum albumins was studied by microcalorimetric techniques. A complete thermodynamic profile of the interaction was obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. The equilibrium constant of the complexation process was of the order of 10(6)M(-1) and the binding stoichiometry was found to be 1:1 with both the serum albumins. The binding was driven by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropy contributions. The binding affinity was lower at higher salt concentrations in both cases but the same was dominated by mostly non-electrostatic forces at all salt concentrations. The polyelectrolytic forces contributed only 5-8% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy change. The standard molar enthalpy change enhanced whereas the standard molar entropic contribution decreased with rise in temperature but they compensated each other to keep the standard molar Gibbs energy change almost invariant. The negative standard molar heat capacity values suggested the involvement of a significant hydrophobic contribution in the complexation process. Besides, enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon was also observed in both the systems. The thermal stability of the serum proteins was found to be remarkably enhanced on binding to carmoisine.

  9. The black/white mortality crossover: investigation in a community-based study.

    PubMed

    Wing, S; Manton, K G; Stallard, E; Hames, C G; Tryoler, H A

    1985-01-01

    The black/white mortality crossover at about age 75, a result of lower white mortality rates at younger ages and lower black rates at the oldest ages, has been observed in U.S. vital statistics since 1900. Though a persistant observation in such data, its validity has been challenged by questions about census enumeration and age reporting on death certificates. Analyses of 20 years experience of all-cause mortality in the community-based Evans County Study using a Weibull model of age specific mortality rates showed a statistically significant black/white mortality crossover for both men (at age 73) and women (at age 85). The finding of a crossover in this longitudinally followed population is significant because the age reporting for both survivors and age at death for nonsurvivors were obtained in the study protocol and did not rely on age reporting either in census data or on the death certificate. Differences in the age and sex patterns of mortality between two populations living in the same geographic region are relevant to questions about the etiology of the major age-related chronic diseases as well as to topics of current interest in health care policy.

  10. Precipitation measurement using SIR-C: A feasibility study. Investigation at nadir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahamad, Atiq; Moore, Richard K.

    1993-01-01

    The most significant limitation of the imaging SAR in rain measurements is the ground return coupled to the rain cell. Here we report a study of the possibility of using the X-SAR and the C-band channel of SIR-C for rain measurement. Earlier signal-to-clutter calculations rule out the use of X-SAR at steeper off-vertical angles of incidence (i.e., 20 less than theta less than 50). Only rain rates greater than 30 mm/hr at angles of incidence greater than 60 degrees showed good signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR). This study involved calculations at vertical incidence. There is adequate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at vertical incidence, but the presence of high-range side-lobe levels leads to small SCR for measurement over oceans at both X and C bands. For larger rain thickness (greater than two km), the SCR gets better and smaller rain rates (greater than 10 mm/hr) can be measured. However, rain measurements over forests seem to be feasible at nadir even for smaller rain thickness (less than two km). We conclude that X band may be usable over the forest at vertical incidence to measure rain rates greater than five mm/hr even for shallow rain thickness and over ocean for large rain thickness.

  11. Supporting early career health investigators in Kenya: A qualitative study of HIV/AIDS research capacity building

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Joseph; Nduati, Ruth; Kiarie, James; Farquhar, Carey

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Strategies to transfer international health research training programs to sub-Saharan African institutions focus on developing cadres of local investigators who will lead such programs. Using a critical leadership theory framework, we conducted a qualitative study of one program to understand how collaborative training and research can support early career investigators in Kenya toward the program transfer goal. Methods We used purposive sampling methods and a semi-structured protocol to conduct in-depth interviews with US (N = 5) and Kenyan (N = 5) independent investigators. Transcripts were coded using a two-step process, and then compared with each other to identify major themes. Results A limited local research environment, funding needs and research career mentorship were identified as major influences on early career researchers. Institutional demands on Kenyan faculty to teach rather than complete research restricted investigators’ ability to develop research careers. This was coupled with lack of local funding to support research. Sustainable collaborations between Kenyan, US and other international investigators were perceived to mitigate these challenges and support early career investigators who would help build a robust local research environment for training. Conclusion Mutually beneficial collaborations between Kenyan and US investigators developed during training mitigate these challenges and build a supportive research environment for training. In these collaborations, early career investigators learn how to navigate the complex international research environment to build local HIV research capacity. Shared and mutually beneficial resources within international research collaborations are required to support early career investigators and plans to transfer health research training to African institutions. PMID:26113923

  12. Preliminary Investigations on Intradiscal Pressures during Daily Activities: An In Vivo Study Using the Merino Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Reitmaier, Sandra; Schmidt, Hendrik; Ihler, Renate; Kocak, Tugrul; Graf, Nicolas; Ignatius, Anita; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Currently, no studies exist, which attest the suitability of the ovine intervertebral disc as a biomechanical in vivo model for preclinical tests of new therapeutic strategies of the human disc. By measuring the intradiscal pressure in vivo, the current study attempts to characterize an essential biomechanical parameter to provide a more comprehensive physiological understanding of the ovine intervertebral disc. Methods Intradiscal pressure (IDP) was measured for 24 hours within the discs L2-L3 and L4-L5 via a piezo-resistive pressure sensor in one merino sheep. The data were divided into an activity and a recovery phase and the corresponding average pressures for both phases were determined. Additionally, IDPs for different static and dynamic activities were analyzed and juxtaposed to human data published previously. After sacrificing the sheep, the forces corresponding to the measured IDPs were examined ex vivo in an axial compression test. Results The temporal patterns of IDP where pressure decreased during activity and increased during rest were comparable between humans and sheep. However, large differences were observed for different dynamic activities such as standing up or walking. Here, IDPs averaged 3.73 MPa and 1.60 MPa respectively, approximately two to four times higher in the ovine disc compared to human. These IDPs correspond to lower ex vivo derived axial compressive forces for the ovine disc in comparison to the human disc. For activity and rest, average ovine forces were 130 N and 58 N, compared to human forces of 400-600 N and 100 N, respectively. Conclusions In vivo IDPs were found to be higher in the ovine than in the human disc. In contrast, axial forces derived ex vivo were markedly lower in comparison to humans. Both should be considered in future preclinical tests of intradiscal therapies using the sheep. The techniques used in the current study may serve as a protocol for measuring IDP in a variety of large animal models

  13. Qualitative study investigating the commissioning process for older people's services provided by third sector organisations: SOPRANO study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Sands, Gina; Chadborn, Neil; Craig, Chris; Gladman, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The commissioning of third sector services for older people may influence the quality, availability and coordination of services for older people. The SOPRANO study aims to understand the relationships between and processes of commissioning bodies and third sector organisations providing health and social care services for older people. Methods and analysis This qualitative study will be based in the East Midlands region of England. An initial scoping survey of commissioners will give an overview of services to maintain the health and well-being of older people in the community that are commissioned. Following this, semistructured interviews will be conducted with 4 sample groups: health and social care commissioners, service provider managers, service provider case workers and older service users. A sample size of 10–15 participants in each of the 4 groups is expected to be sufficient to reach data saturation, resulting in a final expected sample size of 40–60 participants. Informed consent will be gained from all participants, and those unable to provide informed consent will be excluded. The interview data will be analysed by 2 researchers using framework content analysis. Ethics and dissemination Approval for the study has been gained from the University of Nottingham School of Medicine ethical review board, and the relevant approvals have been gained from the National Health Service (NHS) research and development departments for interviewing NHS staff. Early engagement with a wide range of stakeholders will ensure that the research findings are extensively disseminated to relevant stakeholders (including commissioners and third sector providers) in an accessible format using the extensive communication networks available to the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care CLAHRCs (applied health research organisations covering all of England). The study will also be disseminated

  14. Investigation of Noises in GPS Time Series: Case Study on Epn Weekly Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klos, Anna; Bogusz, Janusz; Figurski, Mariusz; Kosek, Wieslaw; Gruszczynski, Maciej

    2014-05-01

    The noises in GPS time series are stated to be described the best by the combination of white (Gaussian) and power-law processes. They are mainly the effect of mismodelled satellite orbits, Earth orientation parameters, atmospheric effects, antennae phase centre effects, or of monument instability. Due to the fact, that velocities of permanent stations define the kinematic reference frame, they have to fulfil the requirement of being stable at 0.1 mm/yr. The previously performed researches showed, that the wrong assumption of noise model leads to the underestimation of velocities and their uncertainties from 2 up to even 11, especially in the Up direction. This presentation focuses on more than 200 EPN (EUREF Permanent Network) stations from the area of Europe with various monument types (concrete pillars, buildings, metal masts, with or without domes, placed on the ground or on the rock) and coordinates of weekly changes (GPS weeks 0834-1459). The topocentric components (North, East, Up) in ITRF2005 which come from the EPN Re-Processing made by the Military University of Technology Local Analysis Centre (MUT LAC) were processed with Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MLE) using CATS software. We have assumed the existence of few combinations of noise models (these are: white, flicker and random walk noise with integer spectral indices and power-law noise models with fractional spectral indices) and investigated which of them EPN weekly time series are likely to follow. The results show, that noises in GPS time series are described the best by the combination of white and flicker noise model. It is strictly related to the so-called common mode error (CME) that is spatially correlated error being one of the dominant error source in GPS solutions. We have assumed CME as spatially uniform, what was a good approximation for stations located hundreds of kilometres one to another. Its removal with spatial filtering reduces the amplitudes of white and flicker noise by a

  15. Investigative studies into the recovery of DNA from improvised explosive device containers.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Shane G; Stallworth, Shawn E; Foran, David R

    2012-05-01

    Apprehending those who utilize improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is a national priority owing to their use both domestically and abroad. IEDs are often concealed in bags, boxes, or backpacks to prevent their detection. Given this, the goal of the research presented was to identify IED handlers through postblast DNA recovery from IED containers. Study participants were asked to use backpacks for 11 days, after which they served as containers for pipe bombs. Eleven postdeflagration backpack regions likely to be handled were swabbed and analyzed via mini-short tandem repeats (miniSTRs) and alleles were called blind. An experimental consensus method was examined in which profiles from all regions were considered, to help identify spurious drop-in/out. Results were correct for all loci, except one that remained ambiguous. The results show that recovering DNA from IED containers is a viable approach for aiding in the identification of those who may have been involved in an IED event.

  16. After the doctorate: a qualitative study investigating nursing research career development in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Nawafleh, Ahmed; Zeilani, Ruqayya S; Evans, Catrin

    2013-12-01

    There is a dearth of research exploring the development of postdoctoral nursing research careers in non-Western contexts. This paper reports on a qualitative study of Jordanian graduates of UK PhD programs. Interviews were held with 16 graduates who worked in the nursing faculty of seven different universities in Jordan. Participants reported that their doctoral degree had equipped them with confidence and enthusiasm for developing a research career. Mentorship, leadership, and peer support were identified as essential to supporting ongoing research activity. Access to these sources of support was variable and participants also described a range of institutional and organizational structures that directly or indirectly discouraged them from developing research productivity. This research suggests that support for postdoctoral novice researchers is an important area for further attention - for Jordanian universities, for UK PhD supervisors (and their associated academic departments), and for the wider nursing community.

  17. An Exploratory Study Investigating the Effects of Barefoot Running on Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Alloway, Ross G; Alloway, Tracy Packiam; Magyari, Peter M; Floyd, Shelley

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the potential cognitive benefits of running barefoot compared to shod. Young adults (N = 72, M age = 24.4 years, SD = 5.5) ran both barefoot and shod on a running track while stepping on targets (poker chips) and when not stepping on targets. The main finding was that participants performed better on a working memory test when running barefoot compared to shod, but only when they had to step on targets. These results supported the idea that additional attention is needed when running barefoot to avoid stepping on objects that could potentially injure the foot. Significant increases in participant's heart rate were also found in the barefoot condition. No significant differences were found in participants' speed across conditions. These findings suggested that working memory may be enhanced after at least 16 minutes of barefoot running if the individual has to focus attention on the ground.

  18. Biosorption of metal contaminants using immobilized biomass: A laboratory study. Rept. of Investigations/1991

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, T.H.; Ferguson, C.R.; Bennett, P.G.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed porous beads containing immobilized biological materials for removing metal contaminants from waste waters. The beads, designated as BIO-FIX beads, are prepared by blending biomass, such as sphagnum peat moss or algae, into a polymer solution and spraying the mixture into water. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine bead sorption and elution characteristics. Batch and continuous tests demonstrated that BIO-FIX beads sorbed arsenic, cadmium, lead, and other toxic metals from acid mine drainage waters collected from several sites. Selectivity for heavy and toxic metal ions over calcium and magnesium was demonstrated. The beads exhibited excellent metal sorption and handling characteristics in stirred tanks, column contactors, and a low-maintenance passive system. The sorption process was reversible, and metal ions were eluted from the beads using dilute mineral acids. Cyclic tests indicated that the beads continued to extract metal ions after repeated loading-elution cycles.

  19. AFM investigation and optical band gap study of chemically deposited PbS thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, S.; Mansoor, M.; Abubakar; Asim, M. M.

    2016-08-01

    The interest into deposition of nanocrystalline PbS thin films, the potential of designing and tailoring both the topographical features and the band gap energy (Eg) by controlling growth parameters, has significant technological importance. Nanocrystalline thin films of lead sulfide were grown onto glass substrates by chemical bath deposition (CBD) method. The experiments were carried out by varying deposition temperature. We report on the modification of structural and optical properties as a function of deposition temperature. The morphological changes of the films were analyzed by using SEM and AFM. AFM was also used to calculate average roughness of the films. XRD spectra indicated preferred growth of cubic phase of PbS films in (200) direction with increasing deposition time. Optical properties have been studied by UV-Spectrophotometer. From the diffused reflectance spectra we have calculated the optical Eg shift from 0.649-0.636 eV with increasing deposition time.

  20. Investigation study on the nonlinear optical properties of natural dyes: Chlorophyll a and b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouissa, B.; Bouchouit, K.; Abed, S.; Essaidi, Z.; Derkowska, B.; Sahraoui, B.

    2013-04-01

    We report the results on third and second order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of two natural pigments extracted from spinach. The last were identified by UV-vis spectral analysis. Thin films were prepared by spin coating technique and deposited on glass substrate. The measurements of third order nonlinear optical susceptibilities were performed in solutions using degenerate four wave mixing technique (DFWM) at the measurement wavelength of 532 nm. The third and second order nonlinear optical susceptibilities of the studied pigments were also evaluated on thin films using the third and second harmonics generation (THG and SHG) Maker fringes technique respectively at 1064 nm. All these results were in good agreement with the literature data.

  1. Model Intercomparison Study to Investigate a Dense Contaminant Plume in a Complex Hydrogeologic System

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark D. ); Cole, Charles R. ); Foley, Michael G. ); Zinina, Galina A.; Zinin, Alexander I.; Vasil'Kova, Nelly A.; Samsonova, Lilia M.

    2001-12-01

    A joint Russian and U.S. model intercomparison study was undertaken for developing more realistic contaminant transport models of the Mayak Site, Southern Urals. The test problems were developed by the Russian Team based on their experience modeling contaminant migration near Lake Karachai. The intercomparison problems were designed to address lake and contaminant plume interactions, as well as river interactions and plume density effects. Different numerical codes were used. Overall there is good agreement between the results of both models. Features shown by both models include (1) the sinking of the plume below the lake, (2) the raising of the water table in the fresh water adjacent to the lake in response to the increased pressure from the dense plume, and (3) the formation of a second sinking plume in an area where evapotranspiration exceeded infiltration, thus increasing the solute concentrations above the source (i.e., lake) values.

  2. Experimental study of arachnoiditis from iohexol, an investigational nonionic aqueous contrast medium.

    PubMed

    Haughton, V M; Ho, K C; Lipman, B T

    1982-01-01

    Myelography was performed in 16 monkeys using either metrizamide or iohexol, a new nonionic aqueous contrast medium. Eight of the animals received almost five times the recommended clinical dose of contrast medium per unit of body weight; the other eight received the equivalent of a high clinical dose. The severity of resultant arachnoiditis 12 weeks later was evaluated by repeat myelography and by histologic study of the arachnoid. No animals had severe arachnoiditis. Two of the four animals examined with the higher dose of metrizamide had moderate arachnoiditis and one had mild arachnoiditis; with the lower dose of metrizamide, two of four animals had mild arachnoiditis. No significant evidence of arachnoiditis was seen in any of the eight animals examined with iohexol.

  3. Microstructure investigation and magnetic study of permalloy thin films grown by thermal evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamrani, Sabrina; Guittoum, Abderrahim; Schäfer, Rudolf; Pofahl, Stefan; Neu, Volker; Hemmous, Messaoud; Benbrahim, Nassima

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of thickness on the structural and magnetic properties of permalloy thin films, evaporated on glass substrate. The films thicknesses range from 16 to 90 nm. From X-ray diffraction spectra analysis, we show that the thinner films present a "1,1,1" preferred orientation. However, the thicker films exhibit a random orientation. The grains size increases and the lattice parameter decreases with increasing thickness. The magnetic force microscopy observations display cross-tie walls features only for the two thicker films (60 and 90 nm thick films). The magnetic microstructure, carried out by Kerr microscopy technique, shows the presence of magnetic domains changing with the direction of applied magnetic field. The coercive field, Hc, was found to decrease from 6.5 for 16 to 1.75 Oe for 90 nm. All these results will be discussed and correlated.

