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Sample records for 20s core particle

  1. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners. PMID:19653995

  2. N-terminal α7 deletion of the proteasome 20S core particle substitutes for yeast PI31 function.

    PubMed

    Yashiroda, Hideki; Toda, Yousuke; Otsu, Saori; Takagi, Kenji; Mizushima, Tsunehiro; Murata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome core particle (CP) is a conserved protease complex that is formed by the stacking of two outer α-rings and two inner β-rings. The α-ring is a heteroheptameric ring of subunits α1 to α7 and acts as a gate that restricts entry of substrate proteins into the catalytic cavity formed by the two abutting β-rings. The 31-kDa proteasome inhibitor (PI31) was originally identified as a protein that binds to the CP and inhibits CP activity in vitro, but accumulating evidence indicates that PI31 is required for physiological proteasome activity. To clarify the in vivo role of PI31, we examined the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PI31 ortholog Fub1. Fub1 was essential in a situation where the CP assembly chaperone Pba4 was deleted. The lethality of Δfub1 Δpba4 was suppressed by deletion of the N terminus of α7 (α7ΔN), which led to the partial activation of the CP. However, deletion of the N terminus of α3, which activates the CP more efficiently than α7ΔN by gate opening, did not suppress Δfub1 Δpba4 lethality. These results suggest that the α7 N terminus has a role in CP activation different from that of the α3 N terminus and that the role of Fub1 antagonizes a specific function of the α7 N terminus.

  3. Chemical cross-linking, mass spectrometry and in silico modeling of proteasomal 20S core particles of the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii

    PubMed Central

    Karadzic, Ivanka; Maupin-Furlow, Julie; Humbard, Matt; Prunetti, Laurence; Singh, Pragya; Goodlett, David R.

    2012-01-01

    A fast and accurate method is reported to generate distance constraints between juxtaposited amino acids and to validate molecular models of halophilic protein complexes. Proteasomal 20S core particles (CPs) from the haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii were used to investigate the quaternary structure of halophilic proteins based on their symmetrical, yet distinct subunit composition. Proteasomal CPs are cylindrial barrel-like structures of four-stacked homoheptameric rings of α- and β-type subunits organized in α7β7β7α7 stoichiometry. The CPs of H. volcanii are formed from a single type of β subunit associated with α1 and/or α2 subunits. Tandem affinity chromatography and new genetic constructs were used to separately isolate α17β7β7α17 and α27β7β7α27 CPs from H. volcanii. Chemically cross-linked peptides of the H. volcanii CPs were analyzed by high-performance mass spectrometry and an open modification search strategy to first generate and then to interpret the resulting tandem mass spectrometric data. Distance constraints obtained by chemical cross-linking mass spectrometry (CXMS), together with the available structural data of non-halophilic CPs, facilitated the selection of accurate models of H. volcanii proteasomal CPs composed of α1-, α2-, and β-homoheptameric rings from among several different possiblePDB structures. PMID:22623373

  4. Cereblon inhibits proteasome activity by binding to the 20S core proteasome subunit beta type 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang Min; Lee, Jongwon; Park, Chul-Seung

    2012-10-26

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding cereblon (CRBN) are associated with mental retardation. Although CRBN has been investigated in several cellular contexts, its function remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that CRBN plays a role in regulating the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Heterologous expression of CRBN inhibited proteasome activity in a human neuroblastoma cell line. Furthermore, proteasome subunit beta type 4 (PSMB4), the β7 subunit of the 20S core complex, was identified as a direct binding partner of CRBN. These findings suggest that CRBN may modulate proteasome activity by directly interacting with the β7 subunit.

  5. Cryo-EM reveals the conformation of a substrate analogue in the human 20S proteasome core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Morris, Edward P.

    2015-07-01

    The proteasome is a highly regulated protease complex fundamental for cell homeostasis and controlled cell cycle progression. It functions by removing a wide range of specifically tagged proteins, including key cellular regulators. Here we present the structure of the human 20S proteasome core bound to a substrate analogue inhibitor molecule, determined by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-particle analysis at a resolution of around 3.5 Å. Our map allows the building of protein coordinates as well as defining the location and conformation of the inhibitor at the different active sites. These results open new prospects to tackle the proteasome functional mechanisms. Moreover, they also further demonstrate that cryo-EM is emerging as a realistic approach for general structural studies of protein-ligand interactions.

  6. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  7. Vortex Cores of Inertial Particles.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Theisel, Holger

    2014-12-01

    The cores of massless, swirling particle motion are an indicator for vortex-like behavior in vector fields and to this end, a number of coreline extractors have been proposed in the literature. Though, many practical applications go beyond the study of the vector field. Instead, engineers seek to understand the behavior of inertial particles moving therein, for instance in sediment transport, helicopter brownout and pulverized coal combustion. In this paper, we present two strategies for the extraction of the corelines that inertial particles swirl around, which depend on particle density, particle diameter, fluid viscosity and gravity. The first is to deduce the local swirling behavior from the autonomous inertial motion ODE, which eventually reduces to a parallel vectors operation. For the second strategy, we use a particle density estimation to locate inertial attractors. With this, we are able to extract the cores of swirling inertial particle motion for both steady and unsteady 3D vector fields. We demonstrate our techniques in a number of benchmark data sets, and elaborate on the relation to traditional massless corelines.

  8. The 20S proteasome core, active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, induces autoantibody production and accelerates rejection.

    PubMed

    Dieudé, Mélanie; Bell, Christina; Turgeon, Julie; Beillevaire, Deborah; Pomerleau, Luc; Yang, Bing; Hamelin, Katia; Qi, Shijie; Pallet, Nicolas; Béland, Chanel; Dhahri, Wahiba; Cailhier, Jean-François; Rousseau, Matthieu; Duchez, Anne-Claire; Lévesque, Tania; Lau, Arthur; Rondeau, Christiane; Gingras, Diane; Muruve, Danie; Rivard, Alain; Cardinal, Héloise; Perreault, Claude; Desjardins, Michel; Boilard, Éric; Thibault, Pierre; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2015-12-16

    Autoantibodies to components of apoptotic cells, such as anti-perlecan antibodies, contribute to rejection in organ transplant recipients. However, mechanisms of immunization to apoptotic components remain largely uncharacterized. We used large-scale proteomics, with validation by electron microscopy and biochemical methods, to compare the protein profiles of apoptotic bodies and apoptotic exosome-like vesicles, smaller extracellular vesicles released by endothelial cells downstream of caspase-3 activation. We identified apoptotic exosome-like vesicles as a central trigger for production of anti-perlecan antibodies and acceleration of rejection. Unlike apoptotic bodies, apoptotic exosome-like vesicles triggered the production of anti-perlecan antibodies in naïve mice and enhanced anti-perlecan antibody production and allograft inflammation in mice transplanted with an MHC (major histocompatibility complex)-incompatible aortic graft. The 20S proteasome core was active within apoptotic exosome-like vesicles and controlled their immunogenic activity. Finally, we showed that proteasome activity in circulating exosome-like vesicles increased after vascular injury in mice. These findings open new avenues for predicting and controlling maladaptive humoral responses to apoptotic cell components that enhance the risk of rejection after transplantation.

  9. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank; van IJzendoorn, Leo J.; Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula; Gehrke, Nicole; Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva; Johansson, Christer

    2015-04-01

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems - BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm - and one single-core particle system - SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm.

  10. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to

  11. Analytical analysis of particle-core dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2010-01-01

    Particle-core interaction is a well-developed model of halo formation in high-intensity beams. In this paper, we present an analytical solution for averaged, single particle dynamics, around a uniformly charged beam. The problem is analyzed through a sequence of canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian, which describes nonlinear particle oscillations. A closed form expression for maximum particle deviation from the axis is obtained. The results of this study are in good agreement with numerical simulations and with previously obtained data.

  12. Magnetic behavior of core shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Rong; Wang, Cheng-Chien; Chen, I.-Han

    2006-09-01

    We have prepared composite magnetic core-shell particles using the process of soap-free emulsion polymerization and the co-precipitation method. The shell of the synthesized composite sphere is cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O 4) nanoparticles and the core consists of poly(styrene-co-methacrylic acid) polymer. The mean crystallite sizes of the coated CoFe 2O 4 nanoparticles were controlled in the range of 2.4-6.7 nm by the concentration of [NH 4+] and heated temperature. The magnetic properties of the core-shell spherical particles can go from superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic behavior depending on the crystalline sizes of CoFe 2O 4.

  13. Assembly mechanisms of specialized core particles of the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Bai, Minghui; Zhao, Xian; Sahara, Kazutaka; Ohte, Yuki; Hirano, Yuko; Kaneko, Takeumi; Yashiroda, Hideki; Murata, Shigeo

    2014-07-16

    The 26S proteasome has a highly complicated structure comprising the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). Along with the standard CP in all eukaryotes, vertebrates have two more subtypes of CP called the immunoproteasome and the thymoproteasome. The immunoproteasome has catalytic subunits β1i, β2i, and β5i replacing β1, β2, and β5 and enhances production of major histocompatibility complex I ligands. The thymoproteasome contains thymus-specific subunit β5t in place of β5 or β5i and plays a pivotal role in positive selection of CD8+ T cells. Here we investigate the assembly pathways of the specialized CPs and show that β1i and β2i are incorporated ahead of all the other β-subunits and that both β5i and β5t can be incorporated immediately after the assembly of β3 in the absence of β4, distinct from the assembly of the standard CP in which β-subunits are incorporated in the order of β2, β3, β4, β5, β6, β1, and β7. The propeptide of β5t is a key factor for this earlier incorporation, whereas the body sequence seems to be important for the earlier incorporation of β5i. This unique feature of β5t and β5i may account for preferential assembly of the immunoproteasome and the thymoproteasome over the standard type even when both the standard and specialized subunits are co-expressed.

  14. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  15. Entrapment of carbon dioxide with chitosan-based core-shell particles containing changeable cores.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanrui; Fu, Yinghao; Lin, Xia; Xiao, Congming

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-based core-shell particles that contained changeable cores were successfully applied to anchor carbon dioxide. The entrapment capacity of the particles for carbon dioxide (EC) depended on the cores. It was found that EC of the particles contained aqueous cores was higher than that of the beads with water-soluble chitosan gel cores, which was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, calcium ions and sodium hydroxide were introduced within the particles to examine their effect on the entrapment. EC of the particles was enhanced with sodium hydroxide when the cores were WSC gel. The incorporation of calcium ions was helpful for stabilizing carbon dioxide through the formation of calcium carbonate, which was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectrometry. This phenomenon meant the role of calcium ions for fixating carbon dioxide was significant.

  16. Granulation of core particles suitable for film coating by agitation fluidized bed I. Optimum formulation for core particles and development of a novel friability test method.

    PubMed

    Hamashita, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Yasuo; Aketo, Takao; Watano, Satoru

    2007-08-01

    To prepare powdered medicines without bitter taste, film coating is required to cover the surface of core particles. In this study, effect of formulation and operating conditions of agitation fluidized bed on the core particle properties was investigated. In order to prevent breakage of the core particles during coating process, which sometimes causes variation of drug dissolution rate, addition of maltose syrup powder during the formulation process of the core particles was investigated. Also, a method for friability test in which the core particles were subjected to strong impact was proposed to evaluate strength of the core particles. The friability of the core particles determined by this test method correlated well with the actual friability of the particles during the coating process. Based on this result, we confirmed this novel friability test method could predict the core particle endurance during the coating process.

  17. Chimeric hepatitis B virus core particles with parts or copies of the hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, A; Tanaka, T; Hoshi, Y; Kato, N; Tachibana, K; Iizuka, H; Machida, A; Okamoto, H; Yamasaki, M; Miyakawa, Y

    1993-01-01

    Either parts or multiple copies of the core gene of hepatitis C virus (HCV) were fused to the 3' terminus of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core gene with 34 codons removed. As many as four copies of HCV core protein (720 amino acids) were fused to the carboxy terminus of truncated HBV core protein (149 amino acids) without preventing the assembly of HBV core particles. Chimeric core particles were sandwiched between monoclonal antibody to HBV core and that to HCV core, thereby indicating that antigenic determinants of both HBV and HCV cores were accessible on them. Proteolytic digestion deprived chimeric core particles of the antigenicity for the HCV core without affecting that of the HBV core, confirming the surface exposure of HCV core determinants. The density of HCV core determinants on chimeric core particles increased as copies of fused HCV core protein were increased. Hybrid core particles with multiple HCV core determinants would be instrumental as an antigen probe for detecting class-specific antibodies to the HCV core in patients with acute and chronic hepatitis C and for simultaneous detection of antibodies to HBV core and those to HCV core in donated blood. Images PMID:8396669

  18. Particle Behavior During the Arc Spraying Process with Cored Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, W.; Vogli, E.; Abdulgader, M.; Gurris, M.; Kuzmin, D.; Turek, S.

    2008-12-01

    To use the manifold possibilities that arc spraying offers to deposit wear resistance layers, knowledge of the particle formation and their behavior is necessary. This work is focused on studying the particle properties during arc spraying with cored wires. Different cored wires under various spraying parameters are investigated by means of a high speed camera. Particle properties in-flight, such as velocity and temperature, are determined. Correlation between particle behavior and particle characteristics at different spraying conditions is established. At the same time, the particle-laden gas flow is simulated numerically and the computed solutions are used to illustrate the utility of the proposed CFD model and compared with experimental results. The employed mathematical model represents a system of macroscopic conservation laws for the continuous gas phase and for the gas-solid mixture. This approach formulation makes it possible to circumvent the numerical difficulties associated with the implementation of a (potentially ill-posed) two-fluid model. The discretization in space is performed using a high-resolution finite element scheme based on algebraic flux correction in terms of local characteristic variables. The artificial diffusion operator is constructed on the discrete level and fitted to the local solution behavior using a multidimensional flux limiter of TVD type.

  19. Twist Neutrality and the Diameter of the Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohr, Jakob; Olsen, Kasper

    2012-03-01

    The diameter of the nucleosome core particle is the same for all the eukaryotes. Here we discuss the possibility that this selectiveness is consistent with a propensity for twist neutrality, in particular, for the double helical DNA to stay rotationally neutral when strained. Reorganization of DNA cannot be done without some level of temporal tensile stress, and as a consequence chiral molecules, such as helices, will twist under strain. The requirement that the nucleosome, constituting the nucleosome core particle and linker DNA, has a vanishing strain-twist coupling leads to a requirement for the amount of bending. For the diameter of the coiled DNA we obtain the relatively accurate numerical estimate of 2R=82Å.

  20. Flying particle sensors in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, D. S.; Schmidt, O. A.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical fibre sensors make use of diverse physical effects to measure parameters such as strain, temperature and electric field. Here we introduce a new class of reconfigurable fibre sensor, based on a ‘flying-particle’ optically trapped inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre and illustrate its use in electric field and temperature sensing with high spatial resolution. The electric field distribution near the surface of a multi-element electrode is measured with a resolution of ∼100 μm by monitoring changes in the transmitted light signal due to the transverse displacement of a charged silica microparticle trapped within the hollow core. Doppler-based velocity measurements are used to map the gas viscosity, and thus the temperature, along a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. The flying-particle approach represents a new paradigm in fibre sensors, potentially allowing multiple physical quantities to be mapped with high positional accuracy over kilometre-scale distances.

  1. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  2. Chiral discotic columnar germs of nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed Central

    Livolant, F; Leforestier, A

    2000-01-01

    In concentrated solution and in the presence of high concentrations of monovalent cations, nucleosome core particles order into a discotic columnar mesophase. This phase is limited to finite-sized hexagonal germs that further divide into six coiled branches, following an iterative process. We show how the structure of the germs comes from the competition between hexagonal packing and chirality with a combination of dendritic facetting and double-twist configurations. Geometrical considerations lead us to suspect that the chirality of the eukaryotic chromosomes may originate from the same competition. PMID:10777768

  3. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  4. Core-shell composite particles composed of biodegradable polymer particles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-01

    Core-shell composite particles with biodegradability and superparamagnetic behavior were prepared using a Pickering emulsion for targeted drug delivery based on magnetic guidance. The composite particles were composed of a core of biodegradable polymer and a shell of assembled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. It was found that the dispersibility of the nanoparticles is crucial for controlling the core-shell structure. The addition of a small amount of dispersant into the nanoparticle's suspension could improve the dispersibility and led to the formation of composite particles with a thin magnetic shell covering a polymeric core. The composite particles were also fabricated with a model drug loaded into the core, which was released via hydrolysis of the core under strong alkaline conditions. Because the core can also be biodegraded by lipase, this result suggests that the slow release of the drug from the composite particles should occur inside the body.

  5. Chemical physics of DNA packaging in a nucleosome core particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spakowitz, Andrew; Sudhanshu, Bariz

    2008-03-01

    The fundamental unit of packaged DNA, the nucleosome core particle, contains 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped 1.7 times around a cationic protein complex called the histone octamer. A string of nucleosomes is organized into higher-order structures at several hierarchical levels to form chromatin, a remarkable complex that is compact yet maintains accessibility for gene expression. We develop a theoretical model of the nucleosome core particle in order to extract detailed quantitative information from single-molecule measurements of a single nucleosome under tension. We employ the wormlike chain model to describe the DNA strand as a thermally fluctuating polymer chain. The chain adsorbs on a spool that represents the histone octamer. This model is directly compared to single-molecule experiments conducted in Carlos Bustamante's lab; we find good agreement between our theory and the experimental data. Our model reveals the mechanism that underlies structural transitions that are apparent in the experimental measurements and predicts the conditions where these transitions occur. We proceed to construct a free energy surface to predict the dynamic response in a single-molecule experiment with a time-dependent rate of unwinding the nucleosome. The combination of single-molecule experiments and our theoretical modeling gives detailed information about the specific interactions between DNA and histone proteins.

  6. OBSERVED CORE OF A GRADUAL SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharov, L.; Valtonen, E.; Reiner, M. J.; Thompson, B. J.; Klassen, A.

    2010-12-20

    Using space-borne particle and EUV detection and radio spectrograms from both ground-based and space-borne instruments, we study the first phase of the major solar energetic particle (SEP) event associated with the western solar flare and fast and wide coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2000 April 4. The SEP event being observed at the magnetic connection to the eruption's center starts with deka-MeV nucl{sup -1} helium- and relativistic electron-rich production from coronal sources identified with the electromagnetic diagnostics and the SEP event modeling. The broadband observations and modeling of the initial phase of the 'well-connected' major SEP event support the idea that acceleration of SEPs starts in the helium-rich plasma of the eruption's core in association with coronal shocks and magnetic reconnections caused by the CME liftoff, and that the coronal component dominates during the first hour of the SEP event considered, not yet being shielded by the CME bow shock in the solar wind. The first phase of the SEP event is followed by a second phase of SEP production associated with a decelerating CME-driven shock wave in the solar wind, which accelerates ions from a distinct, helium-poor seed particle population that may originate from the CME interaction with a coronal streamer.

  7. Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of proteasome core particles.

    PubMed

    Weberruss, Marion H; Savulescu, Anca F; Jando, Julia; Bissinger, Thomas; Harel, Amnon; Glickman, Michael H; Enenkel, Cordula

    2013-10-16

    Short-lived proteins are degraded by proteasome complexes, which contain a proteolytic core particle (CP) but differ in the number of regulatory particles (RPs) and activators. A recently described member of conserved proteasome activators is Blm10. Blm10 contains 32 HEAT-like modules and is structurally related to the nuclear import receptor importin/karyopherin β. In proliferating yeast, RP-CP assemblies are primarily nuclear and promote cell division. During quiescence, RP-CP assemblies dissociate and CP and RP are sequestered into motile cytosolic proteasome storage granuli (PSG). Here, we show that CP sequestration into PSG depends on Blm10, whereas RP sequestration into PSG is independent of Blm10. PSG rapidly clear upon the resumption of cell proliferation and proteasomes are relocated into the nucleus. Thereby, Blm10 facilitates nuclear import of CP. Blm10-bound CP serves as an import receptor-cargo complex, as Blm10 mediates the interaction with FG-rich nucleoporins and is dissociated from the CP by Ran-GTP. Thus, Blm10 represents the first CP-dedicated nuclear import receptor in yeast.

  8. Development of magnetic luminescent core/shell nanocomplex particles with fluorescence using Rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Uk; Song, Yoon Seok; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A simple method was developed to synthesize Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite particles. ► The magnetic particle shows that highly luminescent and core/shell particles are formed. ► Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. ► The magnetic particles could detect fluorescence for the application of biosensor. -- Abstract: A simple and reproducible method was developed to synthesize a novel class of Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite core/shell particles. Using a single cobalt core, Rhodamine 6G of organic dye molecules was entrapped in a silica shell, resulting in core/shell particles of ∼200 nm diameter. Analyses using a variety of techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibration sample magnetometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and fluorescence intensity demonstrated that dye molecules were trapped inside the core/shell particles. A photoluminescence investigation showed that highly luminescent and photostable core/shell particles were formed. Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. The synthesized magnetic particles could be used to detect fluorescence on glass substrate arrays for bioassay and biosensor applications.

  9. Experimental Study of Brownian Dynamics of Bent-core Colloidal Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Chun-Zhen; Joshi, Bhuwan; Huang, Ji-Ping; Wei, Qi-Huo

    2009-03-01

    Bent-core or banana-shaped molecules exhibit a variety of intriguing liquid crystalline mesophases including nematics and smectic phases. We try to develop suspensions of bent-core shaped colloidal particles to mimic the bent-core liquid crystals. This report will focus on the fabrication of bent-core colloidal particle suspension, and optical microscopic studies of the Brownian dynamics of individual bent-core colloidal particles. The bent-core colloidal particles confined between two glass substrates are observed through dark-field optical microscopy, and their orientation and position are obtained through imaging processing. Results on the translational and rotational Brownian dynamics of these type of particles will be reported.

  10. Core-shell particles: preparation, fundamentals and applications in high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Richard; Ahmed, Adham; Edge, Tony; Zhang, Haifei

    2014-08-29

    The challenges in HPLC are fast and efficient separation for a wide range of samples. Fast separation often results in very high operating pressure, which places a huge burden on HPLC instrumentation. In recent years, core-shell silica microspheres (with a solid core and a porous shell, also known as fused-core or superficially porous microspheres) have been widely investigated and used for highly efficient and fast separation with reasonably low pressure for separation of small molecules, large molecules and complex samples. In this review, we firstly show the types of core-shell particles and how they are generally prepared, focusing on the methods used to produce core-shell silica particles for chromatographic applications. The fundamentals are discussed on why core-shell particles can perform better with low back pressure, in terms of van Deemter equation and kinetic plots. The core-shell particles are compared with totally porous silica particles and also monolithic columns. The use of columns packed with core-shell particles in different types of liquid chromatography is then discussed, followed by illustrating example applications of such columns for separation of various types of samples. The review is completed with conclusion and a brief perspective on future development of core-shell particles in chromatography.

  11. Silica-silver core-shell particles for antibacterial textile application.

    PubMed

    Nischala, K; Rao, Tata N; Hebalkar, Neha

    2011-01-01

    The silica-silver core-shell particles were synthesized by simple one pot chemical method and were employed on the cotton fabric as an antibacterial agent. Extremely small (1-2 nm) silver nanoparticles were attached on silica core particles of average 270 nm size. The optimum density of the nano silver particles was found which was sufficient to show good antibacterial activity as well as the suppression in their surface plasmon resonance responsible for the colour of the core-shell particle for antibacterial textile application. The change in the density and size of the particles in the shell were monitored and confirmed by direct evidence of their transmission electron micrographs and by studying surface plasmon resonance characteristics. The colony counting method of antibacterial activity testing showed excellent results and even the least silver containing core-shell particles showed 100% activity against bacterial concentration of 10(4) colony counting units (cfu). The bonding between core-shell particles and cotton fabric was examined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The antibacterial activity test confirmed the firm attachment of core-shell particles to the cotton fabric as a result 10 times washed sample was as good antibacterial as that of unwashed sample. The bacterial growth was inhibited on and beneath the coated fabric, at the same time no zone of inhibition which occurs due to the migration of silver ions into the medium was observed indicating immobilization of silver nanoparticles on silica and core-shell particles on fabric by strong bonding.

  12. Uptake and release of anionic surfactant into and from cationic core-shell microgel particles.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Melanie; Vincent, Brian; Burnett, Gary

    2007-08-28

    Core-shell microgel particles, in the colloidal size range, have been prepared and characterized, where the core and the shell are both copolymers, based on N-isopropylacrylamide, but where the core and shell contain different pH-responsive groups having widely separated acid dissociation constants (pKa). The core contains vinylpyridine (VP), which has a pKa value of 4.92, and the shell contains 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEM), which has a pKa value of 8.4. The dispersion properties, and the uptake and release of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (SDBS), have been studied for both the core and the core-shell microgel particles as a function of pH changes. Both the core and the core-shell particles have been shown to swell as the pH decreases over the range from 7 to 3. However, despite the large differences in the pKa values of the VP and DMEAM groups, no distinct steps in the swelling ratio-pH curve for the core-shell particles were observed, and it is postulated that the boundary between the core and shell regions may be somewhat extended, rather than sharp. The uptake of the anionic surfactant SDBS has been shown to depend on two distinct attractive interactions between the surfactant molecules and the microgel particles: electrostatic and hydrophobic. A reasonable correlation between the minimum in the particle diameter, for both the core and the core-shell particles, and the point of charge neutralization, in the presence of SDBS, has been established.

  13. Gold nanoparticle localization at the core surface by using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Haruma

    2005-12-06

    We report novel thermosensitive hybrid core-shell particles via in situ gold nanoparticle formation using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template. This method for the in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles with microgel interiors offers the advantage of eliminating or significantly reducing particle aggregation. In addition, by using thermosensitive microgel structures in which the shell has thermosensitive and gel properties in water--whereas the core itself is a water-insoluble polymer--we were able to synthesize the gold nanoparticles only at the surface of the core, which had reactive sites to bind metal ions. After the gold nanoparticles were synthesized, electroless gold plating was carried out to control the thickness of the gold nanoshells. The dispersions of the obtained hybrid particles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and the dried particles were also observed by electron microscopy. Adaptation of the technique shown here will create a number of applications as optical, electronic, and biomedical functional materials.

  14. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  15. Core-corona PSt/P(BA-AA) composite particles by two-stage emulsion polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Delong; Ren, Xiaolin; Zhang, Xinya; Liao, Shijun

    2016-03-01

    Raspberry-shaped composite particles with polystyrene (PSt) as core and poly(n-butyl acrylate-co-acrylic acid) (P(BA-AA)) as corona were synthesized via emulsion polymerization. The random copolymer, P(BA-AA), was pre-prepared and used as a polymeric surfactant, its emulsifying properties adjusted by changing the mass ratio of BA and AA. The morphology of the resulting core-corona composite particles, P(St/P(BA-AA)), could be regulated and controlled by varying the concentrations of P(BA-AA) or the mass ratio of BA:AA in P(BA-AA). The experimental results indicate that 3.0-6.0 wt% of P(BA-AA) is required to obtain stable composite emulsions, and P(BA-AA) with a mass ratio of BA:AA = 1:2 is able to generate distinct core-corona structures. A mechanism of composite particle formation is proposed based on the high affinity between the PSt core and the hydrophobic segments of P(BA-A). The regular morphology of the colloidal film is expected to facilitate potential application of core-corona particles in the field of light scattering. Furthermore, the diversity of core-corona particles can be expanded by replacing P(BA-AA) corona particles with other amphiphilic particles.

  16. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.; Keifer, David Z.; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein’s C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of “dark” particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  17. Binding of ethidium to the nucleosome core particle. 2. Internal and external binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, C.T.; Small, E.W.; van Holde, K.E. )

    1991-06-11

    The authors have previously reported that the binding of ethidium bromide to the nucleosome core particle results in a stepwise dissociation of the structure which involves the initial release of one copy each of H2A and H2B. In this report, they have examined the absorbance and fluorescence properties of intercalated and outside bound forms of ethidium bromide. From these properties, they have measured the extent of external, electrostatic binding of the dye versus internal, intercalation binding to the core particle, free from contribution by linker DNA. They have established that dissociation is induced by the intercalation mode of binding to DNA within the core particle DNA, and not by binding to the histones or by nonintercalative binding to DNA. The covalent binding of ({sup 3}H)-8-azidoethidium to the core particle clearly shows that < 1.0 adduct is formed per histone octamer over a wide range of input ratios. Simultaneously, analyses of steady-state fluorescence enhancement and fluorescence lifetime data from bound ethidium complexes demonstrate extensive intercalation binding. Combined analyses from steady-state fluorescence intensity with equilibrium dialysis or fluorescence lifetime data revealed that dissociation began when {approximately}14 ethidium molecules are bound by intercalation to each core particle and < 1.0 nonintercalated ion pair was formed per core particle.

  18. DNA base excision repair of uracil residues in reconstituted nucleosome core particles

    PubMed Central

    Nilsen, Hilde; Lindahl, Tomas; Verreault, Alain

    2002-01-01

    The human base excision repair machinery must locate and repair DNA base damage present in chromatin, of which the nucleosome core particle is the basic repeating unit. Here, we have utilized fragments of the Lytechinus variegatus 5S rRNA gene containing site-specific U:A base pairs to investigate the base excision repair pathway in reconstituted nucleosome core particles in vitro. The human uracil-DNA glycosylases, UNG2 and SMUG1, were able to remove uracil from nucleosomes. Efficiency of uracil excision from nucleosomes was reduced 3- to 9-fold when compared with naked DNA, and was essentially uniform along the length of the DNA substrate irrespective of rotational position on the core particle. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the excision repair pathway of an abasic site can be reconstituted on core particles using the known repair enzymes, AP-endonuclease 1, DNA polymerase β and DNA ligase III. Thus, base excision repair can proceed in nucleosome core particles in vitro, but the repair efficiency is limited by the reduced activity of the uracil-DNA glycosylases and DNA polymerase β on nucleosome cores. PMID:12411511

  19. Self-assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles from recombinant hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, M; Lorinczi, M; Rijnbrand, R; Lemon, S M; Watowich, S J

    2001-03-01

    Little is known about the assembly pathway and structure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) since insufficient quantities of purified virus are available for detailed biophysical and structural studies. Here, we show that bacterially expressed HCV core proteins can efficiently self-assemble in vitro into nucleocapsid-like particles. These particles have a regular, spherical morphology with a modal distribution of diameters of approximately 60 nm. Self-assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles requires structured RNA molecules. The 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein are sufficient for self-assembly into nucleocapsid-like particles. Inclusion of the carboxy-terminal domain of the core protein modifies the core assembly pathway such that the resultant particles have an irregular outline. However, these particles are similar in size and shape to those assembled from the 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein. These results provide novel opportunities to delineate protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions critical for HCV assembly, to study the molecular details of HCV assembly, and for performing high-throughput screening of assembly inhibitors.

  20. Synthesis and Characterization of Polyvinylpyrrolidone Silica Core-Shell Nanocomposite Particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lian-Xi; Li, Jie; Li, Xi; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Jiao, Cai-Bin

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a novel and facile strategy for making a new type of polymer/silica nanocomposte particle was proposed. Colloidally stable polyvinypyrrolidone (PVP)/silica core-shell nanocomposite particles have been successfully synthesized using an azo initiator via seed polymerization of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and VFSs (VFSs) that were derived from vinyl triethoxysilane (VTES). It was suggested from the FTIR and TGA analysis that the copolymerization reaction of NVP with VFSs has been thoroughly carried out. In addition, SEM images showed that PVP/silica nanocomposite particles have relatively rough surface due to surface polymerization in comparison with VFSs. Furthermore, TEM results proved that the size of VFSs had considerable effects on the appearance of PVP/silica nanocomposite particles. Generally, it presented that several silica nanoparticle cores with an average size of 78 nm mainly pack together within each nanocomposite particle after seed polymerization. Interestingly, the average shell thickness was 59 nm for most PVP/silica nanocomposite particles with cores about 242 nm. However, when the core size was large enough to about 504 nm, a series of PVP/silica nanocomposite particles with a relative thin shell were observed.

  1. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30-50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles.

  2. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30–50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles. PMID:25597747

  3. [Scattering properties of core-shell structure of mist wrapped dust particles].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-qi; Song, Wei; Wang, Yan; Miao, Xin-hui; Xu, Li-jun; Liu, Yu; Li, Cheng; Li Wen-long; Wang, Yi-ran; Cai, Hong-xing

    2014-12-01

    The authors have investigated the optical properties of core-shell structure of mist wrapped dust particles based on the method of discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The influence on the thickness of the elliptical core-shell structure were calculated which the ratio of long axis and short axis is 2:1, and the change of scattering angle for scattering characteristics. The results shows that the thickness of outer layer increase from 1.2 to 4.8 μm with the scattering and extinction coefficient of double core-shell layers particles decrease from 3.4 and 3.43 to 2.543 and 2.545, when the size of inner core isn't change. And scattering relative strength also increased obviously. The thickness of inner core increase from 0.6 to 2.4 μm with the of scattering and extinction coefficient change from 2.59 and 2.88 to 2.6 and 2.76 when thickness of outer remain constant. Effect of the thickness of visible outer layer on the scattering characteristics of double core-shell layers particles is greater, because of the interaction between scattering light and outer materials. The scattering relative intensity decrease with wavelength increased, while increased with the scale of core-shell structure increase. The results make a promotion on the study of the transportation characteristics of laser and scattering characteristics when the atmospheric aerosol and water mist interact together.

  4. [The true story and advantages of the famous Hepatitis B virus core particles: Outlook 2016].

    PubMed

    Pumpens, P; Grens, E

    2016-01-01

    This review article is a continuation of the paper "Hepatitis B core particles as a universal display model: a structure-function basis for development" written by Pumpens P. and Grens E., ordered by Professor Lev Kisselev and published in FEBS Letters, 1999, 442, 1-6. The past 17 years have strengthened the paper's finding that the human hepatitis B virus core protein, along with other Hepadnaviridae family member core proteins, is a mysterious, multifunctional protein. The core gene of the Hepadnaviridae genome encodes five partially collinear proteins. The most important of these is the HBV core protein p21, or HBc. It can self-assemble by forming viral HBc particles, but also plays a crucial role in the regulation of viral replication. Since 1986, the HBc protein has been one of the first and the most successful tools of the virus-like particle (VLP) technology. Later, the woodchuck hepatitis virus core protein (WHc) was also used as a VLP carrier. The Hepadnaviridae core proteins remain favourite VLP candidates for the knowledge-based design of future vaccines, gene therapy vectors, specifically targeted nanocontainers, and other modern nanotechnological tools for prospective medical use.

  5. Importance of core electrostatic properties on the electrophoresis of a soft particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De, Simanta; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Gopmandal, Partha P.

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the volumetric charged density of the dielectric rigid core on the electrophoresis of a soft particle is analyzed numerically. The volume charge density of the inner core of a soft particle can arise for a dendrimer structure or bacteriophage MS2. We consider the electrokinetic model based on the conservation principles, thus no conditions for Debye length or applied electric field is imposed. The fluid flow equations are coupled with the ion transport equations and the equation for the electric field. The occurrence of the induced nonuniform surface charge density on the outer surface of the inner core leads to a situation different from the existing analysis of a soft particle electrophoresis. The impact of this induced surface charge density together with the double-layer polarization and relaxation due to ion convection and electromigration is analyzed. The dielectric permittivity and the charge density of the core have a significant impact on the particle electrophoresis when the Debye length is in the order of the particle size. We find that by varying the ionic concentration of the electrolyte, the particle can exhibit reversal in its electrophoretic velocity. The role of the polymer layer softness parameter is addressed in the present analysis.

  6. Nucleation mode particles with a nonvolatile core in the exhaust of a heavy duty diesel vehicle.

    PubMed

    Rönkkö, Topi; Virtanen, Annele; Kannosto, Jonna; Keskinen, Jorma; Lappi, Maija; Pirjola, Liisa

    2007-09-15

    The characteristics of the nucleation mode particles of a Euro IV heavy-duty diesel vehicle exhaust were studied. The NOx and PM emissions of the vehicle were controlled through the use of cooled EGR and high-pressure fuel injection techniques; no exhaust gas after-treatment was used. Particle measurements were performed in vehicle laboratory and on road. Nucleation mode dominated the particle number size distribution in all the tested driving conditions. According to the on-road measurements, the nucleation mode was already formed after 0.7 s residence time in the atmosphere and no significant changes were observed for longer residence times. The nucleation mode was insensitive to the fuel sulfur content, dilution air temperature, and relative humidity. An increase in the dilution ratio decreased the size of the nucleation mode particles. This behavior was observed to be linked to the total hydrocarbon concentration in the diluted sample. In volatility measurements, the nucleation mode particles were observed to have a nonvolatile core with volatile species condensed on it. The results indicate that the nucleation mode particles have a nonvolatile core formed before the dilution process. The core particles have grown because of the condensation of semivolatile material, mainly hydrocarbons, during the dilution.

  7. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Liu, Nanguo; ...

    2011-01-01

    Ceriumore » m (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0 × 10 − 14  m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5 × 10 − 13  m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.« less

  8. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  9. Tuning the spin crossover in nano-objects: From hollow to core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Félix, Gautier; Mikolasek, Mirko; Molnár, Gábor; Nicolazzi, William; Bousseksou, Azzedine

    2014-06-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles displaying spin crossover (SCO) effect on the shell and/or on the core are studied using Monte Carlo simulations of an elastic microscopic Ising-like model. In this Letter we demonstrate that the SCO transition temperature can be controlled by adjusting the width of the shell and the width of the core as well as the misfit between the lattice constants. An original coupled system with a SCO active shell and an active core with another SCO material is proposed. Inducing the transition of the core by the spin transition of the shell results in a hysteresis in the thermal spin transition of the shell. This new type of memory effect in SCO compounds is based on the engineering of particle morphology.

  10. Amplified light scattering and emission of silver and silver core-silica shell particles.

    PubMed

    Siiman, Olavi; Jitianu, Andrei; Bele, Marjan; Grom, Patricia; Matijević, Egon

    2007-05-01

    Side versus forward light scattergrams, and fluorescence (488 nm excitation) intensity versus particle count histograms were gathered for bare, R6G-coated, and silica-R6G-coated silver particles of 150-200 nm diameter, one-by-one by flow cytometry. Fluorescence emission intensity of the composite particles monotonically increased and then reached a plateau with greater R6G concentrations, as measured by flow cytometry. Fluorescence amplification factors of up to 3.5x10(3) were estimated by reference to measurements on core-shell particles with silica instead of silver cores. Huge surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensities, at least 10(14)-fold greater than normal Raman scattering intensities, were observed with 633 nm excitation for molecules such as rhodamine 6G (R6G) on the same single particles of silver. Although routine transmission (TEM) and scanning (SEM) electron microscopies showed gross structures of the bare and coated particles, high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), revealed Brownian roughness describing quantum size and larger structures on the surface of primary colloidal silver particles. These silver particles were further characterized by extinction spectra and zeta potentials. Structural and light scattering observations that are reported herein were used to tentatively propose a new hierarchical model for the mechanism of SERS.

  11. Resonant optical propulsion of a particle inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Maslov, A V

    2016-07-01

    Resonant propulsion of small nonresonant particles inside metal waveguides due to the formation of resonant states by the guided modes below their cutoffs has been predicted in the past. Here it is shown that stable resonant propulsion exists in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers, which are all-dielectric structures and are a major platform for various photonic applications. Specific features of the resonant propulsion are discussed together with the fiber design issues. The results may enable power-efficient transport of particles over long distances, particle sorting, and sensitive detection.

  12. Viscoelastic properties of electrorheological suspensions of core-shell (carbon/polyaniline) particles in silicone oil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacik, M.; Almajdalawi, S.; Mrlik, M.; Pavlinek, V.; Saha, P.; Stejskal, J.

    2013-02-01

    Carbon/polyaniline particles with core-shell structure were synthesized as a novel dispersed phase for electrorheological (ER) suspensions in this study. Core of these composite particles was obtained by carbonization of polyaniline base in an inert atmosphere of nitrogen at 650°C and then coated with polyaniline shell. The morphology and composition of prepared particles were examined with scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, respectively. The analysis revealed the conversion of polyaniline to carbon via ring-opening happened during the carbonization process and successful coating of carbonized particles with shell layer. The products retained the original granular structure after carbonization as well as after the coatings. The dielectric spectra analysis suggests high particle polarizability of carbonized material. Thus, the measurements performed under oscillatory shear flow showed a remarkably high ER intensity at relatively low electric field strengths. Coating of carbonized particles by polyaniline base changes compatibility of particle surface with silicone oil medium and, consequently, flow properties of suspensions in the absence of electric field, but does not influence the shear rate dependence of the complex viscosity in the electric field.

  13. Core Fueling and Edge Particle Flux Analysis in Ohmically and Auxiliary Heated NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    V.A. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; NSTX Research Team

    2002-06-12

    The Boundary Physics program of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is focusing on optimization of the edge power and particle flows in b * 25% L- and H-mode plasmas of t {approx} 0.8 s duration heated by up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast wave and up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection. Particle balance and core fueling efficiencies of low and high field side gas fueling of L-mode homic and NBI heated plasmas have been compared using an analytical zero dimensional particle balance model and measured ion and neutral fluxes. Gas fueling efficiencies are in the range of 0.05-0.20 and do not depend on discharge magnetic configuration, density or poloidal location of the injector. The particle balance modeling indicates that the addition of HFS fueling results in a reversal of the wall loading rate and higher wall inventories. Initial particle source estimates obtained from neutral pressure and spectroscopic measurements indicate that ion flux into the divertor greatly exceeds midplane ion flux from the main plasma, suggesting that the scrape-off cross-field transport plays a minor role in diverted plasmas. Present analysis provides the basis for detailed fluid modeling of core and edge particle flows and particle confinement properties of NSTX plasmas. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contracts No. DE-AC02-76CH03073, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and W-7405-ENG-36.

  14. Biodegradable and magnetic core-shell composite particle prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes optimization of preparation conditions of a core-shell composite particle, and its heat generation by alternating magnetic fields. The composite particles are prepared with a modified emulsion solvent diffusion method, which is combined with Pickering emulsion stabilized by magnetic nanoparticles. In this method, the magnetic nanoparticles act as an emulsifier, and its amount and size are crucial to morphology of the composite particles. The magnetic nanoparticles of 8-9 nm would be strongly adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface rather than the larger nanoparticles. At the optimized concentration of the magnetic nanoparticle’s suspension for the preparation, small and uniform composite particles are obtained since the amount of the nanoparticles is enough to prevent coalescence of droplets during the formation of the composites. The heat generation by alternating magnetic fields emerged certainly. This result suggests the composite particles have a property as a heat-generating carrier for hyperthermia treatment.

  15. Structure of RCC1 chromatin factor bound to the nucleosome core particle

    SciTech Connect

    Makde, Ravindra D.; England, Joseph R.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Tan, Song

    2010-11-11

    The small GTPase Ran enzyme regulates critical eukaryotic cellular functions including nuclear transport and mitosis through the creation of a RanGTP gradient around the chromosomes. This concentration gradient is created by the chromatin-bound RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) protein, which recruits Ran to nucleosomes and activates Ran's nucleotide exchange activity. Although RCC1 has been shown to bind directly with the nucleosome, the molecular details of this interaction were not known. Here we determine the crystal structure of a complex of Drosophila RCC1 and the nucleosome core particle at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, providing an atomic view of how a chromatin protein interacts with the histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. Our structure also suggests that the Widom 601 DNA positioning sequence present in the nucleosomes forms a 145-base-pair nucleosome core particle, not the expected canonical 147-base-pair particle.

  16. Water-soluble core/shell nanoparticles for proton therapy through particle-induced radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Maeng Jun; Kim, Kye-Ryung

    2015-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), therapy, and drug delivery systems. Metallic nanoparticles as therapeutic tools have been demonstrated using radio-frequency magnetic fields or near-infrared light. Recently, therapeutic applications of metallic nanomaterials combined with proton beams have been reported. Particle-induced radiation from metallic nanoparticles, which can enhance the therapeutic effects of proton therapy, was released when the nanoparticles were bombarded by a high-energy proton beam. Core/shell nanoparticles, especially Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles, have drawn attention in biological applications due to their attractive characteristics. However, studies on the phase transfer of organic-ligand-based core/shell nanoparticles into water are limited. Herein, we demonstrated that hydrophobic core/shell structured nanomaterials could be successfully dispersed in water through chloroform/surfactant mixtures. The effects of the core/shell nanomaterials and the proton irradiation on Escherichia coli (E. coli) were also explored.

  17. Copper(II) ions affect the gating dynamics of the 20S proteasome: a molecular and in cell study

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Anna Maria; Monaco, Irene; Attanasio, Francesco; Lanza, Valeria; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Tomasello, Marianna Flora; Cunsolo, Alessandra; Rizzarelli, Enrico; De Luigi, Ada; Salmona, Mario; Milardi, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Due to their altered metabolism cancer cells are more sensitive to proteasome inhibition or changes of copper levels than normal cells. Thus, the development of copper complexes endowed with proteasome inhibition features has emerged as a promising anticancer strategy. However, limited information is available about the exact mechanism by which copper inhibits proteasome. Here we show that Cu(II) ions simultaneously inhibit the three peptidase activities of isolated 20S proteasomes with potencies (IC50) in the micromolar range. Cu(II) ions, in cell-free conditions, neither catalyze red-ox reactions nor disrupt the assembly of the 20S proteasome but, rather, promote conformational changes associated to impaired channel gating. Notably, HeLa cells grown in a Cu(II)-supplemented medium exhibit decreased proteasome activity. This effect, however, was attenuated in the presence of an antioxidant. Our results suggest that if, on one hand, Cu(II)-inhibited 20S activities may be associated to conformational changes that favor the closed state of the core particle, on the other hand the complex effect induced by Cu(II) ions in cancer cells is the result of several concurring events including ROS-mediated proteasome flooding, and disassembly of the 26S proteasome into its 20S and 19S components. PMID:27633879

  18. Synthesis, characterization and application of smart magnetic core-shell polymeric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Kin Man Edmond

    Magnetic gamma-Fe2O3 nanoparticles with three different types of surface modification were prepared. They include oleate-coated gamma-Fe 2O3 (o-Fe2O3), citrate-coated gamma-Fe 2O3 (c-Fe2O3), vinyl-coated gamma-Fe 2O3 (MPS-Fe2O3) nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were synthesized via three approaches: (1) decomposition and oxidation of Fe(CO)5 with oleic acid in a hot organic medium; (2) co-precipitation of FeCl2 and FeCl3 in an ammonium solution at pH 11--12, followed by surface coating with trisodium citrate; and (3) subsequent modification of the citrate-coated gamma-Fe2O3 through hydrolysis and condensation of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MPS) using the modified Stober method, respectively. Encapsulation of these three types of magnetic nanoparticles into the poly(methyl methacrylate)/chitosan core-shell particles via graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from chitosan were attempted. Successful encapsulation of iron oxide nanoparticles into the core-shell particles was achieved when the MPS-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were subjected to the copolymerization conditions. The magnetic core-shell particles (MCS) produced, in a reasonable yield, had diameter below 200 nm with narrow size distribution. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrographs of the particles clearly revealed well-defined core-shell nanostructures where magnetic nanoparticles located inside PMMA and coated with chitosan shell. Properties of the MCS particles including their surface charge density, colloidal stability, chemical composition, magnetization measurement and film-forming ability were investigated with zeta-potential measurement, particle size measurement, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Application of the MCS particles was explored. The MCS particles were used to stabilize with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via

  19. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1.

    PubMed

    Cole, Hope A; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B; Clark, David J

    2016-01-29

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these 'proto-chromatosomes' are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1.

  20. Harnessing the advantages of hard and soft colloids by the use of core-shell particles as interfacial stabilizers.

    PubMed

    Buchcic, C; Tromp, R H; Meinders, M B J; Cohen Stuart, M A

    2017-02-15

    The ability of colloidal particles to penetrate fluid interfaces is a crucial factor in the preparation of particle stabilized disperse systems such as foams and emulsions. For hard micron-sized particles the insertion into fluid interfaces requires substantial energy input, but soft particles are known to adsorb spontaneously. Particle hardness, however, may also affect foam and emulsion stability. The high compliance of soft particles may compromise their ability to withstand the lateral compression associated with disproportionation. Hence, particles which can spontaneously adsorb onto fluid interfaces, and yet depict low compliance may be ideal as interfacial stabilizers. In the present work, we prepared core-shell particles comprising a hard, polystyrene core and a soft poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) based shell. We found that such core-shell particles adsorb spontaneously onto various fluid interfaces. The absence of a pronounced energy barrier for interfacial adsorption allowed the facile preparation of particle-stabilized bubbles as well as emulsion droplets. For bubbles, the stability was better than that of bubbles stabilized by entirely soft particles, but disproportionation was not stopped completely. Emulsion droplets, in contrast, showed excellent stability against both coalescence and disproportionation. Lateral compression of core-shell particles due to disproportionation was clearly limited by the presence of the polystyrene core, leading to long-lasting stability. For emulsions, we even observed non-spherical droplets, indicating a negligible Laplace pressure. Our results indicate that core-shell particles comprising a hard core and a soft shell combine the advantageous properties of hard and soft particles, namely spontaneous adsorption and limited compliance, and can therefore be superior materials for the preparation of particle-stabilized dispersions.

  1. LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate increases proteoglycan binding and promotes atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, John T.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in humans and animals suggest that LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate (CO) is associated with increased atherosclerosis. Diet enrichment with MUFAs enhances LDL CO content. Steroyl O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) is the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of much of the CO found in LDL, and gene deletion of SOAT2 minimizes CO in LDL and protects against atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the increased atherosclerosis associated with LDL core enrichment in CO results from an increased affinity of the LDL particle for arterial proteoglycans. ApoB-100-only Ldlr−/− mice with and without Soat2 gene deletions were fed diets enriched in either cis-MUFA or n-3 PUFA, and LDL particles were isolated. LDL:proteogylcan binding was measured using surface plasmon resonance. Particles with higher CO content consistently bound with higher affinity to human biglycan and the amount of binding was shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerosis of the LDL donor mice. The data strongly support the thesis that atherosclerosis was induced through enhanced proteoglycan binding of LDL resulting from LDL core CO enrichment. PMID:23804810

  2. Toll-like receptor 2 senses hepatitis C virus core protein but not infectious viral particles

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Marco; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Jilg, Nikolaus; Paranhos-Baccalà, Glaucia; Stoll-Keller, Françoise; Wakita, Takaji; Hafkemeyer, Peter; Blum, Hubert E.; Barth, Heidi; Henneke, Philipp; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pathogen recognition molecules activating the innate immune system. Cell surface expressed TLRs, such as TLR2 and TLR4 have been shown to play an important role in human host defenses against viruses through sensing of viral structural proteins. In this study, we aimed to elucidate whether TLR2 and TLR4 participate in inducing antiviral immunity against hepatitis C virus by sensing viral structural proteins. We studied TLR2 and TLR4 activation by cell-culture derived infectious virions (HCVcc) and serum-derived virions in comparison to purified recombinant HCV structural proteins and enveloped virus-like particles. Incubation of TLR2 or TLR4 transfected cell lines with recombinant core protein resulted in activation of TLR2-dependent signaling. In contrast, neither infectious virions nor enveloped HCV-like particles triggered TLR2 and TLR4 signaling. These findings suggest that monomeric HCV core protein but not intact infectious particles are sensed by TLR2. Impairment of core-TLR interaction in infectious viral particles may contribute to escape from innate antiviral immune responses. PMID:20375602

  3. Coherent coexistence of nanodiamonds and carbon onions in icosahedral core-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir Ya. Madison, Alexey E.; Mackay, Alan L.

    2007-03-01

    In icosahedral carbon nanoparticles, the diamond-like core can undergo a reversible topological transition into and coexist coherently with the onion shells. The general approach for describing and designing complex hierarchical icosahedral structures is discussed. Structural models of icosahedral carbon nanoparticles in which the local arrangement of atoms is virtually identical to that in diamond are derived. It is shown that icosahedral diamond-like particles can be transformed into onion-like shell structures (and vice versa) by the consecutive smoothing (puckering) of atomic networks without disturbance of their topological integrity. The possibility of coherent coexistence of icosahedral diamond-like core with onion shells is shown.

