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Sample records for 20s core particle

  1. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Förster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners. PMID:19653995

  2. An atomic model AAA-ATPase/20S core particle sub-complex of the 26S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, Friedrich; Lasker, Keren; Beck, Florian; Nickell, Stephan; Sali, Andrej; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2009-10-16

    The 26S proteasome is the most downstream element of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway of protein degradation. It is composed of the 20S core particle (CP) and the 19S regulatory particle (RP). The RP consists of 6 AAA-ATPases and at least 13 non-ATPase subunits. Based on a cryo-EM map of the 26S proteasome, structures of homologs, and physical protein-protein interactions we derive an atomic model of the AAA-ATPase-CP sub-complex. The ATPase order in our model (Rpt1/Rpt2/Rpt6/Rpt3/Rpt4/Rpt5) is in excellent agreement with the recently identified base-precursor complexes formed during the assembly of the RP. Furthermore, the atomic CP-AAA-ATPase model suggests that the assembly chaperone Nas6 facilitates CP-RP association by enhancing the shape complementarity between Rpt3 and its binding CP alpha subunits partners.

  3. Cryo-EM structure of SNAP-SNARE assembly in 20S particle

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qiang; Huang, Xuan; Sun, Shan; Li, Xueming; Wang, Hong-Wei; Sui, Sen-Fang

    2015-01-01

    N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) and α soluble NSF attachment proteins (α-SNAPs) work together within a 20S particle to disassemble and recycle the SNAP receptor (SNARE) complex after intracellular membrane fusion. To understand the disassembly mechanism of the SNARE complex by NSF and α-SNAP, we performed single-particle cryo-electron microscopy analysis of 20S particles and determined the structure of the α-SNAP-SNARE assembly portion at a resolution of 7.35 Å. The structure illustrates that four α-SNAPs wrap around the single left-handed SNARE helical bundle as a right-handed cylindrical assembly within a 20S particle. A conserved hydrophobic patch connecting helices 9 and 10 of each α-SNAP forms a chock protruding into the groove of the SNARE four-helix bundle. Biochemical studies proved that this structural element was critical for SNARE complex disassembly. Our study suggests how four α-SNAPs may coordinate with the NSF to tear the SNARE complex into individual proteins. PMID:25906996

  4. Cryo-EM reveals the conformation of a substrate analogue in the human 20S proteasome core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Paula C. A.; Morris, Edward P.

    2015-07-01

    The proteasome is a highly regulated protease complex fundamental for cell homeostasis and controlled cell cycle progression. It functions by removing a wide range of specifically tagged proteins, including key cellular regulators. Here we present the structure of the human 20S proteasome core bound to a substrate analogue inhibitor molecule, determined by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-particle analysis at a resolution of around 3.5 Å. Our map allows the building of protein coordinates as well as defining the location and conformation of the inhibitor at the different active sites. These results open new prospects to tackle the proteasome functional mechanisms. Moreover, they also further demonstrate that cryo-EM is emerging as a realistic approach for general structural studies of protein-ligand interactions.

  5. Cryo-EM reveals the conformation of a substrate analogue in the human 20S proteasome core

    PubMed Central

    da Fonseca, Paula C.A.; Morris, Edward P.

    2015-01-01

    The proteasome is a highly regulated protease complex fundamental for cell homeostasis and controlled cell cycle progression. It functions by removing a wide range of specifically tagged proteins, including key cellular regulators. Here we present the structure of the human 20S proteasome core bound to a substrate analogue inhibitor molecule, determined by electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) and single-particle analysis at a resolution of around 3.5 Å. Our map allows the building of protein coordinates as well as defining the location and conformation of the inhibitor at the different active sites. These results open new prospects to tackle the proteasome functional mechanisms. Moreover, they also further demonstrate that cryo-EM is emerging as a realistic approach for general structural studies of protein–ligand interactions. PMID:26133119

  6. Nucleosome Core Particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nucleosome Core Particle grown on STS-81. The fundamental structural unit of chromatin and is the basis for organization within the genome by compaction of DNA within the nucleus of the cell and by making selected regions of chromosomes available for transcription and replication. Principal Investigator's are Dr. Dan Carter and Dr. Gerard Bunick of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  7. Vortex Cores of Inertial Particles.

    PubMed

    Günther, Tobias; Theisel, Holger

    2014-12-01

    The cores of massless, swirling particle motion are an indicator for vortex-like behavior in vector fields and to this end, a number of coreline extractors have been proposed in the literature. Though, many practical applications go beyond the study of the vector field. Instead, engineers seek to understand the behavior of inertial particles moving therein, for instance in sediment transport, helicopter brownout and pulverized coal combustion. In this paper, we present two strategies for the extraction of the corelines that inertial particles swirl around, which depend on particle density, particle diameter, fluid viscosity and gravity. The first is to deduce the local swirling behavior from the autonomous inertial motion ODE, which eventually reduces to a parallel vectors operation. For the second strategy, we use a particle density estimation to locate inertial attractors. With this, we are able to extract the cores of swirling inertial particle motion for both steady and unsteady 3D vector fields. We demonstrate our techniques in a number of benchmark data sets, and elaborate on the relation to traditional massless corelines. PMID:26356967

  8. [Ag20 {S2 P(OR)2 }12 ]: A Superatom Complex with a Chiral Metallic Core and High Potential for Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Rajendra S; Lin, Yan-Ru; Liao, Jian-Hong; Chen, Yuan-Jang; Liu, Yu-Chiao; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; Kahlal, Samia; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C W

    2016-07-11

    The synthesis and structural determination of a silver nanocluster [Ag20 {S2 P(OiPr)2 }12 ] (2), which contains an intrinsic chiral metallic core, is produced by reduction of one silver ion from the eight-electron superatom complex [Ag21 {S2 P(OiPr)2 }12 ](PF6 ) (1) by borohydrides. Single-crystal X-ray analysis displays an Ag20 core of pseudo C3 symmetry comprising a silver-centered Ag13 icosahedron capped by seven silver atoms. Its n-propyl derivative, [Ag20 {S2 P(OnPr)2 }12 ] (3), can also be prepared by the treatment of silver(I) salts and dithiophosphates in a stoichiometric ratio in the presence of excess amount of [BH4 ](-) . Crystal structure analyses reveal that the capping silver-atom positions relative to their icosahedral core are distinctly different in 2 and 3 and generate isomeric, chiral Ag20 cores. Both Ag20 clusters display an emission maximum in the near IR region. DFT calculations are consistent with a description within the superatom model of an 8-electron [Ag13 ](5+) core protected by a [Ag7 {S2 P(OR)2 }12 ](5-) external shell. Two additional structural variations are predicted by DFT, showing the potential for isomerism in such [Ag20 {S2 P(OR)2 }12 ] species. PMID:27189869

  9. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank; van IJzendoorn, Leo J.; Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula; Gehrke, Nicole; Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva; Johansson, Christer

    2015-04-01

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems - BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm - and one single-core particle system - SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm.

  10. Improved Thermoplastic/Iron-Particle Transformer Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A.; Bryant, Robert G.; Namkung, Min

    2004-01-01

    A method of fabricating improved transformer cores from composites of thermoplastic matrices and iron-particles has been invented. Relative to commercially available laminated-iron-alloy transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method weigh less and are less expensive. Relative to prior polymer-matrix/ iron-particle composite-material transformer cores, the cores fabricated by this method can be made mechanically stronger and more magnetically permeable. In addition, whereas some prior cores have exhibited significant eddy-current losses, the cores fabricated by this method exhibit very small eddy-current losses. The cores made by this method can be expected to be attractive for use in diverse applications, including high-signal-to-noise transformers, stepping motors, and high-frequency ignition coils. The present method is a product of an experimental study of the relationships among fabrication conditions, final densities of iron particles, and mechanical and electromagnetic properties of fabricated cores. Among the fabrication conditions investigated were molding pressures (83, 104, and 131 MPa), and molding temperatures (250, 300, and 350 C). Each block of core material was made by uniaxial-compression molding, at the applicable pressure/temperature combination, of a mixture of 2 weight percent of LaRC (or equivalent high-temperature soluble thermoplastic adhesive) with 98 weight percent of approximately spherical iron particles having diameters in the micron range. Each molded block was cut into square cross-section rods that were used as core specimens in mechanical and electromagnetic tests. Some of the core specimens were annealed at 900 C and cooled slowly before testing. For comparison, a low-carbon-steel core was also tested. The results of the tests showed that density, hardness, and rupture strength generally increased with molding pressure and temperature, though the correlation was rather weak. The weakness of the correlation was attributed to

  11. Analytical analysis of particle-core dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2010-01-01

    Particle-core interaction is a well-developed model of halo formation in high-intensity beams. In this paper, we present an analytical solution for averaged, single particle dynamics, around a uniformly charged beam. The problem is analyzed through a sequence of canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian, which describes nonlinear particle oscillations. A closed form expression for maximum particle deviation from the axis is obtained. The results of this study are in good agreement with numerical simulations and with previously obtained data.

  12. Core-shell diodes for particle detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guobin; Plentz, Jonathan; Höger, Ingmar; Dellith, Jan; Dellith, Andrea; Falk, Fritz

    2016-02-01

    High performance particle detectors are needed for fundamental research in high energy physics in the exploration of the Higgs boson, dark matter, anti-matter, gravitational waves and proof of the standard model, which will extend the understanding of our Universe. Future particle detectors should have ultrahigh radiation hardness, low power consumption, high spatial resolution and fast signal response. Unfortunately, some of these properties are counter-influencing for the conventional silicon drift detectors (SDDs), so that they cannot be optimized simultaneously. In this paper, the main issues of conventional SDDs have been analyzed, and a novel core-shell detector design based on micro- and nano-structures etched into Si-wafers is proposed. It is expected to simultaneously reach ultrahigh radiation hardness, low power consumption, fast signal response and high spatial resolution down to the sub-micrometer range, which will probably meet the requirements for the most powerful particle accelerators in the near future. A prototype core-shell detector was fabricated using modern silicon nanotechnology and the functionality was tested using electron-beam-induced current measurements. Such a high performance detector will open many new applications in extreme radiation environments such as high energy physics, astrophysics, high resolution (bio-) imaging and crystallography, which will push these fields beyond their current boundaries.

  13. Multiscale modelling of nucleosome core particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyubartsev, Alexander P.; Korolev, Nikolay; Fan, Yanping; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2015-02-01

    The nucleosome core particle (NCP) is the basic building block of chromatin. Under the influence of multivalent cations, isolated mononucleosomes exhibit a rich phase behaviour forming various columnar phases with characteristic NCP-NCP stacking. NCP stacking is also a regular element of chromatin structure in vivo. Understanding the mechanism of nucleosome stacking and the conditions leading to self-assembly of NCPs is still incomplete. Due to the complexity of the system and the need to describe electrostatics properly by including the explicit mobile ions, novel modelling approaches based on coarse-grained (CG) methods at the multiscale level becomes a necessity. In this work we present a multiscale CG computer simulation approach to modelling interactions and self-assembly of solutions of NCPs induced by the presence of multivalent cations. Starting from continuum simulations including explicit three-valent cobalt(III)hexammine (CoHex3+) counterions and 20 NCPs, based on a previously developed advanced CG NCP model with one bead per amino acid and five beads per two DNA base pair unit (Fan et al 2013 PLoS One 8 e54228), we use the inverse Monte Carlo method to calculate effective interaction potentials for a ‘super-CG’ NCP model consisting of seven beads for each NCP. These interaction potentials are used in large-scale simulations of up to 5000 NCPs, modelling self-assembly induced by CoHex3+. The systems of ‘super-CG’ NCPs form a single large cluster of stacked NCPs without long-range order in agreement with experimental data for NCPs precipitated by the three-valent polyamine, spermidine3+.

  14. Entrapment of carbon dioxide with chitosan-based core-shell particles containing changeable cores.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yanrui; Fu, Yinghao; Lin, Xia; Xiao, Congming

    2016-08-01

    Water-soluble chitosan-based core-shell particles that contained changeable cores were successfully applied to anchor carbon dioxide. The entrapment capacity of the particles for carbon dioxide (EC) depended on the cores. It was found that EC of the particles contained aqueous cores was higher than that of the beads with water-soluble chitosan gel cores, which was confirmed with thermogravimetric analysis. In addition, calcium ions and sodium hydroxide were introduced within the particles to examine their effect on the entrapment. EC of the particles was enhanced with sodium hydroxide when the cores were WSC gel. The incorporation of calcium ions was helpful for stabilizing carbon dioxide through the formation of calcium carbonate, which was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectra and scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive spectrometry. This phenomenon meant the role of calcium ions for fixating carbon dioxide was significant. PMID:27174910

  15. A novel approach to a fine particle coating using porous spherical silica as core particles.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Makoto; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Isaji, Keiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Ikematsu, Yasuyuki; Aoki, Shigeru

    2014-08-01

    Abstract The applicability of porous spherical silica (PSS) was evaluated as core particles for pharmaceutical products by comparing it with commercial core particles such as mannitol (NP-108), sucrose and microcrystalline cellulose spheres. We investigated the physical properties of core particles, such as particle size distribution, flow properties, crushing strength, plastic limit, drying rate, hygroscopic property and aggregation degree. It was found that PSS was a core particle of small particle size, low friability, high water adsorption capacity, rapid drying rate and lower occurrence of particle aggregation, although wettability is a factor to be carefully considered. The aggregation and taste-masking ability using PSS and NP-108 as core particles were evaluated at a fluidized-bed coating process. The functional coating under the excess spray rate shows different aggregation trends and dissolution profiles between PSS and NP-108; thereby, exhibiting the formation of uniform coating under the excess spray rate in the case of PSS. This expands the range of the acceptable spray feed rates to coat fine particles, and indicates the possibility of decreasing the coating time. The results obtained in this study suggested that the core particle, which has a property like that of PSS, was useful in overcoming such disadvantages as large particle size, which feels gritty in oral cavity; particle aggregation; and the long coating time of the particle coating process. These results will enable the practical fine particle coating method by increasing the range of optimum coating conditions and decreasing the coating time in fluidized bed technology. PMID:23781858

  16. One-step synthesis of gold polyaniline core shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhijuan; Yuan, Junhua; Han, Dongxue; Niu, Li; Ivaska, Ari

    2007-03-01

    A one-step method has been developed for synthesizing gold-polyaniline (Au@PANI) core-shell particles by using chlorauric acid (HAuCl4) to oxidize aniline in the presence of acetic acid and Tween 40 at room temperature. SEM images indicated that the resulting core-shell particles were composed of submicrometre-scale Au particles and PANI shells with an average thickness of 25 nm. Furthermore, a possible mechanism concerning the growth of Au@PANI particles was also proposed based on the results of control experiments.

  17. Histone hyperacetylation can induce unfolding of the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, R; Bazett-Jones, D P; Locklear, L; Dixon, G H

    1990-01-01

    A direct correlation exists between the level of histone H4 hyperacetylation induced by sodium butyrate and the extent to which nucleosomes lose their compact shape and become elongated (62.0% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6; overall mean in the length/width ratio = 1.83 +/- 0.48) when bound to electron microscope specimen grids at low ionic strength (1mM EDTA, 10mM Tris, pH 8.0). A marked proportion of elongated core particles is also observed in the naturally occurring hyperacetylated chicken testis chromatin undergoing spermatogenesis when analyzed at low ionic strength (36.8% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6). Core particles of elongated shape (length/width ratio over 1.6) generated under low ionic strength conditions are absent in the hypoacetylated chicken erythrocyte chromatin and represent only 2.3% of the untreated Hela S3 cell core particles containing a low proportion of hyperacetylated histones. The marked differences between control and hyperacetylated core particles are absent if the particles are bound to the carbon support film in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl, 6mM MgCl2 and 10mM Tris pH 8.0, conditions known to stabilize nucleosomes. A survey of the published work on histone hyperacetylation together with the present results indicate that histone hyperacetylation does not produce any marked disruption of the core particle 'per se', but that it decreases intranucleosomal stabilizing forces as judged by the lowered stability of the hyperacetylated core particle under conditions of shearing stress such as cationic competition by the carbon support film of the EM grid for DNA binding. Images PMID:2339060

  18. Chromatin core particle unfolding induced by tryptic cleavage of histones.

    PubMed Central

    Lilley, D M; Tatchell, K

    1977-01-01

    Chromatin 'core particles' have been digested with trypsin to varying extents. The resulting particles are homogeneous by the criterion of ultracentrifuge boundary analysis. Sedimentation coefficients are lowered as cleavages are introduced into the histones, showing that an unfolding of the core particle occurs. This unfolding is further characterised by a lower melting temperature together with a premelting phase, higher molar ellipticity in the circular dichroism spectra at 280 nm and increased kinetics of digestion by both micrococcal nuclease and DNase I. Differences are also observed in the products of nuclease digestion. The most consistent interpretation of the data involves an unfolding process whereby free rods of DNA are released to extend from a nucleoprotein core. Images PMID:896484

  19. PMMA/PMMA core-shell particles with ellipsoidal, fluorescent cores: accessing rotational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias K; Klinkenberg, Nele; Schuetter, Stefan; Saenger, Nicolai; Pfleiderer, Patrick; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2015-03-10

    For several decades, nonaqueous dispersions of PMMA particles have played an important role in colloid research. They have found application as colloidal model systems, which are used to probe glassy dynamics or to explore crystal nucleation. To date, most research has focused on spherical particles, in which only translational motion can be investigated. Recently, however, there has been a surge of interest in analyzing also rotational dynamics. In this contribution, we introduce a new class of core-shell particles, which can be used as rotational probes. The colloids described herein are composed of shape anisotropic, fluorescent cores covered with nonfluorescent PMMA shells. The core-shell particles are built up in four steps. In a first step, we produce fluorescent and photo-cross-linkable PMMA colloids. In the second step, these particles are thermomechanically elongated and fixed in defined ellipsoidal shapes by photo-cross-linking. Subsequently, we cover the cross-linked, fluorescent core with a nonfluorescent PMMA shell. The shape of the resulting core-shell colloids is tunable between the initial anisotropic and perfect spherical shape. For shaping, we apply a simple solvent swelling procedure. As one option, this method yields perfect PMMA spheres with ellipsoidal, fluorescent centers. We also report morphological particle characterization using various fluorescence microscopy techniques. Finally, we demonstrate that the rotational dynamics of individual colloids can be tracked and analyzed. PMID:25654438

  20. Optimization of nanoparticle core size for magnetic particle imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Matthew R.; Minard, Kevin R.; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2009-05-01

    Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a powerful new diagnostic visualization platform designed for measuring the amount and location of superparamagnetic nanoscale molecular probes (NMPs) in biological tissues. Promising initial results indicate that MPI can be extremely sensitive and fast, with good spatial resolution for imaging human patients or live animals. Here, we present modeling results that show how MPI sensitivity and spatial resolution both depend on NMP-core physical properties, and how MPI performance can be effectively optimized through rational core design. Monodisperse magnetite cores are attractive since they are readily produced with a biocompatible coating and controllable size that facilitates quantitative imaging.

  1. Interaction of RNA polymerase II with acetylated nucleosomal core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Pineiro, M.; Gonzalez, P.J.; Hernandez, F.; Palacian, E. )

    1991-05-31

    Chemical acetylation of nucleosomal cores is accompanied by an increase in their efficiency as in vitro transcription templates. Low amounts of acetic anhydride cause preferential modification of the amino-terminal tails of core histones. Modification of these domains, which causes moderate structural effects, is apparently correlated with the observed stimulation of RNA synthesis. In contrast, extensive modification of the globular regions of core histones, which is accompanied by a large structural relaxation of the particle, causes little additional effect on transcription. Acetylation of the amino-terminal domains of histones might stimulate transcription by changing the interaction of the histone tails with components of the transcriptional machinery.

  2. Optical properties of core-mantle spheroidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somsikov, Vadim V.; Farafonov, Victor G.

    1994-12-01

    The new solution of the problem of light scattering by coated spheroids was used to calculate the optical properties of prolate and oblate particles. The solution was obtained by the method of separation of variables for confocal spheroids. We consider the silicate core ice mantle particles and present the extinction cross-sections for prolate and oblate spheroids with the refractive indices mcore equals 1.7 + Oi, 1.7 + 0.1i and mmantle equals 1.3, the aspect ratio (a/b)mantle equals 2 and various volume ratios Vcore/Vtotal. The results are plotted for different size parameters xv equals 2(pi) rv/(lambda) , where rv is the radius of equivolume sphere and (lambda) is the wavelength of incident radiation. The main conclusions are: (a) if Vcore/Vtotal equals 0.5, the optical properties of a core-mantle particle are determined mainly by its core: for prolate non-absorbing spheroids when xv 10, for oblate absorbing and non-absorbing spheroids when xv particles with xv equals 1 and 2. (c) the non-linear increase of cross- sections is obtained for oblate particles with size parameters xv equals 1 - 5. (d) the small imaginary part of the core refractive index m [Im(m) < 0.01] practically does not change the optical properties of an inhomogeneous particle. When the imaginary part reaches 0.1, the noticeable changes of cross-sections may be detected.

  3. Hollow-core waveguide characterization by optically induced particle transport.

    PubMed

    Measor, Philip; Kühn, Sergei; Lunt, Evan J; Phillips, Brian S; Hawkins, Aaron R; Schmidt, Holger

    2008-04-01

    We introduce a method for optical characterization of hollow-core optical waveguides. Radiation pressure exerted by the waveguide modes on dielectric microspheres is used to analyze salient properties such as propagation loss and waveguide mode profiles. These quantities were measured for quasi-single-mode and multimode propagation in on-chip liquid-filled hollow-core antiresonant reflecting optical waveguides. Excellent agreement with analytical and numerical models is found, demonstrating that optically induced particle transport provides a simple, inexpensive, and nondestructive alternative to other characterization methods. PMID:18382513

  4. Flying particle sensors in hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, D. S.; Schmidt, O. A.; Euser, T. G.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2015-07-01

    Optical fibre sensors make use of diverse physical effects to measure parameters such as strain, temperature and electric field. Here we introduce a new class of reconfigurable fibre sensor, based on a ‘flying-particle’ optically trapped inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre and illustrate its use in electric field and temperature sensing with high spatial resolution. The electric field distribution near the surface of a multi-element electrode is measured with a resolution of ∼100 μm by monitoring changes in the transmitted light signal due to the transverse displacement of a charged silica microparticle trapped within the hollow core. Doppler-based velocity measurements are used to map the gas viscosity, and thus the temperature, along a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre. The flying-particle approach represents a new paradigm in fibre sensors, potentially allowing multiple physical quantities to be mapped with high positional accuracy over kilometre-scale distances.

  5. Hollow-Core Photonic Band Gap Fibers for Particle Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Robert J.; Spencer, James E.; Kuhlmey, Boris T.; /Sydney U.

    2011-08-19

    Photonic band gap (PBG) dielectric fibers with hollow cores are being studied both theoretically and experimentally for use as laser driven accelerator structures. The hollow core functions as both a longitudinal waveguide for the transverse-magnetic (TM) accelerating fields and a channel for the charged particles. The dielectric surrounding the core is permeated by a periodic array of smaller holes to confine the mode, forming a photonic crystal fiber in which modes exist in frequency pass-bands, separated by band gaps. The hollow core acts as a defect which breaks the crystal symmetry, and so-called defect, or trapped modes having frequencies in the band gap will only propagate near the defect. We describe the design of 2-D hollow-core PBG fibers to support TM defect modes with high longitudinal fields and high characteristic impedance. Using as-built dimensions of industrially-made fibers, we perform a simulation analysis of the first prototype PBG fibers specifically designed to support speed-of-light TM modes.

  6. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  7. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5' splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  8. Core-shell composite particles composed of biodegradable polymer particles and magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-01

    Core-shell composite particles with biodegradability and superparamagnetic behavior were prepared using a Pickering emulsion for targeted drug delivery based on magnetic guidance. The composite particles were composed of a core of biodegradable polymer and a shell of assembled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. It was found that the dispersibility of the nanoparticles is crucial for controlling the core-shell structure. The addition of a small amount of dispersant into the nanoparticle's suspension could improve the dispersibility and led to the formation of composite particles with a thin magnetic shell covering a polymeric core. The composite particles were also fabricated with a model drug loaded into the core, which was released via hydrolysis of the core under strong alkaline conditions. Because the core can also be biodegraded by lipase, this result suggests that the slow release of the drug from the composite particles should occur inside the body.

  9. OBSERVED CORE OF A GRADUAL SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE EVENT

    SciTech Connect

    Kocharov, L.; Valtonen, E.; Reiner, M. J.; Thompson, B. J.; Klassen, A.

    2010-12-20

    Using space-borne particle and EUV detection and radio spectrograms from both ground-based and space-borne instruments, we study the first phase of the major solar energetic particle (SEP) event associated with the western solar flare and fast and wide coronal mass ejection (CME) on 2000 April 4. The SEP event being observed at the magnetic connection to the eruption's center starts with deka-MeV nucl{sup -1} helium- and relativistic electron-rich production from coronal sources identified with the electromagnetic diagnostics and the SEP event modeling. The broadband observations and modeling of the initial phase of the 'well-connected' major SEP event support the idea that acceleration of SEPs starts in the helium-rich plasma of the eruption's core in association with coronal shocks and magnetic reconnections caused by the CME liftoff, and that the coronal component dominates during the first hour of the SEP event considered, not yet being shielded by the CME bow shock in the solar wind. The first phase of the SEP event is followed by a second phase of SEP production associated with a decelerating CME-driven shock wave in the solar wind, which accelerates ions from a distinct, helium-poor seed particle population that may originate from the CME interaction with a coronal streamer.

  10. Polystyrene-Core-Silica-Shell Hybrid Particles Containing Gold and Magnetic Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jia; Vana, Philipp

    2016-02-18

    Polystyrene-core-silica-shell hybrid particles were synthesized by combining the self-assembly of nanoparticles and the polymer with a silica coating strategy. The core-shell hybrid particles are composed of gold-nanoparticle-decorated polystyrene (PS-AuNP) colloids as the core and silica particles as the shell. PS-AuNP colloids were generated by the self-assembly of the PS-grafted AuNPs. The silica coating improved the thermal stability and dispersibility of the AuNPs. By removing the "free" PS of the core, hollow particles with a hydrophobic cage having a AuNP corona and an inert silica shell were obtained. Also, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were encapsulated in the core, which resulted in magnetic core-shell hybrid particles by the same strategy. These particles have potential applications in biomolecular separation and high-temperature catalysis and as nanoreactors. PMID:26639677

  11. Development of magnetic luminescent core/shell nanocomplex particles with fluorescence using Rhodamine 6G

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hee Uk; Song, Yoon Seok; Park, Chulhwan; Kim, Seung Wook

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► A simple method was developed to synthesize Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite particles. ► The magnetic particle shows that highly luminescent and core/shell particles are formed. ► Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. ► The magnetic particles could detect fluorescence for the application of biosensor. -- Abstract: A simple and reproducible method was developed to synthesize a novel class of Co-B/SiO{sub 2}/dye/SiO{sub 2} composite core/shell particles. Using a single cobalt core, Rhodamine 6G of organic dye molecules was entrapped in a silica shell, resulting in core/shell particles of ∼200 nm diameter. Analyses using a variety of techniques such as transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibration sample magnetometry, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and fluorescence intensity demonstrated that dye molecules were trapped inside the core/shell particles. A photoluminescence investigation showed that highly luminescent and photostable core/shell particles were formed. Such core/shell particles can be easily suspended in water. The synthesized magnetic particles could be used to detect fluorescence on glass substrate arrays for bioassay and biosensor applications.

  12. Environmentally responsive core/shell particles via electrohydrodynamic co-jetting of fully miscible polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Kazemi, Abbass; Lahann, Joerg

    2008-10-01

    Herein it is demonstrated that electrohydrodynamic co-jetting is not limited to Janus-type particles, but can also be used for the preparation of core/shell particles. Using side-by-side flow of miscible polymer solutions, electrohydrodynamic co-jetting offers an elegant and scalable route towards preparation of core/shell particles with otherwise difficult-to-prepare particle architectures, including particles with hydrophilic shell and core. Throughout this study, electrohydrodynamic co-jetting of aqueous solutions consisting of a mixture of PAAm-co-AA and PAA is used, and a range of different types of particles with distinct compartments are observed. Transition from Janus particles to core/shell particles appears to be caused by changes in the relative conductivity of the two jetting solutions. After crosslinking, the core/shell particles are stable in aqueous solution and exhibit reproducible swelling behavior while maintaining the original core/shell geometry. In addition, the pH-responsiveness of the particles is demonstrated by repeatedly switching the environmental pH between 1.3 and 12. Moreover, the core/shell particles show surprising uptake selectivity. For instance, a 450% increase in uptake of 6-carboxyfluorescein over rhodamine B base is found. PMID:18819137

  13. Core shell particles consisting of cobalt ferrite and silica as model ferrofluids [CoFe 2O 4-SiO 2 core shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Joachim; Autenrieth, Tina; Hempelmann, Rolf

    2002-11-01

    Nearly monodisperse core shell particles consisting of a magnetic core of cobalt ferrite (CoFe 2O 4) and a shell of silica (SiO 2) are prepared via a modified Stöber synthesis. The core shell structure is confirmed by TEM, the size distribution of the whole particles was determined by means of photon correlation spectroscopy and small angle X-ray scattering. Due to charged surface groups of the silica shells and the magnetic moments of the cores, these particles interact both via a screened Coulomb potential and via a magnetic dipole potential. If stray ions are removed in the presence of a mixed bed ion exchanger, the electrostatic repulsion induces colloidal crystallisation. The lattice constant is influenced by the interaction with a magnetic field gradient, indicated by a blue shift of the Laue spots towards increasing field gradient.

  14. Tunable core-shell particles generated from smart water-soluble chitosan seeds.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Congming; You, Rongrui; Dong, Yanrui; Zhang, Zhongxin

    2016-05-20

    A chain-like route was presented to create various core-shell particles with soft, aqueous or inorganic cores respectively. Water-soluble chitosan (WSC) gel particles were obtained through gelating the aqueous WSC solution of 0.02g/mL at its isoelectric point. Then, polyelectrolyte complexes were formed and surrounded on the outer surfaces of WSC gel particles by immersing the particles in 2wt% aqueous sodium alginate. Soft WSC cores in these core-shell particles disappeared after maintaining the particles in 1M HCl for 6h. The cores of obtained particles at this step became aqueous, and could be further transformed into inorganic ones via contacting the particles with copper sulfate and sodium sulfide aqueous solutions successively. The composition of the shell was verified with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The formation of various core-shell particles was confirmed with digital photographic observation, thermogravimetric and fluorescence analyses. The whole process was a chain-like one and was able to stop at any stage to harvest a corresponding target. PMID:26917373

  15. Particle-core study of halo dynamics in periodic-focusing channels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tai-Sen F.

    2000-01-01

    This paper reports on an approach to investigate the dynamics of halo particles in mismatched charged-particle beams propagating through periodic-focusing channels using the particle-core model. The proposed method employs canonical transformations to minimize, in new phase-space variables, the flutter due to the periodic focusing to allow making stroboscopic plots. Applying this method, we find that in periodic-focusing systems, certain particles initially not in the halo region can be brought into resonance with the core oscillation to become halo particles. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Gold nanoparticle localization at the core surface by using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Daisuke; Kawaguchi, Haruma

    2005-12-01

    We report novel thermosensitive hybrid core-shell particles via in situ gold nanoparticle formation using thermosensitive core-shell particles as a template. This method for the in situ synthesis of gold nanoparticles with microgel interiors offers the advantage of eliminating or significantly reducing particle aggregation. In addition, by using thermosensitive microgel structures in which the shell has thermosensitive and gel properties in water--whereas the core itself is a water-insoluble polymer--we were able to synthesize the gold nanoparticles only at the surface of the core, which had reactive sites to bind metal ions. After the gold nanoparticles were synthesized, electroless gold plating was carried out to control the thickness of the gold nanoshells. The dispersions of the obtained hybrid particles were characterized by dynamic light scattering and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and the dried particles were also observed by electron microscopy. Adaptation of the technique shown here will create a number of applications as optical, electronic, and biomedical functional materials. PMID:16316147

  17. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Pierson, Elizabeth E; Keifer, David Z; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein's C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of "dark" particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  18. Importin β Can Bind Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein and Empty Core-Like Particles and Induce Structural Changes

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Elizabeth E.; Keifer, David Z.; Delaleau, Mildred; Gallucci, Lara; Cazenave, Christian; Kann, Michael; Jarrold, Martin F.; Zlotnick, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids are found in many forms: immature single-stranded RNA-filled cores, single-stranded DNA-filled replication intermediates, mature cores with relaxed circular double-stranded DNA, and empty capsids. A capsid, the protein shell of the core, is a complex of 240 copies of core protein. Mature cores are transported to the nucleus by a complex that includes both importin α and importin β (Impα and Impβ), which bind to the core protein’s C-terminal domains (CTDs). Here we have investigated the interactions of HBV core protein with importins in vitro. Strikingly, empty capsids and free core protein can bind Impβ without Impα. Cryo-EM image reconstructions show that the CTDs, which are located inside the capsid, can extrude through the capsid to be bound by Impβ. Impβ density localized on the capsid exterior near the quasi-sixfold vertices, suggested a maximum of 30 Impβ per capsid. However, examination of complexes using single molecule charge-detection mass spectrometry indicate that some complexes include over 90 Impβ molecules. Cryo-EM of capsids incubated with excess Impβ shows a population of damaged particles and a population of “dark” particles with internal density, suggesting that Impβ is effectively swallowed by the capsids, which implies that the capsids transiently open and close and can be destabilized by Impβ. Though the in vitro complexes with great excess of Impβ are not biological, these results have implications for trafficking of empty capsids and free core protein; activities that affect the basis of chronic HBV infection. PMID:27518410

  19. A Core-Particle Model for Periodically Focused Ion Beams with Intense Space-Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, S M; Barnard, J J; Bukh, B; Chawla, S R; Chilton, S H

    2006-08-02

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam described by the KV distribution. The core beam has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section and can be applied to model both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent utter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel [Lund and Chawla, Nuc. Instr. and Meth. A 561, 203 (2006)]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  20. A core-particle model for periodically focused ion beams withintense space-charge

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Bukh, Boris; Chawla, SurgreevR.; Chilton, Sven H.

    2006-08-28

    A core-particle model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam that has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section. The model can be applied to both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed to remove coherent flutter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincare phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The core-particle model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing channel. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  1. Theory of longitudinal beam halo in RF linacs: I. core/test-particle formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J.J.; Lund, S.M.

    1997-05-01

    For intense beams, the analysis of tenuous halo components of the particle distribution that surround the main core of the distribution can be challenging. So-called core/test particle models in which a test particle is evolved in the applied and space-charge forces of the beam core have been instrumental in understanding the structure and extent of transverse beam halo produced by resonant particle interactions with the oscillating space-charge forces of a mismatched beam core. Here we present a core/test particle model developed for the analysis of longitudinal beam halo in intense, ion-beam rf linacs. Equations of motion are derived for a test particle moving interior to, and exterior to, a uniform density ellipsoidal beam bunch. Coupled transverse-longitudinal mismatch modes of the ellipsoidal beam envelope are analyzed. Typical parameters suggest the possibility of a low-order resonant interaction between longitudinal particle oscillations and a low-frequency envelope mode. Properties of this resonance are in an accompanying paper by the authors in these proceedings.

  2. Shape evolution of a core-shell spherical particle under hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Colin, Jérôme

    2012-03-01

    The morphological evolution by surface diffusion of a core-shell spherical particle has been investigated theoretically under hydrostatic pressure when the shear modulii of the core and shell are different. A linear stability analysis has demonstrated that depending on the pressure, shear modulii, and radii of both phases, the free surface of the composite particle may be unstable with respect to a shape perturbation. A stability diagram finally emphasizes that the roughness development is favored in the case of a hard shell with a soft core. PMID:22587137

  3. Self-Assembly of Nucleocapsid-Like Particles from Recombinant Hepatitis C Virus Core Protein

    PubMed Central

    Kunkel, Meghan; Lorinczi, Marta; Rijnbrand, René; Lemon, Stanley M.; Watowich, Stanley J.

    2001-01-01

    Little is known about the assembly pathway and structure of hepatitis C virus (HCV) since insufficient quantities of purified virus are available for detailed biophysical and structural studies. Here, we show that bacterially expressed HCV core proteins can efficiently self-assemble in vitro into nucleocapsid-like particles. These particles have a regular, spherical morphology with a modal distribution of diameters of approximately 60 nm. Self-assembly of nucleocapsid-like particles requires structured RNA molecules. The 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein are sufficient for self-assembly into nucleocapsid-like particles. Inclusion of the carboxy-terminal domain of the core protein modifies the core assembly pathway such that the resultant particles have an irregular outline. However, these particles are similar in size and shape to those assembled from the 124 N-terminal residues of the core protein. These results provide novel opportunities to delineate protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions critical for HCV assembly, to study the molecular details of HCV assembly, and for performing high-throughput screening of assembly inhibitors. PMID:11160716

  4. Enhanced Electrorheological Properties of Elastomers Containing TiO₂/Urea Core-Shell Particles.

    PubMed

    Niu, Chenguang; Dong, Xufeng; Qi, Min

    2015-11-11

    Polar molecule-coated core-shell particles have been used to prepare electrorheological (ER) fluids with high performance. Inspired by those studies, TiO2/urea core-shell structured particles were fabricated and used to prepare novel ER elastomers, whose properties were compared with the ER elastomers with bare TiO2 particles. Particles characterization results illustrate the TiO2/urea particles present little change in size, morphology and crystal structure with respect to the bare amorphous TiO2 particles, while clear core-shell structure is observed. Compared with the bare TiO2 particles filled elastomer, the TiO2/urea particles filled elastomer presents higher dielectric constant, indicating enhanced polarization. The viscoelastic properties of the two elastomers under different strain amplitude, frequency and electric field were tested. The results indicate that the TiO2/urea particles filled elastomer shows higher storage modulus G' and higher relative ER effect within the low field strength region from 0 to 2 kV/mm. Coating polar molecules is an effective method to improve the ER performance for ER elastomers. PMID:26492099

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Polyvinylpyrrolidone Silica Core-Shell Nanocomposite Particles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lian-Xi; Li, Jie; Li, Xi; Zhang, Zhong-Min; Jiao, Cai-Bin

    2015-03-01

    In this work, a novel and facile strategy for making a new type of polymer/silica nanocomposte particle was proposed. Colloidally stable polyvinypyrrolidone (PVP)/silica core-shell nanocomposite particles have been successfully synthesized using an azo initiator via seed polymerization of N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (NVP) and VFSs (VFSs) that were derived from vinyl triethoxysilane (VTES). It was suggested from the FTIR and TGA analysis that the copolymerization reaction of NVP with VFSs has been thoroughly carried out. In addition, SEM images showed that PVP/silica nanocomposite particles have relatively rough surface due to surface polymerization in comparison with VFSs. Furthermore, TEM results proved that the size of VFSs had considerable effects on the appearance of PVP/silica nanocomposite particles. Generally, it presented that several silica nanoparticle cores with an average size of 78 nm mainly pack together within each nanocomposite particle after seed polymerization. Interestingly, the average shell thickness was 59 nm for most PVP/silica nanocomposite particles with cores about 242 nm. However, when the core size was large enough to about 504 nm, a series of PVP/silica nanocomposite particles with a relative thin shell were observed. PMID:26413650

  6. A core-particle model for periodically focused ion beams with intense space-charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; Bukh, Boris; Chawla, Sugreev R.; Chilton, Sven H.

    2007-07-01

    A core-particle (CP) model is derived to analyze transverse orbits of test-particles evolving in the presence of a core ion beam that has uniform density within an elliptical cross-section. The model can be applied to both quadrupole and solenoidal focused beams in periodic or aperiodic lattices. Efficient analytical descriptions of electrostatic space-charge fields external to the beam core are derived to simplify model equations. Image-charge effects are analyzed for an elliptical beam centered in a round, conducting pipe to estimate model corrections resulting from image-charge nonlinearities. Transformations are employed in diagnostics to remove coherent flutter motion associated with oscillations of the ion beam core due to rapidly varying, linear applied-focusing forces. Diagnostics for particle trajectories, Poincaré phase-space projections, and single-particle emittances based on these transformations better illustrate the effects of nonlinear forces acting on particles evolving outside the core. A numerical code has been written based on this model. Example applications illustrate model characteristics. The CP model described has recently been applied to identify physical processes leading to space-charge transport limits for an rms-envelope matched beam in a periodic quadrupole focusing-channel [S.M. Lund, S.R. Chawla, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 561 (2006) 203]. Further characteristics of these processes are presented here.

  7. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30-50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles.

  8. Pre-Stressing Micron-Scale Aluminum Core-Shell Particles to Improve Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The main direction in increasing reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles for energetic applications is reduction in their size down to nanoscale. However, Al nanoparticles are 30–50 times more expensive than micron scale particles and possess safety and environmental issues. Here, we improved reactivity of Al micron scale particles by synthesizing pre-stressed core-shell structures. Al particles were annealed and quenched to induce compressive stresses in the alumina passivation shell surrounding Al core. This thermal treatment was designed based on predictions of the melt-dispersion mechanism (MDM); a theory describing Al particle reaction under high heating rate. For all anneal treatment temperatures, experimental flame propagation rates for Al combined with nanoscale copper oxide (CuO) are in quantitative agreement with the theoretical predictions based on the MDM. The best treatment increases flame rate by 36% and achieves 68% of that for the best Al nanoparticles. PMID:25597747

  9. [Scattering properties of core-shell structure of mist wrapped dust particles].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shi-qi; Song, Wei; Wang, Yan; Miao, Xin-hui; Xu, Li-jun; Liu, Yu; Li, Cheng; Li Wen-long; Wang, Yi-ran; Cai, Hong-xing

    2014-12-01

    The authors have investigated the optical properties of core-shell structure of mist wrapped dust particles based on the method of discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The influence on the thickness of the elliptical core-shell structure were calculated which the ratio of long axis and short axis is 2:1, and the change of scattering angle for scattering characteristics. The results shows that the thickness of outer layer increase from 1.2 to 4.8 μm with the scattering and extinction coefficient of double core-shell layers particles decrease from 3.4 and 3.43 to 2.543 and 2.545, when the size of inner core isn't change. And scattering relative strength also increased obviously. The thickness of inner core increase from 0.6 to 2.4 μm with the of scattering and extinction coefficient change from 2.59 and 2.88 to 2.6 and 2.76 when thickness of outer remain constant. Effect of the thickness of visible outer layer on the scattering characteristics of double core-shell layers particles is greater, because of the interaction between scattering light and outer materials. The scattering relative intensity decrease with wavelength increased, while increased with the scale of core-shell structure increase. The results make a promotion on the study of the transportation characteristics of laser and scattering characteristics when the atmospheric aerosol and water mist interact together. PMID:25881412

  10. Importance of core electrostatic properties on the electrophoresis of a soft particle.

    PubMed

    De, Simanta; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Gopmandal, Partha P

    2016-08-01

    The impact of the volumetric charged density of the dielectric rigid core on the electrophoresis of a soft particle is analyzed numerically. The volume charge density of the inner core of a soft particle can arise for a dendrimer structure or bacteriophage MS2. We consider the electrokinetic model based on the conservation principles, thus no conditions for Debye length or applied electric field is imposed. The fluid flow equations are coupled with the ion transport equations and the equation for the electric field. The occurrence of the induced nonuniform surface charge density on the outer surface of the inner core leads to a situation different from the existing analysis of a soft particle electrophoresis. The impact of this induced surface charge density together with the double-layer polarization and relaxation due to ion convection and electromigration is analyzed. The dielectric permittivity and the charge density of the core have a significant impact on the particle electrophoresis when the Debye length is in the order of the particle size. We find that by varying the ionic concentration of the electrolyte, the particle can exhibit reversal in its electrophoretic velocity. The role of the polymer layer softness parameter is addressed in the present analysis. PMID:27627364

  11. Optofluidic immobility of particles trapped in liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Garbos, M K; Euser, T G; Russell, P St J

    2011-09-26

    We study the conditions under which a particle, laser-guided in a vertically-oriented hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with liquid, can be kept stationary against a microfluidic counter-flow. An immobility parameter-the fluid flow rate required to immobilize a particle against the radiation force produced by unit guided optical power-is introduced to quantify the conditions under which this occurs, including radiation, viscous and gravity forces. Measurements show that this parameter depends strongly on the ratio of particle radius a to core radius R, peaking at an intermediate value of a/R. The results follow fairly well the theoretical estimates of the optical (calculated approximately using a ray optics approach) and numerically simulated drag forces. We suggest that the system has potential applications in, e.g., measurement of the diameter, refractive index and density of particles, synthesis and biomedical research. PMID:21996905

  12. Controlled Release from Core-Shell Nanoporous Silica Particles for Corrosion Inhibition of Aluminum Alloys

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jiang, Xingmao; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Liu, Nanguo; Xu, Huifang; Rathod, Shailendra; Shah, Pratik; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Ceriumore » m (Ce) corrosion inhibitors were encapsulated into hexagonally ordered nanoporous silica particles via single-step aerosol-assisted self-assembly. The core/shell structured particles are effective for corrosion inhibition of aluminum alloy AA2024-T3. Numerical simulation proved that the core-shell nanostructure delays the release process. The effective diffusion coefficient elucidated from release data for monodisperse particles in water was 1.0 × 10 − 14  m 2 s for Ce 3+ compared to 2.5 × 10 − 13  m 2 s for NaCl. The pore size, pore surface chemistry, and the inhibitor solubility are crucial factors for the application. Microporous hydrophobic particles encapsulating a less soluble corrosion inhibitor are desirable for long-term corrosion inhibition.« less

  13. Chemical compositions of black carbon particle cores and coatings via soot particle aerosol mass spectrometry with photoionization and electron ionization.