  4. Studies of heat-source driven natural convection: A numerical investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emara, A. A.; Kulacki, F. A.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal convection driven by uniform volumetric energy sources was studied in a horizontal fluid layer bounded from above by a rigid, isothermal surface and from below by a rigid, zero heat-flux surface. The side walls of the fluid domain were assumed to be rigid and perfectly insulating. The computations were formally restricted to two-dimensional laminar convection but were carried out for a range of Rayleigh numbers which spans the regimes of laminar and turbulent flow. The results of the computations consists of streamline and isotherm patterns, horizontally averaged temperature distributions, and horizontally averaged Nusselt numbers at the upper surface. Flow and temperature fields do not exhibit a steady state, but horizontally averaged Nusselt numbers reach limiting, quasi-steady values for all Rayleigh numbers considered. Correlations of the Nusselt number in terms of the Rayleigh and Prandtl numbers were determined.

  5. Status of volcanic hazard studies for the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Crowe, B.M.; Vaniman, D.T.; Carr, W.J.

    1983-03-01

    Volcanism studies of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) region are concerned with hazards of future volcanism with respect to underground disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The hazards of silicic volcanism are judged to be negligible; hazards of basaltic volcanism are judged through research approaches combining hazard appraisal and risk assessment. The NTS region is cut obliquely by a N-NE trending belt of volcanism. This belt developed about 8 Myr ago following cessation of silicic volcanism and contemporaneous with migration of basaltic activity toward the southwest margin of the Great Basin. Two types of fields are present in the belt: (1) large-volume, long-lived basalt and local rhyolite fields with numerous eruptive centers and (2) small-volume fields formed by scattered basaltic scoria cones. Late Cenozoic basalts of the NTS region belong to the second field type. Monogenetic basalt centers of this region were formed mostly by Strombolian eruptions; Surtseyean activity has been recognized at three centers. Geochemically, the basalts of the NTS region are classified as straddle A-type basalts of the alkalic suite. Petrological studies indicate a volumetric dominance of evolved hawaiite magmas. Trace- and rare-earth-element abundances of younger basalt (<4 Myr) of the NTS region and southern Death Valley area, California, indicate an enrichment in incompatible elements, with the exception of rubidium. The conditional probability of recurring basaltic volcanism and disruption of a repository by that event is bounded by the range of 10{sup -8} to 10{sup -10} as calculated for a 1-yr period. Potential disruptive and dispersal effects of magmatic penetration of a repository are controlled primarily by the geometry of basalt feeder systems, the mechanism of waste incorporation in magma, and Strombolian eruption processes.

  6. Rubella outbreak investigation, Gokwe North District, Midlands province, Zimbabwe, 2014 - a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Makoni, Annamercy Chenaimoyo; Chemhuru, Milton; Bangure, Donewell; Gombe, Notion Tafara; Tshimanga, Mufuta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Rubella is a contagious disease, caused by rubella virus and transmitted via the respiratory route. Rubella in pregnancy may cause Congenital Rubella Syndrome (CRS), characterized by multiple defects to the brain, heart, eyes and ears. Gokwe North experienced an increase in rubella cases from 6 cases (24 June 2014) to 374 cases (12 August 2014). The study was conducted to determine risk factors associated with contracting rubella. Methods A 1:1 unmatched case control study was conducted. A case was a child <15 years, resided in Gokwe North, with maculopapular rash and tested positive for rubella specific IgM or was linked epidemiologically to a laboratory confirmed case. Blood was collected for laboratory diagnosis. An interviewer administered questionnaire was used. Epi Info™ was used to analyze data. Results Eighty eight cases and 88 controls were recruited, median age for cases was 7 years (Q1 = 4, Q3 = 8) and 6 years (Q1 = 3, Q3 = 9) for controls. Independent risk factors for contracting rubella were; classmate contact (AOR 9.44; (95% CI 4.29-20.77)) and having >3 children in a household (AOR 2.59; 95%CI (1.23-5.42)). Only 10.2% and 6.8% of the caregivers’ cases and controls respectively, knew rubella is spread through contact with an infected person (p = 0.57). Majority of caregivers (97.8%) reported to the health facility within two days of onset of rash. Conclusion Outbreak was driven by contact at school and was spread into the community through school children. Screening and isolation of the sick controlled the outbreak. Routine rubella vaccination could be considered to prevent similar outbreaks. PMID:26834913

  7. ERP investigation of study-test background mismatch during face recognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Fabrice; Guillem, François; Tiberghien, Guy; Stip, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Old/new effects on event-related potentials (ERP) were explored in 20 patients with schizophrenia and 20 paired comparison subjects during unfamiliar face recognition. Extrinsic perceptual changes - which influence the overall familiarity of an item while retaining face-intrinsic features for use in structural face encoding - were manipulated between the study phase and the test. The question raised here concerns whether these perceptual incongruities would have a different effect on the sense of familiarity and the corresponding behavioral and ERP measures in the two groups. The results showed that schizophrenia patients were more inclined to consider old faces shown against a new background as distractors. This drop in face familiarity was accompanied by the disappearance of ERP old/new effects in this condition, i.e., FN400 and parietal old/new effects. Indeed, while ERP old/new recognition effects were found in both groups when the picture of the face was physically identical to the one presented for study, the ERP correlates of recognition disappeared among patients when the background behind the face was different. This difficulty in disregarding a background change suggests that recognition among patients with schizophrenia is based on a global perceptual matching strategy rather than on the extraction of configural information from the face. The correlations observed between FN400 amplitude, the rejection of faces with a different background, and the reality-distortion scores support the idea that the recognition deficit found in schizophrenia results from early anomalies that are carried over onto the parietal ERP old/new effect. Face-extrinsic perceptual variations provide an opportune situation for gaining insight into the social difficulties that patients encounter throughout their lives.

  8. Chemobrain Experienced by Breast Cancer Survivors: A Meta-Ethnography Study Investigating Research and Care Implications

    PubMed Central

    Selamat, Maryam Hafsah; Loh, Siew Yim; Mackenzie, Lynette; Vardy, Janette

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment, colloquially termed “chemobrain”, occurs in 10–40% of all cancer patients, and is an emerging target of cancer survivorship research. Aim This study reviews published qualitative studies to explore cognitive impairments or chemobrain among breast cancer survivors, with particular attention given to the impact on quality of life. Method Using keywords, we searched ten electronic databases (CINAHL, EMBASE, Proquest, OVID SP, MEDLINE, Oxford Journal, Science Direct, PubMED). Findings Of 457 papers, seven relevant papers were included. Data was extracted and concepts were analysed using a meta ethnography approach. Four second order intepretations were identified, on the basis of which, four third order intrepretations were constructed. Linked together in a line of argument, was a consistent account on their struggles to self-manage the chemobrain impairments that impact their daily lives. Five concepts emerged from the analysis of the primary findings: i) real experiences of cognitive changes, ii) calls for help, iii) impact of cognitive impairments, iv) coping and v) survivorship and meaning. Further synthesis resulted in four new order intepretations: i) The chemobrain struggle, ii) The substantial impact of chemobrain on life domains, iii) The struggle to readjust and to self manage, and iv) ‘thankful yet fearful’ representation. Discussion Awareness of cognitive changes were context-dependent on healthcare settings and cultural contexts as strong determinants. Subjects verified the existence of chemobrain but healthcare providers mis-recognised, under-recognised, and sometimes negated it perhaps due to its unknown aetiology. Asian breast cancer survivors appear less vocal than their western counterparts. Conclusion The current literature on the lived experiences of how women experienced chemobrain provides a consistent report that chemobrain is real, persistent and with detrimental impacts on quality of life - manifested

  9. A pilot study investigating changes in neural processing after mindfulness training in elite athletes

    PubMed Central

    Haase, Lori; May, April C.; Falahpour, Maryam; Isakovic, Sara; Simmons, Alan N.; Hickman, Steven D.; Liu, Thomas T.; Paulus, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to pay close attention to the present moment can be a crucial factor for performing well in a competitive situation. Training mindfulness is one approach to potentially improve elite athletes’ ability to focus their attention on the present moment. However, virtually nothing is known about whether these types of interventions alter neural systems that are important for optimal performance. This pilot study examined whether an intervention aimed at improving mindfulness [Mindful Performance Enhancement, Awareness and Knowledge (mPEAK)] changes neural activation patterns during an interoceptive challenge. Participants completed a task involving anticipation and experience of loaded breathing during functional magnetic resonance imaging recording. There were five main results following mPEAK training: (1) elite athletes self-reported higher levels of interoceptive awareness and mindfulness and lower levels of alexithymia; (2) greater insula and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) activation during anticipation and post-breathing load conditions; (3) increased ACC activation during the anticipation condition was associated with increased scores on the describing subscale of the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire; (4) increased insula activation during the post-load condition was associated with decreases in the Toronto Alexithymia Scale identifying feelings subscale; (5) decreased resting state functional connectivity between the PCC and the right medial frontal cortex and the ACC. Taken together, this pilot study suggests that mPEAK training may lead to increased attention to bodily signals and greater neural processing during the anticipation and recovery from interoceptive perturbations. This association between attention to and processing of interoceptive afferents may result in greater adaptation during stressful situations in elite athletes. PMID:26379521

  10. Investigation of Sbas L1/L5 Signals and Their Application to the Ionospheric TEC Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padokhin, A. M.; Kunitsyn, V.; Andreeva, E. S.; Nesterov, I. A.; Kurbatov, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    With the development of SBAS systems the dual frequency L1/L5 observations from a number of geostationary satellites are now available. It provides the possibility to retrieve ionospheric TEC from these observations using the same approach as for dual frequency GPS/GLONASS observations. In this work we study the properties of L1/L5 signals of American WAAS and Indian GAGAN geostationary satellites observed with geodetic GNSS receivers located at equatorial and mid-latitudes and estimate corresponding TEC and errors of such estimations. Along with the advantages of geostationary TEC observations, such as almost motionless underionospheric point, there are points that should be taken into account when analyzing geostationary TEC data, including larger amount of plasmaspheric electron content in geostationary TEC compared to GNSS observations, and very low elevation angles of geostationary satellites already at midlatitudes, so the spatial gradients of electron density should be considered. We present long term datasets of geostationary TEC variations during current Solar cycle in various heliogeophysical conditions at equatorial and midlatitude stations and their comparison with the data of nearest ionosondes and high-orbital radiotomography, as well as spectral and wavelet analysis of geostationary TEC variations data, providing typical periods of observed TEC variations at different time scales (e.g. diurnal variations, disturbances associated with sunset and sunrise terminator etc.). We also study the possibility to include the geostationary TEC data to the ionospheric tomography procedures. The authors acknowledge the support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (12-05-33065, 12-05-31231, 13-05-01122, 13-05-10080, 14-05-31445), grant of the President of Russian Federation MK-2544.2012.5 and Lomonosov Moscow State University Program of Development.

  11. Investigation of the Prevalence of Obesity in Iran: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Study.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Asghar; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Asadollahi, Khairollah; Sarokhani, Diana; Islami, Farhad; Sarokhani, Mandana

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is one of the main public health problems which underlie many chronic illnesses and socioeconomic difficulties. According to the literature review, there are limited data on the prevalence of obesity in different parts of Iran as well as its trend and prevalence among different age and gender groups. The aim of this study was to estimate the obesity prevalence in Iran using meta-analysis. All the corresponding articles published in the external and internal journals, final reports of research projects, articles of related congresses and the reference index of the correlated papers published between 1995 and 2010 were collected via the electronic research engines (PubMed, Scopus, SID, Magiran, IranMedex). Data were analyzed using meta-analysis (random effects model) and meta-regression). A total of 144 articles with the sample size of 377858 people (134588 males and 164858 females) were enrolled in the study. The prevalence of obesity in populations above the age of 18 was estimated as 21.7% (CI 95%: 18.5% - 25%) and in populations below 18 as 6.1% (CI 95%: 6.8%-5.4%). Meta-regression analysis showed an ascending trend in the prevalence of obesity in Iran. The prevalence rates of obesity according to the BMI index, NCHC and percentile above 95 were 17.4%, 7.6% and 7.4%, respectively. The BMI mean was 19.3 in populations below the age of 18 (CI 95%: 17-21.6) and 25.2 in those above the age of 18 (CI 95%: 27.1-23.3). Considering the increasing rate of obesity in Iran and its effects on the public health, corresponding health authorities should revise the obesity preventive programs and, using public health interventions, reduce the rate of obesity in the country.

  12. Violence permeating daily life: a qualitative study investigating perspectives on violence among women in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Tazeen S; Krantz, Gunilla; Mogren, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study explored how married women perceive situations which create family conflicts and lead to different forms of violence in urban Pakistan. In addition, it examines perceptions of consequences of violence, their adverse health effects, and how women resist violence within marital life. Methods: Five focus group discussions were conducted with 28 women in Karachi. Purposive sampling, aiming for variety in age, employment status, education, and socioeconomic status, was employed. The focus group discussions were conducted in Urdu and translated into English. Manifest and latent content analysis were applied. Results: One major theme emerged during the analysis, ie, family violence through the eyes of females. This theme was subdivided into three main categories. The first category, ie, situations provoking violence and their manifestations, elaborates on circumstances that provoke violence and situations that sustain violence. The second category, ie, actions and reactions to exposure to violence, describes consequences of ongoing violence within the family, including those that result in suicidal thoughts and actions. The final category, ie, resisting violence, describes how violence is avoided through women’s awareness and actions. Conclusion: The current study highlights how female victims of abuse are trapped in a society where violence from a partner and family members is viewed as acceptable, where divorce is unavailable to the majority, and where societal support of women is limited. There is an urgent need to raise the subject of violence against women and tackle this human rights problem at all levels of society by targeting the individual, family, community, and societal levels concurrently. PMID:23152709

  13. Cross-Sectional Investigation of HEMS Activities in Europe: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Gava, Paolo; Truhlář, Anatolij; Sandberg, Mårten; Group, The Euphorea

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To gather information on helicopter emergency medical services (HEMSs) activities across Europe. Methods. Cross-sectional data-collection on daily (15 November 2013) activities of a sample of European HEMSs. A web-based questionnaire with both open and closed questions was used, developed by experts of the European Prehospital Research Alliance (EUPHOREA). Results. We invited 143 bases from 11 countries; 85 (60%) reported base characteristics only and 73 (51%) sample-day data too. The variety of base characteristics was enormous; that is, the target population ranged from 94.000 to 4.500.000. Of 158 requested primary missions, 62 (0.82 per base) resulted in landing. Cardiac aetiology (36%) and trauma (36%) prevailed, mostly of life-threatening severity (43%, 0.64 per mission). Had HEMS been not dispatched, patients would have been attended by another physician in 67% of cases, by paramedics in 24%, and by nurses in 9%. On-board physicians estimated to have caused a major decrease of death risk in 47% of missions, possible decrease in 22%, minor benefit in 17%, no benefit in 11%, and damage in 3%. Earlier treatment and faster transport to hospital were the main reasons for benefit. The most frequent therapeutic procedure was drug administration (78% of missions); endotracheal intubation occurred in 25% of missions and was an option hardly offered by ground crews. Conclusions. The study proved feasible, establishing an embryonic network of European HEMS. The participation rate was low and limits the generalizability of the results. Fortunately, because of its cross-sectional characteristics and the handy availability of the web platform, the study is easily repeatable with an enhanced network. PMID:25538947

  14. Synthesis, biological investigation, calf thymus DNA binding and docking studies of the sulfonyl hydrazides and their derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murtaza, Shahzad; Shamim, Saima; Kousar, Naghmana; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Sirajuddin, Muhammad; Rana, Usman Ali

    2016-03-01

    The present study describes the syntheses and biological investigations of sulfonyl hydrazides and their novel derivatives. The detailed investigations involved the characterization of the newly synthesized compounds using FTIR, NMR, mass spectrometry and by single crystal X-Ray diffraction (XRD) analysis techniques. The binding tendencies of these compounds with CT-DNA (calf thymus DNA) have been explored by electronic absorption (UV) spectroscopy and viscosity measurement. The binding constant (K) and Gibb's free energy (ΔG) values were also calculated accordingly. In addition, we also investigated the biological activities such as antioxidant, antibacterial, enzyme inhibition and DNA interactions. The antioxidant activity was assayed by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity, while antibacterial activity was investigated against four bacterial strains (viz. Escherichia coli, Crynibacteria bovius, Staphylococcus auras and Bacillus antherasis) by employing the common disc diffusion method. Enzyme inhibition activity of the synthesized compounds was examined against butyrylcholinestrase. The results of enzyme inhibition activity and the DNA binding interaction studies were also collected through molecular docking program using computational analysis. Our study reveals that the newly synthesized compounds possess moderate to good biological activities.