  4. Behavior of pH-sensitive core shell particles at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Mark D'Souza; Manga, Mohamed S; Hunter, Timothy N; Cayre, Olivier J; Biggs, Simon

    2012-03-20

    In this article, the adsorption of latex core-responsive polymer-shell nanoparticles at the air-water interface is investigated using a Langmuir trough. Phase transition isotherms are used to explore their responsive behavior at the interface as a function of changes in the pH of the subphase. By adjusting the pH of the water prior to particle deposition, we probe the effect of the stabilizing polymer wetting by the water subphase on the stability of these particles at the air-water interface. In addition, by initially compressing a stable film of adsorbed particles and then subsequently changing the pH of the subphase we study desorption of these particles into the water phase.

  5. Nonthermal nuclear reactions induced by fast α particles in the solar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, Victor T.

    2015-02-01

    Nonthermal nuclear effects triggered in the solar carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle by fast α particles—products of the p p chain reactions—are examined. The main attention is paid to 8.674-MeV α particles generated in the 7Li(p ,α ) α reaction. Nonthermal characteristics of these α particles and their influence on some nuclear processes are determined. It is found that the α -particle effective temperature is at a level of 1.1 MeV and exceeds the solar core temperature by 3 orders of magnitude. These fast particles are able to significantly enhance some endoergic (α ,p ) reactions neglected in standard solar model calculations. In particular, they can substantially affect the balance of the p +17O⇄α +14N reactions due to an appreciable increase of the reverse reaction rate. It is shown that in the region R =0.08 -0.25 R⊙ the reverse α +14N reaction can block the forward p +17O reaction, thus preventing closing of the CNO-II cycle, and increase the 17O abundance by a factor of 2-155 depending on R . This indicates that the fast α particles produced in the p p cycle can distort running of the CNO cycle, making it essentially different in the inner and outer core regions.

  6. Protein encapsulated core-shell structured particles prepared by coaxial electrospraying: investigation on material and processing variables.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Maedeh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Thian, Eng San; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2014-10-01

    Biodegradable polymeric particles have been extensively investigated for controlled drug delivery of various therapeutic agents. 'Coaxial' electrospraying was successfully employed in this study, to fabricate core-shell PLGA particles containing bovine serum albumin (BSA) as the model protein, and the results were also compared to particles prepared by 'emulsion' electrospraying. Two different molecular weights of PLGA were employed to encapsulate the protein. Solution properties and processing parameters were found to influence the morphology of the core-shell particles. Depending on the type of solvent used to dissolve the polymer as well as the polymer concentration and molecular weight, the mean diameter of the particles varied between 3.0 to 5.5 μm. Fluorescence microscopic analysis of the electrosprayed particles using FITC-conjugated BSA demonstrated the core-shell structure of the developed particles. The encapsulation efficiency and release behavior of BSA was influenced by shell:core feeding ratio, protein concentration, and the electrospraying method. The encapsulation efficiency of BSA within the core-shell particles of high and low molecular weight PLGA was found 15.7% and 25.1% higher than the emulsion electrosprayed particles, respectively. Moreover, the total amount of BSA released from low molecular weight PLGA particles was significantly higher than high molecular weight PLGA particles within 43 days of release studies, with negligible effect on encapsulation efficiency. The technique of coaxial electrospraying has high potential for encapsulation of susceptible protein-based therapeutic agents such as growth factors for multiple drug delivery applications.

  7. Epoxy-acrylic core-shell particles by seeded emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hong, Liang; Lin, Jui-Ching; Meyers, Greg; Harris, Joseph; Radler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel method for synthesizing epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes. We first prepared an aqueous dispersion of high molecular weight solid epoxy prepolymers using a mechanical dispersion process at elevated temperatures, and we subsequently used the epoxy dispersion as a seed in the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers comprising methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Advanced analytical techniques, such as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PFT-AFM), have elucidated a unique core-shell morphology of the epoxy-acrylic hybrid particles. Moreover, the formation of the core-shell morphology in the seeded emulsion polymerization process is primarily attributed to kinetic trapping of the acrylic phase at the exterior of the epoxy particles. By this new method, we are able to design the epoxy and acrylic polymers in two separate steps, and we can potentially synthesize epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes with a broad range of compositions.

  8. Hierarchically functionalized magnetic core/multishell particles and their postsynthetic conversion to polymer capsules.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Sophia; Silvestre, Martin; Tsotsalas, Manuel; Winkler, Anna-Lena; Shahnas, Artak; Grosjean, Sylvain; Laye, Fabrice; Gliemann, Hartmut; Lahann, Joerg; Bräse, Stefan; Franzreb, Matthias; Wöll, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The controlled synthesis of hierarchically functionalized core/multishell particles is highly desirable for applications in medicine, catalysis, and separation. Here, we describe the synthesis of hierarchically structured metal-organic framework multishells around magnetic core particles (magMOFs) via layer-by-layer (LbL) synthesis. The LbL deposition enables the design of multishell systems, where each MOF shell can be modified to install different functions. Here, we used this approach to create controlled release capsules, in which the inner shell serves as a reservoir and the outer shell serves as a membrane after postsynthetic conversion of the MOF structure to a polymer network. These capsules enable the controlled release of loaded dye molecules, depending on the surrounding media.

  9. Measurement of energetic-particle-driven core magnetic fluctuations and induced fast-ion transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Koliner, J. J.; Eilerman, S.; Reusch, J. A.; Anderson, J. K.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Liu, D.

    2013-03-01

    Internal fluctuations arising from energetic-particle-driven instabilities, including both density and radial magnetic field, are measured in a reversed-field-pinch plasma. The fluctuations peak near the core where fast ions reside and shift outward along the major radius as the instability transits from the n = 5 to n = 4 mode. During this transition, strong nonlinear three-wave interaction among multiple modes accompanied by enhanced fast-ion transport is observed.

  10. Low loss Sendust powder cores comprised of particles coated by sodium salt insulating layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ding; Wang, Xian; Nie, Yan; Feng, Zekun; Gong, Rongzhou; Chen, Yajie; Harris, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    Toroid-shaped Sendust powder cores were prepared from cold pressing mechanically pulverized Fe-Si-Al powder that had been coated using an inorganic insulating layer. The present work focuses on the effect of the sodium salt-coated Sendust particles upon the high frequency magnetic properties. Sendust powders, having a particle size range of ˜125 μm, exhibit a high saturation magnetization of 118.9 A.m2/kg and a low coercivity of 56 A/m. The experiments indicate that the sodium-based glass insulating layer synthesized from sodium metaphosphate and sodium metaborate can effectively reduce the change in permeability with frequency or DC bias field, yielding high effective permeability (μe) of ˜113 over a wide frequency range from 10 kHz-1 MHz. Furthermore, the effective permeability is measured at ˜27 at H = 7854 A/m, indicating stable and high effective permeability under a DC bias field. The measurements of permeability under DC bias field indicate a peak in the quality factor (Q) values corresponding to a DC-bias field of 1.5-6 (kA/m) at frequencies from 50 to 200 kHz: The effective permeability remains at ˜74. The sodium salt-coated granular cores demonstrate a core loss of 68 mW/cm3 at Bm = 50 mT and f = 50 kHz: These values compare favorably to those of silicone coated Sendust particles.

  11. Synthesis of zirconium tungstate-zirconia core-shell composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Khazeni, Nasser; Mavis, Bora; Guenduez, Guengoer; Colak, Uner

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}-ZrO{sub 2} core-shell particles to offer solutions for sintering problems. {yields} Core synthesis by a precursor based on tungstic acid and zirconium acetate. {yields} Shell phase by urea hydrolysis in the presence of zirconium ions. {yields} [Urea]/[ZrOCl{sub 2}] ratio controls the rate of shell precursor precipitation. -- Abstract: In this work, ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}-ZrO{sub 2} core-shell composite particles were synthesized. ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} that was used in the core is a material with negative coefficient of thermal expansion, and it was synthesized from a high-pH precursor based on use of tungstic acid and zirconium acetate. Shell layer was composed of ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystallites and precipitated from an aqueous solution by urea hydrolysis. While volume of the shell was effectively controlled by the initial zirconium ion concentration in the solutions, the rate of precipitation was a function of the ratio of initial concentrations of urea to zirconium ions. It is hypothesized that isolation of the ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} within a layer of ZrO{sub 2}, will be a key element in solving problems associated with reactivity of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} towards other components in sintering of ceramic-ceramic composites with tuned or zero thermal expansion coefficient.

  12. On the optimization of the solid core radius of superficially porous particles for finite adsorption rate.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof

    2011-02-18

    Packed chromatographic columns with the superficially porous particles (porous shell particles) guarantee higher efficiency. The theoretical equation of the Height Equivalent to a Theoretical Plate (HETP), for columns packed with spherical superficially porous particles, was used for the analysis of the column efficiency for finite rate of adsorption-desorption process. The HETP equation was calculated by the application of the moment analysis to elution peaks evaluated with the General Rate (GR) model. The optimal solid core radius for maximum column efficiency was estimated for a wide spectrum of internal and external mass transfer resistances, adsorption kinetic rate and axial dispersion. The separation power of the shell adsorbent for two component mixture, in analytical and preparative chromatography, was discussed. The conditions of the equivalence between the solutions of the General Rate model with slow adsorption kinetic and the Lumped Kinetic Model (LKM) or the Equilibrium Dispersive (ED) model were formulated.

  13. Mesoporous silica coated silica-titania spherical particles: from impregnation to core-shell formation.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Takei, Toshiaki; Ogawa, Makoto

    2016-11-22

    The coating of solid surfaces with inorganic materials is a promising approach not only to impart various functionalities but also to modify physicochemical properties that are affected by the geometry/structure of the coating. In this study, a silica-hexadecyltrimethylammonium (silica-CTA) hybrid layer was deposited on monodispersed spherical particles composed of titania and octadecylamine (titania-ODA) by a sol-gel reaction of tetraethoxysilane in aqueous CTA/ammonia/methanol solution. The formation of the coating was confirmed by SEM and TEM observations. The coating thickness varied from a few nm to 100 nm depending on the Si/Ti ratio. We found that Si/Ti = 0.68 resulted in the formation of microporous silica-titania particles with the pore size of 0.7 nm as revealed by nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements. Because the titania-ODA particles can be converted to mesoporous titania particles after removing ODA by acid/base treatment, the silica species can be impregnated into the titania particles and replace ODA under basic conditions. By increasing the Si/Ti molar ratio up to 1.4, silica-titania particles with non-porous structures were obtained. An amorphous to anatase transition occurred at around 800 °C, indicating the complete impregnation of silica inside the titania particles. Further increases of the Si/Ti molar ratio (to 3.4 and 6.8) led to the formation of the silica-CTA shell on the core particles, and the shell was converted to mesoporous silica layers with a pore size of 2 nm after calcination at 550 °C for 5 h. Non-linear control of the pore size/structure is presented for the first time; this will be useful for the precise design of diverse hybrid materials for optical, catalytic and biomedical applications.

  14. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-21

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization.

  15. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity.

  16. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering.

    PubMed

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-02-23

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate ('/' = physisorbed, '-' = chemisorbed), from molten Field's metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity.

  17. Core/shell silicon/polyaniline particles via in-flight plasma-induced polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasar-Inceoglu, Ozgul; Zhong, Lanlan; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Although silicon nanoparticles have potential applications in many relevant fields, there is often the need for post-processing steps to tune the property of the nanomaterial and to optimize it for targeted applications. In particular surface modification is generally necessary to both tune dispersibility of the particles in desired solvents to achieve optimal coating conditions, and to interface the particles with other materials to realize functional heterostructures. In this contribution we discuss the realization of core/shell silicon/polymer nanoparticles realized using a plasma-initiated in-flight polymerization process. Silicon particles are produced in a non-thermal plasma reactor using silane as a precursor. After synthesis they are aerodynamically injected into a second plasma reactor into which aniline vapor is introduced. The second plasma initiates the polymerization reactor leading to the formation of a 3-4 nm thick polymer shell surrounding the silicon core. The role of processing conditions on the properties of the polymeric shell is discussed. Preliminary results on the testing of this material as an anode for lithium ion batteries are presented.

  18. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  19. Electronic excitation transport in core antennae of enriched photosystem I particles from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Causgrove, T.P.; Yang, S.; Struve, W.S.

    1988-10-20

    The polarized photobleaching recovery of PSI-60 particles enriched in iron-sulfur protein and P700 was monitored with approx. 2-ps resolution at 665, 670, 675, and 681 nm. Considerable residual anisotropy appears at long times, proving that local ordering exists in the Chl a-protein core antenna of PSI-60. At these four wavelengths, the polarization decays with mean lifetimes between 2.9 and 6.6 ps. This slow time scale suggests that the depolarization accompanies electronic excitation transport between clusters of Chl a chromophores rather than between individual nearest-neighbor chromophores.

  20. Facile preparation of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles for Li-ion battery cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Naito, Makio

    2015-02-01

    Core@shell and concentration-gradient particles have attracted much attention as improved cathodes for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, most of their preparation routes have employed a precisely-controlled co-precipitation method. Here, we report a facile preparation route of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles by dry powder processing. The core@shell particles composed of the MnO2 core and the Li(Ni,Mn)2O4 spinel shell are prepared by mechanical treatment using an attrition-type mill, whereas the concentration-gradient spinel particles with an average composition of LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 are produced by calcination of their core@shell particles as a precursor. The concentration-gradient LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 spinel cathode exhibits the high discharge capacity of 135.3 mA h g-1, the wide-range plateau at a high voltage of 4.7 V and the cyclability with a capacity retention of 99.4% after 20 cycles. Thus, the facile preparation route of the core@shell and concentration-gradient particles may provide a new opportunity for the discovery and investigation of functional materials as well as for the cathode materials for LIBs.

  1. Facile preparation of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles for Li-ion battery cathode materials

    PubMed Central

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Naito, Makio

    2015-01-01

    Core@shell and concentration-gradient particles have attracted much attention as improved cathodes for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, most of their preparation routes have employed a precisely-controlled co-precipitation method. Here, we report a facile preparation route of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles by dry powder processing. The core@shell particles composed of the MnO2 core and the Li(Ni,Mn)2O4 spinel shell are prepared by mechanical treatment using an attrition-type mill, whereas the concentration-gradient spinel particles with an average composition of LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 are produced by calcination of their core@shell particles as a precursor. The concentration-gradient LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 spinel cathode exhibits the high discharge capacity of 135.3 mA h g−1, the wide-range plateau at a high voltage of 4.7 V and the cyclability with a capacity retention of 99.4% after 20 cycles. Thus, the facile preparation route of the core@shell and concentration-gradient particles may provide a new opportunity for the discovery and investigation of functional materials as well as for the cathode materials for LIBs. PMID:27877756

  2. Facile preparation of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles for Li-ion battery cathode materials.

    PubMed

    Kozawa, Takahiro; Naito, Makio

    2015-02-01

    Core@shell and concentration-gradient particles have attracted much attention as improved cathodes for Li-ion batteries (LIBs). However, most of their preparation routes have employed a precisely-controlled co-precipitation method. Here, we report a facile preparation route of core@shell and concentration-gradient spinel particles by dry powder processing. The core@shell particles composed of the MnO2 core and the Li(Ni,Mn)2O4 spinel shell are prepared by mechanical treatment using an attrition-type mill, whereas the concentration-gradient spinel particles with an average composition of LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 are produced by calcination of their core@shell particles as a precursor. The concentration-gradient LiNi0.32Mn1.68O4 spinel cathode exhibits the high discharge capacity of 135.3 mA h g(-1), the wide-range plateau at a high voltage of 4.7 V and the cyclability with a capacity retention of 99.4% after 20 cycles. Thus, the facile preparation route of the core@shell and concentration-gradient particles may provide a new opportunity for the discovery and investigation of functional materials as well as for the cathode materials for LIBs.

  3. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles.

    PubMed

    Waite, Kenrick A; De-La Mota-Peynado, Alina; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-02-12

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy.

  4. Site-specific aflatoxin B sub 1 adduction of sequence-positioned nucleosome core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The question of how the presence of nucleosomal packing of DNA modifies carcinogen interaction at specific sites cannot be answered by studies on whole chromatin or bulk nucleosomes because of the heterogeneity of DNA sequences in the particles. This problem was circumvented by constructing nucleosomes that are homogenous in DNA-histone contact points. A cloned DNA fragment, containing a sea urchin 5S gene which precisely positions a histone octamer was employed. By using {sup 32}P end-labeled DNA and genotoxins that allow cleavage at sites of attack, the frequency of adduction at every susceptible nucleotide can be determined on sequencing gels. The small methylating agent dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and the bulky alkylating agent afatoxin B{sub 1}-dichloride (AFB{sub 1}-Cl{sub 2}) were used to probe the influence of DNA-histone interactions on DNA alkylation patterns in sequence-positioned core particles.

  5. Salt-induced conformation and interaction changes of nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed Central

    Mangenot, Stéphanie; Leforestier, Amélie; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Livolant, Françoise

    2002-01-01

    Small angle x-ray scattering was used to follow changes in the conformation and interactions of nucleosome core particles (NCP) as a function of the monovalent salt concentration C(s). The maximal extension (D(max)) of the NCP (145 +/- 3-bp DNA) increases from 137 +/- 5 A to 165 +/- 5 A when C(s) rises from 10 to 50 mM and remains constant with further increases of C(s) up to 200 mM. In view of the very weak increase of the R(g) value in the same C(s) range, we attribute this D(max) variation to tail extension, a proposal confirmed by simulations of the entire I(q) curves, considering an ideal solution of particles with tails either condensed or extended. This tail extension is observed at higher salt values when particles contain longer DNA fragments (165 +/- 10 bp). The maximal extension of the tails always coincides with the screening of repulsive interactions between particles. The second virial coefficient becomes smaller than the hard sphere virial coefficient and eventually becomes negative (net attractive interactions) for NCP(145). Addition of salt simultaneously screens Coulombic repulsive interactions between NCP and Coulombic attractive interactions between tails and DNA inside the NCP. We discuss how the coupling of these two phenomena may be of biological relevance. PMID:11751321

  6. Orbital Evolution of Particles and Stable Zones at the F Ring Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whizin, Akbar; Cuzzi, J.; Hogan, R.; Dobrovolskis, A.; Colwell, J.; Scargle, J.; Dones, L.; Showalter, M.

    2012-10-01

    The F ring of Saturn is often thought of as a ‘shepherded’ ring; however, it is closer to the more massive of its two shepherd satellites, Prometheus. Pandora, the outer satellite, is near a 3:2 mean motion resonance with larger Mimas causing periodic fluctuations in its orbit. The perturbations from the Saturnian satellites result in chaotic orbits throughout the F ring region (Scargle et al 1993 DPS 25, #26.04, Winter et al 2007 MNRAS 380, L54; 2010 A&A 523, A67). We follow the approach of Cuzzi et al. (abstract this meeting) in exploring zones of relative stability in the F ring region using a N-body Bulirsch-Stoer orbital integrator that includes the 14 main satellites of Saturn. We find relatively stable zones situated among the tightly packed Prometheus and Pandora resonances that we dub “anti-resonances.” At these locations ring particles have much smaller changes in their semi-major axes and eccentricities than particles outside of anti-resonance zones. We present high radial resolution simulations where we track the orbital evolution of 6000 test particles over time in a 200km region and find that the variance of the semi-major axes of particles in anti-resonances can be less than 1km over a period of 32 years, while just 5km away in either radial direction the variance can be tens of km’s. More importantly, particles outside of these stable zones can migrate into one due to chaotic orbits, but once they enter an anti-resonance zone they remain there. The anti-resonances act as long-lived sinks for ring particles and explain the location of the F ring core even though it is not in overall torque balance with the shepherd moons.

  7. One-piece micropumps from liquid crystalline core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Eva-Kristina; Liang, Hsin-Ling; Kapernaum, Nadia; Giesselmann, Frank; Lagerwall, Jan; Zentel, Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    Responsive polymers are low-cost, light weight and flexible, and thus an attractive class of materials for the integration into micromechanical and lab-on-chip systems. Triggered by external stimuli, liquid crystalline elastomers are able to perform mechanical motion and can be utilized as microactuators. Here we present the fabrication of one-piece micropumps from liquid crystalline core-shell elastomer particles via a microfluidic double-emulsion process, the continuous nature of which enables a low-cost and rapid production. The liquid crystalline elastomer shell contains a liquid core, which is reversibly pumped into and out of the particle by actuation of the liquid crystalline shell in a jellyfish-like motion. The liquid crystalline elastomer shells have the potential to be integrated into a microfluidic system as micropumps that do not require additional components, except passive channel connectors and a trigger for actuation. This renders elaborate and high-cost micromachining techniques, which are otherwise required for obtaining microstructures with pump function, unnecessary.

  8. Crystal structure of human nucleosome core particle containing enzymatically introduced CpG methylation.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yoshifumi; Wakamori, Masatoshi; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-06-01

    Cytosine methylation, predominantly of the CpG sequence in vertebrates, is one of the major epigenetic modifications crucially involved in the control of gene expression. Due to the difficulty of reconstituting site-specifically methylated nucleosomal DNA at crystallization quality, most structural analyses of CpG methylation have been performed using chemically synthesized oligonucleotides, There has been just one recent study of nucleosome core particles (NCPs) reconstituted with nonpalindromic human satellite 2-derived DNAs. Through the preparation of a 146-bp palindromic α-satellite-based nucleosomal DNA containing four CpG dinucleotide sequences and its enzymatic methylation and restriction, we reconstituted a 'symmetric' human CpG-methylated nucleosome core particle (NCP). We solved the crystal structures of the CpG-methylated and unmodified NCPs at 2.6 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. We observed the electron densities of two methyl groups, among the eight 5-methylcytosines introduced in the CpG-fully methylated NCP. There were no obvious structural differences between the CpG-methylated 'symmetric NCP' and the unmodified NCP. The preparation of a crystallization-grade CpG-methylated NCP provides a platform for the analysis of CpG-methyl reader and eraser proteins.

  9. Co-axial capillaries microfluidic device for synthesizing size- and morphology-controlled polymer core-polymer shell particles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhenqi; Serra, Christophe A; Bouquey, Michel; Prat, Laurent; Hadziioannou, Georges

    2009-10-21

    An easy assembling-disassembling co-axial capillaries microfluidic device was built up for the production of double droplets. Uniform polymer core-polymer shell particles were synthesized by polymerizing the two immiscible monomer phases composing the double droplet. Thus poly(acrylamide) core-poly(tri(propylene glycol) diacrylate) shell particles with controlled core diameter and shell thickness were simply obtained by adjusting operating parameters. An empirical law was extracted from experiments to predict core and shell sizes. Additionally uniform and predictable non-spherical polymer objects were also prepared without adding shape-formation procedures in the experimental device. An empirical equation for describing the lengths of rod-like polymer particles is also presented.

  10. Adhesion phenomena between particles according to the content of organic binder in core for thin-wall casting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Hee; Cho, Geon-Ho; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Kim, In-Soo; Jo, Chang-Young; Lee, Jin-Seok

    2014-10-01

    The content of organic binder in a core for thin-wall casting has been controlled to investigate the adhesion phenomena of inorganic binder between starting particles, as directly related to the mechanical and thermal properties of the core. The inorganic binder precursor was composed of tetraethyl orthosilicate and sodium methoxide as the silicon dioxide and sodium oxide precursors, respectively. Poly(vinyl alcohol), a hydrophilic polymer, was used as an organic binder. The particles coated with the inorganic precursor were sculpted with the organic binder and then the prepared core samples were heated at 1000 degrees C for 1 h. The core samples prepared with the optimum content of organic binder show the highest fracture strength. This may be due to the enhancement of adhesion by the glass phase formed between starting particles. However, when too much or too little organic binder is employed, the strength values of the core samples are significantly decreased. This is because the network structure of the glass phase is not inadequately created or the glass phase is not uniformly developed between starting particles, resulting in the insufficient contact between starting particles during the convert process.

  11. Rapid microwave synthesis and photoluminescence properties of rare earth-based coordination polymer core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shuang; Xu, Hualan; Wang, Mengya; Zhong, Shengliang; Zeng, Chenghui

    2016-12-01

    Coordination polymer (CP) core-shell particles, with Eu-based CP as the core and La-based CP as the shell, were prepared using a facile microwave heating method. Pyridine-2, 5-dicarboxylic acid (PDA) was selected as the organic building blo, and DMF was used as the solvent. SEM and TEM images show that the resultant cores are nanospheres with diameters of 200-400 nm. Products with different shell thickness were prepared. The luminescence properties of the core-shell structures were studied and the influence of the La-based CP shell on the photoluminescence properties of the core were investigated. The fluorescence intensity and lifetime of the Eu-based CP core were varied with the addition of shell thickness. Both of them increases at first and then decreases with the increase of shell thickness.

  12. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  13. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle

    PubMed Central

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications. PMID:26474902

  14. Assembly Pathway of Hepatitis B Core Virus-like Particles from Genetically Fused Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Kris; Shepherd, Dale A.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Whelan, Mike; Rowlands, David J.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular complexes are responsible for many key biological processes. However, in most cases details of the assembly/disassembly of such complexes are unknown at the molecular level, as the low abundance and transient nature of assembly intermediates make analysis challenging. The assembly of virus capsids is an example of such a process. The hepatitis B virus capsid (core) can be composed of either 90 or 120 dimers of coat protein. Previous studies have proposed a trimer of dimers as an important intermediate species in assembly, acting to nucleate further assembly by dimer addition. Using novel genetically-fused coat protein dimers, we have been able to trap higher-order assembly intermediates and to demonstrate for the first time that both dimeric and trimeric complexes are on pathway to virus-like particle (capsid) formation. PMID:25953902

  15. Meaningful timescales from Monte Carlo simulations of particle systems with hard-core interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Liborio I.

    2016-12-01

    A new Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for simulating the dynamics of particle systems characterized by hard-core interactions is introduced. In contrast to traditional Kinetic Monte Carlo approaches, where the state of the system is associated with minima in the energy landscape, in the proposed method, the state of the system is associated with the set of paths traveled by the atoms and the transition probabilities for an atom to be displaced are proportional to the corresponding velocities. In this way, the number of possible state-to-state transitions is reduced to a discrete set, and a direct link between the Monte Carlo time step and true physical time is naturally established. The resulting rejection-free algorithm is validated against event-driven molecular dynamics: the equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamics of hard disks converge to the exact results with decreasing displacement size.

  16. The H1 linker histones: multifunctional proteins beyond the nucleosomal core particle.

    PubMed

    Hergeth, Sonja P; Schneider, Robert

    2015-11-01

    The linker histone H1 family members are a key component of chromatin and bind to the nucleosomal core particle around the DNA entry and exit sites. H1 can stabilize both nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin architecture. In general, H1 molecules consist of a central globular domain with more flexible tail regions at both their N- and C-terminal ends. The existence of multiple H1 subtypes and a large variety of posttranslational modifications brings about a considerable degree of complexity and makes studying this protein family challenging. Here, we review recent progress in understanding the function of linker histones and their subtypes beyond their role as merely structural chromatin components. We summarize current findings on the role of H1 in heterochromatin formation, transcriptional regulation and embryogenesis with a focus on H1 subtypes and their specific modifications.

  17. Geodesic motions of test particles in a relativistic core-shell spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lei; Wu, Xin; Huang, Guoqing

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the geodesic motions of test particles in the intermediate vacuum between a monopolar core and an exterior shell of dipoles, quadrupoles and octopoles. The radii of the innermost stable circular orbits at the equatorial plane depend only on the quadrupoles. A given oblate quadrupolar leads to the existence of two innermost stable circular orbits, and their radii are larger than in the Schwarzschild spacetime. However, a given prolate quadrupolar corresponds to only one innermost stable circular orbit, and its radius is smaller than in the Schwarzschild spacetime. As to the general geodesic orbits, one of the recently developed extended phase space fourth order explicit symplectic-like methods is efficiently applicable to them although the Hamiltonian of the relativistic core-shell system is not separable. With the aid of both this fast integrator without secular growth in the energy errors and gauge invariant chaotic indicators, the effect of these shell multipoles on the geodesic dynamics of order and chaos is estimated numerically.

  18. Influence of particle size and shell thickness of core-shell packing materials on optimum experimental conditions in preparative chromatography.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Krisztián; Felinger, Attila

    2015-08-14

    The applicability of core-shell phases in preparative separations was studied by a modeling approach. The preparative separations were optimized for two compounds having bi-Langmuir isotherms. The differential mass balance equation of chromatography was solved by the Rouchon algorithm. The results show that as the size of the core increases, larger particles can be used in separations, resulting in higher applicable flow rates, shorter cycle times. Due to the decreasing volume of porous layer, the loadability of the column dropped significantly. As a result, the productivity and economy of the separation decreases. It is shown that if it is possible to optimize the size of stationary phase particles for the given separation task, the use of core-shell phases are not beneficial. The use of core-shell phases proved to be advantageous when the goal is to build preparative column for general purposes (e.g. for purification of different products) in small scale separations.

  19. Anti-fatigue Effects of 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol and 20(S)-Protopanaxatriol in Mice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyun A; Kim, Dae-Eung; Choi, Hyuck Jai; Kim, Nam Jae; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. MEYER, Araliaceae), which contains protopanaxadiol-type and protopanaxatriol-type ginsenosides, has been used for inflammation, fatigue, stress, and tumor in Asian countries. Orally administered ginsenosides are metabolized to their aglycones 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT) by gut microbiota. However, their anti-fatigue effects have not been studied thoroughly. Therefore, we investigated the anti-fatigue activities of PPD and PPT in mice, using the weight-loaded swimming (WLS) and the rota-rod tests. Ginseng water extract (GW), ginseng saponin fraction (GWS) and ginseng polysaccharide fraction (GWP) at concentrations of 50 and 100 mg/kg and PPD and PPT at 5 and 10 mg/kg were orally administered to mice once daily for 5 d. GW, GWS, and PPT significantly increased the WLS time, however, GWP and PPD did not cause any significant change. PPT induced the most significant increase in WLS time. PPD (10 mg/kg) and PPT (5 and 10 mg/kg) inhibited the WLS-induced increase in corticosterone, lactate, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and creatinine levels as well as the reduction in glucose level. PPT increased the riding time in the rota-rod test, and also inhibited corticosterone, lactate, and creatinine levels. These findings suggest that the anti-fatigue effect of ginseng may be attributable to its saponins, particularly PPT, rather than to its polysaccharides.

  20. Core-shell-structured silica/polyacrylate particles prepared by Pickering emulsion: influence of the nucleation model on particle interfacial organization and emulsion stability.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jing; Shu, Shi; Wang, Feng; Li, Zhilin; Liu, Jingjun; Song, Ye; Jia, Yi

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a new evidence of the versatility of silica sol as a stabilizer for Pickering emulsions. The organization of silica particles at the oil-water interface is a function of the nucleation model. The present results show that nucleation model, together with monomer hydrophobicity, can be used as a trigger to modify the packing density of silica particles at the oil-water interface: Less hydrophobic methylmethacrylate, more wettable with silica particles, favors the formation of core-shell-structured composite when the composite particles are prepared by miniemulsion polymerization in which monomers are fed in batch (droplet nucleation). By contrast, hydrophobic butylacrylate promotes the encapsulating efficiency of silica when monomers are fed dropwise (homogeneous nucleation). The morphologies of polyacrylate-nano-SiO2 composites prepared from different feed ratio of methylmethacrylate/butylacrylate (with different hydrophobicity) and by different feed processes are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results from SEM and TEM show that the morphologies of the as-prepared polyacrylate/nano-SiO2 composite can be a core-shell structure or a bare acrylic sphere. The stability of resulting emulsions composed of these composite particles is strongly dependent on the surface coverage of silica particles. The emulsion stability is improved by densely silica-packed composite particles.

  1. Magnetorheology of core-shell carbonyl iron/ZnO rod-like particle silicone oil suspensions under oscillatory shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mrlik, M.; Machovsky, M.; Pavlinek, V.; Kuritka, I.

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is a preparation and application of inorganic coating on the surface of carbonyl iron particles. The two step solvothermal synthesis provides core-shell CI/ZnO rod-like morphology. Compact coating of particles has a slightly negative impact on their magnetic properties (measured for magnetic field strength in the range from 0 to 213 mT); however, there is a suitable magnetorheological performance investigated under oscillatory shear, suitable to be applied in real applications.

  2. Structural Analysis of the Bacterial Proteasome Activator Bpa in Complex with the 20S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Bolten, Marcel; Delley, Cyrille L; Leibundgut, Marc; Boehringer, Daniel; Ban, Nenad; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2016-12-06

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis harbors proteasomes that recruit substrates for degradation through an ubiquitin-like modification pathway. Recently, a non-ATPase activator termed Bpa (bacterial proteasome activator) was shown to support an alternate proteasomal degradation pathway. Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of Bpa in complex with the 20S core particle (CP). For docking into the cryo-EM density, we solved the X-ray structure of Bpa, showing that it forms tight four-helix bundles arranged into a 12-membered ring with a 40 Å wide central pore and the C-terminal helix of each protomer protruding from the ring. The Bpa model was fitted into the cryo-EM map of the Bpa-CP complex, revealing its architecture and striking symmetry mismatch. The Bpa-CP interface was resolved to 3.5 Å, showing the interactions between the C-terminal GQYL motif of Bpa and the proteasome α-rings. This docking mode is related to the one observed for eukaryotic activators with features specific to the bacterial complex.

  3. Determination of and evidence for non-core-shell structure of particles containing black carbon using the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, Arthur J., III; Lewis, Ernie R.; Kleinman, Lawrence; Xu, Jianzhong; Zhang, Qi

    2012-03-01

    The large uncertainty associated with black carbon (BC) direct forcing is due, in part, to the dependence of light absorption of BC-containing particles on the position of the BC within the particle. It is predicted that this absorption will be greatest for an idealized core-shell configuration in which the BC is a sphere at the center of the particle whereas much less absorption should be observed for particles in which the BC is located near or on the surface. Such microphysical information on BC-containing particles has previously been provided only by labor-intensive microscopy techniques, thus often requiring that climate modelers make assumptions about the location of the BC within the particle that are based more on mathematical simplicity than physical reality. The present paper describes a novel analysis method that utilizes the temporal behavior of the scattering and incandescence signals from individual particles containing refractory BC (rBC) measured by the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to distinguish particles with rBC near the surface from those that have structures more closely resembling the core-shell configuration. This approach permits collection of a high-time-resolution data set of the fraction of rBC-containing particles with rBC near the surface. By application of this method to a plume containing tracers for biomass burning, it was determined that this fraction was greater than 60%. Such a data set will not only provide previously unavailable information to the climate modeling community, allowing greater accuracy in calculating rBC radiative forcing, but also will yield insight into aerosol processes.

  4. Spherical 3D photonic crystal with conducting nanoshell and particle core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamudio-Lara, A.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J.; Escobedo-Alatorre, J.; Pérez-Careta, E.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Tecpoyotl-Torres, Margarita; Vázquez-Buenos Aires, O.

    2009-06-01

    We discuss a structured 3D Dielectric Photonic Crystal with both a metallic core and a metallic shell. We discuss the role of each one, the stack, the core as well as the cavity formed between the core and the shell. The low frequency metallic core features becomes much more significant as it gets smaller and get diluted by the cavity.

  5. Probing Enhanced Double-Strand Break Formation at Abasic Sites within Clustered Lesions in Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samya; Chakraborty, Supratim; Jacinto, Marco Paolo; Paul, Michael D; Balster, Morgan V; Greenberg, Marc M

    2017-01-10

    DNA is rapidly cleaved under mild alkaline conditions at apyrimidinic/apurinic sites, but the half-life is several weeks in phosphate buffer (pH 7.5). However, abasic sites are ∼100-fold more reactive within nucleosome core particles (NCPs). Histone proteins catalyze the strand scission, and at superhelical location 1.5, the histone H4 tail is largely responsible for the accelerated cleavage. The rate constant for strand scission at an abasic site is enhanced further in a nucleosome core particle when it is part of a bistranded lesion containing a proximal strand break. Cleavage of this form results in a highly deleterious double-strand break. This acceleration is dependent upon the position of the abasic lesion in the NCP and its structure. The enhancement in cleavage rate at an apurinic/apyrimidinic site rapidly drops off as the distance between the strand break and abasic site increases and is negligible once the two forms of damage are separated by 7 bp. However, the enhancement of the rate of double-strand break formation increases when the size of the gap is increased from one to two nucleotides. In contrast, the cleavage rate enhancement at 2-deoxyribonolactone within bistranded lesions is more modest, and it is similar in free DNA and nucleosome core particles. We postulate that the enhanced rate of double-strand break formation at bistranded lesions containing apurinic/apyrimidinic sites within nucleosome core particles is a general phenomenon and is due to increased DNA flexibility.

  6. Glass-NiP-CoFeP triplex-shell particles with hollow cores and tunable magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    An, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jingjie

    2013-02-01

    Low density (0.55-0.92g/mL, depending on the shell thickness and composition) glass-metal-metal triplex-shell hollow particles (TSHP) were prepared by a three-step route. First, micrometer-sized silicate glass particles with hollow cores, uniform shells, and high sphericity were prepared through spray drying and subsequent melting. NiP shell was uniformly assembled to the previously obtained glass hollow particles by silver seed induced chemical reduction of Ni(2+) by sodium hypophosphite, and glass-NiP double-shell hollow particles (DSHP) with compact and uniform shells were formed. The as-formed NiP particles further acted as the seeds for the directed formation and assembly of the CoFeP shell on the NiP shell to form the final glass-NiP-CoFeP triplex-shell hollow particles (TSHP). The influences of the component of the reaction system on the composition, structure, and magnetic properties of the hollow particles were studied. The multishell hollow particles thus obtained may have some promising applications in the fields of low-density magnetic materials, conduction, microwave absorbers, catalysis, etc. This work provides an additional strategy to fabricate multishell structured hollow particles with tailored shell composition and magnetic properties, which can be extended to the controlled preparation of multishell composite particles with the shells consisting of metal, oxides, or other compounds.

  7. Fuzzy ternary particle systems by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization from layer-by-layer colloidal core-shell macroinitiator particles.

    PubMed

    Fulghum, Timothy M; Patton, Derek L; Advincula, Rigoberto C

    2006-09-26

    We report the synthesis of ternary polymer particle material systems composed of (a) a spherical colloidal particle core, coated with (b) a polyelectrolyte intermediate shell, and followed by (c) a grafted polymer brush prepared by surface-initiated polymerization as the outer shell. The layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition process was utilized to create a functional intermediate shell of poly(diallyl-dimethylammonium chloride)/poly(acrylic acid) multilayers on the colloid template with the final layer containing an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) macroinitiator polyelectrolyte. The intermediate core-shell architecture was analyzed with FT-IR, electrophoretic mobililty (zeta-potential) measurements, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. The particles were then utilized as macroinitiators for the surface-initiated ATRP grafting process for poly(methyl methacrylate) polymer brush. The polymer grafting was confirmed with thermo gravimetric analysis, FT-IR, and TEM. The polymer brush formed the outermost shell for a ternary colloidal particle system. By combining the LbL and surface-initiated ATRP methods to produce controllable multidomain core-shell architectures, interesting functional properties should be obtainable based on independent polyelectrolyte and polymer brush behavior.

  8. Internal stresses in pre-stressed micron-scale aluminum core-shell particles and their improved reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2015-09-01

    Dilatation of aluminum (Al) core for micron-scale particles covered by alumina (Al2O3) shell was measured utilizing x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation for untreated particles and particles after annealing at 573 K and fast quenching at 0.46 K/s. Such a treatment led to the increase in flame rate for Al + CuO composite by 32% and is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the melt-dispersion mechanism of reaction for Al particles. Experimental results confirmed theoretical estimates and proved that the improvement of Al reactivity is due to internal stresses. This opens new ways of controlling particle reactivity through creating and monitoring internal stresses.

  9. Internal stresses in pre-stressed micron-scale aluminum core-shell particles and their improved reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2015-09-07

    Dilatation of aluminum (Al) core for micron-scale particles covered by alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) shell was measured utilizing x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation for untreated particles and particles after annealing at 573 K and fast quenching at 0.46 K/s. Such a treatment led to the increase in flame rate for Al + CuO composite by 32% and is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the melt-dispersion mechanism of reaction for Al particles. Experimental results confirmed theoretical estimates and proved that the improvement of Al reactivity is due to internal stresses. This opens new ways of controlling particle reactivity through creating and monitoring internal stresses.

  10. Nonhistone nuclear high mobility group proteins 14 and 17 stabilize nucleosome core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Paton, A.E.; Wilkinson-Singley, E.; Olins, D.W.

    1983-11-10

    Nucleosome core particles form well defined complexes with the nuclear nonhistone proteins HMG 14 or 17. The binding of HMG 14 or 17 to nucleosomes results in greater stability of the nucleosomal DNA as shown by circular dichroism and thermal denaturation. Under appropriate conditions the binding is cooperative, and cooperativity is ionic strength dependent. The specificity and cooperative transitions of high mobility group (HMG) binding are preserved in 1 M urea. Specificity is lost in 4 M urea. Thermal denaturation and circular dichroism show a dramatic reversal of the effects of urea on nucleosomes when HMG 14 or 17 is bound, indicating stabilization of the nucleosome by HMG proteins. Complexes formed between reconstructed nucleosomes containing purified inner histones plus poly (dA-dT) and HMG 14 or 17 demonstrate that the HMG binding site requires only DNA and histones. Electron microscopy reveals no major structural alterations in the nucleosome upon binding of HMG 14 or 17. Cross-linking the nucleosome extensively with formaldehyde under cooperative HMG binding conditions does not prevent the ionic strength-dependent shift to noncooperative binding. This suggests mechanisms other than internal nucleosome conformational changes may be involved in cooperative HMG binding.

  11. 3D simulations of young core-collapse supernova remnants undergoing efficient particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar

    2016-06-01

    Within our Galaxy, supernova remnants are believed to be the major sources of cosmic rays up to the 'knee'. However important questions remain regarding the share of the hadronic and leptonic components, and the fraction of the supernova energy channelled into these components. We address such question by the means of numerical simulations that combine a hydrodynamic treatment of the shock wave with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. Performing 3D simulations allows us to produce synthetic projected maps and spectra of the thermal and non-thermal emission, that can be compared with multi-wavelength observations (in radio, X-rays, and γ-rays). Supernovae come in different types, and although their energy budget is of the same order, their remnants have different properties, and so may contribute in different ways to the pool of Galactic cosmic-rays. Our first simulations were focused on thermonuclear supernovae, like Tycho's SNR, that usually occur in a mostly undisturbed medium. Here we present our 3D simulations of core-collapse supernovae, like the Cas A SNR, that occur in a more complex medium bearing the imprint of the wind of the progenitor star.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of flaky core-shell particles by magnetron sputtering silver onto diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Deyuan; Cai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Diatomite has delicate porous structures and various shapes, making them ideal templates for microscopic core-shell particles fabrication. In this study, a new process of magnetron sputtering assisted with photoresist positioning was proposed to fabricate lightweight silver coated porous diatomite with superior coating quality and performance. The diatomite has been treated with different sputtering time to investigate the silver film growing process on the surface. The morphologies, constituents, phase structures and surface roughness of the silver coated diatomite were analyzed with SEM, EDS, XRD and AFM respectively. The results showed that the optimized magnetron sputtering time was 8-16 min, under which the diatomite templates were successfully coated with uniform silver film, which exhibits face centered cubic (fcc) structure, and the initial porous structures were kept. Moreover, this silver coating has lower surface roughness (RMS 4.513 ± 0.2 nm) than that obtained by electroless plating (RMS 15.692 ± 0.5 nm). And the infrared emissivity of coatings made with magnetron sputtering and electroless plating silver coated diatomite can reach to the lowest value of 0.528 and 0.716 respectively.

  13. Relationship between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and particle size in dated core sediments in Lake Lianhuan, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Zang, Shuying

    2013-09-01

    Atmospheric particle associated with pyrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) poses serious threats to human health by inhalation exposure, especially in semiarid areas. Hence, the distributions of PAHs and particle size in two core sediments collected from Lake Lianhuan, Northeast China were studied. The sediments were dated radiometrically, and particle size distribution and PAH concentration were evaluated and potential human health risk was assessed. From 1980 to 2007, the dominant PAHs in the two cores were 2- and 3-ring PAHs, and the concentrations of 3-6 ring PAHs gradually increased from the early 1990s. Diagnostic ratios indicated that pyrogenic PAHs were the main sources of PAHs which changed over time from combustions of wood and coal to liquid fossil fuel sources. Fine particles (<65 μm) were the predominant particle size (56-97%). Lacustrine source (with the peak towards 200-400 μm) and eolian sources derived from short (2.0-10 and 30-65 μm) and long (0.4-1.0 μm) distance suspension were indentified from frequency distribution pattern of particle size. Significant correlations between 3-6 ring PAHs (especially carcinogenic 5-6 ring PAHs) and 10-35 μm particulate fractions indicated that eolian particles played an important role in adsorbing pyrogenic PAHs. Petroleum source of PAHs was only identified during the 1980s in one core sediments, in which positive correlations between 2-ring PAHs and particulate fractions of >125 μm were found. Future research should focus on the seven carcinogenic pyrogenic PAHs due to a rapidly increasing trend since 1995 based on the assessment of toxic equivalency factors.

  14. Fabrication of quantum dot/silica core-shell particles immobilizing Au nanoparticles and their dual imaging functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Matsudo, Hiromu; Li, Ting-ting; Shibuya, Kyosuke; Kubota, Yohsuke; Oikawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tomohiko; Gonda, Kohsuke

    2016-03-01

    The present work proposes preparation methods for quantum dot/silica (QD/SiO2) core-shell particles that immobilize Au nanoparticles (QD/SiO2/Au). A colloid solution of QD/SiO2 core-shell particles with an average size of 47.0 ± 6.1 nm was prepared by a sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of the QDs with an average size of 10.3 ± 2.1 nm. A colloid solution of Au nanoparticles with an average size of 17.9 ± 1.3 nm was prepared by reducing Au3+ ions with sodium citrate in water at 80 °C. Introduction of amino groups to QD/SiO2 particle surfaces was performed using (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (QD/SiO2-NH2). The QD/SiO2/Au particles were fabricated by mixing the Au particle colloid solution and the QD/SiO2-NH2 particle colloid solution. Values of radiant efficiency and computed tomography for the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution were 2.23 × 107 (p/s/cm2/sr)/(μW/cm2) at a QD concentration of 8 × 10-7 M and 1180 ± 314 Hounsfield units and an Au concentration of 5.4 × 10-2 M. The QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was injected into a mouse chest wall. Fluorescence emitted from the colloid solution could be detected on the skin covering the chest wall. The colloid solution could also be X-ray-imaged in the chest wall. Consequently, the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was found to have dual functions, i.e., fluorescence emission and X-ray absorption in vivo, which makes the colloid solution suitable to function as a contrast agent for dual imaging processes.

  15. A disulfide-bonded dimer of the core protein of hepatitis C virus is important for virus-like particle production.

    PubMed

    Kushima, Yukihiro; Wakita, Takaji; Hijikata, Makoto

    2010-09-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein forms the nucleocapsid of the HCV particle. Although many functions of core protein have been reported, how the HCV particle is assembled is not well understood. Here we show that the nucleocapsid-like particle of HCV is composed of a disulfide-bonded core protein complex (dbc-complex). We also found that the disulfide-bonded dimer of the core protein (dbd-core) is formed at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the core protein is initially produced and processed. Mutational analysis revealed that the cysteine residue at amino acid position 128 (Cys128) of the core protein, a highly conserved residue among almost all reported isolates, is responsible for dbd-core formation and virus-like particle production but has no effect on the replication of the HCV RNA genome or the several known functions of the core protein, including RNA binding ability and localization to the lipid droplet. The Cys128 mutant core protein showed a dominant negative effect in terms of HCV-like particle production. These results suggest that this disulfide bond is critical for the HCV virion. We also obtained the results that the dbc-complex in the nucleocapsid-like structure was sensitive to proteinase K but not trypsin digestion, suggesting that the capsid is built up of a tightly packed structure of the core protein, with its amino (N)-terminal arginine-rich region being concealed inside.

  16. Wetting on fractal superhydrophobic surfaces from "core-shell" particles: a comparison of theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Synytska, Alla; Ionov, Leonid; Grundke, Karina; Stamm, Manfred

    2009-03-03

    We report an experimental and theoretical investigation of the wetting behavior of different model polar and nonpolar liquids and their mixtures on superhydrophobic fractal surfaces made of polymer- or silane-coated "core-shell" particles. We compared the experimental results with the theoretical predictions made according to the theories of Onda-Shibuichi (describes wetting on fractal surfaces) and Cassie-Baxter (describes wetting on generic rough composite surfaces). We found that the experimental findings deviate from the behavior predicted by the Onda-Shibuichi model. On the other hand, the wetting properties were found to be close to the predictions made by the Cassie-Baxter model in the hydrophobic region (the intrinsic contact angle on the flat surface is larger than 90 degrees). However, the wetting behavior in the hydrophilic region (the intrinsic contact angle is less than 90 degrees) could not be described by the Onda-Shibuichi or Cassie-Baxter model. The observed inconsistency between the experimental results and theoretical predictions was explained by the formation of metastable states of a liquid droplet on a fabricated fractal surface according to the theory developed by Johnson and Dettre for generic rough surfaces. The entrapments of the liquid droplets in metastable states resulted in superhydrophobic behavior on fractal surfaces as well, made from nonfluorinated material such as polystyrene with a surface free energy of about 30 mJ/m2. This finding is very promising for real industrial applications where fluorinated compounds are willing to be reduced. It can be concluded that employing a texture with fractal geometry is necessary for the design of superhydrophobic coatings. Thereby, extremely lowering the surface free energy of materials by fluorination is not an obligatory factor for the generation of liquid-repellent superhydrophobic materials. We believe that the results we presented in the paper give new insight into the understanding of

  17. Structural Flexibility of the Nucleosome Core Particle at Atomic Resolution studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Roccatano, Danilo; Barthel, Andre; Zacharias, Martin W.

    2007-01-24

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Comparative explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed on a complete nucleosome core particle with and without N-terminal histone tails for more than 20 ns. Main purpose of the simulations was to study the dynamics of mobile elements such as histone N-terminal tails and how packing and DNA-bending influences the fine structure and dynamics of DNA. Except for the tails, histone and DNA molecules stayed on average close to the crystallographic start structure supporting the quality of the current force field approach. Despite the packing strain, no increase of transitions to noncanonical nucleic acid backbone conformations compared to regular B-DNA was observed. The pattern of kinks and bends along the DNA remained close to the experiment overall. In addition to the local dynamics, the simulations allowed the analysis of the superhelical mobility indicating a limited relative mobility of DNA segments separated by one superhelical turn (mean relative displacement of approximately 60.2 nm, mainly along the superhelical axis). An even higher rigidity was found for relative motions (distance fluctuations) of segments separated by half a superhelical turn (approximately 60.1 nm). The N-terminal tails underwent dramatic conformational rearrangements on the nanosecond time scale toward partially and transiently wrapped states around the DNA. Many of the histone tail changes corresponded to coupled association and folding events from fully solvent-exposed states toward complexes with the major and minor grooves of DNA. The simulations indicate that the rapid conformational changes of the tails can modulate the DNA accessibility within a few nanoseconds. # 2007

  18. On the extent of size range and power law scaling for particles of natural carbonate fault cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billi, Andrea

    2007-09-01

    To determine the size range and both type and extent of the scaling laws for particles of loose natural carbonate fault rocks, six granular fault cores from Mesozoic carbonate strata of central Italy were sampled. Particle size distributions of twelve samples were determined by combining sieving and sedimentation methods. Results show that, regardless of the fault geometry, kinematics, and tectonic history, the size of fault rock particles respects a power law distribution across approximately four orders of magnitude. The fractal dimension ( D) of the particle size distribution in the analysed samples ranges between ˜2.0 and ˜3.5. A lower bound to the power law trend is evident in all samples except in those with the highest D-values; in these samples, the smallest analysed particles (˜0.0005 mm in diameter) were also included in the power law interval, meaning that the lower size limit of the power law distribution decreases for increasing D-values and that smallest particles start to be comminuted with increasing strain (i.e. increasing fault displacement and D-values). For increasing D-values, also the largest particles tends to decrease in number, but this evidence may be affected by a censoring bias connected with the sample size. Stick-slip behaviour is suggested for the studied faults on the basis of the inferred particle size evolutions. Although further analyses are necessary to make the results of this study more generalizable, the preliminary definition of the scaling rules for fault rock particles may serve as a tool for predicting a large scale of fault rock particles once a limited range is known. In particular, data from this study may result useful as input numbers in numerical models addressing the packing of fault rock particles for frictional and hydraulic purposes.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Monodisperse Metallodielectric SiO2@Pt@SiO2 Core-Shell-Shell Particles.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Alexey; Lehmann, Hauke; Finsel, Maik; Klinke, Christian; Weller, Horst; Vossmeyer, Tobias

    2016-01-26

    Metallodielectric nanostructured core-shell-shell particles are particularly desirable for enabling novel types of optical components, including narrow-band absorbers, narrow-band photodetectors, and thermal emitters, as well as new types of sensors and catalysts. Here, we present a facile approach for the preparation of submicron SiO2@Pt@SiO2 core-shell-shell particles. As shown by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the first steps of this approach allow for the deposition of closed and almost perfectly smooth platinum shells onto silica cores via a seeded growth mechanism. By choosing appropriate conditions, the shell thickness could be adjusted precisely, ranging from ∼3 to ∼32 nm. As determined by X-ray diffraction, the crystalline domain sizes of the polycrystalline metal shells were ∼4 nm, regardless of the shell thickness. The platinum content of the particles was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and for thin shells consistent with a dense metal layer of the TEM-measured thickness. In addition, we show that the roughness of the platinum shell strongly depends on the storage time of the gold seeds used to initiate reductive platinum deposition. Further, using polyvinylpyrrolidone as adhesion layer, it was possible to coat the metallic shells with very homogeneous and smooth insulating silica shells of well-controlled thicknesses between ∼2 and ∼43 nm. After depositing the particles onto silicon substrates equipped with interdigitated electrode structures, the metallic character of the SiO2@Pt particles and the insulating character of the SiO2 shells of the SiO2@Pt@SiO2 particles were successfully demonstrated by charge transport measurements at variable temperatures.