    PubMed

    Canagaratna, Manjula R; Massoli, Paola; Browne, Eleanor C; Franklin, Jonathan P; Wilson, Kevin R; Onasch, Timothy B; Kirchstetter, Thomas W; Fortner, Edward C; Kolb, Charles E; Jayne, John T; Kroll, Jesse H; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2015-05-14

    Black carbon is an important constituent of atmospheric aerosol particle matter (PM) with significant effects on the global radiation budget and on human health. The soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS) has been developed and deployed for real-time ambient measurements of refractory carbon particles. In the SP-AMS, black carbon or metallic particles are vaporized through absorption of 1064 nm light from a CW Nd:YAG laser. This scheme allows for continuous "soft" vaporization of both core and coating materials. The main focus of this work is to characterize the extent to which this vaporization scheme provides enhanced chemical composition information about aerosol particles. This information is difficult to extract from standard SP-AMS mass spectra because they are complicated by extensive fragmentation from the harsh 70 eV EI ionization scheme that is typically used in these instruments. Thus, in this work synchotron-generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light in the 8-14 eV range is used to measure VUV-SP-AMS spectra with minimal fragmentation. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of commercially available carbon black, fullerene black, and laboratory generated flame soots were obtained. Small carbon cluster cations (C(+)-C5(+)) were found to dominate the VUV-SP-AMS spectra of all the samples, indicating that the corresponding neutral clusters are key products of the SP vaporization process. Intercomparisons of carbon cluster ratios observed in VUV-SP-AMS and SP-AMS spectra are used to confirm spectral features that could be used to distinguish between different types of refractory carbon particles. VUV-SP-AMS spectra of oxidized organic species adsorbed on absorbing cores are also examined and found to display less thermally induced decomposition and fragmentation than spectra obtained with thermal vaporization at 200 °C (the minimum temperature needed to quantitatively vaporize ambient oxidized organic aerosol with a continuously heated surface). The particle cores

  14. Determining the size distribution of core-shell spheres and other complex particles by laser diffraction.

    PubMed

    Lagasse, R R; Richards, D Wayne

    2003-11-01

    The goal of this work is to determine the size distribution of hollow glass spheres by laser diffraction, an experiment which involves measuring angle-dependent scattering of light from particles dispersed in a liquid. The proprietary software supplied with commercial instruments is not strictly applicable to our two-layer, glass-shell, hollow-core spheres because it requires that the particles have spatially homogeneous properties. We therefore developed Fortran code to compute the scattering from core-shell spherical particles. The results show that the scattering from representative hollow glass particles diverges from homogeneous sphere scattering when the radius decreases from 10 to 3 microm. Additionally, scattering measurements on two core-shell hollow glass powders were analyzed using the exact core-shell optical model and homogeneous sphere approximations. In both cases, the size distribution determined using the exact core-shell model differs from that determined using the homogeneous-sphere approximation when the distribution covers radii smaller than about 10 microm, as expected. The size distribution based on the exact core-shell optical model was determined using a new algorithm. Although the basic equations used in the algorithm have been published previously, they are developed here in a different form, which can be implemented using Fortran and MatLab routines available commercially and in the public domain. This algorithm could be used to determine the size distribution of other kinds of particles, such as cylindrical rods, as long as their angle-dependent scattering could be computed. PMID:14554168

  15. Spherical core-shell magnetic particles constructed by main-chain palladium N-heterocyclic carbenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huaixia; Li, Liuyi; Wang, Jinyun; Wang, Ruihu

    2015-02-01

    The encapsulation of the functional species on magnetic core is a facile approach for the synthesis of core-shell magnetic materials, and surface encapsulating matrices play crucial roles in regulating their properties and applications. In this study, two core-shell palladium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) particles (Fe3O4@PNP1 and Fe3O4@PNP2) were prepared by a one-pot reaction of semi-rigid tripodal imidazolium salts and palladium acetate in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite nanoparticles are encapsulated inside the main-chain palladium, which act as cores. The conjugated effects of triphenyltriazine and triphenylbenzene in the imidazolium salts have important influence on their physical properties and catalytic performances. Fe3O4@PNP2 shows better recyclability than Fe3O4@PNP1. Unexpectedly, Pd(ii) is well maintained after six consecutive catalytic runs in Fe3O4@PNP2, and Pd(0) and Pd(ii) coexist in Fe3O4@PNP1 under the same conditions; moreover, the morphologies of these spherical core-shell particles show no significant variation after six consecutive catalytic runs.The encapsulation of the functional species on magnetic core is a facile approach for the synthesis of core-shell magnetic materials, and surface encapsulating matrices play crucial roles in regulating their properties and applications. In this study, two core-shell palladium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) particles (Fe3O4@PNP1 and Fe3O4@PNP2) were prepared by a one-pot reaction of semi-rigid tripodal imidazolium salts and palladium acetate in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite nanoparticles are encapsulated inside the main-chain palladium, which act as cores. The conjugated effects of triphenyltriazine and triphenylbenzene in the imidazolium salts have important influence on their physical properties and catalytic performances. Fe3O4@PNP2 shows better recyclability than Fe3O4@PNP1. Unexpectedly, Pd(ii) is well maintained after six consecutive catalytic runs in

  16. Electron Cryotomography Studies of Maturing HIV-1 Particles Reveal the Assembly Pathway of the Viral Core

    PubMed Central

    Woodward, Cora L.; Cheng, Sarah N.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To better characterize the assembly of the HIV-1 core, we have used electron cryotomography (ECT) to image infected cells and the viral particles cryopreserved next to them. We observed progressive stages of virus assembly and egress, including flower-like flat Gag lattice assemblies, hemispherical budding profiles, and virus buds linked to the plasma membrane via a thin membrane neck. The population of budded viral particles contains immature, maturation-intermediate, and mature core morphologies. Structural characteristics of the maturation intermediates suggest that the core assembly pathway involves the formation of a CA sheet that associates with the condensed ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex. Our analysis also reveals a correlation between RNP localization within the viral particle and the formation of conical cores, suggesting that the RNP helps drive conical core assembly. Our findings support an assembly pathway for the HIV-1 core that begins with a small CA sheet that associates with the RNP to form the core base, followed by polymerization of the CA sheet along one side of the conical core toward the tip, and then closure around the body of the cone. IMPORTANCE During HIV-1 assembly and release, the Gag polyprotein is organized into a signature hexagonal lattice, termed the immature lattice. To become infectious, the newly budded virus must disassemble the immature lattice by proteolyzing Gag and then reassemble the key proteolytic product, the structural protein p24 (CA), into a distinct, mature hexagonal lattice during a process termed maturation. The mature HIV-1 virus contains a conical capsid that encloses the condensed viral genome at its wide base. Mutations or small molecules that interfere with viral maturation also disrupt viral infectivity. Little is known about the assembly pathway that results in the conical core and genome encapsidation. Here, we have used electron cryotomography to structurally characterize HIV-1 particles that are

  17. Design of Gas-phase Synthesis of Core-Shell Particles by Computational Fluid - Aerosol Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Buesser, B; Pratsinis, S E

    2011-11-01

    Core-shell particles preserve the bulk properties (e.g. magnetic, optical) of the core while its surface is modified by a shell material. Continuous aerosol coating of core TiO2 nanoparticles with nanothin silicon dioxide shells by jet injection of hexamethyldisiloxane precursor vapor downstream of titania particle formation is elucidated by combining computational fluid and aerosol dynamics. The effect of inlet coating vapor concentration and mixing intensity on product shell thickness distribution is presented. Rapid mixing of the core aerosol with the shell precursor vapor facilitates efficient synthesis of hermetically coated core-shell nanoparticles. The predicted extent of hermetic coating shells is compared to the measured photocatalytic oxidation of isopropanol by such particles as hermetic SiO2 shells prevent the photocatalytic activity of titania. Finally the performance of a simpler, plug-flow coating model is assessed by comparisons to the present detailed CFD model in terms of coating efficiency and silica average shell thickness and texture. PMID:23729817

  18. Trajectories of microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes and nucleosome core particles.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-06-01

    We present here raw trajectories of molecular dynamics simulations for nucleosome with linker DNA strands as well as minimalistic nucleosome core particle model. The simulations were done in explicit solvent using CHARMM36 force field. We used this data in the research article Shaytan et al., 2016 [1]. The trajectory files are supplemented by TCL scripts providing advanced visualization capabilities. PMID:27222871

  19. Resonant optical propulsion of a particle inside a hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Maslov, A V

    2016-07-01

    Resonant propulsion of small nonresonant particles inside metal waveguides due to the formation of resonant states by the guided modes below their cutoffs has been predicted in the past. Here it is shown that stable resonant propulsion exists in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers, which are all-dielectric structures and are a major platform for various photonic applications. Specific features of the resonant propulsion are discussed together with the fiber design issues. The results may enable power-efficient transport of particles over long distances, particle sorting, and sensitive detection. PMID:27367102

  20. Microfluidic conceived pH sensitive core-shell particles for dual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ikram Ullah; Stolch, Lukas; Serra, Christophe A; Anton, Nicolas; Akasov, Roman; Vandamme, Thierry F

    2015-01-15

    In current study, we report on the synthesis of core-shell microparticles for dual drug delivery by means of a two co-axial microfluidic device and online UV assisted free radical polymerization. Before developing pH-sensitive particles, ketoprofen loaded poly(methyl acrylate) core-ranitidine HCl loaded poly(acrylamide) shell particles were produced. Influence of inner and outer phases flow rates on particle size, shape, core diameter, shell thickness, and drug release properties was studied. All the particles were monodispersed with coefficient of variation below 5%. Furthermore, their diameter ranged from 100 to 151 μm by increasing continuous (Qc) to middle (Qm) phase flow rate ratio (Qc/Qm). Core diameter varied from 58 to 115 μm by decreasing middle (Qm) to inner (Qi) phase flow rate ratio (Qm/Qi) at constant continuous phase flow rate as confirmed by SEM images. It was observed that an optimum concentration of acrylamide (30 wt%) and an appropriate combination of surfactants were necessary to get core-shell particles otherwise Janus structure was obtained. FTIR confirmed the complete polymerization of core and shell phases. MTT assay showed variation in viability of cells under non-contact and contact conditions with less cytotoxicity for the former. Under non-contact conditions LD50 was 3.1mg/mL. Release studies in USP phosphate buffer solution showed simultaneously release of ketoprofen and ranitidine HCl for non pH-sensitive particles. However, release rates of ranitidine HCl and ketoprofen were higher at low and high pH respectively. To develop pH-sensitive particles for colon targeting, the previous shell phase was admixed with few weight percentage of pH sensitive carboxyethyl acrylate monomer. Core and shell contained the same hydrophobic and hydrophilic model drugs as in previous case. The pH-sensitive shell prevented the release of the two entrapped molecules at low pH while increasing significantly their release rate at higher pH with a maximum

  1. Core Fueling and Edge Particle Flux Analysis in Ohmically and Auxiliary Heated NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    V.A. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; NSTX Research Team

    2002-06-12

    The Boundary Physics program of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is focusing on optimization of the edge power and particle flows in b * 25% L- and H-mode plasmas of t {approx} 0.8 s duration heated by up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast wave and up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection. Particle balance and core fueling efficiencies of low and high field side gas fueling of L-mode homic and NBI heated plasmas have been compared using an analytical zero dimensional particle balance model and measured ion and neutral fluxes. Gas fueling efficiencies are in the range of 0.05-0.20 and do not depend on discharge magnetic configuration, density or poloidal location of the injector. The particle balance modeling indicates that the addition of HFS fueling results in a reversal of the wall loading rate and higher wall inventories. Initial particle source estimates obtained from neutral pressure and spectroscopic measurements indicate that ion flux into the divertor greatly exceeds midplane ion flux from the main plasma, suggesting that the scrape-off cross-field transport plays a minor role in diverted plasmas. Present analysis provides the basis for detailed fluid modeling of core and edge particle flows and particle confinement properties of NSTX plasmas. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contracts No. DE-AC02-76CH03073, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and W-7405-ENG-36.

  2. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Magnetic Properties of Polymer-Bound Iron Particle Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Bryant, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    Spherical iron particles of three different size distributions, 6-10 microns in diameter, 100 mesh and 30-80 mesh, were mixed with 2.0 wt. % of soluble imide and compression molded at 300 C under 131 MPa. Post fabrication heat treatments were performed at 960 C for 6 hours resulting in a significant enhancement of the permeability in low field region for all the specimens except for the one made of 30-80 mesh particles. The rate of core loss of these specimens at a magnetic induction of 5 kG measured up to 1 kHz shows a noticeable increase after heat treatment which, along with the permeability enhancement, can be explained by the coalescence of particles forming a network of conductivity paths in the specimens. The scanning electron micrographs taken for the 6-10 micron particle specimens show no evidence of heat treatment-induced grain growth. The untreated specimens show a very weak f(sup 2) dependence of the core loss which clearly indicates a negligible contribution from the eddy current loss. In particular, an almost perfect linearity was found in the frequency dependence of the core loss of the untreated specimen made of 100 mesh iron particles.

  3. Effects of Heat Treatment on the Magnetic Properties of Polymer-Bound Iron Particle Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Bryant, R. G.; Buchman, A.

    1998-01-01

    Spherical iron particles of three different size distributions, 6-10 micrometers in diameter, 100 mesh and 30-80 mesh, were mixed with 2.0 wt % of soluble imide and compression molded at 300 C under 131 MPa. Post-fabrication heat treatments were performed at 960 C for 6 h resulting in a significant enhancement of the permeability in low field region for all the specimens except for the one made of 30-80 mesh particles. The rate of core loss of these specimens at a magnetic induction of 5 kG measured up to 1 kHz shows a noticeable. increase after heat treatment which, along with the permeability enhancement, can be explained by the coalescence of particles forming a network of conductivity paths in the specimens. ne scanning electron micrographs taken for the 6-10 micrometer particle specimens show no evidence of heat treatment-induced grain growth. The untreated specimens show a very weak f(sup 2) -dependence of the core loss which clearly indicates a negligible contribution from the eddy current loss. In particular, an almost perfect linearity was found in the frequency dependence of the core loss of the untreated specimen made of 100 mesh iron particles.

  4. Biodegradable and magnetic core-shell composite particle prepared by emulsion solvent diffusion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Chiemi; Ushimaru, Kazunori; Horiishi, Nanao; Tsuge, Takeharu; Kitamoto, Yoshitaka

    2016-02-01

    The present paper describes optimization of preparation conditions of a core-shell composite particle, and its heat generation by alternating magnetic fields. The composite particles are prepared with a modified emulsion solvent diffusion method, which is combined with Pickering emulsion stabilized by magnetic nanoparticles. In this method, the magnetic nanoparticles act as an emulsifier, and its amount and size are crucial to morphology of the composite particles. The magnetic nanoparticles of 8-9 nm would be strongly adsorbed at a liquid-liquid interface rather than the larger nanoparticles. At the optimized concentration of the magnetic nanoparticle’s suspension for the preparation, small and uniform composite particles are obtained since the amount of the nanoparticles is enough to prevent coalescence of droplets during the formation of the composites. The heat generation by alternating magnetic fields emerged certainly. This result suggests the composite particles have a property as a heat-generating carrier for hyperthermia treatment.

  5. Structure of RCC1 chromatin factor bound to the nucleosome core particle

    SciTech Connect

    Makde, Ravindra D.; England, Joseph R.; Yennawar, Hemant P.; Tan, Song

    2010-11-11

    The small GTPase Ran enzyme regulates critical eukaryotic cellular functions including nuclear transport and mitosis through the creation of a RanGTP gradient around the chromosomes. This concentration gradient is created by the chromatin-bound RCC1 (regulator of chromosome condensation) protein, which recruits Ran to nucleosomes and activates Ran's nucleotide exchange activity. Although RCC1 has been shown to bind directly with the nucleosome, the molecular details of this interaction were not known. Here we determine the crystal structure of a complex of Drosophila RCC1 and the nucleosome core particle at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution, providing an atomic view of how a chromatin protein interacts with the histone and DNA components of the nucleosome. Our structure also suggests that the Widom 601 DNA positioning sequence present in the nucleosomes forms a 145-base-pair nucleosome core particle, not the expected canonical 147-base-pair particle.

  6. Water-soluble core/shell nanoparticles for proton therapy through particle-induced radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Jung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Maeng Jun; Kim, Kye-Ryung

    2015-02-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), therapy, and drug delivery systems. Metallic nanoparticles as therapeutic tools have been demonstrated using radio-frequency magnetic fields or near-infrared light. Recently, therapeutic applications of metallic nanomaterials combined with proton beams have been reported. Particle-induced radiation from metallic nanoparticles, which can enhance the therapeutic effects of proton therapy, was released when the nanoparticles were bombarded by a high-energy proton beam. Core/shell nanoparticles, especially Au-coated magnetic nanoparticles, have drawn attention in biological applications due to their attractive characteristics. However, studies on the phase transfer of organic-ligand-based core/shell nanoparticles into water are limited. Herein, we demonstrated that hydrophobic core/shell structured nanomaterials could be successfully dispersed in water through chloroform/surfactant mixtures. The effects of the core/shell nanomaterials and the proton irradiation on Escherichia coli (E. coli) were also explored.

  7. Highly temperature responsive core-shell magnetic particles: synthesis, characterization and colloidal properties.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mahbubor; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Fessi, Hatem; Elaissari, Abdelhamid

    2011-08-15

    Temperature responsive magnetic polymer submicron particles were prepared by two step seed emulsion polymerization process. First, magnetic seed polymer particles were obtained by emulsion polymerization of styrene using potassium persulfate (KPS) as an initiator and divinylbenzne (DVB) as a cross-linker in the presence of oil-in-water magnetic emulsion (organic ferrofluid droplets). Thereafter, DVB cross-linked magnetic polymer particles were used as seed in the precipitation polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) to induce thermosensitive PNIPAM shell onto the hydrophobic polymer surface of the cross-linked magnetic polymer particles. To impart cationic functional groups in the thermosensitive PNIPAM backbone, the functional monomer aminoethylmethacrylate hydrochloride (AEMH) was used to polymerize with NIPAM while N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (MBA) and 2, 2'-azobis (2-methylpropionamidine) dihydrochloride (V-50) were used as a cross-linker and as an initiator respectively. The effect of seed to monomer (w/w) ratio along with seed nature on the final particle morphology was investigated. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) results demonstrated particles swelling at below volume phase transition temperature (VPTT) and deswelling above the VPTT. The perfect core (magnetic) shell (polymer) structure of the particles prepared was confirmed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The chemical composition of the particles were determined by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The effect of temperature, pH, ionic strength on the colloidal properties such as size and zeta potential of the micron sized thermo-sensitive magnetic particles were also studied. In addition, a short mechanistic discussion on the formation of core-shell morphology of magnetic polymer particles has also been discussed. PMID:21570083

  8. A theoretical study on the advantage of core-shell particles with radially-oriented mesopores.

    PubMed

    Deridder, Sander; Catani, Martina; Cavazzini, Alberto; Desmet, Gert

    2016-07-22

    We report on a first-principles numerical study explaining the potential advantage of core-shell particles with strictly radially-oriented mesopores. Comparing the efficiency of these particles with fully porous and core-shell particles with a conventional (i.e., randomly oriented) mesopore network, the present numerical study shows a similar strong reduction in minimal reduced plate height (hmin) as was very recently observed in an experimental study by Wei et al. (respectively a hmin-reduction on the order of about 1 and 0.5 reduced plate height-units). As such, the present work provides a theoretical basis to understand and confirm their experimental findings and quantifies the general advantage of "radial-diffusion-only" particles. Determining the effective longitudinal diffusion (B-term contribution) in a series of dedicated, independent simulations, it was found that this contribution can be described by a very simple, yet fully exact mathematical expression for the case of "radial- diffusion-only" particles. Using this expression, the significant increase in efficiency of these particles can be fully attributed to their much smaller B-term band broadening, while their C-term band broadening (representing the mass transfer resistance) remains unaffected. PMID:27317003

  9. Novel nucleosomal particles containing core histones and linker DNA but no histone H1

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Hope A.; Cui, Feng; Ocampo, Josefina; Burke, Tara L.; Nikitina, Tatiana; Nagarajavel, V.; Kotomura, Naoe; Zhurkin, Victor B.; Clark, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosomal DNA is assembled into regularly spaced nucleosomes, which play a central role in gene regulation by determining accessibility of control regions. The nucleosome contains ∼147 bp of DNA wrapped ∼1.7 times around a central core histone octamer. The linker histone, H1, binds both to the nucleosome, sealing the DNA coils, and to the linker DNA between nucleosomes, directing chromatin folding. Micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digests the linker to yield the chromatosome, containing H1 and ∼160 bp, and then converts it to a core particle, containing ∼147 bp and no H1. Sequencing of nucleosomal DNA obtained after MNase digestion (MNase-seq) generates genome-wide nucleosome maps that are important for understanding gene regulation. We present an improved MNase-seq method involving simultaneous digestion with exonuclease III, which removes linker DNA. Remarkably, we discovered two novel intermediate particles containing 154 or 161 bp, corresponding to 7 bp protruding from one or both sides of the nucleosome core. These particles are detected in yeast lacking H1 and in H1-depleted mouse chromatin. They can be reconstituted in vitro using purified core histones and DNA. We propose that these ‘proto-chromatosomes’ are fundamental chromatin subunits, which include the H1 binding site and influence nucleosome spacing independently of H1. PMID:26400169

  10. LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate increases proteoglycan binding and promotes atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Melchior, John T.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Shah, Ramesh; Wilson, Martha D.; Hantgan, Roy R.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2013-01-01

    Several studies in humans and animals suggest that LDL particle core enrichment in cholesteryl oleate (CO) is associated with increased atherosclerosis. Diet enrichment with MUFAs enhances LDL CO content. Steroyl O-acyltransferase 2 (SOAT2) is the enzyme that catalyzes the synthesis of much of the CO found in LDL, and gene deletion of SOAT2 minimizes CO in LDL and protects against atherosclerosis. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the increased atherosclerosis associated with LDL core enrichment in CO results from an increased affinity of the LDL particle for arterial proteoglycans. ApoB-100-only Ldlr−/− mice with and without Soat2 gene deletions were fed diets enriched in either cis-MUFA or n-3 PUFA, and LDL particles were isolated. LDL:proteogylcan binding was measured using surface plasmon resonance. Particles with higher CO content consistently bound with higher affinity to human biglycan and the amount of binding was shown to be proportional to the extent of atherosclerosis of the LDL donor mice. The data strongly support the thesis that atherosclerosis was induced through enhanced proteoglycan binding of LDL resulting from LDL core CO enrichment. PMID:23804810

  11. Coherent coexistence of nanodiamonds and carbon onions in icosahedral core-shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, Vladimir Ya. Madison, Alexey E.; Mackay, Alan L.

    2007-03-01

    In icosahedral carbon nanoparticles, the diamond-like core can undergo a reversible topological transition into and coexist coherently with the onion shells. The general approach for describing and designing complex hierarchical icosahedral structures is discussed. Structural models of icosahedral carbon nanoparticles in which the local arrangement of atoms is virtually identical to that in diamond are derived. It is shown that icosahedral diamond-like particles can be transformed into onion-like shell structures (and vice versa) by the consecutive smoothing (puckering) of atomic networks without disturbance of their topological integrity. The possibility of coherent coexistence of icosahedral diamond-like core with onion shells is shown.

  12. Investigation of the EAS Lateral Particle Density at 500 m Distance from Shower Core

    SciTech Connect

    Toma, G.

    2008-01-24

    For the experimental conditions of the KASCADE-Grande experiment, the density of EAS charged particles at the distance of about 500 m from the shower core S(500) has been shown by detailed simulation studies to be an approximate energy estimator, being nearly independent of the mass of the primary particle. This report presents some experimentally observed features of the S(500) observable registered with the KASCADE-Grande array installed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Germany The measured energy deposits of particles in the 37 scintillation detector stations have been used to reconstruct the lateral charged particle distributions that are described by a Linsley parameterization (LDF). Among other features, the S(500) dependence from the EAS angle of incidence has been studied.

  13. Surface mode hybridization in the optical response of core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiessen, E.; Heinisch, R. L.; Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2016-03-01

    We present an exact rewriting of the Mie coefficients describing the scattering of light by a spherical core-shell particle which enables their interpretation in terms of a hybridization of the two surface modes arising, respectively, at the core-shell and the shell-medium interface. For this particular case, we thus obtain from the Mie theory—analytically for all multipole orders and hence for arbitrarily sized particles—the hybridization scenario, which so far has been employed primarily for small particles in the electrostatic approximation. To demonstrate the strength of the rewriting approach, we also extract the hybridization scenario for a stratified sphere directly from the expansion coefficients for the electromagnetic fields.

  14. Epoxy-acrylic core-shell particles by seeded emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Hong, Liang; Lin, Jui-Ching; Meyers, Greg; Harris, Joseph; Radler, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We developed a novel method for synthesizing epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes. We first prepared an aqueous dispersion of high molecular weight solid epoxy prepolymers using a mechanical dispersion process at elevated temperatures, and we subsequently used the epoxy dispersion as a seed in the emulsion polymerization of acrylic monomers comprising methyl methacrylate (MMA) and methacrylic acid (MAA). Advanced analytical techniques, such as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and peak force tapping atomic force microscopy (PFT-AFM), have elucidated a unique core-shell morphology of the epoxy-acrylic hybrid particles. Moreover, the formation of the core-shell morphology in the seeded emulsion polymerization process is primarily attributed to kinetic trapping of the acrylic phase at the exterior of the epoxy particles. By this new method, we are able to design the epoxy and acrylic polymers in two separate steps, and we can potentially synthesize epoxy-acrylic hybrid latexes with a broad range of compositions. PMID:27078740

  15. Synthesis of zirconium tungstate-zirconia core-shell composite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Khazeni, Nasser; Mavis, Bora; Guenduez, Guengoer; Colak, Uner

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}-ZrO{sub 2} core-shell particles to offer solutions for sintering problems. {yields} Core synthesis by a precursor based on tungstic acid and zirconium acetate. {yields} Shell phase by urea hydrolysis in the presence of zirconium ions. {yields} [Urea]/[ZrOCl{sub 2}] ratio controls the rate of shell precursor precipitation. -- Abstract: In this work, ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8}-ZrO{sub 2} core-shell composite particles were synthesized. ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} that was used in the core is a material with negative coefficient of thermal expansion, and it was synthesized from a high-pH precursor based on use of tungstic acid and zirconium acetate. Shell layer was composed of ZrO{sub 2} nanocrystallites and precipitated from an aqueous solution by urea hydrolysis. While volume of the shell was effectively controlled by the initial zirconium ion concentration in the solutions, the rate of precipitation was a function of the ratio of initial concentrations of urea to zirconium ions. It is hypothesized that isolation of the ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} within a layer of ZrO{sub 2}, will be a key element in solving problems associated with reactivity of ZrW{sub 2}O{sub 8} towards other components in sintering of ceramic-ceramic composites with tuned or zero thermal expansion coefficient.

  16. Low loss Sendust powder cores comprised of particles coated by sodium salt insulating layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ding; Wang, Xian; Nie, Yan; Feng, Zekun; Gong, Rongzhou; Chen, Yajie; Harris, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    Toroid-shaped Sendust powder cores were prepared from cold pressing mechanically pulverized Fe-Si-Al powder that had been coated using an inorganic insulating layer. The present work focuses on the effect of the sodium salt-coated Sendust particles upon the high frequency magnetic properties. Sendust powders, having a particle size range of ˜125 μm, exhibit a high saturation magnetization of 118.9 A.m2/kg and a low coercivity of 56 A/m. The experiments indicate that the sodium-based glass insulating layer synthesized from sodium metaphosphate and sodium metaborate can effectively reduce the change in permeability with frequency or DC bias field, yielding high effective permeability (μe) of ˜113 over a wide frequency range from 10 kHz-1 MHz. Furthermore, the effective permeability is measured at ˜27 at H = 7854 A/m, indicating stable and high effective permeability under a DC bias field. The measurements of permeability under DC bias field indicate a peak in the quality factor (Q) values corresponding to a DC-bias field of 1.5-6 (kA/m) at frequencies from 50 to 200 kHz: The effective permeability remains at ˜74. The sodium salt-coated granular cores demonstrate a core loss of 68 mW/cm3 at Bm = 50 mT and f = 50 kHz: These values compare favorably to those of silicone coated Sendust particles.

  17. Controllable fabrication and characterization of biocompatible core-shell particles and hollow capsules as drug carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lingyun; Gong, Xinglong; Xuan, Shouhu; Zhang, Hong; Gong, Xiuqing; Jiang, Wanquan; Chen, Zuyao

    2006-10-01

    SiO 2@CdSe core-shell particles were fabricated by controllable deposition CdSe nanoparticles on silica colloidal spheres. Step-wise coating process was tracked by the TEM and XRD measurements. In addition, SiO 2@CdSe/polypyrrole(PPy) multi-composite particles were synthesized based on the as-prepared SiO 2@CdSe particles by cationic polymerization. The direct electrochemistry of myoglobin (Mb) could be performed by immobilizing Mb on the surface of SiO 2@CdSe particles. Immobilized with Mb, SiO 2@CdSe/PPy-Mb also displayed good bioelectrochemical activity. It confirmed the good biocompatible property of the materials with protein. CdSe hollow capsules were further obtained as the removal of the cores of SiO 2@CdSe spheres. Hollow and porous character of CdSe sub-meter size capsules made them becoming hopeful candidates as drug carriers. Doxorubicin, a typical an antineoplastic drug, was introduced into the capsules. A good sustained drug release behavior of the loading capsules was discovered via performing a release test in the PBS buffer (pH 7.4) solution at 310 k. Furthermore, SiO 2@CdSe/PPy could be converted to various smart hollow capsules via selectively removal of their relevant components.

  18. Continuous syntheses of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles using microwave-assisted core particle formation coupled with galvanic metal displacement.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Masato; Hiyoshi, Norihito; Nishioka, Masateru; Koda, Hidekazu; Sato, Koichi; Miyazawa, Akira; Suzuki, Toshishige M

    2014-08-01

    Continuous synthesis of Pd@Pt and Cu@Ag core-shell nanoparticles was performed using flow processes including microwave-assisted Pd (or Cu) core-nanoparticle formation followed by galvanic displacement with a Pt (or Ag) shell. The core-shell structure and the nanoparticle size were confirmed using high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) observation and EDS elemental mapping. The Pd@Pt nanoparticles with a particle size of 6.5 ± 0.6 nm and a Pt shell thickness of ca. 0.25 nm were synthesized with appreciably high Pd concentration (Pd 100 mM). This shell thickness corresponds to one atomic layer thickness of Pt encapsulating the Pd core metal. The particle size of core Pd was controlled by tuning the initial concentrations of Na2[PdCl4] and PVP. Core-shell Cu@Ag nanoparticles with a particle size of 90 ± 35 nm and an Ag shell thickness of ca. 3.5 nm were obtained using similar sequential reactions. Oxidation of the Cu core was suppressed by the coating of Cu nanoparticles with the Ag shell. PMID:24948122

  19. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    PubMed Central

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  20. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering.

    PubMed

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate ('/' = physisorbed, '-' = chemisorbed), from molten Field's metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity. PMID:26902483

  1. Mechanical Fracturing of Core-Shell Undercooled Metal Particles for Heat-Free Soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çınar, Simge; Tevis, Ian D.; Chen, Jiahao; Thuo, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Phase-change materials, such as meta-stable undercooled (supercooled) liquids, have been widely recognized as a suitable route for complex fabrication and engineering. Despite comprehensive studies on the undercooling phenomenon, little progress has been made in the use of undercooled metals, primarily due to low yields and poor stability. This paper reports the use of an extension of droplet emulsion technique (SLICE) to produce undercooled core-shell particles of structure; metal/oxide shell-acetate (‘/’ = physisorbed, ‘-’ = chemisorbed), from molten Field’s metal (Bi-In-Sn) and Bi-Sn alloys. These particles exhibit stability against solidification at ambient conditions. Besides synthesis, we report the use of these undercooled metal, liquid core-shell, particles for heat free joining and manufacturing at ambient conditions. Our approach incorporates gentle etching and/or fracturing of outer oxide-acetate layers through mechanical stressing or shearing, thus initiating a cascade entailing fluid flow with concomitant deformation, combination/alloying, shaping, and solidification. This simple and low cost technique for soldering and fabrication enables formation of complex shapes and joining at the meso- and micro-scale at ambient conditions without heat or electricity.

  2. Core/shell silicon/polyaniline particles via in-flight plasma-induced polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasar-Inceoglu, Ozgul; Zhong, Lanlan; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2015-08-01

    Although silicon nanoparticles have potential applications in many relevant fields, there is often the need for post-processing steps to tune the property of the nanomaterial and to optimize it for targeted applications. In particular surface modification is generally necessary to both tune dispersibility of the particles in desired solvents to achieve optimal coating conditions, and to interface the particles with other materials to realize functional heterostructures. In this contribution we discuss the realization of core/shell silicon/polymer nanoparticles realized using a plasma-initiated in-flight polymerization process. Silicon particles are produced in a non-thermal plasma reactor using silane as a precursor. After synthesis they are aerodynamically injected into a second plasma reactor into which aniline vapor is introduced. The second plasma initiates the polymerization reactor leading to the formation of a 3-4 nm thick polymer shell surrounding the silicon core. The role of processing conditions on the properties of the polymeric shell is discussed. Preliminary results on the testing of this material as an anode for lithium ion batteries are presented.

  3. Nanostructured core-shell Ni deposition on SiC particles by alkaline electroless coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, M.; Karslioğlu, R.; Alp, A.; Akbulut, H.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, core-shell nanostructured nickel formation on silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic powders was achieved through the electroless deposition method using alkaline solutions. To produce a nano core-shell Ni deposition on the SiC surfaces, process parameters such as pH values, the type of reducer material, deposition temperature, stirring rate and activation procedure among others were determined. Full coverage of core-shell nickel structures on SiC surfaces was achieved with a grain size of between 100 and 300 nm, which was approximately the same deposition thickness on the SiC surfaces. The surface morphology of the coated SiC particles showed a homogenous distribution of nanostructured nickel grains characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. The nanostructures of the crystalline Ni coatings were observed to be attractive for achieving both good bonding and dense structure. The thin core shell-structure of Ni on the SiC surfaces was assessed as a beneficial reinforcement for possible metal matrix composite manufacturing.

  4. Electronic excitation transport in core antennae of enriched photosystem I particles from spinach chloroplasts

    SciTech Connect

    Causgrove, T.P.; Yang, S.; Struve, W.S.

    1988-10-20

    The polarized photobleaching recovery of PSI-60 particles enriched in iron-sulfur protein and P700 was monitored with approx. 2-ps resolution at 665, 670, 675, and 681 nm. Considerable residual anisotropy appears at long times, proving that local ordering exists in the Chl a-protein core antenna of PSI-60. At these four wavelengths, the polarization decays with mean lifetimes between 2.9 and 6.6 ps. This slow time scale suggests that the depolarization accompanies electronic excitation transport between clusters of Chl a chromophores rather than between individual nearest-neighbor chromophores.

  5. Exchange coupled SrFe12O19/Fe-Co core/shell particles with different shell thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xia; Hong, Yang-Ki; Park, Jihoon; Lee, Woncheol; Lane, Alan M.

    2015-11-01

    SrFe12O19/Fe-Co core/shell particles with different shell thickness were synthesized by polyol reduction of Fe and Co ions at 180°C with SrFe12O19 particles dispersed in solvent. The core/shell structure is formed by magnetic self-assembly due to the remanent magnetization of SrFe12O19 particles. Within a limited concentration range, the shell thickness could be controlled by regulating the concentration of Fe and Co ions. Core/shell structured SrFe12O19/Fe-Co particles showed more effective exchange coupling effects between hard and soft phases than physically mixed SrFe12O19 and Fe-Co particles. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Influence of rigid core permittivity and double layer polarization on the electrophoresis of a soft particle: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; De, Simanta

    2016-01-01

    The nonlinear electrophoresis of a soft particle with a polarizable uncharged rigid core coated with a polyelectrolyte layer is studied. Due to the coupled nature of the governing electrokinetic equations, a numerical approach is adopted. Our numerical solutions are in good agreement with the existing experimental and theoretical results for a particle with a non-polarizable core when the impacts of the nonlinear effects are low. The induced surface potential of the dielectric rigid core has an impact on the soft particle electrophoresis. The combined effects of the solid polarization of the core and double layer polarization have not been addressed previously in the context of soft particle electrophoresis. We have found that both these effects create retardation on the electrophoresis and are significant when the applied electric field is not weak. The double layer polarization is significant when the Debye length is in the order of the particle size. The range of the applied electric field for which the electrophoretic velocity of a soft particle with a non-polarizable core varies linearly with the applied electric field may create a nonlinear variation in electrophoretic velocity when the core is considered to be polarizable.

  7. Site-specific aflatoxin B sub 1 adduction of sequence-positioned nucleosome core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The question of how the presence of nucleosomal packing of DNA modifies carcinogen interaction at specific sites cannot be answered by studies on whole chromatin or bulk nucleosomes because of the heterogeneity of DNA sequences in the particles. This problem was circumvented by constructing nucleosomes that are homogenous in DNA-histone contact points. A cloned DNA fragment, containing a sea urchin 5S gene which precisely positions a histone octamer was employed. By using {sup 32}P end-labeled DNA and genotoxins that allow cleavage at sites of attack, the frequency of adduction at every susceptible nucleotide can be determined on sequencing gels. The small methylating agent dimethyl sulfate (DMS) and the bulky alkylating agent afatoxin B{sub 1}-dichloride (AFB{sub 1}-Cl{sub 2}) were used to probe the influence of DNA-histone interactions on DNA alkylation patterns in sequence-positioned core particles.

  8. Cu-Ni nano-alloy: mixed, core-shell or Janus nano-particle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guisbiers, Grégory; Khanal, Subarna; Ruiz-Zepeda, Francisco; Roque de La Puente, Jorge; José-Yacaman, Miguel

    2014-11-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles like Cu-Ni are particularly attractive due to their magnetic and catalytic properties; however, their properties depend strongly on the structure of the alloy i.e. mixed, core-shell or Janus. To predict the alloy structure, this paper investigates the size and shape effects as well as the surface segregation effect on the Cu-Ni phase diagram. Phase maps have been plotted to determine the mixing/demixing behavior of this alloy according the particle shape. Cu-Ni nanoalloy can form a mixed particle or a Janus one depending on the synthesis temperature. Surface segregation is also considered and reveals a nickel surface-enrichment. Finally, this paper provides a useful roadmap for experimentalists.Bimetallic nanoparticles like Cu-Ni are particularly attractive due to their magnetic and catalytic properties; however, their properties depend strongly on the structure of the alloy i.e. mixed, core-shell or Janus. To predict the alloy structure, this paper investigates the size and shape effects as well as the surface segregation effect on the Cu-Ni phase diagram. Phase maps have been plotted to determine the mixing/demixing behavior of this alloy according the particle shape. Cu-Ni nanoalloy can form a mixed particle or a Janus one depending on the synthesis temperature. Surface segregation is also considered and reveals a nickel surface-enrichment. Finally, this paper provides a useful roadmap for experimentalists. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05739b

  9. One-piece micropumps from liquid crystalline core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischmann, Eva-Kristina; Liang, Hsin-Ling; Kapernaum, Nadia; Giesselmann, Frank; Lagerwall, Jan; Zentel, Rudolf

    2012-11-01

    Responsive polymers are low-cost, light weight and flexible, and thus an attractive class of materials for the integration into micromechanical and lab-on-chip systems. Triggered by external stimuli, liquid crystalline elastomers are able to perform mechanical motion and can be utilized as microactuators. Here we present the fabrication of one-piece micropumps from liquid crystalline core-shell elastomer particles via a microfluidic double-emulsion process, the continuous nature of which enables a low-cost and rapid production. The liquid crystalline elastomer shell contains a liquid core, which is reversibly pumped into and out of the particle by actuation of the liquid crystalline shell in a jellyfish-like motion. The liquid crystalline elastomer shells have the potential to be integrated into a microfluidic system as micropumps that do not require additional components, except passive channel connectors and a trigger for actuation. This renders elaborate and high-cost micromachining techniques, which are otherwise required for obtaining microstructures with pump function, unnecessary.

  10. Strategies for crystallizing a chromatin protein in complex with the nucleosome core particle

    PubMed Central

    Makde, Ravindra D.; Tan, Song

    2013-01-01

    The molecular details for how chromatin factors and enzymes interact with the nucleosome are critical to understand fundamental genetic processes including cell division and gene regulation. A structural understanding of such processes has been hindered by the difficulty producing diffraction quality crystals of chromatin proteins in complex with the nucleosome. We describe here the steps used to grow crystals of the 300 kDa RCC1 chromatin factor/nucleosome core particle complex which diffract to 2.9 Å resolution. These steps included both pre- and post-crystallization strategies potentially useful to other complexes. We screened multiple variant RCC1-nucleosome core particle complexes assembled using different RCC1 homologs and deletion variants, and nucleosomes containing nucleosomal DNA with different sequences and lengths as well as histone deletion variants. We found that using RCC1 from different species produced different crystal forms of the RCC1-nucleosome complex consistent with key crystal packing interactions mediated by RCC1. Optimization of post-crystallization soaks to dehydrate the crystals dramatically improved the diffraction quality of the RCC1/nucleosome crystal from 5.0 to 2.9 Å resolution. PMID:23928047

  11. Purification of infective bluetongue virus particles by immuno-affinity chromatography using anti-core antibody.

    PubMed

    Chand, Karam; Biswas, Sanchay K; Mondal, Bimalendu

    2016-03-01

    An immuno-affinity chromatography technique for purification of infective bluetongue virus (BTV) has been descried using anti-core antibodies. BTV anti-core antibodies (prepared in guinea pig) were mixed with cell culture-grown BTV-1 and then the mixture was added to the cyanogens bromide-activated protein-A Sepharose column. Protein A binds to the antibody which in turn binds to the antigen (i.e. BTV). After thorough washing, antigen-antibody and antibody-protein A couplings were dissociated with 4M MgCl2, pH6.5. Antibody molecules were removed by dialysis and virus particles were concentrated by spin column ultrafiltration. Dialyzed and concentrated material was tested positive for BTV antigen by a sandwich ELISA and the infectivity of the chromatography-purified virus was demonstrated in cell culture. This method was applied for selective capture of BTV from a mixture of other viruses. As group-specific antibodies (against BTV core) were used to capture the virus, it is expected that virus of all BTV serotypes could be purified by this method. This method will be helpful for selective capture and enrichment of BTV from concurrently infected blood or tissue samples for efficient isolation in cell culture. Further, this method can be used for small scale purification of BTV avoiding ultracentrifugation. PMID:26925450

  12. Sialic Acid-Imprinted Fluorescent Core-Shell Particles for Selective Labeling of Cell Surface Glycans.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Sudhirkumar; El-Schich, Zahra; Malakpour, Atena; Wan, Wei; Dizeyi, Nishtman; Mohammadi, Reza; Rurack, Knut; Gjörloff Wingren, Anette; Sellergren, Börje

    2015-11-01

    The expression of cell surface glycans terminating with sialic acid (SA) residues has been found to correlate with various disease states there among cancer. We here report a novel strategy for specific fluorescence labeling of such motifs. This is based on sialic acid-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles equipped with nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD) fluorescent reporter groups allowing environmentally sensitive fluorescence detection at convenient excitation and emission wavelengths. Imprinting was achieved exploiting a hybrid approach combining reversible boronate ester formation between p-vinylphenylboronic acid and SA, the introduction of cationic amine functionalities, and the use of an NBD-appended urea-monomer as a binary hydrogen-bond donor targeting the SA carboxylic acid and OH functionalities. The monomers were grafted from 200 nm RAFT-modified silica core particles using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as cross-linker resulting in a shell thickness of ca. 10 nm. The particles displayed strong affinity for SA in methanol/water mixtures (K = 6.6 × 10(5) M(-1) in 2% water, 5.9 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water, B(max) ≈ 10 μmol g(-1)), whereas binding of the competitor glucuronic acid (GA) and other monosaccharides was considerably weaker (K (GA) = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) in 98% water). In cell imaging experiments, the particles selectively stained different cell lines in correlation with the SA expression level. This was further verified by enzymatic cleavage of SA and by staining using a FITC labeled SA selective lectin. PMID:26414878

  13. Isostructural solid-solid phase transition in monolayers of soft core-shell particles at fluid interfaces: structure and mechanics.