  15. A Study for Visual Realism of Designed Pictures on Computer Screens by Investigation and Brain-Wave Analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan-Ting; Lee, Kun-Chou

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the visual realism of designed pictures on computer screens is studied by investigation and brain-wave analyses. The practical electroencephalogram (EEG) measurement is always time-varying and fluctuating so that conventional statistical techniques are not adequate for analyses. This study proposes a new scheme based on "fingerprinting" to analyze the EEG. Fingerprinting is a technique of probabilistic pattern recognition used in electrical engineering, very like the identification of human fingerprinting in a criminal investigation. The goal of this study was to assess whether subjective preference for pictures could be manifested physiologically by EEG fingerprinting analyses. The most important advantage of the fingerprinting technique is that it does not require accurate measurement. Instead, it uses probabilistic classification. Participants' preference for pictures can be assessed using fingerprinting analyses of physiological EEG measurements.

  16. A Study for Visual Realism of Designed Pictures on Computer Screens by Investigation and Brain-Wave Analyses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lan-Ting; Lee, Kun-Chou

    2016-08-01

    In this article, the visual realism of designed pictures on computer screens is studied by investigation and brain-wave analyses. The practical electroencephalogram (EEG) measurement is always time-varying and fluctuating so that conventional statistical techniques are not adequate for analyses. This study proposes a new scheme based on "fingerprinting" to analyze the EEG. Fingerprinting is a technique of probabilistic pattern recognition used in electrical engineering, very like the identification of human fingerprinting in a criminal investigation. The goal of this study was to assess whether subjective preference for pictures could be manifested physiologically by EEG fingerprinting analyses. The most important advantage of the fingerprinting technique is that it does not require accurate measurement. Instead, it uses probabilistic classification. Participants' preference for pictures can be assessed using fingerprinting analyses of physiological EEG measurements. PMID:27324166

  17. Investigation of peripheral photoplethysmographic morphology changes induced during a hand-elevation study.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Michelle; Phillips, Justin P; Kyriacou, Panayiotis A

    2016-10-01

    A hand-elevation study was carried out in the laboratory in order to alter peripheral blood flow with the aim of increasing understanding of factors affecting the morphology of peripheral photoplethysmographic signals. Photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals were recorded from twenty healthy volunteer subjects during a hand-elevation study in which the right hand was raised and lowered relative to heart level, while the left hand remained static. Red and infrared (IR) PPG signals were obtained from the right and left index fingers using a custom-made PPG processing system. PPG features were identified using a feature-detection algorithm based on the first derivative of the PPG signal. The systolic PPG amplitude, the reflection index, crest time, pulse width at half height, and delta T were calculated from 20 s IR PPG signals from three positions of the right hand with respect to heart level (-50, 0, +50 cm) in 19 volunteers. PPG features were found to change with hand elevation. On lowering the hand to 50 cm below heart level, ac systolic PPG amplitudes from the finger decreased by 68.32 %, while raising the arm increased the systolic amplitude by 69.99 %. These changes in amplitude were attributed to changes in hydrostatic pressure and the veno-arterial reflex. Other morphological variables, such as crest time, were found to be statistically significantly different across hand positions, indicating increased vascular resistance on arm elevation than on dependency. It was hypothesized that these morphological PPG changes were influenced by changes in downstream venous resistance, rather than arterial, or arteriolar, resistance. Changes in hand position relative to heart level can significantly affect the morphology of the peripheral ac PPG waveform. These alterations are due to a combination of physical effects and physiological responses to changes in hand position, which alter vascular resistance. Care should be taken when interpreting morphological data derived

  18. Learning science through talk: A case study of middle school students engaged in collaborative group investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinicola, Debra Ann

    Reformers call for change in how science is taught in schools by shifting the focus towards conceptual understanding for all students. Constructivist learning is being promoted through the dissemination of National and State Science Standards that recommend group learning practices in science classrooms. This study examined the science learning and interactions, using case study methodology, of one collaborative group of 4 students in an urban middle school. Data on science talk and social interaction were collected over 9 weeks through 12 science problem solving sessions. To determine student learning through peer interaction, varied group structures were implemented, and students reflected on the group learning experience. Data included: field notes, cognitive and reflective journals, audiotapes and videotapes of student talk, and audiotapes of group interviews. Journal data were analyzed quantitatively and all other data was transcribed into The Ethnograph database for qualitative analysis. The data record was organized into social and cognitive domains and coded with respect to interaction patterns to show how group members experienced the social construction of science concepts. The most significant finding was that all students learned as a result of 12 talk sessions as evidenced by pre- and post-conceptual change scores. Interactions that promoted learning involved students connecting their thoughts, rephrasing, and challenging ideas. The role structure was only used by students about 15% of the time, but it started the talk with a science focus, created awareness of scientific methods, and created an awareness of equitable member participation. Students offered more spontaneous, explanatory talk when the role structure was relaxed, but did not engage in as much scientific writing. They said the role structure was important for helping them know what to do in the talk but they no longer needed it after a time. Gender bias, status, and early adolescent

  19. Investigation on trophic state index by artificial neural networks (case study: Dez Dam of Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghi, H.; Karimi, L.; Javid, A. H.

    2015-06-01

    Dam construction and surface runoff control is one of the most common approaches for water-needs supply of human societies. However, the increasing development of social activities and hence the subsequent increase in environmental pollutants leads to deterioration of water quality in dam reservoirs and eutrophication process could be intensified. So, the water quality of reservoirs is now one of the key factors in operation and water quality management of reservoirs. Hence, maintaining the quality of the stored water and identification and examination of changes along time has been a constant concern of humans that involves the water authorities. Traditionally, empirical trophic state indices of dam reservoirs often defined based on changes in concentration of effective factors (nutrients) and its consequences (increase in chlorophyll a), have been used as an efficient tool in the definition of dam reservoirs quality. In recent years, modeling techniques such as artificial neural networks have enhanced the prediction capability and the accuracy of these studies. In this study, artificial neural networks have been applied to analyze eutrophication process in the Dez Dam reservoir in Iran. In this paper, feed forward neural network with one input layer, one hidden layer and one output layer was applied using MATLAB neural network toolbox for trophic state index (TSI) analysis in the Dez Dam reservoir. The input data of this network are effective parameters in the eutrophication: nitrogen cycle parameters and phosphorous cycle parameters and parameters that will be changed by eutrophication: Chl a, SD, DO and the output data is TSI. Based on the results from estimation of modified Carlson trophic state index, Dez Dam reservoir is considered to be eutrophic in the early July to mid-November and would be mesotrophic with decrease in temperature. Therefore, a decrease in water quality of the dam reservoir during the warm seasons is expectable. The results indicated that

  20. Systematic review of studies investigating sentinel node navigation surgery and lymphatic mapping for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Can, Mehmet Fatih; Yagci, Gokhan; Cetiner, Sadettin

    2013-08-01

    Evolutions in minimally invasive surgical techniques and advances in sentinel node navigation surgery (SNNS) have had considerable impact on current insights into surgical treatment of gastric cancer. Extensive data on this method of surgical application have accumulated but have been principally derived from single-institute studies. Isosulfan blue and patent blue violet have been the most frequently used dye tracers in the past; however, indocyanine green has now is increasingly popular. The double-tracer method, where dye and radioisotope tracers are used together, seems to be more effective than any single tracer. Among newly emerging adjunct techniques and promising alternative in particular are infrared ray electronic endoscopy, florescence imaging, nanoparticles, and near-infrared technology. Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining is still the method of choice for the detection of sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastases. Immunohistochemical staining can be used to support H&E findings, but the equipment costs of ultrarapid processing systems are currently slowing down their worldwide spread. We believe minimally invasive function-preserving resection of the stomach, together with lymphatic basin dissection navigated by SLNs, can represent the ideal approach for SNNS to detect clinically node-negative early gastric cancer, although this remains to be elucidated. Patients with cT3 or more advanced disease should still be treated by means of standard D2 dissection.

  1. Spectroscopic investigations, molecular interactions, and molecular docking studies on the potential inhibitor "thiophene-2-carboxylicacid".

    PubMed

    Karthick, T; Balachandran, V; Perumal, S

    2015-04-15

    Thiophene derivatives have been focused in the past decades due to their remarkable biological and pharmacological activities. In connection with that the conformational stability, spectroscopic characterization, molecular (inter- and intra-) interactions, and molecular docking studies on thiophene-2-carboxylicacid have been performed in this work by experimental FT-IR and theoretical quantum chemical computations. Experimentally recorded FT-IR spectrum in the region 4000-400 cm(-1) has been compared with the scaled theoretical spectrum and the spectral peaks have been assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution results obtained from MOLVIB program package. The conformational stability of monomer and dimer conformers has been examined. The presence of inter- and intramolecular interactions in the monomer and dimer conformers have been explained by natural bond orbital analysis. The UV-Vis spectra of the sample in different solvents have been simulated and solvent effects were predicted by polarisable continuum model with TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. To test the biological activity of the sample, molecular docking (ligand-protein) simulations have been performed using SWISSDOCK web server. The full fitness (FF) score and binding affinity values revealed that thiophene-2-carboxylicacid can act as potential inhibitor against inflammation.

  2. A new method for studying microaerobic fermentations; 2: An experimental investigation of xylose fermentation

    SciTech Connect

    Franzen, C.J.; Liden, G.; Niklasson, C. . Dept. of Chemical Reaction)

    1994-08-05

    A new experimental technique, called oxygen programmed fermentation (OPF), was used to study microbial cultures of the yeasts Pichia stipitis and Candida utilis growing on xylose as carbon and energy source. In the oxygen programmed fermentation, the inlet oxygen mole fraction was continuously changed to scan through a wide range of oxygen uptake rates in a continuous culture. The largest ethanol yields and productivities for P. stipitis were found at oxygen transfer rates below 1.5 mmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1]. It was found that the ratio between the culture fluorescence and near-IR absorbance increased at oxygen transfer rates lower than 1.5 mmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1]. Small amounts of ethanol were produced also by C. utilis when the oxygen transfer rate was between 0 and 3 mmol L[sup [minus]1] h[sup [minus]1]. It is suggested that OPF will form a nice complement to ordinary, microaerobic chemostat experiments, by making the identification of interesting regions of oxygen transfer rates possible in an efficient and time-saving initial experiment.

  3. Investigating the double-deficit hypothesis in Greek: findings from a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Timothy C; Georgiou, George K; Kendeou, Panayiota

    2009-01-01

    This study examined longitudinally the double-deficit hypothesis in Greek, an orthographically consistent language, following a group of children from kindergarten to Grade 2. Four groups were formed on the basis of two composite scores of phonological and naming-speed criterion measures: a double-deficit group (DD; n = 17), a phonological deficit group (PD; n = 33), a naming deficit group (ND; n = 33), and a control group exhibiting no deficits (CnD; n = 159). The four groups were identified in Grade 1, and they were compared retrospectively in kindergarten only on the criterion measures, and in Grades 1 and 2 on measures of word-reading fluency and accuracy, orthographic processing, and passage comprehension. The effects of verbal and nonverbal ability, age, gender, and parental education were controlled among the groups. Results showed that the DD group exhibited greater dysfunction in reading and orthographic processing compared to the single-deficit and CnD groups. Also, although the three deficit groups were not easily differentiated in kindergarten, their differences were maximized in Grade 1 and retained in Grade 2. The type and severity of reading deficits found in the ND group were mostly associated with naming speed at both the word- and text-reading levels, deficits that persisted across development. The PD group showed mostly deficient orthographic and poor decoding skills that improved across development. Implications of the findings for the double-deficit hypothesis in languages with transparent orthographies are discussed. PMID:19723979

  4. Investigation into Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Fabiola; Latorre, Malcolm A; Göransson, Nathanael; Zsigmond, Peter; Wårdell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    New deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode designs offer operation in voltage and current mode and capability to steer the electric field (EF). The aim of the study was to compare the EF distributions of four DBS leads at equivalent amplitudes (3 V and 3.4 mA). Finite element method (FEM) simulations (n = 38) around cylindrical contacts (leads 3389, 6148) or equivalent contact configurations (leads 6180, SureStim1) were performed using homogeneous and patient-specific (heterogeneous) brain tissue models. Steering effects of 6180 and SureStim1 were compared with symmetric stimulation fields. To make relative comparisons between simulations, an EF isolevel of 0.2 V/mm was chosen based on neuron model simulations (n = 832) applied before EF visualization and comparisons. The simulations show that the EF distribution is largely influenced by the heterogeneity of the tissue, and the operating mode. Equivalent contact configurations result in similar EF distributions. In steering configurations, larger EF volumes were achieved in current mode using equivalent amplitudes. The methodology was demonstrated in a patient-specific simulation around the zona incerta and a "virtual" ventral intermediate nucleus target. In conclusion, lead design differences are enhanced when using patient-specific tissue models and current stimulation mode. PMID:27618109

  5. Growth process of microcrystalline silicon studied by combined photoluminescence and Raman investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Klossek, A.; Mankovics, D.; Ratzke, M.; Arguirov, T.; Kittler, M.; Kirner, S.; Gabriel, O.; Stannowski, B.; Schlatmann, R.; Friedrich, F.

    2013-12-14

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon on glass substrates leads to formation of silicon amorphous films with partial crystallization of nano-grains in the amorphous matrix. We studied the transition of amorphous to microcrystalline silicon during such deposition. Formation of silicon nano-grains was detected by means of photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. The crystalline fraction and the mean size of the nano-grains were estimated by the position and the intensity of the peaks in the Raman spectrum. We showed that the fraction of crystalline silicon in the layers and the size of the nano-grains are strongly dependent on the growth conditions. The photoluminescence spectra exhibit distinct features related to recombination in the amorphous and in the crystalline phases. A significant narrowing of the photoluminescence peak related to the amorphous phase with increasing crystalline fraction indicates a structural modification in the amorphous silicon. It suggests an ordering process occurring before the start of the actual crystallization. A peak at about 1.4 eV was associated with isolated nano-crystalline grains within the amorphous matrix. A correlation between the peak energy and grain size was found, indicating effects of carrier quantum confinement. The experimental results confirm the established theoretical models for growth of microcrystalline silicon films.

  6. Theoretical Investigation of Dissolution Test Criteria for Waiver of Clinical Bioequivalence Study.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Kiyohiko

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to provide a theoretical basis for the dissolution test criteria of a biowaiver scheme. The critical dissolution number (Dncrit) was defined as a value to show bioequivalence of AUC and Cmax against infinitely rapid dissolution (Dn = ∞). The gastrointestinal tract was represented by the one-compartment model. The dissolution of a drug was expressed by the Noyes-Whitney equation. The permeation of a drug was expressed by the first-order equation. The approximate analytical solutions of Dncrit were derived from the analytical solution for the fraction of a dose absorbed [Fa = 1 - exp(-1/(1/Dn + Do/Pn)]; Do, the dose number; Pn, the permeation number). Numerical integration was also performed to calculate Dncrit more accurately. Dncrit was found to become smaller as Pn and Do became smaller. Dncrit for Cmax was found to be dependent on the elimination half-life of a drug as well as Pn and Do. The Fa equation can be an appropriate theoretical basis for a biowaiver scheme. PMID:27238491

  7. Investigation and Design Studies of SOFC Electrode Performance at Elevated Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Ted Ohrn; Shung Ik Lee

    2010-07-31

    An experimental program was set forth to study fuel cell performance at pressure and under various compositions. Improvement in cathode electrode performance is on the order of 33-40% at pressures of 6.4 Bara compared to atmospheric pressure. Key cathode operational parameters are the concentration and partial pressure of O2, and temperature. The effect of partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) decreases the activation polarization, although there appears to be a secondary effect of absolute pressure as well. The concentration of oxygen impacts the diffusion component of the polarization, which is largely insensitive to absolute pressure. The effect of pressure was found to reduce the total polarization resistance of full fuel-cells beyond the reduction determined for the cathode alone. The total reduction in ASR was on the order of 0.10 ohm-cm2 for a pressure increase from 1 to 6.5 Bara, with about 70% of the improvement being realized from 1 to 4 Bara. An important finding was that there is an effect of steam on the cathode that is highly temperature dependent. The loss of performance at temperatures below 850 C was very large for the standard LSM + YSZ cathodes.

  8. Academic computer science and gender: A naturalistic study investigating the causes of attrition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Declue, Timothy Hall

    Far fewer women than men take computer science classes in high school, enroll in computer science programs in college, or complete advanced degrees in computer science. The computer science pipeline begins to shrink for women even before entering college, but it is at the college level that the "brain drain" is the most evident numerically, especially in the first class taken by most computer science majors called "Computer Science 1" or CS-I. The result, for both academia and industry, is a pronounced technological gender disparity in academic and industrial computer science. The study revealed the existence of several factors influencing success in CS-I. First, and most clearly, the effect of attribution processes seemed to be quite strong. These processes tend to work against success for females and in favor of success for males. Likewise, evidence was discovered which strengthens theories related to prior experience and the perception that computer science has a culture which is hostile to females. Two unanticipated themes related to the motivation and persistence of successful computer science majors. The findings did not support the belief that females have greater logistical problems in computer science than males, or that females tend to have a different programming style than males which adversely affects the females' ability to succeed in CS-I.