  20. Preparation and characterization of inorganic-organic trilayer core-shell polysilsesquioxane/polyacrylate/polydimethylsiloxane hybrid latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Ruiqin; Qiu, Teng; Han, Feng; He, Lifan; Li, Xiaoyu

    2012-07-01

    The inorganic-organic trilayer core-shell polysilsesquioxane/polyacrylate/polydimethylsiloxane hybrid latex particles have been successfully prepared via seeded emulsion polymerization of acrylate monomers and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) gradually, using functional polymethacryloxypropylsilsesquioxane (PSQ) latex particles with reactive methacryloxypropyl groups synthesized by the hydrolysis and polycondensation of (3-methacryloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane in the presence of mixed emulsifiers as seeds. The FTIR spectra show that acrylate monomers and D4 are effectively involved in the emulsion copolymerization and formed the polydimethylsiloxane-containing hybrid latex particles. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) confirm that the resultant hybrid latex particles have evident trilayer core-shell structure and a narrow size distribution. XPS analysis also indicates that polysilsesquioxane/polyacrylate/polydimethylsiloxane hybrid latex particles have been successfully prepared and PDMS is rich in the surface of the hybrid latex film. Additionally, compared with the hybrid latex film without PDMS, the hybrid latex film containing PDMS shows higher hydrophobicity (water contact angle) and lower water absorption.

  1. Generation of nano-sized core-shell particles using a coaxial tri-capillary electrospray-template removal method.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lihua; Luo, Jun; Tu, Kehua; Wang, Li-Qun; Jiang, Hongliang

    2014-03-01

    This study proposed a new strategy based on a coaxial tri-capillary electrospray-template removal process for producing nanosized polylactide-b-polyethylene glycol (PLA-PEG) particles with a core-shell structure. Microparticles with core-shell-corona structures were first fabricated by coaxial tri-capillary electrospray, and core-shell nanoparticles less than 200 nm in size were subsequently obtained by removing the PEG template from the core-shell-corona microparticles. The nanoparticle size could be modulated by adjusting the flow rate of corona fluid, and nanoparticles with an average diameter of 106±5 nm were obtained. The nanoparticles displayed excellent dispersion stability in aqueous media and very low cytotoxicity. Paclitaxel was used as a model drug to be incorporated into the core section of the nanoparticles. A drug loading content in the nanoparticles as high as 50.7±1.5 wt% with an encapsulation efficiency of greater than 70% could be achieved by simply increasing the feed rate of the drug solution. Paclitaxel exhibited sustained release from the nanoparticles for more than 40 days. The location of the paclitaxel in the nanoparticles, i.e., in the core or shell layer, did not have a significant effect on its release.

  2. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or Huntington’s disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.—Chondrogianni, N., Georgila, K., Kourtis, N

  3. Self-assembled HCV core virus-like particles targeted and inhibited tumor cell migration and invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Xuehe; Jin, Aihui; Jia, Qunying; Zhou, Huaibin; Kang, Shuai; Lou, Yongliang; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    We used a baculovirus expression system to express fusion proteins of HCV core, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide, and IFN-α2a fragments in Sf9 cells. Western blotting and electron microscopy demonstrate that HCV core, peptides RGD, and IFN-α2a fusion proteins assemble into 30 to 40 nm nano-particles (virus-like particles, VLPs). Xenograft assays show that VLPs greatly reduced tumor volume and weight with regard to a nontreated xenograft. Migration and invasion results show that VLPs can inhibit the migration and invasion of the breast cancer cells MDA-MB231. This study will provide theoretical and experimental basis for the establishment of safe and effective tumor-targeted drug delivery systems and clinical application of VLPs carrying cell interacting cargo.

  4. Synthesis of TiO{sub 2} core/RuO{sub 2} shell particles using multistep ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stopic, Srecko; Friedrich, Bernd; Schroeder, Michael; Weirich, Thomas E.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} core/RuO{sub 2} shell submicron-particles were prepared via a sequential spray pyrolysis. • Spherical particles have the mean particle diameters between 200 and 400 nm. • This method is promising for synthesis of core–shell and core–multishell materials. - Abstract: Spherical submicron-particles with TiO{sub 2} core–RuO{sub 2} shell structure have been synthesized by employing sequential ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The particles have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and different transmission electron microscopy techniques. The quality of the core–shell structure of the particles has been confirmed by comparison of the experimental data with those generated on the basis of a hard sphere core–shell model. It has been found that the mixing of the Ru-containing aerosol with the TiO{sub 2} particle stream has a significant impact on the core–shell formation. The method introduced in this study can probably be applied for preparation of core–shell and core–multishell materials that are difficult to synthesize in a single step spray pyrolysis process.

  5. Yield Optimisation of Hepatitis B Virus Core Particles in E. coli Expression System for Drug Delivery Applications.

    PubMed

    Bin Mohamed Suffian, Izzat Fahimuddin; Garcia-Maya, Mitla; Brown, Paul; Bui, Tam; Nishimura, Yuya; Palermo, Amir Rafiq Bin Mohammad Johari; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2017-03-03

    An E. coli expression system offers a mean for rapid, high yield and economical production of Hepatitis B Virus core (HBc) particles. However, high-level production of HBc particles in bacteria is demanding and optimisation of HBc particle yield from E. coli is required to improve laboratory-scale productivity for further drug delivery applications. Production steps involve bacterial culture, protein isolation, denaturation, purification and finally protein assembly. In this study, we describe a modified E. coli based method for purifying HBc particles and compare the results with those obtained using a conventional purification method. HBc particle morphology was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Protein specificity and secondary structure were confirmed by Western Blot and Circular Dichroism (CD), respectively. The modified method produced ~3-fold higher yield and greater purity of wild type HBc particles than the conventional method. Our results demonstrated that the modified method produce a better yield and purity of HBc particles in an E. coli-expression system, which are fully characterised and suitable to be used for drug delivery applications.

  6. Yield Optimisation of Hepatitis B Virus Core Particles in E. coli Expression System for Drug Delivery Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bin Mohamed Suffian, Izzat Fahimuddin; Garcia-Maya, Mitla; Brown, Paul; Bui, Tam; Nishimura, Yuya; Palermo, Amir Rafiq Bin Mohammad Johari; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T.

    2017-01-01

    An E. coli expression system offers a mean for rapid, high yield and economical production of Hepatitis B Virus core (HBc) particles. However, high-level production of HBc particles in bacteria is demanding and optimisation of HBc particle yield from E. coli is required to improve laboratory-scale productivity for further drug delivery applications. Production steps involve bacterial culture, protein isolation, denaturation, purification and finally protein assembly. In this study, we describe a modified E. coli based method for purifying HBc particles and compare the results with those obtained using a conventional purification method. HBc particle morphology was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Protein specificity and secondary structure were confirmed by Western Blot and Circular Dichroism (CD), respectively. The modified method produced ~3-fold higher yield and greater purity of wild type HBc particles than the conventional method. Our results demonstrated that the modified method produce a better yield and purity of HBc particles in an E. coli-expression system, which are fully characterised and suitable to be used for drug delivery applications. PMID:28256592

  7. Production of rotavirus core-like particles in Sf9 cells using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fabiana; Dias, Mafalda M; Vidigal, João; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Patrone, Marco; Teixeira, Ana P; Alves, Paula M

    2014-02-10

    A flexible Sf9 insect cell line was recently developed leveraging the recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) technology, which competes with the popular baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) in terms of speed to produce new proteins. Herein, the ability of this cell platform to produce complex proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles, was evaluated. A gene construct coding for a VP2-GFP fusion protein was targeted to a pre-characterized high recombination efficiency locus flanked by flipase (Flp) recognition target sites and, after three weeks in selection, an isogenic cell population was obtained. Despite the lower cell specific productivities with respect to those obtained by baculovirus infection, the titers of VP2-GFP reached in shake flask batch cultures were comparable as a result of higher cell densities. To further improve the VP2-GFP levels from stable expression, analysis of exhausted medium was undertaken to design feeding strategies enabling higher cell densities as well as increased culture duration. The implementation of the best strategy allowed reaching 20 million cells per ml in bioreactor cultures; the integrity of the rotavirus core-like particles could be confirmed by electron microscopy. Overall, we show that this Sf9-Flp cell platform represents a valuable alternative to the BEVS for producing complex recombinant proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles.

  8. Development of polymer-biomolecule core-shell particles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthiwangcharoen, Nisaraporn

    Developing efficient strategies to introduce biomolecules around polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) is critical for targeted delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Although polymeric NPs have been well established, problems such as toxicity, stability, and immunoresistance remain potential concerns. The first part of this dissertation focuses on the development of nanosized targeted drug delivery vehicle in cancer chemotherapy. The vehicle was created by the self-assembly of folate-grafted filamentous bacteriophage M13 with poly(caprolactone- b-2-vinylpyridine) while doxorubicin, the antitumor drugs, was successfully loaded in the interior of the vehicles. These particles offer unique properties of being able to selectively target tumor cells while appearing to be safe and non-toxic to normal cells. Although they have shown great prospects in many biomedical applications, less is known about the interactions between biomolecules and polymers. The next part of the dissertation focuses on the self-assembly of proteins and polymers to create polymer-protein core-shell nanoparticles (PPCS-NPs). Several proteins with different isoelectric points and molecular weights were employed to demonstrate a versatility of our assembly method while a series of esterified derivatives of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) were synthesized to evaluate the interaction between proteins and polymers. Our data indicated that the polymers containing pyridine residues can successfully assemble with proteins, and the mechanism is mainly governed by hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions. This in turn helps retaining proteins' folding conformation and functionality, which are also demonstrated in the in vitro/in vivo cellular uptake of the PPCS-NPs in endothelial cells. The last part of the dissertation focuses on the self-assembly of the bienzyme-polymer NPs. Glucose oxidase (GOX) together with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were employed to construct bienzyme

  9. Nanoscale indentation of polymer and composite polymer-silica core-shell submicrometer particles by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Armini, Silvia; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Whelan, Caroline M; Maex, Karen; Higashitani, Ko

    2007-02-13

    Atomic force microscopy was employed to probe the mechanical properties of surface-charged polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based terpolymer and composite terpolymer core-silica shell particles in air and water media. The composite particles were achieved with two different approaches: using a silane coupling agent (composite A) or attractive electrostatic interactions (composite B) between the core and the shell. Young's moduli (E) of 4.3+/-0.7, 11.1+/-1.7, and 8.4+/-1.7 GPa were measured in air for the PMMA-based terpolymer, composite A, and composite B, respectively. In water, E decreases to 1.6+/-0.2 GPa for the terpolymer; it shows a slight decrease to 8.0+/-1.2 GPa for composite A, while it decreases to 2.9+/-0.6 GPa for composite B. This trend is explained by considering a 50% swelling of the polymer in water confirmed by dynamic light scattering. Close agreement is found between the absolute values of elastic moduli determined by nanoindentation and known values for the corresponding bulk materials. The thickness of the silica coating affects the mechanical properties of composite A. In the case of composite B, because the silica shell consists of separate particles free to move in the longitudinal direction that do not individually deform when the entire composite deforms, the elastic properties of the composites are determined exclusively by the properties of the polymer core. These results provide a basis for tailoring the mechanical properties of polymer and composite particles in air and in solution, essential in the design of next-generation abrasive schemes for several technological applications.

  10. Chemical compositions of solid particles present in the Greenland NEEM ice core over the last 110,000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyabu, Ikumi; Iizuka, Yoshinori; Fischer, Hubertus; Schüpbach, Simon; Gfeller, Gideon; Svensson, Anders; Fukui, Manabu; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder; Hansson, Margareta

    2015-09-01

    This study reports the chemical composition of particles present along Greenland's North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core, back to 110,000 years before present. Insoluble and soluble particles larger than 0.45 µm were extracted from the ice core by ice sublimation, and their chemical composition was analyzed using scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. We show that the dominant insoluble components are silicates, whereas NaCl, Na2SO4, CaSO4, and CaCO3 represent major soluble salts. For the first time, particles of CaMg(CO3)2 and Ca(NO3)2•4H2O are identified in a Greenland ice core. The chemical speciation of salts varies with past climatic conditions. Whereas the fraction of Na salts (NaCl + Na2SO4) exceeds that of Ca salts (CaSO4 + CaCO3) during the Holocene (0.6-11.7 kyr B.P.), the two fractions are similar during the Bølling-Allerød period (12.9-14.6 kyr B.P.). During cold climate such as over the Younger Dryas (12.0-12.6 kyr B.P.) and the Last Glacial Maximum (15.0-26.9 kyr B.P.), the fraction of Ca salts exceeds that of Na salts, showing that the most abundant ion generally controls the salt budget in each period. High-resolution analyses reveal changing particle compositions: those in Holocene ice show seasonal changes, and those in LGM ice show a difference between cloudy bands and clear layers, which again can be largely explained by the availability of ionic components in the atmospheric aerosol body of air masses reaching Greenland.

  11. Application of hepatitis B core particles produced by human primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PLC/342) propagated in nude mice to the determination of anti-HBc by passive hemagglutination.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Itoh, Y; Tsuda, F; Matsui, T; Tanaka, T; Miyamoto, H; Naitoh, S; Imai, M; Usuda, S; Nakamura, T

    1986-05-22

    Human primary hepatocellular carcinoma (PLC/342), carried by nude mice, produces hepatitis B core particles as well as hepatitis B surface antigen particles. Core particles purified form PLC/342 tumors displayed epitopes of hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAg) but not epitopes of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) on their surface, unlike core particles prepared from Dane particles, derived from plasma of asymptomatic carriers, that expressed epitopes of both HBcAg and HBeAg. Core particles obtained from PLC/342 tumors were applied to the determination of antibody to HBcAg (anti-HBc) by passive hemagglutination. The assay detected anti-HBc not only in individuals with persistent infection with hepatitis B virus and in those who had recovered from transient infection, but also in patients with acute type B hepatitis, indicating that it can detect anti-HBc of either IgG or IgM class. A liberal availability of core particles from tumors carried by nude mice, taken together with an easy applicability of the method, would make the passive hemagglutination for anti-HBc a valuable tool in clinical and epidemiological studies, especially in places where sophisticated methods are not feasible.

  12. ATP-dependent incorporation of 20S protease into the 26S complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, E; Ganoth, D; Armon, T; Hershko, A

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-dependent 26S protease complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin is formed by the assembly of three factors in an ATP-requiring process. We now identify one of the factors as the 20S "multicatalytic" protease, a complex of low molecular weight subunits widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. Comparison of the subunit compositions of purified 20S and 26S complexes indicates that the former is an integral part of the latter. By the use of detergent treatment to activate latent protease activity, we show that the 20S protease becomes incorporated into the 26S complex in the ATP-dependent assembly process. It thus seems that the 20S protease is the "catalytic core" of the 26S complex of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:2554287

  13. Core-shell diode array for high performance particle detectors and imaging sensors: status of the development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, G.; Hübner, U.; Dellith, J.; Dellith, A.; Stolz, R.; Plentz, J.; Andrä, G.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a novel high performance radiation detector and imaging sensor by a ground-breaking core-shell diode array design. This novel core-shell diode array are expected to have superior performance respect to ultrahigh radiation hardness, high sensitivity, low power consumption, fast signal response and high spatial resolution simultaneously. These properties are highly desired in fundamental research such as high energy physics (HEP) at CERN, astronomy and future x-ray based protein crystallography at x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) etc.. This kind of detectors will provide solutions for these fundamental research fields currently limited by instrumentations. In this work, we report our progress on the development of core-shell diode array for the applications as high performance imaging sensors and particle detectors. We mainly present our results in the preparation of high aspect ratio regular silicon rods by metal assisted wet chemical etching technique. Nearly 200 μm deep and 2 μm width channels with high aspect ratio have been etched into silicon. This result will open many applications not only for the core-shell diode array, but also for a high density integration of 3D microelectronics devices.

  14. Improving Powder Magnetic Core Properties via Application of Thin, Insulating Silica-Nanosheet Layers on Iron Powder Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ishizaki, Toshitaka; Nakano, Hideyuki; Tajima, Shin; Takahashi, Naoko

    2016-01-01

    A thin, insulating layer with high electrical resistivity is vital to achieving high performance of powder magnetic cores. Using layer-by-layer deposition of silica nanosheets or colloidal silica over insulating layers composed of strontium phosphate and boron oxide, we succeeded in fabricating insulating layers with high electrical resistivity on iron powder particles, which were subsequently used to prepare toroidal cores. The compact density of these cores decreased after coating with colloidal silica due to the substantial increase in the volume, causing the magnetic flux density to deteriorate. Coating with silica nanosheets, on the other hand, resulted in a higher electrical resistivity and a good balance between high magnetic flux density and low iron loss due to the thinner silica layers. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the thickness of the colloidal silica coating was about 700 nm, while that of the silica nanosheet coating was 30 nm. There was one drawback to using silica nanosheets, namely a deterioration in the core mechanical strength. Nevertheless, the silica nanosheet coating resulted in nanoscale-thick silica layers that are favorable for enhancing the electrical resistivity. PMID:28336835

  15. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S

    2015-02-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.

  16. Oxygen Reduction on Well-Defined Core-Shell Nanocatalysts: Particle Size, Facet, and Pt Shell Thickness Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.X.; Inada, H.; Wu, L.; Zhu, Y.; Choi, Y.; Liu, P.; Zhou, W.-P.; Adzic, R.R.

    2009-11-09

    We examined the effects of the thickness of the Pt shell, lattice mismatch, and particle size on specific and mass activities from the changes in effective surface area and activity for oxygen reduction induced by stepwise Pt-monolayer depositions on Pd and Pd{sub 3}Co nanoparticles. The core?shell structure was characterized at the atomic level using Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with element-sensitive electron energy loss spectroscopy. The enhancements in specific activity are largely attributed to the compressive strain effect based on the density functional theory calculations using a nanoparticle model, revealing the effect of nanosize-induced surface contraction on facet-dependent oxygen binding energy. The results suggest that moderately compressed (111) facets are most conducive to oxygen reduction reaction on small nanoparticles and indicate the importance of concerted structure and component optimization for enhancing core?shell nanocatalysts activity and durability.

  17. Quantitative cellular uptake of double fluorescent core-shelled model submicronic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leclerc, Lara; Boudard, Delphine; Pourchez, Jérémie; Forest, Valérie; Marmuse, Laurence; Louis, Cédric; Bin, Valérie; Palle, Sabine; Grosseau, Philippe; Bernache-Assollant, Didier; Cottier, Michèle

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between particles' physicochemical parameters, their uptake by cells and their degree of biological toxicity represent a crucial issue, especially for the development of new technologies such as fabrication of micro- and nanoparticles in the promising field of drug delivery systems. This work was aimed at developing a proof-of-concept for a novel model of double fluorescence submicronic particles that could be spotted inside phagolysosomes. Fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) particles were synthesized and then conjugated with a fluorescent pHrodo™ probe, red fluorescence of which increases in acidic conditions such as within lysosomes. After validation in acellular conditions by spectral analysis with confocal microscopy and dynamic light scattering, quantification of phagocytosis was conducted on a macrophage cell line in vitro. The biological impact of pHrodo functionalization (cytotoxicity, inflammatory response, and oxidative stress) was also investigated. Results validate the proof-of-concept of double fluorescent particles (FITC + pHrodo), allowing detection of entirely engulfed pHrodo particles (green and red labeling). Moreover incorporation of pHrodo had no major effects on cytotoxicity compared to particles without pHrodo, making them a powerful tool for micro- and nanotechnologies.

  18. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based multifunctional optical system for trapping, position sensing, and detection of fluorescent particles.

    PubMed

    Shinoj, V K; Murukeshan, V M

    2012-05-15

    We demonstrate a novel multifunctional optical system that is capable of trapping, imaging, position sensing, and fluorescence detection of micrometer-sized fluorescent test particles using hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). This multifunctional optical system for trapping, position sensing, and fluorescent detection is designed such that a near-IR laser light is used to create an optical trap across a liquid-filled HC-PCF, and a 473 nm laser is employed as a source for fluorescence excitation. This proposed system and the obtained results are expected to significantly enable an efficient integrated trapping platform employing HC-PCF for diagnostic biomedical applications.

  19. Structural variation of solid core and thickness of porous shell of 1.7 μm core-shell silica particles on chromatographic performance: narrow bore columns.

    PubMed

    Omamogho, Jesse O; Hanrahan, John P; Tobin, Joe; Glennon, Jeremy D

    2011-04-15

    Chromatographic and mass transfer kinetic properties of three narrow bore columns (2.1×50 mm) packed with new core-shell 1.7 μm EIROSHELL™-C(18) (EiS-C(18)) particles have been studied. The particles in each column varied in the solid-core to shell particle size ratio (ρ), of 0.59, 0.71 and 0.82, with a porous silica shell thickness of 350, 250 and 150 nm respectively. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), Coulter counter analysis, gas pycnometry, nitrogen sorption analysis and inverse size exclusion chromatography (ISEC) elucidated the physical properties of these materials. The porosity measurement of the packed HILIC and C(18) modified phases provided the means to estimate the phase ratios of the three different shell columns (EiS-150-C(18), EiS-250-C(18) and EiS-350-C(18)). The dependence of the chromatographic performance to the volume fraction of the porous shell was observed for all three columns. The naphtho[2,3-a]pyrene retention factor of k'∼10 on the three EiS-C(18s) employed to obtain the height equivalents to theoretical plates (HETPs) data were achieved by varying the mobile phase compositions and applying the Wilke and Chang relationship to obtain a parallel reduced linear velocity. The Knox fit model gave the coefficient of the reduce HETPs for the three EiS-C(18s). The reduced plate height minimum h(min)=1.9 was achieved for the EiS-150-C(18) column, and generated an efficiency of over 350,000 N/m and h(min)=2.5 equivalent to an efficiency of 200,000 N/m for the EiS-350-C(18) column. The efficiency loss of the EiS-C18 column emanating from the system extra-column volume was discussed with respect to the porous shell thickness.

  20. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  1. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  2. Core and grain boundary sensitivity of tungsten-oxide sensor devices by molecular beam assisted particle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huelser, T. P.; Lorke, A.; Ifeacho, P.; Wiggers, H.; Schulz, C.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the synthesis of WO3 and WOx (2.6≥x≤2.8) by adding different concentrations of tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) into a H2/O2/Ar premixed flame within a low-pressure reactor equipped with a particle-mass spectrometer (PMS). The PMS results show that mean particle diameters dp between 5 and 9 nm of the as-synthesized metal-oxides can be obtained by varying the residence time and precursor concentration in the reactor. This result is further validated by N2 adsorption measurements on the particle surface, which yielded a 91 m2/g surface area, corresponding to a spherical particle diameter of 9 nm (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller technique). H2/O2 ratios of 1.6 and 0.63 are selected to influence the stoichiometry of the powders, resulting in blue-colored WOx and white WO3 respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the as-synthesized materials indicates that the powders are mostly amorphous, and the observed broad reflexes can be attributed to the orthorhombic structure of β-WO3. Thermal annealing at 973 K for 3 h in air resulted in crystalline WO3 comprised of both monoclinic and orthorhombic phases. The transmission electron microscope micrograph analysis shows that the particles exhibit spherical morphology with some degree of agglomeration. Impedance spectroscopy is used for the electrical characterization of tungsten-oxide thin films with a thickness of 50 nm. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent gas-sensing properties of the material deposited on interdigital capacitors are investigated. Sensitivity experiments reveal two contributions to the overall sensitivity, which result from the surface and the core of each particle.

  3. Photovoltaic Properties of CdSe/CdS and CdS/CdSe Core-Shell Particles Synthesized by Use of Uninterrupted Precipitation Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selene Coria-Monroy, C.; Sotelo-Lerma, M.; Martínez-Alonso, Claudia; Moreno-Romero, Paola M.; Rodríguez-Castañeda, Carlos A.; Corona-Corona, Israel; Hu, Hailin

    2015-10-01

    Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and cadmium sulfide (CdS) are good electron acceptors for hybrid solar cells. CdSe and CdS nanoparticles can be prepared at low temperatures (60-80°C) from alkaline aqueous solutions of a cadmium salt, sodium citrate, and thiourea, as sulfur source, or sodium selenosulfate, as selenium source. Under the same experimental conditions, the reaction kinetics for CdS were faster than for CdSe. Formation of CdSe/CdS core-shell particles (type I: CdSe as core and CdS as shell) could be achieved by use of an uninterrupted one-step process by setting high and low solution temperatures for the core and shell compounds, respectively. The yield of the CdSe product was higher at a pH 8.5-9.5 whereas that of the CdS product was higher at higher pH (10-11). Therefore, formation of the "inverse" CdS/CdSe structure (type II: CdS as core and CdSe as shell) was possible in a one-step solution process by choosing a high solution pH for the core and a lower pH for the shell. Photoluminescence spectra and electron micrographs confirmed formation of the two types of core-shell particle. The photovoltaic performance of heterojunctions prepared with core-shell particles and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), also suggested formation of core-shell particles. Both the photovoltage and photocurrent density of hybrid solar cells depended on the shell compound and not on the core. It was shown that the interface of the heterojunctions plays is important in solar cell applications, and its modification could be realized by incorporating different shell compounds on core particles.

  4. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of surface-modified nano-sized core/shell tin particles for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Schmuelling, Guido; Oehl, Nikolas; Knipper, Martin; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna; Plaggenborg, Thorsten; Meyer, Hinrich-Wilhelm; Placke, Tobias; Parisi, Jürgen; Winter, Martin

    2014-09-05

    Tin is able to lithiate and delithiate reversibly with a high theoretical specific capacity, which makes it a promising candidate to supersede graphite as the state-of-the-art negative electrode material in lithium ion battery technology. Nevertheless, it still suffers from poor cycling stability and high irreversible capacities. In this contribution, we show the synthesis of three different nano-sized core/shell-type particles with crystalline tin cores and different amorphous surface shells consisting of SnOx and organic polymers. The spherical size and the surface shell can be tailored by adjusting the synthesis temperature and the polymer reagents in the synthesis, respectively. We determine the influence of the surface modifications with respect to the electrochemical performance and characterize the morphology, structure, and thermal properties of the nano-sized tin particles by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The electrochemical performance is investigated by constant current charge/discharge cycling as well as cyclic voltammetry.

  5. The optical Tamm states at the interface between a photonic crystal and a nanocomposite containing core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetrov, S. Ya; Pankin, P. S.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the optical Tamm states (OTSs) localized at the interface between a photonic crystal (PC) and a nanocomposite consisting of spherical nanoparticles with a dielectric core and a metallic shell, which are dispersed in a transparent matrix, and is characterized by the resonance permittivity. Spectra of transmission, reflection, and absorption of normally incident light waves by the investigated structure are calculated. The spectral manifestation of the Tamm states caused by negative values of the real part of the effective permittivity in the visible spectral range is studied. It is demonstrated that, along with the significantly extended band gap of the PC, the transmission spectrum contains an additional stopband caused by nanocomposite absorption near the resonance frequency. It is shown that the OTSs can be implemented in two band gaps of the PCs, each corresponding to a certain plasmon resonance frequency of the nanocomposite. It is established that the characteristics of the Tamm state localized at the edge of the PCs significantly depend on the ratio between the particle core volume and the total particle volume.

  6. Tandem Fusion of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Allows Assembly of Virus-Like Particles in Bacteria and Plants with Enhanced Capacity to Accommodate Foreign Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Peyret, Hadrien; Gehin, Annick; Thuenemann, Eva C.; Blond, Donatienne; El Turabi, Aadil; Beales, Lucy; Clarke, Dean; Gilbert, Robert J. C.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.; Holmes, Kris; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Whelan, Mike; Rosenberg, William; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rowlands, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The core protein of the hepatitis B virus, HBcAg, assembles into highly immunogenic virus-like particles (HBc VLPs) when expressed in a variety of heterologous systems. Specifically, the major insertion region (MIR) on the HBcAg protein allows the insertion of foreign sequences, which are then exposed on the tips of surface spike structures on the outside of the assembled particle. Here, we present a novel strategy which aids the display of whole proteins on the surface of HBc particles. This strategy, named tandem core, is based on the production of the HBcAg dimer as a single polypeptide chain by tandem fusion of two HBcAg open reading frames. This allows the insertion of large heterologous sequences in only one of the two MIRs in each spike, without compromising VLP formation. We present the use of tandem core technology in both plant and bacterial expression systems. The results show that tandem core particles can be produced with unmodified MIRs, or with one MIR in each tandem dimer modified to contain the entire sequence of GFP or of a camelid nanobody. Both inserted proteins are correctly folded and the nanobody fused to the surface of the tandem core particle (which we name tandibody) retains the ability to bind to its cognate antigen. This technology paves the way for the display of natively folded proteins on the surface of HBc particles either through direct fusion or through non-covalent attachment via a nanobody. PMID:25830365

  7. Preparation of nanosized drug particles by the coating of inorganic cores: naproxen and ketoprofen on alumina.

    PubMed

    Joguet, Laurent; Sondi, Ivan; Matijević, Egon

    2002-07-15

    Nanosized alumina particles with modal diameters of 8 and 13 nm, respectively, were successfully coated by the adsorption of naproxen [(+)-6-methoxy-alpha-methyl-2-naphthalene acetic acid] and ketoprofen [alpha-methyl-3-(4-methylbenzoil) benzene acetic acid] in aqueous and ethanol solutions. The presence of the drugs at the alumina surface was confirmed by attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy and electrokinetic measurements, while their bound amounts were assessed by thermogravimetric analysis.

  8. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    DOE PAGES

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; ...

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated withmore » the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.« less

  9. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated with the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.

  10. Novel co-axial prilling technique for the development of core-shell particles as delayed drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Auriemma, Giulia; Russo, Paola; Mencherini, Teresa; Campiglia, Pietro; Stigliani, Mariateresa; Aquino, Rita Patrizia

    2014-08-01

    In this study, biocompatible double layered beads consisting of pectin core and alginate shell were prepared through a single step manufacturing process based on prilling apparatus equipped with co-axial nozzles. The core was loaded with piroxicam (PRX) as model non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Morphology, size distribution and shape of the double layered beads varied depending on the operative conditions and polymer concentrations. Co-axial nozzles size, applied vibration frequency, gelling conditions and, mainly, polymers mass ratio were identified as critical variables. Particularly, the relative viscosity of polymeric feed solutions inside the nozzle was the key parameter to obtain homogeneous and well-formed coated particles. The produced beads were investigated for the release kinetic in different media. Once PRX was encapsulated within the pectin core, a controlled release pattern was observed. Particularly, beads produced with 4:1 core/shell ratio (F4) released less than 30% of PRX in simulated gastric fluid (SGF) while total liberation of the drug was achieved during the next 3h in simulated intestinal fluid (SIF). More interesting, F4 tested in SIF was able to release drug in a delayed and sustained manner at established time points (2h_8.2%, 3h_32.2%, 4h_70.1% and 5h_about 100%). Based on the above results, co-axial prilling approach is expected to provide success in manufacturing systems with delayed drug release profiles. Such systems may be potentially useful in targeting diseases which are affected by the circadian rhythm, such as chronic inflammation.

  11. Isocratic and gradient impedance plot analysis and comparison of some recently introduced large size core-shell and fully porous particles.

    PubMed

    Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Cabooter, Deirdre; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2013-10-18

    The intrinsic kinetic performance of three recently commercialized large size (≥4μm) core-shell particles packed in columns with different lengths has been measured and compared with that of standard fully porous particles of similar and smaller size (5 and 3.5μm, respectively). The kinetic performance is compared in both absolute (plot of t0 versus the plate count N or the peak capacity np for isocratic and gradient elution, respectively) and dimensionless units. The latter is realized by switching to so-called impedance plots, a format which has been previously introduced (as a plot of t0/N(2) or E0 versus Nopt/N) and has in the present study been extended from isocratic to gradient elution (where the impedance plot corresponds to a plot of t0/np(4) versus np,opt(2)/np(2)). Both the isocratic and gradient impedance plot yielded a very similar picture: the clustered impedance plot curves divide into two distinct groups, one for the core-shell particles (lowest values, i.e. best performance) and one for the fully porous particles (highest values), confirming the clear intrinsic kinetic advantage of core-shell particles. If used around their optimal flow rate, the core-shell particles displayed a minimal separation impedance that is about 40% lower than the fully porous particles. Even larger gains in separation speed can be achieved in the C-term regime.

  12. Characterization of exposures to nanoscale particles and fibers during solid core drilling of hybrid carbon nanotube advanced composites.

    PubMed

    Bello, Dhimiter; Wardle, Brian L; Zhang, Jie; Yamamoto, Namiko; Santeufemio, Christopher; Hallock, Marilyn; Virji, M Abbas

    2010-01-01

    This work investigated exposures to nanoparticles and nanofibers during solid core drilling of two types of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT)-hybrid composites: (1) reinforced plastic hybrid laminates (alumina fibers and CNT); and (2) graphite-epoxy composites (carbon fibers and CNT). Multiple real-time instruments were used to characterize the size distribution (5.6 nm to 20 microm), number and mass concentration, particle-bound polyaromatic hydrocarbons (b-PAHs), and surface area of airborne particles at the source and breathing zone. Time-integrated samples included grids for electron microscopy characterization of particle morphology and size resolved (2 nm to 20 microm) samples for the quantification of metals. Several new important findings herein include generation of airborne clusters of CNTs not seen during saw-cutting of similar composites, fewer nanofibers and respirable fibers released, similarly high exposures to nanoparticles with less dependence on the composite thickness, and ultrafine (< 5 nm) aerosol originating from thermal degradation of the composite material.

  13. Preparation of bovine serum albumin surface-imprinted submicrometer particles with magnetic susceptibility through core-shell miniemulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chau Jin; Chua, Hong Gap; Ker, Kwee Hong; Tong, Yen Wah

    2008-02-01

    Molecular imprinting is a state-of-the-art technique for preparing mimics of natural, biological receptors. Nevertheless, the imprinting of macromolecules like proteins remains a challenge due to their bulkiness and sensitivity to denaturation. In this work, a surface imprinting strategy based on covalently immobilized template molecules was adopted for protein imprinting. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) surface-imprinted submicrometer particles (500-600 nm) with magnetic susceptibility were prepared through a two-stage core-shell miniemulsion polymerization system using methyl methacrylate and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as functional and cross-linking monomers, respectively. The particles possessed a novel red blood cell-like structure and exhibited a very favorable recognition property toward the template BSA molecules in aqueous medium. In a two-protein system, the particles had shown a very high specific recognition of the template proteins over the nontemplate proteins. The magnetic susceptibility was imparted through the successful encapsulation of Fe3O4 nanoparticles. Their superparamagnetic nature increases their potential applications in the fields such as magnetic bioseparation, cell labeling, and bioimaging. In addition, the importance of template immobilization for successful protein imprinting had also been illustrated to demonstrate the potential of this approach as a general methodology for protein imprinting.

  14. 3.9 Å structure of the nucleosome core particle determined by phase-plate cryo-EM

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Eugene Y.D.; Vogirala, Vinod K.; Inian, Oviya; Wong, Andrew S.W.; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Plitzko, Juergen M.; Danev, Radostin; Sandin, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The Volta phase plate is a recently developed electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) device that enables contrast enhancement of biological samples. Here we have evaluated the potential of combining phase-plate imaging and single particle analysis to determine the structure of a small protein–DNA complex. To test the method, we made use of a 200 kDa Nucleosome Core Particle (NCP) reconstituted with 601 DNA for which a high-resolution X-ray crystal structure is known. We find that the phase plate provides a significant contrast enhancement that permits individual NCPs and DNA to be clearly identified in amorphous ice. The refined structure from 26,060 particles has an overall resolution of 3.9 Å and the density map exhibits structural features consistent with the estimated resolution, including clear density for amino acid side chains and DNA features such as the phosphate backbone. Our results demonstrate that phase-plate cryo-EM promises to become an important method to determine novel near-atomic resolution structures of small and challenging samples, such as nucleosomes in complex with nucleosome-binding factors. PMID:27563056

  15. Synthesis of Nanostructured/Macroscopic Low-Density Copper Foams Based on Metal-Coated Polymer Core-Shell Particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Ho; Bazin, Nick; Shaw, Jessica I; Yoo, Jae-Hyuck; Worsley, Marcus A; Satcher, Joe H; Sain, John D; Kuntz, Joshua D; Kucheyev, Sergei O; Baumann, Theodore F; Hamza, Alex V

    2016-12-21

    A robust, millimeter-sized low-density Cu foam with ∼90% (v/v) porosity, ∼30 nm thick walls, and ∼1 μm diameter spherical pores is prepared by the slip-casting of metal-coated polymer core-shell particles followed by a thermal removal of the polymer. In this paper, we report our key findings that enable the development of the low-density Cu foams. First, we need to synthesize polystyrene (PS) particles coated with a very thin Cu layer (in the range of tens of nanometers). A simple reduction in the amount of Cu deposited onto the PS was not sufficient to form such a low-density Cu foams due to issues related to foam collapse and densification upon the subsequent polymer removal step. Precise control over the morphology of the Cu coating on the particles is essential for the synthesis of a lower density of foams. Second, improving the dispersion of PS-Cu particles in a suspension used for the casting as well as careful optimization of a baking condition minimize the formation of irregular large voids, leading to Cu foams with a more uniform packing and a better connectivity of neighboring Cu hollow shells. Finally, we analyzed mechanical properties of the Cu foams with a depth-sensing indentation test. The uniform Cu foams show a significant improvement in mechanical properties (∼1.5× modulus and ∼3× hardness) compared to those of uncontrolled foam samples with a similar foam density but irregular large voids. Higher surface areas and a good electric conductivity of the Cu foams present a great potential to future applications.

  16. Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles and polystyrene: a highly versatile approach to the preparation of colloidal particles with polystyrene cores and gold nanoparticle coronae.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia; Jin, Jie; Zheng, Fan; Zhao, Hanying

    2010-06-01

    Colloidal particles with polystyrene (PS) cores and gold nanoparticle (AuNP) coronae were prepared on the basis of the self-assembly of AuNP's and PS. Citrate-stabilized AuNP's were dispersed in aqueous solution, and PS with thiol terminal groups (PS-SH) was dissolved in toluene. A stable emulsion was obtained by mixing the two solutions. Optical microscope images indicate that after grafting of PS-SH to the citrate-stabilized AuNP's at liquid-liquid interface, the interfacial tension is reduced and the average size of toluene droplets in the emulsion decreases. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) results also prove the grafting of PS-SH to AuNP's and the location of the hybrid nanoparticles at the liquid-liquid interface. Colloidal particles with PS cores and AuNP coronae were prepared by adding the emulsion to excess methanol. The weight ratio of PS-SH to AuNP exerts a significant effect on the size of colloidal particles. TEM and dynamic light scattering results both indicate that the size of colloidal particles increases with the weight ratio. The application of the core-shell-structured colloidal particles to protein separation was also investigated in this research. Colloidal particles with PS-coated magnetic nanoparticles in the cores were also prepared by this strategy.

  17. Density functional formulation of the random-phase approximation for inhomogeneous fluids: Application to the Gaussian core and Coulomb particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydel, Derek; Ma, Manman

    2016-06-01

    Using the adiabatic connection, we formulate the free energy in terms of the correlation function of a fictitious system, hλ(r ,r') , in which interactions λ u (r ,r') are gradually switched on as λ changes from 0 to 1. The function hλ(r ,r') is then obtained from the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation and the two equations constitute a general liquid-state framework for treating inhomogeneous fluids. The two equations do not yet constitute a closed set. In the present work we use the closure cλ(r ,r') ≈-λ β u (r ,r') , known as the random-phase approximation (RPA). We demonstrate that the RPA is identical with the variational Gaussian approximation derived within the field-theoretical framework, originally derived and used for charged particles. We apply our generalized RPA approximation to the Gaussian core model and Coulomb charges.

  18. Silicate core-organic refractory mantle particles as interstellar dust and as aggregated in comets and stellar disks.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J M; Li, A

    1997-01-01

    The principal observational properties of silicate core-organic refractory mantle interstellar dust grains in the infrared at 3.4 microns and at 10 microns and 20 microns are discussed in terms of the cyclic evolution of particles forming in stellar atmospheres and undergoing subsequent accretion, photoprocessing and destruction (erosion). Laboratory plus space emulation of the photoprocessing of laboratory analog ices and refractories are discussed. The aggregated interstellar dust model of comets is summarized. The same properties required to explain the temperature and infrared properties of comet coma dust are shown to be needed to account for the infrared silicate and continuum emission of the beta Pictoris disk as produced by a cloud of comets orbiting the star.

  19. Screen of multifunctional monoclonal antibodies against hepatitis B core virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chang; Ding, Fei-Xiang; Wang, Fang; He, Xiao-Wen; He, Ying; Li, Zhao-Shen; Sun, Shu-Han

    2009-06-01

    HBc-VLP can be used in an epitope presentation system to carry foreign epitopes and mimic live virus in order to study viral particle uptake, virion-mediated activation and antigen presentation by dendritic cells. In this study, a multifunctional mAb was produced using a novel research strategy. A truncated HBc-VLP bone vector with a special conformation was used as an immunogen and the target hybridoma cell lines were screened by a series of tests; including ELISA, Western blot, and cellular immunofluorescence based on the epitope presentation system. The screened monoclonal antibody was used to identify the HBc-VLP vector, a fusion HBc-VLP vaccine, and intracellular HBV capsids. The new strategy facilitated acquisition of the desired mAbs and will serve as a reference for other VLP-related research.

  20. Nano-magnetic particles used in biomedicine: core and coating materials.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Z; Karimi, L; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications have been developed by many researchers. Separation, immunoassay, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia are enhanced by the use of suitable magnetic nanoparticles and coating materials in the form of ferrofluids. Due to their low biocompatibility and low dispersion in water solutions, nanoparticles that are used for biomedical applications require surface treatment. Various kinds of coating materials including organic materials (polymers), inorganic metals (gold, platinum) or metal oxides (aluminum oxide, cobalt oxide) have been attracted during the last few years. Based on the recent advances and the importance of nanomedicine in human life, this paper attempts to give a brief summary on the different ferrite nano-magnetic particles and coatings used in nanomedicine.

  1. The mutable nature of particle-core excitations with spin in the one-valence-proton nucleus 133Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchi, G.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Colò, G.; Bortignon, P. F.; Bottoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Régis, J.-M.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Fraile, L. M.; Lozeva, R.; Belvito, B.; Benzoni, G.; Bruce, A.; Carroll, R.; Cieplicka-Oryǹczak, N.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Didierjean, F.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Kröll, T.; Lalkovski, S.; Mach, H.; Mărginean, N.; Melon, B.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Nannini, A.; Napoli, D.; Olaizola, B.; Paziy, V.; Podolyák, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Saed-Samii, N.; Szpak, B.; Vedia, V.

    2016-09-01

    The γ-ray decay of excited states of the one-valence-proton nucleus 133Sb has been studied using cold-neutron induced fission of 235U and 241Pu targets, during the EXILL campaign at the ILL reactor in Grenoble. By using a highly efficient HPGe array, coincidences between γ-rays prompt with the fission event and those delayed up to several tens of microseconds were investigated, allowing to observe, for the first time, high-spin excited states above the 16.6 μs isomer. Lifetimes analysis, performed by fast-timing techniques with LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, revealed a difference of almost two orders of magnitude in B(M1) strength for transitions between positive-parity medium-spin yrast states. The data are interpreted by a newly developed microscopic model which takes into account couplings between core excitations (both collective and non-collective) of the doubly magic nucleus 132Sn and the valence proton, using the Skyrme effective interaction in a consistent way. The results point to a fast change in the nature of particle-core excitations with increasing spin.

  2. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Santosh P; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D; Govindarajan, J

    2013-02-01

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a = 25 cm and major radius, R = 75 cm) using a 45° parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and ΔE∕E of high-energy channel has been found to be ∼10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature Ti(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically Te(0) ∼ 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  3. Synthesis of polystyrene core/SiO2 shell composite particles and fabrication of SiO2 capsules out of them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terekhin, V.

    2017-01-01

    Systemic studies on the dependence of the morphology of polystyrene core/SiO2 shell composite particles on the conditions of their fabrication have been performed. Spherical polystyrene particles synthesized in the presence of a cationic initiator of polymerization were used as cores. SiO2 shells were formed by modified Stober’s method. Exposure of the synthesized composite particles to high temperatures has been shown to cause destruction of their polystyrene core, thereby allowing the formation of mesoporous SiO2 capsules with a mean pore diameter of ~3 nm and specific surface area of ~270 m2/g. Model experiments on loading the SiO2 capsules with amoxicillin have been carried out. Spectrophotometry in the UV and visible spectral regions has been used to estimate the kinetics of amoxicillin release from the SiO2 capsules.

  4. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications.

  5. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications.

    PubMed

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-06-26

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications.

  6. Antiviral Activity of Gold/Copper Sulfide Core/Shell Nanoparticles against Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Broglie, Jessica Jenkins; Alston, Brittny; Yang, Chang; Ma, Lun; Adcock, Audrey F.; Chen, Wei; Yang, Liju

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide in a plethora of residential and commercial settings, including restaurants, schools, and hospitals. Methods for easily detecting the virus and for treating and preventing infection are critical to stopping norovirus outbreaks, and inactivation via nanoparticles (NPs) is a more universal and attractive alternative to other physical and chemical approaches. Using norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk) virus-like particles (VLPs) as a model viral system, this study characterized the antiviral activity of Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) against GI.1 VLPs for the rapid inactivation of HuNoV. Inactivation of VLPs (GI.1) by Au/CuS NPs evaluated using an absorbance-based ELISA indicated that treatment with 0.083 μM NPs for 10 min inactivated ~50% VLPs in a 0.37 μg/ml VLP solution and 0.83 μM NPs for 10 min completely inactivated the VLPs. Increasing nanoparticle concentration and/or VLP-NP contact time significantly increased the virucidal efficacy of Au/CuS NPs. Changes to the VLP particle morphology, size, and capsid protein were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The strategy reported here provides the first reported proof-of-concept Au/CuS NPs-based virucide for rapidly inactivating human norovirus. PMID:26474396

  7. Glucose sensing through Fano resonances in mesoscale silica core-gold shell particles arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pincella, Francesca; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a versatile, cheap and reusable plasmonic sensor able to detect glucose in the physiological concentration range by means of a simple label-free optical detection scheme. In order to achieve the aforementioned goal we applied a self-assembly deposition technique for the large-scale arraying of mesoscale gold nanoshell particles. Different from metallic nanospheres arrays, the localized surface plasmon resonances of gold nanoshells arrays extend in both the visible and near-infrared range, making them extremely promising for their use in biological media. Furthermore, the optical response of mesoscale gold nanoshells arrays showed another remarkable characteristic, which is the presence of various Fano resonances that have the advantage of enhancing the sensitivity of the plasmonic substrate to the external media thanks to their sharp features and increased spectral contrast. The plasmonic sensor was shown to have an extended working range with a good linear response for large refractive index shifts, where a bulk refractive index sensitivity of 0.93 RIU-1 (RIU, refractive index units) was achieved experimentally. In addition, the plasmonic sensor could detect aqueous glucose solutions in the blood concentration range (0-25 mM), with a sensitivity of 0.24 M-1.

  8. Preparation and characterization of polymer electrolyte membranes based on silicon-containing core-shell structured nanocomposite latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shuangling; Sun, Chenggang; Gao, Yushan; Cui, Xuejun

    2015-09-01

    A series of silicon-containing core-shell structured polyacrylate/2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (SiO2-CS-PA/A) nanocomposite latex particles are prepared by the emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of acrylate monomers and various amount of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) with colloidal nanosilica particles as seed. The chemical and morphological structures of latex particles with high monomer conversion are determined using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SiO2-CS-PA/A nanocomposite membranes are fabricated through pouring the latex onto a clean surface of glass and drying at 60 °C for 10 h and 120 °C for 2 h. The nanocomposite membranes possess good thermal and dimensional stability. In addition, in comparison to Nafion® 117, the nanocomposite membranes exhibit moderate proton conductivity, significantly better methanol barrier and selectivity. The methanol diffusion coefficient is in the range of 1.03 × 10-8 to 5.26 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 which is about two orders of magnitude lower than that of Nafion® 117 (2.36 × 10-6 cm2 s-1). The SiO2-CS-PA/A 5 membrane shows the highest selectivity value (2.34 × 105 S cm-3) which is approximately 11.0 times of that (2.13 × 104 S cm-3) of Nafion® 117. These results indicate that the nanocomposite membranes are promising candidates to be used as polymer electrolyte membranes in direct methanol fuel cells.

  9. Wrinkle-assisted linear assembly of hard-core/soft-shell particles: impact of the soft shell on the local structure.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mareen; Karg, Matthias; Fortini, Andrea; Hellweg, Thomas; Fery, Andreas

    2012-04-07

    This article addresses wrinkle assisted assembly of core-shell particles with hard cores and soft poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) shells. As core materials we chose silica as well as silver nanoparticles. The assembled structures show that the soft shells act as a separator between the inorganic cores. Anisotropic alignment is found on two length scales, macroscopically guided through the wrinkle structure and locally due to deformation of the polymer shell leading to smaller inter-core separations as compared to assembly on flat substrates without confinement. The structures were analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy. Radial distribution functions are shown, clearly highlighting the impact of confinement on nearest neighbour distances and symmetry. The observed ordering is directly compared to Monte-Carlo simulations for hard-core/soft-shell particles, showing that the observed symmetries are a consequence of the soft interaction potential and differ qualitatively from a hard-sphere situation. For the silver-poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) particles, we show UV-vis absorbance measurements revealing optical anisotropy of the generated structures due to plasmon coupling. Furthermore, the high degree of order of the assembled structures on macroscopic areas is demonstrated by laser diffraction effects.

  10. Biomimetic synthesis of raspberry-like hybrid polymer-silica core-shell nanoparticles by templating colloidal particles with hairy polyamine shell.

    PubMed

    Pi, Mengwei; Yang, Tingting; Yuan, Jianjun; Fujii, Syuji; Kakigi, Yuichi; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Cheng, Shiyuan

    2010-07-01

    The nanoparticles composed of polystyrene core and poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] (PDEA) hairy shell were used as colloidal templates for in situ silica mineralization, allowing the well-controlled synthesis of hybrid silica core-shell nanoparticles with raspberry-like morphology and hollow silica nanoparticles by subsequent calcination. Silica deposition was performed by simply stirring a mixture of the polymeric core-shell particles in isopropanol, tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and water at 25 degrees C for 2.5h. No experimental evidence was found for nontemplated silica formation, which indicated that silica deposition occurred exclusively in the PDEA shell and formed PDEA-silica hybrid shell. The resulting hybrid silica core-shell particles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetry, aqueous electrophoresis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. TEM studies indicated that the hybrid particles have well-defined core-shell structure with raspberry morphology after silica deposition. We found that the surface nanostructure of hybrid nanoparticles and the composition distribution of PDEA-silica hybrid shell could be well controlled by adjusting the silicification conditions. These new hybrid core-shell nanoparticles and hollow silica nanoparticles would have potential applications for high-performance coatings, encapsulation and delivery of active organic molecules.