    PubMed

    Rey, Marcel; Fernández-Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Steinacher, Mathias; Scheidegger, Laura; Geisel, Karen; Richtering, Walter; Squires, Todd M; Isa, Lucio

    2016-04-13

    We have studied the complete two-dimensional phase diagram of a core-shell microgel-laden fluid interface by synchronizing its compression with the deposition of the interfacial monolayer. Applying a new protocol, different positions on the substrate correspond to different values of the monolayer surface pressure and specific area. Analyzing the microstructure of the deposited monolayers, we discovered an isostructural solid-solid phase transition between two crystalline phases with the same hexagonal symmetry, but with two different lattice constants. The two phases corresponded to shell-shell and core-core inter-particle contacts, respectively; with increasing surface pressure the former mechanically failed enabling the particle cores to come into contact. In the phase-transition region, clusters of particles in core-core contacts nucleate, melting the surrounding shell-shell crystal, until the whole monolayer moves into the second phase. We furthermore measured the interfacial rheology of the monolayers as a function of the surface pressure using an interfacial microdisk rheometer. The interfaces always showed a strong elastic response, with a dip in the shear elastic modulus in correspondence with the melting of the shell-shell phase, followed by a steep increase upon the formation of a percolating network of the core-core contacts. These results demonstrate that the core-shell nature of the particles leads to a rich mechanical and structural behavior that can be externally tuned by compressing the interface, indicating new routes for applications, e.g. in surface patterning or emulsion stabilization. PMID:26948023

  14. The structure of nucleosomal core particles within transcribed and repressed gene regions.

    PubMed Central

    Studitsky, V M; Belyavsky, A V; Melnikova, A F; Mirzabekov, A D

    1988-01-01

    The arrangement of histones along DNA in nucleosomal core particles within transcribed heat shock gene (hsp 70) region and repressed insertion within ribosomal genes of Drosophila was analysed by using protein-DNA crosslinking methods combined with hybridization tests. In addition, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to compare the overall nucleosomal shape and the nucleosomal DNA size. The arrangement of histones along DNA and general compactness of nucleosomes were shown to be rather similar in transcriptionally active and inactive genomic regions. On the other hand, nucleosomes within transcriptionally active chromatin are characterized by a larger size of nucleosomal DNA produced by micrococcal nuclease digestion and some peculiarity in electrophoretic mobility. Images PMID:3144704

  15. Assembly Pathway of Hepatitis B Core Virus-like Particles from Genetically Fused Dimers*

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Kris; Shepherd, Dale A.; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Whelan, Mike; Rowlands, David J.; Stonehouse, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Macromolecular complexes are responsible for many key biological processes. However, in most cases details of the assembly/disassembly of such complexes are unknown at the molecular level, as the low abundance and transient nature of assembly intermediates make analysis challenging. The assembly of virus capsids is an example of such a process. The hepatitis B virus capsid (core) can be composed of either 90 or 120 dimers of coat protein. Previous studies have proposed a trimer of dimers as an important intermediate species in assembly, acting to nucleate further assembly by dimer addition. Using novel genetically-fused coat protein dimers, we have been able to trap higher-order assembly intermediates and to demonstrate for the first time that both dimeric and trimeric complexes are on pathway to virus-like particle (capsid) formation. PMID:25953902

  16. Gel-based chemical cross-linking analysis of 20S proteasome subunit-subunit interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai; Xiong, Hua; Che, Jing; Xi, Qing-Song; Huang, Liu; Xiong, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in breast tumorigenesis by controlling transcription factors, thus promoting cell cycle growth, and degradation of tumor suppressor proteins. However, breast cancer patients have failed to benefit from proteasome inhibitor treatment partially due to proteasome heterogeneity, which is poorly understood in malignant breast neoplasm. Chemical crosslinking is an increasingly important tool for mapping protein three-dimensional structures and proteinprotein interactions. In the present study, two cross-linkers, bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS(3)) and its water-insoluble analog disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), were used to map the subunit-subunit interactions in 20S proteasome core particle (CP) from MDA-MB-231 cells. Different types of gel electrophoresis technologies were used. In combination with chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry, we applied these gel electrophoresis technologies to the study of the noncovalent interactions among 20S proteasome subunits. Firstly, the CP subunit isoforms were profiled. Subsequently, using native/SDSPAGE, it was observed that 0.5 mmol/L BS(3) was a relatively optimal cross-linking concentration for CP subunit-subunit interaction study. 2-DE analysis of the cross-linked CP revealed that α1 might preinteract with α2, and α3 might pre-interact with α4. Moreover, there were different subtypes of α1α2 and α3α4 due to proteasome heterogeneity. There was no significant difference in cross-linking pattern for CP subunits between BS(3) and DSS. Taken together, the gel-based characterization in combination with chemical cross-linking could serve as a tool for the study of subunit interactions within a multi-subunit protein complex. The heterogeneity of 20S proteasome subunit observed in breast cancer cells may provide some key information for proteasome inhibition strategy. PMID:27465334

  17. Particle-core coupling in 37S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, R.; Wang, Z. M.; Bouhelal, M.; Haas, F.; Liang, X.; Azaiez, F.; Behera, B. R.; Burns, M.; Caurier, E.; Corradi, L.; Curien, D.; Deacon, A. N.; Dombrádi, Zs.; Farnea, E.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Hodsdon, A.; Ibrahim, F.; Jungclaus, A.; Keyes, K.; Kumar, V.; Lunardi, S.; Mǎrginean, N.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Nowacki, F.; Ollier, J.; O'Donnell, D.; Papenberg, A.; Pollarolo, G.; Salsac, M.-D.; Scarlassara, F.; Simpson, G.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K. M.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefanini, A. M.; Szilner, S.; Trotta, M.; Verney, D.

    2016-04-01

    Excited states of the neutron-rich N =21 37S nucleus have been studied using binary grazing reactions produced by the interaction of a 215-MeV beam of 36S ions with a thin 208Pb target. The magnetic spectrometer, PRISMA, and the γ -ray array, CLARA, were used in the measurements. The level scheme of 37S was established to an excitation energy of 4196 keV and a number of new transitions were observed, in particular that corresponding to the decay of the proposed Jπ=(11 /2 -) level at an excitation energy of 2776 keV. The structure of the state is discussed within the context of state-of-the-art shell-model calculations using the SDPF-U effective interaction; the main component of the wave function corresponds to the coupling of the odd 1 f7 /2 neutron to the first 2+ state of the 36S core. The electromagnetic decay properties of the state are discussed within the context of a particle-core coupling model and the shell model. The other members of the multiplet of states are also discussed.

  18. Topoisomerase I activity associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) particles and equine infectious anemia virus core.

    PubMed Central

    Priel, E; Showalter, S D; Roberts, M; Oroszlan, S; Segal, S; Aboud, M; Blair, D G

    1990-01-01

    In the present study, we found a topoisomerase I (topo I) activity in two strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) particles. The topo I activity was located in the EIAV cores and differed from the cellular topo I in its ionic requirements and response to ATP, indicating that these were two distinct forms of this enzyme. Topo I activity was removed from the viral lysates and viral cores by anti-topo I antiserum. The only protein recognized by this antiserum was an 11.5 kd protein in HIV lysate and 11 kd in EIAV lysate. We showed that the 11 kd protein recognized by the anti-topo I antiserum is the EIAV p11 nucleocapsid protein. Furthermore, purified topo I protein blocked the binding of the antibodies to the p11 protein and vice versa, purified p11 protein blocked the binding of these antibodies to the cellular topo I. These results suggest that the EIAV p11 nucleocapsid protein and the cellular topo I share similar epitopes. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2174357

  19. ESC-EEC-EPC code system for plasma core and edge equilibrium and particle orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xujing

    2013-10-01

    A new Edge Equilibrium Code (EEC), which is a new solver of the Grad-Shafranov equation complementing the existing ESC code (based on Fourier representation) is presented. EEC, being developed specifically for the near edge region with an arbitrary shape of the plasma boundary, uses adaptive flux coordinates with Hermite finite element representation. A special routine for fast solving the sparse matrix equations was created for EEC. The edge solution of EEC is matched with the core solution from ESC through a virtual boundary and the two codes communicate as two parallel processes. This approach addresses the future needs in enhancing functionality of EEC without conflicting with the interface of both codes. The code was complemented by Edge Particle Code (EPC) for massive calculation of collisional particle orbits using GPU. The resulting ESC-EEC-EPC code system acquired unmatched ability (a) in fast free and fixed boundary equilibrium calculations for arbitrary plasma shapes, (b) in using both r - z and different flux coordinates, (c) in choosing different combinations of input profiles, (d) in performing equilibrium reconstruction together with variances analysis, and (e) in assessing the diagnostics used for equilibrium reconstruction. Chinese National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program 2011GB105003, US DOE SBIR grant # 94307S10-II.

  20. Starvation Induces Proteasome Autophagy with Different Pathways for Core and Regulatory Particles*

    PubMed Central

    Waite, Kenrick A.; Mota-Peynado, Alina De-La; Vontz, Gabrielle; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome is responsible for the degradation of many cellular proteins. If and how this abundant and normally stable complex is degraded by cells is largely unknown. Here we show that in yeast, upon nitrogen starvation, proteasomes are targeted for vacuolar degradation through autophagy. Using GFP-tagged proteasome subunits, we observed that autophagy of a core particle (CP) subunit depends on the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3, although a regulatory particle (RP) subunit does not. Furthermore, upon blocking of autophagy, RP remained largely nuclear, although CP largely localized to the cytosol as well as granular structures within the cytosol. In all, our data reveal a regulated process for the removal of proteasomes upon nitrogen starvation. This process involves CP and RP dissociation, nuclear export, and independent vacuolar targeting of CP and RP. Thus, in addition to the well characterized transcriptional up-regulation of genes encoding proteasome subunits, cells are also capable of down-regulating cellular levels of proteasomes through proteaphagy. PMID:26670610

  1. Fast determination of biogenic amines in beverages by a core-shell particle column.

    PubMed

    Preti, Raffaella; Antonelli, Marta Letizia; Bernacchia, Roberta; Vinci, Giuliana

    2015-11-15

    A fast and reliable HPLC method for the determination of 11 biogenic amines in beverages has been performed. After pre-column derivatization with dansyl-chloride a Kinetex C18 core-shell particle column (100 mm × 4.6 mm, 2.6 μm particle size) has been employed and the biogenic amines were identified and quantified in a total run time of 13 min with ultraviolet (UV) or fluorescence detection (FLD). Chromatographic conditions such as column temperature (kept at 50 °C), gradient elution and flow rate have been optimized and the method has been tested on red wine and fruit nectar. The proposed method is enhanced in terms of reduced analysis time and eluent consumption with respect of classical HPLC method as to be comparable to UHPLC methods. Green and cost-effective, this method can be used as a quality-control tool for routine quantitative analysis of biogenic amines in beverages for the average laboratory. PMID:25977063

  2. Bladder cancer detection using a peptide substrate of the 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Natalia; Wysocka, Magdalena; Brzezińska, Magdalena; Dębowski, Dawid; Sieńczyk, Marcin; Gorodkiewicz, Ewa; Guszcz, Tomasz; Czaplewski, Cezary; Rolka, Krzysztof; Lesner, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The 20S catalytic core of the human 26S proteasome can be secreted from cells, and high levels of extracellular 20S proteasome have been linked to many types of cancers and autoimmune diseases. Several diagnostic approaches have been developed that detect 20S proteasome activity in plasma, but these suffer from problems with efficiency and sensitivity. In this report, we describe the optimization and synthesis of an internally quenched fluorescent substrate of the 20S proteasome, and investigate its use as a potential diagnostic test in bladder cancer. This peptide, 2-aminobenzoic acid (ABZ)-Val-Val-Ser-Tyr-Ala-Met-Gly-Tyr(3-NO2 )-NH2 , is cleaved by the chymotrypsin 20S proteasome subunit and displays an excellent specificity constant value (9.7 × 10(5)  m(-1) ·s(-1) ) and a high kcat (8 s(-1) ). Using this peptide, we identified chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity in the majority of urine samples obtained from patients with bladder cancer, whereas the proteasome activity in urine samples from healthy volunteers was below the detection limit (0.5 pm). These findings were confirmed by an inhibitory study and immunochemistry methods. PMID:27326540

  3. Magnetically self-assembled SrFe12O19/Fe-Co core/shell particles

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, X; Park, J; Hong, YK; Lane, AM

    2015-02-15

    Epitaxial growth to synthesize core/shell-structured materials is limited because large lattice mismatches are common between materials. Magnetically hard/soft, core/shell-structured materials can be potentially used for rare-earth free permanent magnets, but their synthesis presents a challenge. We report a wet chemistry method to synthesize core/shell structured particles consisting of a magnetically hard SrFe12O19 core and a soft Fe-Co shell, with a lattice mismatch of similar to 100%, which cannot be achieved by conventional epitaxial growth or other alternative methods. When decreasing the size of the magnetically soft Fe-Co nanoclusters to below 5 nm, we show that they can be magnetically attracted by the hard SrFe12O19 to form core/shell structured particles. An AC demagnetization experiment demonstrates the formation mechanism of the core/shell particles, and their magnetic hysteresis loop shows potential for use as rare-earth free permanent magnets. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Advantages of core-shell particle columns in Sequential Injection Chromatography for determination of phenolic acids.

    PubMed

    Chocholouš, Petr; Vacková, Jana; Srámková, Ivana; Satínský, Dalibor; Solich, Petr

    2013-01-15

    Currently, for Sequential Injection Chromatography (SIC), only reversed phase C18 columns have been used for chromatographic separations. This article presents the first use of three different stationary phases: three core-shell particle-packed reversed phase columns in flow systems. The aim of this work was to extend the chromatographic capabilities of the SIC system. Despite the particle-packed columns reaching system pressures of ≤ 610 PSI, their conditions matched those of a commercially produced and optimised SIC system (SIChrom™ (FIAlab(®), USA)) with a 8-port high-pressure selection valve and medium-pressure Sapphire™ syringe pump with a 4 mL reservoir and maximum system pressure of ≤ 1000 PSI. The selectivity of each of the tested columns, Ascentis(®) Express RP-Amide, Ascentis(®) Express Phenyl-Hexyl and Ascentis(®) Express C18 (30 mm × 4.6mm, core-shell particle size 2.7 μm), was compared by their ability to separate seven phenolic acids that are secondary metabolite substances widely distributed in plants. The separations of all of the components were performed by isocratic elution using binary mobile phases composed of acetonitrile and 0.065% phosphoric acid at pH 2.4 (a specific ratio was used for each column) at a flow-rate of 0.60 mL/min. The volume of the mobile phase was 3.8 mL for each separation. The injection volume of the sample was 10 μL for each separation. The UV detection wavelengths were set to 250, 280 and 325 nm. The RP-Amide column provided the highest chromatographic resolution and allowed for complete baseline separation of protocatechuic, syringic, vanillic, ferulic, sinapinic, p-coumaric and o-coumaric acids. The Phenyl-Hexyl and C18 columns were unable to completely separate the tested mixture, syringic and vanillic acid and ferulic and sinapinic acids could not be separated from one another. The analytical parameters were a LOD of 0.3 mg L(-1), a LOQ of 1.0 mg L(-1), a calibration range of 1.0-50.0 (100.0) mg L(-1

  5. Core-shell-structured silica/polyacrylate particles prepared by Pickering emulsion: influence of the nucleation model on particle interfacial organization and emulsion stability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This work reports a new evidence of the versatility of silica sol as a stabilizer for Pickering emulsions. The organization of silica particles at the oil-water interface is a function of the nucleation model. The present results show that nucleation model, together with monomer hydrophobicity, can be used as a trigger to modify the packing density of silica particles at the oil-water interface: Less hydrophobic methylmethacrylate, more wettable with silica particles, favors the formation of core-shell-structured composite when the composite particles are prepared by miniemulsion polymerization in which monomers are fed in batch (droplet nucleation). By contrast, hydrophobic butylacrylate promotes the encapsulating efficiency of silica when monomers are fed dropwise (homogeneous nucleation). The morphologies of polyacrylate-nano-SiO2 composites prepared from different feed ratio of methylmethacrylate/butylacrylate (with different hydrophobicity) and by different feed processes are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results from SEM and TEM show that the morphologies of the as-prepared polyacrylate/nano-SiO2 composite can be a core-shell structure or a bare acrylic sphere. The stability of resulting emulsions composed of these composite particles is strongly dependent on the surface coverage of silica particles. The emulsion stability is improved by densely silica-packed composite particles. PMID:25313299

  6. PDMAEMA-grafted core-shell-corona particles for nonviral gene delivery and magnetic cell separation.

    PubMed

    Majewski, Alexander P; Stahlschmidt, Ullrich; Jérôme, Valérie; Freitag, Ruth; Müller, Axel H E; Schmalz, Holger

    2013-09-01

    Monodisperse, magnetic nanoparticles as vectors for gene delivery were successfully synthesized via the grafting-from approach. First, oleic acid stabilized maghemite nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3) were encapsulated with silica utilizing a reverse microemulsion process with simultaneous functionalization with initiating sites for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Polymerization of 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) from the core-shell nanoparticles led to core-shell-corona hybrid nanoparticles (γ-Fe2O3@silica@PDMAEMA) with an average grafting density of 91 polymer chains of DP(n) = 540 (PDMAEMA540) per particle. The permanent attachment of the arms was verified by field-flow fractionation. The dual-responsive behavior (pH and temperature) was confirmed by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and turbidity measurements. The interaction of the hybrid nanoparticles with plasmid DNA at various N/P ratios (polymer nitrogen/DNA phosphorus) was investigated by DLS and zeta-potential measurements, indicating that for N/P ≥ 7.5 the complexes bear a positive net charge and do not undergo secondary aggregation. The hybrids were tested as transfection agents under standard conditions in CHO-K1 and L929 cells, revealing transfection efficiencies >50% and low cytotoxicity at N/P ratios of 10 and 15, respectively. Due to the magnetic properties of the hybrid gene vector, it is possible to collect most of the cells that have incorporated a sufficient amount of magnetic material by using a magnetic activated cell sorting system (MACS). Afterward, cells were further cultivated and displayed a transfection efficiency of ca. 60% together with a high viability. PMID:23889326

  7. Design of Gas-phase Synthesis of Core-Shell Particles by Computational Fluid – Aerosol Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Buesser, B.; Pratsinis, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell particles preserve the bulk properties (e.g. magnetic, optical) of the core while its surface is modified by a shell material. Continuous aerosol coating of core TiO2 nanoparticles with nanothin silicon dioxide shells by jet injection of hexamethyldisiloxane precursor vapor downstream of titania particle formation is elucidated by combining computational fluid and aerosol dynamics. The effect of inlet coating vapor concentration and mixing intensity on product shell thickness distribution is presented. Rapid mixing of the core aerosol with the shell precursor vapor facilitates efficient synthesis of hermetically coated core-shell nanoparticles. The predicted extent of hermetic coating shells is compared to the measured photocatalytic oxidation of isopropanol by such particles as hermetic SiO2 shells prevent the photocatalytic activity of titania. Finally the performance of a simpler, plug-flow coating model is assessed by comparisons to the present detailed CFD model in terms of coating efficiency and silica average shell thickness and texture. PMID:23729817

  8. Thermosensitive core-shell particles as model systems for studying the flow behavior of concentrated colloidal dispersions.

    PubMed

    Crassous, J J; Siebenbürger, M; Ballauff, M; Drechsler, M; Henrich, O; Fuchs, M

    2006-11-28

    We report on a comprehensive investigation of the flow behavior of colloidal thermosensitive core-shell particles at high densities. The particles consist of a solid core of poly(styrene) onto which a network of cross-linked poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) is affixed. Immersed in water the shell of these particles will swell if the temperature is low. Raising the temperature above 32 degrees C leads to a volume transition within this shell which leads to a marked shrinking of the shell. The particles have well-defined core-shell structure and a narrow size distribution. The remaining electrostatic interactions due to a small number of charges affixed to the core particles can be screened by adding 0.05M KCl to the suspensions. Below the lower critical solution temperature at 32 degrees C the particles are purely repulsive. Above this transition, a thermoreversible coagulation takes place. Lowering the temperature again leads to full dissociation of the aggregates formed by this process. The particles crystallize for effective volume fractions between 0.48 and 0.55. The crystallites can be molten by shear in order to reach a fluid sample again. The reduced shear stress measured in this metastable disordered state was found to be a unique function of the shear rate and the effective volume fraction. These reduced flow curves thus obtained can be described quantitatively by the theory of Fuchs and Cates [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 248304 (2002)] which is based on the mode-coupling theory of the glass transition. PMID:17144739

  9. Monodisperse and core-shell-structured SiO2@YBO3:Eu3+ spherical particles: synthesis and characterization.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cuikun; Kong, Deyan; Liu, Xiaoming; Wang, Huan; Yu, Min; Lin, Jun

    2007-04-01

    Y0.9Eu0.1BO3 phosphor layers were deposited on monodisperse SiO2 particles of different sizes (300, 570, 900, and 1200 nm) via a sol-gel process, resulting in the formation of core-shell-structured SiO2@Y0.9Eu0.1BO3 particles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra as well as lifetimes were employed to characterize the resulting composite particles. The results of XRD, FE-SEM, and TEM indicate that the 800 degrees C annealed sample consists of crystalline YBO3 shells and amorphous SiO2 cores, in spherical shape with a narrow size distribution. Under UV (240 nm) and VUV (172 nm) light or electron beam (1-6 kV) excitation, these particles show the characteristic 5D0-7F1-4 orange-red emission lines of Eu3+ with a quantum yield ranging from 36% (one-layer Y0.9Eu0.1BO3 on SiO2) to 54% (four-layer Y0.9Eu0.1BO3 on SiO2). The luminescence properties (emission intensity and color coordinates) of Eu3+ ions in the core-shell particles can be tuned by the coating number of Y0.9Eu0.1BO3 layers and SiO2 core particle size to some extent, pointing out the great potential for these particles applied in displaying and lightening fields. PMID:17338518

  10. Characterization of a new series of non-covalent proteasome inhibitors with exquisite potency and selectivity for the 20S β5-subunit

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Christopher; Gigstad, Kenneth M.; Hales, Paul; Garcia, Khristofer; Jones, Matthew; Bruzzese, Frank J.; Barrett, Cynthia; Liu, Jane X.; Soucy, Teresa A.; Sappal, Darshan S.; Bump, Nancy; Olhava, Edward J.; Fleming, Paul; Dick, Lawrence R.; Tsu, Christopher; Sintchak, Michael D.; Blank, Jonathan L.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian 26S proteasome is a 2500 kDa multi-catalytic complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. We describe the synthesis and properties of a novel series of non-covalent di-peptide inhibitors of the proteasome used on a capped tri-peptide that was first identified by high-throughput screening of a library of approx. 350000 compounds for inhibitors of the ubiquitin–proteasome system in cells. We show that these compounds are entirely selective for the β5 (chymotrypsin-like) site over the β1 (caspase-like) and β2 (trypsin-like) sites of the 20S core particle of the proteasome, and over a panel of less closely related proteases. Compound optimization, guided by X-ray crystallography of the liganded 20S core particle, confirmed their non-covalent binding mode and provided a structural basis for their enhanced in vitro and cellular potencies. We demonstrate that such compounds show low nanomolar IC50 values for the human 20S β5 site in vitro, and that pharmacological inhibition of this site in cells is sufficient to potently inhibit the degradation of a tetra-ubiquitin–luciferase reporter, activation of NFκB (nuclear factor κB) in response to TNF-α (tumour necrosis factor-α) and the proliferation of cancer cells. Finally, we identified capped di-peptides that show differential selectivity for the β5 site of the constitutively expressed proteasome and immunoproteasome in vitro and in B-cell lymphomas. Collectively, these studies describe the synthesis, activity and binding mode of a new series of non-covalent proteasome inhibitors with unprecedented potency and selectivity for the β5 site, and which can discriminate between the constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome in vitro and in cells. PMID:20632995

  11. Characterization of a new series of non-covalent proteasome inhibitors with exquisite potency and selectivity for the 20S [beta]5-subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, Christopher; Gigstad, Kenneth M.; Hales, Paul; Garcia, Khristofer; Jones, Matthew; Bruzzese, Frank J.; Barrett, Cynthia; Liu, Jane X.; Soucy, Teresa A.; Sappal, Darshan S.; Bump, Nancy; Olhava, Edward J.; Fleming, Paul; Dick, Lawrence R.; Tsu, Christopher; Sintchak, Michael D.; Blank, Jonathan L.

    2012-04-30

    The mammalian 26S proteasome is a 2500 kDa multi-catalytic complex involved in intracellular protein degradation. We describe the synthesis and properties of a novel series of non-covalent di-peptide inhibitors of the proteasome used on a capped tri-peptide that was first identified by high-throughput screening of a library of approx. 350000 compounds for inhibitors of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in cells. We show that these compounds are entirely selective for the {beta}5 (chymotrypsin-like) site over the {beta}1 (caspase-like) and {beta}2 (trypsin-like) sites of the 20S core particle of the proteasome, and over a panel of less closely related proteases. Compound optimization, guided by X-ray crystallography of the liganded 20S core particle, confirmed their non-covalent binding mode and provided a structural basis for their enhanced in vitro and cellular potencies. We demonstrate that such compounds show low nanomolar IC{sub 50} values for the human 20S {beta}5 site in vitro, and that pharmacological inhibition of this site in cells is sufficient to potently inhibit the degradation of a tetra-ubiquitin-luciferase reporter, activation of NF{Kappa}B (nuclear factor {Kappa}B) in response to TNF-{alpha} (tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}) and the proliferation of cancer cells. Finally, we identified capped di-peptides that show differential selectivity for the {beta}5 site of the constitutively expressed proteasome and immunoproteasome in vitro and in B-cell lymphomas. Collectively, these studies describe the synthesis, activity and binding mode of a new series of non-covalent proteasome inhibitors with unprecedented potency and selectivity for the {beta}5 site, and which can discriminate between the constitutive proteasome and immunoproteasome in vitro and in cells.

  12. Linker histone protects linker DNA on only one side of the core particle and in a sequence-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    An, Woojin; Leuba, Sanford H.; van Holde, Kensal; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    1998-01-01

    The protection against micrococcal nuclease digestion afforded to chromatosomal DNA by the presence of a linker histone (H1o) has been quantitatively measured in two reconstituted systems. We have used chromatosomes reconstituted at two distinct positions on a DNA fragment containing the 5S rRNA gene from Lytechinus variegatus and at a specific position on a sequence containing Gal4- and USF-binding sites. In all cases, we find asymmetric protection, with ≈20 bp protected on one side of the core particle and no protection on the other. We demonstrated through crosslinking experiments that the result is not due to any sliding of the histone core caused by either linker histone addition or micrococcal nuclease cleavage. Because the core particle is itself a symmetric object, the preferred asymmetric location of a linker histone must be dictated by unknown elements in the DNA sequence. PMID:9520377

  13. Glass-NiP-CoFeP triplex-shell particles with hollow cores and tunable magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    An, Zhenguo; Zhang, Jingjie

    2013-02-01

    Low density (0.55-0.92g/mL, depending on the shell thickness and composition) glass-metal-metal triplex-shell hollow particles (TSHP) were prepared by a three-step route. First, micrometer-sized silicate glass particles with hollow cores, uniform shells, and high sphericity were prepared through spray drying and subsequent melting. NiP shell was uniformly assembled to the previously obtained glass hollow particles by silver seed induced chemical reduction of Ni(2+) by sodium hypophosphite, and glass-NiP double-shell hollow particles (DSHP) with compact and uniform shells were formed. The as-formed NiP particles further acted as the seeds for the directed formation and assembly of the CoFeP shell on the NiP shell to form the final glass-NiP-CoFeP triplex-shell hollow particles (TSHP). The influences of the component of the reaction system on the composition, structure, and magnetic properties of the hollow particles were studied. The multishell hollow particles thus obtained may have some promising applications in the fields of low-density magnetic materials, conduction, microwave absorbers, catalysis, etc. This work provides an additional strategy to fabricate multishell structured hollow particles with tailored shell composition and magnetic properties, which can be extended to the controlled preparation of multishell composite particles with the shells consisting of metal, oxides, or other compounds. PMID:23281871

  14. Nuclear import of an intact preassembled proteasome particle

    PubMed Central

    Savulescu, Anca F.; Shorer, Hagai; Kleifeld, Oded; Cohen, Ilana; Gruber, Rita; Glickman, Michael H.; Harel, Amnon

    2011-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a conserved 2.5 MDa protein degradation machine that localizes to different cellular compartments, including the nucleus. Little is known about the specific targeting mechanisms of proteasomes in eukaryotic cells. We used a cell-free nuclear reconstitution system to test for nuclear targeting and import of distinct proteasome species. Three types of stable, proteolytically active proteasomes particles were purified from Xenopus egg cytosol. Two of these, the 26S holoenzyme and the 20S core particle, were targeted to the nuclear periphery but did not reach the nucleoplasm. This targeting depends on the presence of mature nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) in the nuclear envelope. A third, novel form, designated here as 20S+, was actively imported through NPCs. The 20S+ proteasome particle resembles recently described structural intermediates from other systems. Nuclear import of this particle requires functional NPCs, but it is not directly regulated by the Ran GTPase cycle. The mere presence of the associated “+” factors is sufficient to reconstitute nuclear targeting and confer onto isolated 20S core particles the ability to be imported. Stable 20S+ particles found in unfertilized eggs may provide a means for quick mobilization of existing proteasome particles into newly formed nuclear compartments during early development. PMID:21289101

  15. Use of novel phenyl-hexyl core-shell particles in nano-LC.

    PubMed

    Fanali, Salvatore; Rocchi, Silvia; Chankvetadze, Bezhan

    2013-06-01

    This paper reports the use of novel phenyl-hexyl core-shell particles packed into fused silica capillaries in nano-LC. Capillary columns of different id of 25, 50, 75, 100, and 150 μm were packed employing the slurry packing method. The columns were used for the separation of a model mixture containing five aromatic hydrocarbons. Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, n-propylbenzene, and n-butylbenzene were separated utilizing an isocratic elution mode. Mixtures of water/ACN at different ratio were studied to find optimal experimental conditions for baseline separation of all sample components. As expected with this novel stationary phase, an RP chromatographic mechanism was observed. A mixture of water/ACN, 30:70, v/v allowed the complete resolution of the studied analytes. Efficiency increased by decreasing the capillary id recording the highest number of plates per meter with capillaries of 25 μm id. The decrease of the column id also resulted in a flatter dependence of the plate numbers on the linear flow rate of the mobile phase allowing the increase of the flow rate of the mobile phase without significant decrease of efficiency. PMID:23423853

  16. Fabrication and characterization of flaky core-shell particles by magnetron sputtering silver onto diatomite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Deyuan; Cai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Diatomite has delicate porous structures and various shapes, making them ideal templates for microscopic core-shell particles fabrication. In this study, a new process of magnetron sputtering assisted with photoresist positioning was proposed to fabricate lightweight silver coated porous diatomite with superior coating quality and performance. The diatomite has been treated with different sputtering time to investigate the silver film growing process on the surface. The morphologies, constituents, phase structures and surface roughness of the silver coated diatomite were analyzed with SEM, EDS, XRD and AFM respectively. The results showed that the optimized magnetron sputtering time was 8-16 min, under which the diatomite templates were successfully coated with uniform silver film, which exhibits face centered cubic (fcc) structure, and the initial porous structures were kept. Moreover, this silver coating has lower surface roughness (RMS 4.513 ± 0.2 nm) than that obtained by electroless plating (RMS 15.692 ± 0.5 nm). And the infrared emissivity of coatings made with magnetron sputtering and electroless plating silver coated diatomite can reach to the lowest value of 0.528 and 0.716 respectively.

  17. Internal stresses in pre-stressed micron-scale aluminum core-shell particles and their improved reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Levitas, Valery I.; McCollum, Jena; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Tamura, Nobumichi

    2015-09-07

    Dilatation of aluminum (Al) core for micron-scale particles covered by alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) shell was measured utilizing x-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation for untreated particles and particles after annealing at 573 K and fast quenching at 0.46 K/s. Such a treatment led to the increase in flame rate for Al + CuO composite by 32% and is consistent with theoretical predictions based on the melt-dispersion mechanism of reaction for Al particles. Experimental results confirmed theoretical estimates and proved that the improvement of Al reactivity is due to internal stresses. This opens new ways of controlling particle reactivity through creating and monitoring internal stresses.

  18. Fission product retention in TRISCO coated UO sub 2 particle fuels subjected to HTR simulated core heating tests

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, C.A.; Kania, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    Results of the examination and analysis of 25,730 individual microspheres from spherical fuel elements HFR-K3/1 and HFR-K3/3 are reported. The parent spheres were irradiated in excess of end-of-life exposure and subsequently subjected to simulated core heating tests in a special high-temperature furnace at Forschungszentrum, Juelich, GmbH (KFA). Following the heating tests, the spheres were electrolytically deconsolidated to obtain unbonded fuel particles for Irradiated Microsphere Gamma Analyzer (IMGA) analysis. For sphere HFR-K3/1, which was heated for 500 h at 1600{degree}C, only four particles were identified as having released fission products. The remaining particles from the sphere showed no statistical evidence of fission product release. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination showed that three of the defect particles had large sections of the TRISO coating missing, while the fourth appeared normal. For sphere HFR-K3/3, which was heated for 100 h at 1800{degree}C, the IMGA data revealed that fission product release (cesium) from individual particles was significant and that there was large particle-to-particle variation in retention capabilities. Individual particle release (cesium) averaged ten times the KFA-measured integral spherical fuel element release value. In addition, the bimodal distribution of the individual particle data indicated that two distinct modes of failure at fuel temperatures of 1800{degree}C and above may exist. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. The {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets in a pinhole camera with a regular multi-pinhole diaphragm

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, N A

    2000-08-31

    The {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets using a multi-pinhole regular diaphragm is proposed. The image reconstruction technique is described. The results of the {alpha}-particle imaging of a compressed core of microtargets obtained at the 'Iskra-4' laser facility are reported. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. Fabrication of quantum dot/silica core-shell particles immobilizing Au nanoparticles and their dual imaging functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Yoshio; Matsudo, Hiromu; Li, Ting-ting; Shibuya, Kyosuke; Kubota, Yohsuke; Oikawa, Takahiro; Nakagawa, Tomohiko; Gonda, Kohsuke

    2016-03-01

    The present work proposes preparation methods for quantum dot/silica (QD/SiO2) core-shell particles that immobilize Au nanoparticles (QD/SiO2/Au). A colloid solution of QD/SiO2 core-shell particles with an average size of 47.0 ± 6.1 nm was prepared by a sol-gel reaction of tetraethyl orthosilicate in the presence of the QDs with an average size of 10.3 ± 2.1 nm. A colloid solution of Au nanoparticles with an average size of 17.9 ± 1.3 nm was prepared by reducing Au3+ ions with sodium citrate in water at 80 °C. Introduction of amino groups to QD/SiO2 particle surfaces was performed using (3-aminopropyl)-triethoxysilane (QD/SiO2-NH2). The QD/SiO2/Au particles were fabricated by mixing the Au particle colloid solution and the QD/SiO2-NH2 particle colloid solution. Values of radiant efficiency and computed tomography for the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution were 2.23 × 107 (p/s/cm2/sr)/(μW/cm2) at a QD concentration of 8 × 10-7 M and 1180 ± 314 Hounsfield units and an Au concentration of 5.4 × 10-2 M. The QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was injected into a mouse chest wall. Fluorescence emitted from the colloid solution could be detected on the skin covering the chest wall. The colloid solution could also be X-ray-imaged in the chest wall. Consequently, the QD/SiO2/Au particle colloid solution was found to have dual functions, i.e., fluorescence emission and X-ray absorption in vivo, which makes the colloid solution suitable to function as a contrast agent for dual imaging processes.

  1. Self-Assembly of an Alphavirus Core-like Particle Is Distinguished by Strong Intersubunit Association Energy and Structural Defects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joseph Che-Yen; Chen, Chao; Rayaprolu, Vamseedhar; Mukhopadhyay, Suchetana; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-09-22

    Weak association energy can lead to uniform nanostructures: defects can anneal due to subunit lability. What happens when strong association energy leads to particles where defects are trapped? Alphaviruses are enveloped viruses whose icosahedral nucleocapsid core can assemble independently. We used a simplest case system to study Ross River virus (RRV) core-like particle (CLP) self-assembly using purified capsid protein and a short DNA oligomer. We find that capsid protein binds the oligomer with high affinity to form an assembly competent unit (U). Subsequently, U assembles with concentration dependence into CLPs. We determined that U-U pairwise interactions are very strong (ca. -6 kcal/mol) compared to other virus assembly systems. Assembled RRV CLPs appeared morphologically uniform and cryo-EM image reconstruction with imposed icosahedral symmetry yielded a T = 4 structure. However, 2D class averages of the CLPs show that virtually every class had disordered regions. These results suggested that irregular cores may be present in RRV virions. To test this hypothesis, we determined 2D class averages of RRV virions using authentic virions or only the core from intact virions isolated by computational masking. Virion-based class averages were symmetrical, geometric, and corresponded well to projections of image reconstructions. In core-based class averages, cores and envelope proteins in many classes were disordered. These results suggest that partly disordered components are common even in ostensibly well-ordered viruses, a biological realization of a patchy particle. Biological advantages of partly disordered complexes may arise from their ease of dissociation and asymmetry. PMID:26275088

  2. Rheological properties of magnetorheological suspensions based on core-shell structured polyaniline-coated carbonyl iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlačík, M.; Pavlínek, V.; Sáha, P.; Švrčinová, P.; Filip, P.; Stejskal, J.

    2010-11-01

    The sedimentation caused by the high density of suspended particles used in magnetorheological fluids is a significant obstacle for their wider application. In the present paper, core-shell structured carbonyl iron-polyaniline particles in silicone oil were used as a magnetorheological suspension with enhanced dispersion stability. Bare carbonyl iron particles were suspended in silicone oil to create model magnetorheological suspensions of different loading. For a magnetorheological suspension of polyaniline-coated particles the results show a decrease in the base viscosity. Moreover, the polyaniline coating has a negligible influence on the MR properties under an external magnetic field B. The change in the viscoelastic properties of magnetorheological suspensions in the small-strain oscillatory shear flow as a function of the strain amplitude, the frequency and the magnetic flux density was also investigated.

  3. ATP-dependent incorporation of 20S protease into the 26S complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, E; Ganoth, D; Armon, T; Hershko, A

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-dependent 26S protease complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin is formed by the assembly of three factors in an ATP-requiring process. We now identify one of the factors as the 20S "multicatalytic" protease, a complex of low molecular weight subunits widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. Comparison of the subunit compositions of purified 20S and 26S complexes indicates that the former is an integral part of the latter. By the use of detergent treatment to activate latent protease activity, we show that the 20S protease becomes incorporated into the 26S complex in the ATP-dependent assembly process. It thus seems that the 20S protease is the "catalytic core" of the 26S complex of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:2554287

  4. Synthesis and Characterization of Monodisperse Metallodielectric SiO2@Pt@SiO2 Core-Shell-Shell Particles.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Alexey; Lehmann, Hauke; Finsel, Maik; Klinke, Christian; Weller, Horst; Vossmeyer, Tobias

    2016-01-26

    Metallodielectric nanostructured core-shell-shell particles are particularly desirable for enabling novel types of optical components, including narrow-band absorbers, narrow-band photodetectors, and thermal emitters, as well as new types of sensors and catalysts. Here, we present a facile approach for the preparation of submicron SiO2@Pt@SiO2 core-shell-shell particles. As shown by transmission and scanning electron microscopy, the first steps of this approach allow for the deposition of closed and almost perfectly smooth platinum shells onto silica cores via a seeded growth mechanism. By choosing appropriate conditions, the shell thickness could be adjusted precisely, ranging from ∼3 to ∼32 nm. As determined by X-ray diffraction, the crystalline domain sizes of the polycrystalline metal shells were ∼4 nm, regardless of the shell thickness. The platinum content of the particles was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy and for thin shells consistent with a dense metal layer of the TEM-measured thickness. In addition, we show that the roughness of the platinum shell strongly depends on the storage time of the gold seeds used to initiate reductive platinum deposition. Further, using polyvinylpyrrolidone as adhesion layer, it was possible to coat the metallic shells with very homogeneous and smooth insulating silica shells of well-controlled thicknesses between ∼2 and ∼43 nm. After depositing the particles onto silicon substrates equipped with interdigitated electrode structures, the metallic character of the SiO2@Pt particles and the insulating character of the SiO2 shells of the SiO2@Pt@SiO2 particles were successfully demonstrated by charge transport measurements at variable temperatures. PMID:26731341

  5. Hsp90 Enhances Degradation of Oxidized Calmodulin by the 20S Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Whittier, Jennifer E.; Xiong, Yijia; Rechsteiner, Martin C.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2004-10-29

    The 20S proteasome has been suggested to play a critical role in mediating the degradation of abnormal proteins under conditions of oxidative stress, and has been found in tight association with the molecular chaperone Hsp90. To elucidate the role of Hsp90 in promoting the degradation of oxidized calmodulin (CaMox), which accumulates in senescent brain during normal biological aging, we have purified the 20S proteasome free of Hsp90 from red blood cells and assessed its ability to recognize and degrade CaMox in the absence and presence of added Hsp90. The purified 20S proteasome does not degrade CaMox to any appreciable extent. However, following association with Hsp90, the 20S proteasome selectively degrades CaMox. This degradation is sensitive to both proteasome and Hsp90-specific inhibitors, and is further enhanced in the presence of 2 mM ATP. Irrespective of the presence of Hsp90 we find that unoxidized CaM is not significantly degraded. Furthermore, the ability of the proteasome to degrade commonly used fluorogenic peptides is not affected by Hsp90, indicating that there is no change in the accessibility of the catalytic core. Direct binding measurements demonstrate that Hsp90 selectively associates with CaMox; essentially no binding is observed between Hsp90 and unoxidized CaM. Since oxidation has previously been shown to induce both global conformational changes and a reduction in helical content of CaM, these results suggest that Hsp90 in association with the 20S proteasome selectively associates with partially unfolded proteins to promote their degradation by the proteasome.

  6. Self-assembled HCV core virus-like particles targeted and inhibited tumor cell migration and invasion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Xu, Xuehe; Jin, Aihui; Jia, Qunying; Zhou, Huaibin; Kang, Shuai; Lou, Yongliang; Gao, Jimin; Lu, Jianxin

    2013-09-01

    We used a baculovirus expression system to express fusion proteins of HCV core, RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) peptide, and IFN-α2a fragments in Sf9 cells. Western blotting and electron microscopy demonstrate that HCV core, peptides RGD, and IFN-α2a fusion proteins assemble into 30 to 40 nm nano-particles (virus-like particles, VLPs). Xenograft assays show that VLPs greatly reduced tumor volume and weight with regard to a nontreated xenograft. Migration and invasion results show that VLPs can inhibit the migration and invasion of the breast cancer cells MDA-MB231. This study will provide theoretical and experimental basis for the establishment of safe and effective tumor-targeted drug delivery systems and clinical application of VLPs carrying cell interacting cargo.

  7. Kinetic evaluation of new generation of column packed with 1.3 μm core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Guillarme, Davy

    2013-09-20

    The goal of this study was to critically evaluate a new generation of columns packed with 1.3 μm core-shell particles. The practical possibilities and limitations of this column technology were assessed and performance was compared with other reference columns packed with 1.7, 2.6 and 5 μm core-shell particles. The column efficiency achieved with 1.3 μm core-shell particles was indeed impressive, Hmin value of only 1.95 μm was achieved, this would correspond to an efficiency of more than 500,000 plates/m. The separation impedance of this column was particularly low, Emin=2000, mostly due to a reduced plate height, h of 1.50. Comparing the kinetic performance of 1.3 μm core-shell particles to that of other particle dimensions tested in this study revealed that the 1.3 μm material could provide systematically the shortest analysis time in a range of below 30,000 theoretical plates (N<30,000).Despite its excellent chromatographic performance, it was evident that this column suffers from the limitations of current instrumentation in terms of upper pressure limit and extra-column band broadening: (1) even at 1,200 bar, it was not possible to reach an optimal linear velocity showing minimal plate height value, due to the low permeability of this column (Kv=1.7×10(-11)cm(2)), and (2) for these short narrow bore columns packed with 1.3 μm core shell particles, which is mandatory for performing fast-analysis and preventing the influence of frictional heat on column performance in UHPLC, it was observed that the extra-column band broadening could have a major impact on the apparent kinetic performance. In the present work, significant plate count loss was noticed for retention factors of less than 5, even with the best system on the market (σ(2)ec=2 μL(2)). PMID:23953620

  8. Synthesis of TiO{sub 2} core/RuO{sub 2} shell particles using multistep ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stopic, Srecko; Friedrich, Bernd; Schroeder, Michael; Weirich, Thomas E.

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} core/RuO{sub 2} shell submicron-particles were prepared via a sequential spray pyrolysis. • Spherical particles have the mean particle diameters between 200 and 400 nm. • This method is promising for synthesis of core–shell and core–multishell materials. - Abstract: Spherical submicron-particles with TiO{sub 2} core–RuO{sub 2} shell structure have been synthesized by employing sequential ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. The particles have been investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and different transmission electron microscopy techniques. The quality of the core–shell structure of the particles has been confirmed by comparison of the experimental data with those generated on the basis of a hard sphere core–shell model. It has been found that the mixing of the Ru-containing aerosol with the TiO{sub 2} particle stream has a significant impact on the core–shell formation. The method introduced in this study can probably be applied for preparation of core–shell and core–multishell materials that are difficult to synthesize in a single step spray pyrolysis process.

  9. Production of rotavirus core-like particles in Sf9 cells using recombinase-mediated cassette exchange.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Fabiana; Dias, Mafalda M; Vidigal, João; Sousa, Marcos F Q; Patrone, Marco; Teixeira, Ana P; Alves, Paula M

    2014-02-10

    A flexible Sf9 insect cell line was recently developed leveraging the recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) technology, which competes with the popular baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) in terms of speed to produce new proteins. Herein, the ability of this cell platform to produce complex proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles, was evaluated. A gene construct coding for a VP2-GFP fusion protein was targeted to a pre-characterized high recombination efficiency locus flanked by flipase (Flp) recognition target sites and, after three weeks in selection, an isogenic cell population was obtained. Despite the lower cell specific productivities with respect to those obtained by baculovirus infection, the titers of VP2-GFP reached in shake flask batch cultures were comparable as a result of higher cell densities. To further improve the VP2-GFP levels from stable expression, analysis of exhausted medium was undertaken to design feeding strategies enabling higher cell densities as well as increased culture duration. The implementation of the best strategy allowed reaching 20 million cells per ml in bioreactor cultures; the integrity of the rotavirus core-like particles could be confirmed by electron microscopy. Overall, we show that this Sf9-Flp cell platform represents a valuable alternative to the BEVS for producing complex recombinant proteins, such as rotavirus core-like particles. PMID:24333128

  10. Detection of DNA polymerase activities associated with purified duck hepatitis B virus core particles by using an activity gel assay.