  9. Optical investigations of physiology: a study of intrinsic and extrinsic biomedical contrast.

    PubMed Central

    Chance, B; Luo, Q; Nioka, S; Alsop, D C; Detre, J A

    1997-01-01

    The utility and performance of optical studies of tissue depends upon the contrast and the changes of contrast in health and disease and in functional activity. The contrast is determined both by the optical properties of extrinsic chromophores and scatterers but especially upon the changes evoked by physiological activity and pathological states. Here, we have focused upon absorption changes of the intrinsic probe, blood absorbance changes due to cortical hypoxia and to haematomas, giving, for particular conditions, absorbance changes of 0.15 and over 0.4 delta OD, respectively. Functional activity may give changes of blood volume of over 0.05 delta OD with some variability due to individual responses that is best expressed as histogram displays of the distribution of response among a significant population. Responses have been observed in prefrontal parietal and occipital functions (242 tests). Extrinsic probes afford signals dependent upon the dose tolerance of the subject and can readily equal or exceed the blood volume and oxygenation signals, and currently afford vascular volume and flow indications. However, contrast agents for the functional activity of cellular function are ultimately to be expected. Finally, light-scattering changes afford osmolyte-related responses and are here shown to indicate a larger signal attributed to cortical depolarization and K+ release in hypoxia/ischaemia. Thus, the optical method affords imaging of manifold contrasts that greatly enhance its specificity and sensitivity for diagnostic procedures. PMID:9232859

  10. Spectroscopic investigations, molecular interactions, and molecular docking studies on the potential inhibitor "thiophene-2-carboxylicacid"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthick, T.; Balachandran, V.; Perumal, S.

    2015-04-01

    Thiophene derivatives have been focused in the past decades due to their remarkable biological and pharmacological activities. In connection with that the conformational stability, spectroscopic characterization, molecular (inter- and intra-) interactions, and molecular docking studies on thiophene-2-carboxylicacid have been performed in this work by experimental FT-IR and theoretical quantum chemical computations. Experimentally recorded FT-IR spectrum in the region 4000-400 cm-1 has been compared with the scaled theoretical spectrum and the spectral peaks have been assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution results obtained from MOLVIB program package. The conformational stability of monomer and dimer conformers has been examined. The presence of inter- and intramolecular interactions in the monomer and dimer conformers have been explained by natural bond orbital analysis. The UV-Vis spectra of the sample in different solvents have been simulated and solvent effects were predicted by polarisable continuum model with TD-DFT/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) method. To test the biological activity of the sample, molecular docking (ligand-protein) simulations have been performed using SWISSDOCK web server. The full fitness (FF) score and binding affinity values revealed that thiophene-2-carboxylicacid can act as potential inhibitor against inflammation.

  11. An on-road study to investigate fatigue in local/short haul trucking.

    PubMed

    Hanowski, Richard J; Wierwille, Walter W; Dingus, Thomas A

    2003-03-01

    As a precursor to the present research, Hanowski et al. [FHWA Report no. FHWA-MC-98-029. Office of Motor Carriers, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, 1998] conducted a series of focus groups in which local/short haul (L/SH) drivers provided their perspective on safety issues, including fatigue, in their industry. As a follow-up to the Hanowski et al. work, the effort presented here consisted of an on-road field study where in-service L/SH trucks were instrumented with data collection equipment. Two L/SH trucking companies and 42 L/SH drivers participated in this research. The analyses focused on determining if fatigue is an issue in L/SH operations. Of primary interest were critical incidents (near-crashes) where L/SH drivers were judged to be at fault. The results of the analyses indicated that fatigue was present immediately prior to driver involvement in at-fault critical incidents. Though it is difficult to determine with certainty why fatigue was present, the results suggest that drivers' off-hours behavior likely played a significant role in the fatigue experienced on the job. Another key finding of this research is that a small percentage of drivers were responsible for a majority of the critical incidents. This finding suggests that driver selection and monitoring could potentially improve safety in L/SH operations. PMID:12504135

  12. A Simulation Study to Investigate the Potential Use of GPM Data for Flood Prediction Across Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajewski, W. F.; Cunha, L.; Mandapaka, P.; Mantilla, R.

    2011-12-01

    The Critical Zone is the near-surface layer that is created by life processes from microbial scale to ecosystems, which in turn supports nearly all the terrestrial living systems. It extends from the top of the canopy to the bedrock. The biotic-abiotic links between the below- and above-ground processes determine the functional role of the critical zone. To predict and assess the impact of climate and other anthropogenic changes on the Critical Zone processes, a model that considers this zone as a continuum and captures the interactions between roots, soil moisture, nutrient uptake, and photosynthesis is developed. We attempt to address a variety of questions: How does elevated CO2 affect photosynthesis and plant water uptake? What role does hydraulic redistribution play in the below- and above-ground interactions? How do these scale when we consider interaction between multiple vegetation species, for example, between tall and understory vegetation? Results from a number of study sites will be presented and their implications will be discussed.

  13. Investigation into Deep Brain Stimulation Lead Designs: A Patient-Specific Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Fabiola; Latorre, Malcolm A.; Göransson, Nathanael; Zsigmond, Peter; Wårdell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    New deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrode designs offer operation in voltage and current mode and capability to steer the electric field (EF). The aim of the study was to compare the EF distributions of four DBS leads at equivalent amplitudes (3 V and 3.4 mA). Finite element method (FEM) simulations (n = 38) around cylindrical contacts (leads 3389, 6148) or equivalent contact configurations (leads 6180, SureStim1) were performed using homogeneous and patient-specific (heterogeneous) brain tissue models. Steering effects of 6180 and SureStim1 were compared with symmetric stimulation fields. To make relative comparisons between simulations, an EF isolevel of 0.2 V/mm was chosen based on neuron model simulations (n = 832) applied before EF visualization and comparisons. The simulations show that the EF distribution is largely influenced by the heterogeneity of the tissue, and the operating mode. Equivalent contact configurations result in similar EF distributions. In steering configurations, larger EF volumes were achieved in current mode using equivalent amplitudes. The methodology was demonstrated in a patient-specific simulation around the zona incerta and a “virtual” ventral intermediate nucleus target. In conclusion, lead design differences are enhanced when using patient-specific tissue models and current stimulation mode. PMID:27618109

  14. Biosorption of metal contaminants using immobilized biomass: Field studies. Report of Investigations/1993

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffers, T.H.; Bennett, P.G.; Corwin, R.R.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines has developed porous beads containing immobilized biological materials such as sphagnum peat moss for extracting metal contaminants from waste waters. The beads, designated as BIO-FIX beads, have removed toxic metals from over 100 waters in laboratory tests. These waters include acid mine drainage (AMD) water from mining sites, metallurgical and chemical industry waste water, and contaminated ground water. Following the laboratory studies, cooperative field tests were conducted to evaluate the metal adsorption properties of the beads in column and low-maintenance circuits, determine bead stability in varied climatic situations, and demonstrate the beads' potential as a viable waste water treatment technique. Field results indicated that BIO-FIX beads readily adsorbed cadmium, lead, and other toxic metals from dilute waters; effluents frequently met drinking water standards and other discharge criteria. The beads exhibited excellent handling characteristics in both column and low-maintenance circuits, and continued to extract metal ions after repeated loading-elution cycles.

  15. Using Student-Generated Analogies to Investigate Conceptions of Energy: A multidisciplinary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderman Lancor, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    The concept of energy is widely employed in introductory science courses. However, the term energy is defined and utilized in different ways depending on the context, even within a given discipline. Through the lens of metaphor theory, these various definitions of energy are seen as metaphors that highlight and obscure characteristics of energy. Working under this framework, undergraduate students in introductory biology, chemistry, and physics courses were asked to write analogies that reflect their understanding of the role of energy in the context of ecosystems (n = 49), chemical reactions (n = 36), mechanical systems (n = 65), and electrical circuits (n = 44). These analogies were analyzed qualitatively using metaphor theory to gain understanding of how students conceptualize energy in these different contexts. The results of this study indicate that students use seven different conceptual metaphors to explain the role of energy in various scientific contexts: energy as a substance that can be accounted for, energy as a substance that can flow, can change forms, can be carried, can be lost, can be an ingredient or a product, and energy as a process or interaction. This result gives teachers a framework to use in evaluating student ideas about energy.

  16. Investigating the obesogenic effects of marketing snacks with toys: an experimental study in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The inclusion of toys in food packages is a common marketing practice, and it is suspected of promoting obesogenic behaviours. This study aimed to determine whether toys packaged with food are indeed increasing the amount of food eaten by children, and if this effect is enhanced by contemporary exposure to TV and/or advertising. Methods A total of 600 children (balanced according to gender and age groups, 3–6 and 7–10 years old) were randomized in three school facilities in Argentina, Brazil and Mexico and exposed to food (snacks) alone or food associated with toys in an experimental setting. All of the children received the same meal at lunchtime. The products were packages in which chocolate was associated with toys in an egg-shaped container partially filled by chocolate. The children were asked to eat ad libitum for 20 minutes during the afternoon break. In addition, the children were randomized into two groups and either shown or not shown a movie cartoon, with three different levels of exposure to commercials in the TV viewing condition (1, 2 or 3 advertisements). Results No significant differences emerged between the “toys” and “no toys” groups even after taking into account exposure to TV, commercials and other confounding factors. Conclusions The inclusion of toys in food packages was not shown per se to lead to an increase in the caloric intake of children. PMID:23841997

  17. Theoretical Investigation of Dissolution Test Criteria for Waiver of Clinical Bioequivalence Study.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Kiyohiko

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to provide a theoretical basis for the dissolution test criteria of a biowaiver scheme. The critical dissolution number (Dncrit) was defined as a value to show bioequivalence of AUC and Cmax against infinitely rapid dissolution (Dn = ∞). The gastrointestinal tract was represented by the one-compartment model. The dissolution of a drug was expressed by the Noyes-Whitney equation. The permeation of a drug was expressed by the first-order equation. The approximate analytical solutions of Dncrit were derived from the analytical solution for the fraction of a dose absorbed [Fa = 1 - exp(-1/(1/Dn + Do/Pn)]; Do, the dose number; Pn, the permeation number). Numerical integration was also performed to calculate Dncrit more accurately. Dncrit was found to become smaller as Pn and Do became smaller. Dncrit for Cmax was found to be dependent on the elimination half-life of a drug as well as Pn and Do. The Fa equation can be an appropriate theoretical basis for a biowaiver scheme.

  18. An investigation of Chinese attitudes toward the environment: case study using the Grain for Green Project.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shixiong; Chen, Li; Liu, Zhande

    2009-02-01

    China is the world's most populous country and has one of the largest territories. As such, Chinese attitudes and behavior with regard to environmental issues are key factors in protecting the world's natural resources and environment. In this study, we surveyed a random sample of 5000 citizens from six Chinese provinces (Beijing, Shanghai, Hubei, Hunan, Henan, and Shaanxi) to understand their environmental attitudes, contrasts between the attitudes of citizens in different demographic groups, and their willingness to invest in environmental conservation. The results indicated that policymakers and the public increasingly recognize the key role that environmental restoration plays in protecting the overall health of the environment. In total, 91% of the interviewees believed that the environment had deteriorated severely during the past decade, compared with 44% in a 1999 survey. In addition, 78% of the interviewees supported their government's investment of more than 300 billion RMB (approximately 10% of total government revenues in 2004) in the "Grain for Green Project", which discouraged unsustainable land use by compensating farmers and herders for abandoning farming and grazing on marginal land. There was a strong correlation between environmental attitudes and net income and education levels, and other differences were based on the respondents' age, gender, job, and location. Net income and education level were the key factors that affected environmental attitudes. Based on these results, we propose that successful environmental restoration projects must include both an education component and an economic development component. PMID:19260348

  19. Studies of transformer repair workers exposed to PCBs. II. Results of clinical laboratory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Emmett, E.A.; Maroni, M.; Jefferys, J.; Schmith, J.; Levin, B.K.; Alvares, A.

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-eight transformer repairmen currently exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 17 former transformer repairmen, and 56 comparison workers not known to be exposed to PCBs were studied. Measurements were made of serum liver function tests, gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT), lipid profile, thyroid function tests, and other serum biochemistry; hemoglobin; white cell count; 24-hour excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid, porphyrins, 17-hydroxycorticosteriods and 17-ketosteroids; sperm count; spirometry; and antipyrine half-life to evaluate microsomal mixed function oxidase induction. The total exposed group differed significantly from the comparison group in albumin, LDH, T4, T4-RT3 index, and actual/predicted FEV1. Significant differences among all three exposure groups were seen for albumin, T4, T4-RT3 index, and 17-hydroxycorticosteroid excretion. Differences in FEV1 were attributable to smoking. Significant correlations between serum PCBs and serum lipids were removed by adjustment for confounding variables. After adjustment for confounding variables, there was a statistically significant positive correlation between serum PCBs and GGT and a negative correlation between adipose PCBs and 17-hydroxycorticosteroid excretion. These may reflect subtle metabolic effects of PCBs.

  20. Developmental studies of the hippocampus and hippocampal-dependent behaviors: Insights from interdisciplinary studies and tips for new investigators

    PubMed Central

    Albani, Sarah H.; McHail, Daniel G.; Dumas, Theodore C.

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is not fully developed at birth and, with respect to spatial cognition, only begins to show signs of adult-like function at three postnatal weeks in rodents. Studying the developmental period spanning roughly two to four weeks of age permits an understanding of the neural framework necessary for the emergence of spatial navigation and, quite possibly, human episodic memory. However, due to developmental factors, behavior data collection and interpretation can be severely compromised if inappropriate designs are applied. As such, we propose methodological considerations for the behavioral assessment of hippocampal function in developing rats that take into account animal size, growth rate, and sensory and motor ability. We further summarize recent key interdisciplinary studies that are beginning to unravel the molecular machinery and physiological alterations responsible for hippocampal maturation. In general, hippocampal development is a protracted process during which unique contributions to spatial cognition and complex recognition memory come “on line” at different postnatal ages creating a unique situation for elucidating the neural bases of specific components of higher cognitive abilities. PMID:24769291

  1. "I'd know a false confession if I saw one": a comparative study of college students and police investigators.

    PubMed

    Kassin, Saul M; Meissner, Christian A; Norwick, Rebecca J

    2005-04-01

    College students and police investigators watched or listened to 10 prison inmates confessing to crimes. Half the confessions were true accounts; half were false--concocted for the study. Consistent with much recent research, students were generally more accurate than police, and accuracy rates were higher among those presented with audiotaped than videotaped confessions. In addition, investigators were significantly more confident in their judgments and also prone to judge confessors guilty. To determine if police accuracy would increase if this guilty response bias were neutralized, participants in a second experiment were specifically informed that half the confessions were true and half were false. This manipulation eliminated the investigator response bias, but it did not increase accuracy or lower confidence. These findings are discussed for what they imply about the post-interrogation risks to innocent suspects who confess. PMID:15912725

  2. Carbon investigation of two Stardust particles: A TEM, NanoSIMS, and XANES study

    SciTech Connect

    Matrajt, G.; Ito, M; Wirick, S; Messenger, S; Brownlee, D; Joswiak, D; Flynn, G; Sandford, S; Snead, C; Westphal, A

    2008-01-01

    In this work we present the results of a systematic search for cometary organics in 14 Stardust particles (particles from comet 81P/Wild 2, captured by NASA's Stardust mission) by TEM and multidisciplinary studies (XANES and NanoSIMS) of Febo and Ada, two of the organic-bearing particles identified. The combination of the three analytical techniques has established the presence of organic, cometary C in both particles. Using energy-filtered and high-resolution imaging it was shown that the C is amorphous and rare, given that it is found in grains =200 nm in size that are not abundant throughout the particles. The XANES maps and spectra of the carbonaceous areas identified with the TEM have shown that the carbonaceous material is organic due to the presence of carbonyl (C=O) functional groups and the overlapping of C and N on the same grains. In addition, several different C-XANES spectra were obtained from the same particle, suggesting that there is diversity in the types of carbonaceous phases present in these particles, as well as a heterogeneous distribution of the carbonaceous phases within these particles. The C-XANES spectra obtained are different from C-XANES spectra of carbonaceous chondrites and IDPs. In the particle Febo we found five spots showing a pronounced enrichment in the isotope {sup 15}N ({sigma}{sup 15} ffffrom 420 to 639 {+-} 20 to 70%, 1S) that were clearly associated with the C-rich regions. The carbonaceous material has approximately solar C and D/H isotopic compositions, and the bulk O isotopic composition was found to be S{sup 17} O=-18 {+-} 13% and {sigma}{sup 18} O=-37 {+-}12% (aS).