  11. Facile fabrication of core-shell structured magnetic Fe3O4/cross-linked polyphosphazene nanocomposite particles with high stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuzhe; Wang, Minghuan; Fu, Jianwei; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Qun

    2013-08-01

    We herein report a facile approach to the fabrication of core-shell structured magnetic Fe3O4/poly(cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol) nanocomposite particles via precipitation polymerization of comonomers hexachlorocyclotriphosphazene and 4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol in the presence of Fe3O4 nanopaticles. The morphology, composition, thermal property, and magnetic property of the magnetic nanocomposite particles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectra, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and vibrating sample magnetometer, respectively. Results indicated that the submicron-sized magnetic nanocomposite particles own core/shell structures, 410 °C of initial decomposition temperature under an air atmosphere, and 6.2 emu/g of saturation magnetization, which should make them have potential applications in biotechnology and catalyst supports. Furthermore, we also proposed a possible formation mechanism of these magnetic Fe3O4/PZS nanocomposite particles.

  12. Computational investigation of longitudinal diffusion, eddy dispersion, and trans-particle mass transfer in bulk, random packings of core-shell particles with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient.

    PubMed

    Daneyko, Anton; Hlushkou, Dzmitry; Baranau, Vasili; Khirevich, Siarhei; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2015-08-14

    In recent years, chromatographic columns packed with core-shell particles have been widely used for efficient and fast separations at comparatively low operating pressure. However, the influence of the porous shell properties on the mass transfer kinetics in core-shell packings is still not fully understood. We report on results obtained with a modeling approach to simulate three-dimensional advective-diffusive transport in bulk random packings of monosized core-shell particles, covering a range of reduced mobile phase flow velocities from 0.5 up to 1000. The impact of the effective diffusivity of analyte molecules in the porous shell and the shell thickness on the resulting plate height was investigated. An extension of Giddings' theory of coupled eddy dispersion to account for retention of analyte molecules due to stagnant regions in porous shells with zero mobile phase flow velocity is presented. The plate height equation involving a modified eddy dispersion term excellently describes simulated data obtained for particle-packings with varied shell thickness and shell diffusion coefficient. It is confirmed that the model of trans-particle mass transfer resistance of core-shell particles by Kaczmarski and Guiochon [42] is applicable up to a constant factor. We analyze individual contributions to the plate height from different mass transfer mechanisms in dependence of the shell parameters. The simulations demonstrate that a reduction of plate height in packings of core-shell relative to fully porous particles arises mainly due to reduced trans-particle mass transfer resistance and transchannel eddy dispersion.

  13. Incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides by a dNTP-binding cleft mutated reverse transcriptase in hepatitis B virus core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hee-Young; Kim, Hye-Young; Jung, Jaesung; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2008-01-05

    Our recent observation that hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase (P) might initiate minus-strand DNA synthesis without primer [Kim et al., (2004) Virology 322, 22-30], raised a possibility that HBV P protein may have the potential to function as an RNA polymerase. Thus, we mutated Phe 436, a bulky amino acid with aromatic side chain, at the putative dNTP-binding cleft in reverse transcriptase (RT) domain of P protein to smaller amino acids (Gly or Val), and examined RNA polymerase activity. HBV core particles containing RT dNTP-binding cleft mutant P protein were able to incorporate {sup 32}P-ribonucleotides, but not HBV core particles containing wild type (wt), priming-deficient mutant, or RT-deficient mutant P proteins. Since all the experiments were conducted with core particles isolated from transfected cells, our results indicate that the HBV RT mutant core particles containing RT dNTP-binding cleft mutant P protein could incorporate both deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides in replicating systems.

  14. Rapid Histone-Catalyzed DNA Lesion Excision and Accompanying Protein Modification in Nucleosomes and Nucleosome Core Particles.

    PubMed

    Weng, Liwei; Greenberg, Marc M

    2015-09-02

    C5'-Hydrogen atoms are frequently abstracted during DNA oxidation. The oxidized abasic lesion 5'-(2-phosphoryl-1,4-dioxobutane) (DOB) is an electrophilic product of the C5'-radical. DOB is a potent irreversible inhibitor of DNA polymerase β, and forms interstrand cross-links in free DNA. We examined the reactivity of DOB within nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles (NCPs), the monomeric component of chromatin. Depending upon the position at which DOB is generated within a NCP, it is excised from nucleosomal DNA at a rate 275-1500-fold faster than that in free DNA. The half-life of DOB (7.0-16.8 min) in NCPs is shorter than any other abasic lesion. DOB's lifetime in NCPs is also significantly shorter than the estimated lifetime of an abasic site within a cell, suggesting that the observed chemistry would occur intracellularly. Histones also catalyze DOB excision when the lesion is present in the DNA linker region of a nucleosome. Schiff-base formation between DOB and histone proteins is detected in nucleosomes and NCPs, resulting in pyrrolone formation at the lysine residues. The lysines modified by DOB are often post-translationally modified. Consequently, the histone modifications described herein could affect the regulation of gene expression and may provide a chemical basis for the cytotoxicity of the DNA damaging agents that produce this lesion.

  15. Chimeric Derivatives of Hepatitis B Virus Core Particles Carrying Major Epitopes of the Rubella Virus E1 Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Petraityte, Rasa; Sominskaya, Irina; Ose, Velta; Liekniņa, Ilva; Bogans, Janis; Sasnauskas, Kestutis

    2013-01-01

    Three variants of the major rubella virus (RV) E1 protein virus-neutralizing epitope from position 214 to 285 were exposed on the hepatitis B virus (HBV) C-terminally truncated core (HBcΔ) in a virus-like particle (VLP) vector and were produced in Escherichia coli. All three chimeras demonstrated VLPs in bacterial cell lysates, but only HBcΔ-E1(245-285) demonstrated the correct VLP structure after purification. The other chimeras, HBcΔ-E1(214-285) and HBcΔ-E1(214-240), appeared after purification as non-VLP aggregates of 100 to 900 nm in diameter according to dynamic light scattering data. All three variants possessed the intrinsic antigenic activity of RV E1, since they were recognized by natural human anti-RV E1 antibodies and induced an anti-RV E1 response in mice. HBcΔ-E1(214-240) and HBcΔ-E1(245-285) can be regarded as prototypes for a putative RV vaccine because they were able to induce antibodies recognizing natural RV E1 protein in RV diagnostic kits. PMID:24006140

  16. Induced self-energy on a static scalar charged particle in the spacetime of a global monopole with finite core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, D.; de Freitas, U.; Bezerra de Mello, E. R.

    2011-03-01

    We analyze the induced self-energy and self-force on a scalar point-like charged test particle placed at rest in the spacetime of a global monopole admitting a general spherically symmetric inner structure to it. In order to develop this analysis we calculate the three-dimensional Green's function associated with this physical system. We explicitly show that for points outside the monopole's core the scalar self-energy presents two distinct contributions. The first one is induced by the non-trivial topology of the global monopole considered as a point-like defect and the second is a correction induced by the non-vanishing inner structure attributed to it. For points inside the monopole, the self-energy also present a similar structure, where now the first contribution depends on the geometry of the spacetime inside. As illustrations of the general procedure adopted, two specific models, namely flower-pot and the ballpoint-pen, are considered for the region inside. For these two different situations, we were able to obtain exact expressions for the self-energies and self-forces in the regions outside and inside the global monopole.

  17. Inhibitory effect of presenilin inhibitor LY411575 on maturation of hepatitis C virus core protein, production of the viral particle and expression of host proteins involved in pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Otoguro, Teruhime; Tanaka, Tomohisa; Kasai, Hirotake; Yamashita, Atsuya; Moriishi, Kohji

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein is responsible for the formation of infectious viral particles and induction of pathogenicity. The C-terminal transmembrane region of the immature core protein is cleaved by signal peptide peptidase (SPP) for maturation of the core protein. SPP belongs to the family of presenilin-like aspartic proteases. Some presenilin inhibitors are expected to suppress HCV infection and production; however, this anti-HCV effect has not been investigated in detail. In this study, presenilin inhibitors were screened to identify anti-HCV compounds. Of the 13 presenilin inhibitors tested, LY411575 was the most potent inhibitor of SPP-dependent cleavage of HCV core protein. Production of intracellular core protein and supernatant infectious viral particles from HCV-infected cells was significantly impaired by LY411575 in a dose-dependent manner (half maximum inhibitory concentration = 0.27 μM, cytotoxic concentration of the extracts to cause death to 50% of viable cells > 10 μM). No effect of LY411575 on intracellular HCV RNA in the subgenomic replicon cells was detected. LY411575 synergistically promoted daclatasvir-dependent inhibition of viral production, but not that of viral replication. Furthermore, LY411575 inhibited HCV-related production of reactive oxygen species and expression of NADPH oxidases and vascular endothelial growth factor. Taken together, our data suggest that LY411575 suppresses HCV propagation through SPP inhibition and impairs host gene expressions related to HCV pathogenicity.

  18. Core-Shell Soy Protein-Soy Polysaccharide Complex (Nano)particles as Carriers for Improved Stability and Sustained Release of Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei-Ping; Ou, Shi-Yi; Tang, Chuan-He

    2016-06-22

    Using soy protein isolate (SPI) and soy-soluble polysaccharides (SSPS) as polymer matrixes, this study reported a novel process to fabricate unique core-shell complex (nano)particles to perform as carriers for curcumin (a typical poorly soluble bioactive). In the process, curcumin-SPI nanocomplexes were first formed at pH 7.0 and then coated by SSPS. At this pH, the core-shell complex was formed in a way the SPI nanoparticles might be incorporated into the interior of SSPS molecules without distinctly affecting the size and morphology of particles. The core-shell structure was distinctly changed by adjusting pH from 7.0 to 4.0. At pH 4.0, SSPS was strongly bound to the surface of highly aggregated SPI nanoparticles, and as a consequence, much larger complexes were formed. The bioaccessibility of curcumin in the SPI-curcumin complexes was unaffected by the SSPS coating. However, the core-shell complex formation greatly improved the thermal stability and controlled release properties of encapsulated curcumin. The improvement was much better at pH 4.0 than that at pH 7.0. All of the freeze-dried core-shell complex preparations exhibited good redispersion behavior. The findings provide a simple approach to fabricate food-grade delivery systems for improved water dispersion, heat stability, and even controlled release of poorly soluble bioactives.

  19. CHARGED-PARTICLE AND NEUTRON-CAPTURE PROCESSES IN THE HIGH-ENTROPY WIND OF CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect

    Farouqi, K.; Truran, J. W.; Kratz, K.-L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Rauscher, T.; Thielemann, F.-K. E-mail: truran@nova.uchicago.ed E-mail: k-l.Kratz@mpic.d E-mail: F-K.Thielemann@unibas.c

    2010-04-01

    The astrophysical site of the r-process is still uncertain, and a full exploration of the systematics of this process in terms of its dependence on nuclear properties from stability to the neutron drip-line within realistic stellar environments has still to be undertaken. Sufficiently high neutron-to-seed ratios can only be obtained either in very neutron-rich low-entropy environments or moderately neutron-rich high-entropy environments, related to neutron star mergers (or jets of neutron star matter) and the high-entropy wind of core-collapse supernova explosions. As chemical evolution models seem to disfavor neutron star mergers, we focus here on high-entropy environments characterized by entropy S, electron abundance Y{sub e} , and expansion velocity V{sub exp}. We investigate the termination point of charged-particle reactions, and we define a maximum entropy S{sub final} for a given V{sub exp} and Y{sub e} , beyond which the seed production of heavy elements fails due to the very small matter density. We then investigate whether an r-process subsequent to the charged-particle freeze-out can in principle be understood on the basis of the classical approach, which assumes a chemical equilibrium between neutron captures and photodisintegrations, possibly followed by a beta-flow equilibrium. In particular, we illustrate how long such a chemical equilibrium approximation holds, how the freeze-out from such conditions affects the abundance pattern, and which role the late capture of neutrons originating from beta-delayed neutron emission can play. Furthermore, we analyze the impact of nuclear properties from different theoretical mass models on the final abundances after these late freeze-out phases and beta-decays back to stability. As only a superposition of astrophysical conditions can provide a good fit to the solar r-abundances, the question remains how such superpositions are attained, resulting in the apparently robust r-process pattern observed in low

  20. Surface protein imprinted core-shell particles for high selective lysozyme recognition prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinran; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Jianxi; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-12-24

    A novel kind of lysozyme (Lys) surface imprinted core-shell particles was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) strategy. With controllable polymer shell chain length, such particles showed obviously improved selectivity for protein recognition. After the RAFT initial agent and template protein was absorbed on silica particles, the prepolymerization solution, with methacrylic acid and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate as the monomers, and N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) as the cross-linker, was mixed with the silica particles, and the polymerization was performed at 40 °C in aqueous phase through the oxidation-reduction initiation. Ater polymerization, with the template protein removal and destroying dithioester groups with hexylamine, the surface Lyz imprinted particles were obtained with controllable polymer chain length. The binding capacity of the Lys imprinted particles could reach 5.6 mg protein/g material, with the imprinting factor (IF) as 3.7, whereas the IF of the control material prepared without RAFT strategy was only 1.6. The absorption equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Moreover, Lys could be selectively recognized by the imprinted particles from both a four-proteins mixture and egg white sample. All these results demonstrated that these particles prepared by RAFT strategy are promising to achieve the protein recognition with high selectivity.

  1. Rapid determination of parabens in seafood sauces by high-performance liquid chromatography: A practical comparison of core-shell particles and sub-2 μm fully porous particles.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jing; Cao, Xiaoji; Cheng, Zhuo; Qin, Ye; Lu, Yanbin

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the chromatographic performance of superficially porous particles (Halo core-shell C18 column, 50 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.7 μm) was compared with that of sub-2 μm fully porous particles (Acquity BEH C18 , 50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm). Four parabens, methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben, were used as representative compounds for calculating the plate heights in a wide flow rate range and analyzed on the basis of the Van Deemter and Knox equations. Theoretical Poppe plots were constructed for each column to compare their kinetic performance. Both phases gave similar minimum plate heights when using nonreduced coordinates. Meanwhile, the flat C-term of the core-shell column provided the possibilities for applying high flow rates without significant loss in efficiency. The low backpressure of core-shell particles allowed this kind of column, especially compatible with conventional high-performance liquid chromatography systems. Based on these factors, a simple high-performance liquid chromatography method was established and validated for the determination of parabens in various seafood sauces using the Halo core-shell C18 column for separation.

  2. Hindered submicron mobility and long-term storage of presynaptic dense-core granules revealed by single-particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Scalettar, B A; Jacobs, C; Fulwiler, A; Prahl, L; Simon, A; Hilken, L; Lochner, J E

    2012-09-01

    Dense-core granules (DCGs) are organelles found in neuroendocrine cells and neurons that house, transport, and release a number of important peptides and proteins. In neurons, DCG cargo can include the secreted neuromodulatory proteins tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and/or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which play a key role in modulating synaptic efficacy in the hippocampus. This function has spurred interest in DCGs that localize to synaptic contacts between hippocampal neurons, and several studies recently have established that DCGs localize to, and undergo regulated exocytosis from, postsynaptic sites. To complement this work, we have studied presynaptically localized DCGs in hippocampal neurons, which are much more poorly understood than their postsynaptic analogs. Moreover, to enhance relevance, we visualized DCGs via fluorescence labeling of exogenous and endogenous tPA and BDNF. Using single-particle tracking, we determined trajectories of more than 150 presynaptically localized DCGs. These trajectories reveal that mobility of DCGs in presynaptic boutons is highly hindered and that storage is long-lived. We also computed mean-squared displacement curves, which can be used to elucidate mechanisms of transport. Over shorter time windows, most curves are linear, demonstrating that DCG transport in boutons is driven predominantly by diffusion. The remaining curves plateau with time, consistent with motion constrained by a submicron-sized corral. These results have relevance to recent models of presynaptic organization and to recent hypotheses about DCG cargo function. The results also provide estimates for transit times to the presynaptic plasma membrane that are consistent with measured times for onset of neurotrophin release from synaptically localized DCGs.

  3. Atomistic Simulation of Stacked Nucleosome Core Particles: Tail Bridging, the H4 Tail, and Effect of Hydrophobic Forces.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Suman; Glaser, Matthew A; Lansac, Yves; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-03-31

    We report the first atomistic simulation of two stacked nucleosome core particles (NCPs), with an aim to understand, in molecular detail, how they interact, the effect of salt concentration, and how different histone tails contribute to their interaction, with a special emphasis on the H4 tail, known to have the largest stabilizing effect on the NCP-NCP interaction. We do not observe specific K16-mediated interaction between the H4 tail and the H2A-H2B acidic patch, in contrast with the findings from crystallographic studies, but find that the stacking was stable even in the absence of this interaction. We perform simulations with the H4 tail (partially/completely) removed and find that the region between LYS-16 and LYS-20 of the H4 tail holds special importance in mediating the inter-NCP interaction. Performing similar tail-clipped simulations with the H3 tail removed, we compare the roles of the H3 and H4 tails in maintaining the stacking. We discuss the relevance of our simulation results to the bilayer and other liquid-crystalline phases exhibited by NCPs in vitro and, through an analysis of the histone-histone interface, identify the interactions that could possibly stabilize the inter-NCP interaction in these columnar mesophases. Through the mechanical disruption of the stacked nucleosome system using steered molecular dynamics, we quantify the strength of inter-NCP stacking in the presence and absence of salt. We disrupt the stacking at some specific sites of internucleosomal tail-DNA contact and perform a comparative quantification of the binding strengths of various tails in stabilizing the stacking. We also examine how hydrophobic interactions may contribute to the overall stability of the stacking and find a marked difference in the role of hydrophobic forces as compared with electrostatic forces in determining the stability of the stacked nucleosome system.

  4. Mechanochemical surface functionalisation of superparamagnetic microparticles with in situ formed crystalline metal-complexes: a fast novel core-shell particle formation method.

    PubMed

    Brede, F A; Mandel, K; Schneider, M; Sextl, G; Müller-Buschbaum, K

    2015-05-21

    An innovative mechanochemical method is reported for the in situ formation of crystalline metal-complexes on the surface of superparamagnetic nanocomposite microparticles. The process is demonstrated for coating Fe3O4 multicore-silica matrix particles with the 1,2,4-1H-triazole complex [ZnCl2(TzH)2]. The use of mechanochemistry demonstrates a flexible process to obtain functional shells on magnetic particle cores without the need for complicated surface-functionalisation reactions in solution. Simple mixing of the desired shell-precursors ZnCl2 and 1,2,4-1H-triazole (TzH) with the magnetic particles in a ball mill is sufficient to tailor the particle surfaces with novel functionalities while retaining the superparamagnetic behaviour.

  5. Detection and tracking of dual-labeled HIV particles using wide-field live cell imaging to follow viral core integrity

    PubMed Central

    Mamede, Joao I.; Hope, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Live cell imaging is a valuable technique that allows the characterization of the dynamic processes of the HIV-1 life-cycle. Here, we present a method of production and imaging of dual-labeled HIV viral particles that allows the visualization of two events. Varying release of the intravirion fluid phase marker reveals virion fusion and the loss of the integrity of HIV viral cores with the use of live wide-field fluorescent microscopy. PMID:26714704

  6. In vitro recognition of DNA base pairs by histones in histone-DNA complexes and reconstituted core particles: an ultraviolet resonance Raman study.

    PubMed Central

    Laigle, A; Chinsky, L; Turpin, P Y; Liquier, J; Taillandier, E

    1982-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of complexes between DNA and the four core histones, alone or associated, have been investigated in vitro using excitations at 300 and 257 nm, which give complementary informations about the DNA bases. H2A and H2B fractions recognize the G-C base pairs, while H3 and H4 (arginine rich fractions) recognize the A-T base pairs. The associated fractions form complexes with DNA which yield about the same DNA spectral modifications as the DNA-H4 complexes. This reveals the important role of the arginine rich fractions in the core particle formation and confirms the preferential in vitro assembly of nucleosome cores on A-T rich regions of DNA (25). PMID:7155896

  7. Investigation of a new core-shell particle column for ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography analysis of oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Biba, Mirlinda; Welch, Christopher J; Foley, Joe P

    2014-08-05

    A new core-shell particle column showed excellent performance and durability for separation of short (∼21-mer) ribonucleic acid (RNA) oligonucleotides by ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (IP-RPLC). Previously investigated core-shell C18 columns showed excellent peak shapes and separations of closely eluting impurities by IP-RPLC. However, these columns showed only modest long-term stability at the neutral pH and elevated column temperatures of ≥60°C, typically used for IP-RPLC analysis of oligonucleotides. The newly introduced SunShell C18 column provided separations comparable to the previously evaluated core-shell columns, but with significantly improved long-term column stability when operated at neutral pH and elevated column temperature.

  8. Core-shell monodisperse spherical mSiO2/Gd2O3:Eu3+@mSiO2 particles as potential multifunctional theranostic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eurov, Daniil A.; Kurdyukov, Dmitry A.; Kirilenko, Demid A.; Kukushkina, Julia A.; Nashchekin, Alexei V.; Smirnov, Alexander N.; Golubev, Valery G.

    2015-02-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles with diameters in the range 100-500 nm have been synthesized as monodisperse spherical mesoporous (pore diameter 3 nm) silica particles with size deviation of less than 4 %, filled with gadolinium and europium oxides and coated with a mesoporous silica shell. It is shown that the melt technique developed for filling with gadolinium and europium oxides provides a nearly maximum filling of mesopores in a single-run impregnation, with gadolinium and europium uniformly distributed within the particles and forming no bulk oxides on their surface. The coating with a shell does not impair the monodispersity and causes no coagulation. The coating technique enables controlled variation of the shell thickness within the range 5-100 % relative to the core diameter. The thus produced nanoparticles are easily dispersed in water, have large specific surface area (300 m2 g-1) and pore volume (0.3 cm3 g-1), and are bright solid phosphor with superior stability in aqueous media. The core-shell structured particles can be potentially used for cancer treatment as a therapeutic agent (gadolinium neutron-capture therapy and drug delivery system) and, simultaneously, as a multimodal diagnostic tool (fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging), thereby serving as a multifunctional theranostic agent.

  9. Total synthesis of biologically active 20S-hydroxyvitamin D3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qinghui; Lin, Zongtao; Kim, Tae-Kang; Slominski, Andrzej T.; Miller, Duane D.; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A total synthetic strategy of 20S-hydroxyvitamin D3 [20S-(OH)D3] involving modified synthesis of key intermediates 7 and 12, Grignard reaction to stereoseletively generate 20S-OH and Wittig-Horner coupling to establish D3 framework, was completed in 16 steps with an overall yield of 0.4 %. The synthetic 20S-(OH)D3 activated vitamin D receptor (VDR) and initiated the expression of downstream genes. In addition, 20S-(OH)D3 showed similar inhibitory potency as calcitriol [1,25(OH)2D3] on proliferation of melanoma cells. PMID:26433048

  10. Low power loss and field-insensitive permeability of Fe-6.5%Si powder cores with manganese oxide-coated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Junnan E-mail: rzhgong@hust.edu.cn; Wang, Xian; Xu, Xiaojun; Gong, Rongzhou E-mail: rzhgong@hust.edu.cn; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, V. G.

    2015-05-07

    Fe-6.5%Si alloy powders coated with manganese oxides using an innovative in situ process were investigated. The in-situ coating of the insulating oxides was realized with a KMnO{sub 4} solution by a chemical process. The insulating manganese oxides with mixed valance state were verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The thickness of the insulating layer on alloy particles was determined to be in a range of 20–210 nm, depending upon the KMnO{sub 4} concentration. The powder core loss and the change in permeability under a DC-bias field were measured at frequencies ranging from 50 to 100 kHz. The experiments indicated that the Fe-6.5%Si powder cores with a 210 nm-thick manganese oxide layer not only showed a low core loss of 459 mW/cm{sup 3} at 100 kHz but also showed a small reduction in permeability (μ(H)/μ(0) = 85% for μ = 42) at a DC-bias field of 80 Oe. This work has defined a novel pathway to realizing low core loss and field-insensitive permeability for Fe-Si powder cores.

  11. Purification and characterization of Candida albicans 20S proteasome: identification of four proteasomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Fernández Murray, P; Biscoglio, M J; Passeron, S

    2000-03-15

    The 20S proteasome from yeast cells of Candida albicans was purified by successive chromatographic steps to apparent homogeneity, as judged by nondenaturing and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 640 kDa by gel filtration. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate gave at least 10 bands in the range 20-32 kDa. Two-dimensional electrophoresis revealed the presence of at least 14 polypeptides. By electron microscopy after negative staining, the proteasome preparation appeared as typical symmetrical barrel-shaped particles. The enzyme cleaved the peptidyl-arylamide bonds in the model synthetic substrates Cbz-G-G-L-p-nitroanilide, Cbz-G-G-R-beta-naphthylamide, and Cbz-L-L-E-beta-naphthylamide (chymotrypsin-like, trypsin-like, and peptidylglutamyl-peptide-hydrolyzing activities). The differential sensitivity of these activities to aldehyde peptides and sodium dodecyl sulfate supported the multicatalytic nature of this enzyme. Three proteasomal subunits were identified as alpha6/Pre5, alpha3/Y13, and alpha5/Pup2 by internal sequencing of tryptic fragments. Their sequences perfectly matched the corresponding deduced amino acid sequences of the C. albicans genes. A fourth subunit was identified as alpha7/Prs1 by immunorecognition with a monoclonal antibody specific for C8, the human proteasome subunit homologue. Treatment of the intact isolated 20S proteasome with acid phosphatase and Western blot analysis of the separated components indicated that the alpha7/Prs1 subunit is obtained as a multiply phosphorylated protein.

  12. Construction and immunological evaluation of truncated hepatitis B core particles carrying HBsAg amino acids 119-152 in the major immunodominant region (MIR).

    PubMed

    Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao; Guo, Minzhuo; Qiu, Feng; Jia, Zhiyuan; Lu, Xuexin; Meng, Qingling; Bi, Shengli

    2013-09-13

    Hepatitis B capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli can reassemble into icosahedral particles, which could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of foreign epitopes, especially those inserted into its major immunodominant region. Herein, we inserted the entire 'α' antigenic determinant amino acids (aa) 119-152 of HBsAg into the truncated HBc (aa 1-144), between Asp(78) and Pro(79). Prokaryotic expression showed that the mosaic HBc was mainly in the form of inclusion bodies. After denaturation with urea, it was dialyzed progressively for protein renaturation. We observed that before and after renaturation, mosaic HBc was antigenic as determined by HBsAg ELISA and a lot of viruslike particles were observed after renaturation. Thus, we further purified the mosaic viruslike particles by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE chromatography, and Sepharose 4FF chromatography. Negative staining electron microscopy demonstrated the morphology of the viruslike particles. Immunization of Balb/c mice with mosaic particles induced the production of anti-HBs antibody and Th1 cell immune response supported by ELISPOT and CD4/CD8 proportions assay. In conclusion, we constructed mosaic hepatitis core particles displaying the entire 'α' antigenic determinant on the surface and laid a foundation for researching therapeutic hepatits B vaccines.

  13. Charge neutralization as the major factor for the assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles from C-terminal truncated hepatitis C virus core protein

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Vanessa L. de Azevedo; Peabody, David S.; Ferreira, Davis Fernandes; Bianconi, M. Lucia; Gomes, Andre Marco de Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein, in addition to its structural role to form the nucleocapsid assembly, plays a critical role in HCV pathogenesis by interfering in several cellular processes, including microRNA and mRNA homeostasis. The C-terminal truncated HCV core protein (C124) is intrinsically unstructured in solution and is able to interact with unspecific nucleic acids, in the micromolar range, and to assemble into nucleocapsid-like particles (NLPs) in vitro. The specificity and propensity of C124 to the assembly and its implications on HCV pathogenesis are not well understood. Methods Spectroscopic techniques, transmission electron microscopy and calorimetry were used to better understand the propensity of C124 to fold or to multimerize into NLPs when subjected to different conditions or in the presence of unspecific nucleic acids of equivalent size to cellular microRNAs. Results The structural analysis indicated that C124 has low propensity to self-folding. On the other hand, for the first time, we show that C124, in the absence of nucleic acids, multimerizes into empty NLPs when subjected to a pH close to its isoelectric point (pH ≈ 12), indicating that assembly is mainly driven by charge neutralization. Isothermal calorimetry data showed that the assembly of NLPs promoted by nucleic acids is enthalpy driven. Additionally, data obtained from fluorescence correlation spectroscopy show that C124, in nanomolar range, was able to interact and to sequester a large number of short unspecific nucleic acids into NLPs. Discussion Together, our data showed that the charge neutralization is the major factor for the nucleocapsid-like particles assembly from C-terminal truncated HCV core protein. This finding suggests that HCV core protein may physically interact with unspecific cellular polyanions, which may correspond to microRNAs and mRNAs in a host cell infected by HCV, triggering their confinement into infectious particles. PMID:27867765

  14. 26S and PA28-20S Proteasome Activity in Cytosolic Extracts from Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hernebring, Malin

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is a complex multisubunit protease that plays a major role in the degradation of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Proteasome function is one of the key players regulating the proteome and it is vital for many cellular processes. The method described here makes it possible to assay the proteolytic capacities of proteasome complexes separately in crude cytosolic extracts from ES cells. The method is based on hydrolysis of a fluorogenic peptide substrate in lysates prepared under conditions that favor the interactions of the 20S proteasomal catalytical core with either the 19S or the PA28αβ proteasome regulator.

  15. Multi-responsive hybrid particles: thermo-, pH-, photo-, and magneto-responsive magnetic hydrogel cores with gold nanorod optical triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittikulsittichai, Supparesk; Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Sarangi, Subhasis; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Vekilov, Peter G.; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Randall Lee, T.

    2016-06-01

    The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications.The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Contains detailed information about the synthesis of

  16. Construction and immunological evaluation of truncated hepatitis B core particles carrying HBsAg amino acids 119–152 in the major immunodominant region (MIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao; Guo, Minzhuo; Qiu, Feng; Jia, Zhiyuan; Lu, Xuexin; Meng, Qingling; Bi, Shengli

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •The conformational HBV neutralization antigen domain was successfully displayed on the surface of truncated HBc particles. •Appropriate dialysis procedures to support the renaturing environment for the protein refolding. •Efficient purification procedures to obtain high purity and icosahedral particles of mosaic HBV antigen. •Strong immune responses not only including neutralization antibody response but also Th1 cell response were induced in mice. -- Abstract: Hepatitis B capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli can reassemble into icosahedral particles, which could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of foreign epitopes, especially those inserted into its major immunodominant region. Herein, we inserted the entire ‘α’ antigenic determinant amino acids (aa) 119–152 of HBsAg into the truncated HBc (aa 1–144), between Asp{sup 78} and Pro{sup 79}. Prokaryotic expression showed that the mosaic HBc was mainly in the form of inclusion bodies. After denaturation with urea, it was dialyzed progressively for protein renaturation. We observed that before and after renaturation, mosaic HBc was antigenic as determined by HBsAg ELISA and a lot of viruslike particles were observed after renaturation. Thus, we further purified the mosaic viruslike particles by (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, DEAE chromatography, and Sepharose 4FF chromatography. Negative staining electron microscopy demonstrated the morphology of the viruslike particles. Immunization of Balb/c mice with mosaic particles induced the production of anti-HBs antibody and Th1 cell immune response supported by ELISPOT and CD4/CD8 proportions assay. In conclusion, we constructed mosaic hepatitis core particles displaying the entire ‘α’ antigenic determinant on the surface and laid a foundation for researching therapeutic hepatits B vaccines.

  17. Fluorescence anisotropy decay of ethidium bound to nucleosome core particles. 1. Rotational diffusion indicates an extended structure at low ionic strength

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Libertini, L.J.; Small, E.W. )

    1991-05-28

    The fluorescence decay of ethidium intercalated into the DNA of nucleosome core particles increases in average lifetime from about 22 ns in H{sub 2}O to about 39 ns in D{sub 2}O. This increase, combined with the acquisiton of large amounts of data, allows measurement of anisotropy decays out to more than 350 ns. The overall slow rotational motions of the core particle may thereby be more clearly distinguished from the faster torsional motions of the DNA. In 10 mM NaCl at 20{degrees}C, the authors recover a long correlation time of 198 ns in D{sub 2}O (159 ns when corrected to a viscosity of 1.002 cP), in agreement with the value of 164 ns obtained in H{sub 2}O. These values are consistent with hydrodynamic calculations based on the expected size and shape of the hydrated particle. To support their conclusion that this long correlation time derives from Brownian rotational diffusion, they show that the value is directly proportional to the viscosity and inversely proportional to the temperature. No significant changes in the rotational correlation time are observed between 1 and 500 mM ionic strength. Below 1 mM, the particle undergoes the low-salt transition as measured by steady-state tyrosine fluorescence anisotropy. However, they observe little change in shape until the ionic strength is decreased below {approximately}0.2 mM, where the correlation time increases nearly 2-fold, indicating that the particle has opened up into an extended form. They have previously shown that the transition becomes nonreversible below 0.2 mM salt.

  18. Dynamics of Submarine Landslides in an Active Margin from Analysis of Particle Size, Cores, and 3D Seismic Data: Site C0021, IODP Expedition 338, Offshore Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawyer, D.; Moore, Z. T.

    2013-12-01

    The deposits of submarine landslides, termed mass transport deposits (MTDs), were drilled and cored at Site C0021 in the Nankai Trough during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 338. Two MTDs were identified at 94-117 mbsf and 133-176 mbsf. Each MTD includes mud clasts, tilted bedding, and/or chaotic bedding, an increase in shear strength, a decrease in porosity, the occurrence of shear zones/faults, and a semi-transparent seismic facies. We conducted laser particle size analyses of sediments throughout the entire cored interval at Site C0021 (0 - 5 mbsf and 90 - 194 mbsf). Particle size distributions show that sediments shallower than 155 mbsf are composed of approximately 80% silt-sized, 15% clay-sized, and 5% sand-sized particles. Sediments deeper than 155 mbsf are predominantly composed of approximately 65% silt-sized, 15% clay-sized, and 20% sand-sized particles. MTDs have no obvious differences from non-MTD particle size distributions. We are examining the MTDs to gain insight into their dynamic behavior by mapping them in 3D seismic data. We measure slope geometry, runout distance, and characterize the depositional features preserved within the MTDs in the basal surface, top surface, and internal body. We use slope geometry to calculate regional gravitational shear stress and we use runout distance and morphology as indicators of the dynamic behavior of the landslide. Future work will focus on back-analysis estimates of shear stress and shear strength parameters. Our goal is to distinguish whether these landslides occurred as relatively rapid-moving, low-viscosity events or relatively slow-moving, high-viscosity events. This is an important distinction to make given that initial acceleration of a landslide is a critical variable that determines amplitude of slide-generated tsunami.

  19. Synthesis of sol-gel silica particles in reverse micelles with mixed-solvent polar cores: tailoring nanoreactor structure and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bürglová, Kristýna; Hlaváč, Jan; Bartlett, John R.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a new approach for producing metal oxide nano- and microparticles via sol-gel processing in confined media (sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate reverse micelles), in which the chemical and physical properties of the polar aqueous core of the reverse micelles are modulated by the inclusion of a second polar co-solvent. The co-solvents were selected for their capacity to solubilise compounds with low water solubility and included dimethylsulfoxide, dimethylformamide, ethylene glycol, n-propanol, dimethylacetamide and N-methylpyrrolidone. A broad range of processing conditions across the sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate/cyclohexane/water phase diagram were identified that are suitable for preparing particles with dimensions <50 to >500 nm. In contrast, only a relatively narrow range of processing conditions were suitable for preparing such particles in the absence of the co-solvents, highlighting the role of the co-solvent in modulating the properties of the polar core of the reverse micelles. A mechanism is proposed that links the interactions between the various reactive sites on the polar head group of the surfactant and the co-solvent to the nucleation and growth of the particles.

  20. Three-dimensional gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation of plasmas on a massively parallel computer: Final report on LDRD Core Competency Project, FY 1991--FY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Byers, J.A.; Williams, T.J.; Cohen, B.I.; Dimits, A.M.

    1994-04-27

    One of the programs of the Magnetic fusion Energy (MFE) Theory and computations Program is studying the anomalous transport of thermal energy across the field lines in the core of a tokamak. We use the method of gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation in this study. For this LDRD project we employed massively parallel processing, new algorithms, and new algorithms, and new formal techniques to improve this research. Specifically, we sought to take steps toward: researching experimentally-relevant parameters in our simulations, learning parallel computing to have as a resource for our group, and achieving a 100 {times} speedup over our starting-point Cray2 simulation code`s performance.

  1. Formulation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol nanocrystals to improve oral bioavailability and brain delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Lisha; Cao, Fangrui; Miao, Xiaoqing; Chen, Tongkai; Chang, Qi; Zheng, Ying

    2016-01-30

    The aim of this study was to fabricate 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) nanocrystals to improve PPD's oral bioavailability and brain delivery. PPD nanocrystals were fabricated using an anti-solvent precipitation approach where d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was optimized as the stabilizer. The fabricated nanocrystals were nearly spherical with a particle size and drug loading of 90.44 ± 1.45 nm and 76.92%, respectively. They are in the crystalline state and stable at 4°C for at least 1 month. More than 90% of the PPD could be rapidly released from the nanocrystals, which was much faster than the physical mixture and PPD powder. PPD nanocrystals demonstrated comparable permeability to solution at 2.52 ± 0.44×10(-5)cm/s on MDCK monolayers. After oral administration of PPD nanocrystals to rats, PPD was absorbed quickly into the plasma and brain with significantly higher Cmax and AUC0-t compared to those of the physical mixture. However, no brain targeting was observed, as the ratios of the plasma AUC0-t to brain AUC0-t for the two groups were similar. In summary, PPD nanocrystals are a potential oral delivery system to improve PPD's poor bioavailability and its delivery into the brain for neurodegenerative disease and intracranial tumor therapies in the future.

  2. A Dual Laser Scanning Confocal and Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of the Intracellular Localization, Aggregation and Particle Formation of African Horse Sickness Virus Major Core Protein VP7.

    PubMed

    Wall, Gayle V; Rutkowska, Daria A; Mizrachi, Eshchar; Huismans, Henk; van Staden, Vida

    2017-02-01

    The bulk of the major core protein VP7 in African horse sickness virus (AHSV) self-assembles into flat, hexagonal crystalline particles in a process appearing unrelated to viral replication. Why this unique characteristic of AHSV VP7 is genetically conserved, and whether VP7 aggregation and particle formation have an effect on cellular biology or the viral life cycle, is unknown. Here we investigated how different small peptide and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) insertions into the VP7 top domain affected VP7 localization, aggregation, and particle formation. This was done using a dual laser scanning confocal and transmission electron microscopy approach in conjunction with analyses of the solubility, aggregation, and fluorescence profiles of the proteins. VP7 top domain modifications did not prevent trimerization, or intracellular trafficking, to one or two discrete sites in the cell. However, modifications that resulted in a misfolded and insoluble VP7-eGFP component blocked trafficking, and precluded protein accumulation at a single cellular site, perhaps by interfering with normal trimer-trimer interactions. Furthermore, the modifications disrupted the stable layering of the trimers into characteristic AHSV VP7 crystalline particles. It was concluded that VP7 trafficking is driven by a balance between VP7 solubility, trimer forming ability, and trimer-trimer interactions.

  3. Crossover from disordered to core-shell structures of nano-oxide Y2O3 dispersed particles in Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M. P.; Lu, C. Y.; Lu, Z.; Shao, L.; Wang, L. M.; Gao, F.

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations of Y2O3 in bcc Fe and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations were used to understand the structure of Y2O3 nano-clusters in an oxide dispersion strengthened steel matrix. The study showed that Y2O3 nano-clusters below 2 nm were completely disordered. Y2O3 nano-clusters above 2 nm, however, form a core-shell structure, with a shell thickness of 0.5-0.7 nm that is independent of nano-cluster size. Y2O3 nano-clusters were surrounded by off-lattice Fe atoms, further increasing the stability of these nano-clusters. TEM was used to corroborate our simulation results and showed a crossover from a disordered nano-cluster to a core-shell structure.

  4. Mapping the particle acceleration in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present new deep, high-resolution radio images of the diffuse minihalo in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638. The images have been obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 317, 617, and 1280 MHz and with the Very Large Array at 1.5, 4.9, and 8.4 GHz, with angular resolutions ranging from 1'' to 10''. This represents the best radio spectral and imaging data set for any minihalo. Most of the radio flux of the minihalo arises from a bright central component with a maximum radius of ∼80 kpc. A fainter tail of emission extends out from the central component to form a spiral-shaped structure with a length of ∼230 kpc, seen at frequencies 1.5 GHz and below. We find indication of a possible steepening of the total radio spectrum of the minihalo at high frequencies. Furthermore, a spectral index image shows that the spectrum of the diffuse emission steepens with increasing distance along the tail. A striking spatial correlation is observed between the minihalo emission and two cold fronts visible in the Chandra X-ray image of this cool core. These cold fronts confine the minihalo, as also seen in numerical simulations of minihalo formation by sloshing-induced turbulence. All these observations favor the hypothesis that the radio-emitting electrons in cluster cool cores are produced by turbulent re-acceleration.

  5. Fluoride adsorption from aqueous solution by magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@alginate-La particles fabricated via electro-coextrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yahui; Lin, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Quisheng; Luo, Xuegang

    2016-12-01

    The magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@Alg-La particles were fabricated successfully by a simple method of electro-coextrusion, and employed as an adsorbent for separation of fluoride from aqueous solution. Main factors affecting the removal of fluoride, including pH, adsorbent dosage, initial concentration, temperature and contact time were investigated. The adsorption isotherm and adsorption kinetics were studied to understand the adsorption process in detail. The experimental data were fitted well by the non-linear Freundlich isotherm and linear pseudo-second-order model, the maximum fluoride adsorption capacity was 45.230 mg/g at pH 4, 298.15 K. Thermodynamic parameters indicated that the fluoride adsorption process was feasible and spontaneous. The presence of other anions like Cl-, SO42-, HCO3- and PO43- had almost no effect on the fluoride adsorption. The adsorbent can be easily separated from the solution by a magnet. The magnetic core-shell Fe3O4@Alg-La particles before and after fluoride adsorption were studied by SEM, FTIR, EDX and XPS, which indicated that the adsorption mechanism may be related to electrostatic attraction and Lewis acid-base interaction.

  6. Occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes: analysis for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and assessment of numerical methods.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Félix Monteiro; Oliveira, Samuel Conceição

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes is analyzed for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An assessment of numerical methods is performed to solve the boundary value problem generated by the mathematical modeling of diffusion and reaction processes under steady state and isothermal conditions. Two classes of numerical methods were employed: shooting and collocation. The shooting method used the ode function from Scilab software. The collocation methods included: that implemented by the bvode function of Scilab, the orthogonal collocation, and the orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The methods were validated for simplified forms of the Michaelis-Menten equation (zero-order and first-order kinetics), for which analytical solutions are available. Among the methods covered in this article, the orthogonal collocation on finite elements proved to be the most robust and efficient method to solve the boundary value problem concerning Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For this enzyme kinetics, it was found that the dead core can occur when verified certain conditions of diffusion-reaction within the catalytic particle. The application of the concepts and methods presented in this study will allow for a more generalized analysis and more accurate designs of heterogeneous enzymatic reactors.

  7. Synthesis of zinc oxide-encapsulated poly(methyl methacrylate)-chitosan core-shell hybrid particles and their electrochemical property.

    PubMed

    Petchthanasombat, Chayannan; Tiensing, Tinnakorn; Sunintaboon, Panya

    2012-03-01

    The synthesis of hybrid materials possessing zinc oxide nanoparticles encapsulated in core-shell polymer particles having poly(methyl methacrylate) core and chitosan shell (PMMA-CS/ZnO) was carried out via an emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization. The ZnO nanoparticles modified by 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (TPMZnO) were first prepared before being charged to the polymerization system. The effects of polymerization time (from 2 h to 6 h) and the amount of TPMZnO added (0.018 g, 0.020 g, and 0.030 g) were studied. It was found that the polymerization time of 5 h yielded colloidally stable hybrid latex with% MMA conversion up to 90%. Moreover, the increase in the amount of TPMZnO resulted in a decrease in% MMA conversion from 90% to 80%. It was also found from TGA analysis that the amount of TPMZnO added affected the percentage of TPMZnO encapsulation. PMMA-CS/ZnO particles with the size ranging from 173 to 245 nm were observed by TEM. In addition, the PMMA-CS/ZnO hybrid latexes possessed high positive charges in the range of 40-51 mV. The electrochemical property of the electrodes fabricated from PMMA-CS/ZnO nanoparticles was illustrated by cyclic voltammetry.

  8. Alphavirus capsid proteins self-assemble into core-like particles in insect cells: A promising platform for nanoparticle vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Hikke, Mia C; Geertsema, Corinne; Wu, Vincen; Metz, Stefan W; van Lent, Jan W; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-02-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes arthritic diseases in humans, whereas the aquatic salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is associated with high mortality in aquaculture of salmon and trout. Using modern biotechnological approaches, promising vaccine candidates based upon highly immunogenic, enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) have been developed. However, the eVLP structure (core, lipid membrane, surface glycoproteins) is more complex than that of non-enveloped, protein-only VLPs, which are structurally and morphologically 'simple'. In order to develop an alternative to alphavirus eVLPs, in this paper we engineered recombinant baculovirus vectors to produce high levels of alphavirus core-like particles (CLPs) in insect cells by expression of the CHIKV and SAV capsid proteins. The CLPs localize in dense nuclear bodies within the infected cell nucleus and are purified through a rapid and scalable protocol involving cell lysis, sonication and low-speed centrifugation steps. Furthermore, an immunogenic epitope from the alphavirus E2 glycoprotein can be successfully fused to the N-terminus of the capsid protein without disrupting the CLP self-assembling properties. We propose that immunogenic epitope-tagged alphavirus CLPs produced in insect cells present a simple and perhaps more stable alternative to alphavirus eVLPs.

  9. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Revealed 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone-induced Up-regulation of 20S Proteasome in Cultured Human Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prins, John M.; Wang, Yinsheng

    2012-01-01

    The tobacco-specific N-nitrosamine, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone (NNK), is a well-known carcinogen. Although the ability of the metabolically activated form of NNK to generate DNA adducts is well established, little is known about the cellular pathways perturbed by NNK in its native state. In this study, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC), together with mass spectrometry, to assess the perturbation of protein expression in GM00637 human skin fibroblast cells upon NNK exposure. With this approach, we were able to quantify 1412 proteins and 137 of them were with significantly altered expression following NNK exposure, including the up-regulation of all subunits of the 20S proteasome core complex. The up-regulation of the 20S core complex was also reflected by a significant increase in 20S proteasome activities in GM00637, IMR90 and MCF-7 cells upon NNK treatment. Furthermore, the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) antagonist propranolol could attenuate significantly the NNK-induced increase in proteasome activity in all the three cell lines, suggesting that up-regulation of the 20S proteasome may be mediated through the β-AR. Additionally, we found that NNK treatment altered the expression levels of other important proteins including mitochondrial proteins, cytoskeleton-associated proteins, and proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Results from the present study provided novel insights into the cellular mechanisms targeted by NNK. PMID:22369695

  10. Fabrication and electromagnetic properties of bio-based helical soft-core particles by way of Ni-Fe alloy electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mingming; Zhang, Deyuan; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Wenqiang; Yuan, Liming

    2011-12-01

    Ni-Fe alloy electroplating was used as a bio-limited forming process to fabricate bio-based helical soft-core ferromagnetic particles, and a low frequency vibration device was applied to the cathode to avoid microorganism (Spirulina platens) cells adhesion to the copper net during the course of plating. The morphologies and ingredients of the coated Spirulina cells were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometer. The complex permittivity and permeability of the samples containing the coated Spirulina cells before and after heat treatment were measured and investigated by a vector network analyzer. The results show that the Spirulina cells after plating keep their initial helical shape, and applying low frequency vibration to the copper net cathode in the plating process can effectively prevent agglomeration and intertwinement of the Spirulina cells. The microwave absorbing and electromagnetic properties of the samples containing the coated Spirulina cells particles with heat treatment are superior to those samples containing the coated Spirulina cells particles without heat treatment.

  11. Environmentally friendly electroless plating for Ag/TiO2-coated core-shell magnetic particles using ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Dong; Choe, Won-Gyun; Jeong, Jong-Ryul

    2013-11-01

    In this work, high-reflectance brilliant white color magnetic microspheres comprising a Fe/TiO2/Ag core-shell structure with a continuous, uniform compact silver layer were successfully fabricated by TiO2-assisted electroless plating in a simple and eco-friendly method. The coating procedure for TiO2 and Ag involved a sol-gel reaction and electroless plating with ultrasound treatment. The electroless plating step was carried out in an eco-friendly manner in a single process without environmentally toxic additives. The TiO2 layer was used as a modification layer between the Fe microspheres and the silver layer to improve adhesion. A continuous and compact silver layer could be formed with a high degree of morphological control by introducing ultrasonication and adjusting the ammonium hydroxide concentration.

  12. Structural Basis for the Assembly and Gate Closure Mechanisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Li, H; Wang, T; Pan, H; Lin, G; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a proteasome system analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Mtb requires the proteasome to resist killing by the host immune system. The detailed assembly process and the gating mechanism of Mtb proteasome have remained unknown. Using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we have obtained structures of three Mtb proteasome assembly intermediates, showing conformational changes during assembly, and explaining why the {beta}-subunit propeptide inhibits rather than promotes assembly. Although the eukaryotic proteasome core particles close their protein substrate entrance gates with different amino terminal peptides of the seven {alpha}-subunits, it has been unknown how a prokaryotic proteasome might close the gate at the symmetry axis with seven identical peptides. We found in the new Mtb proteasome crystal structure that the gate is tightly sealed by the seven identical peptides taking on three distinct conformations. Our work provides the structural bases for assembly and gating mechanisms of the Mtb proteasome.

  13. Structural basis for the assembly and gate closure mechanisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, H.; Wang, T.; Pan, H.; Lin, G.

    2010-06-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a proteasome system analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Mtb requires the proteasome to resist killing by the host immune system. The detailed assembly process and the gating mechanism of Mtb proteasome have remained unknown. Using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we have obtained structures of three Mtb proteasome assembly intermediates, showing conformational changes during assembly, and explaining why the {beta}-subunit propeptide inhibits rather than promotes assembly. Although the eukaryotic proteasome core particles close their protein substrate entrance gates with different amino terminal peptides of the seven {alpha}-subunits, it has been unknown how a prokaryotic proteasome might close the gate at the symmetry axis with seven identical peptides. We found in the new Mtb proteasome crystal structure that the gate is tightly sealed by the seven identical peptides taking on three distinct conformations. Our work provides the structural bases for assembly and gating mechanisms of the Mtb proteasome.

  14. A novel strategy for rapid quantification of 20(S)-protopanaxatriol and 20(S)-protopanaxadiol saponins in Panax notoginseng P. ginseng and P. quinquefolium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fa-Xiang; Yuan, Cen; Wan, Jian-Bo; Yan, Ru; Hu, Hao; Li, Shao-Ping; Zhang, Qing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    A novel strategy for the qualitative and quantitative determination of 20(S)-protopanaxatriol saponins (PTS) and 20(S)-protopanaxadiol saponins (PDS) in Panax notoginseng, Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolium, based on the overlapping peaks of main components of PTS (calibrated by ginsenoside Rg1) and PDS (calibrated by ginsenoside Rb1), was proposed. The analysis was performed by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with evaporative light scattering detection (HPLC-ELSD). Under specific chromatographic conditions, all samples showed two overlapping peaks containing several main ginsenosides belonging to PTS and PDS, respectively. The overlapping peaks were also identified by using HPLC-MS. Based on the sum and ratio of PTS and PDS, 60 tested Panax samples were divided into three main clusters according to their species. The findings suggested that this strategy provides a simple and rapid approach to quantify PTS and PDS in Panax herbs.