    PubMed Central

    Oberhaus, S M; Newbold, J E

    1993-01-01

    Replication of hepadnaviruses involves reverse transcription of an intermediate RNA molecule. It is generally accepted that this replication scheme is carried out by a virally encoded, multifunctional polymerase which has DNA-dependent DNA polymerase, reverse transcriptase, and RNase H activities. Biochemical studies of the polymerase protein(s) have been limited by the inability to purify useful quantities of functional enzyme from virus particles and, until recently, to express enzymatically active polymerase proteins in heterologous systems. An activity gel assay which detects in situ catalytic activities of DNA polymerases after electrophoresis in partially denaturing polyacrylamide gels was used by M.R. Bavand and O. Laub (J. Virol. 62:626-628, 1988) to show the presence of DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activities associated with hepatitis B virus particles produced in vitro. This assay has provided the only means by which hepadnavirus polymerase proteins have been detected in association with enzymatic activities. Since conventional methods have not allowed purification of useful quantities of enzymatically active polymerase protein(s), we have devised a protocol for purifying large quantities of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) core particles to near homogeneity. These immature virus particles contain DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activities, as shown in the endogenous DNA polymerase assay. We have used the activity gel assay to detect multiple DNA- and RNA-dependent DNA polymerase proteins associated with these purified DHBV core particles. These enzymatically active proteins appear larger than, approximately the same size as, and smaller than an unmodified DHBV polymerase protein predicted from the polymerase open reading frame. This is the first report of the detection of active hepadnavirus core-associated DNA polymerase proteins derived from a natural host. Images PMID:8411359

  11. Development of polymer-biomolecule core-shell particles for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suthiwangcharoen, Nisaraporn

    Developing efficient strategies to introduce biomolecules around polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) is critical for targeted delivery of therapeutic or diagnostic agents. Although polymeric NPs have been well established, problems such as toxicity, stability, and immunoresistance remain potential concerns. The first part of this dissertation focuses on the development of nanosized targeted drug delivery vehicle in cancer chemotherapy. The vehicle was created by the self-assembly of folate-grafted filamentous bacteriophage M13 with poly(caprolactone- b-2-vinylpyridine) while doxorubicin, the antitumor drugs, was successfully loaded in the interior of the vehicles. These particles offer unique properties of being able to selectively target tumor cells while appearing to be safe and non-toxic to normal cells. Although they have shown great prospects in many biomedical applications, less is known about the interactions between biomolecules and polymers. The next part of the dissertation focuses on the self-assembly of proteins and polymers to create polymer-protein core-shell nanoparticles (PPCS-NPs). Several proteins with different isoelectric points and molecular weights were employed to demonstrate a versatility of our assembly method while a series of esterified derivatives of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) were synthesized to evaluate the interaction between proteins and polymers. Our data indicated that the polymers containing pyridine residues can successfully assemble with proteins, and the mechanism is mainly governed by hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interactions. This in turn helps retaining proteins' folding conformation and functionality, which are also demonstrated in the in vitro/in vivo cellular uptake of the PPCS-NPs in endothelial cells. The last part of the dissertation focuses on the self-assembly of the bienzyme-polymer NPs. Glucose oxidase (GOX) together with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were employed to construct bienzyme

  12. 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3-loaded magnetic human serum albumin nanospheres applied to HeLa cervical cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui; Chen, Daozhen; Li, Mengfei; Miao, Fengqin; Liu, Peidang; Tang, Qiusha

    2014-01-01

    20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 is extracted from traditional Chinese medicine, red ginseng. However, due to its poor aqueous solubility and low oral bioavailability, the use of 20(s)-Rg3 is limited. This study aimed to explore a method of preparing nano-sized 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3 particle named 20(s)-ginsenoside Rg3-loaded magnetic human serum albumin nanospheres (20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP) to change dosage form to improve its aqueous solubility and bioavailability. 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP were prepared by the desolvation-crosslinking method. The character of 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP was detected. An antiproliferative effect and cell apoptosis rates of 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP on human cervical cancer cells were determined by the MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. TEM analysis showed that 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP were approximately spherical and uniform in size. Thermodynamic testing showed that the corresponding magnetic fluid of a specific concentration rosed to a steady temperature of 42-65○C. Iron content was approximately 3 mg/mL. Drug encapsulation efficiency was approximately 70%. The potential of 20(s)-Rg3/HSAMNP combined with magnetic hyperthermia therapy to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis was much more prominent than that of the other groups. A new dosage form of 20(s)-Rg3 was prepared, which effectively induced apoptosis in HeLa cervical cancer cells in vitro when combined with hyperthermia. PMID:25226895

  13. An unusual chemical reactivity of Sm site adenosines strongly correlates with proper assembly of core U snRNP particles.

    PubMed

    Hartmuth, K; Raker, V A; Huber, J; Branlant, C; Lührmann, R

    1999-01-01

    The small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNP) U1, U2, U4, and U5 contain a common set of eight Sm proteins that bind to the conserved single-stranded 5'-PuAU3-6GPu-3' (Sm binding site) region of their constituent U snRNA (small nuclear RNA), forming the Sm core RNP. Using native and in vitro reconstituted U1 snRNPs, accessibility of the RNA within the Sm core RNP to chemical structure probes was analyzed. Hydroxyl radical footprinting of in vitro reconstituted U1 snRNP demonstrated that riboses within a large continuous RNA region, including the Sm binding site, were protected. This protection was dependent on the binding of the Sm proteins. In contrast with the riboses, the phosphate groups within the Sm core site were accessible to modifying reagents. The invariant adenosine residue at the 5' end, as well as an adenosine two nucleotides downstream of the Sm binding site, showed an unexpected reactivity with dimethyl sulfate. This novel reactivity could be attributed to N7-methylation of the adenosine and was not observed in naked RNA, indicating that it is an intrinsic property of the RNA- protein interactions within the Sm core RNP. Further, this reactivity was observed concomitantly with formation of the Sm subcore intermediate during Sm core RNP assembly. As the Sm subcore can be viewed as the commitment complex in this assembly pathway, these results suggest that the peculiar reactivity of the Sm site adenosine bases may be diagnostic for proper assembly of the Sm core RNP. Consistent with this idea, a strong correlation was found between the unusual N7-A methylation sensitivity of the Sm core RNP and its ability to be imported into the nucleus of Xenopus laevis oocytes. PMID:9878394

  14. Polystyrene Core-Silica Shell Particles with Defined Nanoarchitectures as a Versatile Platform for Suspension Array Technology.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Dominik; Gawlitza, Kornelia; Rurack, Knut

    2016-04-19

    The need for rapid and high-throughput screening in analytical laboratories has led to significant growth in interest in suspension array technologies (SATs), especially with regard to cytometric assays targeting a low to medium number of analytes. Such SAT or bead-based assays rely on spherical objects that constitute the analytical platform. Usually, functionalized polymer or silica (SiO2) microbeads are used which each have distinct advantages and drawbacks. In this paper, we present a straightforward synthetic route to highly monodisperse SiO2-coated polystyrene core-shell (CS) beads for SAT with controllable architectures from smooth to raspberry- and multilayer-like shells by varying the molecular weight of poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), which was used as the stabilizer of the cores. The combination of both organic polymer core and a structurally controlled inorganic SiO2 shell in one hybrid particle holds great promises for flexible next-generation design of the spherical platform. The particles were characterized by electron microscopy (SEM, T-SEM, and TEM), thermogravimetry, flow cytometry, and nitrogen adsorption/desorption, offering comprehensive information on the composition, size, structure, and surface area. All particles show ideal cytometric detection patterns and facile handling due to the hybrid structure. The beads are endowed with straightforward modification possibilities through the defined SiO2 shells. We successfully implemented the particles in fluorometric SAT model assays, illustrating the benefits of tailored surface area which is readily available for small-molecule anchoring. Very promising assay performance was shown for DNA hybridization assays with quantification limits down to 8 fmol. PMID:27018430

  15. Mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles during infiltration: A core-scale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdalani, Samer; Michel, Eric; di Pietro, Liliana; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael; Rousseau, Marine

    2007-05-01

    Understanding particle movement in soils is a major concern for both geotechnics and soil physics with regard to environmental protection and water resources management. This paper describes a model for mobilization and preferential transport of soil particles through structured soils. The approach combines a kinematic-dispersive wave model for preferential water flow with a convective-dispersive equation subject to a source/sink term for particle transport and mobilization. Particle detachment from macropore walls is considered during both the steady and transient water flow regimes. It is assumed to follow first-order kinetics with a varying detachment efficiency, which depends on the history of the detachment process. Estimates of model parameters are obtained by comparing simulations with experimental particle breakthrough curves obtained during infiltrations through undisturbed soil columns. Both water flux and particle concentrations are satisfactorily simulated by the model. Particle mobilization parameters favoring both attachment and detachment of particles are related to the incoming solution ionic strength by a Fermi-type function.

  16. Preparation and characterization of core-shell structured TiO 2-BaCO 3 particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gablenz, Silvio; Damm, Cornelia; Müller, Franz Werner; Israel, Gunter; Rössel, Michael; Röder, Andreas; Abicht, Hans-Peter

    2001-03-01

    Preparation of core-shell structured TiO 2-BaCO 3 particles as precursor of BaTiO 3 genesis, proceeds using a two step procedure, by first coating the TiO 2 core by Ba(OH) 2 shell followed by conversion of the shell region with CO 2 gas by the formation of BaCO 3. Straightforward experimental results reveal environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) as suitable methods for analytical characterization of the core and shell regions from individual TiO 2-BaCO 3 grains. Evidence of coating the whole ensemble of TiO 2 particles is possible using Photo Electro Motive Force (Photo EMF, PEMF) measurements. This method is able to indicate very sensitively changes of surface properties of TiO 2 after coating with Ba(OH) 2 and BaCO 3, respectively. PEMF measurements were used for the first time with concern to this topic.

  17. Influence of core size on the upconversion luminescence properties of spherical Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} particles with core-shell structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Kezhi; Liu, Zhenyu; Liu, Ye; Song, Weiye; Qin, Weiping

    2013-11-14

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles with different sizes (30, 80, 120, and 180 nm) have been coated with Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} layers by a heterogeneous precipitation method, leading to the formation of core-shell structural Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}@SiO{sub 2} particles. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, upconversion (UC) emission spectra, and fluorescent dynamical analysis. The obtained core-shell particles have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution. Under the excitation of 980 nm diode laser, the core-shell samples showed size-dependent upconversion luminescence (UCL) properties. The inner SiO{sub 2} cores in core-shell samples were proved to have limited effect on the total UCL intensities of Er{sup 3+} ions. The UCL intensities of core-shell particles were demonstrated much higher than the values obtained in pure Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} with the same phosphor volume. The dependence of the specific area of a UCL shell on the size of its inner SiO{sub 2} particle was calculated and analyzed for the first time. It was confirmed that the surface effect came from the outer surfaces of emitting shells is dominant in influencing the UCL property in the core-shell samples. Three-photon UC processes for the green emissions were observed in the samples with small sizes of SiO{sub 2} cores. The results of dynamical analysis illustrated that more nonradiative relaxation occurred in the core-shell samples with smaller SiO{sub 2} core sizes.

  18. Influence of core size on the upconversion luminescence properties of spherical Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+@SiO2 particles with core-shell structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Kezhi; Liu, Zhenyu; Liu, Ye; Song, Weiye; Qin, Weiping

    2013-11-01

    Spherical SiO2 particles with different sizes (30, 80, 120, and 180 nm) have been coated with Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ layers by a heterogeneous precipitation method, leading to the formation of core-shell structural Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+@SiO2 particles. The samples were characterized by using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, upconversion (UC) emission spectra, and fluorescent dynamical analysis. The obtained core-shell particles have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution. Under the excitation of 980 nm diode laser, the core-shell samples showed size-dependent upconversion luminescence (UCL) properties. The inner SiO2 cores in core-shell samples were proved to have limited effect on the total UCL intensities of Er3+ ions. The UCL intensities of core-shell particles were demonstrated much higher than the values obtained in pure Gd2O3:Yb3+/Er3+ with the same phosphor volume. The dependence of the specific area of a UCL shell on the size of its inner SiO2 particle was calculated and analyzed for the first time. It was confirmed that the surface effect came from the outer surfaces of emitting shells is dominant in influencing the UCL property in the core-shell samples. Three-photon UC processes for the green emissions were observed in the samples with small sizes of SiO2 cores. The results of dynamical analysis illustrated that more nonradiative relaxation occurred in the core-shell samples with smaller SiO2 core sizes.

  19. Degradation of oxidized proteins by the proteasome: Distinguishing between the 20S, 26S, and immunoproteasome proteolytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Raynes, Rachel; Pomatto, Laura C D; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome is a ubiquitous and highly plastic multi-subunit protease with multi-catalytic activity that is conserved in all eukaryotes. The most widely known function of the proteasome is protein degradation through the 26S ubiquitin-proteasome system, responsible for the vast majority of protein degradation during homeostasis. However, the proteasome also plays an important role in adaptive immune responses and adaptation to oxidative stress. The unbound 20S proteasome, the core common to all proteasome conformations, is the main protease responsible for degrading oxidized proteins. During periods of acute stress, the 19S regulatory cap of the 26S proteasome disassociates from the proteolytic core, allowing for immediate ATP/ubiquitin-independent protein degradation by the 20S proteasome. Despite the abundance of unbound 20S proteasome compared to other proteasomal conformations, many publications fail to distinguish between the two proteolytic systems and often regard the 26S proteasome as the dominant protease. Further confounding the issue are the differential roles these two proteolytic systems have in adaptation and aging. In this review, we will summarize the increasing evidence that the 20S core proteasome constitutes the major conformation of the proteasome system and that it is far from a latent protease requiring activation by binding regulators. PMID:27155164

  20. Hollow-core photonic crystal fiber based multifunctional optical system for trapping, position sensing, and detection of fluorescent particles.

    PubMed

    Shinoj, V K; Murukeshan, V M

    2012-05-15

    We demonstrate a novel multifunctional optical system that is capable of trapping, imaging, position sensing, and fluorescence detection of micrometer-sized fluorescent test particles using hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF). This multifunctional optical system for trapping, position sensing, and fluorescent detection is designed such that a near-IR laser light is used to create an optical trap across a liquid-filled HC-PCF, and a 473 nm laser is employed as a source for fluorescence excitation. This proposed system and the obtained results are expected to significantly enable an efficient integrated trapping platform employing HC-PCF for diagnostic biomedical applications. PMID:22627511

  1. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  2. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  3. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles. PMID:27121137

  4. Synthesis of polystyrene/polysilsesquioxane core/shell composite particles via emulsion polymerization in the existence of poly(γ-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane) sol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shenglin; Song, Chunfeng; Qiu, Teng; Guo, Longhai; Li, Xiaoyu

    2013-01-01

    Here, we synthesized the polystyrene/polysilsesquioxane (PS/PSQ) core/shell latex particles via emulsion polymerization, which behave as an amusing morphology. First, the nanosized PSQ particles were prepared by the hydrolysis-condensation reaction of γ-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTS) in ethanol medium. Subsequently, the as-obtained methacryloxypropylene functionalized PSQ (PMPTS) sol was directly added into the emulsion system of styrene (St) monomer, and PS/PSQ composite particles with core/shell structure were obtained through emulsion polymerization. We found that the structure of the composite particles can be affected by the synthesis parameters such as reaction time, content of PMPTS added in the reaction, amount of coemulsifier, and the pH value of emulsion system, which were systemically explored by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in this work. These results indicate that the PMPTS particles in the size of about 5 nm could first absorb onto the surface of PS latex particles so as to assemble in a strawberry-like morphology. The further coalescence among the PMPTS particles would result in a continuous PMPTS shell around the PS core. Moreover, the hollow PSQ capsules were prepared after extraction of the PS core by organic solvent, further confirming the core/shell structure of the as-synthesized PS/PMPTS particles. Meanwhile, we also explored the application of the PS/PSQ core/shell particles as a new kind of Pickering emulsifier in the emulsion polymerization of St, and composite particles with complex patchy morphologies have been obtained finally under different ratios of styrene monomer to PS/PMPTS colloidal emulsifier. PMID:23231420

  5. Core and grain boundary sensitivity of tungsten-oxide sensor devices by molecular beam assisted particle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huelser, T. P.; Lorke, A.; Ifeacho, P.; Wiggers, H.; Schulz, C.

    2007-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the synthesis of WO3 and WOx (2.6≥x≤2.8) by adding different concentrations of tungsten hexafluoride (WF6) into a H2/O2/Ar premixed flame within a low-pressure reactor equipped with a particle-mass spectrometer (PMS). The PMS results show that mean particle diameters dp between 5 and 9 nm of the as-synthesized metal-oxides can be obtained by varying the residence time and precursor concentration in the reactor. This result is further validated by N2 adsorption measurements on the particle surface, which yielded a 91 m2/g surface area, corresponding to a spherical particle diameter of 9 nm (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller technique). H2/O2 ratios of 1.6 and 0.63 are selected to influence the stoichiometry of the powders, resulting in blue-colored WOx and white WO3 respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the as-synthesized materials indicates that the powders are mostly amorphous, and the observed broad reflexes can be attributed to the orthorhombic structure of β-WO3. Thermal annealing at 973 K for 3 h in air resulted in crystalline WO3 comprised of both monoclinic and orthorhombic phases. The transmission electron microscope micrograph analysis shows that the particles exhibit spherical morphology with some degree of agglomeration. Impedance spectroscopy is used for the electrical characterization of tungsten-oxide thin films with a thickness of 50 nm. Furthermore, the temperature-dependent gas-sensing properties of the material deposited on interdigital capacitors are investigated. Sensitivity experiments reveal two contributions to the overall sensitivity, which result from the surface and the core of each particle.

  6. Characterization of polymer-silica nanocomposite particles with core-shell morphologies using Monte Carlo simulations and small angle X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Balmer, Jennifer A; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Schmid, Andreas; Armes, Steven P; Fairclough, J Patrick A; Ryan, Anthony J

    2011-07-01

    A two-population model based on standard small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) equations is verified for the analysis of core-shell structures comprising spherical colloidal particles with particulate shells. First, Monte Carlo simulations of core-shell structures are performed to demonstrate the applicability of the model. Three possible shell packings are considered: ordered silica shells due to either charge-dependent repulsive or size-dependent Lennard-Jones interactions or randomly arranged silica particles. In most cases, the two-population model produces an excellent fit to calculated SAXS patterns for the simulated core-shell structures, together with a good correlation between the fitting parameters and structural parameters used for the simulation. The limits of application are discussed, and then, this two-population model is applied to the analysis of well-defined core-shell vinyl polymer/silica nanocomposite particles, where the shell comprises a monolayer of spherical silica nanoparticles. Comprehensive SAXS analysis of a series of poly(styrene-co-n-butyl acrylate)/silica colloidal nanocomposite particles (prepared by the in situ emulsion copolymerization of styrene and n-butyl acrylate in the presence of a glycerol-functionalized silica sol) allows the overall core-shell particle diameter, the copolymer latex core diameter and polydispersity, the mean silica shell thickness, the mean silica diameter and polydispersity, the volume fractions of the two components, the silica packing density, and the silica shell structure to be obtained. These experimental SAXS results are consistent with electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetry, helium pycnometry, and BET surface area studies. The high electron density contrast between the (co)polymer and the silica components, together with the relatively low polydispersity of these core-shell nanocomposite particles, makes SAXS ideally suited for the characterization of this system. Moreover

  7. Hollow and Core-Shell Microgels at Oil-Water Interfaces: Spreading of Soft Particles Reduces the Compressibility of the Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Geisel, Karen; Rudov, Andrey A; Potemkin, Igor I; Richtering, Walter

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the influence of a solid core and of the cross-link density on the compression of microgel particles at oil-water interfaces by means of compression isotherms and computer simulations. We investigate particles with different morphology, namely core-shell particles containing a solid silica core surrounded by a cross-linked polymer shell of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), and the corresponding hollow microgels where the core was dissolved. The polymer shell contains different amounts of cross-linker. The compression isotherms show that the removal of the core leads to an increase of the surface pressure at low compression, and the same effect can be observed when the polymer cross-link density is decreased. Low cross-link density and a missing core thus facilitate spreading of the polymer chains at the interface and, at high compression, hinder the transition to close hexagonal packing. Furthermore, the compression modulus only depends on the cross-link density at low compression, and no difference can be observed between the core-shell particles and the corresponding hollow microgels. It is especially remarkable that a low cross-link density leads to a high compression modulus at low compression, while this behavior is reversed at high compression. Thus, the core does not influence the particle behavior until the polymer shell is highly compressed and the core is directly exposed to the pressure. This is related to an enhanced spreading of polymer chains at the interface and thus high adsorption energy. These conclusions are fully supported by computer simulations which show that the cross-link density of the polymer shell defines the degree of deformation at the interface. Additionally, the core restricts the spreading of polymer chains at the interface. These results illustrate the special behavior of soft microgels at liquid interfaces. PMID:26575794

  8. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the core-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aznar-Siguán, G.; García-Berro, E.; Lorén-Aguilar, P.; Soker, N.; Kashi, A.

    2015-07-01

    The core-degenerate scenario for Type Ia supernovae involves the merger of the hot core of an asymptotic giant branch star and a white dwarf, and might contribute a non-negligible fraction of all thermonuclear supernovae. Despite its potential interest, very few studies, and based on only crude simplifications, have been devoted to investigate this possible scenario, compared with the large efforts invested to study some other scenarios. Here we perform the first three-dimensional simulations of the merger phase, and find that this process can lead to the formation of a massive white dwarf, as required by this scenario. We consider two situations, according to the mass of the circumbinary disc formed around the system during the final stages of the common envelope phase. If the disc is massive enough, the stars merge on a highly eccentric orbit. Otherwise, the merger occurs after the circumbinary disc has been ejected and gravitational wave radiation has brought the stars close enough for the secondary to overflow its Roche lobe radius. Not surprisingly, the overall characteristics of the merger remnants are similar to those found for the double-degenerate scenario, independently of the very different core temperature and of the orbits of the merging stars. They consist of a central massive white dwarf, surrounded by a hot, rapidly rotating corona and a thick debris region.

  9. Synthesis, microstructure and magnetic properties of Fe3Si0.7Al0.3@SiO2 core-shell particles and Fe3Si/Al2O3 soft magnetic composite core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Fan, Xi'an; Wu, Zhaoyang; Li, Guangqiang

    2015-11-01

    Fe3Si0.7Al0.3@SiO2 core-shell particles and Fe3Si/Al2O3 soft magnetic composite core have been synthesized via a modified stöber method combined with following high temperature sintering process. Most of conductive Fe3Si0.7Al0.3 particles could be uniformly coated by insulating SiO2 using the modified stöber method. The Fe3Si0.7Al0.3@SiO2 core-shell particles exhibited good soft magnetic properties with low coercivity and high saturation magnetization. The reaction 4Al+3SiO2=2α-Al2O3+3Si took place during the sintering process. As a result the new Fe3Si/Al2O3 composite was formed. The Fe3Si/Al2O3 composite core displayed more excellent soft magnetic properties, better frequency stability at high frequencies, much higher electrical resistivity and lower core loss than the pure Fe3Si0.7Al0.3 core. The method of introducing insulating layers surrounding magnetic particles provides a promising route to develop new and high compact soft magnetic materials with good magnetic and electric properties.

  10. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of surface-modified nano-sized core/shell tin particles for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmuelling, Guido; Oehl, Nikolas; Knipper, Martin; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna; Plaggenborg, Thorsten; Meyer, Hinrich-Wilhelm; Placke, Tobias; Parisi, Jürgen; Winter, Martin

    2014-09-01

    Tin is able to lithiate and delithiate reversibly with a high theoretical specific capacity, which makes it a promising candidate to supersede graphite as the state-of-the-art negative electrode material in lithium ion battery technology. Nevertheless, it still suffers from poor cycling stability and high irreversible capacities. In this contribution, we show the synthesis of three different nano-sized core/shell-type particles with crystalline tin cores and different amorphous surface shells consisting of SnOx and organic polymers. The spherical size and the surface shell can be tailored by adjusting the synthesis temperature and the polymer reagents in the synthesis, respectively. We determine the influence of the surface modifications with respect to the electrochemical performance and characterize the morphology, structure, and thermal properties of the nano-sized tin particles by means of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and thermogravimetric analysis. The electrochemical performance is investigated by constant current charge/discharge cycling as well as cyclic voltammetry.

  11. The formation of entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations: smoothed particle hydrodynamics versus adaptive mesh refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, C.; Read, J. I.; Hobbs, A.

    2014-06-01

    We simulate cosmological galaxy cluster formation using three different approaches to solving the equations of non-radiative hydrodynamics - classic smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), novel SPH with a higher order dissipation switch (SPHS), and an adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) method. Comparing spherically averaged entropy profiles, we find that SPHS and AMR approaches result in a well-defined entropy core that converges rapidly with increasing mass and force resolution. In contrast, the central entropy profile in the SPH approach is sensitive to the cluster's assembly history and shows poor numerical convergence. We trace this disagreement to the known artificial surface tension in SPH that appears at phase boundaries. Varying systematically numerical dissipation in SPHS, we study the contributions of numerical and physical dissipation to the entropy core and argue that numerical dissipation is required to ensure single-valued fluid quantities in converging flows. However, provided it occurs only at the resolution limit and does not propagate errors to larger scales, its effect is benign - there is no requirement to build `sub-grid' models of unresolved turbulence for galaxy cluster simulations. We conclude that entropy cores in non-radiative galaxy cluster simulations are physical, resulting from entropy generation in shocked gas during cluster assembly.

  12. Construction and Immunological Evaluation of Multivalent Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Core Virus-Like Particles Carrying HBV and HCV Epitopes▿

    PubMed Central

    Sominskaya, Irina; Skrastina, Dace; Dislers, Andris; Vasiljev, Denis; Mihailova, Marija; Ose, Velta; Dreilina, Dzidra; Pumpens, Paul

    2010-01-01

    A multivalent vaccine candidate against hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections was constructed on the basis of HBV core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) as carriers. Chimeric VLPs that carried a virus-neutralizing HBV pre-S1 epitope corresponding to amino acids (aa) 20 to 47 in the major immunodominant region (MIR) and a highly conserved N-terminal HCV core epitope corresponding to aa 1 to 60 at the C terminus of the truncated HBcΔ protein (N-terminal aa 1 to 144 of full-length HBc) were produced in Escherichia coli cells and examined for their antigenicity and immunogenicity. The presence of two different foreign epitopes within the HBc molecule did not interfere with its VLP-forming ability, with the HBV pre-S1 epitope exposed on the surface and the HCV core epitope buried within the VLPs. After immunization of BALB/c mice, specific T-cell activation by both foreign epitopes and a high-titer antibody response against the pre-S1 epitope were found, whereas an antibody response against the HBc carrier was notably suppressed. Both inserted epitopes also induced a specific cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) response, as shown by the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production profile. PMID:20410327

  13. Tandem Fusion of Hepatitis B Core Antigen Allows Assembly of Virus-Like Particles in Bacteria and Plants with Enhanced Capacity to Accommodate Foreign Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Peyret, Hadrien; Gehin, Annick; Thuenemann, Eva C.; Blond, Donatienne; El Turabi, Aadil; Beales, Lucy; Clarke, Dean; Gilbert, Robert J. C.; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.; Holmes, Kris; Stonehouse, Nicola J.; Whelan, Mike; Rosenberg, William; Lomonossoff, George P.; Rowlands, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The core protein of the hepatitis B virus, HBcAg, assembles into highly immunogenic virus-like particles (HBc VLPs) when expressed in a variety of heterologous systems. Specifically, the major insertion region (MIR) on the HBcAg protein allows the insertion of foreign sequences, which are then exposed on the tips of surface spike structures on the outside of the assembled particle. Here, we present a novel strategy which aids the display of whole proteins on the surface of HBc particles. This strategy, named tandem core, is based on the production of the HBcAg dimer as a single polypeptide chain by tandem fusion of two HBcAg open reading frames. This allows the insertion of large heterologous sequences in only one of the two MIRs in each spike, without compromising VLP formation. We present the use of tandem core technology in both plant and bacterial expression systems. The results show that tandem core particles can be produced with unmodified MIRs, or with one MIR in each tandem dimer modified to contain the entire sequence of GFP or of a camelid nanobody. Both inserted proteins are correctly folded and the nanobody fused to the surface of the tandem core particle (which we name tandibody) retains the ability to bind to its cognate antigen. This technology paves the way for the display of natively folded proteins on the surface of HBc particles either through direct fusion or through non-covalent attachment via a nanobody. PMID:25830365

  14. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol saponins inhibit SKOV3 cell migration

    PubMed Central

    LI, BIN; CHEN, DAOMEI; LI, WANYI; XIAO, DAN

    2016-01-01

    While the anti-tumor actions of ginsenosides from Panax notoginseng are well-studied, the anti-proliferative activity of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol saponins (PDS) in Sanchi ginseng on human ovarian cancer has not been reported, nor has its effect on migration of SKOV3 cells been investigated. In the present study, a wound-healing assay indicated that PDS inhibited the migration of SKOV3 cells, and a Matrigel™ tube formation assay demonstrated the presence of inhibitory tube-structures following treatment with PDS. To date, there are no previous reports on the regulation of osteopontin (OPN), a glycophosphoprotein cytokine frequently expressed in ovarian carcinoma effusions by PDS. A reduction in the expression of OPN following PDS-treatment was observed using immunohistochemical and western blot experiments. These results suggest that PDS may be useful in the search for a potential ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26998063

  15. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated with the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.

  16. Nanoscale Au-In alloy-oxide core-shell particles as electrocatalysts for efficient hydroquinone detection

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sutter, E.; Tong, X.; Medina-Plaza, C.; Rodriguez-Mendez, M. L.; Sutter, P.

    2015-10-09

    The presence of hydroquinone (HQ), a phenol ubiquitous in nature and widely used in industry, needs to be monitored because of its toxicity to the environment. Here we demonstrate efficient detection of HQ using simple, fast, and noninvasive electrochemical measurements on indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes modified with nanoparticles comprising bimetallic Au–In cores and mixed Au–In oxide shells. Whereas bare ITO electrodes show very low activity for the detection of HQ, their modification with Au–In core–shell nanoparticles induces a pronounced shift of the oxidation peak to lower potentials, i.e., facilitated oxidation. The response of the different electrodes was correlated withmore » the initial composition of the bimetallic nanoparticle cores, which in turn determined the amount of Au and In stabilized on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells available for the electrochemical reaction. While adding core–shell nanostructures with different compositions of the alloy core facilitates the electrocatalytic (reduction-) oxidation of HQ, the activity is highest for particles with AuIn cores (i.e., a Au:In ratio of 1). This optimal system is found to follow a single pathway, the two-electron oxidation of the quinone–hydroquinone couple, which gives rise to high oxidation peaks and is most effective in facilitating the electrode-to-analyte charge transfer and thus detection. The limits of detection (LOD) decreased when increasing the amount of Au exposed on the surface of the amorphous Au–In oxide shells. As a result the LODs were in the range of 10–5 – 10–6 M and were lower than those obtained using bulk Au.« less

  17. Self-Propelled Particles with Soft-Core Interactions: Patterns, Stability, and Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Orsogna, M. R.; Chuang, Y. L.; Bertozzi, A. L.; Chayes, L. S.

    2006-03-01

    Understanding collective properties of driven particle systems is significant for naturally occurring aggregates and because the knowledge gained can be used as building blocks for the design of artificial ones. We model self-propelling biological or artificial individuals interacting through pairwise attractive and repulsive forces. For the first time, we are able to predict stability and morphology of organization starting from the shape of the two-body interaction. We present a coherent theory, based on fundamental statistical mechanics, for all possible phases of collective motion.

  18. Self-propelled particles with soft-core interactions: patterns, stability, and collapse.

    PubMed

    D' Orsogna, M R; Chuang, Y L; Bertozzi, A L; Chayes, L S

    2006-03-17

    Understanding collective properties of driven particle systems is significant for naturally occurring aggregates and because the knowledge gained can be used as building blocks for the design of artificial ones. We model self-propelling biological or artificial individuals interacting through pairwise attractive and repulsive forces. For the first time, we are able to predict stability and morphology of organization starting from the shape of the two-body interaction. We present a coherent theory, based on fundamental statistical mechanics, for all possible phases of collective motion. PMID:16605738

  19. Silica nanoparticles as the adjuvant for the immunisation of mice using hepatitis B core virus-like particles.

    PubMed

    Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Lieknina, Ilva; Bogans, Janis; Renhofa, Regina; Ose, Velta; Dishlers, Andris; Dekhtyar, Yuri; Pumpens, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology and nanomaterials have facilitated the development of silicon dioxide, or Silica, particles as a promising immunological adjuvant for the generation of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In the present study, we have compared the adjuvanting potential of commercially available Silica nanoparticles (initial particles size of 10-20 nm) with that of aluminium hydroxide, or Alum, as well as that of complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants for the immunisation of BALB/c mice with virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by recombinant full-length Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The induction of B-cell and T-cell responses was studied after immunisation. Silica nanoparticles were able to adsorb maximally 40% of the added HBc, whereas the adsorption capacity of Alum exceeded 90% at the same VLPs/adjuvant ratio. Both Silica and Alum formed large complexes with HBc VLPs that sedimented rapidly after formulation, as detected by dynamic light scattering, spectrophotometry, and electron microscopy. Both Silica and Alum augmented the humoral response against HBc VLPs to the high anti-HBc level in the case of intraperitoneal immunisation, whereas in subcutaneous immunisation, the Silica-adjuvanted anti-HBc level even exceeded the level adjuvanted by Alum. The adjuvanting of HBc VLPs by Silica resulted in the same typical IgG2a/IgG1 ratios as in the case of the adjuvanting by Alum. The combination of Silica with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) led to the same enhancement of the HBc-specific T-cell induction as in the case of the Alum and MPL combination. These findings demonstrate that Silica is not a weaker putative adjuvant than Alum for induction of B-cell and T-cell responses against recombinant HBc VLPs. This finding may have an essential impact on the development of the set of Silica-adjuvanted vaccines based on a long list of HBc-derived virus-like particles as the biological component. PMID:25436773

  20. Silica Nanoparticles as the Adjuvant for the Immunisation of Mice Using Hepatitis B Core Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Lieknina, Ilva; Bogans, Janis; Renhofa, Regina; Ose, Velta; Dishlers, Andris; Dekhtyar, Yuri; Pumpens, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology and nanomaterials have facilitated the development of silicon dioxide, or Silica, particles as a promising immunological adjuvant for the generation of novel prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In the present study, we have compared the adjuvanting potential of commercially available Silica nanoparticles (initial particles size of 10–20 nm) with that of aluminium hydroxide, or Alum, as well as that of complete and incomplete Freund's adjuvants for the immunisation of BALB/c mice with virus-like particles (VLPs) formed by recombinant full-length Hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The induction of B-cell and T-cell responses was studied after immunisation. Silica nanoparticles were able to adsorb maximally 40% of the added HBc, whereas the adsorption capacity of Alum exceeded 90% at the same VLPs/adjuvant ratio. Both Silica and Alum formed large complexes with HBc VLPs that sedimented rapidly after formulation, as detected by dynamic light scattering, spectrophotometry, and electron microscopy. Both Silica and Alum augmented the humoral response against HBc VLPs to the high anti-HBc level in the case of intraperitoneal immunisation, whereas in subcutaneous immunisation, the Silica-adjuvanted anti-HBc level even exceeded the level adjuvanted by Alum. The adjuvanting of HBc VLPs by Silica resulted in the same typical IgG2a/IgG1 ratios as in the case of the adjuvanting by Alum. The combination of Silica with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL) led to the same enhancement of the HBc-specific T-cell induction as in the case of the Alum and MPL combination. These findings demonstrate that Silica is not a weaker putative adjuvant than Alum for induction of B-cell and T-cell responses against recombinant HBc VLPs. This finding may have an essential impact on the development of the set of Silica-adjuvanted vaccines based on a long list of HBc-derived virus-like particles as the biological component. PMID:25436773

  1. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies.

    PubMed

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter (D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) (z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was

  2. Labeling the oily core of nanocapsules and lipid-core nanocapsules with a triglyceride conjugated to a fluorescent dye as a strategy to particle tracking in biological studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiel, Luana Almeida; Contri, Renata Vidor; Bica, Juliane Freitas; Figueiró, Fabrício; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Guterres, Sílvia Stanisçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis of novel fluorescent materials represents a very important step to obtain labeled nanoformulations in order to evaluate their biological behavior. The strategy of conjugating a fluorescent dye with triacylglycerol allows that either particles differing regarding supramolecular structure, i.e., nanoemulsions, nanocapsules, lipid-core nanocapsules, or surface charge, i.e., cationic nanocapsules and anionic nanocapsules, can be tracked using the same labeled material. In this way, a rhodamine B-conjugated triglyceride was obtained to prepare fluorescent polymeric nanocapsules. Different formulations were obtained, nanocapsules (NC) or lipid-core nanocapsules (LNC), using the labeled oil and Eudragit RS100, Eudragit S100, or poly(caprolactone) (PCL), respectively. The rhodamine B was coupled with the ricinolein by activating the carboxylic function using a carbodiimide derivative. Thin layer chromatography, proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy were used to identify the new product. Fluorescent nanocapsule aqueous suspensions were prepared by the solvent displacement method. Their pH values were 4.6 (NC-RS100), 3.5 (NC-S100), and 5.0 (LNC-PCL). The volume-weighted mean diameter ( D 4.3) and polydispersity values were 150 nm and 1.05 (NC-RS100), 350 nm and 2.28 (NC-S100), and 270 nm and 1.67 (LNC-PCL). The mean diameters determined by photon correlation spectroscopy (PCS) ( z-average) were around 200 nm. The zeta potential values were +5.85 mV (NC-RS100), -21.12 mV (NC-S100), and -19.25 mV (LNC-PCL). The wavelengths of maximum fluorescence emission were 567 nm (NC-RS100 and LNC-PCL) and 574 nm (NC-S100). Fluorescence microscopy was used to evaluate the cell uptake (human macrophage cell line) of the fluorescent nanocapsules in order to show the applicability of the approach. When the cells were treated with the fluorescent nanocapsules, red emission was detected

  3. Density functional formulation of the random-phase approximation for inhomogeneous fluids: Application to the Gaussian core and Coulomb particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydel, Derek; Ma, Manman

    2016-06-01

    Using the adiabatic connection, we formulate the free energy in terms of the correlation function of a fictitious system, hλ(r ,r') , in which interactions λ u (r ,r') are gradually switched on as λ changes from 0 to 1. The function hλ(r ,r') is then obtained from the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation and the two equations constitute a general liquid-state framework for treating inhomogeneous fluids. The two equations do not yet constitute a closed set. In the present work we use the closure cλ(r ,r') ≈-λ β u (r ,r') , known as the random-phase approximation (RPA). We demonstrate that the RPA is identical with the variational Gaussian approximation derived within the field-theoretical framework, originally derived and used for charged particles. We apply our generalized RPA approximation to the Gaussian core model and Coulomb charges.

  4. Density functional formulation of the random-phase approximation for inhomogeneous fluids: Application to the Gaussian core and Coulomb particles.

    PubMed

    Frydel, Derek; Ma, Manman

    2016-06-01

    Using the adiabatic connection, we formulate the free energy in terms of the correlation function of a fictitious system, h_{λ}(r,r^{'}), in which interactions λu(r,r^{'}) are gradually switched on as λ changes from 0 to 1. The function h_{λ}(r,r^{'}) is then obtained from the inhomogeneous Ornstein-Zernike equation and the two equations constitute a general liquid-state framework for treating inhomogeneous fluids. The two equations do not yet constitute a closed set. In the present work we use the closure c_{λ}(r,r^{'})≈-λβu(r,r^{'}), known as the random-phase approximation (RPA). We demonstrate that the RPA is identical with the variational Gaussian approximation derived within the field-theoretical framework, originally derived and used for charged particles. We apply our generalized RPA approximation to the Gaussian core model and Coulomb charges. PMID:27415213

  5. Fractal particle size distribution of pulverized fault rocks as a function of distance from the fault core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, Jun; Nakatani, Tsurugi; Nishikawa, Osamu; Nagahama, Hiroyuki

    2015-05-01

    The size distributions of particle in pulverized rocks from the San Andreas fault and the Arima-Takatsuki Tectonic Line were measured. The rocks are characterized by the development of opening mode fractures with an apparent lack of shear. Fragments in the rocks in both fault zones show a fractal size distribution down to the micron scale. Fractal dimensions, dependent on mineral type, decrease from 2.92 to 1.97 with increasing distance normal to the fault core. The fractal dimensions of the rocks are higher than those of both natural and experimentally created fault gouges measured in previous studies. Moreover, the dimensions are higher than the theoretically estimated upper fractal limit under confined comminution. Dimensions close to 3.0 have been reported in impact loading experiments. The observed characteristics indicate that pulverization is likely to have occurred by a dynamic stress pulse with instantaneous volumetric expansion, possibly during seismic rupture propagation similar to impact loading.

  6. Nano-magnetic particles used in biomedicine: core and coating materials.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Z; Karimi, L; Shokrollahi, H

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications have been developed by many researchers. Separation, immunoassay, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermia are enhanced by the use of suitable magnetic nanoparticles and coating materials in the form of ferrofluids. Due to their low biocompatibility and low dispersion in water solutions, nanoparticles that are used for biomedical applications require surface treatment. Various kinds of coating materials including organic materials (polymers), inorganic metals (gold, platinum) or metal oxides (aluminum oxide, cobalt oxide) have been attracted during the last few years. Based on the recent advances and the importance of nanomedicine in human life, this paper attempts to give a brief summary on the different ferrite nano-magnetic particles and coatings used in nanomedicine. PMID:23623057

  7. [Adsorption of Cu on Core-shell Structured Magnetic Particles: Relationship Between Adsorption Performance and Surface Properties].

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-mei; Chen, Jing; Li, Hai-ning; Zhang, Xiao-lei; Zhang, Gao-sheng

    2015-12-01

    In order to reveal the relationship between the adsorption performance of adsorbents and their compositions, structure, and surface properties, the core-shell structured Fe₃O₄/MnO2 and Fe-Mn/Mn₂2 magnetic particles were systematically characterized using multiple techniques and their Cu adsorption behaviors as well as mechanism were also investigated in details. It was found that both Fe₃O4 and Fe-Mn had spinel structure and no obvious crystalline phase change was observed after coating with MnO₂. The introduction of Mn might improve the affinity between the core and the shell, and therefore enhanced the amount and distribution uniformity of the MnO₂ coated. Consequently, Fe-Mn/MnO₂ exhibited a higher BET specific surface area and a lower isoelectric point. The results of sorption experiments showed that Fe-Mn had a higher maximal Cu adsorption capacity of 33.7 mg · g⁻¹ at pH 5.5, compared with 17.5 mg · g⁻¹ of Fe₃O4. After coating, the maximal adsorption capacity of Fe-Mn/MnO₂ was increased to 58.2 mg · g⁻¹, which was 2.6 times as high as that of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ and outperformed the majority of magnetic adsorbents reported in literature. In addition, a specific adsorption of Cu occurred at the surface of Fe₃O₄/MnO₂ or Fe-Mn/MnO₂ through the formation of inner-sphere complexes. In conclusion, the adsorption performance of the magnetic particles was positively related to their compositions, structure, and surface properties. PMID:27011990

  8. Synthesis of 10 nm β-NaYF4:Yb,Er/NaYF4 Core/Shell Upconversion Nanocrystals with 5 nm Particle Cores.

    PubMed

    Rinkel, Thorben; Raj, Athira Naduviledathu; Dühnen, Simon; Haase, Markus

    2016-01-18

    A new method is presented for preparing gram amounts of very small core/shell upconversion nanocrystals without additional codoping of the particles. First, ca. 5 nm β-NaYF4:Yb,Er core particles are formed by the reaction of sodium oleate, rare-earth oleate, and ammonium fluoride, thereby making use of the fact that a high ratio of sodium to rare-earth ions promotes the nucleation of a large number of β-phase seeds. Thereafter, a 2 nm thick NaYF4 shell is formed by using 3-4 nm particles of α-NaYF4 as a single-source precursor for the β-phase shell material. In contrast to the core particles, however, these α-phase particles are prepared with a low ratio of sodium to rare-earth ions, which efficiently suppresses an undesired nucleation of β-NaYF4 particles during shell growth. PMID:26633748

  9. The mutable nature of particle-core excitations with spin in the one-valence-proton nucleus 133Sb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocchi, G.; Leoni, S.; Fornal, B.; Colò, G.; Bortignon, P. F.; Bottoni, S.; Bracco, A.; Michelagnoli, C.; Bazzacco, D.; Blanc, A.; de France, G.; Jentschel, M.; Köster, U.; Mutti, P.; Régis, J.-M.; Simpson, G.; Soldner, T.; Ur, C. A.; Urban, W.; Fraile, L. M.; Lozeva, R.; Belvito, B.; Benzoni, G.; Bruce, A.; Carroll, R.; Cieplicka-Oryǹczak, N.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Didierjean, F.; Jolie, J.; Korten, W.; Kröll, T.; Lalkovski, S.; Mach, H.; Mărginean, N.; Melon, B.; Mengoni, D.; Million, B.; Nannini, A.; Napoli, D.; Olaizola, B.; Paziy, V.; Podolyák, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Saed-Samii, N.; Szpak, B.; Vedia, V.