  3. Catalytic Mechanism Investigation of Lysine-Specific Demethylase 1 (LSD1): A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhongjie; Lu, Junyan; Chen, Liang; Shen, Bairong; Li, Donghai; Zheng, Mingyue; Li, Keqin Kathy; Luo, Cheng; Jiang, Hualiang

    2011-01-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), the first identified histone demethylase, is a flavin-dependent amine oxidase which specifically demethylates mono- or dimethylated H3K4 and H3K9 via a redox process. It participates in a broad spectrum of biological processes and is of high importance in cell proliferation, adipogenesis, spermatogenesis, chromosome segregation and embryonic development. To date, as a potential drug target for discovering anti-tumor drugs, the medical significance of LSD1 has been greatly appreciated. However, the catalytic mechanism for the rate-limiting reductive half-reaction in demethylation remains controversial. By employing a combined computational approach including molecular modeling, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, the catalytic mechanism of dimethylated H3K4 demethylation by LSD1 was characterized in details. The three-dimensional (3D) model of the complex was composed of LSD1, CoREST, and histone substrate. A 30-ns MD simulation of the model highlights the pivotal role of the conserved Tyr761 and lysine-water-flavin motif in properly orienting flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) with respect to substrate. The synergy of the two factors effectively stabilizes the catalytic environment and facilitated the demethylation reaction. On the basis of the reasonable consistence between simulation results and available mutagenesis data, QM/MM strategy was further employed to probe the catalytic mechanism of the reductive half-reaction in demethylation. The characteristics of the demethylation pathway determined by the potential energy surface and charge distribution analysis indicates that this reaction belongs to the direct hydride transfer mechanism. Our study provides insights into the LSD1 mechanism of reductive half-reaction in demethylation and has important implications for the discovery of regulators against LSD1 enzymes. PMID:21984927

  4. Integrated Geophysical and Archaeological investigations to study the site of Aquinum (Frosinone, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Salvatore; Ceraudo, Giuseppe; Zamuner, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    To enhance the knowledge finalised to the location and conservation of the unknown buried structures below the actual studied levels, in the territory of the Ancient Aquinum (Frosinone, Italy) a scientific collaboration, inside the "Ager Aquinas Project" between the University of Salento (Department of Cultural Heritage - Laboratory of Ancient Topography and Photogrammetry) and the Institute of Technologies Applied to Cultural Heritage (ITABC-C.N.R.) has been developed, during 2008-2009 and it is still in progress. The site which is the subject of this paper had been identified in the past through air photo interpretation of vertical historical coverage and field - walking surveys. Ancient Aquinum is characterised by two main aspects: the first depends by the presence of a very big defence-system with mighty walls and large ditch; the second characteristic is the presence or regular but not orthogonal road - system of the town, bordered by an unusual parallelogram shape of the blocks. With the results obtained after the elaborations of the first aerial data sets and field surveys, has been possible to map the main town - planning, drawing the main road system inside and outside the town. Although the analysis of the air photo evidence allowed the global interpretation of the site, it was not possible to reconstruct the archaeological evidences in the central portion of the town. Therefore the Project, during 2008, started with new acquisition and elaboration of aerial photos, field-walking surveys and GPR surveys with the aim to better define the urban plan of the central portion of the ancient town. The location, depth, and size of the buried buildings were effectively estimated from non-destructive remote sensing with a gradiometric and ground-penetrating radar systems. Recent archaeological excavations made (by Prof. Giuseppe Ceraudo - University of Salento, Lecce) during the summer 2009, have confirmed the structures individuated with the geophysical methods

  5. Investigation of interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors in various buffers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawaz, Muhammad; Arayne, Muhammad Saeed; Sultana, Najma; Abbas, Hira Fatima

    2015-02-01

    This work describes a RP-HPLC method for the determination and interaction studies of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors (captopril, enalapril and lisinopril) in various buffers. The separation and interaction of cefpirome with ACE-inhibitors was achieved on a Purospher Star, C18 (5 μm, 250 × 4.6 mm) column. Mobile phase consisted of methanol: water (80:20, v/v, pH 3.3); however, for the separation of lisinopril, it was modified to methanol-water (40:60, v/v, pH 3.3) and pumped at a flow rate of 1 mL min-1. In all cases, UV detection was performed at 225 nm. Interactions were carried out in physiological pH i.e., pH 1 (simulated gastric juice), 4 (simulated full stomach), 7.4 (blood pH) and 9 (simulated GI), drug contents were analyzed by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. Method was found linear in the concentration range of 1.0-50.0 μg mL-1 with correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.999. Precision (RSD%) was less than 2.0%, indicating good precision of the method and accuracy was 98.0-100.0%. Furthermore, cefpirome-ACE-inhibitors' complexes were also synthesized and results were elucidated on the basis of FT-IR, and 1H NMR. The interaction results show that these interactions are pH dependent and for the co-administration of cefpirome and ACE-inhibitors, a proper interval should be given.

  6. Investigation and management of Toxoplasma gondii infection in pregnancy and infancy: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    di Carlo, Paola; Romano, Amelia; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cillino, Salvatore; Schimmenti, Maria Gabriella; Mancuso, Giorgio; la Chiusa, Stella; Novara, Vincenzo; Ingrassia, Daniela; li Vecchi, Valentina; Trizzino, Marcello; Titone, Lucina

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Toxoplasma gondii infection during pregnancy poses a serious risk to the fetus, therefore timely and accurate diagnosis is essential. The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of congenital infection via evaluating mother's immunological status and the possibility to improving the diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Methods: Eighty five mothers with Toxoplasma seroconversion and their offspring were enrolled (among them, 2 spontaneous abortions were documented in the first trimester). Prenatal PCR diagnosis was carried out on 50 patients (60%), with 7 positive cases (14%). Morphological ultrasound scanning revealed anomalies in one fetus. Long-term follow-up included general physical examinations, serological status tested using Western blot, neuro-radiological, ophthalmologic and neurologic examinations, psychological and developmental tests, visual evoked potential tests and audiology tests, as well as anti-Toxoplasma treatment regimes. Results: Fourteen (17%) of the infants were infected at one-year serological follow-up. Chi-square for linear trend of vertical transmission from the first to the third trimester was significant (P=0.009). Western blot analysis showed IgM and IgA in half of the infected infants. In 69 uninfected infants, anti-Toxoplasma IgG immunoblot analysis excluded infection within the 3 months in 18 infants (26%) and in the others within 6 months of life. The most relevant instrumental findings are described. Conclusion: Western blot analysis may help to evaluate infection within the 6 months of life. The accuracy of ultrasound imaging to determine the brain damage in the fetus and newborns is doubtful, and should be combined with MR imaging. Multistep approaches can improve the timing of postnatal follow-up. PMID:21743484

  7. Investigating Preterm Care at the Facility Level: Stakeholder Qualitative Study in Central and Southern Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gondwe, Austrida; Munthali, Alister; Ashorn, Per; Ashorn, Ulla

    2016-07-01

    Objectives Malawi is estimated to have one of the highest preterm birth rates in the world. However, care of preterm infants at facility level in Malawi has not been explored. We aimed to explore the views of health stakeholders about the care of preterm infants in health facilities and the existence of any policy protocol documents guiding the delivery of care to these infants. Methods We conducted 16 in-depth interviews with health stakeholders (11 service providers and 5 policy makers) using an interview guide and asked for any existing policy protocol documents guiding care for preterm infants in the health facilities in Malawi. The collected documents were reviewed and all the interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed and translated. All data were analysed using content analysis approach. Results We identified four policy protocol documents and out of these, one had detailed information explaining the care of preterm infants. Policy makers reported that policy protocol documents to guide care for preterm infants were available in the health facilities but majority (63.6 %) of the service providers lacked knowledge about the existence of these documents. Health stakeholders reported several challenges in caring for preterm infants including lack of trained staff in preterm infant care, antibiotics, space, supervision and poor referral system. Conclusions Our study highlights that improving health care service provider knowledge of preterm infant care is an integral part in preterm child birth. Our findings suggests that policy makers and health decision makers should retain those trained in preterm new born care in the health facility's preterm unit.

  8. Investigation of partial volume correction methods for brain FDG PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.; Huang, S.C.; Mega, M.; Toga, A.W.; Small, G.W.; Phelps, M.E.; Lin, K.P.

    1996-12-01

    The use of positron emission tomography (PET) in quantitative fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) studies of aging and dementia has been limited by partial volume effects. A general method for correction of partial volume effects (PVE) in PET involves the following common procedures; segmentation of MRI brain images into gray matter (GM), white matter (WM), cerebral spinal fluid (CSF), and muscle (MS) components; MRI PET registration; and generation of simulated PET images. Afterward, two different approaches can be taken. The first approach derives first a pixel-by-pixel correction map as the ratio of the measured image to the simulated image [with realistic full-width at half-maximum (FWHM)]. The correction map was applied to the MRI segmentation image. Regions of interest (ROI`s) can then be applied to give results free of partial volume effects. The second approach uses the ROI values of the simulated ``pure`` image (with negligible FWHM) and those of the simulated and the measured PET images to correct for the PVE effect. By varying the ratio of radiotracer concentrations for different tissue components, the in-plane FWHM`s of a three-dimensional point spread function, and the ROI size, the authors evaluated the performance of these two approaches in terms of their accuracy and sensitivity to different simulation configurations. The results showed that both approaches are more robust than the approach developed by Muller-Gartner et al., and the second approach is more accurate and more robust than the first. In conclusion, the authors recommend that the second approach should be used on FDG PET images to correct for partial volume effects and to determine whether an apparent change in GM radiotracer concentration is truly due to metabolic changes.

  9. A prospective case-control study to investigate retinal microvascular changes in acute dengue infection.

    PubMed

    Tan, Petrina; Lye, David C; Yeo, Tun Kuan; Cheung, Carol Y; Thein, Tun-Linn; Wong, Joshua G; Agrawal, Rupesh; Li, Ling-Jun; Wong, Tien-Yin; Gan, Victor C; Leo, Yee-Sin; Teoh, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection can affect the microcirculation by direct viral infection or activation of inflammation. We aimed to determine whether measured retinal vascular parameters were associated with acute dengue infection. Patients with acute dengue were recruited from Communicable Diseases Center, Singapore and age-gender-ethnicity matched healthy controls were selected from a population-based study. Retinal photographs were taken on recruitment and convalescence. A spectrum of quantitative retinal microvascular parameters (retinal vascular caliber, fractal dimension, tortuosity and branching angle) was measured using a semi-automated computer-based program. (Singapore I Vessel Assessment, version 3.0). We included 62 dengue patients and 127 controls. Dengue cases were more likely to have wider retinal arteriolar and venular calibers (158.3 μm vs 144.3 μm, p < 0.001; 227.7 μm vs 212.8 μm, p < 0.001; respectively), higher arteriolar and venular fractal dimensions (1.271 vs 1.249, p = 0.002; 1.268 vs. 1.230, p < 0.001, respectively), higher arteriolar and venular tortuosity (0.730 vs 0.546 [x10(4)], p < 0.001; 0.849 vs 0.658 [x10(4)], p < 0.001; respectively), compared to controls. Resolution of acute dengue coincided with decrease in retinal vascular calibers and venular fractal dimension. Dengue patients have altered microvascular network in the retina; these changes may reflect pathophysiological processes in the immune system.

  10. Theoretical investigation of structures and energetics of sodium adatom and its dimer on graphene: DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Rani, Pooja; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-11-01

    Extensive ab initio calculations have been performed to study the energetics of a sodium (Na) atom and its dimer adsorbed on graphene using the SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS), partial density states (PDOS) of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated. After considering various sites for adsorption of Na on graphene, the center of a hexagonal ring of carbon atoms is found to be the preferred site of adsorption while the Na2 dimer prefers to rest parallel to the graphene sheet. We find insignificant energy differences among adsorption configurations involving different possible sites in parallel orientation, which implies high mobility of the dimer on the graphene sheet. We also notice only a slight distortion of the graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane upon adatom adsorption. However, some lateral displacements seen are more perceptible. Summary The adsorption energy, geometry, charge transfer, ionization potential and density of states (DOS) and PDOS of adatom/dimer-graphene system have been calculated using SIESTA package Soler et al. (2002) [1] which works within a DFT(density functional theory)-GGA (generalized gradient approximation) pseudopotential framework. Preferred site for adsorption of a sodium atom on graphene is the hollow site. For the Na dimer adsorption, we found that horizontal orientation is favored over the vertical one. From DOS plots, it is clear that graphene's states are nearly unaffected by the adsorption of Na adatom and Interaction between sodium and graphene is predominantly ionic

  11. Investigations of interference between electromagnetic transponders and wireless MOSFET dosimeters: A phantom study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhong; Zhang, Lisha; Ramakrishnan, V.; Hagan, Michael; Anscher, Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    clinical localization resolution of 0.5 mm. For hypothesis 2, analysis of variance indicated that there was no statistically significant difference between the dosimeter readings with and without the presence of transponders. Both orthogonal and parallel configurations had difference of polynomial-fit dose to measured dose values within 1.75%.Conclusions: The phantom study indicated that the Calypso System’s localization accuracy was not affected clinically due to the presence of DVS wireless MOSFET dosimeters and the dosimeter-measured doses were not affected by the presence of transponders. Thus, the same patients could be implanted with both transponders and dosimeters to benefit from improved accuracy of radiotherapy treatments offered by conjunctional use of the two systems. PMID:21776780

  12. Using discrepant events in science demonstrations to promote student engagement in scientific investigations: An action research study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Vincent J.

    Students' scientific investigations have been identified in national standards and related reform documents as a critical component of students' learning experiences in school, yet it is not easy to implement them in science classrooms. Could science demonstrations help science teachers put this recommendation into practice? While demonstrations are a common practice in the science classroom and research has documented some positive effects in terms of student motivation and engagement from their use, the literature also shows that, as traditionally presented, science demonstrations do not always achieve their intended outcomes. This, in turn, suggested the value of investigating what design elements of demonstrations could be used to promote specific instructional goals. Employing action research as a methodology, the proposed study was developed to explore how science demonstrations can be designed so as to most effectively promote student engagement in scientific investigations. More specifically, I was interested in examining the effects of using a discrepant event as part of the demonstration, as a way to create cognitive conflict and, thus, increase interest and engagement. I also investigated the relative merit of the well-researched POE (Predict, Observe, Explain) design versus employing demonstrations that appear to the student to be unplanned (what I will refer to as NOE, or a Naturally Occurring Experience). This study was informed by Constructivism, Situated Cognition and Conceptual Change as theoretical frameworks. The project included the design, implementation and study of an intervention consisting of three instructional units designed to support students' learning of the concepts of density, molecular arrangement of gas particles, and cohesion, respectively. In each of these units, lasting a total of two 80-minute class periods, students were asked to design and conduct an investigation to gain a better understanding of the concept under study. In

  13. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 300-FF-1 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Over 1,400 waste facilities have been identified on the Hanford Site. Most of the waste facilities are located within geographic areas on the Hanford Site that are referred to as the 100, 200, 300, 400, and 1100 areas. The purpose of this work plan is to document the project scoping process and to outline all remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) activities, to determine the nature and extent of the threat presented by releases of hazardous substances from the operable unit, and to evaluate proposed remedies for such releases. The goal of the 300-FF-1 remedial investigation (RI) is to provide sufficient information needed to conduct the feasibility study (FS), by determining the nature and extent of the threat to public health and the environment posed by releases of hazardous substances from 300-FF-1, and the performance of specific remedial technologies. 62 refs., 28 figs., 48 tabs.

  14. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, Knoxville, Tennessee: Volume 2, Appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This document contains the appendixes for the remedial investigation and feasibility study for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The following topics are covered in the appendixes: (A) David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site Historical Data, (B) Fieldwork Plans for the David Witherspoon, Inc., 901 Site, (C) Risk Assessment, (D) Remediation Technology Discussion, (E) Engineering Support Documentation, (F) Applicable or Relevant and Appropriate Requirements, and (G) Cost Estimate Documentation.

  15. Investigating the Experiences of Childhood Cancer Patients and Parents Participating in Optional Nontherapeutic Clinical Research Studies in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Errington, Julie; Malik, Ghada; Evans, Julie; Baston, Jenny; Parry, Annie; Price, Lisa; Johnstone, Hina; Peters, Selena; Oram, Victoria; Howe, Karen; Whiteley, Emma; Tunnacliffe, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background While the majority of childhood cancer clinical trials are treatment related, additional optional research investigations may be carried out that do not directly impact on treatment. It is essential that these studies are conducted ethically and that the experiences of families participating in these studies are as positive as possible. Methods A questionnaire study was carried out to investigate the key factors that influence why families choose to participate in optional nontherapeutic research studies, the level of understanding of the trials involved, and the experiences of participation. Results A total of 100 participants from six UK centers were studied; 77 parents, 10 patients >16 years, and 13 patients aged 8–15 years. Ninety‐seven percent of parents and 90% of patients felt that information provided prior to study consent was of the right length, with 52% of parents and 65% of patients fully understanding the information provided. Seventy‐four percent of parents participated in research studies in order to “do something important”, while 74% of patients participated “to help medical staff”. Encouragingly, <5% of participants felt that their clinical care would be negatively affected if they did not participate. Positive aspects of participation included a perception of increased attention from medical staff. Negative aspects included spending longer periods in hospital and the requirement for additional blood samples. Ninety‐six percent of parents and 87% of patients would participate in future studies. Conclusions The study provides an insight into the views of childhood cancer patients and their parents participating in nontherapeutic clinical research studies. Overwhelmingly, the findings suggest that participation is seen as a positive experience. PMID:26928983

  16. Fire investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, A.

    There was considerable progress made on several fronts of fire investigation in the United States in recent years. Progress was made in increasing the quantity of fire investigation and reporting, through efforts to develop the National Fire Incident Reporting System. Improving overall quality of fire investigation is the objective of efforts such as the Fire Investigation Handbook, which was developed and published by the National Bureau of Standards, and the upgrading and expanding of the ""dictionary'' of fire investigation and reporting, the NFPA 901, Uniform Coding for Fire Protection, system. The science of fire investigation as furthered also by new approaches to post fire interviews being developed at the University of Washington, and by in-depth research into factors involved in several large loss fires, including the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. Finally, the use of special study fire investigations - in-depth investigations concentrating on specific fire problems - is producing new glimpses into the nature of the national fire problem. A brief description of the status of efforts in each of these areas is discussed.