  15. PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

    2012-11-01

    Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

  16. Historical record of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in marine sediment cores from Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Bícego, Márcia C; Rose, Neil L; Taniguchi, Satie; Lourenço, Rafael A; Figueira, Rubens C L; Mahiques, Michel M; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the first results of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in sediment cores of Admiralty Bay, Antarctica. These markers were used to assess the local input of anthropogenic materials (particulate and organic compounds) as a result of the influence of human occupation in a sub-Antarctic region and a possible long-range atmospheric transport of combustion products from sources in South America. The highest SCPs and PAHs concentrations were observed during the last 30 years, when three research stations were built in the area and industrial activities in South America increased. The concentrations of SCPs and PAHs were much lower than those of other regions in the northern hemisphere and other reported data for the southern hemisphere. The PAH isomer ratios showed that the major sources of PAHs are fossil fuels/petroleum, biomass combustion and sewage contribution generally close to the Brazilian scientific station.

  17. A novel synthesis method for TiO2 particles with magnetic Fe3O4 cores.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi; Zhang, Keqiang; An, Yi

    2014-01-01

    TiO2@(AC/Fe3O4) (AC is activated carbon) was prepared by using AC and Fe3O4 as joint support. The morphological features, crystal structure, and magnetism of the final product were characterized. The results indicate that TiO2 particles formed on the surface of AC and Fe3O4; the sizes of TiO2 and Fe3O4 were 0.5 and 0.7 μm respectively, and that of AC fell within a wide range. The highly crystalline cubic structures of the TiO2 particles was in accord with the standard X-ray diffractometry spectrum of magnetite and anatase. The maximum saturation magnetization of TiO2@(AC/Fe3O4) was 75 emu g(-1), which was enough to support magnetic recovery. The rate of methylene blue (MB) removal photocatalyzed by TiO2@(AC/Fe3O4) was higher by 50% than that achieved with AC/Fe3O4 photocatalysis, and similar to that achieved with TiO2@AC. The removal rate (kobs) decreased drastically from 1.77 × 10(-2) to 9.36 × 10(-3)min(-1) when the initial concentration of MB solution increased from 2.0 to 5.0 mg L(-1). The kobs value increased from 9.41 × 10(-3) to 1.34 × 10(-2)min(-1) with increasing photocatalyst dosage from 0.2 to 1.0 g, then slightly decreased to 1.33 × 10(-2)min(-1) at 2.0 g dosage.

  18. Characterisation of 20S Proteasome in Tritrichomonas foetus and Its Role during the Cell Cycle and Transformation into Endoflagellar Form.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Gonzaga, Luiz; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Benchimol, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are intracellular complexes that control selective protein degradation in organisms ranging from Archaea to higher eukaryotes. These structures have multiple proteolytic activities that are required for cell differentiation, replication and maintaining cellular homeostasis. Here, we document the presence of the 20S proteasome in the protist parasite Tritrichomonas foetus. Complementary techniques, such as a combination of whole genome sequencing technologies, bioinformatics algorithms, cell fractionation and biochemistry and microscopy approaches were used to characterise the 20S proteasome of T. foetus. The 14 homologues of the typical eukaryotic proteasome subunits were identified in the T. foetus genome. Alignment analyses showed that the main regulatory and catalytic domains of the proteasome were conserved in the predicted amino acid sequences from T. foetus-proteasome subunits. Immunofluorescence assays using an anti-proteasome antibody revealed a labelling distributed throughout the cytosol as punctate cytoplasmic structures and in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy of a T. foetus-proteasome-enriched fraction confirmed the presence of particles that resembled the typical eukaryotic 20S proteasome. Fluorogenic assays using specific peptidyl substrates detected presence of the three typical peptidase activities of eukaryotic proteasomes in T. foetus. As expected, these peptidase activities were inhibited by lactacystin, a well-known specific proteasome inhibitor, and were not affected by inhibitors of serine or cysteine proteases. During the transformation of T. foetus to endoflagellar form (EFF), also known as pseudocyst, we observed correlations between the EFF formation rates, increases in the proteasome activities and reduced levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. The growth, cell cycle and EFF transformation of T. foetus were inhibited after treatment with lactacystin in a dose-dependent manner. Lactacystin treatment also resulted in

  19. Characterisation of 20S Proteasome in Tritrichomonas foetus and Its Role during the Cell Cycle and Transformation into Endoflagellar Form

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Gonzaga, Luiz; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Benchimol, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are intracellular complexes that control selective protein degradation in organisms ranging from Archaea to higher eukaryotes. These structures have multiple proteolytic activities that are required for cell differentiation, replication and maintaining cellular homeostasis. Here, we document the presence of the 20S proteasome in the protist parasite Tritrichomonas foetus. Complementary techniques, such as a combination of whole genome sequencing technologies, bioinformatics algorithms, cell fractionation and biochemistry and microscopy approaches were used to characterise the 20S proteasome of T. foetus. The 14 homologues of the typical eukaryotic proteasome subunits were identified in the T. foetus genome. Alignment analyses showed that the main regulatory and catalytic domains of the proteasome were conserved in the predicted amino acid sequences from T. foetus-proteasome subunits. Immunofluorescence assays using an anti-proteasome antibody revealed a labelling distributed throughout the cytosol as punctate cytoplasmic structures and in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy of a T. foetus-proteasome-enriched fraction confirmed the presence of particles that resembled the typical eukaryotic 20S proteasome. Fluorogenic assays using specific peptidyl substrates detected presence of the three typical peptidase activities of eukaryotic proteasomes in T. foetus. As expected, these peptidase activities were inhibited by lactacystin, a well-known specific proteasome inhibitor, and were not affected by inhibitors of serine or cysteine proteases. During the transformation of T. foetus to endoflagellar form (EFF), also known as pseudocyst, we observed correlations between the EFF formation rates, increases in the proteasome activities and reduced levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. The growth, cell cycle and EFF transformation of T. foetus were inhibited after treatment with lactacystin in a dose-dependent manner. Lactacystin treatment also resulted in

  20. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-05-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. /sup 125/I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17.

  1. Deletion modification enhances anthrax specific immunity and protective efficacy of a hepatitis B core particle-based anthrax epitope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Chenguang; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Dayong; Guo, Qiang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is one of the major virulence factors of anthrax and is also the major constituent of the current anthrax vaccine. Previously, we found that the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA contains a dominant neutralizing epitope, the SFFD. We successfully inserted the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA into the major immunodominant region (MIR) of hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The resulting fusion protein, termed HBc-N144-PA-loop2 (HBcL2), can effectively produce anthrax specific protective antibodies in an animal model. However, the protective immunity caused by HBcL2 could still be improved. In this research, we removed amino acids 79-81 from the HBc MIR of the HBcL2. This region was previously reported to be the major B cell epitope of HBc, and in keeping with this finding, we observed that the short deletion in the MIR not only diminished the intrinsic immunogenicity of HBc but also stimulated a higher titer of anthrax specific immunity. Most importantly, this deletion led to the full protection of the immunized mice against a lethal dose anthrax toxin challenge. We supposed that the conformational changes which occurred after the short deletion and foreign insertion in the MIR of HBc were the most likely reasons for the improvement in the immunogenicity of the HBc-based anthrax epitope vaccine.

  2. Endothelium-independent vasorelaxant effect of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol on isolated rat thoracic aorta

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Wang, Zhen-hua; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Xin; Zhou, Hui; Sun, Chao; Si, Jing; Zhou, Rong; Ma, Cheng-jun; Li, Ji

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ginsenosides are considered to be the major pharmacologically active ginseng constituents, whereas 20(S)-protopanaxadiol [20(S)-PPD] is the active metabolite of ginsenosides in gut. In this study we investigated the effect of 20(S)-PPD on isolated rat thoracic aortas as well as its vasorelaxant mechanisms. Methods: Aortic rings with or without endothelium were prepared from Wistar rats and suspended in organ-chambers. The changes in tension of the preparations were recorded through isometric transducers connected to a data acquisition system. The aortic rings were precontracted with phenylephrine (PE, 1 μmol/L) or high-K+ (80 mmol/L). Results: Application of 20(S)-PPD (21.5–108.5 μmol/L) caused concentration-dependent vasodilation of endothelium-intact aortic rings precontracted with PE or high-K+, which resulted in the EC50 values of 90.4 or 46.5 μmol/L, respectively. The removal of endothelium had no effect on 20(S)-PPD-induced relaxation. The vasorelaxant effect of 20(S)-PPD was also not influenced by the preincubation with β-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol, or with ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker glibenclamide, voltage-dependent K+ channel blocker 4-AP and inward rectifier K+ channel blocker BaCl2, whereas it was significantly attenuated by the preincubation with Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channel blocker TEA (1 mmol/L). Furthermore, the inhibition of NO synthesis, cGMP and prostacyclin pathways did not affect the vasorelaxant effect of 20(S)-PPD. In Ca2+-free solution, 20(S)-PPD (108.5 μmol/L) markedly decreased the extracellular Ca2+-induced contraction in aortic rings precontracted with PE or high-K+ and reduced PE-induced transient contraction. Voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel antagonist nifedipine inhibited PE-induced contraction; further inhibition was observed after the application of receptor-operated Ca2+ channel inhibitor SK&F 96365 or 20(S)-PPD. Conclusion: 20(S)-PPD induces vasorelaxation via an endothelium-independent pathway

  3. Evaluating the accretion of meteoritic debris and interplanetary dust particles in the GPC-3 sediment core using noble gas and mineralogical tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, Thomas H.; Poreda, Robert J.

    2012-05-01

    Extraterrestrial (ET) noble gases (helium and neon) in 35 sediment samples from Central Pacific core LL-44 GPC-3 demonstrate the variable flux of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and major meteorite impacts over the past 70 Ma (21-72 Ma). Spinel mineralogical and chemical compositions clearly distinguish major impact events from the continuous flux of IDPs, including the well-established Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) and late Eocene (E/O) impact boundaries. No spinel grains with chemical or mineralogical evidence of a distinctly ET origin were found in an extensive survey of 'background' samples (i.e. non E/O or K/T boundary) suggesting that either the carrier grains for ET noble gas occur within the Fe-Ti oxide mineral fraction observed in this study (found to include ilmenite and ulvospinel) or are too small for identification by SEM. The presence of ilmenite and ulvospinel suggest lunar regolith is a potential source for ET noble gas-rich particles. Noble gas analysis on both the EMF (extractable magnetic fraction) and the Bulk minus EMF (Bulk - EMF) show that the He and Ne compositions are consistent with partially degassed noble gas signatures of zero-age magnetic grains (Z-MAG) and stratospheric interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). Conclusive evidence for a 'planetary' (Ne-A) noble gas signature is found only in the bulk sediments at the K/T boundary, although all GPC-3 K/T fractions (Bulk, EMF, and HF Digestion) plot along a mixing line between planetary (Ne-A) and solar wind (SW). Spinels from major impact boundaries (K/T; E/O) exhibit dendritic texture and elevated [Ni], consistent with previous reports. In contrast to the otherwise consistent [3He] signal from IDPs, the [3He] at the known impact boundaries (K/T and E/O) actually decreases. These anomalously low [3He] are accompanied by significantly elevated [Ne] and significantly lower (3He/20Ne)solar ratios (˜10× lower) produced by both preferentially degassing of He relative to Ne at times of

  4. Intra- and inter-nucleosomal interactions of the histone H4 tail revealed with a human nucleosome core particle with genetically-incorporated H4 tetra-acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Wakamori, Masatoshi; Fujii, Yoshifumi; Suka, Noriyuki; Shirouzu, Mikako; Sakamoto, Kensaku; Umehara, Takashi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones, such as lysine acetylation of the N-terminal tails, play crucial roles in controlling gene expression. Due to the difficulty in reconstituting site-specifically acetylated nucleosomes with crystallization quality, structural analyses of histone acetylation are currently performed using synthesized tail peptides. Through engineering of the genetic code, translation termination, and cell-free protein synthesis, we reconstituted human H4-mono- to tetra-acetylated nucleosome core particles (NCPs), and solved the crystal structures of the H4-K5/K8/K12/K16-tetra-acetylated NCP and unmodified NCP at 2.4 Å and 2.2 Å resolutions, respectively. The structure of the H4-tetra-acetylated NCP resembled that of the unmodified NCP, and the DNA wrapped the histone octamer as precisely as in the unmodified NCP. However, the B-factors were significantly increased for the peripheral DNAs near the N-terminal tail of the intra- or inter-nucleosomal H4. In contrast, the B-factors were negligibly affected by the H4 tetra-acetylation in histone core residues, including those composing the acidic patch, and at H4-R23, which interacts with the acidic patch of the neighboring NCP. The present study revealed that the H4 tetra-acetylation impairs NCP self-association by changing the interactions of the H4 tail with DNA, and is the first demonstration of crystallization quality NCPs reconstituted with genuine PTMs. PMID:26607036

  5. Magnetic C-C@Fe3O4 double-shelled hollow microspheres via aerosol-based Fe3O4@C-SiO2 core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yangzhi; Li, Xiangcun; He, Gaohong; Qi, Xinhong

    2015-02-18

    Magnetic C-C@Fe3O4 hollow microspheres were prepared by using aerosol-based Fe3O4@C-SiO2 core-shell particles as templates. The magnetic double-shelled microspheres efficiently worked as carriers to load Pt nanoparticles, thus making the catalyst recyclable and reusable.

  6. [Cu32(H)20{S2P(O i Pr)2 }12 ]: The Largest Number of Hydrides Recorded in a Molecular Nanocluster by Neutron Diffraction

    DOE PAGES

    Dhayal, Rajendra S.; Liao, Jian-Hong; Kahlal, Samia; ...

    2015-04-20

    An air- and moisture-stable nanoscale polyhydrido copper cluster [Cu32(H)20{S2P(O i Pr)2 }12 ] (1H) was synthesized and structurally characterized. The molecular structure of 1H exhibits a hexacapped pseudo-rhombohedral core of 14 Cu atoms sandwiched between two nestlike triangular cupola fragments of (2x9) Cu atoms in an elongated triangular gyrobicupola polyhedron. The discrete Cu32 cluster is stabilized by 12 dithiophosphate ligands and a record number of 20 hydride ligands, which were found by high-resolution neutron diffraction to exhibit tri-, tetra-, and pentacoordinated hydrides in capping and interstitial modes. We conclude that this result was further supported by a density functional theorymore » investigation on the simplified model [Cu32(H)20(S2PH2)12].« less

  7. Rubber particles from four different species, examined by transmission electron microscopy and electron-paramagnetic-resonance spin labeling, are found to consist of a homogeneous rubber core enclosed by a contiguous, monolayer biomembrane

    PubMed

    Cornish; Wood; Windle

    1999-11-01

    The physical characteristics of rubber particles from the four rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) producing species Euphorbia lactiflua Phil., Ficus elastica Roxb., Hevea brasiliensis Mull. Arg., and Parthenium argentatum Gray, were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron-paramagnetic-resonance (EPR) spin labeling spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy showed the rubber particles to be composed of a spherical, homogeneous, core of rubber enclosed by a contiguous, electron-dense, single-track surface layer. The biochemical composition of the surface layer and its single-track TEM suggested that a monolayer biomembrane was the surface structure most compatible with the hydrophobic rubber core. The EPR spectra for a series of positional isomers of doxyl stearic acid, used to label the surface layer of the rubber particles, exhibited flexibility gradients and evidence for lipid-protein interactions for all four rubber particle types that is consistent with a biomembrane-like surface. The EPR spectra confirmed that the surface biomembrane is a monolayer. Thus, rubber particles appear similar to oil bodies in their basic architecture. The EPR spectra also provided information on protein location and degree of biomembrane penetration that correlated with the known properties of the rubber-particle-bound proteins. The monolayer biomembrane serves as an interface between the hydrophobic rubber interior and the aqueous cytosol and prevents aggregation of the particles. An unexpected observation for the probes in pure polyisoprene was evidence of an intrinsic flexibility gradient associated with the stearic acid molecule itself.

  8. Relationship between 5S and 20S forms of malate synthase in maturing cottonseeds

    SciTech Connect

    Turley, R.B.; Trelease, R.N.

    1987-04-01

    Malate synthase (MS) activity appears and increases during seed maturation persists during desiccation, then increases again following germination. Because different modes of synthesis and organelle import of MS may occur in maturing and germinated seeds, a comparative study was performed. A comparison of immunoprecipitations from in-vivo-labeled seeds (/sup 35/S-met) and in-vitro translations of Poly A+ RNA (wheat germ) showed no detectable differences in subunit mol wt. When MS activity first appears (42 DPA) only the cytosolic 5S form is found in rate-zonal gradients (5-25% sucrose). At 48 DPA, O d, and 48 h germinated seeds both the 5S and glyoxysomal 20S forms are present, with the 20S becoming more prevalent. Western blots of SDS-PAGE gels showed that no other form(s) of MS (inactive) are present in rate-zonal fractions. Calculations of radiospecific activity (per MS activity) of 5S and 20S forms radiolabeled in vivo (/sup 35/S-met) at various time periods provided further convincing evidence that there is a 5S precursor to 20S product relationship during both seed maturation and seedling growth.

  9. A study on the cerebral sizes of Koreans in their 20S and 40S.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soon-Cheol; Choi, Mi-Hyun; Lee, Bongsoo; Tack, Gye-Rae; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Park, Jong-Rak; Min, Byung-Chan; Park, Byung-Gi

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the cerebral sizes of Korean adults in their third (20s) and fifth decades (40s) of life using Talairach-Nowinski reference points to determine the effect of sex and age on cerebral size and asymmetry. Magnetic resonance images of the brain of 94 adults between 20 and 29 years of age (43 males and 51 females) and 99 adults between 40 and 49 years of age (38 males and 61 females) were measured. The distance between reference points and cerebral size of males was greater than those of females. Cerebral width and the size of the left cerebrum of those in their 40s decreased more than those in their 20s. The effect of age on left cerebral atrophy of males was greater than that of females. Left cerebral size was greater than right cerebral size. There was no difference in cerebral asymmetry between the genders. Cerebral asymmetry of those in their 40s was smaller than of those in their 20s and the decrease of cerebral asymmetry of males due to age was greater than that of females. A positive relationship existed between cerebral height, and body height and weight for males in their 20s.

  10. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and ion mobility analysis of the 20S proteasome complex.

    PubMed

    Loo, Joseph A; Berhane, Beniam; Kaddis, Catherine S; Wooding, Kerry M; Xie, Yongming; Kaufman, Stanley L; Chernushevich, Igor V

    2005-07-01

    Mass spectrometry and gas phase ion mobility [gas phase electrophoretic macromolecule analyzer (GEMMA)] with electrospray ionization were used to characterize the structure of the noncovalent 28-subunit 20S proteasome from Methanosarcina thermophila and rabbit. ESI-MS measurements with a quadrupole time-of-flight analyzer of the 192 kDa alpha7-ring and the intact 690 kDa alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 are consistent with their expected stoichiometries. Collisionally activated dissociation of the 20S gas phase complex yields loss of individual alpha-subunits only, and it is generally consistent with the known alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 architecture. The analysis of the binding of a reversible inhibitor to the 20S proteasome shows the expected stoichiometry of one inhibitor for each beta-subunit. Ion mobility measurements of the alpha7-ring and the alpha7beta7beta7alpha7 complex yield electrophoretic diameters of 10.9 and 15.1 nm, respectively; these dimensions are similar to those measured by crystallographic methods. Sequestration of multiple apo-myoglobin substrates by a lactacystin-inhibited 20S proteasome is demonstrated by GEMMA experiments. This study suggests that many elements of the gas phase structure of large protein complexes are preserved upon desolvation, and that methods such as mass spectrometry and ion mobility analysis can reveal structural details of the solution protein complex.

  11. Virus-like particles of hepatitis B virus core protein containing five mimotopes of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) protect chickens against IBDV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-shan; Ouyang, Wei; Liu, Xiao-juan; He, Kong-wang; Yu, Sheng-qing; Zhang, Hai-bin; Fan, Hong-jie; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2012-03-09

    Current infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccines suffer from maternal antibody interference and mimotope vaccines might be an alternative. Previously we demonstrated an IBDV VP2 five-mimotope polypeptide, 5EPIS, elicited protective immunity in chickens. In the current study, the 5epis gene was inserted into a plasmid carrying human hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) gene at its major immunodominant region site. The recombinant gene was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli to produce chimeric protein HBc-5EPIS which self-assembles to virus-like particles (VLP). Two-week old specific-pathogen-free chickens were immunized intramuscularly with HBc-5EPIS VLP or 5EPIS polypeptide without adjuvant (50 μg/injection) on day 0, 7, 14 and 21. Anti-5EPIS antibody was first detected on day 7 and day 21 in HBc-5EPIS and 5EPIS groups, respectively; on day 28, anti-5EPIS titers reached 12,800 or 1600 by ELISA, and 3200 or 800 by virus neutralization assay in HBc-5EPIS and 5EPIS groups, respectively. No anti-5EPIS antibody was detected in the buffer control group throughout the experiment. Challenge on day 28 with a virulent IBDV strain (GX8/99) resulted in 100%, 40.0% and 26.7% survival for chickens immunized with HBc-5EPIS, 5EPIS and buffer, respectively. These data suggest epitope presentation on chimeric VLP is a promising approach for improving mimotope vaccines for IBDV.

  12. A novel virus-like particle based on hepatitis B core antigen and substrate-binding domain of bacterial molecular chaperone DnaK.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue Jun; Gu, Kai; Xiong, Qi Yan; Shen, Liang; Cao, Rong Yue; Li, Ming Hui; Li, Tai Ming; Wu, Jie; Liu, Jing Jing

    2009-12-09

    Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein has been proved to be an attractive carrier for foreign epitopes, and can display green fluorescent protein (GFP) on its surface. The structure of substrate-binding domain of DnaK [DnaK (394-504 aa), DnaK SBD] is similar to GFP, we therefore reasoned that DnaK SBD might also be tolerated. Electron microscopic observations suggested that the chimeric proteins containing the truncated HBc (HBcDelta) and DnaK SBD could self-assemble into virus-like particle (VLP). Then the accessibility of DnaK SBD and the adjuvanticity of VLP HBcDelta-SBD were demonstrated by two recombinant peptide vaccines against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GhM and GhMNR. The latter carries in addition the peptide motif NRLLLTG which is known to bind to DnaK and DnaK SBD. The combination of VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhMNR elicited stronger humoral responses and caused further testicular atrophy than the combinations of VLP HBcDelta and GhMNR or VLP HBcDelta-SBD and GhM in Balb/c mice. These findings indicate VLP HBcDelta-SBD might serve as an excellent carrier for GhMNR and some other peptide vaccines.

  13. The t-J model of hard-core bosons in slave-particle representation and its Monte-Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yuki; Ishima, Takumi; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Sakakibara, Kazuhiko; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2012-12-01

    We study the system of hard-core bosons (HCB) with two species in the three-dimensional lattice at finite temperatures. In the strong-correlation limit, the system becomes the bosonic t-J model, that is, the t-J model of “bosonic electrons”. The bosonic “electron” operator Bxσ at the site x with a two-component spin σ(= 1, 2***) is treated as a HCB operator, and represented by a composite of two slave particles; a spinon described by a Schwinger boson (CP1 boson) zxσ and a holon described by a HCB field φx as Bxσ = φ†xzxσ.*** This φx is again represented by another CP1 quasi-spinon operator ωxa*** (a = 1, 2***). The phase diagrams of the resulting double CP1 system obtained by Monte Carlo simulations involve first-order and second-order phase boundaries. We present in detail the techniques and algorithm to reduce the hysteresis and locate the first-order transition points.

  14. Noncovalent inhibitors of human 20S and 26S proteasome based on trypsin inhibitor SFTI-1.

    PubMed

    Dębowski, Dawid; Cichorek, Mirosława; Lubos, Marta; Wójcik, Sławomir; Łęgowska, Anna; Rolka, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    Sunflower trypsin inhibitor (SFTI-1) is recognized as an attractive scaffold to designed potent inhibitors of various proteases. We have recently found that its analogues inhibit noncovalently both human and yeast 20S proteasomes. Here, a set of novel and more potent in vitro inhibitors is presented. The inhibitory potency of the peptides was assessed with human 20S proteasome in the presence or absence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and with human 26 proteasome. Their antiproliferative action against tumor (human melanoma cells A375) and normal cells (46 BR.1N human fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes) was determined. The selected fluoresceine-labeled inhibitors were able to internalize into A375 cells and were sometimes present as foci in the cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 685-696, 2016.

  15. [Scientific diffusion in Rio de Janeiro: some considerations about the 20s].

    PubMed

    Moreira, I de C; Massarani, L

    In this article, we collate data about the activities aimed at the diffusion of scientific knowledge, which were developed in Rio de Janeiro in the 20s, and we discuss their main characteristics. We also point out the significant involvement of members of the scientific and academic communities in such activities. The main research questions guiding the investigation are concerned with the identification of the main characteristics of scientific diffusion at the time, the main actors in such a process, their form of organization, the research means and instruments used. We also provide a general analysis of the motivations, interests, and the philosophical and political perspectives of science in the 20s, as reflected in the type of scientific diffusion produced at the time.

  16. Molecular characterization and intracellular distribution of the alpha 5 subunit of Trypanosoma cruzi 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Bessy; Osorio, Luis; Motta, María Cristina M; Huima-Byron, Telervo; Erdjument-Bromage, Heydeie; Muñoz, Christian; Sagua, Hernán; Mortara, Renato A; Echeverría, Alex; Araya, Jorge E; González, Jorge

    2009-12-01

    Three different monoclonal antibodies were produced against Trypanosona cruzi proteasomes. These antibodies were shown to react with a single 27-kDa band on immunoblots of purified proteasomes. Using a 7E5 monoclonal antibody (IgG1) that recognized the alpha5 subunit of protozoan protease we have studied the intracellular distribution of the T. cruzi 20S proteasome. Contrary to all cell types described to date, T. cruzi 20S proteasome was found not only in the cytoplasm and nucleus but also in the kinetoplast. As revealed by confocal microscopy, the reactivity of monoclonal antibody 7E5 was highly specific for protozoan proteasome because the antibody recognized only the proteasomes from parasites and not those from the mammalian host in T. cruzi infected cells. These findings were confirmed by immunoblots or immunoprecipitations, followed by chymotrypsin-like activity detection in kinetoplasts isolated by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradients. Proteasome 20S was present in all T. cruzi stages and only slight differences in terms of relative abundance were found. The potential role of the proteasome in kinetoplast remodeling remains to be determined.

  17. Development of a candidate influenza vaccine based on virus-like particles displaying influenza M2e peptide into the immunodominant region of hepatitis B core antigen: Broad protective efficacy of particles carrying four copies of M2e.

    PubMed

    Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Kuprianov, Victor V; Blokhina, Elena A; Potapchuk, Marina V; Korotkov, Alexander V; Gorshkov, Andrey N; Kasyanenko, Marina A; Ravin, Nikolai V; Kiselev, Oleg I

    2015-06-26

    A long-term objective when designing influenza vaccines is to create one with broad cross-reactivity that will provide effective control over influenza, no matter which strain has caused the disease. Here we summarize the results from an investigation into the immunogenic and protective capacities inherent in variations of a recombinant protein, HBc/4M2e. This protein contains four copies of the ectodomain from the influenza virus protein M2 (M2e) fused within the immunodominant loop of the hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBc). Variations of this basic design include preparations containing M2e from the consensus human influenza virus; the M2e from the highly pathogenic avian A/H5N1 virus and a combination of two copies from human and two copies from avian influenza viruses. Intramuscular delivery in mice with preparations containing four identical copies of M2e induced high IgG titers in blood sera and bronchoalveolar lavages. It also provoked the formation of memory T-cells and antibodies were retained in the blood sera for a significant period of time post immunization. Furthermore, these preparations prevented the death of 75-100% of animals, which were challenged with lethal doses of virus. This resulted in a 1.2-3.5 log10 decrease in viral replication within the lungs. Moreover, HBc particles carrying only "human" or "avian" M2e displayed cross-reactivity in relation to human (A/H1N1, A/H2N2 and A/H3N2) or A/H5N1 and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, respectively; however, with the particles carrying both "human" and "avian" M2e this effect was much weaker, especially in relation to influenza virus A/H5N1. It is apparent from this work that to quickly produce vaccine for a pandemic it would be necessary to have several variations of a recombinant protein, containing four copies of M2e (each one against a group of likely influenza virus strains) with these relevant constructs housed within a comprehensive collection Escherichia coli-producers and maintained ready for use.

  18. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity associated with the yeast viral p91/20S RNA ribonucleoprotein complex.

    PubMed Central

    García-Cuéllar, M P; Esteban, R; Fujimura, T

    1997-01-01

    20S RNA is a noninfectious viral single-stranded RNA found in most laboratory strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. 20S RNA encodes a protein of 91 kDa (p91) that contains the common motifs found among RNA-dependent RNA polymerases from RNA viruses. p91 and 20S RNA are noncovalently associated in vivo, forming a ribonucleoprotein complex. We detected an RNA polymerase activity in p91/20S RNA complexes isolated by high-speed centrifugation. The activity was not inhibited by actinomycin D nor alpha-amanitin. The majority of the in vitro products was 20S RNA and the rest was the complementary strands of 20S RNA. Because the extracts were prepared from cells accumulating 20S RNA over its complementary strands, these in vitro products reflect the corresponding activities in vivo. When the p91/20S RNA complexes were subjected to sucrose gradient centrifugation, the polymerase activity cosedimented with the complexes. Furthermore, an RNA polymerase activity was detected in the complex by an antibody-linked polymerase assay using anti-p91 antiserum, suggesting that p91 is present in the active RNA polymerase machinery. These results together indicate that p91 is the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase or a subunit thereof responsible for 20S RNA replication. PMID:8990396

  19. Granulation of core particles suitable for film coating by agitation fluidized bed III. Effect of scale, agitator rotational speed and blade shape on granule properties and development of a high accuracy scale-up theory.

    PubMed

    Hamashita, Tomohiro; Ono, Tetsuo; Ono, Masaki; Tsunenari, Yoshinobu; Aketo, Takao; Watano, Satoru

    2009-04-01

    The preparation of core particles suitable for subsequent film coating was examined using different scales of agitation fluidized beds. Specifically, the effects of agitator rotational speed and agitator blade shape in different scales of granulators on granule properties such as mass median diameter, apparent density, friability and shape factor were studied. As the agitator rotational speed was increased or when the agitator blade height and angle were large, the mass median diameter and friability of the granules decreased, while the apparent density and shape factor increased, in a manner independent of the vessel size because the granules were subjected to greater compression, shearing and rolling effects. The same core particles could not be prepared using granulators with different vessel sizes by simply adopting a conventional scale-up theory(1,2)) based on kinetic energy similarity. Here, a novel scale-up theory that takes into account agitator blade shape factors is proposed.(3)) When the two scale-up theories were compared, our new theory was capable of predicting the granule properties more accurately than the conventional theory. By adopting this novel theory, the same core particles could be prepared under different operating conditions in any scale of granulator.

  20. Movement Demands of Elite Under-20s and Senior International Rugby Union Players

    PubMed Central

    Drawer, Scott; Pollard, Ben; Eager, Robin; Taylor, Neil; Cook, Christian J.

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the movement demands of elite international Under-20 age grade (U20s) and senior international rugby union players during competitive tournament match play. Forty elite professional players from an U20 and 27 elite professional senior players from international performance squads were monitored using 10Hz global positioning systems (GPS) during 15 (U20s) and 8 (senior) international tournament matches during the 2014 and 2015 seasons. Data on distances, velocities, accelerations, decelerations, high metabolic load (HML) distance and efforts, and number of sprints were derived. Data files from players who played over 60 min (n = 258) were separated firstly into Forwards and Backs, and more specifically into six positional groups; FR–Front Row (prop & hooker), SR–Second Row, BR–Back Row (Flankers & No.8), HB–Half Backs (scrum half & outside half), MF–Midfield (centres), B3 –Back Three (wings & full back) for match analysis. Linear mixed models revealed significant differences between U20 and senior teams in both the forwards and backs. In the forwards the seniors covered greater HML distance (736.4 ± 280.3 vs 701.3 ± 198.7m, p = 0.01) and severe decelerations (2.38 ± 2.2 vs 2.28 ± 1.65, p = 0.05) compared to the U20s, but performed less relative HSR (3.1 ± 1.6 vs 3.2 ± 1.5, p < 0.01), moderate (19.4 ± 10.5 vs 23.6 ± 10.5, p = 0.01) and high accelerations (2.2 ± 1.9 vs 4.3 ± 2.7, p < 0.01) and sprint•min-1 (0.11 ± 0.06 vs 0.11 ± 0.05, p < 0.01). Senior backs covered a greater relative distance (73.3 ± 8.1 vs 69.1 ± 7.6 m•min-1, p < 0.01), greater High Metabolic Load (HML) distance (1138.0 ± 233.5 vs 1060.4 ± 218.1m, p < 0.01), HML efforts (112.7 ± 22.2 vs 98.8 ± 21.7, p < 0.01) and heavy decelerations (9.9 ± 4.3 vs 9.5 ± 4.4, p = 0.04) than the U20s backs. However, the U20s backs performed more relative HSR (7.3 ± 2.1 vs 7.2 ± 2.1, p <0.01) and sprint•min-1 (0.26 ± 0.07 vs 0.25 ± 0.07, p < 0.01). Further

  1. Movement Demands of Elite Under-20s and Senior International Rugby Union Players.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Daniel J; Shearer, David A; Drawer, Scott; Pollard, Ben; Eager, Robin; Taylor, Neil; Cook, Christian J; Kilduff, Liam P

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the movement demands of elite international Under-20 age grade (U20s) and senior international rugby union players during competitive tournament match play. Forty elite professional players from an U20 and 27 elite professional senior players from international performance squads were monitored using 10Hz global positioning systems (GPS) during 15 (U20s) and 8 (senior) international tournament matches during the 2014 and 2015 seasons. Data on distances, velocities, accelerations, decelerations, high metabolic load (HML) distance and efforts, and number of sprints were derived. Data files from players who played over 60 min (n = 258) were separated firstly into Forwards and Backs, and more specifically into six positional groups; FR-Front Row (prop & hooker), SR-Second Row, BR-Back Row (Flankers & No.8), HB-Half Backs (scrum half & outside half), MF-Midfield (centres), B3 -Back Three (wings & full back) for match analysis. Linear mixed models revealed significant differences between U20 and senior teams in both the forwards and backs. In the forwards the seniors covered greater HML distance (736.4 ± 280.3 vs 701.3 ± 198.7m, p = 0.01) and severe decelerations (2.38 ± 2.2 vs 2.28 ± 1.65, p = 0.05) compared to the U20s, but performed less relative HSR (3.1 ± 1.6 vs 3.2 ± 1.5, p < 0.01), moderate (19.4 ± 10.5 vs 23.6 ± 10.5, p = 0.01) and high accelerations (2.2 ± 1.9 vs 4.3 ± 2.7, p < 0.01) and sprint•min-1 (0.11 ± 0.06 vs 0.11 ± 0.05, p < 0.01). Senior backs covered a greater relative distance (73.3 ± 8.1 vs 69.1 ± 7.6 m•min-1, p < 0.01), greater High Metabolic Load (HML) distance (1138.0 ± 233.5 vs 1060.4 ± 218.1m, p < 0.01), HML efforts (112.7 ± 22.2 vs 98.8 ± 21.7, p < 0.01) and heavy decelerations (9.9 ± 4.3 vs 9.5 ± 4.4, p = 0.04) than the U20s backs. However, the U20s backs performed more relative HSR (7.3 ± 2.1 vs 7.2 ± 2.1, p <0.01) and sprint•min-1 (0.26 ± 0.07 vs 0.25 ± 0.07, p < 0.01). Further investigation

  2. Mutational analysis of the active site flap (20s loop) of mandelate racemase.

    PubMed

    Bourque, Jennifer R; Bearne, Stephen L

    2008-01-15

    Mandelate racemase from Pseudomonas putida catalyzes the Mg2+-dependent 1,1-proton transfer that interconverts the enantiomers of mandelate. Residues of the 20s and 50s loops determine, in part, the topology and polarity of the active site and hence the substrate specificity. Previously, we proposed that, during racemization, the phenyl ring of mandelate moves between an S-pocket comprised of residues from the 50s loop and an R-pocket comprised of residues from the 20s loop [Siddiqi, F., Bourque, J. R., Jiang, H., Gardner, M., St. Maurice, M., Blouin, C., and Bearne, S. L. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 9013-9021]. The 20s loop constitutes a mobile beta-meander flap that covers the active site cavity shielding it from solvent and controlling entry and egress of ligands. To understand the role of the 20s loop in catalysis and substrate specificity, we constructed a series of mutants (V22A, V22I, V22F, T24S, A25V, V26A, V26L, V26F, V29A, V29L, V29F, V26A/V29L, and V22I/V29L) in which the sizes of hydrophobic side chains of the loop residues were varied. Catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) for all mutants were reduced between 6- and 40-fold with the exception of those of V22I, V26A, V29L, and V22I/V29L which had near wild-type efficiencies with mandelate. Thr 24 and Ala 25, located at the tip of the 20s loop, were particularly sensitive to minor alterations in the size of their hydrophobic side chains; however, most mutations were tolerated quite well, suggesting that flap mobility could compensate for increases in the steric bulk of hydrophobic side chains. With the exception of V29L, with mandelate as the substrate, and V22F and V26A/V29L, with 2-naphthylglycolate (2-NG) as the substrate, the values of kcat and Km were not altered in a manner consistent with steric obstruction of the R-pocket, perhaps due to flap mobility compensating for the increased size of the hydrophobic side chains. Surprisingly, V22I and V29L catalyzed the racemization of the bulkier substrate 2-NG

  3. The ginsenoside derivative 20(S)-protopanaxadiol inhibits solar ultraviolet light-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Eungmin; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Kim, Jong-Eun; Yang, Hee; Oh, Deok-Kun; Yoon Park, Jung Han; Yoon Park, Dalius; Kim, Hee Jung; Rhee, Young Kyoung; Lee, Ki Won

    2017-04-05

    Ginsenosides are major pharmacologically active compounds present in ginseng (Panax ginseng). Among the ginsenosides, 20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (GPPD) and ginsenoside Rb1 (Rb1) have previously been reported to exhibit anti-wrinkle effects. In this study, 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (20(S)-PPD), an aglycone derivative of the Rb1 metabolite was investigated for its anti-wrinkle benefit and compared to GPPD and Rb1. The anti-wrinkle effect of 20(S)-PPD during solar UV light was investigated using a human skin equivalent model and human keratinocytes. 20(S)-PPD attenuated solar UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression to a greater extent than GPPD and Rb1. 20(S)-PPD treatment modulated MMP-1 mRNA expression and the transcriptional activity of activator protein (AP)-1, a major transcription factor of MMP-1. Two upstream signaling pathways for AP-1, the MEK1/2-ERK1/2-p90(RSK) and MEK3/6-p38 pathways, were also suppressed. Taken together, these findings highlight the potential of 20(S)-PPD for further development as a preventative agent for sunlight-induced skin wrinkle. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Enhanced oral bioavailability and anti-tumour effect of paclitaxel by 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei-Qiong; Wang, Bin; Gan, Hui; Fu, Shou-Ting; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Wu, Zhuo-Na; Zhan, Da-Wei; Gu, Ruo-Lan; Dou, Gui-Fang; Meng, Zhi-Yun

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of paclitaxel in combination with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 on its anti-tumour effect in nude mice. In the Caco-2 transport assay, the apparent permeability from the apical side to the basal side (P(app)) (A-B) and P(app) (B-A) of paclitaxel were measured when co-incubated with different concentrations of 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3. The results indicated that the penetration of paclitaxel through the Caco-2 monolayer from the apical side to the basal side was facilitated by 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 in a concentration-dependent manner. Meanwhile, 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 inhibited P-glycoprotein (P-gp), and the maximum inhibition was achieved at 80 µM (p < 0.05). The pharmacokinetic parameters of paclitaxel after oral co-administration of paclitaxel (40 mg/kg) with various doses of 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 in rats were investigated by an in vivo pharmacokinetic experiment. The results showed that the AUC of paclitaxel co-administered with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 was significantly higher (p < 0.001 at 10 mg/kg) compared with the control. The relative bioavailability (RB) % of paclitaxel with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 was 3.4-fold (10 mg/kg) higher than that of the control. The effect of paclitaxel orally co-administered with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 against human tumour MCF-7 xenografts in nude mice was also evaluated. Paclitaxel (20 mg/kg) co-administered with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 (10 mg/kg) exhibited an effective anti-tumour activity with the relative tumor growth rate (T/C) values of 39.36% (p <0.05). The results showed that 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 enhanced the oral bioavailability of paclitaxel in rats and improved the anti-tumour activity in nude mice, indicating that oral co-administration of paclitaxel with 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 could provide an effective strategy in addition to the established i.v. route.

  5. Sensitivity of Λ single-particle energies to the ΛN spin-orbit coupling and to nuclear core structure in p-shell and sd-shell hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselý, P.; Hiyama, E.; Hrtánková, J.; Mareš, J.

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a mean field model based on realistic 2-body baryon interactions and calculate spectra of a set of p-shell and sd-shell Λ hypernuclei - 13ΛC, 17ΛO, 21ΛNe, 29ΛSi and 41ΛCa. The hypernuclear spectra are compared with the results of a relativistic mean field (RMF) model and available experimental data. The sensitivity of Λ single-particle energies to the nuclear core structure is explored. Special attention is paid to the effect of spin-orbit ΛN interaction on the energy splitting of the Λ single particle levels 0p3/2 and 0p1/2. In particular, we analyze the contribution of the symmetric (SLS) and the anti-symmetric (ALS) spin-orbit terms to the energy splitting. We give qualitative predictions for the calculated hypernuclei.

  6. An ALS disease mutation in Cdc48/p97 impairs 20S proteasome binding and proteolytic communication.

    PubMed

    Barthelme, Dominik; Jauregui, Ruben; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-09-01

    Cdc48 (also known as p97 or VCP) is an essential and highly abundant, double-ring AAA+ ATPase, which is ubiquitous in archaea and eukaryotes. In archaea, Cdc48 ring hexamers play a direct role in quality control by unfolding and translocating protein substrates into the degradation chamber of the 20S proteasome. Whether Cdc48 and 20S cooperate directly in protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is unclear. Two regions of Cdc48 are important for 20S binding, the pore-2 loop at the bottom of the D2 AAA+ ring and a C-terminal tripeptide. Here, we identify an aspartic acid in the pore-2 loop as an important element in 20S recognition. Importantly, mutation of this aspartate in human Cdc48 has been linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In archaeal or human Cdc48 variants, we find that mutation of this pore-2 residue impairs 20S binding and proteolytic communication but does not affect the stability of the hexamer or rates of ATP hydrolysis and protein unfolding. These results suggest that human Cdc48 interacts functionally with the 20S proteasome.

  7. Design, Synthesis and Biological Activities of Novel Gemini 20S-Hydroxyvitamin D3 Analogs.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zongtao; Marepally, Srinivasa R; Kim, Tae-Kang; Janjetovic, Zorica; Oak, Allen Sw; Postlethwaite, Arnold E; Myers, Linda K; Tuckey, Robert C; Slominski, Andrzej T; Miller, Duane D; Li, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Vitamin D3 (D3) can be metabolized by cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) into 20S-hydroxyvitamin D3 (20D3) as a major metabolite. This bioactive metabolite has shown strong antiproliferative, antifibrotic, pro-differentiation and anti-inflammatory effects while being non-toxic (non-calcemic) at high concentrations. Since D3 analogs with two symmetric side chains (Gemini analogs) result in potent activation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), we hypothesized that the chain length and composition of these types of analogs also containing a 20-hydroxyl group would affect their biological activities. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of Gemini 20D3 analogs. Biological tests showed that some of these analogs are partial VDR activators and can significantly stimulate the expression of mRNA for VDR and VDR-regulated genes including CYP24A1 and transient receptor potential cation channel V6 (TRPV6). These analogs inhibited the proliferation of melanoma cells with potency comparable to that of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Moreover, these analogs reduced the level of interferon γ and up-regulated the expression of leukocyte associated immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 in splenocytes, indicating that they have potent anti-inflammatory activities. There are no clear correlations between the Gemini chain length and their VDR activation or biological activities, consistent with the high flexibility of the ligand-binding pocket of the VDR.

  8. Design, Synthesis and Biological Activities of Novel Gemini 20S-Hydroxyvitamin D3 Analogs

    PubMed Central

    LIN, ZONGTAO; MAREPALLY, SRINIVASA R.; KIM, TAE-KANG; JANJETOVIC, ZORICA; OAK, ALLEN SW.; POSTLETHWAITE, ARNOLD E.; MYERS, LINDA K.; TUCKEY, ROBERT C.; SLOMINSKI, ANDRZEJ T.; MILLER, DUANE D.; LI, WEI

    2017-01-01

    Vitamin D3 (D3) can be metabolized by cytochrome P450scc (CYP11A1) into 20S-hydroxyvitamin D3 (20D3) as a major metabolite. This bioactive metabolite has shown strong antiproliferative, antifibrotic, pro-differentiation and anti-inflammatory effects while being non-toxic (non-calcemic) at high concentrations. Since D3 analogs with two symmetric side chains (Gemini analogs) result in potent activation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), we hypothesized that the chain length and composition of these types of analogs also containing a 20-hydroxyl group would affect their biological activities. In this study, we designed and synthesized a series of Gemini 20D3 analogs. Biological tests showed that some of these analogs are partial VDR activators and can significantly stimulate the expression of mRNA for VDR and VDR-regulated genes including CYP24A1 and transient receptor potential cation channel V6 (TRPV6). These analogs inhibited the proliferation of melanoma cells with potency comparable to that of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Moreover, these analogs reduced the level of interferon γ and up-regulated the expression of leukocyte associated immunoglobulin-like receptor 1 in splenocytes, indicating that they have potent anti-inflammatory activities. There are no clear correlations between the Gemini chain length and their VDR activation or biological activities, consistent with the high flexibility of the ligand-binding pocket of the VDR. PMID:26976974

  9. Crystal structure of the human 20S proteasome in complex with carfilzomib.

    PubMed

    Harshbarger, Wayne; Miller, Chase; Diedrich, Chandler; Sacchettini, James

    2015-02-03

    Proteasome inhibition is highly effective as a treatment for multiple myeloma, and recently carfilzomib was granted US FDA approval for the treatment of relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the human constitutive 20S proteasome with and without carfilzomib bound at 2.9 and 2.6 Å, respectively. Our data indicate that the S3 and S4 binding pockets play a pivotal role in carfilzomib's selectivity for chymotrypsin-like sites. Structural comparison with the mouse immunoproteasome crystal structure reveals amino acid substitutions that explain carfilzomib's slight preference for chymotrypsin-like subunits of constitutive proteasomes. In addition, comparison of the human proteasome:carfilzomib complex with the mouse proteasome:PR-957 complex reveals new details that explain why PR-957 is selective for immunoproteasomes. Together, the data presented here support the design of inhibitors for either constitutive or immunoproteasomes, with implications for the treatment of cancers as well as autoimmune and neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. A unified mechanism for proteolysis and autocatalytic activation in the 20S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Eva M.; Heinemeyer, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Arendt, Cassandra S.; Hochstrasser, Mark; Groll, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the 20S proteasome is tightly regulated. The N-terminal propeptides protecting the active-site threonines are autocatalytically released only on completion of assembly. However, the trigger for the self-activation and the reason for the strict conservation of threonine as the active site nucleophile remain enigmatic. Here we use mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography and biochemical assays to suggest that Lys33 initiates nucleophilic attack of the propeptide by deprotonating the Thr1 hydroxyl group and that both residues together with Asp17 are part of a catalytic triad. Substitution of Thr1 by Cys disrupts the interaction with Lys33 and inactivates the proteasome. Although a Thr1Ser mutant is active, it is less efficient compared with wild type because of the unfavourable orientation of Ser1 towards incoming substrates. This work provides insights into the basic mechanism of proteolysis and propeptide autolysis, as well as the evolutionary pressures that drove the proteasome to become a threonine protease. PMID:26964885

  11. Salinosporamide Natural Products: Potent 20S Proteasome Inhibitors as Promising Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gulder, Tobias A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors are rapidly evolving as potent treatment options in cancer therapy. One of the most promising drug candidates of this type is salinosporamide A from the bacterium Salinispora tropica. This marine natural product possesses a complex, densely functionalized γ-lactam-β-lactone pharmacophore, which is responsible for its irreversible binding to its target, the β subunit of the 20S proteasome. Salinosporamide A entered phase I clinical trials for the treatment of multiple myeloma only three years after its discovery. The strong biological activity and the challenging structure of this compound have fueled intense academic and industrial research in recent years, which has led to the development of more than ten syntheses, the elucidation of its biosynthetic pathway, and the generation of promising structure–activity relationships and oncological data. Salinosporamide A thus serves as an intriguing example of the successful interplay of modern drug discovery and biomedical research, medicinal chemistry and pharmacology, natural product synthesis and analysis, as well as biosynthesis and bioengineering. PMID:20927786

  12. The 20S Proteasome Splicing Activity Discovered by SpliceMet

    PubMed Central

    Textoris-Taube, Kathrin; Janek, Katharina; Keller, Christin; Henklein, Petra; Kloetzel, Peter Michael; Zaikin, Alexey

    2010-01-01

    The identification of proteasome-generated spliced peptides (PSP) revealed a new unpredicted activity of the major cellular protease. However, so far characterization of PSP was entirely dependent on the availability of patient-derived cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTL) thus preventing a systematic investigation of proteasome-catalyzed peptide splicing (PCPS). For an unrestricted PSP identification we here developed SpliceMet, combining the computer-based algorithm ProteaJ with in vitro proteasomal degradation assays and mass spectrometry. By applying SpliceMet for the analysis of proteasomal processing products of four different substrate polypeptides, derived from human tumor as well as viral antigens, we identified fifteen new spliced peptides generated by PCPS either by cis or from two separate substrate molecules, i.e., by trans splicing. Our data suggest that 20S proteasomes represent a molecular machine that, due to its catalytic and structural properties, facilitates the generation of spliced peptides, thereby providing a pool of qualitatively new peptides from which functionally relevant products may be selected. PMID:20613855

  13. The Translational Proteome Modulated by 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Ying Hua; Chen, Chien Chuan; Li, Fu An; Cheng, Jen Kun; Lin, Ming Chung; Huang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD), a natural compound of dammarane ginsenoside purified from the ginseng plant, exhibits strong anticancer properties. It has also been reported to have strong antioxidant activity and plays a role in cardiovascular protection. However, the downstream signaling mechanism PPD employs is still unclear and requires further elucidation. Methods Endothelial cells (ECs) EAhy 926 were used to investigate the growth promoting effect of PPD. The protein lysates extracted from both mock- and PPD-treated cells were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to monitor protein changes. After image analysis, proteins with significant change in the expression level were further identified by mass spectrometry. Western blot was applied to further confirm the protein variations in the 2-DE assay. Results In the current study, we found that treatment with PPD (10 μg/ml) significantly increased ECs healing. The translational proteome was established according to 16 up-regulated and 8 down-regulated proteins identified in 2-DE. These proteins were reported to function as energy homeostasis and in the prevention of oxidative stress. The elevated expressions of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and glutathione synthetase (GSS) were further confirmed in the western blot analysis. Conclusions According to the information obtained from translational proteome, we delineated that PPD mediated vascular homeostasis through the up-regulation of anti-oxidative proteins. Additional functional investigations are necessary regarding the HO-1 and GSS proteins. PMID:27122820

  14. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol Phospholipid Complex: Process Optimization, Characterization, In Vitro Dissolution and Molecular Docking Studies.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yiqiong; Zhang, Xitong; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yuxi; Zang, Chuanqi; Wang, Yuqin; Dong, Tina Ting-Xia; Zhang, Tong

    2016-10-19

    20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD), a bioactive compound extracted from ginseng, possesses cardioprotective, neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory, antiestrogenic, anticancer and anxiolytic effects. However, the clinical application of PPD is limited by its weak aqueous solubility. In this study, we optimized an efficient method of preparing its phospholipid complex (PPD-PLC) using a central composite design and response surface analysis. The prepared PPD-PLC was characterized by differential scanning calorimetric, powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance analyses associated with molecular docking calculation. The equilibrium solubility of PPD-PLC in water and n-octanol increased 6.53- and 1.53-times, respectively. Afterwards, using PPD-PLC as the intermediate, the PPD-PLC-loaded dry suspension (PPD-PLC-SU) was prepared with our previous method. In vitro evaluations were conducted on PPD-PLC and PPD-PLC-SU, including dissolution behaviors and stability properties under different conditions. Results of in vitro dissolution behavior revealed the improved dissolution extents and rates of PPD-PLC and PPD-PLC-SU (p < 0.05). Results of the formulation stability investigation also exposed the better stability of PPD-PLC-SU compared with free PPD. Therefore, phospholipid complex technology is a useful formulation strategy for BCS II drugs, as it could effectively improve their hydrophilicity and lipophilicity.