    2016-09-01

    The γ-ray decay of excited states of the one-valence-proton nucleus 133Sb has been studied using cold-neutron induced fission of 235U and 241Pu targets, during the EXILL campaign at the ILL reactor in Grenoble. By using a highly efficient HPGe array, coincidences between γ-rays prompt with the fission event and those delayed up to several tens of microseconds were investigated, allowing to observe, for the first time, high-spin excited states above the 16.6 μs isomer. Lifetimes analysis, performed by fast-timing techniques with LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, revealed a difference of almost two orders of magnitude in B(M1) strength for transitions between positive-parity medium-spin yrast states. The data are interpreted by a newly developed microscopic model which takes into account couplings between core excitations (both collective and non-collective) of the doubly magic nucleus 132Sn and the valence proton, using the Skyrme effective interaction in a consistent way. The results point to a fast change in the nature of particle-core excitations with increasing spin.

  10. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Santosh P; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D; Govindarajan, J

    2013-02-01

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a = 25 cm and major radius, R = 75 cm) using a 45° parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and ΔE∕E of high-energy channel has been found to be ∼10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature Ti(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically Te(0) ∼ 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here. PMID:23464207

  11. Core-ion temperature measurement of the ADITYA tokamak using passive charge exchange neutral particle energy analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Pandya, Santosh P.; Ajay, Kumar; Mishra, Priyanka; Dhingra, Rajani D.; Govindarajan, J.

    2013-02-15

    Core-ion temperature measurements have been carried out by the energy analysis of passive charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping out of the ADITYA tokamak plasma (minor radius, a= 25 cm and major radius, R= 75 cm) using a 45 Degree-Sign parallel plate electrostatic energy analyzer. The neutral particle analyzer (NPA) uses a gas cell configuration for re-ionizing the CX-neutrals and channel electron multipliers (CEMs) as detectors. Energy calibration of the NPA has been carried out using ion-source and {Delta}E/E of high-energy channel has been found to be {approx}10%. Low signal to noise ratio (SNR) due to VUV reflections on the CEMs was identified during the operation of the NPA with ADITYA plasma discharges. This problem was rectified by upgrading the system by incorporating the additional components and arrangements to suppress VUV radiations and improve its VUV rejection capabilities. The noise rejection capability of the NPA was experimentally confirmed using a standard UV-source and also during the plasma discharges to get an adequate SNR (>30) at the energy channels. Core-ion temperature T{sub i}(0) during flattop of the plasma current has been measured to be up to 150 eV during ohmically heated plasma discharges which is nearly 40% of the average core-electron temperature (typically T{sub e}(0) {approx} 400 eV). The present paper describes the principle of tokamak ion temperature measurement, NPA's design, development, and calibration along with the modifications carried out for minimizing the interference of plasma radiations in the CX-spectrum. Performance of the NPA during plasma discharges and experimental results on the measurement of ion-temperature have also been reported here.

  12. Enhanced photoluminescence properties of methylene blue dye encapsulated in nanosized hydroxyapatite/silica particles with core-shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiaolu; Li, Chengfeng; Fan, Chengyu; Feng, Xiaoxing; Cao, Bingqiang

    2013-11-01

    Organic dye of methylene blue (MB) was encapsulated in core-shell structured hydroxyapatite/silica particles (HAp/silica-MB) through a modified Stöber method with the addition of polyvinylpyrrolidone molecules. It was found that MB molecules were released from HAp/silica-MB at a slower rate than those from silica-MB in deionized water. In phosphate buffered saline (pH: 7.2-7.4) and acidic solutions (pH: 1.5-1.6), the penetration of ions in the interface influenced the interaction between HAp and MB molecules, which resulted in the rapid release of MB molecules from HAp/silica-MB. From the UV-Vis absorbance spectra, one could see that MB molecules in HAp/silica-MB were weakly aggregated in comparison with those in silica-MB. For HAp/silica-MB, enhanced luminescence properties were observed in the photoluminescence spectra and dual luminescence with two emission peaks were caused by the presence of monomers and dimers. Contrarily, no photoluminescence emission was detected for samples of free MB and silica-MB under the same excitation condition because of the self-quenching effect. It was the adsorption of MB molecules on HAp that had resulted in the enlargement of intramolecular distance and the reduction of self-quenching effect. These hybrid particles with enhanced luminescent properties might find wide applications in the field of bioanalysis, bioseparation, and biomedical imaging.

  13. Antiviral Activity of Gold/Copper Sulfide Core/Shell Nanoparticles against Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Broglie, Jessica Jenkins; Alston, Brittny; Yang, Chang; Ma, Lun; Adcock, Audrey F; Chen, Wei; Yang, Liju

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide in a plethora of residential and commercial settings, including restaurants, schools, and hospitals. Methods for easily detecting the virus and for treating and preventing infection are critical to stopping norovirus outbreaks, and inactivation via nanoparticles (NPs) is a more universal and attractive alternative to other physical and chemical approaches. Using norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk) virus-like particles (VLPs) as a model viral system, this study characterized the antiviral activity of Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) against GI.1 VLPs for the rapid inactivation of HuNoV. Inactivation of VLPs (GI.1) by Au/CuS NPs evaluated using an absorbance-based ELISA indicated that treatment with 0.083 μM NPs for 10 min inactivated ~50% VLPs in a 0.37 μg/ml VLP solution and 0.83 μM NPs for 10 min completely inactivated the VLPs. Increasing nanoparticle concentration and/or VLP-NP contact time significantly increased the virucidal efficacy of Au/CuS NPs. Changes to the VLP particle morphology, size, and capsid protein were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The strategy reported here provides the first reported proof-of-concept Au/CuS NPs-based virucide for rapidly inactivating human norovirus. PMID:26474396

  14. Antiviral Activity of Gold/Copper Sulfide Core/Shell Nanoparticles against Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles

    PubMed Central

    Broglie, Jessica Jenkins; Alston, Brittny; Yang, Chang; Ma, Lun; Adcock, Audrey F.; Chen, Wei; Yang, Liju

    2015-01-01

    Human norovirus is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide in a plethora of residential and commercial settings, including restaurants, schools, and hospitals. Methods for easily detecting the virus and for treating and preventing infection are critical to stopping norovirus outbreaks, and inactivation via nanoparticles (NPs) is a more universal and attractive alternative to other physical and chemical approaches. Using norovirus GI.1 (Norwalk) virus-like particles (VLPs) as a model viral system, this study characterized the antiviral activity of Au/CuS core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) against GI.1 VLPs for the rapid inactivation of HuNoV. Inactivation of VLPs (GI.1) by Au/CuS NPs evaluated using an absorbance-based ELISA indicated that treatment with 0.083 μM NPs for 10 min inactivated ~50% VLPs in a 0.37 μg/ml VLP solution and 0.83 μM NPs for 10 min completely inactivated the VLPs. Increasing nanoparticle concentration and/or VLP-NP contact time significantly increased the virucidal efficacy of Au/CuS NPs. Changes to the VLP particle morphology, size, and capsid protein were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot analysis. The strategy reported here provides the first reported proof-of-concept Au/CuS NPs-based virucide for rapidly inactivating human norovirus. PMID:26474396

  15. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications

    PubMed Central

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications. PMID:26113394

  16. Preparation by alkaline treatment and detailed characterisation of empty hepatitis B virus core particles for vaccine and gene therapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strods, Arnis; Ose, Velta; Bogans, Janis; Cielens, Indulis; Kalnins, Gints; Radovica, Ilze; Kazaks, Andris; Pumpens, Paul; Renhofa, Regina

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) virus-like particles (VLPs) are one of the most powerful protein engineering tools utilised to expose immunological epitopes and/or cell-targeting signals and for the packaging of genetic material and immune stimulatory sequences. Although HBc VLPs and their numerous derivatives are produced in highly efficient bacterial and yeast expression systems, the existing purification and packaging protocols are not sufficiently optimised and standardised. Here, a simple alkaline treatment method was employed for the complete removal of internal RNA from bacteria- and yeast-produced HBc VLPs and for the conversion of these VLPs into empty particles, without any damage to the VLP structure. The empty HBc VLPs were able to effectively package the added DNA and RNA sequences. Furthermore, the alkaline hydrolysis technology appeared efficient for the purification and packaging of four different HBc variants carrying lysine residues on the HBc VLP spikes. Utilising the introduced lysine residues and the intrinsic aspartic and glutamic acid residues exposed on the tips of the HBc spikes for chemical coupling of the chosen peptide and/or nucleic acid sequences ensured a standard and easy protocol for the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications.

  17. Wrinkle-assisted linear assembly of hard-core/soft-shell particles: impact of the soft shell on the local structure.

    PubMed

    Müller, Mareen; Karg, Matthias; Fortini, Andrea; Hellweg, Thomas; Fery, Andreas

    2012-04-01

    This article addresses wrinkle assisted assembly of core-shell particles with hard cores and soft poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) shells. As core materials we chose silica as well as silver nanoparticles. The assembled structures show that the soft shells act as a separator between the inorganic cores. Anisotropic alignment is found on two length scales, macroscopically guided through the wrinkle structure and locally due to deformation of the polymer shell leading to smaller inter-core separations as compared to assembly on flat substrates without confinement. The structures were analysed by means of scanning electron microscopy. Radial distribution functions are shown, clearly highlighting the impact of confinement on nearest neighbour distances and symmetry. The observed ordering is directly compared to Monte-Carlo simulations for hard-core/soft-shell particles, showing that the observed symmetries are a consequence of the soft interaction potential and differ qualitatively from a hard-sphere situation. For the silver-poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) particles, we show UV-vis absorbance measurements revealing optical anisotropy of the generated structures due to plasmon coupling. Furthermore, the high degree of order of the assembled structures on macroscopic areas is demonstrated by laser diffraction effects. PMID:22395669

  18. Preparation and characterization of polymer electrolyte membranes based on silicon-containing core-shell structured nanocomposite latex particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shuangling; Sun, Chenggang; Gao, Yushan; Cui, Xuejun

    2015-09-01

    A series of silicon-containing core-shell structured polyacrylate/2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (SiO2-CS-PA/A) nanocomposite latex particles are prepared by the emulsifier-free emulsion polymerization of acrylate monomers and various amount of 2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid (AMPS) with colloidal nanosilica particles as seed. The chemical and morphological structures of latex particles with high monomer conversion are determined using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The SiO2-CS-PA/A nanocomposite membranes are fabricated through pouring the latex onto a clean surface of glass and drying at 60 °C for 10 h and 120 °C for 2 h. The nanocomposite membranes possess good thermal and dimensional stability. In addition, in comparison to Nafion® 117, the nanocomposite membranes exhibit moderate proton conductivity, significantly better methanol barrier and selectivity. The methanol diffusion coefficient is in the range of 1.03 × 10-8 to 5.26 × 10-8 cm2 s-1 which is about two orders of magnitude lower than that of Nafion® 117 (2.36 × 10-6 cm2 s-1). The SiO2-CS-PA/A 5 membrane shows the highest selectivity value (2.34 × 105 S cm-3) which is approximately 11.0 times of that (2.13 × 104 S cm-3) of Nafion® 117. These results indicate that the nanocomposite membranes are promising candidates to be used as polymer electrolyte membranes in direct methanol fuel cells.

  19. Controlled delivery of stromal derived factor-1α from poly lactic-co-glycolic acid core-shell particles to recruit mesenchymal stem cells for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zamani, Maedeh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Thian, Eng San; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2015-08-01

    Stromal derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) has shown promising results in treatment of myocardial infarction (MI), via recruitment of endogenous stem cells into the injured myocardium. However, the bioactivity of this susceptible signalling chemokine is reduced significantly during the common fabrication processes of drug delivery systems, due to the exposure to organic-aqueous interfaces or elevated temperature. In this study, we developed a novel SDF-1α delivery system using coaxial electrospraying, the technique which enables fabrication of core-shell particles with minimized contact of organic-aqueous phases. The SDF-1α incorporated PLGA particles exhibited distinct core-shell structure, confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Controlled release of SDF-1α was obtained for at least 40days, and the release rate was tailored by co-encapsulation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) into the core of the particles. The SDF-1α released from PLGA/SDF-1α and PLGA/BSA-SDF-1α particles retained its chemotactic activity, and enhanced the number of migrated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by 38% and 54%, respectively, compared to basal medium used as the control. Moreover, both SDF-1α and BSA supported the proliferation of MSCs within 3days of cell culture. The SDF-1α incorporated core-shell particles developed by electrospraying technique, can be effectively employed as injectable drug delivery system for in situ cardiac regeneration. PMID:25897850

  20. Fabrication of rattle-type TiO2/SiO2 core/shell particles with both high photoactivity and UV-shielding property.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yuan; Chen, Min; Zhang, Yang; Wu, Limin

    2010-07-01

    Rattle-type TiO(2)@void@SiO(2) particles, with commercial TiO(2) particles encapsulated into hollow SiO(2) shell, were fabricated by successive coating of multilayer polyelectrolytes and SiO(2) shell onto TiO(2) particles and then treatment by UV irradiation to remove the polyelectrolyte layers. TEM observation showed that the composite particles had a unique rattle-type structure in which there existed void space between TiO(2) core and SiO(2) shell. The photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B indicated that these composite particles with larger void space tended to have higher photoactivity. The polyurethane films doped with rattle-type TiO(2)@void@SiO(2) composite particles had very good UV-shielding property. PMID:20536170

  1. Broadband and Low-Loss Plasmonic Light Trapping in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using Micrometer-Scale Rodlike and Spherical Core-Shell Plasmonic Particles.

    PubMed

    Malekshahi Byranvand, Mahdi; Nemati Kharat, Ali; Taghavinia, Nima; Dabirian, Ali

    2016-06-29

    Dielectric scattering particles have widely been used as embedded scattering elements in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) to improve the optical absorption of the device. Here we systematically study rodlike and spherical core-shell silica@Ag particles as more effective alternatives to the dielectric scattering particles. The wavelength-scale silica@Ag particles with sufficiently thin Ag shell support hybrid plasmonic-photonic resonance modes that have low parasitic absorption losses and a broadband optical response. Both of these features lead to their successful deployment in light trapping in high-efficiency DSCs. Optimized rodlike silica@Ag@silica particles improve the power conversion efficiency of a DSC from 6.33 to 8.91%. The dimension, surface morphology, and concentration of these particles are optimized to achieve maximal efficiency enhancement. The rodlike silica particles are prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis process and then are coated with Ag in a liquid-phase deposition process by reducing an Ag salt. The aspect ratio of silica rods is tuned by adjusting the temperature and duration of the growth process, whereas the morphology of Ag shell is tailored by controlling the reduction rate of Ag salt, where slower reduction in a polyol process gives a smoother Ag shell. Using optical calculations, the superior performance of the plasmonic core-shell particles is related to the large number of hybrid photonic-plasmonic resonance modes that they support. PMID:27300764

  2. Particle image velocimetry measurements in a representative gas-cooled prismatic reactor core model for the estimation of bypass flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conder, Thomas E.

    Core bypass flow is considered one of the largest contributors to uncertainty in fuel temperature within the Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR). It refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial regions between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. These flows are of concern because they reduce the desired flow rates in the coolant channels, and thereby have significant influence on the maximum fuel element and coolant exit temperatures. Thus, accurate prediction of the bypass flow is important because it directly impacts core temperature, influencing the life and efficiency of the reactor. An experiment was conducted at Idaho National Laboratory to quantify the flow in the coolant channels in relation to the interstitial gaps between fuel blocks in a representative MHTGR core. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the flow fields within a simplified model, which comprised of a stacked junction of six partial fuel blocks with nine coolant tubes, separated by a 6mm gap width. The model had three sections: The upper plenum, upper block, and lower block. Model components were fabricated from clear, fused quartz where optical access was needed for the PIV measurements. Measurements were taken in three streamwise locations: in the upper plenum and in the midsection of the large and small fuel blocks. A laser light sheet was oriented parallel to the flow, while velocity fields were measured at millimeter intervals across the width of the model, totaling 3,276 PIV measurement locations. Inlet conditions were varied to incorporate laminar, transition, and turbulent flows in the coolant channels---all which produced laminar flow in the gap and non-uniform, turbulent flow in the upper plenum. The images were analyzed to create vector maps, and the data was exported for processing and compilation. The bypass flow was estimated by calculating the flow rates through the coolant

  3. Noble Gas and Mineralogical Tracers of Interplanetary Dust Particles and Impact Debris in a Central Pacific Sediment Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T. H.; Poreda, R. J.

    2005-12-01

    Thirty-five deep ocean sediment samples from the Central Pacific sediment core LL-44 GPC-3 were examined for their noble gas composition and mineralogy. The samples spanned from 30 to 71 Ma in age, including the Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T), Paleocene/Eocene (P/E), and Eocene/Oligocene (E/O) boundaries. From each bulk sediment sample, magnetic grains (5-200 μg/g; 1-20 μm diameter) were isolated and analyzed. Noble gas measurements determined the helium and neon isotopic compositions and the abundance of extra-terrestrial (ET) noble gases for the bulk and magnetic fractions. 3He/4He ratios of 3.1x10-4 and 20Ne/22Ne ratios of 9.96-12.62 are consistent with the SEP (solar energetic particle) signature seen in both zero-age magnetic grains (Z-MAG) from the central Pacific sediments and stratospheric interplanetary dust particles (IDPs). The isolated magnetic fraction typically consisted of less than 1% of the bulk sample while accounting for 3 to 10% of the bulk sediment 3He with a maximum of 40% at K/T boundary. The magnetic isolates revealed no significant differences of 3He/4He, 20Ne/22Ne, or (3He/20Ne)solar from the bulk GPC-3 sediments or Z-MAG grains. No temporal variation in He or Ne or anomalous gas signatures associated with the boundaries present within this time interval was observed. Scanning electron microscope analysis was utilized to determine the mineralogy of the magnetic isolates in an effort to distinguish between the continuous flux of interplanetary dust particles and the flux associated with major impact events. This information may also assist in determining the carrier phase of ET noble gases. Anomalously high Ni, Mg, Al, and Cr compositions combined with low or nonexistent abundances of titanium can distinguish extraterrestrial spinel grains from terrestrial spinel. The SEM analysis revealed stark contrasts in composition and morphology in the samples associated with the boundaries included in this study. A survey of ``background'' samples

  4. Incorporation of deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides by a dNTP-binding cleft mutated reverse transcriptase in hepatitis B virus core particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hee-Young; Kim, Hye-Young; Jung, Jaesung; Park, Sun; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2008-01-05

    Our recent observation that hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA polymerase (P) might initiate minus-strand DNA synthesis without primer [Kim et al., (2004) Virology 322, 22-30], raised a possibility that HBV P protein may have the potential to function as an RNA polymerase. Thus, we mutated Phe 436, a bulky amino acid with aromatic side chain, at the putative dNTP-binding cleft in reverse transcriptase (RT) domain of P protein to smaller amino acids (Gly or Val), and examined RNA polymerase activity. HBV core particles containing RT dNTP-binding cleft mutant P protein were able to incorporate {sup 32}P-ribonucleotides, but not HBV core particles containing wild type (wt), priming-deficient mutant, or RT-deficient mutant P proteins. Since all the experiments were conducted with core particles isolated from transfected cells, our results indicate that the HBV RT mutant core particles containing RT dNTP-binding cleft mutant P protein could incorporate both deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides in replicating systems.

  5. Comprehensive untargeted lipidomic analysis using core-shell C30 particle column and high field orbitrap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Narváez-Rivas, Mónica; Zhang, Qibin

    2016-04-01

    The goal of untargeted lipidomics is to have high throughput, yet comprehensive and unambiguous identification and quantification of lipids. Novel stationary phases in LC separation and new mass spectrometric instruments capable of high mass resolving power and faster scanning rate are essential to achieving this goal. In this work, 4 reversed phase LC columns coupled with a high field quadrupole orbitrap mass spectrometer (Q Exactive HF) were thoroughly compared using complex lipid standard mixture and rat plasma and liver samples. A good separation of all lipids was achieved in 24min of gradient. The columns compared include C30 and C18 functionalization on either core-shell or totally porous silica particles, with size ranging from 1.7 to 2.6μm. Accucore C30 column showed the narrowest peaks and highest theoretical plate number, and excellent peak capacity and retention time reproducibility (<1% standard deviation). As a result, it resulted in 430 lipid species identified from rat plasma and rat liver samples with highest confidence. The high resolution offered by the up-front RPLC allowed discrimination of cis/trans isomeric lipid species, and the high field orbitrap mass spectrometer afforded the clear distinction of isobaric lipid species in full scan MS and the unambiguous assignment of sn-positional isomers for lysophospholipids in MS/MS. Taken together, the high efficiency LC separation and high mass resolving MS analysis are very promising tools for untargeted lipidomics analysis. PMID:26928874

  6. Chimeric Derivatives of Hepatitis B Virus Core Particles Carrying Major Epitopes of the Rubella Virus E1 Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Skrastina, Dace; Petrovskis, Ivars; Petraityte, Rasa; Sominskaya, Irina; Ose, Velta; Liekniņa, Ilva; Bogans, Janis; Sasnauskas, Kestutis

    2013-01-01

    Three variants of the major rubella virus (RV) E1 protein virus-neutralizing epitope from position 214 to 285 were exposed on the hepatitis B virus (HBV) C-terminally truncated core (HBcΔ) in a virus-like particle (VLP) vector and were produced in Escherichia coli. All three chimeras demonstrated VLPs in bacterial cell lysates, but only HBcΔ-E1(245-285) demonstrated the correct VLP structure after purification. The other chimeras, HBcΔ-E1(214-285) and HBcΔ-E1(214-240), appeared after purification as non-VLP aggregates of 100 to 900 nm in diameter according to dynamic light scattering data. All three variants possessed the intrinsic antigenic activity of RV E1, since they were recognized by natural human anti-RV E1 antibodies and induced an anti-RV E1 response in mice. HBcΔ-E1(214-240) and HBcΔ-E1(245-285) can be regarded as prototypes for a putative RV vaccine because they were able to induce antibodies recognizing natural RV E1 protein in RV diagnostic kits. PMID:24006140

  7. Assessment of the sensitivity of core / shell parameters derived using the single-particle soot photometer to density and refractive index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J. W.; Allan, J. D.; Liu, D.; Flynn, M.; Weber, R.; Zhang, X.; Lefer, B. L.; Grossberg, N.; Flynn, J.; Coe, H.

    2015-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the dominant absorbing aerosol in the atmosphere, and plays an important role in climate and human health. The optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of soot depend on the amounts (both relative and absolute) of BC and non-refractory material in the particles. Mixing between these two components is often represented in models by a core / shell coated sphere. The single-particle soot photometer (SP2) is one of, if not the only, instrument capable of reporting distributions of both core size and coating thickness. Most studies combine the SP2's incandescence and 1064 nm scattering data to report coating properties, but to date there is no consistency in the assumed values of density and refractive index of the core that are used in these calculations, which can greatly affect the reported parameters such as coating thickness. Given that such data are providing an important constraint for model comparisons and comparison between large data sets, it is important that this lack of consistency is addressed. In this study we explore the sensitivity of the reported coatings to these parameters. An assessment of the coating properties of freshly emitted, thermodenuded ambient particles demonstrated that a core density of 1.8 g cm-3 and refractive index of (2.26-1.26i) were the most appropriate to use with ambient soot in the Los Angeles area. Using these parameters generated a distribution with median shell / core ratio of 1.02 ± 0.11, corresponding to a median absolute coating thickness of 2 ± 8 nm. The main source of statistical error in the single-particle data was random variation in the incandescence signals. Other than the sensitivity to core refractive index, the incandescence calibration was the main source of uncertainty when optically determining the average coatings. The refractive index of coatings was found to have only a minor influence. This work demonstrates that using this technique the SP2 can accurately

  8. Particle distributions in approximately 10(14) 10(16) eV air shower cores at sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodson, A. L.; Ash, A. G.; Bull, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental evidence is reported for fixed distances (0, 1.0, 2.5 and 4.0 m) from the shower centers and for core flattening. The cores become flatter, on average, as the shower size (primary energy) increases. With improved statistics on 4192 cores, the previous results are exactly confirmed.

  9. Halophilic 20S Proteasomes of the Archaeon Haloferax volcanii: Purification, Characterization, and Gene Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather L.; Aldrich, Henry C.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    1999-01-01

    as cylindrical particles of four stacked rings of 600 kDa with CL activity rates similar to the α1β-proteasome, suggesting that at least two separate 20S proteasomes are synthesized. This study is the first description of a prokaryote which produces two separate 20S proteasomes and suggests that there may be distinct physiological roles for the two different α subunits in this halophilic archaeon. PMID:10482525

  10. Core-Shell Soy Protein-Soy Polysaccharide Complex (Nano)particles as Carriers for Improved Stability and Sustained Release of Curcumin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fei-Ping; Ou, Shi-Yi; Tang, Chuan-He

    2016-06-22

    Using soy protein isolate (SPI) and soy-soluble polysaccharides (SSPS) as polymer matrixes, this study reported a novel process to fabricate unique core-shell complex (nano)particles to perform as carriers for curcumin (a typical poorly soluble bioactive). In the process, curcumin-SPI nanocomplexes were first formed at pH 7.0 and then coated by SSPS. At this pH, the core-shell complex was formed in a way the SPI nanoparticles might be incorporated into the interior of SSPS molecules without distinctly affecting the size and morphology of particles. The core-shell structure was distinctly changed by adjusting pH from 7.0 to 4.0. At pH 4.0, SSPS was strongly bound to the surface of highly aggregated SPI nanoparticles, and as a consequence, much larger complexes were formed. The bioaccessibility of curcumin in the SPI-curcumin complexes was unaffected by the SSPS coating. However, the core-shell complex formation greatly improved the thermal stability and controlled release properties of encapsulated curcumin. The improvement was much better at pH 4.0 than that at pH 7.0. All of the freeze-dried core-shell complex preparations exhibited good redispersion behavior. The findings provide a simple approach to fabricate food-grade delivery systems for improved water dispersion, heat stability, and even controlled release of poorly soluble bioactives. PMID:27243766

  11. Subunit Protein Vaccine Delivery System for Tuberculosis Based on Hepatitis B Virus Core VLP (HBc-VLP) Particles.

    PubMed

    Dhanasooraj, Dhananjayan; Kumar, R Ajay; Mundayoor, Sathish

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of modern medicine, tuberculosis (TB), caused by the pathogenic bacterium, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), remains one of the deadliest diseases. This bacterium can lay dormant in individuals and get activated when immunity goes down and has also shown considerable prowess in mutating into drug resistant forms. The global emergence of such drug resistant Mtb and the lack of efficacy of Bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG), the only vaccine available so far, have resulted in a situation which cries out for a safe and effective tuberculosis vaccine.Number of different strategies has been used for developing new anti-TB vaccines and several protective antigens have been identified so far. One strategy, the use of protein subunits, has the potential to develop into a powerful tuberculosis vaccine, not only because of its efficacy and safety, but also because they are economical. The proper delivery of protein subunit vaccines with adjuvants or novel delivery systems is necessary for inducing protective immune responses. The available adjuvants or delivery systems are inadequate for generating such a response. In the present method, we have constructed a vaccine delivery system for tuberculosis based on Virus-Like Particles (VLPs). Hepatitis B Virus core antigen gene was recombinantly modified using Overlap Extension PCR (OEPCR). The final construct was designed to express HBc-VLP carrying external antigen (fusion VLP). Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen CFP-10 was used for the construction of fusion VLP. The recombinant gene for the construct was cloned into a pET expression system and transformed into E. coli BL21(DE3) and induced with IPTG to express the protein. The fusion protein was purified using the Histidine tag and allowed to form VLPs. The preformed VLPs were purified by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The VLPs were characterized using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). PMID:27076312

  12. Surface protein imprinted core-shell particles for high selective lysozyme recognition prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinran; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Jianxi; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-12-24

    A novel kind of lysozyme (Lys) surface imprinted core-shell particles was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) strategy. With controllable polymer shell chain length, such particles showed obviously improved selectivity for protein recognition. After the RAFT initial agent and template protein was absorbed on silica particles, the prepolymerization solution, with methacrylic acid and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate as the monomers, and N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) as the cross-linker, was mixed with the silica particles, and the polymerization was performed at 40 °C in aqueous phase through the oxidation-reduction initiation. Ater polymerization, with the template protein removal and destroying dithioester groups with hexylamine, the surface Lyz imprinted particles were obtained with controllable polymer chain length. The binding capacity of the Lys imprinted particles could reach 5.6 mg protein/g material, with the imprinting factor (IF) as 3.7, whereas the IF of the control material prepared without RAFT strategy was only 1.6. The absorption equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Moreover, Lys could be selectively recognized by the imprinted particles from both a four-proteins mixture and egg white sample. All these results demonstrated that these particles prepared by RAFT strategy are promising to achieve the protein recognition with high selectivity. PMID:25434676

  13. Rapid determination of parabens in seafood sauces by high-performance liquid chromatography: A practical comparison of core-shell particles and sub-2 μm fully porous particles.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jing; Cao, Xiaoji; Cheng, Zhuo; Qin, Ye; Lu, Yanbin

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the chromatographic performance of superficially porous particles (Halo core-shell C18 column, 50 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.7 μm) was compared with that of sub-2 μm fully porous particles (Acquity BEH C18 , 50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.7 μm). Four parabens, methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben, and butylparaben, were used as representative compounds for calculating the plate heights in a wide flow rate range and analyzed on the basis of the Van Deemter and Knox equations. Theoretical Poppe plots were constructed for each column to compare their kinetic performance. Both phases gave similar minimum plate heights when using nonreduced coordinates. Meanwhile, the flat C-term of the core-shell column provided the possibilities for applying high flow rates without significant loss in efficiency. The low backpressure of core-shell particles allowed this kind of column, especially compatible with conventional high-performance liquid chromatography systems. Based on these factors, a simple high-performance liquid chromatography method was established and validated for the determination of parabens in various seafood sauces using the Halo core-shell C18 column for separation. PMID:26383987

  14. Mechanochemical surface functionalisation of superparamagnetic microparticles with in situ formed crystalline metal-complexes: a fast novel core-shell particle formation method.

    PubMed

    Brede, F A; Mandel, K; Schneider, M; Sextl, G; Müller-Buschbaum, K

    2015-05-21

    An innovative mechanochemical method is reported for the in situ formation of crystalline metal-complexes on the surface of superparamagnetic nanocomposite microparticles. The process is demonstrated for coating Fe3O4 multicore-silica matrix particles with the 1,2,4-1H-triazole complex [ZnCl2(TzH)2]. The use of mechanochemistry demonstrates a flexible process to obtain functional shells on magnetic particle cores without the need for complicated surface-functionalisation reactions in solution. Simple mixing of the desired shell-precursors ZnCl2 and 1,2,4-1H-triazole (TzH) with the magnetic particles in a ball mill is sufficient to tailor the particle surfaces with novel functionalities while retaining the superparamagnetic behaviour. PMID:25907694

  15. Detection and Tracking of Dual-Labeled HIV Particles Using Wide-Field Live Cell Imaging to Follow Viral Core Integrity.

    PubMed

    Mamede, João I; Hope, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging is a valuable technique that allows the characterization of the dynamic processes of the HIV-1 life cycle. Here, we present a method of production and imaging of dual-labeled HIV viral particles that allows the visualization of two events. Varying release of the intravirion fluid phase marker reveals virion fusion and the loss of the integrity of HIV viral cores with the use of live wide-field fluorescent microscopy. PMID:26714704

  16. Formulation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol nanocrystals to improve oral bioavailability and brain delivery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Wang, Lisha; Cao, Fangrui; Miao, Xiaoqing; Chen, Tongkai; Chang, Qi; Zheng, Ying

    2016-01-30

    The aim of this study was to fabricate 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) nanocrystals to improve PPD's oral bioavailability and brain delivery. PPD nanocrystals were fabricated using an anti-solvent precipitation approach where d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS) was optimized as the stabilizer. The fabricated nanocrystals were nearly spherical with a particle size and drug loading of 90.44 ± 1.45 nm and 76.92%, respectively. They are in the crystalline state and stable at 4°C for at least 1 month. More than 90% of the PPD could be rapidly released from the nanocrystals, which was much faster than the physical mixture and PPD powder. PPD nanocrystals demonstrated comparable permeability to solution at 2.52 ± 0.44×10(-5)cm/s on MDCK monolayers. After oral administration of PPD nanocrystals to rats, PPD was absorbed quickly into the plasma and brain with significantly higher Cmax and AUC0-t compared to those of the physical mixture. However, no brain targeting was observed, as the ratios of the plasma AUC0-t to brain AUC0-t for the two groups were similar. In summary, PPD nanocrystals are a potential oral delivery system to improve PPD's poor bioavailability and its delivery into the brain for neurodegenerative disease and intracranial tumor therapies in the future. PMID:26680316

  17. Microagglomeration of pulverized pharmaceutical powders using the Wurster process I. Preparation of highly drug-incorporated, subsieve-sized core particles for subsequent microencapsulation by film-coating.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, H; Fukumori, Y

    1999-04-15

    A novel agglomeration process of pulverized pharmaceutical powders into subsieve-sized agglomerates (microagglomeration) was designed for manufacturing highly drug-incorporated core particles for subsequent microencapsulation by film-coating. The microagglomeration of pulverized phenacetin powder, whose mass median diameter was 9 microm, was performed by spraying an aqueous colloidal dispersion of acrylic polymer, Eudragit(R) RS30D, as a binding/coating agent using a spouted bed assisted with a draft tube (the Wurster process), and the effect of process variables was examined. An appropriate spray liquid flow rate made it possible to produce microagglomerates of 20-50 microm with 60% yield. However, 10% of the product still survived as particles smaller than 10 microm even at the elevated liquid flow rate. In contrast, the survived particles smaller than 10 microm tended to be predominantly reduced to 2%, while coarse agglomerates larger than 53 microm were not excessively produced, by additionally setting a fixed bed of glass beads in the spouted bed apparatus. The length of the draft tube influenced compaction of the agglomerates as well as their surface-smoothening. Equipping the fixed bed of the glass beads and the long draft tube in the spouted bed allowed us to prepare microagglomerates of 20-50 microm at yield of 55% applicable as highly drug-incorporated, free-flowing, surface-smoothed, narrowly size-distributed core particles for subsequent microencapsulation by film-coating. PMID:10370190

  18. Low power loss and field-insensitive permeability of Fe-6.5%Si powder cores with manganese oxide-coated particles

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Junnan E-mail: rzhgong@hust.edu.cn; Wang, Xian; Xu, Xiaojun; Gong, Rongzhou E-mail: rzhgong@hust.edu.cn; Feng, Zekun; Chen, Yajie; Harris, V. G.

    2015-05-07

    Fe-6.5%Si alloy powders coated with manganese oxides using an innovative in situ process were investigated. The in-situ coating of the insulating oxides was realized with a KMnO{sub 4} solution by a chemical process. The insulating manganese oxides with mixed valance state were verified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. The thickness of the insulating layer on alloy particles was determined to be in a range of 20–210 nm, depending upon the KMnO{sub 4} concentration. The powder core loss and the change in permeability under a DC-bias field were measured at frequencies ranging from 50 to 100 kHz. The experiments indicated that the Fe-6.5%Si powder cores with a 210 nm-thick manganese oxide layer not only showed a low core loss of 459 mW/cm{sup 3} at 100 kHz but also showed a small reduction in permeability (μ(H)/μ(0) = 85% for μ = 42) at a DC-bias field of 80 Oe. This work has defined a novel pathway to realizing low core loss and field-insensitive permeability for Fe-Si powder cores.

  19. Maturation of the viral core enhances the fusion of HIV-1 particles with primary human T cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Jiyang; Aiken, Christopher . E-mail: chris.aiken@vanderbilt.edu

    2006-03-15

    HIV-1 infection requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes in a reaction catalyzed by the viral envelope proteins gp120 and gp41. We recently reported that efficient HIV-1 particle fusion with target cells is linked to maturation of the viral core by an activity of the gp41 cytoplasmic domain. Here, we show that maturation enhances the fusion of a variety of recombinant viruses bearing primary and laboratory-adapted Env proteins with primary human CD4{sup +} T cells. Overall, HIV-1 fusion was more dependent on maturation for viruses bearing X4-tropic envelope proteins than for R5-tropic viruses. Fusion of HIV-1 with monocyte-derived macrophages was also dependent on particle maturation. We conclude that the ability to couple fusion to particle maturation is a common feature of HIV-1 Env proteins and may play an important role during HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  20. Construction and immunological evaluation of truncated hepatitis B core particles carrying HBsAg amino acids 119-152 in the major immunodominant region (MIR).

    PubMed

    Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao; Guo, Minzhuo; Qiu, Feng; Jia, Zhiyuan; Lu, Xuexin; Meng, Qingling; Bi, Shengli

    2013-09-13

    Hepatitis B capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli can reassemble into icosahedral particles, which could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of foreign epitopes, especially those inserted into its major immunodominant region. Herein, we inserted the entire 'α' antigenic determinant amino acids (aa) 119-152 of HBsAg into the truncated HBc (aa 1-144), between Asp(78) and Pro(79). Prokaryotic expression showed that the mosaic HBc was mainly in the form of inclusion bodies. After denaturation with urea, it was dialyzed progressively for protein renaturation. We observed that before and after renaturation, mosaic HBc was antigenic as determined by HBsAg ELISA and a lot of viruslike particles were observed after renaturation. Thus, we further purified the mosaic viruslike particles by (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, DEAE chromatography, and Sepharose 4FF chromatography. Negative staining electron microscopy demonstrated the morphology of the viruslike particles. Immunization of Balb/c mice with mosaic particles induced the production of anti-HBs antibody and Th1 cell immune response supported by ELISPOT and CD4/CD8 proportions assay. In conclusion, we constructed mosaic hepatitis core particles displaying the entire 'α' antigenic determinant on the surface and laid a foundation for researching therapeutic hepatits B vaccines. PMID:23969156

  1. Multi-responsive hybrid particles: thermo-, pH-, photo-, and magneto-responsive magnetic hydrogel cores with gold nanorod optical triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittikulsittichai, Supparesk; Kolhatkar, Arati G.; Sarangi, Subhasis; Vorontsova, Maria A.; Vekilov, Peter G.; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Randall Lee, T.

    2016-06-01

    The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications.The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Contains detailed information about the synthesis of

  2. Construction and immunological evaluation of truncated hepatitis B core particles carrying HBsAg amino acids 119–152 in the major immunodominant region (MIR)

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Qiudong; Yi, Yao; Guo, Minzhuo; Qiu, Feng; Jia, Zhiyuan; Lu, Xuexin; Meng, Qingling; Bi, Shengli

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •The conformational HBV neutralization antigen domain was successfully displayed on the surface of truncated HBc particles. •Appropriate dialysis procedures to support the renaturing environment for the protein refolding. •Efficient purification procedures to obtain high purity and icosahedral particles of mosaic HBV antigen. •Strong immune responses not only including neutralization antibody response but also Th1 cell response were induced in mice. -- Abstract: Hepatitis B capsid protein expressed in Escherichia coli can reassemble into icosahedral particles, which could strongly enhance the immunogenicity of foreign epitopes, especially those inserted into its major immunodominant region. Herein, we inserted the entire ‘α’ antigenic determinant amino acids (aa) 119–152 of HBsAg into the truncated HBc (aa 1–144), between Asp{sup 78} and Pro{sup 79}. Prokaryotic expression showed that the mosaic HBc was mainly in the form of inclusion bodies. After denaturation with urea, it was dialyzed progressively for protein renaturation. We observed that before and after renaturation, mosaic HBc was antigenic as determined by HBsAg ELISA and a lot of viruslike particles were observed after renaturation. Thus, we further purified the mosaic viruslike particles by (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, DEAE chromatography, and Sepharose 4FF chromatography. Negative staining electron microscopy demonstrated the morphology of the viruslike particles. Immunization of Balb/c mice with mosaic particles induced the production of anti-HBs antibody and Th1 cell immune response supported by ELISPOT and CD4/CD8 proportions assay. In conclusion, we constructed mosaic hepatitis core particles displaying the entire ‘α’ antigenic determinant on the surface and laid a foundation for researching therapeutic hepatits B vaccines.

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Revealed 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone-induced Up-regulation of 20S Proteasome in Cultured Human Fibroblast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Prins, John M.; Wang, Yinsheng

    2012-01-01

    The tobacco-specific N-nitrosamine, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridinyl)-1-butanone (NNK), is a well-known carcinogen. Although the ability of the metabolically activated form of NNK to generate DNA adducts is well established, little is known about the cellular pathways perturbed by NNK in its native state. In this study, we utilized stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC), together with mass spectrometry, to assess the perturbation of protein expression in GM00637 human skin fibroblast cells upon NNK exposure. With this approach, we were able to quantify 1412 proteins and 137 of them were with significantly altered expression following NNK exposure, including the up-regulation of all subunits of the 20S proteasome core complex. The up-regulation of the 20S core complex was also reflected by a significant increase in 20S proteasome activities in GM00637, IMR90 and MCF-7 cells upon NNK treatment. Furthermore, the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) antagonist propranolol could attenuate significantly the NNK-induced increase in proteasome activity in all the three cell lines, suggesting that up-regulation of the 20S proteasome may be mediated through the β-AR. Additionally, we found that NNK treatment altered the expression levels of other important proteins including mitochondrial proteins, cytoskeleton-associated proteins, and proteins involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Results from the present study provided novel insights into the cellular mechanisms targeted by NNK. PMID:22369695

  4. Physical properties and structure of fine core-shell particles used as packing materials for chromatography relationships between particle characteristics and column performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of new brands of packing materials made of fine porous-shell particles, e.g., Halo and Kinetex, has brought great improvements in potential column efficiency, demanding considerable progress in the design of chromatographic instruments. Columns packed with Halo and Kinetex particles provide minimum values of their reduced plate heights of nearly 1.5 and 1.2, respectively. These packing materials have physical properties that set them apart from conventional porous particles. The kinetic performance of 4.6 mm I.D. columns packed with these two new materials is analyzed based on the results of a series of nine independent and complementary experiments: low-temperature nitrogen adsorption (LTNA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), Coulter counter particle size distributions, pycnometry, height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP), peak parking method (PP), total pore blocking method (TPB), and local electrochemical detection across the column exit section (LED). The results of this work establish links between the physical properties of these superficially porous particles and the excellent kinetic performance of columns packed with them. It clarifies the fundamental origin of the difference in the chromatographic performances of the Halo and the Kinetex columns.

  5. Factors affecting the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Al3Ti core-shell-structured particle-reinforced Al matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Baisong; Yi, Jianhong; Ni, Song; Shen, Rujuan; Song, Min

    2016-04-01

    This work studied the effects of matrix powder and sintering temperature on the microstructure and mechanical properties of in situ formed Ti-Al3Ti core-shell-structured particle-reinforced pure Al-based composites. It has been shown that both factors have significant effects on the morphology of the reinforcements and densification behaviour of the composites. Due to the strong interfacial bonding and the limitation of the crack propagation in the intermetallic shell during deformation by soft Al matrix and Ti core, the composite fabricated using fine spherical-shaped Al powder and sintered at 570 °C for 5 h has the optimal combination of the overall mechanical properties. The study provides a direction for the optimum combination of high strength and ductility of the composites by adjusting the fabrication parameters.

  6. Study of Molecular Conformation and Activity-Related Properties of Lipase Immobilized onto Core-Shell Structured Polyacrylic Acid-Coated Magnetic Silica Nanocomposite Particles.