  17. A systematic review of analytical observational studies investigating the association between cardiovascular disease and drinking water hardness.

    PubMed

    Catling, Louise A; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Lake, Iain R; Swift, Louise; Hunter, Paul R

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study is to systematically review and critically assess analytical observational epidemiology studies investigating the association between levels of drinking water hardness and cardiovascular disease. We searched electronic databases and used standardised forms to extract data and assess study quality. Of 2,906 papers identified, 14 met the inclusion criteria (nine case control and five cohort studies). Of the nine case control studies, seven examined both drinking water magnesium and calcium and risk of death from cardiovascular disease. A pooled odds ratio showed a statistically significant inverse association between magnesium and cardiovascular mortality (OR 0.75 (95%CI 0.68, 0.82), p < 0.001). Only two studies reported a statistically significant effect for calcium. Substantial heterogeneity between studies made calculation of a summary estimate for drinking water calcium inappropriate. Of three cohort studies reviewed, two were of good quality. A weak suggestion that soft water was harmful in females and possibly associated with a slightly greater risk of sudden death was reported, but there was no association between water hardness and mortality from stroke or cardiovascular disease. This study found significant evidence of an inverse association between magnesium levels in drinking water and cardiovascular mortality following a meta-analysis of case control studies. Evidence for calcium remains unclear.

  18. Pilot clinical study to investigate the human whole blood spectrum characteristics in the sub-THz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Tzu-Fang; You, Borwen; Gao, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-04-01

    We have conducted a pilot clinical study to not only investigate the THz spectra of ex-vivo fresh human whole blood of 28 patients following 8-hours fasting guideline, but also to find out the critical blood ingredients of which the concentration dominantly affects those THz spectra. A great difference between the THz absorption properties of human blood among different people was observed, while the difference can be up to ~15% of the averaged absorption coefficient of the 28 samples. Our pilot clinical study indicates that triglyceride and red blood cell were two dominant factors to have significant clinically defined negative correlation to the sub-THz absorption coefficients.

  19. Added value of a household-level study during an outbreak investigation of Salmonella serotype Saintpaul infections, New Mexico 2008

    PubMed Central

    Boore, A. L.; Jungk, J.; Russo, E.T.; Redd, J.T.; Angulo, F. J.; Williams, I. T.; Cheek, J. E.; Gould, L. H.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In 2008, nationwide investigations of a Salmonella serotype Saintpaul outbreak led first to consumer warnings for Roma and red round tomatoes, then later for jalapeño and serrano peppers. In New Mexico, where there were a large number of cases but no restaurant-based clusters, the NM Department of Health and the Indian Health Service participated with CDC in individual-level and household-level case-control studies of infections in New Mexico and the Navajo Nation. No food item was associated in the individual-level study. In the household-level study, households with an ill member were more likely to have had jalapeño peppers present during the exposure period and to have reported ever having serrano peppers in the household. This report illustrates the complexity of this investigation, the limitations of traditional individual-level case-control studies when vehicles of infection are ingredients or commonly eaten with other foods, and the added value of a household-level study. PMID:23228507

  20. Study on the Change of Landscape and Ecology of Sitou Forestland by Using Remotely Sensed and Ecological Investigation Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chiang; Lee, Chin-Ling; Liao, Huan-Chang; Tien, Pei-Ling; Huang, Yi-Ru; Tseng, Yu-San; Lai, Jing Rong; Shen, Chieh-Wen

    Due to natural disasters and anthropogenic disturbances in recent years, the landscape in Central Taiwan suffered certain kind of changes. In particular, landslides caused by earthquake and heavy rainfall, improper use and development in slope land enlarge and speed up the change of forest landscape. Few studies were focused on the interactions and relationships between change of ecosystem and landscape in Taiwan after natural disturbances in recent years. In this study, a pioneering research is accomplished by using Landscape Indices (LI) derived from FORMOSAT II Satellite imagery and GIS spatial coverage to describe the possible pattern of change between landscape and ecology. Located at the mountainous area in central Taiwan, ranging from 800 to 1,800 meter and comprising 2,349 hectares in size, Sitou Tract of the National Taiwan University Experimental Forest is selected as the study site. Four satellite images through 2004 to 2007 are used to compute LI, and analyzed with ecological investigation collected from five ground sites. The preliminary result shows that by using remotely sensed data and ground investigation, it is feasible to monitor and assess the relationship between change of landscape and ecology in forests. It indicates that the recovery and restoration of vegetation after the human and natural disturbances highly correlates with the value of NDVI (Normalized Differential Vegetation Index), the composition and diversity of birds and insects are highly correlated with the diversity of patches. The values of SHDI (Shannon Diversity Index), SIDI (Simpson Diversity Index), SHEI (Shannon Evenness Index) and SIEI (Simpson Evenness Index) show that the diversity of landscape is growing while the evenness of landscape remains stable between 2004 and 2007. The ecological investigation in 2006 and 2007 indicated that the species and relative abundance is decreasing. The proof for the obvious relationship between the change of ecology and landscape metrics

  1. Investigating factors associated with adherence behaviour in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia: an observational patient-centered outcome study

    PubMed Central

    Efficace, F; Baccarani, M; Rosti, G; Cottone, F; Castagnetti, F; Breccia, M; Alimena, G; Iurlo, A; Rossi, A R; Pardini, S; Gherlinzoni, F; Salvucci, M; Tiribelli, M; Vignetti, M; Mandelli, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Optimal adherence to imatinib therapy is of paramount importance to maximise treatment effectiveness in patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). The main objective of this study was to investigate patient-reported personal factors associated with adherence behaviour. Methods: Analysis was conducted on 413 CML patients receiving long-term therapy with imatinib. Adherence behaviour was measured with the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale and personal factors investigated included: quality of life, perceived social support, fatigue, symptom burden, psychological wellbeing and desire for additional information. Key socio-demographic and treatment-related factors were also taken into account. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate factors associated with optimal adherence to therapy. Results: In all, 53% of patients reported an optimal adherence behaviour. The final multivariate model retained the following variables as independent predictors of optimal adherence to therapy: desire for more information (ref. no), odds ratio (OR)=0.43 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.29–0.66; P<0.001), social support (higher score representing greater support), OR=1.29 (95% CI, 1.11–1.49; P<0.001) and concomitant drug burden (ref. no), OR=1.82 (95% CI, 1.18–2.80; P=0.006). Conclusion: This study suggests that a higher level of social support, satisfaction with information received and concomitant drug burden are the main factors associated with greater adherence to long-term imatinib therapy. PMID:22871884

  2. Structural property investigations of 1-[2-(2-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]piperidinium chloride: An experimental and computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kołodziejczak, Jerzy; Jezierska, Aneta; Panek, Jarosław J.; De Borggraeve, Wim M.; Kochel, Andrzej; Jose, Rani Alphonsa; Koll, Aleksander

    2008-11-01

    A phenethyl containing piperidinium compound was synthesized and the results of an X-ray crystallographic and computational analysis of this compound are reported. The compound, 1-[2-(2-methoxyphenyl)ethyl]piperidinium chloride, contains a C-H···O contact, which stabilizes the experimentally found conformation. Additionally, an ionic bond between N-H···Cl atoms is present as shown by the crystallographic measurements. The presence of these two contacts prompted us to perform further theoretical studies. The first part of the computational investigations was carried out on the basis of the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) in the solid-state using experimental parameters and conditions as a starting point of the simulation. The time evolution of the interatomic distances of the atoms involved in the N-H···Cl interaction was investigated. Vibrational features of the compound were studied by predicted and power spectra. In addition, static models, based on density functional theory (DFT) and second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation calculus, were built to describe the geometric and electronic structure parameters. Finally, the details of the ionic bridge were analyzed using the natural bond orbitals (NBO) approach. The electron density topology was investigated by the atoms in molecules (AIM) theory. In summary, the ionic bridge modifies the spectroscopic properties of the bridge proton. The negative charge of the chloride anion is partially delocalized via the ammonium moiety to the organic subunit.

  3. Meat and heme iron intake and esophageal adenocarcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    PubMed

    Jakszyn, Paula; Luján-Barroso, Leila; Agudo, Antonio; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Molina, Esther; Sánchez, Ma José; Fonseca-Nunes, Ana; Siersema, Peter D; Matiello, Amalia; Tumino, Rosario; Saieva, Calogero; Pala, Valeria; Vineis, Paolo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Racine, Antoine; Bastide, Nadie; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Riboli, Elio; Murphy, Neil; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Valanou, Elissavet; Oikonomidou, Edespina; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Skeie, Guri; Johansen, Dorthe; Lindkvist, Björn; Johansson, Mattias; Duarte-Salles, Talita; Freisling, Heinz; Barricarte, Aurelio; Huerta, Jose Ma; Amiano, Pilar; Tjonneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Kuehn, Tilman; Grote, Verena; Boeing, Heiner; Peeters, Petra H M; González, Carlos A

    2013-12-01

    Although recent studies suggest that high intakes of meat and heme iron are risk factors for several types of cancer, studies in relation to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) are scarce. Previous results in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) based on a relatively small number of cases suggested a positive association between processed meat and EAC. In this study, we investigate the association between intake of different types of meats and heme iron intake and EAC risk in a larger number of cases from EPIC. The study included 481,419 individuals and 137 incident cases of EAC that occurred during an average of 11 years of follow-up. Dietary intake of meat (unprocessed/processed red and white meat) was assessed by validated center-specific questionnaires. Heme iron was calculated as a type-specific percentage of the total iron content in meat. After adjusting for relevant confounders, we observed a statistically significant positive association of EAC risk with heme iron and processed meat intake, with HR: 1.67, 95% CI: 1.05-2.68 and HR: 2.27, 95% CI:1.33-3.89, respectively, for comparison of the highest vs. lowest tertile of intake. Our results suggest a potential association between higher intakes of processed meat and heme iron and risk of EAC.

  4. Time-course investigation of the gene expression profile during Fasciola hepatica infection: A microarray-based study

    PubMed Central

    Rojas-Caraballo, Jose; López-Abán, Julio; Fernández-Soto, Pedro; Vicente, Belén; Collía, Francisco; Muro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Fasciolosis is listed as one of the most important neglected tropical diseases according with the World Health Organization and is also considered as a reemerging disease in the human beings. Despite there are several studies describing the immune response induced by Fasciola hepatica in the mammalian host, investigations aimed at identifying the expression profile of genes involved in inducing hepatic injury are currently scarce. Data presented here belong to a time-course investigation of the gene expression profile in the liver of BALB/c mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae at 7 and 21 days after experimental infection. The data published here have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE69588, previously published by Rojas-Caraballo et al. (2015) in PLoS One [1]. PMID:26697343

  5. Lab-scale impact test to investigate the pipe-soil interaction and comparative study to evaluate structural responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Dong-Man; Lee, Chi-Seung; Choi, Kwang-Ho; Koo, Bon-Yong; Song, Joon-Kyu; Kim, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Jae-Myung

    2015-07-01

    This study examined the dynamic response of a subsea pipeline under an impact load to determine the effect of the seabed soil. A laboratory-scale soil-based pipeline impact test was carried out to investigate the pipeline deformation/strain as well as the interaction with the soil-pipeline. In addition, an impact test was simulated using the finite element technique, and the calculated strain was compared with the experimental results. During the simulation, the pipeline was described based on an elasto-plastic analysis, and the soil was modeled using the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. The results obtained were compared with ASME D31.8, and the differences between the analysis results and the rules were specifically investigated. Modified ASME formulae were proposed to calculate the precise structural behavior of a subsea pipeline under an impact load when considering sand- and clay-based seabed soils.

  6. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  7. Investigating the molecular and aggregated states of a drug molecule rutaecarpine using spectroscopy, microscopy, crystallography and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Dandpat, Shiba Sundar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2015-06-01

    The photophysical properties of a potential drug molecule rutaecarpine have been investigated in molecular as well as aggregated states. All systems have been characterized by various spectroscopic, microscopic and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The investigation has been carried out by keeping the fact in mind that hydrophobic organic molecules have a strong tendency to form aggregates in aqueous solution. A blue shift in the absorption spectrum of rutaecarpine has been observed for aggregates (compared to molecular solution) indicating the formation of H-type aggregates. The intermolecular interactions responsible for such aggregation have been further investigated through crystallographic and computational studies. It has been observed that π-π stacking interactions among the monomer units play an important role in the formation of H-type aggregates. Quantum mechanical calculations also substantiate the blue shift in the absorption that has been observed for aggregates. In the present case, enhanced emission for aggregates as compared to the molecular solution of rutaecarpine has also been observed. The observed enhanced emission upon aggregation is attributed to the decrease of the non-radiative rate constant (knr) upon aggregation. The effect of a surface active ionic liquid (SAIL), 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C12mim]Br), on the aggregation of rutaecarpine has been investigated. Interestingly, in addition to the decrease in the particle size, a change in the morphology of the aggregates has also been observed with gradual addition of [C12mim]Br to the colloidal solution of rutaecarpine. The present study demonstrates that a SAIL can effectively be used as a medium for dissociation of colloidal aggregates and encapsulation of molecular species, which in turn would be helpful in influencing the drug activity. PMID:25948504

  8. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1, main text

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek Operable Unit (CR/PC OU), an off-site OU associated with environmental restoration activities at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). As a result of past, present, and potential future releases of hazardous substances into the environment, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List in December 1989 (54 FR 48184). Sites on this list must be investigated for possible remedial action, as required by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9601, et seq.). This report documents the findings of the remedial investigation of this OU and the feasibility of potential remedial action alternatives. These studies are authorized by Sect. 117 of CERCLA and were conducted in accordance with the requirements of the National Contingency Plan (40 CFR Part 300). DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) have entered into a Federal Facility Agreement (FFA), as authorized by Sect. 120 of CERCLA and Sects. 3008(h) and 6001 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) (42 U.S.C. 6901, et seq.). The purpose of this agreement is to ensure a coordinated and effective response for all environmental restoration activities occurring at the ORR. In addition to other responsibilities, the FFA parties mutually define the OU boundaries, set remediation priorities, establish remedial investigation priorities and strategies, and identify and select remedial actions. A copy of this FFA is available from the DOE Information Resource Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

  9. Column studies to investigate the fate of veterinary antibiotics in clay soils following slurry application to agricultural land.