  15. Removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solution using Fe3O4-SiO2-poly(1,2-diaminobenzene) core-shell sub-micron particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Lan, Jing; Zhao, Zongshan; Yang, Ye; Tan, Ruiqin; Song, Weijie

    2012-12-01

    In this work, Fe(3)O(4)-SiO(2)-poly(1,2-diaminobenzene) sub-micron particles (FSPs) with high saturated magnetization of ∼60-70 emu/g were developed and utilized for the removal of As(III), Cu(II), and Cr(III) ions from aqueous solution. The isothermal results fitted well with the Freundlich model and the kinetic results fitted well with the two-site pseudo-second-order model, which indicated that multilayer adsorption of As(III), Cu(II), and Cr(III) ions on FSPs occurred at two sites with different energy of adsorption. The maximum adsorption capacities followed the order of As(III) (84±5 mg/g, pH=6.0)>Cr(III) (77±3 mg/g, pH=5.3)>Cu(II) (65±3 mg/g, pH=6.0). And the chelating interaction was considered as the main adsorption mechanism. The as-prepared materials were chemically stable with low leaching of Fe (≤1.7 wt.%) and poly(1,2-diaminobenzene) (≤4.9 wt.%) in tap water, sea water, and acidic/basic solutions. These metal-loaded FSPs could be easily recovered from aqueous solutions using a permanent magnet within 20s. They could also be easily regenerated with acid. The present work indicates that the FSPs are promising for removal of heavy metal ions in field application.

  16. The preparation of composite microsphere with hollow core/porous shell structure by self-assembling of latex particles at emulsion droplet interface.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao Dong; Ge, Xue Wu; Wang, Mo Zhen; Zhang, Zhi Cheng

    2006-07-15

    A submicrometer-scaled polystyrene/melamine-formaldehyde hollow microsphere composite was prepared by self-assembling of sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) latex particles at the interface of emulsion droplets and then being fixed in place using a hard melamine-formaldehyde (MF) composite layer. For control-released purposes, the influential factors that control the size and uniformity of the packed-droplets and the permeability of the composite shell, including the initial particle location, the hydrophilicity and the size of colloidal templates, the oil phase solvent and reserving time of emulsions after the addition of MF prepolymer, were further studied. Relatively uniform sized particle packed-droplets with an average diameter of 10 microm were obtained. The assembled SPS particles kept ordering and minimal conglutination after the preparation of composite microspheres, which allows of controlling the permeability from the interstices between the particles. Porous-mesh-structured MF composite layer was formed to further control the permeability. The morphology of emulsions and composite microspheres were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

  17. Terminal functionalized thiourea-containing dipeptides as multidrug-resistance reversers that target 20S proteasome and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Qin, Jian-Mei; Huang, Ri-Zhen; Yao, Gui-Yang; Liao, Zhi-Xin; Pan, Ying-Ming; Wang, Heng-Shan

    2017-01-27

    A series of inhibitors of 20S proteasome based on terminal functionalized dipeptide derivatives containing the thiourea moiety were synthesized and evaluated for inhibition of 20S proteasome and the effects of multidrug-resistance reversers. These compounds exhibited significant selectivity to the β5-subunit of the human 20S proteasome with IC50 values at submicromolar concentrations. A docking study of the most active compound 6i revealed key interactions between 6i and the active site of the 20S proteasome in which the thiourea moiety and a nitro group were important for improving activity. In particular, compound 6i appeared to be the most potent compound against the NCI-H460 cell line, and displayed similar efficiency in drug-sensitive versus drug-resistant cancer cell lines, at least partly, by inhibition of the activity of 20S proteasome and induce apoptosis. In addition, 6i-induced apoptosis was significantly facilitated in NCI-H460/DOX cells that had been pretreated with inhibitors of P-gp. Mechanistically, compound 6i might trigger apoptotic signalling pathway. Thus, we conclude that dipeptide derivatives containing the thiourea moiety may be the potential inhibitors of proteasome with the ability to reverse multidrug resistance.

  18. Effects of an Anticarcinogenic Bowman-Birk Protease Inhibitor on Purified 20S Proteasome and MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Larissa da Costa; Camargo, Ricardo; Demasi, Marilene; Santana, Jaime Martins; de Freitas, Sonia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors have been described as an important target for cancer therapy due to their potential to regulate the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the degradation pathway of cellular proteins. Here, we reported the effects of a Bowman-Birk-type protease inhibitor, the Black-eyed pea Trypsin/Chymotrypsin Inhibitor (BTCI), on proteasome 20S in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and on catalytic activity of the purified 20S proteasome from horse erythrocytes, as well as the structural analysis of the BTCI-20S proteasome complex. In vitro experiments and confocal microscopy showed that BTCI readily crosses the membrane of the breast cancer cells and co-localizes with the proteasome in cytoplasm and mainly in nucleus. Indeed, as indicated by dynamic light scattering, BTCI and 20S proteasome form a stable complex at temperatures up to 55°C and at neutral and alkaline pHs. In complexed form, BTCI strongly inhibits the proteolytic chymotrypsin-, trypsin- and caspase-like activities of 20S proteasome, indicated by inhibition constants of 10−7 M magnitude order. Besides other mechanisms, this feature can be associated with previously reported cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of BTCI in MCF-7 breast cancer cells by means of apoptosis. PMID:24475156

  19. Heterogeneity in Men’s Marijuana Use in the 20s: Adolescent Antecedents and Consequences in the 30s

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Isaac J.; Capaldi, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescent psychopathology is commonly connected to marijuana use. How changes in these adolescent antecedents and in adolescent marijuana use are connected to patterns of marijuana use in the 20s is little understood. Also not clearly understood is psychopathology in the 30s as predicted by marijuana use in the 20s. This study sought to examine these two issues – and associations with marijuana disorder diagnoses – using a longitudinal dataset of 205 men with essentially annual reports. Individual psychopathology and family characteristics from the men’s adolescence were used to predict their patterns of marijuana use across their 20s, and aspects of the men’s psychopathology in their mid 30s were predicted from these patterns. Three patterns of marijuana use in the 20s were identified using growth mixture modeling and were associated with diagnoses of marijuana disorders at age 26 years. Parental marijuana use predicted chronic use for the men in adulthood. Patterns of marijuana use in the 20s predicted antisocial behavior and deviant peer association at age 36 years (controlling for adolescent levels of the outcomes by residualization). These findings indicate that differential patterns of marijuana use in early adulthood are associated with psychopathology toward midlife. PMID:25017389

  20. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    , hence, with the frictional drag acting on the outer sleeve. As the wire cuts toward the center of the core, the inner sleeve rotates farther with respect to the outer sleeve. Once the wire has cut to the center of the core, the tool and the core can be removed from the hole. The proper choice of cutting wire depends on the properties of the core material. For a sufficiently soft core material, a nonmetallic monofilament can be used. For a rubber-like core material, a metal wire can be used. For a harder core material, it is necessary to use an abrasive wire, and the efficiency of the tool can be increased greatly by vacuuming away the particles generated during cutting. For a core material that can readily be melted or otherwise cut by use of heat, it could be preferable to use an electrically heated cutting wire. In such a case, electric current can be supplied to the cutting wire, from an electrically isolated source, via rotating contact rings mounted on the sleeves.

  1. Reduction of HAuCl4 by Na2S revisited: The case for Au nanoparticle aggregates and against Au2S/Au core/shell particles

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartzberg, A. M.; Grant, C. D.; van Buuren, Tony; ...

    2007-03-10

    The reaction of sodium sulfide with chloroauric acid has been surrounded by a controversy over the structure of the resulting product. The original report proposed a Au2S/Au core/shell structure based on strong near-IR resonance and limited transmission electron microscopy. Subsequent reports used the same model without further attempts to determine the structure of the products. With a significant body of experimental work compiled over a period of several years, we have shown that the major product of this reaction is aggregated spherical nanoparticles of gold with a minority component consisting of triangular and rod-like structures. This is in contradiction tomore » the core/shell structures as originally proposed. Recently, there have been additional reports that again suggest a Au2S/Au core/shell structure or irregularly shaped Au nanoparticles as an explanation for the near-IR resonance. To help resolve this issue, we have carried out further experiments to determine how the reaction products may depend on experimental conditions such as concentration and aging of the reactants, particularly Na2S. It has been determined that sodium thiosulfate is the likely product from Na2S aging. In addition, persistent spectral hole burning experiments have been conducted on gold nanoparticle aggregate (GNA) samples at excitation intensities that are lower than that required to melt the nanostructures. We have observed a decrease in optical absorption on resonance with the excitation laser wavelength, with simultaneous increases in absorption to the blue and red of this wavelength region. However, in the presence of the stabilizer poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP), no increase in absorbance was observed but rather a blue shifting and decrease in intensity of the near-IR plasmon resonance. These results imply that the non-stabilized GNAs are able to break apart and reform into off resonant aggregate structures. In contrast, this behavior is suppressed in PVP stabilized GNAs

  2. Final Report: Measurements of Core Conditions, Implosion Symmetry, and Anomaloes Acceleration Mechanisms on Omega through Charged Particle Spectroscopy, November 1, 1997 - December 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Petrasso, R.; Li, C.K.

    1999-10-19

    This work concerns the first spectroscopic measurements of energetic charged particles on Omega. Individual line profiles include D-3He protons (14.7 MeV) and alphas (3.6 MeV), D-T alphas (3.5 MeV), D-D protons (3.0 MeV), and D-D tutons (1.0 MeV)

  3. Immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasome from human cells via transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits.

    PubMed

    Livinskaya, Veronika A; Barlev, Nickolai A; Nikiforov, Andrey A

    2014-05-01

    The proteasome is a multi-subunit proteolytic complex that plays a central role in protein degradation in all eukaryotic cells. It regulates many vital cellular processes therefore its dysfunction can lead to various pathologies including cancer and neurodegeneration. Isolation of enzymatically active proteasomes is a key step to the successful study of the proteasome regulation and functions. Here we describe a simple and efficient protocol for immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasomes from human HEK 293T cells after transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits tagged with 3xFLAG. To construct 3xFLAG-fusion proteins, DNA sequences encoding the 20S proteasome subunits PSMB5, PSMA5, and PSMA3 were cloned into mammalian expression vector pIRES-hrGFP-1a. The corresponding recombinant proteins PSMB5-3xFLAG, PSMA5-3xFLAG, or PSMA3-3xFLAG were transiently overexpressed in human HEK 293T cells and were shown to be partially incorporated into the intact proteasome complexes. 20S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated from HEK 293T cell extracts under mild conditions using antibodies against FLAG peptide. Isolation of highly purified 20S proteasomes were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting using antibodies against different proteasome subunits. Affinity purified 20S proteasomes were shown to possess chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like peptidase activities confirming their functionality. This simple single-step affinity method of the 20S proteasome purification can be instrumental to subsequent functional studies of proteasomes in human cells.

  4. Hollow Zn/Co ZIF Particles Derived from Core-Shell ZIF-67@ZIF-8 as Selective Catalyst for the Semi-Hydrogenation of Acetylene.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Zhang, Fengjun; Lu, Haiyuan; Hong, Xun; Jiang, Hailong; Wu, Yuen; Li, Yadong

    2015-09-07

    The rational design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with hollow features and tunable porosity at the nanoscale can enhance their intrinsic properties and stimulates increasing attentions. In this Communication, we demonstrate that methanol can affect the coordination mode of ZIF-67 in the presence of Co(2+) and induces a mild phase transformation under solvothermal conditions. By applying this transformation process to the ZIF-67@ZIF-8 core-shell structures, a well-defined hollow Zn/Co ZIF rhombic dodecahedron can be obtained. The manufacturing of hollow MOFs enables us to prepare a noble metal@MOF yolk-shell composite with controlled spatial distribution and morphology. The enhanced gas storage and porous confinement that originate from the hollow interior and coating of ZIF-8 confers this unique catalyst with superior activity and selectivity toward the semi-hydrogenation of acetylene.

  5. Electromagnetic properties of the 2+ state in 134Te: Influence of core excitation on single-particle orbits beyond 132Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Stuchbery, Andrew E; Allmond, James M; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}; Padilla-Rodal, Elizabeth; Radford, David C; Stone, N. J.; Batchelder, J. C.; Beene, James R; Benczer-Koller, N.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, Meredith E; Kumbartzki, G.; Liang, J Felix; Manning, Brett M; Stracener, Daniel W; Yu, Chang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The g factor and B (E2) of the first excited 2+ state have been measured following Coulomb excitation ofthe neutron-rich semimagic nuclide 134Te (two protons outside 132Sn) produced as a radioactive beam. The precision achieved matches related g-factor measurements on stable beams and distinguishes between alternative models. The B(E2) measurement exposes quadrupole strength in the 2+ state beyond that predicted by current large-basis shell-model calculations. This additional quadrupole strength can be attributed to coupling between the two valence protons and excitations of the 132Sn core. However, the wave functions of the low-excitation positive-parity states in 134Te up to 6+ remain dominated by the (g7/2)2 configuration.

  6. Chlamydomonas IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a core component of IFT particle complex B and is required for flagellar assembly.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Behal, Robert H; Geimer, Stefan; Wang, Zhaohui; Williamson, Shana M; Zhang, Haili; Cole, Douglas G; Qin, Hongmin

    2010-08-01

    DYF-1 is a highly conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis in several model organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans, DYF-1 serves as an essential activator for an anterograde motor OSM-3 of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the ciliogenesis-required motility that mediates the transport of flagellar precursors and removal of turnover products. In zebrafish and Tetrahymena DYF-1 influences the cilia tubulin posttranslational modification and may have more ubiquitous function in ciliogenesis than OSM-3. Here we address how DYF-1 biochemically interacts with the IFT machinery by using the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in which the anterograde IFT does not depend on OSM-3. Our results show that this protein is a stoichiometric component of the IFT particle complex B and interacts directly with complex B subunit IFT46. In concurrence with the established IFT protein nomenclature, DYF-1 is also named IFT70 after the apparent size of the protein. IFT70/CrDYF-1 is essential for the function of IFT in building the flagellum because the flagella of IFT70/CrDYF-1-depleted cells were greatly shortened. Together, these results demonstrate that IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a canonical subunit of IFT particle complex B and strongly support the hypothesis that the IFT machinery has species- and tissue-specific variations with functional ramifications.

  7. Core-shell magnetite-silica dithiocarbamate-derivatised particles achieve the Water Framework Directive quality criteria for mercury in surface waters.

    PubMed

    Lopes, C B; Figueira, P; Tavares, D S; Lin, Z; Daniel-da-Silva, A L; Duarte, A C; Rocha, J; Trindade, T; Pereira, E

    2013-09-01

    The sorption capacity of nanoporous titanosilicate Engelhard titanosilicate number 4 (ETS-4) and silica-coated magnetite particles derivatised with dithiocarbamate groups towards Hg(II) was evaluated and compared in spiked ultra-pure and spiked surface-river water, for different batch factors. In the former, and using a batch factor of 100 m(3)/kg and an initial Hg(II) concentrations matching the maximum allowed concentration in an effluent discharge, both materials achieve Hg(II) uptake efficiencies in excess of 99 % and a residual metal concentration lower than the guideline value for drinking water quality. For the surface-river water and the same initial concentration, the Hg(II) uptake efficiency of magnetite particles is outstanding, achieving the quality criteria established by the Water Framework Directive (concerning Hg concentration in surface waters) using a batch factor of 50 m(3)/kg, while the efficiency of ETS-4 is significantly inferior. The dissimilar sorbents' Hg(II) removal efficiency is attributed to different uptake mechanisms. This study also highlights the importance of assessing the effective capacity of the sorbents under realistic conditions in order to achieve trustable results.

  8. Use of a small particle solid-core packing for improved efficiency and rapid measurement of sirolimus and everolimus by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Phillip; Nwafor, Magnus; Tredger, Mike

    2016-06-01

    Measurement of whole blood sirolimus and everolimus is required in order to optimize patient treatment following solid organ transplant. Assay by LC-MS/MS is increasingly preferred; however efficient use of the instrument and short turnaround times are crucial. Use of a 1.6 µm solid-core packing HPLC column (Cortecs) gave significant increases in efficiency, sensitivity and throughput compared with an existing method, following simple protein precipitation of small-volume (20 μL) whole blood samples. Sirolimus, everolimus and the stable isotopic internal standard ((13) C2 D4 - everolimus) eluted at around 0.8 min, and total analytical run time was 2.2 min, saving almost 4 min per sample compared with an existing method. Within-assay imprecision (CV) was 3.3-8.5%, and between-assay imprecision was 2.2-10.8%. Retrospective assay of external quality assurance samples and comparison of patient samples assayed in parallel showed only small differences (between +6.8 and -1.9%) in results using the Cortecs column when compared with the existing method. No significant interferences or ion suppression were observed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Development and validation of a generic high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous separation and determination of six cough ingredients: Robustness study on core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Ali Mohamed; Essam, Hebatallah Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    A generally applicable high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of pharmaceutical preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride, paracetamol, ephedrine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, doxylamine succinate, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide is developed. Optimization of chromatographic conditions was performed for the gradient elution using different buffer pH values, flow rates and two C18 stationary phases. The method was developed using a Kinetex® C18 column as a core-shell stationary phase with a gradient profile using buffer pH 5.0 and acetonitrile at 2.0 mL/min flow rate. Detection was carried out at 220 nm and linear calibrations were obtained for all components within the studied ranges. The method was fully validated in agreement with ICH guidelines. The proposed method is specific, accurate and precise (RSD% < 3%). Limits of detection are lower than 2.0 μg/mL. Qualitative and quantitative responses were evaluated using experimental design to assist the method robustness. The method was proved to be highly robust against 10% change in buffer pH and flow rate (RSD% < 10%), however, the flow rate may significantly influence the quantitative responses of phenylephrine, paracetamol, and doxylamine (RSD% > 10%). Satisfactory results were obtained for commercial combinations analyses. Statistical comparison between the proposed chromatographic and official methods revealed no significant difference.

  10. Synthesis and drug-loading properties of folic acid-modified superparamagnetic Fe3O4 hollow microsphere core/mesoporous SiO2 shell composite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Guo, Xue; Wei, Kaiwei; Wang, Lijuan; Yang, Dandan; Lai, Lifang; Cheng, Meiling; Liu, Qi

    2014-01-01

    A drug delivery system, which not only has superparamagnetic property, higher surface area but also has targeting function, has been developed. The core/shell structural magnetic magnetite mesoporous silica microspheres with amine groups (Fe3O4-SiO2-NH2) were first fabricated by a one-pot direct co-condensation method, then folic acid-modified magnetic mesoporous silica composite microspheres (Fe3O4-SiO2-NHFA) were obtained by the bonding of the Fe3O4-SiO2-NH2 with folic acid as targeted molecule. The resultant composite microspheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, low temperature nitrogen adsorption-desorption, and vibrating sample magnetometer. A well-known inflammational drug ibuprofen was used as a model drug to assess the loading and releasing behavior of the composite microspheres. Fe3O4-SiO2-NHFA system exhibits magnetic properties typical for superparamagnetic material with a higher saturation magnetization value of about 41.2 emu/g and has better capacity of drug storage (32.0 %) and sustained drug-release property. So this system has potential applications in biomedical field.

  11. Biocompatibility of core@shell particles: cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human osteosarcoma cells of colloidal silica spheres coated with crystalline or amorphous zirconia.

    PubMed

    Di Virgilio, A L; Arnal, P M; Maisuls, I

    2014-08-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of novel colloidal silica spheres coated with crystalline or amorphous zirconia (SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) or SiO2@ZrO2(am)) have been studied in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63), after 24 h exposure. SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) and SiO2@ZrO2(am) had mean diameters of 782±19 and 891±34 nm, respectively. SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) exposure reduced cell viability, with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio. The comet and micronucleus (MN) assays detected DNA damage at 5 and 25 μg/mL, respectively. SiO2@ZrO2(am) induced genotoxic action only at 10 and 50 μg/mL (comet and MN assays), along with a decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio at 50 μg/mL. Both particles were found inside the cells, forming vesicles; however, none of them entered the nucleus. Our findings show that crystallization of the shell of the amorphous ZrO2 increases both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity.

  12. Bovine muscle 20S proteasome. III: Quantification in tissue crude extracts using ELISA and radial immunodiffusion techniques and practical applications.

    PubMed

    Aubry, L; Sentandreu, M A; Levieux, D; Ouali, A; Dutaud, D

    2006-10-01

    The 20S proteasome is a large complex (700kDa) that exhibits endo- and exo-peptidase activities with wide specificity. In postmortem muscles, several sets of evidence suggest a possible significant contribution of proteasome to meat tenderisation. Hence, an accurate and rapid quantification procedure is needed to attest that new function during the ageing of meat. In the present work, we developed an ELISA test enabling the quantification of nM concentrations of the 20S proteasome. We further tested the radial immunodiffusion (RID) technique described as a more simple method that can quantitatively determine the concentration of an antigen in a complex mixture. The ELISA test allowed us to quantify the 20S protesome in tissue homogenates and fluids with a recovery of 100%, a coefficient of variation lower than 5% and a detection limit of 9ng/ml. Quantification of the 20S proteasome in various bovine tissue by ELISA showed the highest concentration in liver followed by spleen and kidney, with muscles exhibiting the lowest concentrations. In addition, measurement of the proteasome concentration in eight different bovine muscles with various metabolic profiles led to the conclusion that the relationship between muscle metabolic properties and proteasome concentration is rather complex. Nevertheless, heart muscle exhibited the highest proteasome content (331μg/g wet tissue) whereas the lowest values were found for M. Tensor Fascia Latae (213μg/g wet tissue), a fast twitch white muscle, M. Supraspinatus (209μg/g wet tissue), a slow twitch red muscle and M. Pectoralis profondus (203μg/g wet tissue), an intermediate muscle. As compared to other endogenous peptidases, muscle tissue contains relatively high amounts of proteasome. Hence this complex can be quantified using the RID, which allows quantification of protein in the μg range. Plotting the concentration values determined with both methods for all bovine tissues tested gave a straight line with a correlation

  13. Inhibition of the 20S proteosome by a protein proteinase inhibitor: evidence that a natural serine proteinase inhibitor can inhibit a threonine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Kimihiko; Koide, Takehiko

    2009-02-01

    The 20S proteasome (20S) is an intracellular threonine proteinase (Mr 750,000) that plays important roles in many cellular regulations. Several synthetic peptide inhibitors and bacteria-derived inhibitors such as lactacystin and epoxomicin have been identified as potent proteasome inhibitors. However, essentially no protein proteinase inhibitor has been characterized. By examining several small size protein proteinase inhibitors, we found that a well-known serine proteinase inhibitor from bovine pancreas, basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), inhibits the 20S in vitro and ex vivo. Inhibition of the 20S by BPTI was time- and concentration-dependent, and stoichiometric. To inhibit the 20S activity, BPTI needs to enter into the interior of the 20S molecule. The molar ratio of BPTI to the 20S in the complex was estimated as approximately six BPTI to one 20S, thereby two sets of three peptidase activities (trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like) of the 20S were all inhibited. These results indicate that an entrance hole to the 20S formed by seven alpha-subunits is sufficiently large for BPTI to enter. This report is essentially the initial description of the inhibition of a threonine proteinase by a protein serine proteinase inhibitor, suggesting a common mechanism of inhibition between serine and threonine proteinases by a natural protein proteinase inhibitor.

  14. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Dual ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with microwave-assisted derivatization for simultaneous determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xian-En; Lv, Tao; Zhu, Shuyun; Qu, Fei; Chen, Guang; He, Yongrui; Wei, Na; Li, Guoliang; Xia, Lian; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shijuan; You, Jinmao; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Sun, Jing; Liu, Shuying

    2016-03-11

    This paper, for the first time, reported a speedy hyphenated technique of low toxic dual ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (dual-UADLLME) coupled with microwave-assisted derivatization (MAD) for the simultaneous determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT). The developed method was based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) detection using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. A mass spectrometry sensitizing reagent, 4'-carboxy-substituted rosamine (CSR) with high reaction activity and ionization efficiency was synthesized and firstly used as derivatization reagent. Parameters of dual-UADLLME, MAD and UHPLC-MS/MS conditions were all optimized in detail. Low toxic brominated solvents were used as extractant instead of traditional chlorinated solvents. Satisfactory linearity, recovery, repeatability, accuracy and precision, absence of matrix effect and extremely low limits of detection (LODs, 0.010 and 0.015ng/mL for PPD and PPT, respectively) were achieved. The main advantages were rapid, sensitive and environmentally friendly, and exhibited high selectivity, accuracy and good matrix effect results. The proposed method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetics of PPD and PPT in rat plasma.

  16. Crystal structure of the boronic acid-based proteasome inhibitor bortezomib in complex with the yeast 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Groll, Michael; Berkers, Celia R; Ploegh, Hidde L; Ovaa, Huib

    2006-03-01

    The dipeptide boronic acid bortezomib, also termed VELCADE, is a proteasome inhibitor now in use for the treatment of multiple myeloma, and its use for the treatment of other malignancies is being explored. We determined the crystal structure of the yeast 20S proteasome in complex with bortezomib to establish the specificity and binding mode of bortezomib to the proteasome's different catalytically active sites. This structure should enable the rational design of new boronic acid derivatives with improved affinities and specificities for individual active subunits.

  17. Ribonucleoprotein particles of bacterial small non-coding RNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) and its interaction with RNA polymerase core may link transcription to mRNA fate

    PubMed Central

    van Nues, Rob W.; Castro-Roa, Daniel; Yuzenkova, Yulia; Zenkin, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Coupled transcription and translation in bacteria are tightly regulated. Some small RNAs (sRNAs) control aspects of this coupling by modifying ribosome access or inducing degradation of the message. Here, we show that sRNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) specifically associates with core enzyme of RNAP in vivo and in vitro, independently of σ factor and away from the main nucleic-acids-binding channel of RNAP. We also show that, in the cells, IsrA exists as ribonucleoprotein particles (sRNPs), which involve a defined set of proteins including Hfq, S1, CsrA, ProQ and PNPase. Our findings suggest that IsrA might be directly involved in transcription or can participate in regulation of gene expression by delivering proteins associated with it to target mRNAs through its interactions with transcribing RNAP and through regions of sequence-complementarity with the target. In this eukaryotic-like model only in the context of a complex with its target, IsrA and its associated proteins become active. In this manner, in the form of sRNPs, bacterial sRNAs could regulate a number of targets with various outcomes, depending on the set of associated proteins. PMID:26609136

  18. Heat treatment and thickness-dependent electrical study of Se50Te20S30 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elrahman, M. I.; Hafiz, M. M.; Qasem, Ammar; Abdel-Rahim, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Chalcogenide Se50Te20S30 thin film of different thickness was deposited using thermal evaporation technique. The thermogram of the chalcogenide bulk Se50Te20S30 was obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) with heating rate of 7.5 K/min. The glass transition temperature T g, crystallization temperature T c and peak crystallization temperature T p were identified. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) examination indicates the amorphous nature of the as-deposited film and polycrystalline structure of the thermal annealed ones. The dark electrical resistivity ( ρ) measurements were taken in temperature range (300-500 K) and thickness range (200-450 nm). Analysis of the electrical resistivity results revealed two types of conduction mechanisms: conduction due to extended states in the temperature range ( T > T c) and variable range hopping in the temperature range ( T < T c). The effect of the heat treatment and thickness on the density of localized states at the Fermi level N( E F) and hopping parameters were studied.

  19. Tau protein degradation is catalyzed by the ATP/ubiquitin-independent 20S proteasome under normal cell conditions

    PubMed Central

    Grune, Tilman; Botzen, Diana; Engels, Martina; Voss, Peter; Kaiser, Barbara; Jung, Tobias; Grimm, Stefanie; Ermak, Gennady; Davies, Kelvin J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Tau is the major protein exhibiting intracellular accumulation in Alzheimer disease. The mechanisms leading to its accumulation are not fully understood. It has been proposed that the proteasome is responsible for degrading tau but, since proteasomal inhibitors block both the ubiquitin-dependent 26S proteasome and the ubiqutin-independent 20S proteasome pathways, it is not clear which of these pathways is involved in tau degradation. Some involvement of the ubiquitin ligase, CHIP in tau degradation has also been postulated during stress. In the current studies, we utilized HT22 cells and tau-transfected E36 cells in order to test the relative importance or possible requirement of the ubiquitin-dependent 26S proteasomal system versus the ubiquitin-independent 20S proteasome, in tau degradation. By means of ATP-depletion, ubiquitinylation-deficient E36ts20 cells, a 19S proteasomal regulator subunit MSS1-siRNA approaches, and in vitro ubiquitinylation studies, we were able to demonstrate that ubiquitinylation is not required for normal tau degradation. PMID:20478262

  20. Synthesis and Evaluation of Macrocyclic Peptide Aldehydes as Potent and Selective Inhibitors of the 20S Proteasome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This research explores the first design and synthesis of macrocyclic peptide aldehydes as potent inhibitors of the 20S proteasome. Two novel macrocyclic peptide aldehydes based on the ring-size of the macrocyclic natural product TMC-95 were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of the 20S proteasome. Both compounds inhibited in the low nanomolar range and proved to be selective for the proteasome over other serine and cysteine proteases, particularly when compared to linear analogues with similar amino acid sequences. In HeLa cells, both macrocycles efficiently inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor by blocking proteasomal degradation of the inhibitor protein IκBα after cytokine stimulation. Due to their covalent mechanism of binding these compounds represent a 1000-fold increase in inhibitory potency over previously reported noncovalently binding TMC-95 analogues. Molecular modeling of the macrocyclic peptides confirms the preference of the large S3 pocket for large, hydrophobic residues and the ability to exploit this to improve selectivity of proteasome inhibitors. PMID:26985310

  1. Nonlinear optical properties of As20S80 system chalcogenide glass using Z-scan and its strip waveguide under bandgap light using the self-phase modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, L. E.; He, P. P.; Chen, B. X.; Iso, M.

    2017-02-01

    Optical nonlinearities in the undoped As20S80, low doped P2As20S78 and Sn1As20S79 chacogenide glasses are investigated by using Z-scan method. These experiments show that at 1064 nm the figure of merit (FOM) for As20S80 is ˜1.02, while for Sn1As20S79 increases to ˜1.42, and for P2As20S78 decreases to ˜0.83. These resulted data indicate the addition of Sn in As20S80 system chalcogenide glass can enhance FOM due to creating narrow energy gaps. In addition, the self-phase modulation (SPM) width experiment for Sn1As20S79 strip waveguide displays that the full width half maximum (FWHM) of spectral width increases approximately 0.8 nm under the induction of bandgap light, meaning that the bandgap light can induce to enhance its optical nonlinearity with the nonlinear refractive index of n2≅5.27×10-14 cm2/W.

  2. Material with core-shell structure

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia [Rio Rancho, NM; Richard, Monique N [Ann Arbor, MI; Dehne, Aaron [Maumee, OH; Phillips, Jonathan [Rio Rancho, NM; Stamm, Kimber L [Ann Arbor, MI; Fanson, Paul T [Brighton, MI

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  3. Core layering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, S. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Hernlund, J. W.; Morbidelli, A.

    2015-12-01

    We have created a planetary accretion and differentiation model that self-consistently builds and evolves Earth's core. From this model, we show that the core grows stably stratified as the result of rising metal-silicate equilibration temperatures and pressures, which increases the concentrations of light element impurities into each newer core addition. This stable stratification would naturally resist convection and frustrate the onset of a geodynamo, however, late giant impacts could mechanically mix the distinct accreted core layers creating large homogenous regions. Within these regions, a geodynamo may operate. From this model, we interpret the difference between the planetary magnetic fields of Earth and Venus as a difference in giant impact histories. Our planetary accretion model is a numerical N-body integration of the Grand Tack scenario [1]—the most successful terrestrial planet formation model to date [2,3]. Then, we take the accretion histories of Earth-like and Venus-like planets from this model and post-process the growth of each terrestrial planet according to a well-tested planetary differentiation model [4,5]. This model fits Earth's mantle by modifying the oxygen content of the pre-cursor planetesimals and embryos as well as the conditions of metal-silicate equilibration. Other non-volatile major, minor and trace elements included in the model are assumed to be in CI chondrite proportions. The results from this model across many simulated terrestrial planet growth histories are robust. If the kinetic energy delivered by larger impacts is neglected, the core of each planet grows with a strong stable stratification that would significantly impede convection. However, if giant impact mixing is very efficient or if the impact history delivers large impacts late, than the stable stratification can be removed. [1] Walsh et al. Nature 475 (2011) [2] O'Brien et al. Icarus 223 (2014) [3] Jacobson & Morbidelli PTRSA 372 (2014) [4] Rubie et al. EPSL 301

  4. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  5. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  6. Circadian rhythm of hyperoxidized peroxiredoxin II is determined by hemoglobin autoxidation and the 20S proteasome in red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chun-Seok; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Woo, Hyun Ae; Rhee, Sue Goo

    2014-08-19

    The catalytic cysteine of the typical 2-Cys Prx subfamily of peroxiredoxins is occasionally hyperoxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid during the peroxidase catalytic cycle. Sulfinic Prx (Prx-SO2H) is reduced back to the active form of the enzyme by sulfiredoxin. The abundance of Prx-SO2H was recently shown to oscillate with a period of ∼24 h in human red blood cells (RBCs). We have now investigated the molecular mechanism and physiological relevance of such oscillation in mouse RBCs. Poisoning of RBCs with CO abolished Prx-SO2H formation, implicating H2O2 produced from hemoglobin autoxidation in Prx hyperoxidation. RBCs express the closely related PrxI and PrxII isoforms, and analysis of RBCs deficient in either isoform identified PrxII as the hyperoxidized Prx in these cells. Unexpectedly, RBCs from sulfiredoxin-deficient mice also exhibited circadian oscillation of Prx-SO2H. Analysis of the effects of protease inhibitors together with the observation that the purified 20S proteasome degraded PrxII-SO2H selectively over nonhyperoxidized PrxII suggested that the 20S proteasome is responsible for the decay phase of PrxII-SO2H oscillation. About 1% of total PrxII undergoes daily oscillation, resulting in a gradual loss of PrxII during the life span of RBCs. PrxII-SO2H was detected in cytosolic and ghost membrane fractions of RBCs, and the amount of membrane-bound PrxII-SO2H oscillated in a phase opposite to that of total PrxII-SO2H. Our results suggest that membrane association of PrxII-SO2H is a tightly controlled process and might play a role in the tuning of RBC function to environmental changes.

  7. Dissecting a role of a charge and conformation of Tat2 peptide in allosteric regulation of 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Witkowska, Julia; Karpowicz, Przemysław; Gaczynska, Maria; Osmulski, Pawel A; Jankowska, Elżbieta

    2014-08-01

    Proteasome is a 'proteolytic factory' that constitutes an essential part of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. The involvement of proteasome in regulation of all major aspects of cellular physiology makes it an attractive drug target. So far, only inhibitors of the proteasome entered the clinic as anti-cancer drugs. However, proteasome regulators may also be useful for treatment of inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. We established in our previous studies that the peptide Tat2, comprising the basic domain of HIV-1 Tat protein: R(49) KKRRQRR(56) , supplemented with Q(66) DPI(69) fragment, inhibits the 20S proteasome in a noncompetitive manner. Mechanism of Tat2 likely involves allosteric regulation because it competes with the proteasome natural 11S activator for binding to the enzyme noncatalytic subunits. In this study, we performed alanine walking coupled with biological activity measurements and FTIR and CD spectroscopy to dissect contribution of a charge and conformation of Tat2 to its capability to influence peptidase activity of the proteasome. In solution, Tat2 and most of its analogs with a single Ala substitution preferentially adopted a conformation containing PPII/turn structural motifs. Replacing either Asp10 or two or more adjacent Arg/Lys residues induced a random coil conformation, probably by disrupting ionic interactions responsible for stabilization of the peptides ordered structure. The random coil Tat2 analogs lost their capability to activate the latent 20S proteasome. In contrast, inhibitory properties of the peptides more significantly depended on their positive charge. The data provide valuable clues for the future optimization of the Tat2-based proteasome regulators.

  8. BIM(EL), an intrinsically disordered protein, is degraded by 20S proteasomes in the absence of poly-ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Ceri M; Tsvetkov, Peter; Johnson, Mark; Joyce, Claire L; Lamb, Christopher A; Bryant, Nia J; Komander, David; Shaul, Yosef; Cook, Simon J

    2011-03-15

    BIM-extra long (BIM(EL)), a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein and part of the BCL-2 family, is degraded by the proteasome following activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway. Although studies have demonstrated poly-ubiquitylation of BIM(EL) in cells, the nature of the ubiquitin chain linkage has not been defined. Using ubiquitin-binding domains (UBDs) specific for defined ubiquitin chain linkages, we show that BIM(EL) undergoes K48-linked poly-ubiquitylation at either of two lysine residues. Surprisingly, BIM(EL)ΔKK, which lacks both lysine residues, was not poly-ubiquitylated but still underwent ERK1/2-driven, proteasome-dependent turnover. BIM has been proposed to be an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) and some IDPs can be degraded by uncapped 20S proteasomes in the absence of poly-ubiquitylation. We show that BIM(EL) is degraded by isolated 20S proteasomes but that this is prevented when BIM(EL) is bound to its pro-survival target protein MCL-1. Furthermore, knockdown of the proteasome cap component Rpn2 does not prevent BIM(EL) turnover in cells, and inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP, which catalyses poly-Ub of BIM(EL), causes Cdc25A accumulation but does not inhibit BIM(EL) turnover. These results provide new insights into the regulation of BIM(EL) by defining a novel ubiquitin-independent pathway for the proteasome-dependent destruction of this highly toxic protein.

  9. Inhibition of autophagy potentiates anticancer property of 20(S)-ginsenoside Rh2 by promoting mitochondria-dependent apoptosis in human acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingnan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Cai, Jianye; Wang, Min; Chen, Qidan; Song, Jia; Yu, Ziqi; Huang, Wei; Fang, Jianpei

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is the most prevalent childhood malignancy. Although most children with ALL are cured, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails owing to severe toxicities and drug resistance. Ginsenoside Rh2 (GRh2), a major bioactive component isolated from Panax ginseng, has been shown to have a therapeutic effect on some tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms of cell death induced by 20(S)-GRh2 in ALL cells remains unclear. In this study, we showed that 20(S)-GRh2 inhibited the cell growth and induced mitochondria-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. But it has no cytotoxic effect on human normal blood cells. Furthermore, autophagy plays a protective role in 20(S)-GRh2-induced apoptosis in ALL cell lines and human primary ALL cells. We demonstrated that either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy could be more effective in reducing viability and enhancing 20(S)-GRh2-induced toxicity than 20(S)-GRh2 treatment alone. In addition, inhibition of autophagy could aggravate mitochondrial ROS generation and mitochondrial damage, and then accelerate mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that inhibition of autophagy can sensitize ALL cells towards 20(S)-GRh2. The appropriate inhibition of autophagy could provide a powerful strategy to increase the potency of 20(S)-GRh2 as a novel anticancer agent for ALL therapy. PMID:27027340

  10. Synthesis, microstructure and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}@SiO{sub 2} core–shell particles and Fe{sub 3}Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} soft magnetic composite core

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian; Fan, Xi’an; Wu, Zhaoyang; Li, Guangqiang

    2015-11-15

    Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}@SiO{sub 2} core–shell particles and Fe{sub 3}Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} soft magnetic composite core have been synthesized via a modified stöber method combined with following high temperature sintering process. Most of conductive Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3} particles could be uniformly coated by insulating SiO{sub 2} using the modified stöber method. The Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}@SiO{sub 2} core–shell particles exhibited good soft magnetic properties with low coercivity and high saturation magnetization. The reaction 4Al+3SiO{sub 2}=2α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}+3Si took place during the sintering process. As a result the new Fe{sub 3}Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite was formed. The Fe{sub 3}Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite core displayed more excellent soft magnetic properties, better frequency stability at high frequencies, much higher electrical resistivity and lower core loss than the pure Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3} core. The method of introducing insulating layers surrounding magnetic particles provides a promising route to develop new and high compact soft magnetic materials with good magnetic and electric properties. - Graphical abstract: In Fe{sub 3}Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite, Fe{sub 3}Si phases are separated by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layers and the eddy currents are confined in Fe{sub 3}Si phases, thus increasing resistivity and reducing core loss. - Highlights: • Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}@SiO{sub 2} core–shell particles and Fe{sub 3}Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cores were prepared. • Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3} particles could be uniformly coated by nano-sized SiO{sub 2} clusters. • Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}@SiO{sub 2} particles and Fe{sub 3}Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cores showed good soft magnetic properties. • Fe{sub 3}Si/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} had lower core loss and better frequency stability than Fe{sub 3}Si{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3} cores.

  11. Occurrence of 20S RNA and 23S RNA replicons in industrial yeast strains and their variation under nutritional stress conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Victoria; Gil, Rosario; Vicente Carbonell, José; Navarro, Alfonso

    2002-04-01

    We have characterized industrial yeast strains used in the brewing, baking, and winemaking industries for the presence or absence of cytoplasmic single-stranded 20S and 23S RNAs. Furthermore, the variation of intracellular concentrations of these replicons in brewing and laboratory strains under nutritional stress conditions was determined. Our results show a correlation between the relative abundance of these replicons and exposure of yeast to nutritionally stressful conditions, indicating that these RNAs could be employed as molecular probes to evaluate the exposure of 20S(+) and/or 23S(+) yeast strains to stress situations during industrial manipulation. During this study, several 20S(-)23S(+) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated and identified. This is the first time that a yeast strain containing only 23S RNA has been reported, demonstrating that 20S RNA is not required for 23S RNA replication.

  12. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  13. Hybrid particles and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V; Rodriguez, Rene; Pak, Joshua J; Sun, Chivin

    2015-02-10

    Hybrid particles that comprise a coating surrounding a chalcopyrite material, the coating comprising a metal, a semiconductive material, or a polymer; a core comprising a chalcopyrite material and a shell comprising a functionalized chalcopyrite material, the shell enveloping the core; or a reaction product of a chalcopyrite material and at least one of a reagent, heat, and radiation. Methods of forming the hybrid particles are also disclosed.

  14. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  15. The Effects of Foot Orthosis on the Gait Ability of College Students in Their 20s with Flat Feet

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Kyo Chul; Park, Kwang Yong

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of foot orthosis on the gait ability of college students in their 20s with flat feet. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 college students who had been diagnosed with flat feet. The subjects’ step time, step length, stride time, stride length, and gait velocity were measured using the VICON Motion System (Vicon, Oxford, UK) prior to and while wearing foot orthoses. The resulting data were analyzed using SPSS v. 12.0. [Results] The subject’s step time and stride time significantly decreased for both feet after they began using foot orthosis, and stride length and gait velocity significantly increased in both feet orthosis; however, step length did not significantly increase on either side. [Conclusions] College students with flat feet saw an improvement in elements of their gait while using the foot orthosis. The results of this study verified that students with flat feet might walk more efficiently if they received active gait training via long-term use of foot orthosis. PMID:25364114

  16. Identification of an unstable 4-hydroxynoneal modification on the 20S proteasome subunit α7 by recombinant antibody technology.

    PubMed

    Just, Jesper; Jung, Tobias; Friis, Niels Anton; Lykkemark, Simon; Drasbek, Kim; Siboska, Gunhild; Grune, Tilman; Kristensen, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Numerous cellular functions rely on an active proteasome allowing degradation of damaged or misfolded proteins. Therefore changes in the proteasomal activity have important physiological consequences. During oxidative stress the production of free radicals can result in the formation of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) following lipid peroxidiation. The HNE moiety is highly reactive and via a nucleophilic attack readily forms covalent links to cysteine, histidine and lysine side chains. However, as the chemical properties of these amino acids differ, so does the kinetics of the reactions. While covalent linkage through Michael addition is well established, reversible and unstable associations have only been indicated in a few cases. In the present study we have identified an unstable HNE adduct on the α7 subunit of the 20S proteasome using phage display of recombinant antibodies. This recombinant antibody fragment recognized HNE modified proteasomes in vitro and showed that this epitope was easily HNE modified, yet unstable, and influenced by experimental procedures. Hence unstable HNE-adducts could be overlooked as a regulatory mechanism of proteasomal activity and a participating factor in the decreased proteasomal activity associated with oxidative stress.

  17. Biomimetic Particles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health. PMID:26277289

  18. Biomimetic particles as therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Randall A; Sunshine, Joel C; Green, Jordan J

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle- and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health.

  19. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol-aglycone Downregulation of the Full-length and Splice Variants of Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Bo; Liu, Xichun; Li, Jing; Liu, Shuang; Qi, Yanfeng; Xiong, Zhenggang; Zhang, Allen; Wiese, Thomas; Fu, Xueqi; Gu, Jingkai; Rennie, Paul S.; Sartor, Oliver; Lee, Benjamin R.; Ip, Clement; Zhao, Lijuan; Zhang, Haitao; Dong, Yan

    2012-01-01

    As a public health problem, prostate cancer engenders huge economic and life-quality burden. Developing effective chemopreventive regimens to alleviate the burden remains a major challenge. Androgen signaling is vital to the development and progression of prostate cancer. Targeting androgen signaling via blocking the production of the potent ligand dihydrotestosterone has been shown to decrease prostate cancer incidence. However, the potential of increasing the incidence of high-grade prostate cancers has been a concern. Mechanisms of disease progression after the intervention may include increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate tissue and expression of the constitutively-active AR splice variants (AR-Vs) lacking the ligand-binding domain. Thus, novel agents targeting the receptor, preferentially both the full-length and AR-Vs, are urgently needed. In the present study, we show that ginsenoside 20(S)-protopanaxadiol-aglycone (PPD) effectively downregulates the expression and activity of both the full-length AR and AR-Vs. The effects of PPD on AR and AR-Vs are manifested by an immediate drop in proteins followed by a reduction in transcripts, attributed to PPD induction of proteasome-mediated degradation and inhibition of the transcription of the AR gene. We further show that although PPD inhibits the growth as well as AR expression and activity in LNCaP xenograft tumors, the morphology and AR expression in normal prostates are not affected. This study is the first to show that PPD suppresses androgen signaling through downregulating both the full-length AR and AR-Vs, and provides strong rationale for further developing PPD as a promising agent for the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:22907191

  20. Metabolism of 20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg₂ by Rat Liver Microsomes: Bioactivation to SIRT1-Activating Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Yuan; Zhou, Qi-Le; Yang, Xin-Bao; Wang, Hong-Ping; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2016-06-10

    20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg₂ (1) has recently become a hot research topic due to its potent bioactivities and abundance in natural sources such as the roots, rhizomes and stems-leaves of Panax ginseng. However, due to the lack of studies on systematic metabolic profiles, the prospects for new drug development of 1 are still difficult to predict, which has become a huge obstacle for its safe clinical use. To solve this problem, investigation of the metabolic profiles of 1 in rat liver microsomes was first carried out. To identify metabolites, a strategy of combined analyses based on prepared metabolites by column chromatography and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS) was performed. As a result, four metabolites M1-M4, including a rare new compound named ginsenotransmetin A (M1), were isolated and the structures were confirmed by spectroscopic analyses. A series of metabolites of 1, MA-MG, were also tentatively identified by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS in rat liver microsomal incubate of 1. Partial metabolic pathways were proposed. Among them, 1 and its metabolites M1, M3 and M4 were discovered for the first time to be activators of SIRT1. The SIRT1 activating effects of the metabolite M1 was comparable to those of 1, while the most interesting SIRT1 activatory effects of M3 and M4 were higher than that of 1 and comparable with that of resveratrol, a positive SIRT1 activator. These results indicate that microsome-dependent metabolism may represent a bioactivation pathway for 1. This study is the first to report the metabolic profiles of 1 in vitro, and the results provide an experimental foundation to better understand the in vivo metabolic fate of 1.

  1. Beneficial effects of fermented black ginseng and its ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in LLC-PK1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myoung-Sik; Han, Im-Ho; Lee, Dahae; An, Jun Min; Kim, Su-Nam; Shin, Myoung-Sook; Yamabe, Noriko; Hwang, Gwi Seo; Yoo, Hye Hyun; Choi, Suk-Jung; Kang, Ki Sung; Jang, Hyuk-Jai

    2015-01-01

    Background Nephrotoxicity is a common side effect of medications. Panax ginseng is one of the best-known herbal medicines, and its individual constituents enhance renal function. Identification of its efficacy and mechanisms of action against drug-induced nephrotoxicity, as well as the specific constituents mediating this effect, have recently emerged as an interesting research area focusing on the kidney protective efficacy of P. ginseng. Methods The present study investigated the kidney protective effect of fermented black ginseng (FBG) and its active component ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 against cisplatin (chemotherapy drug)-induced damage in pig kidney (LLC-PK1) cells. It focused on assessing the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases as important mechanistic elements in kidney protection. Results The reduced cell viability induced by cisplatin was significantly recovered with FBG extract and ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 dose-dependently. The cisplatin-induced elevated protein levels of phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p53, and cleaved caspase-3 were decreased after cotreatment with FBG extract or ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3. The elevated percentage of apoptotic LLC-PK1 cells induced by cisplatin treatment was significantly abrogated by cotreatment with FBG and the ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3. Conclusion FBG and its major ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3, ameliorated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in LLC-PK1 cells by blocking the JNK–p53–caspase-3 signaling cascade. PMID:27158234

  2. Microfluidic generation of multifunctional quantum dot barcode particles.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shum, Ho Cheung; Chen, Haosheng; Adams, Laura L A; Gu, Zhongze; Weitz, David A

    2011-06-15

    We develop a new strategy to prepare quantum dot (QD) barcode particles by polymerizing double-emulsion droplets prepared in capillary microfluidic devices. The resultant barcode particles are composed of stable QD-tagged core particles surrounded by hydrogel shells. These particles exhibit uniform spectral characteristics and excellent coding capability, as confirmed by photoluminescence analyses. By using double-emulsion droplets with two inner droplets of distinct phases as templates, we have also fabricated anisotropic magnetic barcode particles with two separate cores or with a Janus core. These particles enable optical encoding and magnetic separation, thus making them excellent functional barcode particles in biomedical applications.

  3. Reliability and validity of a 20-s alternative to the wingate anaerobic test in team sport male athletes.

    PubMed

    Attia, Ahmed; Hachana, Younes; Chaabène, Helmi; Gaddour, Abdelmajid; Neji, Zied; Shephard, Roy J; Chelly, Mohamed Souhaiel

    2014-01-01

    The intent of this study was to evaluate relative and absolute reliability of the 20-s anaerobic test (WAnT20) versus the WAnT30 and to verify how far the various indices of the 30-s Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT30) could be predicted from the WAnT20 data in male athletes. The participants were Exercise Science majors (age: 21.5±1.6 yrs, stature: 0.183±0.08 m, body mass: 81.2±10.9 kg) who participated regularly in team sports. In Phase I, 41 participants performed duplicate WAnT20 and WAnT30 tests to assess reliability. In Phase II, 31 participants performed one trial each of the WAnT20 and WAnT30 to determine the ability of the WAnT20 to predict components of the WAnT30. In Phase III, 31 participants were used to cross-validate the prediction equations developed in Phase II. Respective intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC) for peak power output (PPO) (ICC = 0.98 and 0.95) and mean power output (MPO) (ICC 0.98 and 0.90) did not differ significantly between WAnT20 and WAnT30. ICCs for minimal power output (POmin) and fatigue index (FI) were poor for both tests (range 0.53 to 0.76). Standard errors of the means (SEM) for PPO and MPO were less than their smallest worthwhile changes (SWC) in both tests; however, POmin and FI values were "marginal," with SEM values greater than their respective SWCs for both tests values. Stepwise regression analysis showed that MPO had the highest coefficient of predictability (R = 0.97), with POmin and FI considerable lower (R = 0.71 and 0.41 respectively). Cross-validation showed insignificant bias with limits of agreement of 0.99±1.04, 6.5±92.7 W, and 1.6±9.8% between measured and predicted MPO, POmin, and FI, respectively. WAnT20 offers a reliable and valid test of leg anaerobic power in male athletes and could replace the classic WAnT30.