    PubMed

    Esmaeilnejad-Ahranjani, Parvaneh; Kazemeini, Mohammad; Singh, Gurvinder; Arpanaei, Ayyoob

    2016-04-01

    A facile approach for the preparation of core-shell structured poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-coated Fe3O4 cluster@SiO2 nanocomposite particles as the support materials for the lipase immobilization is reported. Low- or high-molecular-weight (1800 and 100 000, respectively) PAA molecules were covalently attached onto the surface of amine-functionalized magnetic silica nanoacomposite particles. The successful preparation of particles were verified by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential measurement, and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) techniques. Once lipase is covalently immobilized onto the particles with an average diameter of 210 ± 50 nm, resulting from high binding sites concentrations on the low- and high-molecular-weight PAA-coated particles, high lipase immobilization efficiencies (86.2% and 89.9%, respectively), and loading capacities (786 and 816 mg g(-1), respectively) are obtained. Results from circular dichroism (CD) analysis and catalytic activity tests reveal an increase in the β-sheet content of lipase molecules upon immobilization, along with an enhancement in their activities and stabilities. The lipases immobilized onto the low- and high-molecular-weight PAA-coated particles show maximum activities at 55 and 50 °C, respectively, which are ∼28% and ∼15% higher than that of the free lipase at its own optimum temperature (40 °C), respectively. The immobilized lipases exhibit excellent performance at broader temperature and pH ranges and high thermal and storage stabilities, as well as superior reusability. These prepared magnetic nanocomposite particles can be offered as suitable support materials for efficient immobilization of enzymes and improvement of the immobilized enzymes properties. PMID:26986897

  7. Lateral structuring and stability phenomena induced by block copolymers and core-shell nanogel particles at immiscible polymer/polymer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozen, Arif Omer

    We have investigated the parameters such as copolymer/nanoparticle concentration, architecture and molecular weight combined with film thickness, time and temperature in order to develop a molecular-level insight on how lateral interfacial structuring occurs at immiscible polymer/polymer interfaces. I order to develop a molecular-level understanding of how these 'smart' self-assembling materials and core-shell nanogel particles interact both intra- and inter-molecularly and form ordered structures in bulk, as well as at immiscible interfaces, we first focused on the response of core-shell polymer nanoparticles, designated CSNGs, composed of a cross-linked divinylbenzene core and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) arms as they segregate from PMMA homopolymer. We have demonstrated that these nanogel particles exhibit autophobic character when dispersed in high molecular weight homopolymer matrices and segregate to the interface with another fluid. We have further explored the migration of these new-generation nanogel particles (CSNG-Rs) segregating from PS homopolymer to PS/PMMA interfaces. Unlike the instability patterns observed with the CSNGs, which exhibit classical nucleation and growth mechanism with circular hole formation, we have observed an intriguing dewetting pattern and CSNG-Rs forming lateral aggregates and tentacle-like structures at the interface. In parallel with our core-shell particle studies, we have also explored the structuring of copolymer molecules that are far from equilibrium in bulk and complex laminate of polymer thin films. Our early triblock copolymer studies have proven that molecular asymmetry has a profound effect on order-disorder transition temperature. We focused primarily on the effect of the copolymer chemical composition (i.e., block sizes) on the dewetting behavior of PS/SM thin films on PMMA. We elucidate the interfacial segregation and concurrent micellization of diblock copolymers in a dynamically evolving environment with

  8. Facile synthesis of core-shell/hollow anisotropic particles via control of cross-linking during one-pot dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanan; Ma, Yuhong; Liu, Lianying; Yang, Wantai

    2015-05-01

    Preparation of anisotropic particles based on seed phase separation involves multiple processes, and asymmetrical structures and surfaces cannot be produced when anisotropic shapes emerge. In conventional one-pot dispersion polymerization (Dis.P) using cross-linker, only spherical particles are prepared due to rapid and high cross-linking. Herein, monodisperse snowman-like particles with core-shell/hollow structures and partially rough surface were synthesized straightforward by a modified one-pot Dis.P, in which ethylene glycol and water (6/4, vol.) were used as medium, and ammonium persulfate (APS) aqueous solution, vinyl acetate (VA) and/or acrylic acid (AA), divinylbenzene (DVB) and styrene (St) were added at 6h. The cross-linking of growing particles was confined to exterior (forming cross-linked shell), and gel contents were low, leading to phase separation. Asymmetrical morphologies, structures, sizes and surface roughness were flexibly tuned by varying amounts of APS, VA and/or AA, water and DVB, and DVB adding speed. At low APS contents or high DVB amounts, the inhomogeneous cross-linking of head enabled its phase to separate, producing elongated head. With addition of VA and AA, phase separations inside head and body were induced, generating hollow structure. Adding DVB very slowly, nonlinear growth of third compartment occurred, forming bowed head. PMID:25626132

  9. Characterisation of 20S Proteasome in Tritrichomonas foetus and Its Role during the Cell Cycle and Transformation into Endoflagellar Form

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Gonzaga, Luiz; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Benchimol, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are intracellular complexes that control selective protein degradation in organisms ranging from Archaea to higher eukaryotes. These structures have multiple proteolytic activities that are required for cell differentiation, replication and maintaining cellular homeostasis. Here, we document the presence of the 20S proteasome in the protist parasite Tritrichomonas foetus. Complementary techniques, such as a combination of whole genome sequencing technologies, bioinformatics algorithms, cell fractionation and biochemistry and microscopy approaches were used to characterise the 20S proteasome of T. foetus. The 14 homologues of the typical eukaryotic proteasome subunits were identified in the T. foetus genome. Alignment analyses showed that the main regulatory and catalytic domains of the proteasome were conserved in the predicted amino acid sequences from T. foetus-proteasome subunits. Immunofluorescence assays using an anti-proteasome antibody revealed a labelling distributed throughout the cytosol as punctate cytoplasmic structures and in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy of a T. foetus-proteasome-enriched fraction confirmed the presence of particles that resembled the typical eukaryotic 20S proteasome. Fluorogenic assays using specific peptidyl substrates detected presence of the three typical peptidase activities of eukaryotic proteasomes in T. foetus. As expected, these peptidase activities were inhibited by lactacystin, a well-known specific proteasome inhibitor, and were not affected by inhibitors of serine or cysteine proteases. During the transformation of T. foetus to endoflagellar form (EFF), also known as pseudocyst, we observed correlations between the EFF formation rates, increases in the proteasome activities and reduced levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. The growth, cell cycle and EFF transformation of T. foetus were inhibited after treatment with lactacystin in a dose-dependent manner. Lactacystin treatment also resulted in

  10. Characterisation of 20S Proteasome in Tritrichomonas foetus and Its Role during the Cell Cycle and Transformation into Endoflagellar Form.

    PubMed

    Pereira-Neves, Antonio; Gonzaga, Luiz; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F S; Benchimol, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Proteasomes are intracellular complexes that control selective protein degradation in organisms ranging from Archaea to higher eukaryotes. These structures have multiple proteolytic activities that are required for cell differentiation, replication and maintaining cellular homeostasis. Here, we document the presence of the 20S proteasome in the protist parasite Tritrichomonas foetus. Complementary techniques, such as a combination of whole genome sequencing technologies, bioinformatics algorithms, cell fractionation and biochemistry and microscopy approaches were used to characterise the 20S proteasome of T. foetus. The 14 homologues of the typical eukaryotic proteasome subunits were identified in the T. foetus genome. Alignment analyses showed that the main regulatory and catalytic domains of the proteasome were conserved in the predicted amino acid sequences from T. foetus-proteasome subunits. Immunofluorescence assays using an anti-proteasome antibody revealed a labelling distributed throughout the cytosol as punctate cytoplasmic structures and in the perinuclear region. Electron microscopy of a T. foetus-proteasome-enriched fraction confirmed the presence of particles that resembled the typical eukaryotic 20S proteasome. Fluorogenic assays using specific peptidyl substrates detected presence of the three typical peptidase activities of eukaryotic proteasomes in T. foetus. As expected, these peptidase activities were inhibited by lactacystin, a well-known specific proteasome inhibitor, and were not affected by inhibitors of serine or cysteine proteases. During the transformation of T. foetus to endoflagellar form (EFF), also known as pseudocyst, we observed correlations between the EFF formation rates, increases in the proteasome activities and reduced levels of ubiquitin-protein conjugates. The growth, cell cycle and EFF transformation of T. foetus were inhibited after treatment with lactacystin in a dose-dependent manner. Lactacystin treatment also resulted in

  11. Mapping the particle acceleration in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638

    SciTech Connect

    Giacintucci, S.; Markevitch, M.; Brunetti, G.; Venturi, T.; ZuHone, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    We present new deep, high-resolution radio images of the diffuse minihalo in the cool core of the galaxy cluster RX J1720.1+2638. The images have been obtained with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at 317, 617, and 1280 MHz and with the Very Large Array at 1.5, 4.9, and 8.4 GHz, with angular resolutions ranging from 1'' to 10''. This represents the best radio spectral and imaging data set for any minihalo. Most of the radio flux of the minihalo arises from a bright central component with a maximum radius of ∼80 kpc. A fainter tail of emission extends out from the central component to form a spiral-shaped structure with a length of ∼230 kpc, seen at frequencies 1.5 GHz and below. We find indication of a possible steepening of the total radio spectrum of the minihalo at high frequencies. Furthermore, a spectral index image shows that the spectrum of the diffuse emission steepens with increasing distance along the tail. A striking spatial correlation is observed between the minihalo emission and two cold fronts visible in the Chandra X-ray image of this cool core. These cold fronts confine the minihalo, as also seen in numerical simulations of minihalo formation by sloshing-induced turbulence. All these observations favor the hypothesis that the radio-emitting electrons in cluster cool cores are produced by turbulent re-acceleration.

  12. Synthesis of Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) core/shell nanocomposite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Sheng; Xie Jin; Sun Shouheng

    2008-07-15

    Monodispersed cobalt nanoparticles (NPs) with controllable size (8-14 nm) have been synthesized using thermal decomposition of dicobaltoctacarbonyl in organic solvent. The as-synthesized high magnetic moment (125 emu/g) Co NPs are dispersible in various organic solvents, and can be easily transferred into aqueous phase by surface modification using phospholipids. However, the modified hydrophilic Co NPs are not stable as they are quickly oxidized, agglomerated in buffer. Co NPs are stabilized by coating the MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) ferrite shell. Core/shell structured bimagnetic Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites are prepared with tunable shell thickness (1-5 nm). The Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocomposites retain the high magnetic moment density from the Co core, while gaining chemical and magnetic stability from the ferrite shell. Compared to Co NPs, the nanocomposites show much enhanced stability in buffer solution at elevated temperatures, making them promising for biomedical applications. - Graphical abstract: The 10 nm/3 nm Co/MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M=Fe, Mn) bimagnetic core/shell nanocomposites are synthesized from the surface coating of ferrite shell over 10 nm Co nanoparticle seeds. The nanocomposites show much enhanced chemical and magnetic stability in solid state, organic solution and aqueous phase, and are promising for biomedical applications.

  13. Structural Basis for the Assembly and Gate Closure Mechanisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S Proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Li, H; Wang, T; Pan, H; Lin, G; Li, H

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a proteasome system analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Mtb requires the proteasome to resist killing by the host immune system. The detailed assembly process and the gating mechanism of Mtb proteasome have remained unknown. Using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we have obtained structures of three Mtb proteasome assembly intermediates, showing conformational changes during assembly, and explaining why the {beta}-subunit propeptide inhibits rather than promotes assembly. Although the eukaryotic proteasome core particles close their protein substrate entrance gates with different amino terminal peptides of the seven {alpha}-subunits, it has been unknown how a prokaryotic proteasome might close the gate at the symmetry axis with seven identical peptides. We found in the new Mtb proteasome crystal structure that the gate is tightly sealed by the seven identical peptides taking on three distinct conformations. Our work provides the structural bases for assembly and gating mechanisms of the Mtb proteasome.

  14. Structural basis for the assembly and gate closure mechanisms of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis 20S proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, H.; Wang, T.; Pan, H.; Lin, G.

    2010-06-16

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) possesses a proteasome system analogous to the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Mtb requires the proteasome to resist killing by the host immune system. The detailed assembly process and the gating mechanism of Mtb proteasome have remained unknown. Using cryo-electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, we have obtained structures of three Mtb proteasome assembly intermediates, showing conformational changes during assembly, and explaining why the {beta}-subunit propeptide inhibits rather than promotes assembly. Although the eukaryotic proteasome core particles close their protein substrate entrance gates with different amino terminal peptides of the seven {alpha}-subunits, it has been unknown how a prokaryotic proteasome might close the gate at the symmetry axis with seven identical peptides. We found in the new Mtb proteasome crystal structure that the gate is tightly sealed by the seven identical peptides taking on three distinct conformations. Our work provides the structural bases for assembly and gating mechanisms of the Mtb proteasome.

  15. Primary Energy Reconstruction from the Charged Particle Densities Recorded with the KASCADE-Grande Detector at 500 m Distance from Shower Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toma, G.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Link, K.; Łuczak, P.; Ludwig, M.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Melissas, M.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Palmieri, N.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2010-11-01

    Previous EAS investigations have shown that for a fixed primary energy the charged particle density becomes independent of the primary mass at certain (fixed) distances from the shower core. This feature can be used as an estimator for the primary energy. We present results on the reconstruction of the primary energy spectrum of cosmic rays from the experimentally recorded S(500) observable (the density of charged particles at 500 m distance to the shower core) using the KASCADE-Grande detector array. The KASCADE-Grande experiment is hosted by the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology-Campus North, Karlsruhe, Germany, and operated by an international collaboration. The constant intensity cut (CIC) method is applied to evaluate the attenuation of the S(500) observable with the zenith angle and is corrected for. A calibration of S(500) values with the primary energy has been worked out by simulations and was applied to the data to obtain the primary energy spectrum (in the energy range log10[E0/GeV]∈[7.5,9]). The systematic uncertainties induced by different sources are considered. In addition, a correction based on a response matrix is applied to account for the effects of shower-to-shower fluctuations on the spectral index of the reconstructed energy spectrum.

  16. Alphavirus capsid proteins self-assemble into core-like particles in insect cells: A promising platform for nanoparticle vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Hikke, Mia C; Geertsema, Corinne; Wu, Vincen; Metz, Stefan W; van Lent, Jan W; Vlak, Just M; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2016-02-01

    The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus (CHIKV) causes arthritic diseases in humans, whereas the aquatic salmonid alphavirus (SAV) is associated with high mortality in aquaculture of salmon and trout. Using modern biotechnological approaches, promising vaccine candidates based upon highly immunogenic, enveloped virus-like particles (eVLPs) have been developed. However, the eVLP structure (core, lipid membrane, surface glycoproteins) is more complex than that of non-enveloped, protein-only VLPs, which are structurally and morphologically 'simple'. In order to develop an alternative to alphavirus eVLPs, in this paper we engineered recombinant baculovirus vectors to produce high levels of alphavirus core-like particles (CLPs) in insect cells by expression of the CHIKV and SAV capsid proteins. The CLPs localize in dense nuclear bodies within the infected cell nucleus and are purified through a rapid and scalable protocol involving cell lysis, sonication and low-speed centrifugation steps. Furthermore, an immunogenic epitope from the alphavirus E2 glycoprotein can be successfully fused to the N-terminus of the capsid protein without disrupting the CLP self-assembling properties. We propose that immunogenic epitope-tagged alphavirus CLPs produced in insect cells present a simple and perhaps more stable alternative to alphavirus eVLPs. PMID:26287127

  17. On the Origin and Precursor Materials of Glassy Fallback Particles in the Lake Bosumtwi ICDP Cores - Status Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luetke, S.; Deutsch, A.; Kreher-Hartmann, B.; Berndt, J.

    2007-03-01

    Major element composition of fallback particles from the Bosumtwi crater matches well with that one of target rocks with intermediate SiO2 content. Variations in CaO and MgO may reflect heterogeneous carbonate distribution in the precursor material.

  18. Facile synthesis of QD-anchored composite particles with magnetite cluster cores ({sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@QDs)

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Hang-Deok; Lee, Sang-Wha

    2013-06-01

    Highlights: ► Triple layered Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}/QDs were designed as fluorescent magnetic nanocomposites. ► Magnetite cluster-embedded silica exhibited strong and controllable magnetism. ► Effective conjugation between QDs and magnetic silica occurred at pH3. - Abstract: Magnetism-controlled fluorescent composite particles ({sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@QDs) were prepared as QD-anchored silica nanoparticles with magnetite cluster cores. First, citrate-capped magnetites (C-Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) were prepared by the co-precipitation method and subsequently complexed with 3-aminopropyl-trimethoxysilane (APTMS) at room temperature, consequently leading to the formation of magnetite clusters (A-{sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) with alkoxy terminated interfaces. The sol–gel reaction between A-{sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) produced the core-shell {sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}. The resulting core-shell particles exhibited superparamagnetic properties and controllable magnetism simply by adjusting the thickness of nonmagnetic silica layer. After then, amine-terminated {sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} (NH{sub 2}–{sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}) was conjugated with carboxy quantum dots (QDs) using an EDC coupling agent. The QD conjugation with NH{sub 2}–{sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} of lower pH exhibited the higher photoluminescence (PL) intensity, and the resulting composite particles ({sup n}Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}@QDs) can be a useful biomedical agent. This chemical strategy can be further applied to prepare the core-shell magnetic nanostructure with various oxide layers for specific applications.

  19. An advanced coarse-grained nucleosome core particle model for computer simulations of nucleosome-nucleosome interactions under varying ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanping; Korolev, Nikolay; Lyubartsev, Alexander P; Nordenskiöld, Lars

    2013-01-01

    In the eukaryotic cell nucleus, DNA exists as chromatin, a compact but dynamic complex with histone proteins. The first level of DNA organization is the linear array of nucleosome core particles (NCPs). The NCP is a well-defined complex of 147 bp DNA with an octamer of histones. Interactions between NCPs are of paramount importance for higher levels of chromatin compaction. The polyelectrolyte nature of the NCP implies that nucleosome-nucleosome interactions must exhibit a great influence from both the ionic environment as well as the positively charged and highly flexible N-terminal histone tails, protruding out from the NCP. The large size of the system precludes a modelling analysis of chromatin at an all-atom level and calls for coarse-grained approximations. Here, a model of the NCP that include the globular histone core and the flexible histone tails described by one particle per each amino acid and taking into account their net charge is proposed. DNA wrapped around the histone core was approximated at the level of two base pairs represented by one bead (bases and sugar) plus four beads of charged phosphate groups. Computer simulations, using a Langevin thermostat, in a dielectric continuum with explicit monovalent (K(+)), divalent (Mg(2+)) or trivalent (Co(NH(3))(6) (3+)) cations were performed for systems with one or ten NCPs. Increase of the counterion charge results in a switch from repulsive NCP-NCP interaction in the presence of K(+), to partial aggregation with Mg(2+) and to strong mutual attraction of all 10 NCPs in the presence of CoHex(3+). The new model reproduced experimental results and the structure of the NCP-NCP contacts is in agreement with available data. Cation screening, ion-ion correlations and tail bridging contribute to the NCP-NCP attraction and the new NCP model accounts for these interactions. PMID:23418426

  20. Comparison of fused-core and conventional particle size columns by LC-MS/MS and UV: application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Pabbisetty, Deepthi; Groeber, Elizabeth A; Steenwyk, Rick C; Fast, Douglas M

    2009-10-15

    The chromatographic performance of fused-core (superficially porous) HPLC packing materials was compared with conventional fully porous particle materials for LC-MS/MS analysis of two pharmaceuticals in rat plasma. Two commercially available antidepressants, imipramine and desipramine, were assayed using a conventional analytical C(18) column (5 microm, 2.0 mm x 30 mm) and a fused-core C(18) column (2.7 microm, 2.1 mm x 30 mm). Retention time, column efficiency, pressure drop, resolution, and loading capacity were compared under the same operating conditions. The fused-core column demonstrated reduced assay time by 34% and 2-3-fold increased efficiency (N). Loading capacity up to 25 microl of extract injected on column showed no peak distortion. The registered back-pressure from a flow rate of 1.0 ml/min did not exceed 3400 psi making it compatible with standard HPLC equipment (typically rated to 6000 psi). Two mobile phases were examined, and morpholine as an organic base modifier yielded a 2-5-fold increase in S/N near the limit of detection over triethylamine. The 2.7 microm fused-core column was applied to the analysis of imipramine and desipramine in extracted, protein precipitated rat plasma by LC-MS/MS. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 0.5-1000 ng/ml for both imipramine and desipramine. Intra-run precisions (%CV) and accuracies (%bias) were within +/-7.8% and +/-7.3% at three QC levels and within 14.7% and 14.4% at the LOQ level for both analytes. Following a single method qualification run, the method was applied to the quantitation of pharmacokinetic study samples after oral administration of imipramine to male rats. PMID:19540084

  1. Fast analysis of isoflavones by high-performance liquid chromatography using a column packed with fused-core particles.

    PubMed

    Manchón, N; D'Arrigo, M; García-Lafuente, A; Guillamón, E; Villares, A; Ramos, A; Martínez, J A; Rostagno, M A

    2010-10-15

    The recent development of fused-core technology in HPLC columns is enabling faster and highly efficient separations. This technology was evaluated for the development of an fast analysis method for the most relevant soy isoflavones. A step-by-step strategy was used to optimize temperature (25-50°C), flow rate (1.2-2.7 mL/min), mobile phase composition and equilibration time (1-5 min). Optimized conditions provided a method for the separation of all isoflavones in less than 5.8 min and total analysis time (sample-to-sample) of 11.5 min. Evaluation of chromatographic performance revealed excellent reproducibility, resolution, selectivity, peak symmetry and low limits of detection and quantification levels. The use of a fused-core column allows highly efficient, sensitive, accurate and reproducible determination of isoflavones with an outstanding sample throughout and resolution. The developed method was validated with different soy samples with a total isoflavone concentration ranging from 1941.53 to 2460.84 μg g(-1) with the predominant isoflavones being isoflavone glucosides and malonyl derivatives. PMID:20875606

  2. Fabrication and electromagnetic properties of bio-based helical soft-core particles by way of Ni-Fe alloy electroplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Mingming; Zhang, Deyuan; Cai, Jun; Zhang, Wenqiang; Yuan, Liming

    2011-12-01

    Ni-Fe alloy electroplating was used as a bio-limited forming process to fabricate bio-based helical soft-core ferromagnetic particles, and a low frequency vibration device was applied to the cathode to avoid microorganism ( Spirulina platens) cells adhesion to the copper net during the course of plating. The morphologies and ingredients of the coated Spirulina cells were characterized using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometer. The complex permittivity and permeability of the samples containing the coated Spirulina cells before and after heat treatment were measured and investigated by a vector network analyzer. The results show that the Spirulina cells after plating keep their initial helical shape, and applying low frequency vibration to the copper net cathode in the plating process can effectively prevent agglomeration and intertwinement of the Spirulina cells. The microwave absorbing and electromagnetic properties of the samples containing the coated Spirulina cells particles with heat treatment are superior to those samples containing the coated Spirulina cells particles without heat treatment.

  3. Cytoprotective effect of 20S-Rg3 on benzo[a]pyrene-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Poon, Po Ying; Kwok, Hoi Hin; Yue, Patrick Y K; Yang, Mildred S M; Mak, Nai Ki; Wong, Chris K C; Wong, Ricky N S

    2012-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon ubiquitously existing in the environment. Its metabolites have been shown to cause DNA damage and cellular dysfunction in humans. Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer is a Chinese medicinal herb, and ginsenosides are the main active constituent of ginseng. Accumulating evidence had indicated that ginseng extract and ginsenosides possess cytoprotective effects. In this study, the protective effect of ginsenosides on BaP-induced DNA damage in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and HepG2 cells was investigated. The genotoxic effect of BaP was measured by the comet assay. Results showed that tail moment was increased in BaP-treated cells, but cotreatment of ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 can significantly decrease BaP-induced DNA damage. A downstream mechanistic study revealed that 20(S)-Rg3 increased the gene expression of an important phase II detoxifying enzyme NAD(P)H:quinine oxidoreductase 1. The effect was also associated with the activation of protein kinase B (Akt) and nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). These results indicated that 20(S)-Rg3 might protect HDFs from BaP-induced DNA damage through the activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/Nrf2 pathway. Our results also demonstrated that 20(S)-Rg3 is a functional ligand of pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that mediates the induction of drug clearance pathways. Subsequent knockdown of PXR expression by small interfering RNA confirmed the involvement of PXR on the protective effects of 20(S)-Rg3 against BaP-induced DNA damage. In summary, ginsenoside 20(S)-Rg3 can protect against BaP-induced genotoxicity in human cells, suggesting that ginseng may serve as a natural cytoprotective agent against environmental carcinogens. PMID:21956953

  4. Environmentally friendly electroless plating for Ag/TiO2-coated core-shell magnetic particles using ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo-Dong; Choe, Won-Gyun; Jeong, Jong-Ryul

    2013-11-01

    In this work, high-reflectance brilliant white color magnetic microspheres comprising a Fe/TiO2/Ag core-shell structure with a continuous, uniform compact silver layer were successfully fabricated by TiO2-assisted electroless plating in a simple and eco-friendly method. The coating procedure for TiO2 and Ag involved a sol-gel reaction and electroless plating with ultrasound treatment. The electroless plating step was carried out in an eco-friendly manner in a single process without environmentally toxic additives. The TiO2 layer was used as a modification layer between the Fe microspheres and the silver layer to improve adhesion. A continuous and compact silver layer could be formed with a high degree of morphological control by introducing ultrasonication and adjusting the ammonium hydroxide concentration. PMID:23611665

  5. Possibilities of new generation columns packed with 1.3μm core-shell particles in gradient elution mode.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Guillarme, Davy

    2013-12-13

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the practical possibilities in gradient elution mode of a column packed with 1.3μm core-shell particles recently released on the market. For this purpose, two types of analytes possessing different diffusion coefficients were selected (small molecule and peptide). It appears that the new 1.3μm material was particularly well suited for fast separations, compared to other existing core-shell particle dimensions in gradient mode. The new material systematically outperforms the other existing ones for peak capacity up to 300 for small molecules and 700 (corresponding to t0=15min) for peptides. Based on these cut-off values, the advantage of column packed with 1.3μm was much more obvious for peptides vs. small molecules analysis. Further improvements in terms of column mechanical stability and system upper pressure capability could expand the limits of separation speed and efficiency to a different level. Again, because of the current pressure limitation and low permeability, a column length of more than 5-8cm is never desired for small molecules analysis in gradient elution. On the contrary, longer columns were useful for peptide analysis. As example, a column of 28cm packed with 1.3μm particles provides a peak capacity of 1000 in the case of peptides analysis. All the predicted values were experimentally confirmed using a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba and a tryptic digest of a monoclonal antibody (Panitumumab). For the plant extract, the better performance was always achieved with a 5cm long column (P=267 and 268 for the 5 and 15cm, respectively, using a gradient time of 10 and 40min, respectively). Finally, in the case of peptide mapping, a 15cm long column packed with 1.3μm particles was the best choice (P=176 and 311 for the 5 and 15cm, respectively, using a gradient time of 10 and 40min, respectively). PMID:24210304

  6. [Cu32(H)20{S2P(O i Pr)2 }12 ]: The Largest Number of Hydrides Recorded in a Molecular Nanocluster by Neutron Diffraction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dhayal, Rajendra S.; Liao, Jian-Hong; Kahlal, Samia; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Yu-Chiao; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; van Zyl, Werner E.; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C. W.

    2015-04-20

    An air- and moisture-stable nanoscale polyhydrido copper cluster [Cu32(H)20{S2P(O i Pr)2 }12 ] (1H) was synthesized and structurally characterized. The molecular structure of 1H exhibits a hexacapped pseudo-rhombohedral core of 14 Cu atoms sandwiched between two nestlike triangular cupola fragments of (2x9) Cu atoms in an elongated triangular gyrobicupola polyhedron. The discrete Cu32 cluster is stabilized by 12 dithiophosphate ligands and a record number of 20 hydride ligands, which were found by high-resolution neutron diffraction to exhibit tri-, tetra-, and pentacoordinated hydrides in capping and interstitial modes. We conclude that this result was further supported by a density functional theorymore » investigation on the simplified model [Cu32(H)20(S2PH2)12].« less

  7. [Cu32 (H)20 {S2 P(OiPr)2 }12 ]: The Largest Number of Hydrides Recorded in a Molecular Nanocluster by Neutron Diffraction.

    PubMed

    Dhayal, Rajendra S; Liao, Jian-Hong; Kahlal, Samia; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Yu-Chiao; Chiang, Ming-Hsi; van Zyl, Werner E; Saillard, Jean-Yves; Liu, C W

    2015-06-01

    An air- and moisture-stable nanoscale polyhydrido copper cluster [Cu32 (H)20 {S2 P(OiPr)2 }12 ] (1H ) was synthesized and structurally characterized. The molecular structure of 1H exhibits a hexacapped pseudo-rhombohedral core of 14 Cu atoms sandwiched between two nestlike triangular cupola fragments of (2×9) Cu atoms in an elongated triangular gyrobicupola polyhedron. The discrete Cu32 cluster is stabilized by 12 dithiophosphate ligands and a record number of 20 hydride ligands, which were found by high-resolution neutron diffraction to exhibit tri-, tetra-, and pentacoordinated hydrides in capping and interstitial modes. This result was further supported by a density functional theory investigation on the simplified model [Cu32 (H)20 (S2 PH2 )12 ]. PMID:25899822

  8. An N-terminal extension to the hepatitis B virus core protein forms a poorly ordered trimeric spike in assembled virus-like particles

    PubMed Central

    McGonigle, Richard; Yap, Wei Boon; Ong, Swee Tin; Gatherer, Derek; Bakker, Saskia E.; Tan, Wen Siang; Bhella, David

    2015-01-01

    Virus-like particles composed of the core antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBcAg) have been shown to be an effective platform for the display of foreign epitopes in vaccine development. Heterologous sequences have been successfully inserted at both amino and carboxy termini as well as internally at the major immunodominant epitope. We used cryogenic electron microscopy (CryoEM) and three-dimensional image reconstruction to investigate the structure of VLPs assembled from an N-terminal extended HBcAg that contained a polyhistidine tag. The insert was seen to form a trimeric spike on the capsid surface that was poorly resolved, most likely owing to it being flexible. We hypothesise that the capacity of N-terminal inserts to form trimers may have application in the development of multivalent vaccines to trimeric antigens. Our analysis also highlights the value of tools for local resolution assessment in studies of partially disordered macromolecular assemblies by cryoEM. PMID:25557498

  9. PARTICLE IMAGE VELOCIMETRY MEASUREMENTS IN A REPRESENTATIVE GAS-COOLED PRISMATIC REACTOR CORE MODEL: FLOW IN THE COOLANT CHANNELS AND INTERSTITIAL BYPASS GAPS

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas E. Conder; Richard Skifton; Ralph Budwig

    2012-11-01

    Core bypass flow is one of the key issues with the prismatic Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor, and it refers to the coolant that navigates through the interstitial, non-cooling passages between the graphite fuel blocks instead of traveling through the designated coolant channels. To determine the bypass flow, a double scale representative model was manufactured and installed in the Matched Index-of-Refraction flow facility; after which, stereo Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was employed to measure the flow field within. PIV images were analyzed to produce vector maps, and flow rates were calculated by numerically integrating over the velocity field. It was found that the bypass flow varied between 6.9-15.8% for channel Reynolds numbers of 1,746 and 4,618. The results were compared to computational fluid dynamic (CFD) pre-test simulations. When compared to these pretest calculations, the CFD analysis appeared to under predict the flow through the gap.

  10. Role of vacancy and metal doping on combustive oxidation of Zr/ZrO 2 core-shell particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Hyunwook; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2010-11-01

    We studied self-propagated combustion synthesis of transition-metal-doped tetragonal ZrO 2 (t-ZrO 2) with first principles-based one-dimensional diffusion reaction model. The optimal reaction condition for the combustion process was investigated by calculating energetic stability and surface reactivity of oxygen vacancy defects on (101) surface termination of t-ZrO 2 using first-principles density functional methods. In the first-principles model, the surface was doped with 14 different metal impurities in the 4th and 5th row of the periodic table to examine the role of transition-metal doping on the combustion process. Results indicate that there are clear trends in the defect stability and reactivity depending upon the type of metal impurity and their relative location with respect to the oxygen vacancy. Surface density of states and charge density information also show that there is a trade-off between the vacancy stability and chemical activity of the surface defect states. Based on the thermodynamic information obtained from first principles, we analyze the combustion process of a Zr metal particle by using a one-dimensional diffusion-reaction model. The competition between the vacancy-assisted chemisorption and the vacancy diffusion results in an optimal point for rate of combustion reaction with respect to the vacancy stability. From this, we suggest a plausible screening strategy for metal-doping which can be applied at different temperatures and pressures, as well as with different particle sizes. Our analysis indicates that first-principles calculation provides key information that can be subsequently used for an optimization of the reaction rate for a self-sustained combustion process. An explicit inclusion of rates of defect and ionic transport will be introduced into our model in future work.

  11. Facile synthesis of core-shell and Janus particles via 2-D dendritic growth of gold film.

    PubMed

    Jang, Se Gyu; Kim, Se-Heon; Lee, Su Yeon; Jeong, Woong Chan; Yang, Seung-Man

    2010-10-15

    We report a facile method for the electroless deposition (ELD) of gold film via two-dimensional (2-D) dendritic growth. Our scheme employs protonated amine groups, which electrostatically attract both the negatively charged reducing agent and gold-precursor. This electrostatic interaction increases the local concentrations of gold-precursor and reducing agent near the silica surface to levels high enough for gold films with a 2-D fractal morphology to form directly on the surfaces of the amine-functionalized silica nanospheres by diffusion-limited aggregation. Our one-pot reaction avoids the need for seed attachment, which is typically employed for the growth of metallic shells on nanospheres. Therefore, the proposed method significantly reduces the number of processing steps required for the production of core-shell nanospheres. The gold morphologies were systematically investigated in terms of various synthesis variables, including solution pH, reducing agent concentration, and gold precursor injection speed. In addition, we synthesized gold-capped silica nanospheres via ELD of gold on a patterned array of silica nanospheres embedded in polystyrene (PS) film followed by dissolution of the PS matrix, thus demonstrating the potential utility of the proposed method in emerging fields of materials science such as patterning of noble metals and studies of nanometer-scale optics. PMID:20678776

  12. Deletion modification enhances anthrax specific immunity and protective efficacy of a hepatitis B core particle-based anthrax epitope vaccine.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ying; Zhang, Sheng; Cai, Chenguang; Zhang, Jun; Dong, Dayong; Guo, Qiang; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Protective antigen (PA) is one of the major virulence factors of anthrax and is also the major constituent of the current anthrax vaccine. Previously, we found that the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA contains a dominant neutralizing epitope, the SFFD. We successfully inserted the 2β2-2β3 loop of PA into the major immunodominant region (MIR) of hepatitis B virus core (HBc) protein. The resulting fusion protein, termed HBc-N144-PA-loop2 (HBcL2), can effectively produce anthrax specific protective antibodies in an animal model. However, the protective immunity caused by HBcL2 could still be improved. In this research, we removed amino acids 79-81 from the HBc MIR of the HBcL2. This region was previously reported to be the major B cell epitope of HBc, and in keeping with this finding, we observed that the short deletion in the MIR not only diminished the intrinsic immunogenicity of HBc but also stimulated a higher titer of anthrax specific immunity. Most importantly, this deletion led to the full protection of the immunized mice against a lethal dose anthrax toxin challenge. We supposed that the conformational changes which occurred after the short deletion and foreign insertion in the MIR of HBc were the most likely reasons for the improvement in the immunogenicity of the HBc-based anthrax epitope vaccine. PMID:24054942

  13. Particle distributions in approximately 10(13) - 10(16) eV air shower cores at mountain altitude and comparison with Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, A. G.

    1985-01-01

    Photographs of 521 shower cores in an array of current-limited spark (discharge) chambers at Sacramento Peak (2900m above sea level, 730 g /sq cm.), New Mexico, U.S.A., have been analyzed and the results compared with similar data from Leeds (80m above sea level, 1020 g sq cm.). It was found that the central density differential spectrum is consistent with a power law index of -2 up to approx. 1500/sq m where it steepens, and that shower cores become flatter on average with increasing size. Scaling model predictions for proton primaries with a approx E sup -2.71 energy spectrum account well for the altitude dependence of the data at lower densities. However, deviations at higher densities indicate a change in hadron interaction characteristics between approx few x 10 to the 14th power and 10 to the 15th power eV primary energy causing particles close to the shower axis to be spread further out.

  14. Porous Zr(x)Si(1-x)O₂ shell/void/TiO₂ core particles with enhancing transfer for cleaning water.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqing; Zhang, Yunge

    2015-06-15

    In order to immobilize TiO2 and prevent TiO2 nanoparticles from damaging polymeric supporters, the porous Zr(x)Si(1-x)O2 shell/void/TiO2 core particles (Zr-SVTs) were fabricated by the synergistic effect between nonionic surfactant P123 ((EO)20(PO)70(EO)20) and oleic acid (CH3(CH2)7CH=CH(CH2)7COOH) and cohydrolysis between TEOS and ZrOCl2·8H2O. Zr-SVTs were characterized by FT-IR, SEM, TEM, EDX and BET. The results show Zr-SVTs exhibit well-developed spherical shape with channels (approximately 5.5 nm in diameter) in porous Zr(x)Si(1-x)O2 shells. Moreover, the preparation conditions of Zr-SVTs were studied and confirmed, and the photocatalytic activity of Zr-SVTs was studied by photodegrading methyl orange in aqueous solution and oil in sewage containing oil. Alternatively, the photocatalytic activity of Zr-SVTs presents better result compared with SiO2 shell/void/TiO2 core (SVT) without doping Zr into the SiO2 shell, which further demonstrates that the Zr(x)Si(1-x)O2 shell could promote the mass transfer inside channels of Zr-SVTs. It suggests that Zr-SVTs with higher photocatalytic activity are desirable for application in water cleaning. PMID:25780933

  15. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials. PMID:26522701

  16. Tailoring the properties of sub-3 μm silica core-shell particles prepared by a multilayer-by-multilayer process.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hanjiang; Brennan, John D

    2015-01-01

    Sub-3 μm silica core-shell particles (CSPs) were fabricated by a multilayer-by-multilayer method recently developed in our group. In this work, we report on methods to prepare and modify the properties of these CSPs by high temperature calcination, pore size enlargement under basic conditions, and rehydrolyzation in boiling water to make them more suitable as starting materials for preparation of HPLC columns. The chemical, physical and mechanical properties of these modified CSPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen sorption porosimetry. CSPs obtained after these treatments were observed to have the following properties: particle diameter ∼2.7 μm, shell thickness ∼0.5 μm, surface area ∼200 m(2)/g, pore diameter ∼10 nm (and almost no mesopores), pore volume ∼0.5 cc/g, and Si-OH group surface concentration ∼4 OH/nm(2). These properties are in line with those of commercially available sub-3 μm CSP products. PMID:25310582

  17. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-01-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials. PMID:26522701

  18. Interfacial effect on physical properties of composite media: Interfacial volume fraction with non-spherical hard-core-soft-shell-structured particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenxiang; Duan, Qinglin; Ma, Huaifa; Chen, Wen; Chen, Huisu

    2015-11-01

    Interfaces are known to be crucial in a variety of fields and the interfacial volume fraction dramatically affects physical properties of composite media. However, it is an open problem with great significance how to determine the interfacial property in composite media with inclusions of complex geometry. By the stereological theory and the nearest-surface distribution functions, we first propose a theoretical framework to symmetrically present the interfacial volume fraction. In order to verify the interesting generalization, we simulate three-phase composite media by employing hard-core-soft-shell structures composed of hard mono-/polydisperse non-spherical particles, soft interfaces, and matrix. We numerically derive the interfacial volume fraction by a Monte Carlo integration scheme. With the theoretical and numerical results, we find that the interfacial volume fraction is strongly dependent on the so-called geometric size factor and sphericity characterizing the geometric shape in spite of anisotropic particle types. As a significant interfacial property, the present theoretical contribution can be further drawn into predicting the effective transport properties of composite materials.

  19. Microbial transformation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol by Absidia corymbifera. Cytotoxic activity of the metabolites against human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guangtong; Yang, Min; Nong, Shaojun; Yang, Xue; Ling, Yong; Wang, Donggeng; Wang, Xinyang; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Biotransformation of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (1) by the fungus Absidia corymbifera AS 3.3387 yielded five metabolites (2-6). On the basis of spectroscopic data analyses, the metabolites were identified as 26-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (2), 23, 24-en-25-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (3), 25-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (4), 7β-hydroxyl-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (5), and 7-oxo-20(S)-protopanaxatriol (6), respectively. Among them, 5 and 6 are new compounds. These results indicated that A. corymbifera AS 3.3387 could catalyze the side-chain oxidation-reduction, 7β hydroxylation, and the specific C-7 dehydrogenation of derivatives of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol. The metabolites 2, 5, and 6 showed the more potent inhibitory effects against DU-145 and PC-3 cell lines than the substrate. PMID:23022533

  20. Novel internally quenched substrate of the trypsin-like subunit of 20S eukaryotic proteasome.

    PubMed

    Gruba, Natalia; Wysocka, Magdalena; Brzezińska, Magdalena; Debowski, Dawid; Rolka, Krzysztof; Martin, Nathaniel I; Lesner, Adam

    2016-09-01

    This article describes the synthesis, using combinatorial chemistry, of internally quenched substrates of the trypsin-like subunit of human 20S proteasome. Such substrates were optimized in both the nonprime and prime regions of the peptide chain. Two were selected as the most susceptible for proteasomal proteolysis with excellent kinetic parameters: (i) ABZ-Val-Val-Ser-Arg-Ser-Leu-Gly-Tyr(3-NO2)-NH2 (kcat/KM = 934,000 M(-1) s(-1)) and (ii) ABZ-Val-Val-Ser-GNF-Ala-Met-Gly-Tyr(3-NO2)-NH2 (kcat/KM = 1,980,000 M(-1) s(-1)). Both compounds were efficiently hydrolyzed by the 20S proteasome at picomolar concentrations, demonstrating significant selectivity over other proteasome entities. PMID:26314791

  1. Surface induced dissociation yields substructure of Methanosarcina thermophila 20S proteasome complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xin; Loo, Joseph A.; Wysocki, Vicki H.

    2015-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry (MS) and surface induced dissociation (SID) have been applied to study the stoichiometry and quaternary structure of non-covalent protein complexes. In this study, Methanosarcina thermophila 20S proteasome, which consists of four stacked heptameric rings (α7β7β7α7 symmetry), has been selected to explore the SID dissociation pattern of a complicated stacked ring protein complex. SID produces both α and β subunits while collision induced dissociation (CID) produces only highly charged α subunit. In addition, the charge reduced 20S proteasome produces the α7β7 fragment, reflecting the stacked ring topology of the complex. The combination of SID and charge reduction is shown to be a powerful tool for the study of protein complex structure. PMID:26005366

  2. A third interferon-gamma-induced subunit exchange in the 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Groettrup, M; Kraft, R; Kostka, S; Standera, S; Stohwasser, R; Kloetzel, P M

    1996-04-01

    The 20S proteasome is a protease complex of functional importance for antigen processing. Two of the 14 proteasome subunits, delta and MB1, can be replaced by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-encoded and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-inducible subunits LMP2 and LMP7, respectively. LMP2 and LMP7 alter the cleavage site specificity of the 20S proteasome and are required for the efficient generation of T cell epitopes from a number of viral proteins and for optimal MHC class I cell surface expression. We compared the 20S proteasome subunit pattern from IFN-gamma-induced and non-induced mouse fibroblasts on two-dimensional gels and identified a third subunit exchange by microsequencing: the non-MHC-encoded subunit MECL-1 is induced by IFN-gamma and replaces a sofar barely characterized beta subunit designated 'MC14'. In analogy to LMP2 and LMP7, MECL-1 may be functional in MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation. PMID:8625980

  3. Particle size dependence of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering properties of densely arranged two-dimensional assemblies of Au(core)-Ag(shell) nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Sugawa, Kosuke; Akiyama, Tsuyoshi; Tanoue, Yoshimasa; Harumoto, Takashi; Yanagida, Sayaka; Yasumori, Atsuo; Tomita, Shohei; Otsuki, Joe

    2015-09-01

    We investigated the dependence of the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of densely arranged two-dimensional assemblies of spherical Au(core)-Ag(shell) nanoparticles (Au/AgNSs) on the nanoparticle diameter. The size-controlled Au/AgNSs were synthesized using the Au nanosphere seed-mediated growth method without any bulky stabilizers. The diameters of the Au/AgNSs were 38, 53, and 90 nm and the ratio of the total diameter to the Au core diameter was adjusted to ca. 2.0. Extinction spectra of the colloidal solutions of these nanoparticles exhibited the prominent peak of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Ag and therefore the Au/AgNSs exhibited LSPR properties almost the same as Ag nanospheres. It was confirmed from SEM observation that the organic solvent-mediated liquid-liquid interface assembly technique easily generated densely arranged two-dimensional assemblies of the nanospheres. The extinction spectra of all the assemblies exhibited a prominent broad peak ranging from 500 nm to the near-infrared region, which is assigned to the longitudinal LSPR mode of the coupling nanospheres. The extinction intensity increased with increasing nanosphere diameter. The SERS activities of these assemblies were investigated using p-aminothiophenol as a probe molecule. The result revealed that the enhancement factor (EF) of the Raman signal dramatically increased upon increasing the particle diameter. The maximum EF obtained with a laser excitation wavelength of 785 nm was 1.90 × 10(6) for a nanosphere diameter of 90 nm. This renders the two-dimensional assemblies of the plasmonic Au/AgNSs promising for the development of highly sensitive SERS sensor platforms due to their strong electromagnetic effect. PMID:25558009

  4. The Pertussis Toxin S1 Subunit Is a Thermally Unstable Protein Susceptible to Degradation by the 20S Proteasome†

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Abhay H.; Moe, David; Jamnadas, Maneesha; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PT) is an AB-type protein toxin that consists of a catalytic A subunit (PT S1) and an oligomeric, cell-binding B subunit. It belongs to a subset of AB toxins that move from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before A chain passage into the cytosol. Toxin translocation is thought to involve A chain unfolding in the ER and the quality control mechanism of ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The absence of lysine residues in PT S1 may allow the translocated toxin to avoid ubiquitin-dependent degradation by the 26S proteasome, which is the usual fate of exported ERAD substrates. As the conformation of PT S1 appears to play an important role in toxin translocation, we used biophysical and biochemical methods to examine the structural properties of PT S1. Our in vitro studies found that the isolated PT S1 subunit is a thermally unstable protein that can be degraded in a ubiquitin-independent fashion by the core 20S proteasome. The thermal denaturation of PT S1 was inhibited by its interaction with NAD, a donor molecule used by PT S1 for the ADP-ribosylation of target G proteins. These observations support a model of intoxication in which toxin translocation, degradation, and activity are all influenced by the heat-labile nature of the isolated toxin A chain. PMID:17105192

  5. Self-microemulsifying Drug Delivery System Improved Oral Bioavailability of 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol: From Preparation to Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bing; Pu, Yiqiong; Xu, Benliang; Tao, Jiansheng; Wang, Yuqin; Zhang, Tong; Wu, Peiying

    2015-01-01

    20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (20(S)-PPD) is one type of sapogenin of protopanaxadiols and has a variety of pharmacological activities. In order to improve the dissolution of 20(S)-PPD as well as its oral bioavailability, a self-microemulsifying drug delivery system (SMEDDS) was utilized for 20(S)-PPD preparation. Following the preparation of the 20(S)-PPD SMEDDS, its dissolution, stability, and intestinal absorption in rats were studied, and the pharmacokinetics and optimal dosage after oral administration were evaluated. The dissolution tendency of the SMEDDS in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), 0.1 M HCl and distilled water was consistent. SMEDDS was stable under a condition of high temperature (40°C), high humidity or with strong light irradiation, or within 6 h in artificial digestive tracts. 20(S)-PPD SMEDDS was well-absorbed in all intestinal segments in rats. When the drug concentration was higher than 200 µg/mL or the perfusion flow was faster than 0.5 mL/min, passive diffusion of drug in the duodenum reached a saturated level. In addition, P-glycoprotein inhibitor did not affect the intestinal absorption of 20(S)-PPD SMEDDS. Pharmacokinetic study showed that Tmax in male rats was shortened significantly, while Cmax and area under the curve (AUC(0-t)) were remarkably increased. The relative oral bioavailability of 20(S)-PPD SMEDDS was increased approximately three fold compared with the 20(S)-PPD carboxy methyl cellulose (CMC). 20(S)-PPD SMEDDS (100 mg/mL) was administered by gastric infusion to both mice and rats for 14 d. SMEDDS improved the oral bioavailability of 20(S)-PPD and reduced the necessary drug dosage. 20(S)-PPD SMEDDS could become a promising clinical alternative as an anti-tumor or antidepressant drug. PMID:26084568

  6. Virus-like particles of hepatitis B virus core protein containing five mimotopes of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) protect chickens against IBDV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-shan; Ouyang, Wei; Liu, Xiao-juan; He, Kong-wang; Yu, Sheng-qing; Zhang, Hai-bin; Fan, Hong-jie; Lu, Cheng-ping

    2012-03-01

    Current infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) vaccines suffer from maternal antibody interference and mimotope vaccines might be an alternative. Previously we demonstrated an IBDV VP2 five-mimotope polypeptide, 5EPIS, elicited protective immunity in chickens. In the current study, the 5epis gene was inserted into a plasmid carrying human hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) gene at its major immunodominant region site. The recombinant gene was efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli to produce chimeric protein HBc-5EPIS which self-assembles to virus-like particles (VLP). Two-week old specific-pathogen-free chickens were immunized intramuscularly with HBc-5EPIS VLP or 5EPIS polypeptide without adjuvant (50 μg/injection) on day 0, 7, 14 and 21. Anti-5EPIS antibody was first detected on day 7 and day 21 in HBc-5EPIS and 5EPIS groups, respectively; on day 28, anti-5EPIS titers reached 12,800 or 1600 by ELISA, and 3200 or 800 by virus neutralization assay in HBc-5EPIS and 5EPIS groups, respectively. No anti-5EPIS antibody was detected in the buffer control group throughout the experiment. Challenge on day 28 with a virulent IBDV strain (GX8/99) resulted in 100%, 40.0% and 26.7% survival for chickens immunized with HBc-5EPIS, 5EPIS and buffer, respectively. These data suggest epitope presentation on chimeric VLP is a promising approach for improving mimotope vaccines for IBDV. PMID:22285269

  7. Photo-induced exciton generation in polyvinylpyrrolidone encapsulated Ag2S core-shells: Electrochemical deposition, regular shape and high order of particle size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Nillohit; Jana, Sumanta; Gopal Khan, Gobinda; Mondal, Anup

    2012-12-01

    Visible light induced frequency switching behavior, exhibited by the electrochemically deposited thin films of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) encapsulated Ag2S nanosphere (core-shell) is shown here. A low frequency (˜40 Hz) pulse was found to be generated upon illumination with 1 Sun due to excitonic transition, which also showed good switching behavior with the "on" and "off" state of the light. Capping of the semiconductor surface by a polymer like PVP reduces the surface states and thus lowers the built in barrier height and the width of depletion region. So, the number of photo generated but non recombining electron-hole pairs (excitons) increases, which put their signature in some unique physical properties like increase in photoluminescence (PL) intensity, light induced frequency switching behavior due to free exciton generation, etc. Here, the depositions were carried out on indium tin oxide coated glass substrates from an aqueous solution of AgNO3, thioacetamide, and PVP. The films were structurally characterized using high resolution X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and high resolution transmission electron microscopic techniques. The deposited particles were regular in shape with significantly high order of size distribution. Furrier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the presence of PVP as the encapsulating agent. Optical characterization, viz., UV - vis - NIR and NIR-PL revealed noteworthy amount of NIR emission from the deposited material.