    PubMed

    Kay, Paul; Blackwell, Paul A; Boxall, Alistair B A

    2005-07-01

    The environment may be exposed to veterinary medicines administered to livestock due to the application of organic fertilisers to land. For other groups of substances that are applied to agricultural land (e.g. pesticides), preferential flow in underdrained clay soils has been identified as an extremely important pathway by which pollution of surface waters can occur. Three soil column leaching experiments have therefore been carried out using a clay soil to investigate the fate of a range of antibiotics from the sulphonamide, tetracycline and macrolide groups. These column studies complemented a range of other experiments at the field and semi-field scales, as well as modelling studies which are being reported in separate papers. Each column study had a different objective. The first examined the effect of pig slurry on the mobility of antibiotics in clay loam soil. The second experiment investigated changes in soil water pH due to the application of slurry. The final experiment quantified the extent to which soil tillage prior to slurry application can reduce the leaching of antibiotic residues found in slurry. It was found that slurry had no impact on the leaching of oxytetracycline although soil water pH was affected significantly by slurry application. It was also shown that pre-tillage can substantially reduce the leaching of antibiotic residues through macroporous clay soils. PMID:15950042

  10. Investigation of the electrophysiological correlates of negative BOLD response during intermittent photic stimulation: An EEG-fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Maggioni, Eleonora; Zucca, Claudio; Reni, Gianluigi; Cerutti, Sergio; Triulzi, Fabio M; Bianchi, Anna M; Arrigoni, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    Although the occurrence of concomitant positive BOLD responses (PBRs) and negative BOLD responses (NBRs) to visual stimuli is increasingly investigated in neuroscience, it still lacks a definite explanation. Multimodal imaging represents a powerful tool to study the determinants of negative BOLD responses: the integration of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings is especially useful, since it can give information on the neurovascular coupling underlying this complex phenomenon. In the present study, the brain response to intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) was investigated in a group of healthy subjects using simultaneous EEG-fMRI, with the main objective to study the electrophysiological mechanisms associated with the intense NBRs elicited by IPS in extra-striate visual cortex. The EEG analysis showed that IPS induced a desynchronization of the basal rhythm, followed by the instauration of a novel rhythm driven by the visual stimulation. The most interesting results emerged from the EEG-informed fMRI analysis, which suggested a relationship between the neuronal rhythms at 10 and 12 Hz and the BOLD dynamics in extra-striate visual cortex. These findings support the hypothesis that NBRs to visual stimuli may be neuronal in origin rather than reflecting pure vascular phenomena. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2247-2262, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Revision

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-01-01

    This work plan identifies the objectives, tasks, and schedule for conducting a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area of the Hanford Site. The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit addresses contamination identified in the aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, as determined in the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE/RL 1992b). The objectives of this work plan are to develop a program to investigate groundwater contaminants in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area that were designated for Limited Field Investigations (LFIs) and to implement Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) recommended in the 200 West Groundwater AAMSR. The purpose of an LFI is to evaluate high priority groundwater contaminants where existing data are insufficient to determine whether an IRM is warranted and collect sufficient data to justify and implement an IRM, if needed. A Qualitative Risk Assessment (QRA) will be performed as part of the LFI. The purpose of an IRM is to develop and implement activities, such as contaminant source removal and groundwater treatment, that will ameliorate some of the more severe potential risks of groundwater contaminants prior to the RI and baseline Risk Assessment (RA) to be conducted under the Final Remedy Selection (FRS) at a later date. This work plan addresses needs of a Treatability Study to support the design and implementation of an interim remedial action for the Uranium-{sup 99}{Tc}-Nitrate multi-contaminant IRM plume identified beneath U Plant.

  12. Correlates of joint child protection and police child sexual abuse investigations: results from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect–2008

    PubMed Central

    Tonmyr, L.; Gonzalez, A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Our study examines the frequency of joint investigations by child protection workers and the police in sexual abuse investigations compared to other maltreatment types and the association of child-, caregiver-, maltreatment- and investigation-related characteristics in joint investigations, focussing specifically on investigations involving sexual abuse. Methods: We analyzed data from the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect–2008 using logistic regression. Results: The data suggest that sexual abuse (55%), and then physical abuse, neglect and emotional maltreatment, are most often co-investigated. Substantiation of maltreatment, severity of maltreatment, placement in out-of-home care, child welfare court involvement and referral of a family member to specialized services was more likely when the police were involved in an investigation. Conclusion: This study adds to the limited information on correlates of joint child protection agency and police investigations. Further research is needed to determine the effectiveness of these joint investigations. PMID:26605560

  13. An investigation into the move towards electronic journals: a case study of NHS libraries in Kent, Surrey and Sussex.

    PubMed

    England, Rebecca

    2013-09-01

    Electronic journals are so embedded into practice in academic libraries that it is easy to forget that this is not the case everywhere. In NHS libraries, for example, the staff face a particular set of issues. This article is based on Rebecca England's dissertation on this topic, completed as part of the MSc Econ course in Information and Library studies at Aberystwyth University. Rebecca is E-resources Librarian at the Maidstone and Tunbridge Wells NHS Trust. She investigated the momentum towards electronic journals in NHS libraries in the Kent, Surrey and Sussex region and the potential for a regional purchasing consortium.

  14. [Comment on “Investigations unveil Holocene thrusting for onshore Portugal”] Paleoseismological studies near Lisbon: Holocene thrusting or landslide activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, João M. L.; Marques, Fernando M. S. F.

    A paper on paleoseismological investigations in the Lower Tagus River Valley (LTV) region, northeast of Lisbon, Portugal, was recently published in Eos Transactions by Fonseca et al. (2000a). The LTV is an area of significant seismicity attested by the occurrence of magnitude 6.5-7 historical earthquakes, and has been the subject of several geological studies. Nevertheless, major uncertainties on the regional tectonic structure have subsisted until now, mainly due to a Cenozoic sedimentary cover that hides most of the active faults rooted in the basement.

  15. Remedial investigation/feasibility study of the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1: Main text

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the findings of an investigation into contamination of the Clinch River and Poplar Creek near the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in eastern Tennessee. For more than 50 years, various hazardous and radioactive substances have been released to the environment as a result of operations and waste management activities at the ORR. In 1989, the ORR was placed on the National Priorities List (NPL), established and maintained under the federal Comprehensive environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Under CERCLA, NPL sites must be investigated to determine the nature and extent of contamination at the site, assess the risk to human health and the environment posed by the site, and, if necessary, identify feasible remedial alternatives that could be used to clean the site and reduce risk. To facilitate the overall environmental restoration effort at the ORR, CERCLA activities are being implemented individually as distinct operable units (OUs). This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek OU.

  16. Dietary intake of heme iron and risk of gastric cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study.

    PubMed

    Jakszyn, Paula; Agudo, Antonio; Lujan-Barroso, Leila; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Jenab, Mazda; Navarro, Carmen; Palli, Domenico; Boeing, Heiner; Manjer, Jonas; Numans, Mattijs E; Igali, Laszlo; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Morois, Sophie; Grioni, Sara; Panico, cSalvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Quirós, J Ramon; Molina-Montes, Esther; Huerta Castaño, Jose Ma; Barricarte, Aurelio; Amiano, Pilar; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Wareham, Nicholas; Allen, Naomi E; Key, Timothy J; Jeurnink, Suzanne M; Peeters, Petra H M; Bamia, Christina; Valanou, Elisabeth; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Bergmann, Manuela M; Lindkvist, Björn; Stenling, Roger; Johansson, Ingegerd; Dahm, Christina C; Overvad, Kim; Olsen, Anja; Tjonneland, Anne; Skeie, Guri; Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild; Lund, Eiliv; Michaud, Dominique S; Mouw, Traci; Riboli, Elio; González, Carlos A

    2012-06-01

    Even though recent studies suggest that a high intake of heme iron is associated with several types of cancer, epidemiological studies in relation to gastric cancer (GC) are lacking. Our previous results show a positive association between red and processed meat and non cardia gastric cancer, especially in Helicobacter pylori infected subjects. The aim of the study is to investigate the association between heme iron intake and GC risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EURGAST-EPIC). Dietary intake was assessed by validated center-specific questionnaires. Heme iron was calculated as a type-specific percentage of the total iron content in meat intake, derived from the literature. Antibodies of H. pylori infection and vitamin C levels were measured in a sub-sample of cases and matched controls included in a nested case-control study within the cohort. The study included 481,419 individuals and 444 incident cases of GC that occurred during an average of 8.7 years of followup. We observed a statistically significant association between heme iron intake and GC risk (HR 1.13 95% CI: 1.01-1.26 for a doubling of intake) adjusted by sex, age, BMI, education level, tobacco smoking and energy intake. The positive association between heme iron and the risk of GC was statistically significant in subjects with plasma vitamin C <39 mmol/l only (log2 HR 1.54 95% CI (1.01-2.35). We found a positive association between heme iron intake and gastric cancer risk. PMID:21717452

  17. Investigation of parameters highlighting drug induced small changes of the T-wave's morphology for drug safety studies.

    PubMed

    Baas, Tobias; Gräfe, Ksenija; Khawaja, Antoun; Dössel, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    In guideline E14, the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requests for clinical studies to investigate the prolongation of the heart rate corrected QT-interval (QTc) of the ECG. As drug induced QT-prolongation can be caused by changes in the repolarisation of the ventricles, it is so far a thorough ECG biomarker of risk for ventricular tachyarrhythmias and Torsade de Pointes (TdP). Ventricular repolarisation changes not only change QT but also influence the morphology of the T-wave. In a (400 mg single dose) Moxifloxacin positive control study both, QTc and several descriptors describing the T-wave morphology have been measured. Moxifloxacin is changing two shape dependent descriptors significantly (P<0.05) about 3 to 4 hours after a 400 mg oral single dose of Moxifloxacin.

  18. Does Formal Complexity Reflect Cognitive Complexity? Investigating Aspects of the Chomsky Hierarchy in an Artificial Language Learning Study

    PubMed Central

    Öttl, Birgit; Jäger, Gerhard; Kaup, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether formal complexity, as described by the Chomsky Hierarchy, corresponds to cognitive complexity during language learning. According to the Chomsky Hierarchy, nested dependencies (context-free) are less complex than cross-serial dependencies (mildly context-sensitive). In two artificial grammar learning (AGL) experiments participants were presented with a language containing either nested or cross-serial dependencies. A learning effect for both types of dependencies could be observed, but no difference between dependency types emerged. These behavioral findings do not seem to reflect complexity differences as described in the Chomsky Hierarchy. This study extends previous findings in demonstrating learning effects for nested and cross-serial dependencies with more natural stimulus materials in a classical AGL paradigm after only one hour of exposure. The current findings can be taken as a starting point for further exploring the degree to which the Chomsky Hierarchy reflects cognitive processes. PMID:25885790

  19. Does formal complexity reflect cognitive complexity? Investigating aspects of the Chomsky Hierarchy in an artificial language learning study.

    PubMed

    Öttl, Birgit; Jäger, Gerhard; Kaup, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether formal complexity, as described by the Chomsky Hierarchy, corresponds to cognitive complexity during language learning. According to the Chomsky Hierarchy, nested dependencies (context-free) are less complex than cross-serial dependencies (mildly context-sensitive). In two artificial grammar learning (AGL) experiments participants were presented with a language containing either nested or cross-serial dependencies. A learning effect for both types of dependencies could be observed, but no difference between dependency types emerged. These behavioral findings do not seem to reflect complexity differences as described in the Chomsky Hierarchy. This study extends previous findings in demonstrating learning effects for nested and cross-serial dependencies with more natural stimulus materials in a classical AGL paradigm after only one hour of exposure. The current findings can be taken as a starting point for further exploring the degree to which the Chomsky Hierarchy reflects cognitive processes. PMID:25885790

  20. Life stress, emotional health, and mean telomere length in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-Norfolk population study.

    PubMed

    Surtees, Paul G; Wainwright, Nicholas W J; Pooley, Karen A; Luben, Robert N; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M

    2011-11-01

    We investigated the association between psychological stress, emotional health, and relative mean telomere length in an ethnically homogeneous population of 4,441 women, aged 41-80 years. Mean telomere length was measured using high-throughput quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Social adversity exposure and emotional health were assessed through questionnaire and covariates through direct measurement and questionnaire. This study found evidence that adverse experiences during childhood may be associated with shorter telomere length. This finding remained after covariate adjustment and showed evidence of a dose-response relationship with increasing number of reported childhood difficulties associated with decreasing relative mean telomere length. No associations were observed for any of the other summary measures of social adversity and emotional health considered. These results extend and provide support for some previous findings concerning the association of adverse experience and emotional health histories with shorter telomere length in adulthood. Replication of these findings in longitudinal studies is now essential.

  1. Pilot clinical study to investigate the human whole blood spectrum characteristics in the sub-THz region.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tzu-Fang; You, Borwen; Gao, Hao-Cheng; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2015-04-01

    We have conducted a pilot clinical study to not only investigate the sub-THz spectra of ex-vivo fresh human whole blood of 28 patients following 8-hours fasting guideline, but also to find out the critical blood ingredients of which the concentration dominantly affects those sub-THz spectra. A great difference between the sub-THz absorption properties of human blood among different people was observed, while the difference can be up to ~15% of the averaged absorption coefficient of the 28 samples. Our pilot clinical study indicates that triglycerides and the number of red blood cells were two dominant factors to have significant negative correlation to the sub-THz absorption coefficients. PMID:25968774

  2. Flow Visualization Study of a 1/48-Scale AFTI/F111 Model to Investigate Horizontal Tail Flow Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjarke, Lisa J.

    1991-01-01

    During flight testing of the AFTI/F111 aircraft, horizontal tail buffet was observed. Flutter analysis ruled out any aeroelastic instability, so a water-tunnel flow visualization study was conducted to investigate possible flow disturbances on the horizontal tail which might cause buffet. For this study, a 1/48-scale model was used. Four different wing cambers and one horizontal tail setting were tested between 0 and 20 deg angle of attack. These wing cambers corresponded to the following leading training edge deflections: 0/2, 10/10, 10/2, and 0/10. Flow visualization results in the form of still photographs are presented for each of the four wing cambers between 8 and 12 deg angle of attack. In general, the horizontal tail experiences flow disturbances which become more pronounced with angle of attack or wing trailing-edge deflection.

  3. Does formal complexity reflect cognitive complexity? Investigating aspects of the Chomsky Hierarchy in an artificial language learning study.

    PubMed

    Öttl, Birgit; Jäger, Gerhard; Kaup, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether formal complexity, as described by the Chomsky Hierarchy, corresponds to cognitive complexity during language learning. According to the Chomsky Hierarchy, nested dependencies (context-free) are less complex than cross-serial dependencies (mildly context-sensitive). In two artificial grammar learning (AGL) experiments participants were presented with a language containing either nested or cross-serial dependencies. A learning effect for both types of dependencies could be observed, but no difference between dependency types emerged. These behavioral findings do not seem to reflect complexity differences as described in the Chomsky Hierarchy. This study extends previous findings in demonstrating learning effects for nested and cross-serial dependencies with more natural stimulus materials in a classical AGL paradigm after only one hour of exposure. The current findings can be taken as a starting point for further exploring the degree to which the Chomsky Hierarchy reflects cognitive processes.

  4. The software IDA for investigation of asteroid dynamics and its use for study of some asteroid motion (Abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushina, T.; Bykova, L.; Letner, O.; Baturin, A.

    2015-08-01

    This work is devoted to description of the application suite IDA that is designed for investigation of dynamics and probability orbital evolution of asteroids. IDA allows to predict asteroid motion, to reveal close encounters, possible collisions and orbital resonance with planets, to estimate impact probability, to demonstrate asteroid and planets motion on a computer screen and to solve some additional problems. The features of the suite are multifunctionality, high efficiency and a convenient interface. The application suite IDA consists of following subsystems: subsystem "Assol" which allows to study orbital evolution of the nominal orbit and to demonstrate the asteroid and planets motion on a computer screen; subsystem "Observations" which intended to asteroid orbit fitting to positional observations and construction of initial probability domain with non-linear methods; subsystem "Distribution" which developed for the visualization of distribution of observations along an asteroid orbit; subsystem "Clones ensemble" which allows to construct an initial probability domain with the linear method; subsystem "Evolution" which designed for the study of the orbital evolution of an ensemble of asteroid clones; subsystem "Megno" which intended to estimate of predictability time of asteroid motion by means of average MEGNO parameter. The results of the motion investigation of the asteroid 2012 MF7 are given to demonstrate use of the application suite. This object has nonzero collision probability with the Earth in 2046.

  5. Study of the leaching behaviour of ladle slags by means of leaching tests combined with geochemical modelling and mineralogical investigations.

    PubMed

    Loncnar, Mojca; van der Sloot, Hans A; Mladenovič, Ana; Zupančič, Marija; Kobal, Lara; Bukovec, Peter

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the leachability of freshly produced ladle slag derived from both austenitic and ferritic stainless steel production, and from electrical and structural steel production, was investigated, in order to determine whether variations in the chemical and mineralogical composition of these slags affect their leaching behaviour. The effect of the method used for slag cooling was also studied. The results obtained by using the single batch test were combined with those obtained by means of more sophisticated characterisation leaching tests, which, in combination with geochemical speciation modelling, helped to better identify the release mechanisms and phases that control the release of individual elements. It was found that, although variations in the chemical composition of the slag can affect the slag's minerology, neither such variations, nor the choice of the slag cooling treatment, have a significant effect on the leachability of individual elements, since the leaching is governed by surface phenomena. In fact, the mineral transformations on the slag surface, rather than the bulk mineral composition, dictate the release of these elements from the ladle slag. The solubility-controlling phases were predicted by multi-element modelling, and verified to the extent made possible by the performed mineralogical investigations. PMID:27262282

  6. Mechanistic investigation of the uncatalyzed esterification reaction of acetic acid and acid halides with methanol: a DFT study.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Monsurat M; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Honarparvar, Bahareh; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2016-10-01

    Implementation of catalysts to drive reactions from reactants to products remains a burden to synthetic and organic chemists. In spite of investigations into the kinetics and mechanism of catalyzed esterification reactions, less effort has been made to explore the possibility of an uncatalyzed esterification process. Therefore, a comprehensive mechanistic perspective for the uncatalyzed mechanism at the molecular level is presented. Herein, we describe the non-catalyzed esterification reaction of acetic acid and its halide derivatives (XAc, where X= OH, F, Cl, Br, I) with methanol (MeOH) through a concerted process. The reaction in vacuum and methanol was performed using the density functional theory (DFT) method at M06-2X level with def2-TZVP basis set after a careful literature survey and computations. Esterification through cyclic 4- or 6-membered transition state structures in one- or two-step concerted mechanisms were investigated. The present study outlines the possible cyclic geometry conformations that may occur during experiments at simple ratio of reactants. The free energy of activation for acetic acid and acetyl chloride are 36 kcal mol(-1) and 21 kcal mol(-1), respectively. These are in good agreement with available experimental results from the literature. The selected quantum chemical descriptors proved to be useful tools in chemical reactivity prediction for the reaction mechanism. This quantum mechanics study can serve as a necessary step towards revisiting uncatalyzed reaction mechanisms in some classical organic reactions. PMID:27604278

  7. Ethics of medical care and clinical research: a qualitative study of principal investigators in biomedical HIV prevention research.