  4. PA28, an activator of the 20 S proteasome, is inactivated by proteolytic modification at its carboxyl terminus.

    PubMed

    Ma, C P; Willy, P J; Slaughter, C A; DeMartino, G N

    1993-10-25

    PA28, a protein activator of the 20 S proteasome, was previously identified in soluble extracts of bovine red blood cells (Ma, C.-P., Slaughter, C. A., and DeMartino, G. N. (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 10515-10523). To determine whether this regulatory protein is as widely distributed as the proteasome, PA28 content and activity were examined in various eukaryotic tissues by immunoblot analysis and by functional assays of tissue extracts. PA28 protein was present in all sources examined. PA28 activity, however, was not detected in many of these sources, including those with the highest level of PA28 protein. To determine the biochemical basis of this result, PA28 was purified from extracts of rat liver, which had high levels of PA28 protein but no PA28 activity. The resulting purified PA28 had no detectable activity but had native and subunit molecular weights indistinguishable from the active PA28 of bovine red blood cells. Using the inactivation of purified PA28 as an assay, a protein that inactivated PA28 without altering its apparent molecular weight on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was identified, purified, and characterized from bovine liver. It had biochemical and catalytic characteristics similar to those of lysosomal carboxypeptidase B. When leupeptin, an inhibitor of lysosomal carboxypeptidase B, was included in the buffers used for the preparation of PA28, PA28 activity was detected in tissues which otherwise failed to demonstrate this activity. A similar result was obtained when extracts were prepared in a manner that minimized disruption of lysosomes. Other carboxypeptidases such as carboxypeptidase Y and pancreatic carboxypeptidase B also inactivated PA28 without altering its apparent molecular weight. Active PA28 binds to the proteasome to form a protease-activator complex that can be isolated after velocity sedimentation centrifugation through glycerol density gradients. Carboxypeptidase-inactivated PA28 failed to form such a complex

  5. Potential role of 20S proteasome in maintaining stem cell integrity of human bone marrow stromal cells in prolonged culture expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Xue-Qin; Zhu, Qian; Cheng, Xiao-Long; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prolonged culture expansion retards proliferation and induces senescence of hBMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced 20S proteasomal activity and expression potentially contribute to cell aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MG132-mediated 20S proteasomal inhibition induces senescence-like phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA stimulates proteasomal activity and restores replicative senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA retains differentiation without affecting stem cell characterizations. -- Abstract: Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) could be used in clinics as precursors of multiple cell lineages following proper induction. Such application is impeded by their characteristically short lifespan, together with the increasing loss of proliferation capability and progressive reduction of differentiation potential after the prolonged culture expansion. In the current study, we addressed the possible role of 20S proteasomes in this process. Consistent with prior reports, long-term in vitro expansion of hBMSCs decreased cell proliferation and increased replicative senescence, accompanied by reduced activity and expression of the catalytic subunits PSMB5 and PSMB1, and the 20S proteasome overall. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 produced a senescence-like phenotype in early passages, whereas treating late-passage cells with 18{alpha}-glycyrrhetinic acid (18{alpha}-GA), an agonist of 20S proteasomes, delayed the senescence progress, enhancing the proliferation and recovering the capability of differentiation. The data demonstrate that activation of 20S proteasomes assists in counteracting replicative senescence of hBMSCs expanded in vitro.

  6. Extralunar dust in apollo cores?

    PubMed

    Barber, D J; Hutcheon, I; Price, P B

    1971-01-29

    Densities of nuclear tracks exceed 10(11) per square centimeter in several percent of the micrometer-size silicate grains from all depths in the 12-and 60-centimeter lunar cores. Either these grains were irradiated in space as extralunar dust or the ratio of iron to hydrogen in low-energy (about 1 million electron volts per nucleon) solar particles is orders of magnitude higher than in the photosphere.

  7. Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

  8. Common subtypes of idiopathic generalized epilepsies: Lack of linkage to D20S19 close to candidate loci (EBN1, EEGV1) on chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, T.; Schmitz, B.; Janz, D.

    1996-02-16

    Hereditary factors play a major role in the etiology of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). A trait locus (EBN1) for a rare subtype of IGEs, the benign neonatal familial convulsions, and a susceptibility gene (EEGV1) for the common human low-voltage electroencephalogram have been mapped close together with D20S19 to the chromosomal region 20q13.2. Both loci are potential candidates for the susceptibility to IGE spectra with age-related onset beyond the neonatal period. The present study tested the hypothesis that a putative susceptibility locus linked to D20S19 predisposes to spectra of IGEs with age-related onset from childhood to adolescence. Linkage analyses were conducted in 60 families ascertained through IGE patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy or childhood absence epilepsy. Our results provide evidence against linkage of a putative susceptibility gene for four hierarchically broadened IGE spectra with D20S19 assuming tentative single-locus genetic models. The extent of an {open_quotes}exclusion region{close_quotes} (lod scores below -2) varied from 0.5 cM up to 22 cM on either side of D2OSl9 depending on the trait assumed. These results are contrary to the expectation that a susceptibility gene in vicinity to D20S19 confers a common major gene effect to the expression of IGE spectra with age-related onset from childhood to adolescence. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Counterrotating cores in elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcella, Marc Comas

    The dynamics of the merger between a high- and a low-elliptical galaxy was studied to understand how kinematically peculiar cores in elliptical galaxies might form. Numerical simulations of mergers provide rotation curves, surface density profiles, surface density contour plots and velocity maps of the merger remnants, as well as diagnostics on the dynamics such as phase-space diagrams. This type of merger can create counterrotating cores. The core of the smaller galaxy, of higher density, is not disrupted by the primary tidal field and sinks to the center of the primary as an independent dynamical subsystem. Core counterrotation occurs only when the initial merger orbit is retrograde with respect to the pin of the primary. The remnant has higher effective radius and lower mean central surface density than the primary galaxy, but a smaller core radius. The adsorption of orbital energy and angular momentum by the primary particles greatly modifies the kinematic structure of the larger galaxy. Twisted rotation axes and isophote twists appear over the whole body of the remnant. These diagnostics may be used to determine whether observed peculiar cores might have formed via an elliptical-elliptical merger. Galaxies with counterrotating cores should show a complex velocity field, isophotal irregularities, and, in general, a slow rotation in the main body of the galaxy. The present experiments are the first galaxy-satellite merger experiments involving an active, rotating secondary. They show that part of the orbital angular momentum is absorbed by the secondary, thus the secondary contributes to its own sinking: the sinking rate depends on the orientation of the secondary spin. Long-slit spectroscopic observations of NGC 3656 are reported.

  10. Recovery of antigenically reactive HIV-2 cores.

    PubMed

    Chrystie, I L; Almeida, J D

    1989-03-01

    Negative staining studies of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have been hampered by the fragile nature of the particles. Although detergent treatment is capable of releasing cores from HIV-2 particles, these are unstable and do not retain morphological integrity. Addition of glutaraldehyde will stabilise these structures but, if used at too high a concentration, will destroy their antigenicity. This study shows that if both detergent and glutaraldehyde are used in correct proportions, antigenically reactive cores can be recovered from HIV-2 cell cultures. More specifically we show that a mixture of 0.1% Nonidet P40 and 0.1% glutaraldehyde produces preparations of HIV-2 cores that are suitable for immune electron microscopy. These cores reacted positively, that is, formed immune complexes, with both human HIV-2 antisera and a mouse monoclonal antibody that, although directed against p24 (HIV-1), reacts also with p25 (HIV-2).

  11. Microstructure of Purified Rubber Particles.

    PubMed

    Wood; Cornish

    2000-05-01

    Purified rubber particles from Hevea brasiliensis (Brazilian rubber tree), Parthenium argentatum (guayule), Ficus elastica (Indian rubber tree), and Euphorbia lactiflua were examined and compared using conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field-emission SEM, cryo-SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Rubber particles of all four species were spherical; they varied in size and had a uniform homogeneous material, the rubber core, surrounded by a contiguous monolayer (half-unit) membrane. Frozen-hydrated and/or untreated particles from H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum deformed and fused readily, whereas those from F. elastica and E. lactiflua retained their spherical shapes. These results indicate that the surface components of the H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum particles are more fluid than those of F. elastica or E. lactiflua. When fixed in aldehyde, F. elastica particles retained their spherical exterior shapes but had hollow centers, whereas H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum particles completely collapsed. In aldehyde-osmium tetroxide-fixed material, the rubber core of F. elastica was poorly preserved in some particles in which only a small amount of the rubber core remained adhering to the monolayer membrane, leaving a hollow center. Euphorbia lactiflua particles were well preserved in terms of retaining the rubber core; however, the membrane was not as easily discernible as it was in the other three species. Both H. brasiliensis and P. argentatum were well preserved following fixation; their cores remained filled with rubber, and their monolayer membranes were defined. The addition of potassium permanganate to the fixation-staining regime resulted in higher-contrast micrographs and more well defined monolayer membranes.

  12. Towards micrometer sized core-shell actuators from liquid crystalline elastomers by a continuous flow synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Eva-Kristina; Liang, Hsin-Ling; Lagerwall, Jan; Zentel, Rudolf

    2012-03-01

    We present here the successful preparation of liquid crystalline core-shell elastomers via a microfluidic double-emulsion process. The customized set-up allows for a temperature-controlled fabrication of the core-shell particles from a thermoresponsive mesogenic monomer. The nematic liquid crystalline shell is filled with a non-mesogenic core of silicone oil. To verify the core-shell structure with optical microscopy, we prepared particles with a colored core using a red dye. We were also able to micro-manipulate the particles and penetrate them with a small glass capillary to extract the liquid core.

  13. Single Domain SmCo5@Co Exchange-coupled Magnets Prepared from Core/shell Sm[Co(CN)6]·4H2O@GO Particles: A Novel Chemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ce; Jia, Lihui; Wang, Shouguo; Gao, Chen; Shi, Dawei; Hou, Yanglong; Gao, Song

    2013-01-01

    SmCo5 based magnets with smaller size and larger maximum energy product have been long desired in various fields such as renewable energy technology, electronic industry and aerospace science. However, conventional relatively rough synthetic strategies will lead to either diminished magnetic properties or irregular morphology, which hindered their wide applications. In this article, we present a facile chemical approach to prepare 200 nm single domain SmCo5@Co core/shell magnets with coercivity of 20.7 kOe and saturation magnetization of 82 emu/g. We found that the incorporation of GO sheets is responsible for the generation of the unique structure. The single domain SmCo5 core contributes to the large coercivity of the magnets and the exchange-coupled Co shell enhances the magnetization. This method can be further utilized in the synthesis other Sm-Co based exchange-coupled magnets. PMID:24356309

  14. Single Domain SmCo5@Co Exchange-coupled Magnets Prepared from Core/shell Sm[Co(CN)6].4H2O@GO Particles: A Novel Chemical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ce; Jia, Lihui; Wang, Shouguo; Gao, Chen; Shi, Dawei; Hou, Yanglong; Gao, Song

    2013-12-01

    SmCo5 based magnets with smaller size and larger maximum energy product have been long desired in various fields such as renewable energy technology, electronic industry and aerospace science. However, conventional relatively rough synthetic strategies will lead to either diminished magnetic properties or irregular morphology, which hindered their wide applications. In this article, we present a facile chemical approach to prepare 200 nm single domain SmCo5@Co core/shell magnets with coercivity of 20.7 kOe and saturation magnetization of 82 emu/g. We found that the incorporation of GO sheets is responsible for the generation of the unique structure. The single domain SmCo5 core contributes to the large coercivity of the magnets and the exchange-coupled Co shell enhances the magnetization. This method can be further utilized in the synthesis other Sm-Co based exchange-coupled magnets.

  15. Single domain SmCo5@Co exchange-coupled magnets prepared from core/shell Sm[Co(CN)6]·4H2O@GO particles: a novel chemical approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ce; Jia, Lihui; Wang, Shouguo; Gao, Chen; Shi, Dawei; Hou, Yanglong; Gao, Song

    2013-12-20

    SmCo5 based magnets with smaller size and larger maximum energy product have been long desired in various fields such as renewable energy technology, electronic industry and aerospace science. However, conventional relatively rough synthetic strategies will lead to either diminished magnetic properties or irregular morphology, which hindered their wide applications. In this article, we present a facile chemical approach to prepare 200 nm single domain SmCo5@Co core/shell magnets with coercivity of 20.7 kOe and saturation magnetization of 82 emu/g. We found that the incorporation of GO sheets is responsible for the generation of the unique structure. The single domain SmCo5 core contributes to the large coercivity of the magnets and the exchange-coupled Co shell enhances the magnetization. This method can be further utilized in the synthesis other Sm-Co based exchange-coupled magnets.

  16. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  17. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans [Reno, NV; Chakrabarty, Rajan K [Reno, NV; Arnott, W Patrick [Reno, NV

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  18. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  19. Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for working the same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Sher, Eric C.; Manna, Liberato

    2007-12-25

    Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making shaped nanocrystal particles are disclosed. One embodiment includes a method for forming a branched, nanocrystal particle. It includes (a) forming a core having a first crystal structure in a solution, (b) forming a first arm extending from the core having a second crystal structure in the solution, and (c) forming a second arm extending from the core having the second crystal structure in the solution.

  20. Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A Paul [Oakland, CA; Scher, Erik C [Menlo Park, CA; Manna, Liberato [Berkeley, CA

    2011-11-22

    Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making shaped nanocrystal particles are disclosed. One embodiment includes a method for forming a branched, nanocrystal particle. It includes (a) forming a core having a first crystal structure in a solution, (b) forming a first arm extending from the core having a second crystal structure in the solution, and (c) forming a second arm extending from the core having the second crystal structure in the solution.

  1. Shaped Nonocrystal Particles And Methods For Making The Same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2005-02-15

    Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making shaped nanocrystal particles are disclosed. One embodiment includes a method for forming a branched, nanocrystal particle. It includes (a) forming a core having a first crystal structure in a solution, (b) forming a first arm extending from the core having a second crystal structure in the solution, and (c) forming a second arm extending from the core having the second crystal structure in the solution.

  2. Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C; Manna, Liberato

    2013-12-17

    Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making shaped nanocrystal particles are disclosed. One embodiment includes a method for forming a branched, nanocrystal particle. It includes (a) forming a core having a first crystal structure in a solution, (b) forming a first arm extending from the core having a second crystal structure in the solution, and (c) forming a second arm extending from the core having the second crystal structure in the solution.

  3. Ice Core Dating Software for Interactive Dating of Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Mayewski, P. A.; Abdul Jawad, B. S.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists involved in ice core dating are well familiar with the problem of identification and recording the depth of annual signals using stable isotopes, glaciochemistry, ECM (electrical conductivity), DEP (dielectric properties) and particle counter data. Traditionally all parameters used for ice core dating were plotted as a function of depth, printed and after years were marked on the paper, converted to depth vs. age time scale. To expedite this tedious and manual process we developed interactive computer software, Ice core Dating (ICD) program. ICD is written in Java programming language, and uses GPL and GPL site licensed graphic libraries. The same 3.5 Mb in size pre-compiled single jar file, that includes all libraries and application code, was successfully tested on WinOS, Mac OSX, Linux, and Solaris operating systems running Java VM version 1.4. We have followed the modular design philosophy in our source code so potential integration with other software modules, data bases and server side distributed computer environments can be easily implemented. We expect to continue development of new suites of tools for easy integration of ice core data with other available time proxies. ICD is thoroughly documented and comes with a technical reference and cookbook that explains the purpose of the software and its many features, and provides examples to help new users quickly become familiar with the operation and philosophy of the software. ICD is available as a free download from the Climate Change Institute web site ( under the terms of GNU GPL public license.

  4. Core-nucleus distortation in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We are completing a study of the effects of the spherical distortion of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} nucleus by the {Lambda} in a hypernucleus. The response of the core was determined by an appropriately chosen energy-density functional which depends, in particular, on the nuclear compressibility. The forcing action of the A is determined by the nuclear density dependence of the {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter which is obtained from our work on the {Lambda} single-particle energies. Because of the strongly repulsive {Lambda}NN forces, this {Lambda} binding {open_quotes}saturates{close_quotes} at a density close to the central density of nuclei, and results in a reduced core-nucleus distortion much less than would otherwise be obtained. The effects of the core distortion then turn out to be very small even for quite light hypernuclei. This result justifies the assumption that spherical core nuclei are effectively undistorted in a hypernucleus.

  5. A conserved role for the 20S proteasome and Nrf2 transcription factor in oxidative stress adaptation in mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Andrew M.; Staab, Trisha A.; Tower, John; Sieburth, Derek; Davies, Kelvin J. A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammalian cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced adaptation to oxidative stress is strongly dependent on an Nrf2 transcription factor-mediated increase in the 20S proteasome. Here, we report that both Caenorhabditis elegans nematode worms and Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies are also capable of adapting to oxidative stress with H2O2 pre-treatment. As in mammalian cells, this adaptive response in worms and flies involves an increase in proteolytic activity and increased expression of the 20S proteasome, but not of the 26S proteasome. We also found that the increase in 20S proteasome expression in both worms and flies, as in mammalian cells, is important for the adaptive response, and that it is mediated by the SKN-1 and CNC-C orthologs of the mammalian Nrf2 transcription factor, respectively. These studies demonstrate that stress mechanisms operative in cell culture also apply in disparate intact organisms across a wide biological diversity. PMID:23038734

  6. Counterrotating Cores in Elliptical Galaxies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcells, Marc Comas

    The dynamics of the merger between a high- and a low-luminosity elliptical galaxy has been studied to understand how kinematically peculiar cores in elliptical galaxies might form. Numerical simulations of mergers provide rotation curves, surface density profiles, surface density contour plots and velocity maps of the merger remnants, as well as diagnostics on the dynamics such as phase-space diagrams. This type of merger can create counterrotating cores. The core of the smaller galaxy, of higher density, is not disrupted by the primary tidal field and sinks to the center of the primary as an independent dynamical subsystem. Core counterrotation occurs only when the initial merger orbit is retrograde with respect to the spin of the primary. The remnant has higher effective radius and lower mean central surface density than the primary galaxy, but a smaller core radius. The adsorption of orbital energy and angular momentum by the primary particles greatly modifies the kinematic structure of the larger galaxy. Twisted rotation axes and isophote twists appear over the whole body of the remnant. These diagnostics may be used to determine whether observed peculiar cores might have formed via an elliptical-elliptical merger. Galaxies with counterrotating cores should show a complex velocity field, isophotal irregularities, and, in general, a slow rotation in the main body of the galaxy. The present experiments are the first galaxy-satellite merger experiments involving an active, rotating secondary. They show that part of the orbital angular momentum is absorbed by the secondary, thus the secondary contributes to its own sinking: the sinking rate depends on the orientation of the secondary spin. Long-slit spectroscopic observations of NGC 3656 are reported. Rotation curves indicate that NGC 3656 contains a core spinning in a direction perpendicular to the rotation in the main body of the galaxy. Velocity reversals at intermediate radii are also observed. These features

  7. Dynamic Cores in Hydrostatic Disguise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballesteros-Paredes, Javier; Klessen, Ralf S.; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2003-07-01

    We discuss the column density profiles of ``cores'' in three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) numerical simulations of turbulent molecular clouds. The SPH scheme allows us to perform a high spatial resolution analysis of the density maxima (cores) at scales between ~0.003 and 0.3 pc. We analyze simulations in three different physical conditions: large-scale driving (LSD), small-scale driving (SSD), and random Gaussian initial conditions without driving (GC), each one at two different time steps: just before self-gravity is turned on (t0) and when gravity has been operating such that 5% of the total mass in the box has been accreted into cores (t1). For this data set, we perform Bonnor-Ebert fits to the column density profiles of cores found by a clump-finding algorithm. We find that, for the particular fitting procedure we use, 65% of the cores can be matched to Bonnor-Ebert (BE) profiles, and of these, 47% correspond to stable equilibrium configurations with ξmax<6.5, even though the cores analyzed in the simulations are not in equilibrium but instead are dynamically evolving. The temperatures obtained with the fitting procedure vary between 5 and 60 K (in spite of the simulations being isothermal, with T=11.3 K), with the peak of the distribution being at T=11 K and most clumps having fitted temperatures between 5 and 30 K. Central densities obtained with the BE fit tend to be smaller than the actual central densities of the cores. We also find that for the LSD and GC cases, there are more BE-like cores at t0 than at t1 with ξmax<=20, while in the case of SSD, there are more such cores at t1 than at t0. We interpret this as a consequence of the stronger turbulence present in the cores of run SSD, which prevents good BE fits in the absence of gravity, and delays collapse in its presence. Finally, in some cases we find substantial superposition effects when we analyze the projection of the density structures, even though the scales over which we

  8. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  9. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  10. GRAVITATIONAL ACCRETION OF PARTICLES ONTO MOONLETS EMBEDDED IN SATURN's RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Yuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Daisaka, Hiroshi E-mail: ohtsuki@tiger.kobe-u.ac.jp

    2014-12-20

    Using a local N-body simulation, we examine gravitational accretion of ring particles onto moonlet cores in Saturn's rings. We find that gravitational accretion of particles onto moonlet cores is unlikely to occur in the C ring and probably difficult in the inner B ring as well provided that the cores are rigid water ice. Dependence of particle accretion on ring thickness changes when the radial distance from the planet and/or the density of particles is varied: the former determines the size of the core's Hill radius relative to its physical size, while the latter changes the effect of self-gravity of accreted particles. We find that particle accretion onto high-latitude regions of the core surface can occur even if the rings' vertical thickness is much smaller than the core radius, although redistribution of particles onto the high-latitude regions would not be perfectly efficient in outer regions of the rings such as the outer A ring, where the size of the core's Hill sphere in the vertical direction is significantly larger than the core's physical radius. Our results suggest that large boulders recently inferred from observations of transparent holes in the C ring are not formed locally by gravitational accretion, while propeller moonlets in the A ring would be gravitational aggregates formed by particle accretion onto dense cores. Our results also imply that the main bodies of small satellites near the outer edge of Saturn's rings may have been formed in rather thin rings.

  11. Electrocatalysts having gold monolayers on platinum nanoparticle cores, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to gold-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of an electrocatalytically active core at least partially encapsulated by an outer shell of gold or gold alloy. The invention more particularly relates to such particles having a noble metal-containing core, and more particularly, a platinum or platinum alloy core. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  12. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  13. Method of determining nanoparticle core weight.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Fred; O'loughlin, Terry; Weissleder, Ralph; Josephson, Lee

    2005-02-01

    Polymer-coated metal or metal oxide nanoparticles have a variety of uses in industry, biological research, and medicine. Characterization of nanoparticles often includes determination of the dimensions of the electron-dense core by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), with the weight of the core determined from core volume and core density. However, TEM is labor intensive, has a long turnaround time, and uses equipment that is sometimes not readily available. Here we present an alternative method for determining the weight of nanoparticle cores termed the viscosity/light scattering method, which uses (i) measurements of viscosity over a wide concentration range to obtain the partial specific volume, (ii) measurements of particle diameter by light scattering, to obtain the volume of an individual particle, and (iii) the concentration of nanoparticles (w/v). We have applied this method to determine the weights of nanoparticle cores (iron of amino-CLIO and ferritin), the weights of globular proteins (molecular weight of IgG and albumin), and the weight of polystyrene microspheres. The viscosity/light scattering method is nondestructive of the sample and can be performed with a variety of materials on a routine basis.

  14. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  15. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  16. Particle separator

    DOEpatents

    Hendricks, Charles D.

    1990-01-01

    Method and apparatus (10) are provided for separating and classifying particles (48,50,56) by dispersing the particles within a fluid (52) that is upwardly flowing within a cone-shaped pipe (12) that has its large end (20) above its small end (18). Particles of similar size and shape (48,50) migrate to individual levels (A,B) within the flowing fluid. As the fluid is deflected by a plate (42) at the top end of the pipe (12), the smallest particles are collected on a shelf-like flange (40). Ever larger particles are collected as the flow rate of the fluid is increased. To prevent particle sticking on the walls (14) of the pipe (12), additional fluid is caused to flow into the pipe (12) through holes (68) that are specifically provided for that purpose. Sticking is further prevented by high frequency vibrators (70) that are positioned on the apparatus (10).

  17. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  18. Characterizing Particle Combustion in a Rijke Burner.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-29

    Rijke Burner. rp = NU In( I + BT) PgpCpgdp 3.2 Shrinking Core Model -, Levenspiel (1972) outlines the shrinking core model. In this model the particle...M. E., Numerical Methods and Modeling for Chemical Engineers. John Wiley and Sons (1984) Levenspiel , 0., Chemical Reaction Engineering Second

  19. The effects of t’ai chi on muscle activity, pain, and balance in females in their 20s with acute low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jee-Hun; Cho, Tae-Yong; Cho, Yong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted in order to examine the effects of t’ai chi on females in their 20s with acute low back pain. The subjects were 30 females in their 20s with acute low back pain. [Subjects and Methods] They were equally and randomly divided into a t’ai chi group and a stretching group. The intervention was applied three times per week, one hour each time, for a total of eight weeks. During the one hour, the subjects conducted warm-up exercises for 10 min, primary exercises for 40 min, and cool-down exercises for 10 min. In order to examine changes in low back pain in the patients according to the intervention method, muscle activity, pain, and balance elements (left and right side movement distance, forward and backward movement distance) were measured. [Results] Muscle activity and the visual analog scale score significantly decreased in both the t’ai chi group and the stretching group. Regarding changes in balance elements, the t’ai chi group’s left and right side movement distance decreased, which was statistically significant. However, the t’ai chi group’s forward and backward movement distance and the stretching group’s forward and backward movement distance and left and right side movement distance did not change. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study, t’ai chi is considered an appropriate exercise program to reduce acute low back pain in females in their 20s. This is because when compared with stretching, it enables posture maintenance with lesser force due to decreased muscle activity, it is more helpful for improvements in balance ability, and it is effective in decreasing pain. PMID:25931717

  20. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  1. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  2. Synchronous occurrence of squamous-cell carcinoma "transformation" and EGFR exon 20 S768I mutation as a novel mechanism of resistance in EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Longo, Lucia; Mengoli, Maria Cecilia; Bertolini, Federica; Bettelli, Stefania; Manfredini, Samantha; Rossi, Giulio

    2017-01-01

    The occurrence of secondary EGFR mutation T790M in exon 20 and histologic "transformation" are common mechanisms underlying resistance to EGFR first- or second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). We describe here on a hitherto unreported mechanism of EGFR TKI resistance synchronously combining squamous-cell carcinoma change and occurrence of the EGFR exon 20 S768I secondary mutation in a 43 year-old woman with stage IV adenocarcinoma harbouring EGFR exon 21 L858R mutation. After 8 months of response to gefitinib, the patient experienced EGFR TKI resistance and died of leptomeningeal neoplastic dissemination.

  3. Formation of Bidisperse Particle Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Zhao, Bing; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric

    2014-11-01

    When a group of dense particles is released instantaneously into water, their motion has been conceptualized as a circulating particle thermal (Ruggerber 2000). However, Wen and Nacamuli (1996) observed the formation of particle clumps characterized by a narrow, fast moving core shedding particles into wakes. They observed the clump formation even for particles in the non-cohesive range as long as the source Rayleigh number was large (Ra > 1E3) or equivalently the source cloud number (Nc) was small (Nc < 3.2E2). This physical phenomenon has been investigated by Zhao et al. (2014) through physical experiments. They proposed the theoretical support for Nc dependence and categorized the formation processes into cloud formation, transitional regime and clump formation. Previous works focused mainly on the behavior of monodisperse particles. The present study further extends the experimental investigation to the formation process of bidisperse particles. Experiments are conducted in a glass tank with a water depth of 90 cm. Finite amounts of sediments with various weight proportions between coarser and finer particles are released from a cylindrical tube. The Nc being tested ranges from 6E-3 to 9.9E-2, which covers all the three formation regimes. The experimental results showed that the introduction of coarse particles promotes cloud formation and reduce the losses of finer particles into the wake. More quantitative descriptions of the effects of source conditions on the formation processes will be presented during the conference.

  4. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  5. Ferrofluid-based Stretchable Magnetic Core Inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic materials are commonly used in inductor and transformer cores to increase inductance density. The emerging field of stretchable electronics poses a new challenge since typical magnetic cores are bulky, rigid and often brittle. This paper presents, for the first time, stretchable inductors incorporating ferrofluid as a liquid magnetic core. Ferrofluids, suspensions of nanoscale magnetic particles in a carrier liquid, provide enhanced magnetic permeability without changing the mechanical properties of the surrounding elastomer. The inductor tested in this work consisted of a liquid metal solenoid wrapped around a ferrofluid core in separate channels. The low frequency inductance was found to increase from 255 nH before fill to 390 nH after fill with ferrofluid, an increase of 52%. The inductor was also shown to survive uniaxial strains of up to 100%.

  6. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, Robert W.; Dobelbower, M. Christian

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  7. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  8. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  9. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  10. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  11. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  12. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  13. Final report on key comparison CCQM-K92: Electrolytic conductivity at 0.05 S m-1 and 20 S m-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskočil, L.; Máriássy, M.; Reyes, Adrian; Monroy, Marcela; Vospělová, Alena; Magnusson, Bertil; Pyykkö, Rauno; Kardash, Elena; Barbieri Gonzaga, Fabiano; Fraga, I. C. S.; Lopes, J. C.; Silva, W. B., Jr.; Borges, P. P.; Rocha, W. F. C.; Durbiano, Francesca; Orrù, E.; Pratt, Kenneth W.; Tønnes Jakobsen, Pia; Dalsgaard Jensen, Hans; Avnskjold, Jørgen; Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Suvorov, V. I.; Xiaoping, Song; Hai, Wang; Seitz, Steffen; Spitzer, Petra; Gavrilkin, Vladimir; Prokopenko, Leonid; Stennik, Oleksiy; Kozlowski, Wladyslaw; Dumanska-Kulpa, Joanna; Grzybowska, Izabela; Ovchinnikov, Yury A.; Nagyné Szilágyi, Zsófia; Fükö, Judit

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the key comparison CCQM-K92 was to demonstrate the capabilities of the participating NMIs to measure electrolytic conductivity of an unknown sample. Two samples with nominal electrolytic conductivity values of 0.05 S m-1 and 20 S m-1 have been prepared for comparison. For the first time a conductivity value larger than those given in the IUPAC document [1] was measured in a CCQM comparison. Thus no calibration standards with similar conductivity value were available. The comparison was an activity of the Electrochemical Working Group (EAWG) of the CCQM and was coordinated by SMU. In the comparison NMIs from fifteen countries took part. The higher conductivity (20 S m-1) was measured by ten participants. Good agreement of the results was observed for the majority of participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  14. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  15. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  17. GPU-enabled particle-particle particle-tree scheme for simulating dense stellar cluster system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasawa, Masaki; Portegies Zwart, Simon; Makino, Junichiro

    2015-07-01

    We describe the implementation and performance of the (Particle-Particle Particle-Tree) scheme for simulating dense stellar systems. In , the force experienced by a particle is split into short-range and long-range contributions. Short-range forces are evaluated by direct summation and integrated with the fourth order Hermite predictor-corrector method with the block timesteps. For long-range forces, we use a combination of the Barnes-Hut tree code and the leapfrog integrator. The tree part of our simulation environment is accelerated using graphical processing units (GPU), whereas the direct summation is carried out on the host CPU. Our code gives excellent performance and accuracy for star cluster simulations with a large number of particles even when the core size of the star cluster is small.

  18. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  19. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  20. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  1. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  2. Joint trajectories of cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms from the mid-20s to the mid-30s predicting generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Yeon; Brook, Judith S; Finch, Stephen J; De La Rosa, Mario; Brook, David W

    2017-03-10

    The current study examines longitudinal patterns of cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms as predictors of generalized anxiety disorder using data from the Harlem Longitudinal Development Study. There were 674 African American (53%) and Puerto Rican (47%) participants. Among the 674 participants, 60% were females. In the logistic regression analyses, the indicators of membership in each of the joint trajectories of cigarette smoking and depressive symptoms from the mid-20s to the mid-30s were used as the independent variables, and the diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder in the mid-30s was used as the dependent variable. The high cigarette smoking with high depressive symptoms group and the low cigarette smoking with high depressive symptoms group were associated with an increased likelihood of having generalized anxiety disorder as compared to the no cigarette smoking with low depressive symptoms group. The findings shed light on the prevention and treatment of generalized anxiety disorder.

  3. Identification of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A4 as the Major Isozyme Responsible for the Glucuronidation of 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; He, Chunyong; Fang, Lianxiang; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-01-01

    20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD), one of the representative aglycones of ginsenosides, has a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities. Although phase I metabolism has been investigated extensively, information regarding phase II metabolism of this compound remains to be elucidated. Here, a glucuronidated metabolite of PPD in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and rat liver microsomes (RLMs) was unambiguously identified as PPD-3-O-β-d-glucuronide by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry. The chemical inhibition and recombinant human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms assay showed that the PPD glucuronidation was mainly catalyzed by UGT1A4 in HLM, whereas UGT1A3 showed weak catalytic activity. In conclusion, PPD-3-O-β-d-glucuronide was first identified as the principal glucuronidation metabolite of PPD in HLMs, which was catalyzed by UGT1A4. PMID:27005621

  4. Auroral particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-06-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  5. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  6. Character of energy flow in air shower core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, K.; Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Energy per charged particle near the core of air showers was measured by 9 energy flow detectors, which were the combination of Cerenkov counters and scintillators. Energy per particle of each detector was normalized to energy at 2m from the core. The following results were obtained as to the energy flow: (1) integral frequency distribution of mean energy per particle (averaged over 9 detectors) is composed of two groups separated distinctly; and (2) showers contained in one group show an anisotropy of arrival direction.

  7. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  8. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  9. Core Concepts of Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Jackie L.

    1995-01-01

    Core concepts of kinesiology are the basis of communication about movement that facilitate progression of skill levels. The article defines and exemplifies each of 10 core concepts: range of motion, speed of motion, number of segments, nature of segments, balance, coordination, compactness, extension at release/contact, path of projection, and…

  10. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  11. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  12. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  13. Modular core holder

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, J.; Cole, C.W.; Hamid, S.; Lucas, J.K.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a modular core holder. It comprises: a sleeve, forming an internal cavity for receiving a core. The sleeve including segments; support means, overlying the sleeve, for supporting the sleeve; and access means, positioned between at least two of the segments of the sleeve, for allowing measurement of conditions within the internal cavity.

  14. More on the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Monnica

    2013-01-01

    From a higher education perspective, new "Common Core" standards could improve student college-readiness levels, reduce institutional remediation rates, and close education gaps in and between states. As a national initiative to create common educational standards for students across multiple states, the Common Core State Standards…

  15. Mercury's core evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deproost, Marie-Hélène; Rivoldini, Attilio; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing data of Mercury's surface by MESSENGER indicate that Mercury formed under reducing conditions. As a consequence, silicon is likely the main light element in the core together with a possible small fraction of sulfur. Compared to sulfur, which does almost not partition into solid iron at Mercury's core conditions and strongly decreases the melting temperature, silicon partitions almost equally well between solid and liquid iron and is not very effective at reducing the melting temperature of iron. Silicon as the major light element constituent instead of sulfur therefore implies a significantly higher core liquidus temperature and a decrease in the vigor of compositional convection generated by the release of light elements upon inner core formation.Due to the immiscibility in liquid Fe-Si-S at low pressure (below 15 GPa), the core might also not be homogeneous and consist of an inner S-poor Fe-Si core below a thinner Si-poor Fe-S layer. Here, we study the consequences of a silicon-rich core and the effect of the blanketing Fe-S layer on the thermal evolution of Mercury's core and on the generation of a magnetic field.

  16. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  17. Faster-than-Light Particles: A Review of Tachyon Characteristics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-10-01

    A-DlAO9(4 529 RAND CORP SANTA MNtICA CA F/6 20/S FASTER-THAN-LIBI4T PARTICLES: A REVIEW OF TACHYON CHARACTERISTIC--ETCWU) OCT B0 E A PUSCHER F49620...77-C-0023 UNCLASSIFIED RAI0IN-1530-AF N. I nmui ininmuuuI LEVEL A RAND NOTE FASTER-THAN-LIGHT PARTICLES: A REVIEW OF ) ( TACHYON CHARACTERISTICS Edward...RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4TIT LE ( d Subtitle) TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED ( Faster-than-Light Particles: A Review of /Interim -i Tachyon

  18. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  19. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  20. Lunar Regolith Particle Shape Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiekhaefer, Rebecca; Hardy, Sandra; Rickman, Douglas; Edmunson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Future engineering of structures and equipment on the lunar surface requires significant understanding of particle characteristics of the lunar regolith. Nearly all sediment characteristics are influenced by particle shape; therefore a method of quantifying particle shape is useful both in lunar and terrestrial applications. We have created a method to quantify particle shape, specifically for lunar regolith, using image processing. Photomicrographs of thin sections of lunar core material were obtained under reflected light. Three photomicrographs were analyzed using ImageJ and MATLAB. From the image analysis measurements for area, perimeter, Feret diameter, orthogonal Feret diameter, Heywood factor, aspect ratio, sieve diameter, and sieve number were recorded. Probability distribution functions were created from the measurements of Heywood factor and aspect ratio.

  1. Bacterial Fouling in a Model Core System

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, J. C.; Bramhill, B.; Wardlaw, N. C.; Costerton, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    We have used a sintered glass bead core to simulate the spaces and surfaces of reservoir rock in studies of the bacterial plugging phenomenon that affects waterflood oil recovery operations. The passage of pure or mixed natural populations of bacteria through this solid matrix was initially seen to promote the formation of adherent bacterial microcolonies on available surfaces. Bacteria within these microcolonies produced huge amounts of exopolysaccharides and coalesced to form a confluent plugging biofilm that eventually caused a >99% decrease in core permeability. Aerobic bacteria developed a plugging biofilm on the inlet face of the core, facultative anaerobes plugged throughout the core, and dead bacteria did not effectively plug the narrow (33-μm) spaces of this solid matrix because they neither adhered extensively to surfaces nor produced the extensive exopolysaccharides characteristic of living cells. The presence of particles in the water used in these experiments rapidly decreased the core permeability because they became trapped in the developing biofilm and accelerated the plugging of pore spaces. Once established, cells within the bacterial biofilm could be killed by treatment with a biocide (isothiazalone), but their essentially inert carbohydrate biofilm matrix persisted and continued to plug the pore spaces, whereas treatment with 5% sodium hypochlorite killed the bacteria, dissolved the exopolysaccharide biofilm matrix, and restored permeability to these plugged glass bead cores. Images PMID:16346760

  2. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  3. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  4. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  5. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  6. Particle Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroyuki K. M.

    2014-05-01

    Geophysics research has long been dominated by classical mechanics, largely disregarding the potential of particle physics to augment existing techniques. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in probing Earth's interior with muons and neutrinos. Existing results for various volcanological targets are reviewed. Geoneutrinos are also highlighted as examples in which the neutrino probes elucidate the composition of Earth's deep interior. Particle geophysics has the potential to serve as a useful paradigm to transform our understanding of Earth as dramatically as the X-ray transformed our understanding of medicine and the body.

  7. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  8. Stretchable inductor with liquid magnetic core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    Adding magnetic materials is a well-established method for improving performance of inductors. However, traditional magnetic cores are rigid and poorly suited for the emerging field of stretchable electronics, where highly deformable inductors are used to wirelessly couple power and data signals. In this work, stretchable inductors are demonstrated based on the use of ferrofluids, magnetic liquids based on distributed magnetic particles, to create a compliant magnetic core. Using a silicone molding technique to create multi-layer fluidic channels, a liquid metal solenoid is fabricated around a ferrofluid channel. An analytical model is developed for the effects of mechanical strain, followed by experimental verification using two different ferrofluids with different permeabilities. Adding ferrofluid was found to increase the unstrained inductance by up to 280% relative to a similar inductor with a non-magnetic silicone core, while retaining the ability to survive uniaxial strains up to 100%.

  9. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  10. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  11. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  12. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  13. Airborne Particles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Carl F.; Ojala, Eric J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students collect airborne particles using a common vacuum cleaner. Suggests ways for the students to convert their data into information related to air pollution and human health. Urges consideration of weather patterns when analyzing the results of the investigation. (TW)

  14. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  15. Nanorice Particles: Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hui (Inventor); Brandl, Daniel (Inventor); Le, Fei (Inventor); Nordlander, Peter (Inventor); Halas, Nancy J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid nanoparticle, i.e., a nanorice particle, which combines the intense local fields of nanorods with the highly tunable plasmon resonances of nanoshells, is described herein. This geometry possesses far greater structural tunability than previous nanoparticle geometries, along with much larger local field enhancements and far greater sensitivity as a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensor than presently known dielectric-conductive material nanostructures. In an embodiment, a nanoparticle comprises a prolate spheroid-shaped core having a first aspect ratio. The nanoparticle also comprises at least one conductive shell surrounding said prolate spheroid-shaped core. The nanoparticle has a surface plasmon resonance sensitivity of at least 600 nm RIU(sup.-1). Methods of making the disclosed nanorice particles are also described herein.

  16. Porous metal oxide particles and their methods of synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanglin; Liu, Qiang

    2013-03-12

    Methods are generally disclosed for synthesis of porous particles from a solution formed from a leaving agent, a surfactant, and a soluble metal salt in a solvent. The surfactant congregates to form a nanoparticle core such that the metal salt forms about the nanoparticle core to form a plurality of nanoparticles. The solution is heated such that the leaving agent forms gas bubbles in the solution, and the plurality of nanoparticles congregate about the gas bubbles to form a porous particle. The porous particles are also generally disclosed and can include a particle shell formed about a core to define an average diameter from about 0.5 .mu.m to about 50 .mu.m. The particle shell can be formed from a plurality of nanoparticles having an average diameter of from about 1 nm to about 50 nm and defined by a metal salt formed about a surfactant core.

  17. Characterization of core–shell MOF particles by depth profiling experiments using on-line single particle mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGES

    Cahill, J. F.; Fei, H.; Cohen, S. M.; ...

    2015-01-05

    Materials with core-shell structures have distinct properties that lend themselves to a variety of potential applications. Characterization of small particle core-shell materials presents a unique analytical challenge. Herein, single particles of solid-state materials with core-shell structures were measured using on-line aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS). Laser 'depth profiling' experiments verified the core-shell nature of two known core-shell particle configurations (< 2 mu m diameter) that possessed inverted, complimentary core-shell compositions (ZrO2@SiO2 versus SiO2@ZrO2). The average peak area ratios of Si and Zr ions were calculated to definitively show their core-shell composition. These ratio curves acted as a calibrant for anmore » uncharacterized sample - a metal-organic framework (MOF) material surround by silica (UiO-66(Zr)@SiO2; UiO = University of Oslo). ATOFMS depth profiling was used to show that these particles did indeed exhibit a core-shell architecture. The results presented here show that ATOFMS can provide unique insights into core-shell solid-state materials with particle diameters between 0.2-3 mu m.« less

  18. Core-Shell Composite Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Sriya

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in various fields due to their unique properties not seen in similar bulk materials. Among them, core-shell composite nanoparticles are an important class of materials which are attractive for their applications in catalysis, sensing, electromagnetic shielding, drug delivery, and environmental remediation. This dissertation focuses on the study of core-shell type of nanoparticles where a polymer serves as the core and inorganic nanoparticles are the shell. This is an interesting class of supramolecular building blocks and can "exhibit unusual, possibly unique, properties which cannot be obtained simply by co-mixing polymer and inorganic particles". The one-step Pickering emulsion polymerization method was successfully developed and applied to synthesize polystyrene-silica core-shell composite particles. Possible mechanisms of the Pickering emulsion polymerization were also explored. The silica nanoparticles were thermodynamically favorable to self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces at the initial stage of polymerization and remained at the interface to finally form the shells of the composite particles. More importantly, Pickering emulsion polymerization was employed to synthesize polystyrene/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-silica core-shell nanoparticles with N-isopropylacrylamide incorporated into the core as a co-monomer. The composite nanoparticles were temperature sensitive and could be up-taken by human prostate cancer cells and demonstrated effectiveness in drug delivery and cancer therapy. Similarly, by incorporating poly-2-(N,N)-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PDMA) into the core, pH sensitive core-shell composite nanoparticles were synthesized and applied as effective carriers to release a rheological modifier upon a pH change. Finally, the research focuses on facile approaches to engineer the transition of the temperature-sensitive particles and develop composite core-shell nanoparticles with a metallic shell.

  19. Non-antibiotic agent ginsenoside 20(S)-Rh2 enhanced the antibacterial effects of ciprofloxacin in vitro and in vivo as a potential NorA inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Sun, Yuan; Wang, Yaoyao; Lu, Meng; He, Jichao; Liu, Jiali; Chen, Qianying; Zhang, Xiaoxuan; Zhou, Fang; Wang, Guangji; Sun, Xianqiang

    2014-10-05

    The aim of this study is to explore the potential enhancing effect of ginsenoside 20(S)-Rh2 (Rh2) towards ciprofloxacin (CIP) against Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection in vitro and in vivo, and analyze the possible mechanisms through NorA inhibition from a target cellular pharmacokinetic view. In combination with non-toxic dosage of Rh2, the susceptibilities of S. aureus strains to CIP were significantly augmented, and the antibacterial kinetics of CIP in the S. aureus strains were markedly promoted. This enhancing effect of Rh2 towards CIP was also observed in S. aureus infected peritonitis mice, with elevated survival rate and reduced bacteria counts in blood. However, Rh2 did not influence the plasma concentrations of CIP. Further analysis indicated that Rh2 significantly promoted the accumulations of CIP in S. aureus, and inhibited the NorA mediated efflux of pyronin Y. The expressions of NorA gene on S. aureus were positively correlated with the enhancing effect of Rh2 with CIP. This is the first report of the enhancing effect of Rh2 with CIP for S. aureus infection in vitro and in vivo, of which it is probably that Rh2 inhibited NorA-mediated efflux and promoted the accumulation of CIP in the bacteria.

  20. A 20(S)-protopanoxadiol derivative overcomes multi-drug resistance by antagonizing ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wantao; Xu, Qin; Xiao, Meng; Hu, Lihong; Mao, Li; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, failure of chemotherapy is often caused by the ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1), and few drugs have been successfully developed to overcome ABCB1-mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR). To suppress ABCB1 activity, we previously designed and synthesized a new series of derivatives based on 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD). In the present study, we investigated the role of PPD derivatives in the function of ABC transporters. Non-toxic concentrations of the PPD derivative PPD12 sensitized ABCB1-overexpressing cells to their anti-cancer substrates better than either the parental PPD or inactive PPD11. PPD12 increased intracellular accumulation of adriamycin and rhodamine123 in resistant cancer cells. Although PPD12 did not suppress the expression of ABCB1 mRNA or protein, it stimulated the activity of ABCB1 ATPase. Because PPD12 is a competitive inhibitor, it was predicted to bind to the large hydrophobic cavity of homology-modeled human ABCB1. PPD12 also enhanced the efficacy of adriamycin against ABCB1-overexpressing KB/VCR xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, PPD12 enhances the efficacy of substrate drugs in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. These findings suggest that a combination therapy consisting of PPD12 with conventional chemotherapeutic agents may be an effective treatment for ABCB1-mediated MDR cancer patients. PMID:26824187

  1. Sensitive determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol in rat plasma using HPLC-APCI-MS: application of pharmacokinetic study in rats.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hong-Can; Sun, Jian-Guo; Wang, Guang-Ji; A, Ji-Ye; Xie, Hai-Tang; Zha, Wei-Bin; Yan, Bei; Sun, Fen-Zhi; Hao, Hai-Ping; Gu, Sheng-Hua; Sheng, Long-Sheng; Shao, Feng; Shi, Jian; Zhou, Fang

    2008-12-15

    20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD), the main metabolite of protopanoxadiol type ginsenosides (e.g. Rg3 and Rh2), is a very promising anti-cancer drug candidate. To evaluate the pharmacokinetic property of PPD, we reported a reliable, sensitive and simple method utilizing liquid chromatography (HPLC)-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) to determine PPD. PPD and the internal standard, panoxadiol (PD) were extracted from plasma with acetic ether, separated on a C18 reverse column, and then analyzed by APCI-MS. Targeting fragment ion at m/z 425 for both PPD and PD was monitored in selected-ion monitoring (SIM) mode. PPD can be quantitatively determined at the concentration as low as 1 ng/mL using 200 microL plasma. And the sensitive method showed excellent linearity over a range from 1 to 1000 ng/mL, high recovery, accuracy and precision at the concentrations of 2.5, 100.0 and 1000.0 ng/mL, respectively. The method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetic study of PPD in rats. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated and absolute bioavailability of PPD was 36.8+/-12.4%, at least ten times higher than that of Rg3 and Rh2, indicating its good absorption in gastrointestinal tract. It was further suggested that PPD be a promising anti-cancer candidate and probably responsible for the observed pharmacological activity of Rg3 and Rh2.

  2. Influence of the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation exercise programs on idiopathic scoliosis patient in the early 20s in terms of curves and balancing abilities: single case study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byung-Ki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) exercise programs for idiopathic scoliosis with a female patient in the early 20s in terms of her spinal curve and balancing abilities. The study subject was selected among 21-year-old female college students. There were no particular activities that the subject could not perform, but patient complained of difficulty in maintaining the standing position for a prolonged time. Patient chest X-ray results showed S-shaped curves tilted towards the left or right in the lumbar spine, thoracic spine, and cervical spine areas. The PNF exercise programs consists of seven therapeutic exercise programs, including home exercises considering the patients’ balancing abilities, the lateral symmetry of the spinal sway, the distortion, and the height of the pelvis and scapula bones. The programs last for 6 weeks and includes three sessions per week, with each session lasting for 30 min. Before and after the execution of the PNF exercise programs, the subject was monitored for the changes in her spinal sways through chest X-ray tests. Also, using a balance measurement instrument, the subject’s static and dynamic balancing abilities were tested. After executing the PNF exercise programs for 6 weeks, the spinal sways of the subject were corrected, and her static and dynamic balancing abilities were improved compared to the baseline values. PMID:28119879

  3. Oxidation and interaction of DJ-1 with 20S proteasome in the erythrocytes of early stage Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoshiro; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Matsumura, Akihiro; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Itoh, Sayoko; Sutou, Kenta; Kobayashi, Mayuka; Mita, Yuichiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Hisahara, Shin; Hara, Yasuo; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Hamakubo, Takao; Kusunoki, Susumu; Shimohama, Shun; Noguchi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive, age-related, neurodegenerative disorder, and oxidative stress is an important mediator in its pathogenesis. DJ-1, the product of the causative gene of a familial form of PD, plays a significant role in anti-oxidative defence to protect cells from oxidative stress. DJ-1 undergoes preferential oxidation at the cysteine residue at position 106 (Cys-106) under oxidative stress. Here, using specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1 (oxDJ-1), it was found that the levels of oxDJ-1 in the erythrocytes of unmedicated PD patients (n = 88) were higher than in those of medicated PD patients (n = 62) and healthy control subjects (n = 33). Elevated oxDJ-1 levels were also observed in a non-human primate PD model. Biochemical analysis of oxDJ-1 in erythrocyte lysates showed that oxDJ-1 formed dimer and polymer forms, and that the latter interacts with 20S proteasome. These results clearly indicate a biochemical alteration in the blood of PD patients, which could be utilized as an early diagnosis marker for PD. PMID:27470541

  4. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  5. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  6. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  7. INTEGRAL core programme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  8. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  9. Coaxial microreactor for particle synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Bartsch, Michael; Kanouff, Michael P; Ferko, Scott M; Crocker, Robert W; Wally, Karl

    2013-10-22

    A coaxial fluid flow microreactor system disposed on a microfluidic chip utilizing laminar flow for synthesizing particles from solution. Flow geometries produced by the mixing system make use of hydrodynamic focusing to confine a core flow to a small axially-symmetric, centrally positioned and spatially well-defined portion of a flow channel cross-section to provide highly uniform diffusional mixing between a reactant core and sheath flow streams. The microreactor is fabricated in such a way that a substantially planar two-dimensional arrangement of microfluidic channels will produce a three-dimensional core/sheath flow geometry. The microreactor system can comprise one or more coaxial mixing stages that can be arranged singly, in series, in parallel or nested concentrically in parallel.

  10. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  12. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  13. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  14. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  15. Particle classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Etkin, B.