  8. Alloying and oxidation of in situ produced core-shell Al@Yb nanoalloy particles--an "on-the-fly" study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaofan; Andersson, Tomas; Mikkelä, Mikko-Heikki; Mårsell, Erik; Björneholm, Olle; Xu, Xiaojun; Tchaplyguine, Maxim; Liu, Zejin

    2014-08-28

    Core-shell-structured nanoalloy particles with an Al-dominated interior covered by few Yb monolayers have been fabricated using a vapor-aggregation method involving magnetron sputtering. The radially segregated structure of the Yb-Al nanoparticles has been disclosed by "on-the-fly" photoelectron spectroscopy monitoring of the nanoparticle beam in Yb 4f and Al 2p electron binding energy regions. Both, the binding energy values and the electron microscopy images taken on the deposited nanoparticles, allow estimating their dimensions to be in the 5-10 nm range. The photoelectron spectroscopy results suggest that in these nanoparticles no trivalent Yb--the typical case for the macroscopic Yb-Al alloy--is present. The oxidation of preformed Yb-Al nanoparticles was successfully attempted, leading to the appearance of divalent Yb surface oxide--in contrast to the bulk macroscopic Yb which is trivalent in the oxide. Our results suggest that at intermediate oxygen exposures "sandwich-like" nanoparticles of YbO/Yb/Al were synthesized. At higher O2 exposures, the oxygen seems to penetrate all the way to the Yb-Al interface. The results of the present study have to be considered when photonic applications of Yb-doped garnet nanoparticles are planned. PMID:25173009

  9. [Physicochemical, catalytic, and regulatory properties of malate dehydrogenase from Rhodovulum steppense bacteria, strain A-20s].

    PubMed

    Eprintsev, A T; Falaleeva, M I; Parfenova, I V; Liashchenko, M S; Kompantseva, E I; Tret'iakova, A Iu

    2014-01-01

    The physicochemical, regulatory, and kinetic properties of malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37) from haloalkaliphilic purple nonsulfur Rhodovulum steppense bacteria, strain A-20s, were studied. The malate dehydrogenase (MDH) preparation with a specific activity of 0.775 ± 0.113 U/mg protein was obtained in an electrophoretically homogeneous state using multistep purification. Using homogenous preparations, the molecular weight and the Michaelis constant of the enzyme were determined; the effects of metal ions, the temperature effect, and the thermal stability of the MDH were studied. The dimer structure of the enzyme was demonstrated by DS-Na-electrophoresis. PMID:25739304

  10. Human 20S proteasome activity towards fluorogenic peptides of various chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Rut, Wioletta; Drag, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease responsible for the degradation of misfolded proteins. We have synthesized fluorogenic substrates in which the peptide chain was systematically elongated from two to six amino acids and evaluated the effect of peptide length on all three catalytic activities of human 20S proteasome. In the cases of five- and six-membered peptides, we have also synthesized libraries of fluorogenic substrates. Kinetic analysis revealed that six-amino-acid substrates are significantly better for chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activity than shorter peptidic substrates. In the case of trypsin-like activity, a five-amino-acid substrate was optimal. PMID:27176742

  11. Two-point discrimination of the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20's.

    PubMed

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Soon-Hee; An, Ho-Jung; Moon, Ok-Gon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yun, Young-Dae; Park, Joo-Hyun; Min, Kyoung-Ok

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The present study attempted to measure two-point discrimination in the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20's. [Subjects and Methods] Using a three-point esthesiometer, we conducted an experiment with a group of 256 college students (128 male and 128 female), attending N University in Chonan, Republic of Korea. [Results] Females showed two-point discrimination at a shorter distance than males at the following points: (i) 5 cm above the elbow joint, the middle part, and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the anterior upper arm; (ii) 5 cm above the elbow joint and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the posterior upper arm; (iii) 5 cm above the front of the wrist joint of the forearm; 5 cm below the elbow joint, the palmar part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the thumb, the dorsal part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the middle and little fingers. It was also found that females showed greater two-point discrimination than males in distal regions rather than proximal regions. [Conclusion] The findings of this study will help establish normal values for two-point discrimination of upper extremities of young Koreans in their 20's. PMID:27134375

  12. Analysis of F2-isoprostanes in plasma of pregnant women by HPLC-MS/MS using a column packed with core-shell particles

    PubMed Central

    Larose, Jessica; Julien, Pierre; Bilodeau, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Plasma F2-isoprostanes (F2-isoPs) are reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress. Several possible F2-isoPs are generated by the oxidation of arachidonic acid esterified in phospholipids. The separation of these isomers represents a technical challenge for rapid and selective determination. We have developed a HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous determination of seven plasma F2-isoPs, namely 8-iso-15(R)-prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), 8-iso-PGF2α, 15(R)-PGF2α, iPF2α-IV, iPF2α-VI, 5-iPF2α-VI, and (±)5-8,12-iso-iPF2α-VI. We have validated this method in plasma of pregnant women, a mild physiological oxidative stress known to increase F2-isoPs. Thus, plasma samples of women collected at the third trimester of pregnancy (n = 20) were subjected to alkaline hydrolysis followed by liquid-liquid extraction in order to extract total F2-isoPs. The F2-isoPs were separated within 16.5 min using a column packed with core-shell particles. The class VI isomers were the most abundant, accounting for 65% of the total level of all quantified F2-isoPs in plasma of pregnant women (P < 0.05). The 15(R)-PGF2α was the most abundant of the class III isomers quantified. This method allowed fast and selective separation of seven isomers from three different classes of F2-isoP regioisomers. PMID:23431046

  13. The Hepatitis B Virus Core Variants that Expose Foreign C-Terminal Insertions on the Outer Surface of Virus-Like Particles.

    PubMed

    Dishlers, Andris; Skrastina, Dace; Renhofa, Regina; Petrovskis, Ivars; Ose, Velta; Lieknina, Ilva; Jansons, Juris; Pumpens, Paul; Sominskaya, Irina

    2015-12-01

    The major immunodominant region (MIR) and N-terminus of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) core (HBc) protein were used to expose foreign insertions on the outer surface of HBc virus-like particles (VLPs). The additions to the HBc positively charged arginine-rich C-terminal (CT) domain are usually not exposed on the VLP surface. Here, we constructed a set of recombinant HBcG vectors in which CT arginine stretches were substituted by glycine residues. In contrast to natural HBc VLPs and recombinant HBc VLP variants carrying native CT domain, the HBcG VLPs demonstrated a lowered capability to pack bacterial RNA during expression in Escherichia coli cells. The C-terminal addition of a model foreign epitope from the HBV preS1 sequence to the HBcG vectors resulted in the exposure of the inserted epitope on the VLP surface, whereas the same preS1 sequences added to the native CT of the natural HBc protein remained buried within the HBc VLPs. Based on the immunisation of mice, the preS1 epitope added to the HBcG vectors as a part of preS1(20-47) and preS1phil sequences demonstrated remarkable immunogenicity. The same epitope added to the original C-terminus of the HBc protein did not induce a notable level of anti-preS1 antibodies. HBcG vectors may contribute to the further development of versatile HBc VLP-based vaccine and gene therapy applications. PMID:26446016

  14. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD) analogues chemosensitize multidrug-resistant cancer cells to clinical anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junhua; Wang, Xu; Liu, Peng; Deng, Rongxin; Lei, Min; Chen, Wantao; Hu, Lihong

    2013-07-15

    Novel 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD) analogues were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for the chemosensitizing activity against a multidrug resistant (MDR) cell line (KBvcr) overexpressing P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Structure-activity relationship analysis showed that aromatic substituted aliphatic amine at the 24-positions (groups V) effectively and significantly sensitized P-gp overexpressing multidrug resistant (MDR) cells to anticancer drugs, such as docetaxel (DOC), vincristine (VCR), and adriamycin (ADM). PPD derivatives 12 and 18 showed 1.3-2.6 times more effective reversal ability than verapamil (VER) for DOC and VCR. Importantly, no cytotoxicity was observed by the active PPD analogues (5μM) against both non-MDR and MDR cells, suggesting that PPD analogues serve as novel lead compounds toward a potent and safe resistance modulator. Moreover, a preliminary mechanism study demonstrated that the chemosensitizing activity of PPD analogues results from inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpressed in MDR cancer cells. PMID:23683834

  15. Secondary Metabolites Produced by an Endophytic Fungus Pestalotiopsis sydowiana and Their 20S Proteasome Inhibitory Activities.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xuekui; Kim, Soonok; Liu, Changheng; Shim, Sang Hee

    2016-01-01

    Fungal endophytes have attracted attention due to their functional diversity. Secondary metabolites produced by Pestalotiopsis sydowiana from a halophyte, Phragmites communis Trinus, were investigated. Eleven compounds, including four penicillide derivatives (1-4) and seven α-pyrone analogues (5-10) were isolated from cultures of P. sydowiana. The compounds were identified based on spectroscopic data. The inhibitory activities against the 20S proteasome were evaluated. Compounds 1-3, 5, and 9-10 showed modest proteasome inhibition activities, while compound 8 showed strong activity with an IC50 of 1.2 ± 0.3 μM. This is the first study on the secondary metabolites produced by P. sydowiana and their proteasome inhibitory activities. The endophytic fungus P. sydowiana might be a good resource for proteasome inhibitors. PMID:27447600

  16. Chalcogenide coatings of Ge15Sb20S65 and Te20As30Se50.

    PubMed

    Nazabal, Virginie; Cathelinaud, Michel; Shen, Weidong; Nemec, Petr; Charpentier, Frédéric; Lhermite, Hervé; Anne, Marie-Laure; Capoulade, Jérémie; Grasset, Fabien; Moreac, Alain; Inoue, Satoru; Frumar, Miloslav; Adam, Jean-Luc; Lequime, Michel; Amra, Claude

    2008-05-01

    Chalcogenide coatings are investigated to obtain either optical components for spectral applications or optochemical sensors in the mid-infrared. The deposition of Ge(15)Sb(20)S(65) and Te(20)As(30)Se(50) chalcogenide glasses is performed by two physical techniques: electron-beam and pulsed-laser deposition. The quality of the film is analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy to characterize the morphology, topography, and chemical composition. The optical properties and optical constants are also determined. A CF(4) dry etching is performed on these films to obtain a channeled optical waveguide. For a passband filter made by electron-beam deposition, cryolite as a low-refractive-index material and chalcogenide glasses as high-refractive-index materials are used to favor a large refractive-index contrast. A shift of a centered wavelength of a photosensitive passband filter is controlled by illumination time. PMID:18449231

  17. Development of a candidate influenza vaccine based on virus-like particles displaying influenza M2e peptide into the immunodominant region of hepatitis B core antigen: Broad protective efficacy of particles carrying four copies of M2e.

    PubMed

    Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Kuprianov, Victor V; Blokhina, Elena A; Potapchuk, Marina V; Korotkov, Alexander V; Gorshkov, Andrey N; Kasyanenko, Marina A; Ravin, Nikolai V; Kiselev, Oleg I

    2015-06-26

    A long-term objective when designing influenza vaccines is to create one with broad cross-reactivity that will provide effective control over influenza, no matter which strain has caused the disease. Here we summarize the results from an investigation into the immunogenic and protective capacities inherent in variations of a recombinant protein, HBc/4M2e. This protein contains four copies of the ectodomain from the influenza virus protein M2 (M2e) fused within the immunodominant loop of the hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBc). Variations of this basic design include preparations containing M2e from the consensus human influenza virus; the M2e from the highly pathogenic avian A/H5N1 virus and a combination of two copies from human and two copies from avian influenza viruses. Intramuscular delivery in mice with preparations containing four identical copies of M2e induced high IgG titers in blood sera and bronchoalveolar lavages. It also provoked the formation of memory T-cells and antibodies were retained in the blood sera for a significant period of time post immunization. Furthermore, these preparations prevented the death of 75-100% of animals, which were challenged with lethal doses of virus. This resulted in a 1.2-3.5 log10 decrease in viral replication within the lungs. Moreover, HBc particles carrying only "human" or "avian" M2e displayed cross-reactivity in relation to human (A/H1N1, A/H2N2 and A/H3N2) or A/H5N1 and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, respectively; however, with the particles carrying both "human" and "avian" M2e this effect was much weaker, especially in relation to influenza virus A/H5N1. It is apparent from this work that to quickly produce vaccine for a pandemic it would be necessary to have several variations of a recombinant protein, containing four copies of M2e (each one against a group of likely influenza virus strains) with these relevant constructs housed within a comprehensive collection Escherichia coli-producers and maintained ready for use

  18. 3D morphology of the human hepatic ferritin mineral core: New evidence for a subunit structure revealed by single particle analysis of HAADF-STEM images

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Ying-Hsi; Sader, Kasim; Powell, Jonathan J.; Bleloch, Andrew; Gass, Mhairi; Trinick, John; Warley, Alice; Li, Andy; Brydson, Rik; Brown, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Ferritin, the major iron storage protein, has dual functions; it sequesters redox activity of intracellular iron and facilitates iron turn-over. Here we present high angle annular dark field (HAADF) images from individual hepatic ferritin cores within tissue sections, these images were obtained using spherical aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) under controlled electron fluence. HAADF images of the cores suggest a cubic morphology and a polycrystalline (ferrihydrite) subunit structure that is not evident in equivalent bright field images. By calibrating contrast levels in the HAADF images using quantitative electron energy loss spectroscopy, we have estimated the absolute iron content in any one core, and produced a three dimensional reconstruction of the average core morphology. The core is composed of up to eight subunits, consistent with the eight channels in the protein shell that deliver iron to the central cavity. We find no evidence of a crystallographic orientation relationship between core subunits. Our results confirm that the ferritin protein shell acts as a template for core morphology and within the core, small (∼2 nm), surface-disordered ferrihydrite subunits connect to leave a low density centre and a high surface area that would allow rapid turn-over of iron in biological systems. PMID:19116170

  19. An ALS disease mutation in Cdc48/p97 impairs 20S proteasome binding and proteolytic communication.

    PubMed

    Barthelme, Dominik; Jauregui, Ruben; Sauer, Robert T

    2015-09-01

    Cdc48 (also known as p97 or VCP) is an essential and highly abundant, double-ring AAA+ ATPase, which is ubiquitous in archaea and eukaryotes. In archaea, Cdc48 ring hexamers play a direct role in quality control by unfolding and translocating protein substrates into the degradation chamber of the 20S proteasome. Whether Cdc48 and 20S cooperate directly in protein degradation in eukaryotic cells is unclear. Two regions of Cdc48 are important for 20S binding, the pore-2 loop at the bottom of the D2 AAA+ ring and a C-terminal tripeptide. Here, we identify an aspartic acid in the pore-2 loop as an important element in 20S recognition. Importantly, mutation of this aspartate in human Cdc48 has been linked to familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). In archaeal or human Cdc48 variants, we find that mutation of this pore-2 residue impairs 20S binding and proteolytic communication but does not affect the stability of the hexamer or rates of ATP hydrolysis and protein unfolding. These results suggest that human Cdc48 interacts functionally with the 20S proteasome. PMID:26134898

  20. Fast parallelized kalman filter based reconstruction of charged particle trajectories for the compressed baryonic matter experiment on a many-core server at the laboratory of information technologies, JINR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablyazimov, T. O.; Zyzak, M. V.; Ivanov, V. V.; Kisel, P. I.

    2014-07-01

    The charged particle trajectory online reconstruction in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment (GSI, Germany) is an extremely difficult task. It is conditioned by a high rate of the ion beam-tar-get collisions (up to 107/s), high track multiplicity in each nucleus-nucleus collision (up to 1000 particles), and charged-particle trajectory registration with the coordinate detectors located in a highly inhomogeneous magnetic field. Such a problem could be solved only by using modern high-performance computers. This work scrutinizes a Kalman filter based track reconstruction algorithm implemented using different parallelization approaches. To perform the analysis, a many-core hybrid server with two Intel Xeon X5660 CPUs and a NVidia GTX 480 GPU (JINR LIT) was used.

  1. A unified mechanism for proteolysis and autocatalytic activation in the 20S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Huber, Eva M; Heinemeyer, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Arendt, Cassandra S; Hochstrasser, Mark; Groll, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the 20S proteasome is tightly regulated. The N-terminal propeptides protecting the active-site threonines are autocatalytically released only on completion of assembly. However, the trigger for the self-activation and the reason for the strict conservation of threonine as the active site nucleophile remain enigmatic. Here we use mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography and biochemical assays to suggest that Lys33 initiates nucleophilic attack of the propeptide by deprotonating the Thr1 hydroxyl group and that both residues together with Asp17 are part of a catalytic triad. Substitution of Thr1 by Cys disrupts the interaction with Lys33 and inactivates the proteasome. Although a Thr1Ser mutant is active, it is less efficient compared with wild type because of the unfavourable orientation of Ser1 towards incoming substrates. This work provides insights into the basic mechanism of proteolysis and propeptide autolysis, as well as the evolutionary pressures that drove the proteasome to become a threonine protease. PMID:26964885

  2. A unified mechanism for proteolysis and autocatalytic activation in the 20S proteasome

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Eva M.; Heinemeyer, Wolfgang; Li, Xia; Arendt, Cassandra S.; Hochstrasser, Mark; Groll, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the 20S proteasome is tightly regulated. The N-terminal propeptides protecting the active-site threonines are autocatalytically released only on completion of assembly. However, the trigger for the self-activation and the reason for the strict conservation of threonine as the active site nucleophile remain enigmatic. Here we use mutagenesis, X-ray crystallography and biochemical assays to suggest that Lys33 initiates nucleophilic attack of the propeptide by deprotonating the Thr1 hydroxyl group and that both residues together with Asp17 are part of a catalytic triad. Substitution of Thr1 by Cys disrupts the interaction with Lys33 and inactivates the proteasome. Although a Thr1Ser mutant is active, it is less efficient compared with wild type because of the unfavourable orientation of Ser1 towards incoming substrates. This work provides insights into the basic mechanism of proteolysis and propeptide autolysis, as well as the evolutionary pressures that drove the proteasome to become a threonine protease. PMID:26964885

  3. Salinosporamide Natural Products: Potent 20S Proteasome Inhibitors as Promising Cancer Chemotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gulder, Tobias A. M.

    2010-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors are rapidly evolving as potent treatment options in cancer therapy. One of the most promising drug candidates of this type is salinosporamide A from the bacterium Salinispora tropica. This marine natural product possesses a complex, densely functionalized γ-lactam-β-lactone pharmacophore, which is responsible for its irreversible binding to its target, the β subunit of the 20S proteasome. Salinosporamide A entered phase I clinical trials for the treatment of multiple myeloma only three years after its discovery. The strong biological activity and the challenging structure of this compound have fueled intense academic and industrial research in recent years, which has led to the development of more than ten syntheses, the elucidation of its biosynthetic pathway, and the generation of promising structure–activity relationships and oncological data. Salinosporamide A thus serves as an intriguing example of the successful interplay of modern drug discovery and biomedical research, medicinal chemistry and pharmacology, natural product synthesis and analysis, as well as biosynthesis and bioengineering. PMID:20927786

  4. The Translational Proteome Modulated by 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Ying Hua; Chen, Chien Chuan; Li, Fu An; Cheng, Jen Kun; Lin, Ming Chung; Huang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD), a natural compound of dammarane ginsenoside purified from the ginseng plant, exhibits strong anticancer properties. It has also been reported to have strong antioxidant activity and plays a role in cardiovascular protection. However, the downstream signaling mechanism PPD employs is still unclear and requires further elucidation. Methods Endothelial cells (ECs) EAhy 926 were used to investigate the growth promoting effect of PPD. The protein lysates extracted from both mock- and PPD-treated cells were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to monitor protein changes. After image analysis, proteins with significant change in the expression level were further identified by mass spectrometry. Western blot was applied to further confirm the protein variations in the 2-DE assay. Results In the current study, we found that treatment with PPD (10 μg/ml) significantly increased ECs healing. The translational proteome was established according to 16 up-regulated and 8 down-regulated proteins identified in 2-DE. These proteins were reported to function as energy homeostasis and in the prevention of oxidative stress. The elevated expressions of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and glutathione synthetase (GSS) were further confirmed in the western blot analysis. Conclusions According to the information obtained from translational proteome, we delineated that PPD mediated vascular homeostasis through the up-regulation of anti-oxidative proteins. Additional functional investigations are necessary regarding the HO-1 and GSS proteins. PMID:27122820

  5. Ginseng saponin metabolite 20(S)-protopanaxadiol inhibits tumor growth by targeting multiple cancer signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    GAO, JIAN-LI; LV, GUI-YUAN; HE, BAI-CHENG; ZHANG, BING-QIANG; ZHANG, HONGYU; WANG, NING; WANG, CHONG-ZHI; DU, WEI; YUAN, CHUN-SU; HE, TONG-CHUAN

    2013-01-01

    Plant-derived active constituents and their semi-synthetic or synthetic analogs have served as major sources of anticancer drugs. 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) is a metabolite of ginseng saponin of both American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer). We previously demonstrated that ginsenoside Rg3, a glucoside precursor of PPD, exhibits anti-proliferative effects on HCT116 cells and reduces tumor size in a xenograft model. Our subsequent study indicated that PPD has more potent antitumor activity than that of Rg3 in vitro although the mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of PPD remains to be defined. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying the anticancer activity of PPD in human cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. PPD was shown to inhibit growth and induce cell cycle arrest in HCT116 cells. The in vivo studies indicate that PPD inhibits xenograft tumor growth in athymic nude mice bearing HCT116 cells. The xenograft tumor size was significantly reduced when the animals were treated with PPD (30 mg/kg body weight) for 3 weeks. When the expression of previously identified Rg3 targets, A kinase (PRKA) anchor protein 8 (AKAP8L) and phosphatidylinositol transfer protein α (PITPNA), was analyzed, PPD was shown to inhibit the expression of PITPNA while upregulating AKAP8L expression in HCT116 cells. Pathway-specific reporter assays indicated that PPD effectively suppressed the NF-κB, JNK and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways. Taken together, our results suggest that the anticancer activity of PPD in colon cancer cells may be mediated through targeting NF-κB, JNK and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways, although the detailed mechanisms underlying the anticancer mode of PPD action need to be fully elucidated. PMID:23633038

  6. Interactions of PAN's C-termini with archaeal 20S proteasome and implications for the eukaryotic proteasome–ATPase interactions

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yadong; Smith, David M; Kim, Ho Min; Rodriguez, Victor; Goldberg, Alfred L; Cheng, Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Protein degradation in the 20S proteasome is regulated in eukaryotes by the 19S ATPase complex and in archaea by the homologous PAN ATPase ring complex. Subunits of these hexameric ATPases contain on their C-termini a conserved hydrophobic-tyrosine-X (HbYX) motif that docks into pockets in the 20S to stimulate the opening of a gated substrate entry channel. Here, we report the crystal structure of the archaeal 20S proteasome in complex with the C-terminus of the archaeal proteasome regulatory ATPase, PAN. This structure defines the detailed interactions between the critical C-terminal HbYX motif and the 20S α-subunits and indicates that the intersubunit pocket in the 20S undergoes an induced-fit conformational change on binding of the HbYX motif. This structure together with related mutagenesis data suggest how in eukaryotes certain proteasomal ATPases bind to specific pockets in an asymmetrical manner to regulate gate opening. PMID:20019667

  7. Composite Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Spang & Company's new configuration of converter transformer cores is a composite of gapped and ungapped cores assembled together in concentric relationship. The net effect of the composite design is to combine the protection from saturation offered by the gapped core with the lower magnetizing requirement of the ungapped core. The uncut core functions under normal operating conditions and the cut core takes over during abnormal operation to prevent power surges and their potentially destructive effect on transistors. Principal customers are aerospace and defense manufacturers. Cores also have applicability in commercial products where precise power regulation is required, as in the power supplies for large mainframe computers.

  8. Immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasome from human cells via transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits.

    PubMed

    Livinskaya, Veronika A; Barlev, Nickolai A; Nikiforov, Andrey A

    2014-05-01

    The proteasome is a multi-subunit proteolytic complex that plays a central role in protein degradation in all eukaryotic cells. It regulates many vital cellular processes therefore its dysfunction can lead to various pathologies including cancer and neurodegeneration. Isolation of enzymatically active proteasomes is a key step to the successful study of the proteasome regulation and functions. Here we describe a simple and efficient protocol for immunoaffinity purification of the functional 20S proteasomes from human HEK 293T cells after transient overexpression of specific proteasome subunits tagged with 3xFLAG. To construct 3xFLAG-fusion proteins, DNA sequences encoding the 20S proteasome subunits PSMB5, PSMA5, and PSMA3 were cloned into mammalian expression vector pIRES-hrGFP-1a. The corresponding recombinant proteins PSMB5-3xFLAG, PSMA5-3xFLAG, or PSMA3-3xFLAG were transiently overexpressed in human HEK 293T cells and were shown to be partially incorporated into the intact proteasome complexes. 20S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated from HEK 293T cell extracts under mild conditions using antibodies against FLAG peptide. Isolation of highly purified 20S proteasomes were confirmed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting using antibodies against different proteasome subunits. Affinity purified 20S proteasomes were shown to possess chymotrypsin- and trypsin-like peptidase activities confirming their functionality. This simple single-step affinity method of the 20S proteasome purification can be instrumental to subsequent functional studies of proteasomes in human cells. PMID:24583181

  9. Multi-responsive hybrid particles: thermo-, pH-, photo-, and magneto-responsive magnetic hydrogel cores with gold nanorod optical triggers.

    PubMed

    Rittikulsittichai, Supparesk; Kolhatkar, Arati G; Sarangi, Subhasis; Vorontsova, Maria A; Vekilov, Peter G; Brazdeikis, Audrius; Randall Lee, T

    2016-06-01

    The research strategy described in this manuscript harnesses the attractive properties of hydrogels, gold nanorods (Aurods), and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) by synthesizing one unique multi-responsive nanostructure. This novel hybrid structure consists of silica-coated magnetic particles encapsulated within a thermo-responsive P(NIPAM-co-AA) hydrogel network on which Aurods are assembled. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that these composite particles respond to several forms of external stimuli (temperature, pH, light, and/or applied magnetic field) owing to their specific architecture. Exposure of the hybrid particles to external stimuli led to a systematic and reversible variation in the hydrodynamic diameter (swelling-deswelling) and thus in the optical properties of the hybrid particles (red-shifting of the plasmon band). Such stimuli-responsive volume changes can be effectively exploited in drug-delivery applications. PMID:27227963

  10. The proteasomal subunit Rpn6 is a molecular clamp holding the core and regulatory subcomplexes together

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Ganesh Ramnath; Nagy, István; Bohn, Stefan; Unverdorben, Pia; Hubert, Agnes; Körner, Roman; Nickell, Stephan; Lasker, Keren; Sali, Andrej; Tamura, Tomohiro; Nishioka, Taiki; Förster, Friedrich; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Bracher, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Proteasomes execute the degradation of most cellular proteins. Although the 20S core particle (CP) has been studied in great detail, the structure of the 19S regulatory particle (RP), which prepares ubiquitylated substrates for degradation, has remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of one of the RP subunits, Rpn6, and we describe its integration into the cryo-EM density map of the 26S holocomplex at 9.1 Å resolution. Rpn6 consists of an α-solenoid-like fold and a proteasome COP9/signalosome eIF3 (PCI) module in a right-handed suprahelical configuration. Highly conserved surface areas of Rpn6 interact with the conserved surfaces of the Pre8 (alpha2) and Rpt6 subunits from the alpha and ATPase rings, respectively. The structure suggests that Rpn6 has a pivotal role in stabilizing the otherwise weak interaction between the CP and the RP. PMID:22187461

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasome in complex with protein substrates

    PubMed Central

    Felderer, Karin; Groves, Matthew; Diez, Joachim; Pohl, Ehmke; Witt, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    The 20S proteasome is a 700 kDa barrel-shaped proteolytic complex that is traversed by an internal channel which widens into three cavities: two antechambers and one central chamber. Entrance to the complex is restricted by the narrow opening of the channel, which only allows unfolded substrates to reach the active sites located within the central cavity. The X-ray structures of 20S proteasomes from different organisms with and without inhibitors bound have led to a detailed knowledge of their structure and proteolytic function. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that underlie substrate translocation into the 20S proteasome and the role of the antechambers remain elusive. To investigate putative changes within the proteasome that occur during substrate translocation, ‘host–guest’ complexes between the Thermoplasma acidophilum 20S proteasomes and either cytochrome c (cyt c) or green fluorescent protein (GFP) were produced and crystallized. Orthorhombic crystals belonging to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 116, b = 207, c = 310 Å (cyt c) and a = 116, b = 206, c = 310 Å (GFP), were formed and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 3.4 Å (cyt c) and 3.8 Å (GFP) resolution. PMID:18931431

  12. Antitumoral Activity of (20R)- and (20S)-Ginsenoside Rh2 on Transplanted Hepatocellular Carcinoma in Mice.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qun; Rong, Na; Liu, Li-Jia; Xu, Xiao-Lin; Liu, Jian-Ting; Jin, Feng-Xie; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2016-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the leading causes of malignancy-related death in China. Its therapy in clinics is a big challenge. Ginsenoside Rh2 is one of the most notable cancer-preventing components from red ginseng and it has been reported that ginsenoside Rh2 exhibited potent cytotoxicity against human hepatoma cells. Rh2 exists as two different stereoisomeric forms, (20S)-ginsenoside Rh2 and (20R)-ginsenoside Rh2. Previous reports showed that the Rh2 epimers demonstrated different pharmacological activities and only (20S)-ginsenoside Rh2 showed potent proliferation inhibition on cancer cells in vitro. However, the in vivo anti-hepatoma activity of (20R)-ginsenoside Rh2 and (20S)-ginsenoside Rh2 has not been reported yet. This work assessed and compared the anti-hepatoma activities of (20S)-ginsenoside Rh2 and (20R)-ginsenoside Rh2 using H22 a hepatoma-bearing mouse model in vivo. In addition, hematoxylin and eosin staining, the deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay, and the semiquantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction method were used to further study the apoptosis of the tumors. The results showed that both (20S)-ginsenoside Rh2 and (20R)-ginsenoside Rh2 suppressed the growth of H22 transplanted tumors in vivo, and the highest inhibition rate could be up to 42.2 and 46.8 %, respectively (p < 0.05). Further, hematoxylin/eosin staining and the deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling assay indicated that both (20R)-ginsenoside Rh2 and (20S)-ginsenoside Rh2 could induce H22 hepatoma tumor cell apoptosis, with apoptosis indexes of 3.87 %, and 3.80 %, respectively (p < 0.05). Moreover, this effect was accompanied by downregulating the level of Bcl-2 mRNA. In conclusion, both (20S)-ginsenoside Rh2 and (20R)-ginsenoside Rh2 can suppress the growth of H22 hepatomas without causing severe side effects, and this effect is associated with the induction of apoptosis. PMID:27163230

  13. Visualisation of γH2AX Foci Caused by Heavy Ion Particle Traversal; Distinction between Core Track versus Non-Track Damage

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Nakako Izumi; Brunton, Holly; Watanabe, Ritsuko; Shrikhande, Amruta; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Fujimori, Akira; Murakami, Takeshi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Jeggo, Penny; Shibata, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Heavy particle irradiation produces complex DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) which can arise from primary ionisation events within the particle trajectory. Additionally, secondary electrons, termed delta-electrons, which have a range of distributions can create low linear energy transfer (LET) damage within but also distant from the track. DNA damage by delta-electrons distant from the track has not previously been carefully characterised. Using imaging with deconvolution, we show that at 8 hours after exposure to Fe (∼200 keV/µm) ions, γH2AX foci forming at DSBs within the particle track are large and encompass multiple smaller and closely localised foci, which we designate as clustered γH2AX foci. These foci are repaired with slow kinetics by DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in G1 phase with the magnitude of complexity diminishing with time. These clustered foci (containing 10 or more individual foci) represent a signature of DSBs caused by high LET heavy particle radiation. We also identified simple γH2AX foci distant from the track, which resemble those arising after X-ray exposure, which we attribute to low LET delta-electron induced DSBs. They are rapidly repaired by NHEJ. Clustered γH2AX foci induced by heavy particle radiation cause prolonged checkpoint arrest compared to simple γH2AX foci following X-irradiation. However, mitotic entry was observed when ∼10 clustered foci remain. Thus, cells can progress into mitosis with multiple clusters of DSBs following the traversal of a heavy particle. PMID:23967070

  14. Core-Cutoff Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gheen, Darrell

    2007-01-01

    , hence, with the frictional drag acting on the outer sleeve. As the wire cuts toward the center of the core, the inner sleeve rotates farther with respect to the outer sleeve. Once the wire has cut to the center of the core, the tool and the core can be removed from the hole. The proper choice of cutting wire depends on the properties of the core material. For a sufficiently soft core material, a nonmetallic monofilament can be used. For a rubber-like core material, a metal wire can be used. For a harder core material, it is necessary to use an abrasive wire, and the efficiency of the tool can be increased greatly by vacuuming away the particles generated during cutting. For a core material that can readily be melted or otherwise cut by use of heat, it could be preferable to use an electrically heated cutting wire. In such a case, electric current can be supplied to the cutting wire, from an electrically isolated source, via rotating contact rings mounted on the sleeves.

  15. SplitCore Technology Allows Efficient Production of Virus-Like Particles Presenting a Receptor-Contacting Epitope of Human IgE.

    PubMed

    Baltabekova, A Zh; Shagyrova, Zh S; Kamzina, A S; Voykov, M; Zhiyenbay, Ye; Ramanculov, E M; Shustov, A V

    2015-08-01

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) plays a central role in type I hypersensitivity including allergy and asthma. Novel treatment strategy envisages development of a therapeutic vaccine designed to elicit autologous blocking antibodies against the IgE. We sought to develop an IgE-epitope antigen that induces antibodies against a receptor-contacting epitope on human IgE molecule. We designed the VLP immunogens which utilize hepatitis B virus core protein (HBcAg) as a carrier, and present arrays of the receptor-contacting epitopes of the human IgE on their surfaces. FG loop from the IgE domain Cε3 was engineered into the HBcAg. Two constructs explore a well-established approach of insertion into a main immunodominant region of the HBcAg. Third construct is different in that the carrier is produced in a form of an assembly of two polypeptide chains which upon expression remain associated in a stable VLP-forming subunit (SplitCore technology). No VLPs were isolated from E.coli expressing the IgE-epitope antigens with contiguous sequences. On the contrary, the SplitCore antigen carrying the FG loop efficiently formed the VLPs. Immunization of mice with the VLPs presenting receptor-contacting epitope of the IgE elicited antibodies recognizing the human IgE in ELISA. PMID:25837568

  16. New trend in the LC separation analysis of pharmaceuticals--high performance separation by ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with core-shell particle C18 columns--.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Nagamatsu, Kumi

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a mini-review of the recent results in the ultra high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation of pharmaceuticals by our group. High performance UHPLC separation employing core-shell particle C18 columns was demonstrated. High performance (high theoretical plate number of approximately 20000/10 cm, low theoretical plate height of 5 μm) was obtained without any specific devices in the conventional HPLC apparatus, only through changing detector sampling times and the inner diameter of the connecting tube. High theoretical plate numbers with low column back pressure obtained by the core-shell particle columns enabled fast separation of the analytes. Methanol, which gives high column pressure drops in the reversed-phase mode HPLC compared with acetonitrile, can be used without any trouble. One analysis of the purity testing of diltiazem hydrochloride was performed within 100 s. One analysis in the photostability testing of mecobalamin (vitamin B12 analogue) was successful within 180 s. PMID:24521905

  17. Co@Co3O4 core-shell particle encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cage hybrids as active and durable oxygen-evolving catalysts.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinzhe; Fang, Yiyun; Wen, Lixin; Li, Feng; Yin, Guanlin; Chen, Wanmin; An, Xingcai; Jin, Jun; Ma, Jiantai

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt-based nanomaterials are promising candidates as efficient, affordable, and sustainable alternative electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). However, the catalytic efficiency of traditional nanomaterials is still far below what is expected, because of their low stability in basic solutions and poor active site exposure yield. Here a unique hybrid nanomaterial comprising Co@Co3O4 core-shell nanoparticle (NP) encapsulated N-doped mesoporous carbon cages on reduced graphene oxide (denoted as Co@Co3O4@NMCC/rGO) is successfully synthesized via a carbonization and subsequent oxidation strategy of a graphene oxide (GO)-based metal-organic framework (MOF). Impressively, the special carbon cage structure is very important for not only leading to a large active surface area, enhanced mass/charge transport capability, and easy release of gas bubbles, but also preventing Co@Co3O4 NPs from aggregation and peeling off during prolonged electrochemical reactions. As a result, in alkaline media, the resulting hybrid materials catalyze the OER with a low onset potential of ∼1.50 V (vs. RHE) and an over-potential of only 340 mV to achieve a stable current density of 10 mA cm(-2) for at least 25 h. In addition, metallic Co cores in Co@Co3O4 provide an alternative way for electron transport and accelerate the OER rate. PMID:26914166

  18. Engineering the nanostructure of a polymer-nanocomposite film containing Ti-based core-shell particles to enhance dielectric response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevegowda, Amoghavarsha; Young, Neil P.; Grant, Patrick S.

    2015-09-01

    Nylon-6 based polymer-nanocomposite (PNC) dielectrics containing nano-regions of Ti-only and Ag + Ti have been manufactured by layer-by-layer deposition. By varying the thickness and deposition rate of individual layers, the PNC structure was manipulated at the nano-scale and then studied using various types of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhanced PNC dielectric properties, with a dielectric constant k as high as ~73, were shown to relate critically to in situ reactions and the detailed nano-arrangement of the resulting Ti (core)-TiOx (shell) and Ag nanoparticles.Nylon-6 based polymer-nanocomposite (PNC) dielectrics containing nano-regions of Ti-only and Ag + Ti have been manufactured by layer-by-layer deposition. By varying the thickness and deposition rate of individual layers, the PNC structure was manipulated at the nano-scale and then studied using various types of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhanced PNC dielectric properties, with a dielectric constant k as high as ~73, were shown to relate critically to in situ reactions and the detailed nano-arrangement of the resulting Ti (core)-TiOx (shell) and Ag nanoparticles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03824c

  19. Link between Organ-specific Antigen Processing by 20S Proteasomes and CD8+ T Cell–mediated Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Ruppert, Thomas; Strehl, Britta; Jungblut, Peter R.; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Lamer, Stephanie; Prinz, Immo; Drung, Ilse; Kloetzel, Peter-M.; Kaufmann, Stefan H.E.; Steinhoff, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of cross-reactive HSP60-specific CD8+ T cells into immunodeficient mice causes autoimmune intestinal pathology restricted to the small intestine. We wondered whether local immunopathology induced by CD8+ T cells can be explained by tissue-specific differences in proteasome-mediated processing of major histocompatibility complex class I T cell epitopes. Our experiments demonstrate that 20S proteasomes of different organs display a characteristic composition of α and β chain subunits and produce distinct peptide fragments with respect to both quality and quantity. Digests of HSP60 polypeptides by 20S proteasomes show most efficient generation of the pathology related CD8+ T cell epitope in the small intestine. Further, we demonstrate that the organ-specific potential to produce defined T cell epitopes reflects quantities that are relevant for cytotoxic T lymphocyte recognition. We propose tissue-specific antigen processing by 20S proteasomes as a potential mechanism to control organ-specific immune responses. PMID:11956289

  20. Chlamydomonas IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a core component of IFT particle complex B and is required for flagellar assembly.