    PubMed

    Haire, Bridget G

    2013-04-01

    In clinical research there is a tension between the role of a doctor, who must serve the best interests of the patient, and the role of the researcher, who must produce knowledge that may not have any immediate benefits for the research participant. This tension is exacerbated in HIV research in low and middle income countries, which frequently uncovers comorbidities other than the condition under study. Some bioethicists argue that as the goals of medicine and those of research are distinct, it is a mistake for researchers to assume therapeutic responsibilities while engaging in research. Others propose that there is a duty of care, but disagree as to how this is limited and specified. In this qualitative study, principal investigators from HIV prevention trials discuss their experience of providing medical benefits to participants within the context of conducting research into HIV biomedical prevention technologies. They describe the limitations imposed at times by funders and at times by infrastructure constraints, and canvass the importance of ancillary care provision and capacity building in trial communities. The views of the principal investigators are compatible with the perspective that there is a duty of care, limited by the nature of the research, the depth of the relationship between research and participant, and the capacity of the research site. The therapeutic orientation in HIV prevention trial appears to be indivisible from competent research practise by making concrete and appropriate benefits available to trial participants and their communities that support rather than compete with local infrastructure.

  8. Twins Early Development Study (TEDS): A Genetically Sensitive Investigation of Cognitive and Behavioral Development From Childhood to Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Plomin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The Twins Early Development Study (TEDS) is a large longitudinal sample of twins born in England and Wales between 1994 and 1996. The focus of TEDS has been on cognitive and behavioral development, including difficulties in the context of normal development. TEDS began when multiple births were identified from birth records and the families were invited to take part in the study; 16,810 pairs of twins were originally enrolled in TEDS. More than 10,000 of these twin pairs remain enrolled in the study to date. DNA has been collected for more than 7,000 pairs, and genome-wide genotyping data for two million DNA markers are available for 3,500 individuals. The TEDS families have taken part in studies when the twins were aged 2, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 14, and 16 years of age. Data collection is currently underway to assess the adult destinations of the twins as they move from school to university and the workplace. Between January 2012 and December 2014, all of the TEDS twins will turn 18, and the study will transition to an adult sample. TEDS represents an outstanding resource for investigating the developmental effects of genes and environments on complex quantitative traits from childhood to young adulthood and beyond. PMID:23110994

  9. A community-based case–control study to investigate the role of iron deficiency in the persistence of goiter

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Rambha; Chaudhary, Chintu; Agarwalla, Rashmi; Shaikh, Zakirhusain; Goel, R.K.D.; Patvegar, Bilkish

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To find out the magnitude of iron deficiency anemia in the age group of 6–12 years and investigate the role of iron deficiency as a possible contributor to endemic goiter in school children in Ambala. Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted as a subset of a cross-sectional study among 2700 children from 6 to 12 years of age to find out the prevalence of goiter. All the subjects who were found to be suffering from goiter in the cross-sectional study were enrolled in the case–control study as cases and were compared with age- and sex-matched controls (children without goiter) from the same cohort. The study was conducted from February 2011 to January 2012. Results: Out of total, goiter was observed in 12.6% of the subjects. Urinary iodine excretion was found to be <100 μg/L in 57 (10.5%) children. Mean hemoglobin (Hb) level of the study population was 11.9 g/dL. It was noted that 71% of the goitrous children had anemia (Hb <12 g/dL) as compared to 63.7% of the control group. Serum ferritin (SF) was <15 ng/mL in 70% of the children. The mean ± standard deviation of SF in the goitrous and nongoitrous children was 19.65 ± 32.51 μg/L and 27.55 ± 21.07 μg/L, respectively (P = 0.012). Conclusion: The findings in the study suggest that iron deficiency anemia in children is contributing toward the persistence of goiter in the postiodization phase. PMID:27366719

  10. A decades-long investigation of acute metabolism-based hepatotoxicity by herbal constituents: a case study of pennyroyal oil.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Perry; Khojasteh, S Cyrus

    2015-02-01

    Herbal supplements are often regarded as "natural", and are, therefore, considered by many to be safer than pharmaceuticals; however, the adverse effects of these supplements are under-reported in many cases. Many herbal supplements, such as pyrrolizidine alkaloids, kava, chaparral and germander, are known to induce liver injury, which, in general, is one of the main toxicity liabilities observed in the clinic and accounts for about half of total liver failures. One example is the hepatotoxicity of pennyroyal oil, which is ingested as an abortifacient, among other uses. For three decades, the late Professor Sidney Nelson contributed to our understanding of the mechanism of toxicity of pennyroyal and broadened our understanding of chemical toxicology. Here we present the studies and review the findings on acute hepatotoxicity of pennyroyal oil. These studies involved the isolation and characterization of pennyroyal components, determination of the appropriate animal models, identification of the structural requirement for toxicity and determination of the target enzymes and the enzymes involved in the process of bioactivation. Studies with stable isotope labeled pennyroyal metabolites, pulegone and menthofuran, furthered our understanding of the role of cytochrome P450 in the oxidation of these compounds. This review presents the investigational tools used in the study of pennyroyal oil, allowing the reader to not only appreciate these methods but also utilize them to tackle and better understand metabolism-based toxicity in their own projects.

  11. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 3. Appendix E

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This document contains Appendix E: Toxicity Information and Uncertainty Analysis, description of methods, from the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  12. Investigation into the cause of mortality in 49 cases of idiopathic inflammatory myopathy: A single center study

    PubMed Central

    XIAO, YIZHI; ZUO, XIAOXIA; YOU, YUNHUI; LUO, HUI; DUAN, LIPING; ZHANG, WEIRU; LI, YISHA; XIE, YANLI; ZHOU, YAOU; NING, WANGBIN; LI, TONG; LIU, SIJIA; ZHU, HONGLIN; JIANG, YING; WU, SIYAO; ZHAO, HONGJUN

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic muscle weakness and myositis with unknown etiology. IIM may affect the function of multiple organs and has a poor prognosis. In the present study, the causes of mortality in patients with IIM admitted to the Xiangya Hospital during the last 14 years were investigated. The investigation included an analysis of frequent causes of IIM, and of infections and associated complications. A cohort study was conducted on 676 patients with IIM that were admitted to Xiangya Hospital from January, 2001 to January, 2015. There were 49 patient mortalities (7.2% of the total cases), of which 34 mortalities were infection-associated and 15 were not infection-associated. The proportion of infection-associated IIM mortalities had increased since 2001. Of the 34 infection-associated mortalities, 31 cases (63.3%) were of fungal and bacterial infections, most frequently infecting the lungs and the blood. Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii were the most commonly isolated pathogens, and co-infection with the two pathogens was observed in the majority of cases. In the IIM mortalities not associated with infection, there were 2 acute myocardial infarction cases, 2 acute interstitial lung disease cases, 4 malignancies and 1 case of each of the following: Arrhythmia, pneumothorax, ventilator weakness, pulmonary artery hypertension, gastrointestinal bleeding, liver failure and renal failure. Three mortalities were secondary to viral hepatitis in the present study. Pathogenic infection was the most frequent cause of mortality in patients with IIM. The remaining causes of mortality included secondary to heart failure, lung dysfunction and malignancy. Following the ubiquitous application of glucocorticoids and immunosuppressants, the proportion of infection-associated mortalities increased in patients with IIM. Thus, in addition to focusing on the primary disease, infection should receive

  13. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 1. Main text

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This is the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  14. Case study investigation of meso-synoptic scale effects on the total ozone column. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Murphey, B.B.

    1994-01-01

    Stratospheric-tropospheric exchange has been studied by several investigators as a possible mechanism responsible for movement of air of recent stratospheric history to the middle and lower troposphere. It is important to characterize the movement of ozone from the stratosphere to the troposphere since ozone is an important greenhouse gas. The meteorological mechanisms which characterize this movement of ozone-enriched air from the stratosphere to the troposphere are the cutoff low tropopause fold, post-frontal subsidence, the jetstream tropopause fold, and gravity-wave breaking. All of these mechanisms involve the lowering or raising of the tropopause, which can increase or decrease the total ozone column amount at a specific location. Four case studies, two in the continental U.S. (Atlanta, Georgia and Whiteface Mountain, New York) and two in the polar regions (ABLE-3A Mission 8; Barrow, Alaska and South Pole Station, Antarctica) were investigated to determine the meteorological mechanism responsible for altering the column of ozone. These cases were chosen because of their ideal meteorological regime or because of the compliment of concurrent chemical and meteorological measurements at each location. After performing meteorological analysis on the cases, it was found that post-frontal subsidence that occurred with the passage of a strong short wave was the principal mechanism responsible for a 50 DU day-to-day increase in total ozone column at Atlanta during the outbreak of a strong Arctic anticyclone. In the first three cases, a good linkage was found between meteorological conditions and the expected changes in total column amount. At South Pole, no relationships were found between meteorological changes and changes in total ozone column during a weak summertime frontal passage. The meteorological analyses presented in this study provide evidence that TOMS can be a useful nowcasting tool, especially for detecting strong waves, as found in the Atlanta case.

  15. Remedial investigation/feasibility study for the Clinch River/Poplar Creek operable unit. Volume 4. Appendix F

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    This section contains ecotoxicological profiles for the COPECs for the combined Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report for the Clinch River/Poplar Crack (CR/PC) Operable Unit (OU). The ecotoxicological information is presented for only those endpoints for which the chemicals are COPECs. The CR/PC OU is located in Anderson and Roane Counties, Tennessee and consists of the Clinch River and several of its embayments in Melton Hill and Watts Bar Reservoirs. These waters have received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. A remedial investigation has been conducted to determine the current nature and extent of any contamination and to assess the resulting risk to human health and the environment. The feasibility study evaluates remedial action alternatives to identify any that are feasible for implementation and that would effectively reduce risk. Historical studies had indicated that current problems would likely include {sup 137}Cs in sediment of the Clinch River, mercury in sediment and fish of Poplar Creek and PCBs and pesticides in fish from throughout the OU. Peak releases of mercury and {sup 137}Cs occurred over 35 years ago, and current releases are low. Past releases of PCBs from the ORR are poorly quantified, and current releases are difficult to quantify because levels are so low. The site characterization focused on contaminants in surface water, sediment, and biota. Contaminants in surface water were all found to be below Ambient Water Quality Criteria. Other findings included the following: elevated metals including cesium 137 and mercury in McCoy Branch sediments; PCBs and chlordane elevated in several fish species, presenting the only major human health risk, significant ecological risks in Poplar Creek but not in the Clinch River.

  16. Remedial investigation/feasibility study work plan for the 100-BC-2 operable unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This work plan and attached supporting project plans establish the operable unit setting and the objectives, procedures, tasks, and schedule for conducting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the 100-BC-2 operable unit in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The 100 Area is one of four areas at the Hanford Site that are on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) National Priorities List under CERCLA. The 100-BC-2 operable unit is one of two source operable units in the 100-B/C Area (Figure ES-1). Source operable units are those that contain facilities and unplanned release sites that are potential sources of hazardous substance contamination. The 100-BC-2 source operable unit contains waste sites that were formerly in the 100-BC-2, 100-BC-3, and 100-BC-4 operable units. Because of their size and geographic location, the waste sites from these two operable units were added to 100-BC-2. This allows for a more efficient and effective investigation of the remaining 100-B/C Reactor area waste sites. The investigative approach to waste sites associated with the 100-BC-2 operable unit are listed in Table ES-1. The waste sites fall into three general categories: high priority liquid waste disposal sites, low priority liquid waste disposal sites, and solid waste burial grounds. Several sites have been identified as candidates for conducting an IRM. Two sites have been identified as warranting additional limited field sampling. The two sites are the 116-C-2A pluto crib, and the 116-C-2C sand filter.

  17. The possible importance of income and education as covariates in cohort studies that investigate the relationship between diet and disease

    PubMed Central

    Temple, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Background:  Many cohort studies have been carried out that have provided information on the relationship between diet and health-related outcomes. Omission of important covariates during multivariate analysis may give rise to error due to residual confounding. A possibly important covariate is socioeconomic status (SES) as this is related to both diet and health. Objective: To determine the frequency with which different measures of SES are included as covariates during multivariate analysis of cohort studies that investigated the relationship between diet and health. Methodology:  An analysis was carried out of 76 randomly selected papers from 66 cohort studies. The papers covered many dietary variables and a wide variety of diseases/health-related outcomes. The cohort studies were carried out in many different locations and the subjects varied widely in age. Results:  Approximately two-thirds of the papers (65.8%) used at least one measure of SES as a covariate. Education was used most often (60.5% of papers), followed by income (14.4%) and social class (2.6%). More than one measure of SES was used in 11.8% of papers. Conclusions:  Failure to include income (or another measure of present SES, such as occupation) may be a common source of error in cohort studies. Over-reliance on education may be particularly important as it is likely to be a weaker measure of present SES than is income. There is a need for more research on this question. SES in childhood is almost never included in multivariate analysis in cohort studies carried out on adults. This could also play a significant role in disease risk in middle age or later. Very little is known regarding whether this is also a source of residual confounding. PMID:27303622

  18. Microstructural investigations of as-fabricated, long-term thermally aged and neutron irradiated RPV materials: An atom probe study

    SciTech Connect

    Pareige, P.J.; Miller, M.K.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    Atom probe field ton microscopy (APFIM) investigations of the microstructure of as-fabricated, long-term thermally aged ({approximately}100,000h. at 540{degrees}F (282{degrees}C)) and neutron-irradiated (6.6{times}10{sup 18} and 3.47{times}10{sup 19} n cm{sup {minus}2} (E>1 MeV) at {approximately}550{degrees}F (288{degrees}C)) surveillance materials from commercial reactor pressure vessel steels were performed This combination of materials and conditions permitted the investigation of potential thermal aging effects as well as the neutron-induced effects. The microstructural study focused on the quantification of the matrix chemistry and the detection and characterization of radiation-induced precipitates. The APFIM results indicate that there was no microstructural evolution after a long term-thermal exposure in weld (0.28 wt% Cu), plate (0.13 wt% Cu) or forging (0.02 wt% Cu) materials. Conversely, matrix depletion of copper and phosphorus solutes and the presence of Cu. P, Ni, Mn and Si rich clusters were observed in the neutron-irradiated weld material. These APFIM comparisons of materials in all three conditions are consistent with the measured change in mechanical properties (transition temperature shift).

  19. A simulation study investigating a Cherenkov material for use with the prompt gamma range verification in proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Lau, Andy; Ahmad, Salahuddin; Chen, Yong

    2016-05-01

    In vivo range verification methods will reveal information about the penetration depth into a patient for an incident proton beam. The prompt gamma (PG) method is a promising in vivo technique that has been shown to yield this range information by measuring the escaping MeV photons given a suitable detector system. The majority of current simulations investigating PG detectors utilize common scintillating materials ideal for photons within a low neutron background radiation field using complex geometries or novel designs. In this work we simulate a minimal detector system using a material ideal for MeV photon detection in the presence of a significant neutron field based on the Cherenkov phenomenon. The response of this selected material was quantified for the escaping particles commonly found in proton therapy applications and the feasibility of using the PG technique for this detector material was studied. Our simulations found that the majority of the range information can be determined by detecting photons emitted with a timing window less than ∼50 ns after the interaction of the proton beam with the water phantom and with an energy threshold focusing on the energy range of the de-excitation of 16O photons (∼6 MeV). The Cherenkov material investigated is able to collect these photons and estimate the range with timescales on the order of tens of nanoseconds as well as greatly suppress the signal due to neutron. PMID:27163377

  20. To investigate antihyperglycemic and antihyperlipidemic potential of safrole in rodents by in-vivo and in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Rani, S; Sharma, S; Kumar, S

    2014-06-01

    In the present investigation anti-diabetic and in-vitro antioxidant potential of safrole were evaluated (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o.) in acute and chronic Streptozotocin-nicotinamide (STZ) induced antihyperglycemic rat model. The oral administration of safrole for 30 days affects the level of blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), phospholipids, high density lipoprotein (HDL), body weight, insulin level, liver glycogen content, antioxidant parameters, lipase, α-amylase in normal and STZ induced diabetic rats. The oral administration of safrole at dose 100 & 200 mg/kg p.o. significantly improve the diabetic condition in Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. In enzymatic assay, the IC50 value of the safrole for α-amylase and lipase was found to be 702.78 and 861.35 μg/ml respectively which was found comparable with the standard drug (ascorbic acid) as 252.12 μg/ml. Further studies can be performed on safrole for mechanistic and toxicological aspects so that it can be investigated as a new substance for the management of various diseases.