    1987-04-14

    This patent describes a classifier for particulate material comprising a housing having an inlet to receive a classifying air flow flowing in a given direction, collection means downstream of the inlet to receive material classified by the air flow, and material introduction means intermediate the inlet and the collection means to introduce particles entrained in a secondary air stream into the housing in a direction other than the given direction. The material introduction means includes a material outlet aperture in a wall of the housing extending generally perpendicular to the given direction, conveying means to convey material and the secondary air stream to the material outlet and diverting means to divert the secondary air stream to a direction generally parallel to the classifying air flow flowing in the given direction. The diverting means includes a surface extending downstream from the outlet and adjacent thereto and being dimensioned to divert the secondary airstream by a Coanda effect generally parallel to the given direction and thereby segregate the secondary air/stream from the particles and permit continued movement of the particles along predictable trajectories.

  16. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  17. Tail-induced attraction between nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Mühlbacher, F; Schiessel, H; Holm, C

    2006-09-01

    We study a possible electrostatic mechanism underlying the compaction of DNA inside the nuclei of eucaryotes: the tail-bridging effect between nucleosomes, the fundamental DNA packaging units of the chromatin complex. As a simple model of the nucleosome we introduce the eight-tail colloid, a charged sphere with eight oppositely charged, flexible, grafted chains that represent the terminal histone tails. We show that our complexes attract each other via the formation of chain bridges and contrast this to the effect of attraction via charge patches. We demonstrate that the attraction between eight-tail colloids can be tuned by changing the fraction of charged monomers on the tails. This suggests a physical mechanism of chromatin compaction where the degree of DNA condensation is controlled via biochemical means, namely the acetylation and deacetylation of lysines in the histone tails.

  18. Saturn's F Ring Core: Calm Amidst Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whizin, A.; Cuzzi, J.; Hogan, R.; Dobrovolskis, A.; Colwell, J. E.; Scargle, J.; Dones, L.; Showalter, M.

    2012-12-01

    Near the edge of Saturn's Roche Zone the F ring is straddled on either side by two small satellites Prometheus and Pandora and as such undergoes perturbations that result in orbital chaos (Scargle et al 1993 DPS 25, #26.04, Winter et al 2007 MNRAS 380, L54; 2010 A&A 523, A67). Even in such an unstable environment the F ring appears to be relatively stable. Thus we postulate there are quiescent stable zones arising from mutual resonant interactions from the two ring moons. It is in one of these zones we believe the F ring has found a stable foothold despite the chaotic orbits in the region. At locations we call "anti-resonances" ring particles have much smaller changes over time in their semi-major axes and eccentricities than particles outside of these anti-resonance zones. We devise an impulse-based perturbation model that explains the orbital outcomes from successive perturbations from two satellites. In addition we compute the orbital evolution of thousands of mass-less test particles with a Bulirsch-Stoer N-body integrator over a narrow radial range covering the F ring core region at high spatial resolution. We find that the variance of the semi-major axes of particles in anti-resonances can be less than ~1km over a period of 32 years, while just a few kilometers away in either radial direction the variance can be tens of kilometers. More importantly, particles outside of these stable zones can migrate into a stable zone due to chaotic orbits, but once they enter an anti-resonance zone they remain there. The anti-resonances act as long-lived sinks for ring particles and explain the location of the F ring core despite its location not being in overall torque balance with ring moons.

  19. Enhanced Magnetic Properties in Antiferromagnetic-Core/Ferrimagnetic-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vasilakaki, Marianna; Trohidou, Kalliopi N.; Nogués, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles are gaining increasing interest due to their foreseen applications. Inverse antiferromagnetic(AFM)/ferrimagnetic(FiM) core/shell nanoparticles are particularly appealing since they may overcome some of the limitations of conventional FiM/AFM systems. However, virtually no simulations exist on this type of morphology. Here we present systematic Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations of the exchange bias properties of such nanoparticles. The coercivity, HC, and loop shift, Hex, present a non-monotonic dependence with the core diameter and the shell thickness, in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. Additionally, we demonstrate novel unconventional behavior in FiM/AFM particles. Namely, while HC and Hex decrease upon increasing FiM thickness for small AFM cores (as expected), they show the opposite trend for large cores. This presents a counterintuitive FiM size dependence for large AFM cores that is attributed to the competition between core and shell contributions, which expands over a wider range of core diameters leading to non-vanishing Hex even for very large cores. Moreover, the results also hint different possible ways to enhance the experimental performance of inverse core/shell nanoparticles for diverse applications. PMID:25872473

  20. Experimental Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Carl; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Purohit, Milind V.

    2014-08-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Profs. S.R. Mishra, R. Petti, M.V. Purohit, J.R. Wilson (co-PI's), and C. Rosenfeld (PI), engaged in studies in "Experimental Particle Physics." The group collaborated with similar groups at other universities and at national laboratories to conduct experimental studies of elementary particle properties. We utilized the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. Mishra, Rosenfeld, and Petti worked predominantly on neutrino experiments. Experiments conducted in the last fifteen years that used cosmic rays and the core of the sun as a source of neutrinos showed conclusively that, contrary to the former conventional wisdom, the "flavor" of a neutrino is not immutable. A neutrino of flavor "e," "mu," or "tau," as determined from its provenance, may swap its identity with one of the other flavors -- in our jargon, they "oscillate." The oscillation phenomenon is extraordinarily difficult to study because neutrino interactions with our instruments are exceedingly rare -- they travel through the earth mostly unimpeded -- and because they must travel great distances before a substantial proportion have made the identity swap. Three of the experiments that we worked on, MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE utilize a beam of neutrinos from an accelerator at Fermilab to determine the parameters governing the oscillation. Two other experiments that we worked on, NOMAD and MIPP, provide measurements supportive of the oscillation experiments. Good measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters may constitute a "low energy window" on related phenomena that are otherwise unobservable because they would occur only at energies way above the reach of conceivable accelerators. Purohit and Wilson participated in the BaBar experiment

  1. Enhanced oral absorption of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol by self-assembled liquid crystalline nanoparticles containing piperine: in vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Sun, E; Tan, Xiao-bin; Li, Song-lin; Cheng, Xu-dong; You, Ming; Jia, Xiao-bin

    2013-01-01

    Background 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD), similar to several other anticancer agents, has low oral absorption and is extensively metabolized. These factors limit the use of PPD for treatment of human diseases. Methods In this study, we used cubic nanoparticles containing piperine to improve the oral bioavailability of PPD and to enhance its absorption and inhibit its metabolism. Cubic nanoparticles loaded with PPD and piperine were prepared by fragmentation of glyceryl monoolein (GMO)/poloxamer 407 bulk cubic gel and verified using transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. We evaluated the in vitro release of PPD from these nanoparticles and its absorption across the Caco-2 cell monolayer model, and subsequently, we examined the bioavailability and metabolism of PPD and its nanoparticles in vivo. Results The in vitro release of PPD from these nanoparticles was less than 5% at 12 hours. PPD-cubosome and PPD-cubosome loaded with piperine (molar ratio PPD/piperine, 1:3) increased the apical to basolateral permeability values of PPD across the Caco-2 cell monolayer from 53% to 64%, respectively. In addition, the results of a pharmacokinetic study in rats showed that the relative bioavailabilities of PPD-cubosome [area under concentration–time curve (AUC)0–∞] and PPD-cubosome containing piperine (AUC0–∞) compared to that of raw PPD (AUC0–∞) were 166% and 248%, respectively. Conclusion The increased bioavailability of PPD-cubosome loaded with piperine is due to an increase in absorption and inhibition of metabolism of PPD by cubic nanoparticles containing piperine rather than because of improved release of PPD. The cubic nanoparticles containing piperine may be a promising oral carrier for anticancer drugs with poor oral absorption and that undergo extensive metabolism by cytochrome P450. PMID:23426652

  2. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  3. Recent developments in pressure coring

    SciTech Connect

    McFall, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    The current rapid growth in the number of enhanced oil and gas recovery projects has created a strong demand for reservoir data such as true residual oil saturations. The companies providing pressure coring services have moved to fill this need. Two recent developments have emerged with the potential of significantly improving the present performance of pressure coring. Coring bits utilizing synthetic diamond cutters have demonstrated coring rates of one-foot per minute while improving core recovery. It is also apparent that cores of a near-unconsolidated nature are more easily recovered. In addition, a special low invasion fluid that is placed in the core retriever has demonstrated reduced core washing by the drilling mud and a decrease in the complexity of preparing cores for analysis. This paper describes the design, laboratory, and field testing efforts that led to these coring improvements. Also, experience in utilizing these developments while recovering over 100 cores is discussed.

  4. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  5. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  6. Fresnel particle tracing in three dimensions using diffraction phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongkeun; Popescu, Gabriel; Badizadegan, Kamran; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S

    2007-04-01

    We have developed a novel experimental technique for tracking small particles in three dimensions with nanometer accuracy. The longitudinal positioning of a micrometer-sized particle is determined by using the Fresnel approximation to describe the transverse distribution of the wavefront that originated in the particle. The method utilizes the high-sensitivity quantitative phase imaging capability of diffraction phase microscopy recently developed in our laboratory. We demonstrate the principle of the technique with experiments on Brownian particles jittering in water both in bulk and in the vicinity of a boundary. The particles are localized in space within an error cube of 20 nm x 20 nm x 20 nm for a 33 Hz acquisition rate and 20s recording time.

  7. Tailored Core Shell Cathode Powders for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, Scott

    2015-03-23

    In this Phase I SBIR project, a “core-shell” composite cathode approach was evaluated for improving SOFC performance and reducing degradation of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode materials, following previous successful demonstrations of infiltration approaches for achieving the same goals. The intent was to establish core-shell cathode powders that enabled high performance to be obtained with “drop-in” process capability for SOFC manufacturing (i.e., rather than adding an infiltration step to the SOFC manufacturing process). Milling, precipitation and hetero-coagulation methods were evaluated for making core-shell composite cathode powders comprised of coarse LSCF “core” particles and nanoscale “shell” particles of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) or praseodymium strontium manganite (PSM). Precipitation and hetero-coagulation methods were successful for obtaining the targeted core-shell morphology, although perfect coverage of the LSCF core particles by the LSM and PSM particles was not obtained. Electrochemical characterization of core-shell cathode powders and conventional (baseline) cathode powders was performed via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) half-cell measurements and single-cell SOFC testing. Reliable EIS testing methods were established, which enabled comparative area-specific resistance measurements to be obtained. A single-cell SOFC testing approach also was established that enabled cathode resistance to be separated from overall cell resistance, and for cathode degradation to be separated from overall cell degradation. The results of these EIS and SOFC tests conclusively determined that the core-shell cathode powders resulted in significant lowering of performance, compared to the baseline cathodes. Based on the results of this project, it was concluded that the core-shell cathode approach did not warrant further investigation.

  8. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  9. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  10. A conceptual framework for mixing structures in individual aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weijun; Sun, Jiaxing; Xu, Liang; Shi, Zongbo; Riemer, Nicole; Sun, Yele; Fu, Pingqing; Zhang, Jianchao; Lin, Yangting; Wang, Xinfeng; Shao, Longyi; Chen, Jianmin; Zhang, Xiaoye; Wang, Zifa; Wang, Wenxing

    2016-11-01

    This study investigated the particle size- and age-dependent mixing structures of individual particles in clean and polluted air. Aerosols were classified into eight components: sea salt, mineral dust, fly ash, metal, soot, sulfates, nitrates, and organic matter (OM). Based on our aerosol classification, a particle that consists of two or more aerosol components can be defined as an internally mixed particle. Otherwise, it is considered to be an externally mixed particle. Within the internally mixed particle class, we identified four heterogeneous mixing structures: core-shell, dumbbell, OM coating, and dispersed OM, as well as one homogeneous-like mixing structure. Homogeneous-like mixing mainly occurred in fine particles (<1 µm), while the frequency of heterogeneously mixed particles increased with particle size. Our study demonstrated that particle mixing structures depend on particle size and location and evolve with time. OM-coating and core-shell structures are important indicators for particle aging in air as long as they are distant from specific emission sources. Long-range transported particles tended to have core-shell and OM-coating structures. We found that secondary aerosol components (e.g., sulfates, nitrates, and organics) determined particle mixing structures, because their phases change following particle hydration and dehydration under different relative humidities. Once externally mixed particles are transformed into internally mixed particles, they cannot revert to their former state, except when semivolatile aerosol components are involved. Categorizing mixing structures of individual particles is essential for studying their optical and hygroscopic properties and for tracing the development of their physical or chemical properties over time.

  11. Synthesis of AlNiCo core/shell nanopowders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genc, A. M.; Akdeniz, M. V.; Ozturk, T.; Kalay, Y. E.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic core/shell nanostructures have been recently received much interest owing to their utmost potential in permanent magnetic applications. In the present work, AlNiCo permanent magnet powders were synthesized by ball milling and a core/shell nanostructure was obtained using RF induced plasma. The effects of particle size and nanoshell structure on the magnetic properties were investigated in details. The coercivity of AlNiCo powders was found to increase with decreasing particle size, exclusively nanopowders encapsulated with Fe3O4 shell showed the highest coercivity values. The shell structure produced during plasma reaction was found to form a resistant layer against oxidation of metallic nanoparticles.

  12. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  13. SAXS analysis of single- and multi-core iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Szczerba, Wojciech; Costo, Rocio; Morales, Maria del Puerto; Thünemann, Andreas F.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the characterization of four superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dimercaptosuccinic acid, which are suitable candidates for reference materials for magnetic properties. Particles p1 and p2 are single-core particles, while p3 and p4 are multi-core particles. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis reveals a lognormal type of size distribution for the iron oxide cores of the particles. Their mean radii are 6.9 nm (p1), 10.6 nm (p2), 5.5 nm (p3) and 4.1 nm (p4), with narrow relative distribution widths of 0.08, 0.13, 0.08 and 0.12. The cores are arranged as a clustered network in the form of dense mass fractals with a fractal dimension of 2.9 in the multi-core particles p3 and p4, but the cores are well separated from each other by a protecting organic shell. The radii of gyration of the mass fractals are 48 and 44 nm, and each network contains 117 and 186 primary particles, respectively. The radius distributions of the primary particle were confirmed with transmission electron microscopy. All particles contain purely maghemite, as shown by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. PMID:28381973

  14. The Neogene Forearc Basins of the Ecuadorian Shelf (1°N-2°20'S): Preliminary Interpretation of a Dense Grid of Mcs Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collot, J. Y.; Hernández Salazar, M. J.; Michaud, F.; Proust, J. N.; Ortega, R.; Aleman, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Forearc basins serve as a sedimentary archive of sea-level variations and subduction-related tectonic processes. Along the Ecuadorian convergent margin (0°40'N-2°20'S) we interpreted a dense network (one profile every 4 km) of MCS reflection profiles acquired by the Ecuadorian State during the 2009 SCAN cruise with a 8-km-long, 640-channel streamer, and an array of 4000 in3total volume air guns to improve our understanding of the dynamic processes that shape forearc basin stratigraphy and tectonic structures. Isopach and structural maps of the acoustic basement show two structural segments on the margin. The northern segment (0°45'S-0°40'N) is characterized by - three sedimentary basins called Pedernales, Bahía-Jama and Caráquez basins, - N30°-50° trending transcurrent faults and -N80°-90° trending normal faults dipping to the south. The southern segment (2°S-0°45'S) is characterized by acoustic basement high, NS-trending until 1°10'S, with small localized sedimentary basins and by N320°-340° trending normal faults dipping to the north. At least five seismic units separated by unconformities are evidenced in the northern basins. Tentative correlations with geological data from the offshore Caraquez-1 well and the on-shore geology, suggest the following Neogene deformation steps: 1) sedimentary basins were initiated along N80°-90° trending normal faults in a regional N30°-50° trending strike slip system during lower Miocene; 2) deformation ended by a regional erosion (underlined by a flat regional unconformity) after the lower Miocene; 3) subsidence began by an undersea regional erosion after the Middle-Upper Miocene (underlined by an irregular regional unconformity), and 4) uplift and locally subsidence of the shelf edge with reactivation of a strike slip fault system from Pliocene (?) to Present. The arrival of the Carnegie ridge and associated seamounts to the trench axis is proposed at the origin of this last stage.

  15. Turbulent scales of dilute particle-laden flows in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groszmann, Daniel E.; Rogers, Chris B.

    2004-12-01

    The work described in this paper attempts to characterize the effects of inertia, isolated from gravity, on the dispersion of solid particles in a turbulent air flow. The experiment consisted of releasing particles of various sizes in an enclosed box of fan-generated, near-homogeneous, isotropic, and stationary turbulent airflow and examining the particle behavior in a microgravity environment. The turbulence box was characterized in ground-based experiments using laser Doppler velocimetry techniques. Microgravity was established by free floating the experiment apparatus during the parabolic trajectory of NASA's KC-135 reduced-gravity aircraft. The microgravity generally lasted about 20 s, with about 50 parabolas per flight and one flight per day over a testing period of four days. To cover a broad range of flow regimes of interest, particles with Stokes numbers St of about 1-100 were released in the turbulence box. The three-dimensional measurements of particle motion were made with a particle-tracking algorithm using a three-camera stereo imaging system. Digital photogrammetric techniques were used to determine the particle locations from the calibrated camera images. The epipolar geometry constraint identified matching particles from the three different camera views and a direct spatial intersection scheme determined the coordinates of particles in three-dimensional space. Since particle loadings were light, velocity and acceleration constraints allowed particles in a sequence of frames to be matched, resulting in particle tracks and dispersion measurements. The goal was to compare the dispersion of different Stokes number particles in zero gravity and thereby decouple the effects of gravity from inertia on the dispersion. Results show that higher inertia particles disperse less in isotropic, nondecaying turbulent flows under zero gravity, in agreement with current models. Measurements show that particles with St≈1 dispersed about ten times more than the St

  16. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  17. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  18. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  19. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  20. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Olich, Eugene E.; Dahl, Leslie R.

    1995-01-01

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter.

  1. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  2. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  3. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which…

  4. Core Geometry Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirata, Li Ann

    Core Geometry is a course offered in the Option Y sequence of the high school mathematics program described by the Hawaii State Department of Education's guidelines. The emphasis of this course is on the general awareness and use of the relationships among points, lines, and figures in planes and space. This sample course is based on the…

  5. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  6. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  7. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  8. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  9. Tailoring magnetic properties of core/shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hao; Sun, Shouheng; Li, J.; Wang, Z. L.; Liu, J. P.

    2004-08-01

    Bimagnetic FePt /MFe2O4(M =Fe,Co) core/shell nanoparticles are synthesized via high-temperature solution phase coating of 3.5nm FePt core with MFe2O4 shell. The thickness of the shell is controlled from 0.5 to 3nm. An assembly of the core/shell nanoparticles shows a smooth magnetization transition under an external field, indicating effective exchange coupling between the FePt core and the oxide shell. The coercivity of the FePt /Fe3O4 particles depends on the volume ratio of the hard and soft phases, consistent with previous theoretical predictions. These bimagnetic core/shell nanoparticles represent a class of nanostructured magnetic materials with their properties tunable by varying the chemical composition and thickness of the coating materials.

  10. Symmetry breaking and hole localization in multiple core electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Carravetta, V; Ågren, H

    2013-08-08

    Motivated by recent opportunitites to study hollow molecules with multiple core holes offered by X-ray free electron lasers, we revisit the core-hole localization and symmetry breaking problem, now studying ionization of more than one core electron. It is shown, using a N2 molecule with one, two, three, and four core holes, for example, that in a multiconfigurational determination of the core ionization potentials employing a molecular point group with broken inversion symmetry, one particular configuration is sufficient to account for the symmetry breaking relaxation energy in an independent particle approximation in the case of one or three holes, whereas the choice of point group symmetry is unessential for two and four holes. The relaxation energy follows a quadratic dependence on the number of holes in both representations.

  11. Histone Core Slips along DNA and Prefers Positioning at the Chain End

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaue, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Yoshimura, Shige H.; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2001-08-13

    We studied the stability and dynamics of a model of a nucleosome, the fundamental unit for the packing of long DNA in eukaryotes, using a Brownian dynamics simulation. For the proper folding of a stiff polymer on a core particle, moderate attractive interaction is shown to be essentially important, which explains the empirical experimental protocol for the reconstitution of nucleosomes. The effect of the chain end on the positioning of the core particle is examined and compared with the experimental data by atomic force microscopy measurement. It is also suggested that the core particle exhibits sliding motion alongthe chain as a manifestation of Brownian motion.

  12. Solar Energetic Particle Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, D. V.

    2003-01-01

    In the largest solar energetic-particle (SEP) events, acceleration occurs at shock waves driven out from the Sun by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). In fact, the highest proton intensities directly measured near Earth at energies up to approximately 1 GeV occur at the time of passage of shocks, which arrive about a day after the CMEs leave the Sun. CME-driven shocks expanding across magnetic fields can fill over half of the heliosphere with SEPs. Proton-generated Alfven waves trap particles near the shock for efficient acceleration but also throttle the intensities at Earth to the streaming limit early in the events. At high energies, particles begin to leak from the shock and the spectrum rolls downward to form an energy-spectral 'knee' that can vary in energy from approximately 1 MeV to approximately 1 GeV in different events. All of these factors affect the radiation dose as a function of depth and latitude in the Earth's atmosphere and the risk to astronauts and equipment in space. SEP ionization of the polar atmosphere produces nitrates that precipitate to become trapped in the polar ice. Observations of nitrate deposits in ice cores reveal individual large SEP events and extend back approximately 400 years. Unlike sunspots, SEP events follow the approximately 80-100-year Gleissberg cycle rather faithfully and are now at a minimum in that cycle. The largest SEP event in the last 400 years appears to be related to the flare observed by Carrington in 1859, but the probability of SEP events with such large fluences falls off sharply because of the streaming limit.

  13. Particle Beam Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peach, Ken; Ekdahl, Carl

    2014-02-01

    Particle beam radiography, which uses a variety of particle probes (neutrons, protons, electrons, gammas and potentially other particles) to study the structure of materials and objects noninvasively, is reviewed, largely from an accelerator perspective, although the use of cosmic rays (mainly muons but potentially also high-energy neutrinos) is briefly reviewed. Tomography is a form of radiography which uses multiple views to reconstruct a three-dimensional density map of an object. There is a very wide range of applications of radiography and tomography, from medicine to engineering and security, and advances in instrumentation, specifically the development of electronic detectors, allow rapid analysis of the resultant radiographs. Flash radiography is a diagnostic technique for large high-explosive-driven hydrodynamic experiments that is used at many laboratories. The bremsstrahlung radiation pulse from an intense relativistic electron beam incident onto a high-Z target is the source of these radiographs. The challenge is to provide radiation sources intense enough to penetrate hundreds of g/cm2 of material, in pulses short enough to stop the motion of high-speed hydrodynamic shocks, and with source spots small enough to resolve fine details. The challenge has been met with a wide variety of accelerator technologies, including pulsed-power-driven diodes, air-core pulsed betatrons and high-current linear induction accelerators. Accelerator technology has also evolved to accommodate the experimenters' continuing quest for multiple images in time and space. Linear induction accelerators have had a major role in these advances, especially in providing multiple-time radiographs of the largest hydrodynamic experiments.

  14. Rotationally induced fragmentation in the prestellar core L1544

    SciTech Connect

    Klapp, Jaime; Zavala, Miguel; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Troconis, Jorge

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations indicate that there is no correlation between the level of turbulence and fragmentation in detected protostellar cores, suggesting that turbulence works mainly before gravitationally bound prestellar cores form and that their inner parts are likely to be velocity coherent. Based on this evidence, we simulate the collapse and fragmentation of an isolated, initially centrally condensed, uniformly rotating core of total mass M = 5.4 M {sub ☉}, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-2 modified with the inclusion of sink particles, in order to compare the statistical properties of the resulting stellar ensembles with previous gravoturbulent fragmentation models. The initial conditions are intended to fit the observed properties of the prestellar core L1544. We find that for ratios of the rotational to the gravitational energy β ≥ 0.05, a massive disk is formed at the core center from which a central primary condenses after ∼50 kyr. Soon thereafter the disk fragments into secondary protostars, consistent with an intermediate mode of star formation in which groups of 10-100 stars form from a single core. The models predict peak accretion rates between ∼10{sup –5} and 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for all stars and reproduce many of the statistical properties predicted from gravoturbulent fragmentation, suggesting that on the small scales of low-mass, dense cores these are independent of whether the contracting gas is turbulent or purely rotating.

  15. Dark matter cores all the way down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Agertz, O.; Collins, M. L. M.

    2016-07-01

    We use high-resolution simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to study the physics of dark matter cusp-core transformations at the edge of galaxy formation: M200 = 107-109 M⊙. We work at a resolution (˜4 pc minimum cell size; ˜250 M⊙ per particle) at which the impact from individual supernovae explosions can be resolved, becoming insensitive to even large changes in our numerical `sub-grid' parameters. We find that our dwarf galaxies give a remarkable match to the stellar light profile; star formation history; metallicity distribution function; and star/gas kinematics of isolated dwarf irregular galaxies. Our key result is that dark matter cores of size comparable to the stellar half-mass radius r1/2 always form if star formation proceeds for long enough. Cores fully form in less than 4 Gyr for the M200 = 108 M⊙ and ˜14 Gyr for the 109 M⊙ dwarf. We provide a convenient two parameter `CORENFW' fitting function that captures this dark matter core growth as a function of star formation time and the projected stellar half-mass radius. Our results have several implications: (i) we make a strong prediction that if Λcold dark matter is correct, then `pristine' dark matter cusps will be found either in systems that have truncated star formation and/or at radii r > r1/2; (ii) complete core formation lowers the projected velocity dispersion at r1/2 by a factor of ˜2, which is sufficient to fully explain the `too-big-to-fail problem'; and (iii) cored dwarfs will be much more susceptible to tides, leading to a dramatic scouring of the sub-halo mass function inside galaxies and groups.

  16. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  17. Granular core phenomenon induced by convection in a vertically vibrated cylindrical container

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jing; Liu, Chuanping; Wu, Ping; Xie, Zi-Ang; Hu, Kaiwei; Wang, Li

    2016-09-01

    A mixture of 13X molecular sieve (13XMS) particles and glass particles with identical diameters is placed in a cylindrical container. Under vertical vibration, heavier glass particles tend to cluster and are wrapped inside the convection of 13XMS particles, resulting in the granular core phenomenon. The vibration frequency f strongly influences particle convection and particle cluster modes. By contrast, the effect of the dimensionless acceleration amplitude Γ can be neglected. For different f ranges, the granular core is classified as center-type and ring-type cores. For the center-type core, heavy particles are distributed as an approximate zeroth-order Bessel function of the first kind in the radial direction and an exponential function in the height direction. For the ring-type core, the concentration of heavy particles follows the power-series function in the radial direction. A granular transport model is then established based on heavy-particle movements under steady state to analyze the effect of vibration parameters and granular convection on density segregation.

  18. Submicron magnetic core conducting polypyrrole polymer shell: Preparation and characterization.

    PubMed

    Tenório-Neto, Ernandes Taveira; Baraket, Abdoullatif; Kabbaj, Dounia; Zine, Nadia; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Fessi, Hatem; Kunita, Marcos Hiroiuqui; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic particles are of great interest in various biomedical applications, such as, sample preparation, in vitro biomedical diagnosis, and both in vivo diagnosis and therapy. For in vitro applications and especially in labs-on-a-chip, microfluidics, microsystems, or biosensors, the needed magnetic dispersion should answer various criteria, for instance, submicron size in order to avoid a rapid sedimentation rate, fast separations under an applied magnetic field, and appreciable colloidal stability (stable dispersion under shearing process). Then, the aim of this work was to prepare highly magnetic particles with a magnetic core and conducting polymer shell particles in order to be used not only as a carrier, but also for the in vitro detection step. The prepared magnetic seed dispersions were functionalized using pyrrole and pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. The obtained core-shell particles were characterized in terms of particle size, size distribution, magnetization properties, FTIR analysis, surface morphology, chemical composition, and finally, the conducting property of those particles were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The obtained functional submicron highly magnetic particles are found to be conducting material bearing function carboxylic group on the surface. These promising conducting magnetic particles can be used for both transport and lab-on-a-chip detection.

  19. Particle processing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshio, Sakka

    2014-02-01

    includes two papers on the fabrication of mechanically reliable nanocomposites by dispersing graphene into a ceramic matrix, and on supercapacitors with high energy densities in a Co(OH)2 system decorated with graphene and carbon nanotubes. As a novel preparation method of oxide films, the fabrication of alumina films with laminated structures by ac anodization is reviewed. Moreover a new type of nanosheet has been fabricated by the exfoliation of layered, ternary transition-metal carbide and nitride compounds, known as Mn + 1AXn phases (or MAX phases) where M is an early transition metal, such as Ti or Nb, A is an A group element, such as Si or Al, X is carbon and/or nitrogen and n = 1-3 [4]. Among the MAX phases, those containing Mo have been theoretically calculated by first-principles calculations to be a source for obtaining Mo2C nanosheets with potentially unique properties. As an example of improving bulk ceramic properties, texturing by using a high magnetic field [5] and sintering by the electric current activated/assisted sintering (ECAS) technology [6] have been demonstrated for ultra-high temperature ceramics with high-temperature strength. A project on the development of materials and particle processing for the field of environment and energy has been ongoing at the National Institute for Materials Science since April 2011. This project employs various core competence technologies for particle processing such as ion beam irradiation for nanoparticle fabrication [7], fullerene nanomaterial processing using liquid-liquid interface precipitation [8], a gas reduction nitridation process to obtain Si3N4-based phosphor materials [9], advanced phosphors via novel processing [10, 11], ultra-high pressure technology for processing and in situ analysis [12, 13], colloidal processing in a high magnetic field to obtain laminated, textured ceramics [1, 3, 5], the ECAS process for nanostructuring ceramics [6] and so forth. Here, I would like to introduce some research

  20. Drift of suspended ferromagnetic particles due to the Magnus effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisov, S. I.; Pedchenko, B. O.

    2017-01-01

    A minimal system of equations is introduced and applied to study the drift motion of ferromagnetic particles suspended in a viscous fluid and subjected to a time-periodic driving force and a nonuniformly rotating magnetic field. It is demonstrated that the synchronized translational and rotational oscillations of these particles are accompanied by their drift in a preferred direction, which occurs under the action of the Magnus force. We calculate both analytically and numerically the drift velocity of particles characterized by single-domain cores and nonmagnetic shells and show that there are two types of drift, unidirectional and bidirectional, which can be realized in suspensions composed of particles with different core-shell ratios. The possibility of using the phenomenon of bidirectional drift for the separation of core-shell particles in suspensions is also discussed.

  1. Nanophotonics of isolated spherical particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yu. É.; Zemlyanov, A. A.; Panina, E. K.

    2010-09-01

    The problem of extreme focusing of an optical beam into the spatial region with wavelength dimensions is considered with the use of the special features of radiation interaction with isolated spherical particles. Results of numerical computations of the optical field intensity at the surface of silver particles of different radii upon exposure to laser radiation with different wavelengths are presented. It is demonstrated that the relative intensity of the plasmon optical field on the nanoparticle surface increases and the field focusing region decreases with increasing particle radius. Results of numerical computations illustrating the influence of the shell of composite nanoparticles comprising a dielectric core and a metal shell on the optical field intensity in the vicinity of the particle are presented. The problem of local optical foci of a transparent microparticle (photonic nanojets) is investigated. It is established that variation of the micron particle size, its optical properties, and laser radiation parameters allows the amplitude and spatial characteristics of the photonic nanojet region to be controlled efficiently.

  2. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  3. A Classical WR Model with Particle Types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazel, A.; Suhov, Y.; Stuhl, I.

    2015-06-01

    A version of the Widom-Rowlinson model is considered, where particles of types coexist, subject to pairwise hard-core exclusions. For , in the case of large equal fugacities, we give a complete description of the pure phase picture based on the theory of dominant ground states.

  4. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  5. Nonuniform distribution of excision repair synthesis in nucleosome core DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, S.Y.; Smerdon, M.J.

    1985-12-17

    We have studied the distribution in nucleosome core DNA of nucleotides incorporated by excision repair synthesis occurring immediately after UV irradiation in human cells. The differences previously observed for whole nuclei between the DNase I digestion profiles of repaired DNA (following its refolding into a nucleosome structure) and bulk DNA are obtained for isolated nucleosome core particles. Analysis of the differences obtained indicates that they could reflect a significant difference in the level of repair-incorporated nucleotides at different sites within the core DNA region. To test this possibility directly, we have used exonuclease III digestion of very homogeneous sized core particle DNA to map the distribution of repair synthesis in these regions. Results indicate that in a significant fraction of the nucleosomes the 5' and 3' ends of the core DNA are markedly enhanced in repair-incorporated nucleotides relative to the central region of the core particle. A best fit analysis indicates that a good approximation of the data is obtained for a distribution where the core DNA is uniformly labeled from the 5' end to position 62 and from position 114 to the 3' end, with the 52-base central region being devoid of repair-incorporated nucleotides. This distribution accounts for all of the quantitative differences observed previously between repaired DNA and bulk DNA following the rapid phase of nucleosome rearrangement when it is assumed that linker DNA and the core DNA ends are repaired with equal efficiency and the nucleosome structure of newly repaired DNA is identical with that of bulk chromatin. The 52-base central region that is devoid of repair synthesis contains the lowest frequency cutting sites for DNase I in vitro, as well as the only internal locations where two (rather than one) histones interact with a 10-base segment of each DNA strand.

  6. Core-shell column Tanaka characterization and additional tests using active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsson, Jufang Wu; Karlsson, Anders; Kjellberg, Viktor

    2016-12-01

    In the last decade, core-shell particles have gained more and more attention in fast liquid chromatography separations due to their comparable performance with fully porous sub-2 μm particles and their significantly lower back pressure. Core-shell particles are made of a solid core surrounded by a shell of classic fully porous material. To embrace the developed core-shell column market and use these columns in pharmaceutical analytical applications, 17 core-shell C18 columns purchased from various vendors with various dimensions (50 mm × 2.1 mm to 100 mm × 3 mm) and particle sizes (1.6-2.7 μm) were characterized using Tanaka test protocols. Furthermore, four selected active pharmaceutical ingredients were chosen as test probes to investigate the batch to batch reproducibility for core-shell columns of particle size 2.6-2.7 μm, with dimension of 100 × 3 mm and columns of particle size 1.6 μm, with dimension 100 × 2.1 mm under isocratic elution. Columns of particle size 2.6-2.7 μm were also tested under gradient elution conditions. To confirm the claimed comparable efficiency of 2.6 μm core-shell particles as sub-2 μm fully porous particles, column performances of the selected core-shell columns were compared with BEH C18 , 1.7 μm, a fully porous column material as well.

  7. Core Outlet Temperature Study

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Hoffman, E.; Majumdar, S.

    2008-07-28

    It is a known fact that the power conversion plant efficiency increases with elevation of the heat addition temperature. The higher efficiency means better utilization of the available resources such that higher output in terms of electricity production can be achieved for the same size and power of the reactor core or, alternatively, a lower power core could be used to produce the same electrical output. Since any nuclear power plant, such as the Advanced Burner Reactor, is ultimately built to produce electricity, a higher electrical output is always desirable. However, the benefits of the higher efficiency and electricity production usually come at a price. Both the benefits and the disadvantages of higher reactor outlet temperatures are analyzed in this work.

  8. Dynamics of core accretion

    DOE PAGES

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolutionmore » on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as

  9. Dynamics of core accretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2012-12-21

    In this paper, we perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the ‘Piecewise Parabolic Method’ with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either ‘locally isothermal’ or ‘locally isentropic’) and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling

  10. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.

  11. Geomagnetism of earth's core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. R.

    1983-01-01

    Instrumentation, analytical methods, and research goals for understanding the behavior and source of geophysical magnetism are reviewed. Magsat, launched in 1979, collected global magnetometer data and identified the main terrestrial magnetic fields. The data has been treated by representing the curl-free field in terms of a scalar potential which is decomposed into a truncated series of spherical harmonics. Solutions to the Laplace equation then extend the field upward or downward from the measurement level through intervening spaces with no source. Further research is necessary on the interaction between harmonics of various spatial scales. Attempts are also being made to analytically model the main field and its secular variation at the core-mantle boundary. Work is also being done on characterizing the core structure, composition, thermodynamics, energetics, and formation, as well as designing a new Magsat or a tethered satellite to be flown on the Shuttle.

  12. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1996-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  13. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1994-04-05

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figures.

  14. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, Alan W.; Gonzales, Aaron A.; Patel, Mahadeo R.; Olich, Eugene E.

    1994-01-01

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups.

  15. Banded electromagnetic stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Gonzales, A.A.; Patel, M.R.; Olich, E.E.

    1996-06-11

    A stator core for an electromagnetic pump includes a plurality of circumferentially adjoining groups of flat laminations disposed about a common centerline axis and collectively defining a central bore and a discontinuous outer perimeter, with adjacent groups diverging radially outwardly to form V-shaped gaps. An annular band surrounds the groups and is predeterminedly tensioned to clamp together the laminations, and has a predetermined flexibility in a radial direction to form substantially straight bridge sections between the adjacent groups. 5 figs.

  16. Toroidal core winder

    DOEpatents

    Potthoff, Clifford M.

    1978-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for placing wire windings on a toroidal body, such as a transformer core, having an orifice in its center. The apparatus comprises a wire storage spool, a wire loop holding continuous belt maintained in a C-shaped loop by a belt supporting structure and provision for turning the belt to place and tighten loops of wire on a toroidal body, which is disposed within the gap of the C-shaped belt loop.

  17. Electromagnetic pump stator core

    DOEpatents

    Fanning, A.W.; Olich, E.E.; Dahl, L.R.

    1995-01-17

    A stator core for supporting an electrical coil includes a plurality of groups of circumferentially abutting flat laminations which collectively form a bore and perimeter. A plurality of wedges are interposed between the groups, with each wedge having an inner edge and a thicker outer edge. The wedge outer edges abut adjacent ones of the groups to provide a continuous path around the perimeter. 21 figures.

  18. Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albright, Dennis; Butler, Carey; West, Nicole; Cole, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Institute for Scientific Research, Inc. (ISR) research program consist of: 1.Study core physics by adapting existing codes: MCNP4C - Monte Carlo code; COMBINE/VENTURE - diffusion theory; SCALE4 - Monte Carlo, with many utility codes. 2. Determine feasibility and study major design parameters: fuel selection, temperature and reflector sizing. 3. Study reactor kinetics: develop QCALC1 to model point kinetics; study dynamic behavior of the power release.

  19. Variable depth core sampler

    DOEpatents

    Bourgeois, Peter M.; Reger, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  20. Some core contested concepts.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-02-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and to lead to conclusions about a number of significant issues that differ from some conventional beliefs.

  1. GEOS-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-24

    GEOS-CORE is a code that integrates open source Libraries for linear algebra and I/O with two main LLNL-written components: (i) a set of standard finite, discrete, and discontinuous displacement element physics solvers for resolving Darcy fluid flow, explicit mechanics, implicit mechanics, and fluid-mediated fracturing, including resolution of physical behaviors both implicitly and explicitly, and (ii) a MPI-based parallelization implementation for use on generic HPC distributed memory architectures. The resultant code can be used alone for linearly elastic and quasistatic damage problems; problems involving hydraulic fracturing, where the mesh topology is dynamically changed; and general granular materials behavior. The key application domain is for low-rate stimulation and fracture control in subsurface reservoirs (e.g., enhanced geothermal sites and unconventional shale gas stimulation). GEOS-CORE also has interfaces to call external libraries for, e.g., material models and equations fo state; however, LLNL-developed EOS and material models, beyond the aforementioned linear elastic and quasi-static damage models, will not be part of the current release. GEOS-CORE's secondary applications include granular materials behavior under different load paths.

  2. Hollow and Concave Nanoparticles via Preferential Oxidation of the Core in Colloidal Core/Shell Nanocrystals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hollow and concave nanocrystals find applications in many fields, and their fabrication can follow different possible mechanisms. We report a new route to these nanostructures that exploits the oxidation of Cu2–xSe/Cu2–xS core/shell nanocrystals with various etchants. Even though the Cu2–xSe core is encased in a thick Cu2–xS shell, the initial effect of oxidation is the creation of a void in the core. This is rationalized in terms of diffusion of Cu+ ions and electrons from the core to the shell (and from there to the solution). Differently from the classical Kirkendall effect, which entails an imbalance between in-diffusion and out-diffusion of two different species across an interface, the present mechanism can be considered as a limiting case of such effect and is triggered by the stronger tendency of Cu2–xSe over Cu2–xS toward oxidation and by fast Cu+ diffusion in copper chalcogenides. As the oxidation progresses, expansion of the inner void erodes the entire Cu2–xSe core, accompanied by etching and partial collapse of the shell, yielding Cu2–xSySe1–y concave particles. PMID:24866716

  3. 33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. BENCH CORE STATION, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM WHERE CORE MOLDS WERE HAND FILLED AND OFTEN PNEUMATICALLY COMPRESSED WITH A HAND-HELD RAMMER BEFORE THEY WERE BAKED. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  4. Volatiles in interplanetary dust particles - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents a review of the volatiles found within interplanetary dust particles. These particles have been shown to represent primitive material from early in the solar system's formation and also may contain records of stellar processes. The organogenic elements (i.e., H, C, N, O, and S) are among the most abundant elements in our solar system, and their abundances, distributions, and isotopic compositions in early solar system materials permit workers to better understand the processes operating early in the evolutionary history of solar system materials. Interplanetary dust particles have a range of elemental compositions, but generally they have been shown to be similar to carbonaceous chondrites, the solar photosphere, Comet Halley's chondritic cores, and matrix materials of chondritic chondrites. Recovery and analysis of interplanetary dust particles have opened new opportunities for analysis of primitive materials, although interplanetary dust particles represent major challenges to the analyst because of their small size.

  5. Preparation of highly dispersed core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Hideki; Kanda, Takashi; Shibata, Hirobumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Abe, Masahiko

    2006-04-19

    Core/shell-type titania nanocapsules containing a single Ag nanoparticle were prepared. Ag nanoparticles were prepared using the reduction of silver nitrate with hydrazine in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as protective agent. The sol-gel reaction of titanium tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) was used to prepare core/shell-type titania nanocapsules with CTAB-coated Ag nanoparticles as the core. TEM observations revealed that the size of the core (Ag particle) and the thickness of the shell (titania) of the core/shell particles obtained are about 10 nm and 5-10 nm, respectively. In addition, the nanocapsules were found to be dispersed in the medium as individual particles without aggregation. Moreover, titania coating caused the surface plasmon absorption of Ag nanoparticles to shift toward the longer wavelength side.

  6. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  7. A pathway for the growth of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Yang, Xiaofan; Li, Chen; Pennycook, Stephen J; Lupini, Andrew R

    2015-10-12

    In this study, the aging of both Pt-Pd nanoparticles and core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles has been reported to result in alloying of Pt with Pd. In comparison to monometallic Pt catalysts, the growth of Pd-Pt bimetallics is slower; however, the mechanism of growth of particles and the mechanism by which Pd improves the hydrothermal durability of bimetallic Pd-Pt particles remains uncertain. In our work on hydrothermal aging of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles, synthesized by solution methods, with varying Pd:Pt ratio of 1:4, 1:1, and 4:1, we compare the growth of core-shell Pt-Pd nanoparticles and find that particles grow by migrating and joining together. The unique feature of the observed growth is that Pd shells from both particles open up and join, allowing the cores to merge. At high temperatures, alloying occurs in good agreement with reports by other workers.

  8. Polyethylenimine-immobilized core-shell nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and biocompatibility test.

    PubMed

    Ratanajanchai, Montri; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Pimpha, Nuttaporn; Sunintaboon, Panya

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we prepared PEI-immobilized core-shell particles possessing various types of polymer cores via a visible light-induced surfactant-free emulsion polymerization (SFEP) of three vinyl monomers: styrene (St), methyl methacrylate (MMA), and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). An effect of monomers on the polymerization and characteristics of resulting products was investigated. Monomers with high polarity can provide high monomer conversion, high percentage of grafted PEI, stable particles with uniform size distribution but less amino groups per particles. All prepared nanoparticles exhibited a core-shell nanostructure, containing PEI on the shell with hydrodynamic size around 140-230nm. For in-vitro study in Caco-2 cells, we found that the incorporation of PEI into these core-shell nanoparticles can significantly reduce its cytotoxic effect and also be able to internalized within the cells. Accordingly, these biocompatible particles would be useful for various biomedical applications, including gene transfection and intracellular drug delivery.

  9. Measurement of nonvolatile particle number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkatzelis, G. I.; Papanastasiou, D. K.; Florou, K.; Kaltsonoudis, C.; Louvaris, E.; Pandis, S. N.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental methodology was developed to measure the nonvolatile particle number concentration using a thermodenuder (TD). The TD was coupled with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer, measuring the chemical composition and mass size distribution of the submicrometer aerosol and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) that provided the number size distribution of the aerosol in the range from 10 to 500 nm. The method was evaluated with a set of smog chamber experiments and achieved almost complete evaporation (> 98 %) of secondary organic as well as freshly nucleated particles, using a TD temperature of 400 °C and a centerline residence time of 15 s. This experimental approach was applied in a winter field campaign in Athens and provided a direct measurement of number concentration and size distribution for particles emitted from major pollution sources. During periods in which the contribution of biomass burning sources was dominant, more than 80 % of particle number concentration remained after passing through the thermodenuder, suggesting that nearly all biomass burning particles had a nonvolatile core. These remaining particles consisted mostly of black carbon (60 % mass contribution) and organic aerosol (OA; 40 %). Organics that had not evaporated through the TD were mostly biomass burning OA (BBOA) and oxygenated OA (OOA) as determined from AMS source apportionment analysis. For periods during which traffic contribution was dominant 50-60 % of the particles had a nonvolatile core while the rest evaporated at 400 °C. The remaining particle mass consisted mostly of black carbon with an 80 % contribution, while OA was responsible for another 15-20 %. Organics were mostly hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) and OOA. These results suggest that even at 400 °C some fraction of the OA does not evaporate from particles emitted from common combustion processes, such as biomass burning and car engines, indicating that a fraction of this type of OA

  10. Particles, Cutoffs and Inequivalent Representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egg, Matthias; Lam, Vincent; Oldofredi, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    We critically review the recent debate between Doreen Fraser and David Wallace on the interpretation of quantum field theory, with the aim of identifying where the core of the disagreement lies. We show that, despite appearances, their conflict does not concern the existence of particles or the occurrence of unitarily inequivalent representations. Instead, the dispute ultimately turns on the very definition of what a quantum field theory is. We further illustrate the fundamental differences between the two approaches by comparing them both to the Bohmian program in quantum field theory.

  11. COOL CORE CLUSTERS FROM COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rasia, E.; Borgani, S.; Murante, G.; Planelles, S.; Biffi, V.; Granato, G. L.; Beck, A. M.; Steinborn, L. K.; Dolag, K.; Ragone-Figueroa, C.

    2015-11-01

    We present results obtained from a set of cosmological hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy clusters, aimed at comparing predictions with observational data on the diversity between cool-core (CC) and non-cool-core (NCC) clusters. Our simulations include the effects of stellar and active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback and are based on an improved version of the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-3, which ameliorates gas mixing and better captures gas-dynamical instabilities by including a suitable artificial thermal diffusion. In this Letter, we focus our analysis on the entropy profiles, the primary diagnostic we used to classify the degree of cool-coreness of clusters, and the iron profiles. In keeping with observations, our simulated clusters display a variety of behaviors in entropy profiles: they range from steadily decreasing profiles at small radii, characteristic of CC systems, to nearly flat core isentropic profiles, characteristic of NCC systems. Using observational criteria to distinguish between the two classes of objects, we find that they occur in similar proportions in both simulations and observations. Furthermore, we also find that simulated CC clusters have profiles of iron abundance that are steeper than those of NCC clusters, which is also in agreement with observational results. We show that the capability of our simulations to generate a realistic CC structure in the cluster population is due to AGN feedback and artificial thermal diffusion: their combined action allows us to naturally distribute the energy extracted from super-massive black holes and to compensate for the radiative losses of low-entropy gas with short cooling time residing in the cluster core.

  12. Hollow-Core Fiber Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Lin (Inventor); Tjoelker, Robert L. (Inventor); Burt, Eric A. (Inventor); Huang, Shouhua (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Hollow-core capillary discharge lamps on the millimeter or sub-millimeter scale are provided. The hollow-core capillary discharge lamps achieve an increased light intensity ratio between 194 millimeters (useful) and 254 millimeters (useless) light than conventional lamps. The capillary discharge lamps may include a cone to increase light output. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) may also be used.

  13. Sneak in Some Core Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Even if students don't have an aversion to core subjects, they may not see the relationship between the core subjects and their career path. In this article, the author outlines a career path project that can be adapted to work in any career and technical education (CTE) class to highlight the relationship between core subjects and the real world.…

  14. Faculty Supports Communication Core Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopenhaver, Lillian Lodge; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Asks public relations educators what they think about core classes required for students in their field. Finds they generally support the idea that their students should take core mass communications courses, even if such core courses are developed from a traditional journalism/news-editorial standpoint. (MS)

  15. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  16. Mercury's inner core size and core-crystallization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumberry, Mathieu; Rivoldini, Attilio

    2015-03-01

    Earth-based radar observation of Mercury's rotation vector combined with gravity observation by the MESSENGER spacecraft yield a measure of Mercury's moment of inertia and the amplitude of the 88-day libration of its silicate shell. These two geodetic constraints provide information on Mercury's interior structure, including the presence of a fluid core, the radius of the core-mantle boundary and the bulk densities of the core and mantle. In this work, we show how they further provide information on the size of the solid inner core and on the crystallization regime of the fluid core. If Mercury's fluid core is a Fe-FeS alloy with a sulfur concentration on the Fe-rich side of the eutectic, the largest inner core compatible with geodetic observations at the 1σ level is 1325 ± 250 km. Our results further suggest that the crystallization scenario that best fits the geodetic observations involves the formation of Fe-snow within the fluid core, and that this scenario is preferred for models with an iron-poor mantle composition. Consequently, Mercury's dynamo most likely operates in concert with snow formation. For an inner core larger than ∼650 km, snow formation extends to the inner core boundary. If a dynamo cannot be maintained by the dynamics of snow formation, or if such dynamo produces a magnetic field incompatible with observation, Mercury's inner core must then be smaller than 650 km.

  17. Electrocatalysts having platium monolayers on palladium, palladium alloy, and gold alloy core-shell nanoparticles, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Mo, Yibo; Vukmirovic, Miomir; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-12-21

    The invention relates to platinum-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of a noble metal or metal alloy core at least partially encapsulated by an atomically thin surface layer of platinum atoms. The invention particularly relates to such particles having a palladium, palladium alloy, gold alloy, or rhenium alloy core encapsulated by an atomic monolayer of platinum. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  18. CANOPEN Controller IP Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caramia, Maurizio; Montagna, Mario; Furano, Gianluca; Winton, Alistair

    2010-08-01

    This paper will describe the activities performed by Thales Alenia Space Italia supported by the European Space Agency in the definition of a CAN bus interface to be used on Exomars. The final goal of this activity is the development of an IP core, to be used in a slave node, able to manage both the CAN bus Data Link and Application Layer totally in hardware. The activity has been focused on the needs of the EXOMARS mission where devices with different computational performances are all managed by the onboard computer through the CAN bus.

  19. Automated Core Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Yoko; Aiyoshi, Eitaro

    2005-07-15

    Multistate searching methods are a subfield of distributed artificial intelligence that aims to provide both principles for construction of complex systems involving multiple states and mechanisms for coordination of independent agents' actions. This paper proposes a multistate searching algorithm with reinforcement learning for the automatic core design of a boiling water reactor. The characteristics of this algorithm are that the coupling structure and the coupling operation suitable for the assigned problem are assumed and an optimal solution is obtained by mutual interference in multistate transitions using multiagents. Calculations in an actual plant confirmed that the proposed algorithm increased the convergence ability of the optimization process.

  20. On nonthermal processes in the core of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronchev, V. T.

    2015-06-01

    Nonthermal nuclear processes in the core of the Sun that are induced by fast particles appearing as nonthermalized products of exothermic reactions are discussed. Among other things, properties of 8.7-MeV alpha particles originating from the reaction p + 7Li → 2 α are studied, and their effect on the balance of the processes p + 17O ai α + 14N, which close the CNO-II cycle, is determined. It is shown that the effective temperature of fast alpha particles is approximately 1000 times as high as the temperature of the plasma in the Sun's core and that, under some specific conditions, the rate of the reverse reaction α + 14N → p + 17O may be one to two orders of magnitude higher than the rate of the forward reaction p + 17O → α + 14N.