    PubMed

    Fan, Zhen-Chuan; Behal, Robert H; Geimer, Stefan; Wang, Zhaohui; Williamson, Shana M; Zhang, Haili; Cole, Douglas G; Qin, Hongmin

    2010-08-01

    DYF-1 is a highly conserved protein essential for ciliogenesis in several model organisms. In Caenorhabditis elegans, DYF-1 serves as an essential activator for an anterograde motor OSM-3 of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the ciliogenesis-required motility that mediates the transport of flagellar precursors and removal of turnover products. In zebrafish and Tetrahymena DYF-1 influences the cilia tubulin posttranslational modification and may have more ubiquitous function in ciliogenesis than OSM-3. Here we address how DYF-1 biochemically interacts with the IFT machinery by using the model organism Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, in which the anterograde IFT does not depend on OSM-3. Our results show that this protein is a stoichiometric component of the IFT particle complex B and interacts directly with complex B subunit IFT46. In concurrence with the established IFT protein nomenclature, DYF-1 is also named IFT70 after the apparent size of the protein. IFT70/CrDYF-1 is essential for the function of IFT in building the flagellum because the flagella of IFT70/CrDYF-1-depleted cells were greatly shortened. Together, these results demonstrate that IFT70/CrDYF-1 is a canonical subunit of IFT particle complex B and strongly support the hypothesis that the IFT machinery has species- and tissue-specific variations with functional ramifications. PMID:20534810

  1. Aeolian particles in marine cores as a tool for quantitative high-resolution reconstruction of upwelling favorable winds along coastal Atacama Desert, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Aqueveque, Valentina; Alfaro, Stéphane; Vargas, Gabriel; Rutllant, José A.; Caquineau, Sandrine

    2015-05-01

    Upwelling areas play a major role in ocean biogeochemical cycles and ultimately in global climate, especially in higly productive regions as the South Eastern Pacific. This work is based on the analysis of the aeolian lithic particles accumulated in laminated sediments off Mejillones (23°S) in the eastern boundary Humboldt Current System. It proposes a high-resolution quantitative reconstruction of the upwelling-favorable southerly wind strength in the past ∼250 years, comparing its variability with changes in organic carbon export/preserved changes to the sea bottom. The increase of the intensity and variability in fluxes of particles larger than 35 μm and 100 μm since the second half of the 19th century and during the 20th century confirms a general strengthening of southerly winds in the region. Spectral analysis on the complete time-series of yearly depositional fluxes indicates that sedimentary variability can be explained by a combination of interannual (ENSO) to decadal (PDO) oscillations similar to the ones yielded by the analysis of the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation index. However, when applied separately to the lithic fluxes of the first and last centuries of the time-series, the method shows that relative to the one of the interannual mode of variability, the influence of the decadal mode has increased in the recent period. Based on the presence/absence of particles with sizes larger than 35/100 μm, each year of the time series is classified as a 'Low wind' (<6 m/s), 'Intermediate wind' (6-8 m/s), or 'Strong wind' (10 to >12 m/s) year. From the AD 1754-1820 period to the AD 1878-1998 one, the proportion of Low and Intermediate wind years decreased from 12% and 74% to 3% and 68%, respectively, whereas the proportion of strong wind years increased from 14% to 29%. For these periods the mean organic carbon also increased 22%, stating the strong relation between export/preservation productivity rate and southerly wind intensity. In the recent period

  2. Development and validation of a generic high-performance liquid chromatography for the simultaneous separation and determination of six cough ingredients: Robustness study on core-shell particles.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Ali Mohamed; Essam, Hebatallah Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    A generally applicable high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the qualitative and quantitative determination of pharmaceutical preparations containing phenylephrine hydrochloride, paracetamol, ephedrine hydrochloride, guaifenesin, doxylamine succinate, and dextromethorphan hydrobromide is developed. Optimization of chromatographic conditions was performed for the gradient elution using different buffer pH values, flow rates and two C18 stationary phases. The method was developed using a Kinetex® C18 column as a core-shell stationary phase with a gradient profile using buffer pH 5.0 and acetonitrile at 2.0 mL/min flow rate. Detection was carried out at 220 nm and linear calibrations were obtained for all components within the studied ranges. The method was fully validated in agreement with ICH guidelines. The proposed method is specific, accurate and precise (RSD% < 3%). Limits of detection are lower than 2.0 μg/mL. Qualitative and quantitative responses were evaluated using experimental design to assist the method robustness. The method was proved to be highly robust against 10% change in buffer pH and flow rate (RSD% < 10%), however, the flow rate may significantly influence the quantitative responses of phenylephrine, paracetamol, and doxylamine (RSD% > 10%). Satisfactory results were obtained for commercial combinations analyses. Statistical comparison between the proposed chromatographic and official methods revealed no significant difference. PMID:27404374

  3. DUBLIN CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Dublin Core is a metadata element set intended to facilitate discovery of electronic resources. It was originally conceived for author-generated descriptions of Web resources, and the Dublin Core has attracted broad ranging international and interdisciplinary support. The cha...

  4. Dual ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction coupled with microwave-assisted derivatization for simultaneous determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol by ultra high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xian-En; Lv, Tao; Zhu, Shuyun; Qu, Fei; Chen, Guang; He, Yongrui; Wei, Na; Li, Guoliang; Xia, Lian; Sun, Zhiwei; Zhang, Shijuan; You, Jinmao; Liu, Shu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Sun, Jing; Liu, Shuying

    2016-03-11

    This paper, for the first time, reported a speedy hyphenated technique of low toxic dual ultrasonic-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (dual-UADLLME) coupled with microwave-assisted derivatization (MAD) for the simultaneous determination of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol (PPT). The developed method was based on ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) detection using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. A mass spectrometry sensitizing reagent, 4'-carboxy-substituted rosamine (CSR) with high reaction activity and ionization efficiency was synthesized and firstly used as derivatization reagent. Parameters of dual-UADLLME, MAD and UHPLC-MS/MS conditions were all optimized in detail. Low toxic brominated solvents were used as extractant instead of traditional chlorinated solvents. Satisfactory linearity, recovery, repeatability, accuracy and precision, absence of matrix effect and extremely low limits of detection (LODs, 0.010 and 0.015ng/mL for PPD and PPT, respectively) were achieved. The main advantages were rapid, sensitive and environmentally friendly, and exhibited high selectivity, accuracy and good matrix effect results. The proposed method was successfully applied to pharmacokinetics of PPD and PPT in rat plasma. PMID:26877173

  5. Evaluation of precision and accuracy of the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine designed for in vitro exposure.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Navneet; Lacasse, Martine; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Cabral, Jean-Louis; Adamson, Jason; Errington, Graham; Waldron, Karen C; Gaça, Marianna; Morin, André

    2010-12-01

    The Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine enables the generation, dilution, and transfer of fresh cigarette smoke to cell exposure chambers, for in vitro analyses. We present a study confirming the precision (repeatability r, reproducibility R) and accuracy of smoke dose generated by the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) system and delivery to exposure chambers. Due to the aerosol nature of cigarette smoke, the repeatability of the dilution of the vapor phase in air was assessed by quantifying two reference standard gases: methane (CH(4), r between 29.0 and 37.0 and RSD between 2.2% and 4.5%) and carbon monoxide (CO, r between 166.8 and 235.8 and RSD between 0.7% and 3.7%). The accuracy of dilution (percent error) for CH(4) and CO was between 6.4% and 19.5% and between 5.8% and 6.4%, respectively, over a 10-1000-fold dilution range. To corroborate our findings, a small inter-laboratory study was carried out for CH(4) measurements. The combined dilution repeatability had an r between 21.3 and 46.4, R between 52.9 and 88.4, RSD between 6.3% and 17.3%, and error between 4.3% and 13.1%. Based on the particulate component of cigarette smoke (3R4F), the repeatability (RSD = 12%) of the undiluted smoke generated by the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) was assessed by quantifying solanesol using high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection (HPLC/UV). Finally, the repeatability (r between 0.98 and 4.53 and RSD between 8.8% and 12%) of the dilution of generated smoke particulate phase was assessed by quantifying solanesol following various dilutions of cigarette smoke. The findings in this study suggest the Borgwaldt RM20S(®) smoking machine is a reliable tool to generate and deliver repeatable and reproducible doses of whole smoke to in vitro cultures. PMID:21126153

  6. Biocompatibility of core@shell particles: cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human osteosarcoma cells of colloidal silica spheres coated with crystalline or amorphous zirconia.

    PubMed

    Di Virgilio, A L; Arnal, P M; Maisuls, I

    2014-08-01

    The cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of novel colloidal silica spheres coated with crystalline or amorphous zirconia (SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) or SiO2@ZrO2(am)) have been studied in a human osteosarcoma cell line (MG-63), after 24 h exposure. SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) and SiO2@ZrO2(am) had mean diameters of 782±19 and 891±34 nm, respectively. SiO2@ZrO2(cryst) exposure reduced cell viability, with an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio. The comet and micronucleus (MN) assays detected DNA damage at 5 and 25 μg/mL, respectively. SiO2@ZrO2(am) induced genotoxic action only at 10 and 50 μg/mL (comet and MN assays), along with a decrease of the GSH/GSSG ratio at 50 μg/mL. Both particles were found inside the cells, forming vesicles; however, none of them entered the nucleus. Our findings show that crystallization of the shell of the amorphous ZrO2 increases both cytotoxicity and genotoxicity. PMID:25344169

  7. Synthesis and Evaluation of Macrocyclic Peptide Aldehydes as Potent and Selective Inhibitors of the 20S Proteasome.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David L; Meininger, Isabel; Strater, Zack; Steiner, Stephanie; Tomlin, Frederick; Wu, Julia; Jamali, Haya; Krappmann, Daniel; Götz, Marion G

    2016-03-10

    This research explores the first design and synthesis of macrocyclic peptide aldehydes as potent inhibitors of the 20S proteasome. Two novel macrocyclic peptide aldehydes based on the ring-size of the macrocyclic natural product TMC-95 were prepared and evaluated as inhibitors of the 20S proteasome. Both compounds inhibited in the low nanomolar range and proved to be selective for the proteasome over other serine and cysteine proteases, particularly when compared to linear analogues with similar amino acid sequences. In HeLa cells, both macrocycles efficiently inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcription factor by blocking proteasomal degradation of the inhibitor protein IκBα after cytokine stimulation. Due to their covalent mechanism of binding these compounds represent a 1000-fold increase in inhibitory potency over previously reported noncovalently binding TMC-95 analogues. Molecular modeling of the macrocyclic peptides confirms the preference of the large S3 pocket for large, hydrophobic residues and the ability to exploit this to improve selectivity of proteasome inhibitors. PMID:26985310

  8. Heat treatment and thickness-dependent electrical study of Se50Te20S30 thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Elrahman, M. I.; Hafiz, M. M.; Qasem, Ammar; Abdel-Rahim, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Chalcogenide Se50Te20S30 thin film of different thickness was deposited using thermal evaporation technique. The thermogram of the chalcogenide bulk Se50Te20S30 was obtained using a differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) with heating rate of 7.5 K/min. The glass transition temperature T g, crystallization temperature T c and peak crystallization temperature T p were identified. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) examination indicates the amorphous nature of the as-deposited film and polycrystalline structure of the thermal annealed ones. The dark electrical resistivity ( ρ) measurements were taken in temperature range (300-500 K) and thickness range (200-450 nm). Analysis of the electrical resistivity results revealed two types of conduction mechanisms: conduction due to extended states in the temperature range ( T > T c) and variable range hopping in the temperature range ( T < T c). The effect of the heat treatment and thickness on the density of localized states at the Fermi level N( E F) and hopping parameters were studied.

  9. A novel proteasome inhibitor suppresses tumor growth via targeting both 19S proteasome deubiquitinases and 20S proteolytic peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ningning; Liu, Chunjiao; Li, Xiaofen; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Changshan; Zhao, Chong; Huang, Hongbiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhang, Peiquan; Liu, Shouting; Hua, Xianliang; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Lan, Xiaoying; Yi, Songgang; Wang, Shunqing; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q. Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of bortezomib-based therapy for treatment of multiple myeloma has established proteasome inhibition as an effective therapeutic strategy, and both 20S proteasome peptidases and 19S deubiquitinases (DUBs) are becoming attractive targets of cancer therapy. It has been reported that metal complexes, such as copper complexes, inhibit tumor proteasome. However, the involved mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. Here we report that (i) copper pyrithione (CuPT), an alternative to tributyltin for antifouling paint biocides, inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via targeting both 19S proteasome-specific DUBs and 20S proteolytic peptidases with a mechanism distinct from that of the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib; (ii) CuPT potently inhibits proteasome-specific UCHL5 and USP14 activities; (iii) CuPT inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo. This study uncovers a novel class of dual inhibitors of DUBs and proteasome and suggests a potential clinical strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:24912524

  10. Ginsenoside Rg1 and 20(S)-Rg3 Induce IgA Production by Mouse B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ha-Yan; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Kyu-Seon; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Choi, Jae Eul; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2015-01-01

    Ginsenosides are the major components of ginseng, which is known to modulate blood pressure, metabolism, and immune function, and has been used to treat various diseases. It has been reported that ginseng and several ginsenosides have immunoregulatory effects on the innate and T cell-mediated immune response. However, their effects on the humoral immune response have not been fully explored. The present study examined the direct effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) and ginsenosides on mouse B cell proliferation and on antibody production and the expression of germline transcripts (GLT) by mouse B cells in vitro. RGE slightly reduced B cell proliferation, but increased IgA production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg1 and 20(S)-Rg3 selectively induced IgA production and expression of GLTα transcripts by LPS-stimulated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 and 20(S)-Rg3 can drive the differentiation of B cells into IgA-producing cells through the selective induction of GLTα expression. PMID:26770188

  11. Tracking the Subcellular Fate of 20(S)-Hydroxycholesterol with Click Chemistry Reveals a Transport Pathway to the Golgi*

    PubMed Central

    Peyrot, Sara M.; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Luchetti, Giovanni; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel K.; Fujiwara, Hideji; Scherrer, David; Jallouk, Andrew; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Ory, Daniel S.; Covey, Douglas F.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    Oxysterols, oxidized metabolites of cholesterol, are endogenous small molecules that regulate lipid metabolism, immune function, and developmental signaling. Although the cell biology of cholesterol has been intensively studied, fundamental questions about oxysterols, such as their subcellular distribution and trafficking pathways, remain unanswered. We have therefore developed a useful method to image intracellular 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol with both high sensitivity and spatial resolution using click chemistry and fluorescence microscopy. The metabolic labeling of cells with an alkynyl derivative of 20(S)-hydroxycholesterol has allowed us to directly visualize this oxysterol by attaching an azide fluorophore through cyclo-addition. Unexpectedly, we found that this oxysterol selectively accumulates in the Golgi membrane using a pathway that is sensitive to ATP levels, temperature, and lysosome function. Although previous models have proposed nonvesicular pathways for the rapid equilibration of oxysterols between membranes, direct imaging of oxysterols suggests that a vesicular pathway is responsible for differential accumulation of oxysterols in organelle membranes. More broadly, clickable alkynyl sterols may represent useful tools for sterol cell biology, both to investigate the functions of these important lipids and to decipher the pathways that determine their cellular itineraries. PMID:24596093

  12. A novel proteasome inhibitor suppresses tumor growth via targeting both 19S proteasome deubiquitinases and 20S proteolytic peptidases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningning; Liu, Chunjiao; Li, Xiaofen; Liao, Siyan; Song, Wenbin; Yang, Changshan; Zhao, Chong; Huang, Hongbiao; Guan, Lixia; Zhang, Peiquan; Liu, Shouting; Hua, Xianliang; Chen, Xin; Zhou, Ping; Lan, Xiaoying; Yi, Songgang; Wang, Shunqing; Wang, Xuejun; Dou, Q Ping; Liu, Jinbao

    2014-01-01

    The successful development of bortezomib-based therapy for treatment of multiple myeloma has established proteasome inhibition as an effective therapeutic strategy, and both 20S proteasome peptidases and 19S deubiquitinases (DUBs) are becoming attractive targets of cancer therapy. It has been reported that metal complexes, such as copper complexes, inhibit tumor proteasome. However, the involved mechanism of action has not been fully characterized. Here we report that (i) copper pyrithione (CuPT), an alternative to tributyltin for antifouling paint biocides, inhibits the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) via targeting both 19S proteasome-specific DUBs and 20S proteolytic peptidases with a mechanism distinct from that of the FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor bortezomib; (ii) CuPT potently inhibits proteasome-specific UCHL5 and USP14 activities; (iii) CuPT inhibits tumor growth in vivo and induces cytotoxicity in vitro and ex vivo. This study uncovers a novel class of dual inhibitors of DUBs and proteasome and suggests a potential clinical strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:24912524

  13. Ginsenoside Rg1 and 20(S)-Rg3 Induce IgA Production by Mouse B Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Ha-Yan; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Kyu-Seon; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Choi, Jae Eul; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun; Park, Seok-Rae

    2015-12-01

    Ginsenosides are the major components of ginseng, which is known to modulate blood pressure, metabolism, and immune function, and has been used to treat various diseases. It has been reported that ginseng and several ginsenosides have immunoregulatory effects on the innate and T cell-mediated immune response. However, their effects on the humoral immune response have not been fully explored. The present study examined the direct effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) and ginsenosides on mouse B cell proliferation and on antibody production and the expression of germline transcripts (GLT) by mouse B cells in vitro. RGE slightly reduced B cell proliferation, but increased IgA production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rg1 and 20(S)-Rg3 selectively induced IgA production and expression of GLTα transcripts by LPS-stimulated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 and 20(S)-Rg3 can drive the differentiation of B cells into IgA-producing cells through the selective induction of GLTα expression. PMID:26770188

  14. Molecular characterization of NbPAF encoding the alpha6 subunit of the 20S proteasome in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moonil; Yang, Kyoung-Sil; Kim, Yu-Kyung; Paek, Kyung-Hee; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2003-02-28

    The 26S proteasome involved in degradation of proteins covalently modified with polyubiquitin consists of the 20S proteasome and 19S regulatory complex. The NbPAF gene encoding the alpha6 subunit of the 20S proteasome was identified from Nicotiana benthamiana. NbPAF exhibits high sequence homology with the corresponding genes from Arabidopsis, human and yeast. The deduced amino acid sequence of NbPAF reveals that this protein contains the proteasome alpha-type subunits signature and nuclear localization signal at the N-terminus. The genomic Southern blot analysis suggests that the N. benthamiana genome contains one copy of NbPAF. The NbPAF mRNA was detected abundantly in flowers and weakly in roots and stems, but it was almost undetectable in mature leaves. In response to stresses, accumulation of the NbPAF mRNA was stimulated by methyl jasmonate, NaCl and salicylic acid, but not by abscisic acid and cold treatment in leaves. The NbPAF-GFP fusion protein was localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus. PMID:12661772

  15. 24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. A CORE WORKER DISPLAYS THE CORE BOX AND CORES FOR A BRASS GATE VALVE BODY MADE ON A CORE BOX, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  16. Practical synthesis of (20S)-10-(3-aminopropyloxy)-7-ethylcamptothecin, a water-soluble analogue of camptothecin.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Tatsuya; Tsuboi, Yasunori; Nomura, Sumihiro

    2013-03-01

    A robust, practical synthesis of (20S)-10-(3-aminopropyloxy)-7-ethylcamptothecin (T-2513, 5), which is a water-soluble analogue of camptothecin, has been developed. The key step in this synthesis is a highly diastereoselective ethylation at the C20 position by using N-arylsulfonyl-(R)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid ester as a chiral auxiliary, which affords the key intermediate ethyl-(S)-2-acyloxy-2-(6-cyano-5-oxo-1,2,3,5-tetrahydroindolizin-7-yl)butanoate (8k) in 93% yield and 87% de. Optically pure compound 8k was obtained by a single recrystallization from acetone and its further elaboration through Friedlander condensation afforded compound 5. This synthesis does not require any chromatographic purification steps and can provide compound 5 on a multi-gram scale in 6.3% overall yield (16 steps). PMID:23281180

  17. Modifications in endopeptidase and 20S proteasome expression and activities in cadmium treated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants.

    PubMed

    Djebali, Wahbi; Gallusci, Philippe; Polge, Cécile; Boulila, Latifa; Galtier, Nathalie; Raymond, Philippe; Chaibi, Wided; Brouquisse, Renaud

    2008-02-01

    The effects of cadmium (Cd) on cellular proteolytic responses were investigated in the roots and leaves of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., var Ibiza) plants. Three-week-old plants were grown for 3 and 10 days in the presence of 0.3-300 microM Cd and compared to control plants grown in the absence of Cd. Roots of Cd treated plants accumulated four to fivefold Cd as much as mature leaves. Although 10 days of culture at high Cd concentrations inhibited plant growth, tomato plants recovered and were still able to grow again after Cd removal. Tomato roots and leaves are not modified in their proteolytic response with low Cd concentrations (< or =3 microM) in the incubation medium. At higher Cd concentration, protein oxidation state and protease activities are modified in roots and leaves although in different ways. The soluble protein content of leaves decreased and protein carbonylation level increased indicative of an oxidative stress. Conversely, protein content of roots increased from 30 to 50%, but the amount of oxidized proteins decreased by two to threefold. Proteolysis responded earlier in leaves than in root to Cd stress. Additionally, whereas cysteine- and metallo-endopeptidase activities, as well as proteasome chymotrypsin activity and subunit expression level, increased in roots and leaves, serine-endopeptidase activities increased only in leaves. This contrasted response between roots and leaves may reflect differences in Cd compartmentation and/or complexation, antioxidant responses and metabolic sensitivity to Cd between plant tissues. The up-regulation of the 20S proteasome gene expression and proteolytic activity argues in favor of the involvement of the 20S proteasome in the degradation of oxidized proteins in plants. PMID:17952456

  18. Circadian rhythm of hyperoxidized peroxiredoxin II is determined by hemoglobin autoxidation and the 20S proteasome in red blood cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chun-Seok; Yoon, Hyun Ju; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Woo, Hyun Ae; Rhee, Sue Goo

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic cysteine of the typical 2-Cys Prx subfamily of peroxiredoxins is occasionally hyperoxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid during the peroxidase catalytic cycle. Sulfinic Prx (Prx–SO2H) is reduced back to the active form of the enzyme by sulfiredoxin. The abundance of Prx–SO2H was recently shown to oscillate with a period of ∼24 h in human red blood cells (RBCs). We have now investigated the molecular mechanism and physiological relevance of such oscillation in mouse RBCs. Poisoning of RBCs with CO abolished Prx–SO2H formation, implicating H2O2 produced from hemoglobin autoxidation in Prx hyperoxidation. RBCs express the closely related PrxI and PrxII isoforms, and analysis of RBCs deficient in either isoform identified PrxII as the hyperoxidized Prx in these cells. Unexpectedly, RBCs from sulfiredoxin-deficient mice also exhibited circadian oscillation of Prx–SO2H. Analysis of the effects of protease inhibitors together with the observation that the purified 20S proteasome degraded PrxII–SO2H selectively over nonhyperoxidized PrxII suggested that the 20S proteasome is responsible for the decay phase of PrxII–SO2H oscillation. About 1% of total PrxII undergoes daily oscillation, resulting in a gradual loss of PrxII during the life span of RBCs. PrxII–SO2H was detected in cytosolic and ghost membrane fractions of RBCs, and the amount of membrane-bound PrxII–SO2H oscillated in a phase opposite to that of total PrxII–SO2H. Our results suggest that membrane association of PrxII–SO2H is a tightly controlled process and might play a role in the tuning of RBC function to environmental changes. PMID:25092340

  19. Core strengthening.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    Several recent studies have evaluated interventional techniques designed to reduce the risk of serious knee injuries, particularly noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injuries in female athletes. Maintenance of rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis, especially in response to cutting and jumping activities, is a common goal in many training programs. Rotational control of the limb underneath the pelvis is mediated by a complex set of factors including the strength of the trunk muscles and the relationship between the core muscles. It is important to examine the interrelationship between lower extremity function and core stability. PMID:17472321

  20. Effective medium theory expressions for the effective diffusion in chromatographic beds filled with porous, non-porous and porous-shell particles and cylinders. Part II: Numerical verification and quantitative effect of solid core on expected B-term band broadening.

    PubMed

    Deridder, Sander; Desmet, Gert

    2011-01-01

    The results of a numerical simulation study of the diffusion and retention in fully porous spheres and cylinders are compared with some of the high order accuracy analytical solutions for the effective diffusion coefficient that have been derived from the effective medium theory (EMT) theory in part I of the present study. A variety of different ordered (spheres and cylinders) and disordered (cylinders) packings arrangements has been considered. The agreement between simulations and theory was always excellent, lying within the (very tight) accuracy limits of the simulations over the full range of retention factor and diffusion constant values that is practically relevant for most LC applications. Subsequently filling up the spheres and cylinders with a central solid core, while keeping the same packing geometry and the same mobile phase (same thermodynamic retention equilibrium), it was found that the core induces an additional obstruction which reduces the effective intra-particle diffusion coefficient exactly with a factor γ(part)=2/(2+ρ³) for spherical particles and γ(part)=1/(1+ρ²) for cylinders (ρ is the ratio of the core to the particle diameter, ρ=d(core)/d(part)). These expressions hold independently of the packing geometry, the value of the diffusion coefficients and the equilibrium constant or the size of the core. The expressions also imply that, if considering equal mobile phase conditions, the presence of the solid core will never reduce the particle contribution to the B-term band broadening with more than 33% (50% in case of cylindrical pillars). PMID:21122871

  1. Ribonucleoprotein particles of bacterial small non-coding RNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) and its interaction with RNA polymerase core may link transcription to mRNA fate.

    PubMed

    van Nues, Rob W; Castro-Roa, Daniel; Yuzenkova, Yulia; Zenkin, Nikolay

    2016-04-01

    Coupled transcription and translation in bacteria are tightly regulated. Some small RNAs (sRNAs) control aspects of this coupling by modifying ribosome access or inducing degradation of the message. Here, we show that sRNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) specifically associates with core enzyme of RNAPin vivoandin vitro, independently of σ factor and away from the main nucleic-acids-binding channel of RNAP. We also show that, in the cells, IsrA exists as ribonucleoprotein particles (sRNPs), which involve a defined set of proteins including Hfq, S1, CsrA, ProQ and PNPase. Our findings suggest that IsrA might be directly involved in transcription or can participate in regulation of gene expression by delivering proteins associated with it to target mRNAs through its interactions with transcribing RNAP and through regions of sequence-complementarity with the target. In this eukaryotic-like model only in the context of a complex with its target, IsrA and its associated proteins become active. In this manner, in the form of sRNPs, bacterial sRNAs could regulate a number of targets with various outcomes, depending on the set of associated proteins. PMID:26609136

  2. Ribonucleoprotein particles of bacterial small non-coding RNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) and its interaction with RNA polymerase core may link transcription to mRNA fate

    PubMed Central

    van Nues, Rob W.; Castro-Roa, Daniel; Yuzenkova, Yulia; Zenkin, Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Coupled transcription and translation in bacteria are tightly regulated. Some small RNAs (sRNAs) control aspects of this coupling by modifying ribosome access or inducing degradation of the message. Here, we show that sRNA IsrA (IS61 or McaS) specifically associates with core enzyme of RNAP in vivo and in vitro, independently of σ factor and away from the main nucleic-acids-binding channel of RNAP. We also show that, in the cells, IsrA exists as ribonucleoprotein particles (sRNPs), which involve a defined set of proteins including Hfq, S1, CsrA, ProQ and PNPase. Our findings suggest that IsrA might be directly involved in transcription or can participate in regulation of gene expression by delivering proteins associated with it to target mRNAs through its interactions with transcribing RNAP and through regions of sequence-complementarity with the target. In this eukaryotic-like model only in the context of a complex with its target, IsrA and its associated proteins become active. In this manner, in the form of sRNPs, bacterial sRNAs could regulate a number of targets with various outcomes, depending on the set of associated proteins. PMID:26609136

  3. Occurrence of 20S RNA and 23S RNA replicons in industrial yeast strains and their variation under nutritional stress conditions.

    PubMed

    López, Victoria; Gil, Rosario; Vicente Carbonell, José; Navarro, Alfonso

    2002-04-01

    We have characterized industrial yeast strains used in the brewing, baking, and winemaking industries for the presence or absence of cytoplasmic single-stranded 20S and 23S RNAs. Furthermore, the variation of intracellular concentrations of these replicons in brewing and laboratory strains under nutritional stress conditions was determined. Our results show a correlation between the relative abundance of these replicons and exposure of yeast to nutritionally stressful conditions, indicating that these RNAs could be employed as molecular probes to evaluate the exposure of 20S(+) and/or 23S(+) yeast strains to stress situations during industrial manipulation. During this study, several 20S(-)23S(+) Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated and identified. This is the first time that a yeast strain containing only 23S RNA has been reported, demonstrating that 20S RNA is not required for 23S RNA replication. PMID:11921103

  4. Material with core-shell structure

    DOEpatents

    Luhrs, Claudia; Richard, Monique N.; Dehne, Aaron; Phillips, Jonathan; Stamm, Kimber L.; Fanson, Paul T.

    2011-11-15

    Disclosed is a material having a composite particle, the composite particle including an outer shell and a core. The core is made from a lithium alloying material and the outer shell has an inner volume that is greater in size than the core of the lithium alloying material. In some instances, the outer mean diameter of the outer shell is less than 500 nanometers and the core occupies between 5 and 99% of the inner volume. In addition, the outer shell can have an average wall thickness of less than 100 nanometers.

  5. The Tom Core Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ahting, Uwe; Thun, Clemens; Hegerl, Reiner; Typke, Dieter; Nargang, Frank E.; Neupert, Walter; Nussberger, Stephan

    1999-01-01

    Translocation of nuclear-encoded preproteins across the outer membrane of mitochondria is mediated by the multicomponent transmembrane TOM complex. We have isolated the TOM core complex of Neurospora crassa by removing the receptors Tom70 and Tom20 from the isolated TOM holo complex by treatment with the detergent dodecyl maltoside. It consists of Tom40, Tom22, and the small Tom components, Tom6 and Tom7. This core complex was also purified directly from mitochondria after solubilization with dodecyl maltoside. The TOM core complex has the characteristics of the general insertion pore; it contains high-conductance channels and binds preprotein in a targeting sequence-dependent manner. It forms a double ring structure that, in contrast to the holo complex, lacks the third density seen in the latter particles. Three-dimensional reconstruction by electron tomography exhibits two open pores traversing the complex with a diameter of ∼2.1 nm and a height of ∼7 nm. Tom40 is the key structural element of the TOM core complex. PMID:10579717

  6. Photoprotective properties of 20(S)-protopanaxatriol, an aglycone of ginseng saponins: Protection from ultraviolet-B radiation-induced oxidative stress in human epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun-Joo; Kim, Kyunghoon; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Ginsenosides are responsible for diverse pharmacological properties ascribed to ginseng, a plant used in traditional medicine. Ginsenosides are classified into three categories: Protopanaxadiol, protopanaxatriol (PPT) and oleanolic acid. As an aglycone of PPT-type ginsenosides, PPT exists in two stereoisomeric forms, 20(S)-PPT and 20(R)‑PPT. The 20(S)‑PPT stereoisomer is a major metabolic product of PPT‑type ginsenosides produced in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, 20(S)-PPT suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species in HaCaT cells following irradiation with ultraviolet (UV)‑B. In addition, 20(S)‑PPT inhibited UV‑B‑induced gelatinase activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 in HaCaT cells, and suppressed UV‑B‑induced expression and secretion of these proteins. Accordingly, 20(S)‑PPT restored the total glutathione levels in UV‑B‑irradiated keratinocytes. Taken together, these data indicated that 20(S)‑PPT may possess photoprotective properties that combat the effects of UV‑B radiation. PMID:27485900

  7. In Vivo Early Intervention and the Therapeutic Effects of 20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg3 on Hypertrophic Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liying; Sun, Xiaoming; Hu, Changmin; Jin, Rong; Sun, Baoshan; Shi, Yaoming

    2014-01-01

    Background Intra-lesional injections of corticosteroids, interferon, and chemotherapeutic drugs are currently the most popular treatments of hypertrophic scar formation. However, these drugs can only be used after HS is formed, and not during the inflammatory phase of wound healing, which regulates the HS forming process. Objective To investigate a new, effective, combining therapeutic and safe drug for early intervention and treatment for hypertrophic scars. Methods Cell viability assay and flow cytometric analysis were studied in vitro. Animal studies were done to investigate the combining therapeutic effects of 20(S)-ginsenoside Rg3 (Rg3) on the inflammatory phase of wound healing and HS formation. Results In vitro studies showed that Rg3 can inhibit HS fibroblasts proliferation and induce HSF apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. In vivo studies demonstrated that Rg3 can limit the exaggerated inflammation, and do not delay the wound healing process, which indicates that Rg3 could be used as an early intervention to reduce HS formation. Topical injection of 4 mg/mL Rg3 can reduce HS formation by 34%. Histological and molecular studies revealed that Rg3 injection inhibits fibroblasts proliferation thus reduced the accumulation of collagen fibers, and down-regulates VEGF expression in the HS tissue. Conclusion Rg3 can be employed as an early intervention and a combining therapeutic drug to reduce inflammation and HS formation as well. PMID:25502572

  8. Anticancer activity of Panax notoginseng extract 20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD: Targetting beta-catenin signalling.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiuli; Zhao, Yuqing; Fang, Wenfeng; Yang, Wancai

    2009-11-01

    1. The Wnt/beta-catenin pathway plays a critical role in carcinogenesis and so agents that target Wnt/beta-catenin may have potential in cancer prevention and therapy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anticancer activity of the novel natural product dammarane-type triterpene sapogenin (20(S)-25-OCH3-PPD; PPD25) isolated from the leaves of Panax notoginseng. 2. The anticancer activity of PPD25 was evaluated in three colon cancer cell lines and in one lung cancer cell line. The effects of PPD25 to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis were evaluated. In addition, the potential mechanisms underlying the effects of PPD25 were investigated. 3. It was found that the addition of 5 or 25 micromol/L PPD25 to the culture medium significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in all four cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies revealed that PPD25 significantly reduced the expression of beta-catenin, a key mediator in the Wnt pathway, as well as transcriptional targets of beta-catenin, namely c-myc, cyclin D1, cdk4 and T cell factor (TCF)-4. In addition, beta-catenin/TCF transcriptional activity was significantly suppressed by PPD25. 4. The data demonstrate that the PPD25 exerts its anticancer effect by targetting beta-catenin signalling, suggesting that PPD25 may have potential as a chemotherapeutic and/or chemopreventive agent for colon and lung cancer. PMID:19413587

  9. Oxidation and interaction of DJ-1 with 20S proteasome in the erythrocytes of early stage Parkinson's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiro; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Matsumura, Akihiro; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Itoh, Sayoko; Sutou, Kenta; Kobayashi, Mayuka; Mita, Yuichiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Hisahara, Shin; Hara, Yasuo; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Hamakubo, Takao; Kusunoki, Susumu; Shimohama, Shun; Noguchi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive, age-related, neurodegenerative disorder, and oxidative stress is an important mediator in its pathogenesis. DJ-1, the product of the causative gene of a familial form of PD, plays a significant role in anti-oxidative defence to protect cells from oxidative stress. DJ-1 undergoes preferential oxidation at the cysteine residue at position 106 (Cys-106) under oxidative stress. Here, using specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1 (oxDJ-1), it was found that the levels of oxDJ-1 in the erythrocytes of unmedicated PD patients (n = 88) were higher than in those of medicated PD patients (n = 62) and healthy control subjects (n = 33). Elevated oxDJ-1 levels were also observed in a non-human primate PD model. Biochemical analysis of oxDJ-1 in erythrocyte lysates showed that oxDJ-1 formed dimer and polymer forms, and that the latter interacts with 20S proteasome. These results clearly indicate a biochemical alteration in the blood of PD patients, which could be utilized as an early diagnosis marker for PD. PMID:27470541

  10. Broadband (0.05 to 20 s) prediction of displacement response spectra based on worldwide digital records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauzzi, Carlo; Faccioli, Ezio

    2008-10-01

    A new set of empirical equations for prediction of displacement response spectral ordinates from 20 Hz to T = 20 s is illustrated. The coefficients of the equations were obtained by regressing a dataset based on 1,155 tri-axial digital and 9 analog accelerometer records from 60 earthquakes worldwide. Long period disturbances in the accelerograms were evaluated and removed using a very recent method, aimed at preserving the long-period spectral content of the records. Analysis of variance has disclosed only little evidence for regional dependence of ground motions, while a carefully conducted evaluation of site effects resulted in clearly differentiated spectral amplification bands associated to the main ground types B, C, and D of Eurocode 8. Spectral ordinates for vibration periods >5 s were found to scale with magnitude quite consistently with theoretical scaling from Brune’s model. On the other hand, comparison of results with those yielded by recent prediction models in Europe and the United States (NGA), indicated that the latter may not be uniformly reliable at long periods. The proposed empirical equations are easily implemented in computer programs for seismic hazard assessment, being characterized by a simple functional form and a restricted number of predictor variables.

  11. Monodisperse and core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho, and Tm) spherical particles: A facile synthesis and luminescent properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhenhe; Feng, Bin; Bian, Shasha; Liu, Tao; Wang, Mingli; Gao, Yu; Sun, Di; Gao, Xin; Sun, Yaguang

    2012-12-15

    The core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} particles were realized by coating the Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} phosphors onto the surface of non-aggregated, monodisperse and spherical SiO{sub 2} particles by the Pechini sol-gel method. The as-synthesized products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), photolumiminescence (PL), and low-voltage cathodoluminescence (CL). The results indicate that the 800 Degree-Sign C annealed sample consists of crystalline Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} shells and amorphous SiO{sub 2} cores, in spherical shape with a narrow size distribution. The as-obtained particles show strong light emission with different colors corresponding to different Ln{sup 3+} ions under ultraviolet-visible light excitation and low-voltage electron beams excitation, which have potential applications in fluorescent lamps and field emission displays. - Graphical Abstract: Representative SEM and TEM images of the core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} particles; CIE chromaticity diagram showing the emission colors for SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+}; Multicolor emissions of SiO{sub 2}-Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} particles. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The core-shell particles were realized by coating the phosphors onto the surface of SiO{sub 2} particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sample consists of crystalline Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} shells and amorphous SiO{sub 2} cores. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The particles show different light emission colors corresponding to Ln{sup 3+} ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They have potential applications in fluorescent lamps and field emission displays.

  12. Neuroprotective effects of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol against glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Bak, Dong-Ho; Kim, Hyung Don; Kim, Young Ock; Park, Chun Geun; Han, Seung-Yun; Kim, Jwa-Jin

    2016-02-01

    Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.) is commonly used in traditional oriental medicine for its wide spectrum of medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antitumorigenic, adaptogenic and anti-aging properties. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD), the main intestinal metabolite of ginsenosides, is one of the active ingredients in ginseng. In this study, we aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of PPD on PC12 cells; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined cell viability by MTT assay and the morphological changes of PC12 cells following glutamate‑induced cell damage and evaluated the anti‑apoptotic effects of PPD using Hoechst 33258 staining, western blot analysis and Muse™ Cell Analyzer and the antioxidant effects of PPD using FACS analysis and immunofluorescence. Furthermore, PPD exerted protective effects on PC12 cells via the inhibition of mitochondrial damage against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity using immunofluorescence, electron microscopy and FACS analysis. We demonstrate that treatment with PPD suppresses apoptosis, which contributes to the neuroprotective effects of PPD against glutamate‑induced excitotoxicity in PC12 cells. Treatment with PPD inhibited nuclear condensation and decreased the number of Annexin V-positive cells. In addition, PPD increased antioxidant activity and mitochondrial homeostasis in the glutamate-exposed cells. These antioxidant effects were responsible for the neuroprotection and enhanced mitochondrial function following treatment with PPD. Furthermore, PD inhibited the glutamate-induced morphological changes in the mitochondria and scavenged the mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glutamate. In addition, mitochondrial function was significantly improved in terms of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and enhanced mitochondrial mass compared with the cells exposed to glutamate and not treated with PPD. Taken together, the findings of our study indicate

  13. Neuroprotective effects of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol against glutamate-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    BAK, DONG-HO; KIM, HYUNG DON; KIM, YOUNG OCK; PARK, CHUN GEUN; HAN, SEUNG-YUN; KIM, JWA-JIN

    2016-01-01

    Ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Mey.) is commonly used in traditional oriental medicine for its wide spectrum of medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antitumorigenic, adaptogenic and anti-aging properties. 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol (PPD), the main intestinal metabolite of ginsenosides, is one of the active ingredients in ginseng. In this study, we aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of PPD on PC12 cells; however, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. We examined cell viability by MTT assay and the morphological changes of PC12 cells following glutamate-induced cell damage and evaluated the anti-apoptotic effects of PPD using Hoechst 33258 staining, western blot analysis and Muse™ Cell Analyzer and the antioxidant effects of PPD using FACS analysis and immunofluorescence. Furthermore, PPD exerted protective effects on PC12 cells via the inhibition of mitochondrial damage against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity using immunofluorescence, electron microscopy and FACS analysis. We demonstrate that treatment with PPD suppresses apoptosis, which contributes to the neuroprotective effects of PPD against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in PC12 cells. Treatment with PPD inhibited nuclear condensation and decreased the number of Annexin V-positive cells. In addition, PPD increased antioxidant activity and mitochondrial homeostasis in the glutamate-exposed cells. These antioxidant effects were responsible for the neuroprotection and enhanced mitochondrial function following treatment with PPD. Furthermore, PD inhibited the glutamate-induced morphological changes in the mitochondria and scavenged the mitochondrial and cytosolic reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by glutamate. In addition, mitochondrial function was significantly improved in terms of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and enhanced mitochondrial mass compared with the cells exposed to glutamate and not treated with PPD. Taken together, the findings of our study indicate that the

  14. 20(S)-protopanaxadiol, an active ginseng metabolite, exhibits strong antidepressant-like effects in animal tests.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changjiang; Teng, Jijun; Chen, Weidong; Ge, Qiang; Yang, Zhiqi; Yu, Chunying; Yang, Zirong; Jia, William

    2010-12-01

    Ginseng has been used for mood adjustment in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Our previous study has shown that, total ginsenosides, the major pharmacologically functional ingredients of ginseng, possess antidepressant activity. In the present study, we hypothesized that an intestinal metabolite of ginseng, 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (code name S111), as a post metabolism compound (PMC) of ingested ginsenosides, may be responsible for the antidepressant activity of ginseng. To test this hypothesis, antidepressant-like activity of orally given S111 was measured in animal tests including tail suspension test, forced swimming test and rat olfactory bulbectomy depression model. In all those tests, S111 demonstrated antidepressant-like activity as potent as fluoxetine. S111 treated bulbectomy animals had higher levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain and in vitro reuptake assay showed that S111 had a mild inhibitory effect. Furthermore, S111 but not fluoxetine significantly reduced brain oxidative stress and down-regulated serum corticosterone concentration in bulbectomy animals. No disturbance to central nervous system (CNS) normal functions were found in S111 treated animals. These results suggest that the ginseng active metabolite S111 is a potential antidepressant. Since the monoamine reuptake activity of this compound is rather weak, it remains to be investigated whether its antidepressant-like effect is by mechanisms that are different from current antidepressants. Furthermore, this study has demonstrated that post metabolism compounds (PMCs) of herb medicines such as S111 may be a novel source for drug discovery from medicinal herbs. PMID:20647027

  15. Metabolism of 20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg₂ by Rat Liver Microsomes: Bioactivation to SIRT1-Activating Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Yuan; Zhou, Qi-Le; Yang, Xin-Bao; Wang, Hong-Ping; Yang, Xiu-Wei

    2016-01-01

    20(S)-Ginsenoside Rg₂ (1) has recently become a hot research topic due to its potent bioactivities and abundance in natural sources such as the roots, rhizomes and stems-leaves of Panax ginseng. However, due to the lack of studies on systematic metabolic profiles, the prospects for new drug development of 1 are still difficult to predict, which has become a huge obstacle for its safe clinical use. To solve this problem, investigation of the metabolic profiles of 1 in rat liver microsomes was first carried out. To identify metabolites, a strategy of combined analyses based on prepared metabolites by column chromatography and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF/MS) was performed. As a result, four metabolites M1-M4, including a rare new compound named ginsenotransmetin A (M1), were isolated and the structures were confirmed by spectroscopic analyses. A series of metabolites of 1, MA-MG, were also tentatively identified by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS in rat liver microsomal incubate of 1. Partial metabolic pathways were proposed. Among them, 1 and its metabolites M1, M3 and M4 were discovered for the first time to be activators of SIRT1. The SIRT1 activating effects of the metabolite M1 was comparable to those of 1, while the most interesting SIRT1 activatory effects of M3 and M4 were higher than that of 1 and comparable with that of resveratrol, a positive SIRT1 activator. These results indicate that microsome-dependent metabolism may represent a bioactivation pathway for 1. This study is the first to report the metabolic profiles of 1 in vitro, and the results provide an experimental foundation to better understand the in vivo metabolic fate of 1. PMID:27294899

  16. Moving core beam energy absorber and converter

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2012-12-18

    A method and apparatus for the prevention of overheating of laser or particle beam impact zones through the use of a moving-in-the-coolant-flow arrangement for the energy absorbing core of the device. Moving of the core spreads the energy deposition in it in 1, 2, or 3 dimensions, thus increasing the effective cooling area of the device.

  17. Core-collapse Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Hix, William Raphael; Lentz, E. J.; Baird, Mark L; Chertkow, Merek A; Lee, Ching-Tsai; Blondin, J. M.; Bruenn, S. W.; Messer, Bronson; Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Marking the inevitable death of a massive star, and the birth of a neutron star or black hole, core-collapse supernovae bring together physics at a wide range in spatial scales, from kilometer-sized hydrodynamic motions (growing to gigameter scale) down to femtometer scale nuclear reactions. Carrying 10$^{51}$ ergs of kinetic energy and a rich-mix of newly synthesized atomic nuclei, core-collapse supernovae are the preeminent foundries of the nuclear species which make up ourselves and our solar system. We will discuss our emerging understanding of the convectively unstable, neutrino-driven explosion mechanism, based on increasingly realistic neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations that include progressively better nuclear and particle physics. Recent multi-dimensional models with spectral neutrino transport from several research groups, which slowly develop successful explosions for a range of progenitors, have motivated changes in our understanding of the neutrino reheating mechanism. In a similar fashion, improvements in nuclear physics, most notably explorations of weak interactions on nuclei and the nuclear equation of state, continue to refine our understanding of how supernovae explode. Recent progress on both the macroscopic and microscopic effects that affect core-collapse supernovae are discussed.

  18. Calcitriol and 20(S)-protopanaxadiol synergistically inhibit growth and induce apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-Eltriki, Mohamed; Deb, Subrata; Adomat, Hans; Tomlinson Guns, Emma S

    2016-04-01

    The potential cancer preventive roles of calcitriol, the dihydroxylated metabolite of Vitamin D3, as well as 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (aPPD), the aglycone of the protopanaxadiol family of ginsenosides, have gained much attention in recent years for the prevention/treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). In the present study, we evaluated the anticancer and chemosensitization effects of calcitriol at clinically relevant concentrations and aPPD, either alone or in combination, in two well-characterized human PCa cell lines: androgen-sensitive non-metastatic LNCaP cells and androgen-independent metastatic C4-2 cells. The effects of the treatments on PCa cell viability and proliferation rates were evaluated by MTS and Brdu assays, respectively. Combination Indices (CI) and Dose Reduction Indices (DRI) were estimated to assess synergistic anticancer activity using Calcusyn software (Biosoft, Cambridge, UK). Then, we determined the potential Pharmacodynamic interaction mechanisms as follows: The protein expression levels of the genes those are known to control cell cycle (cyclin D1 and cdk2); apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax, and Capspases 3), androgen receptor and Vitamin D receptors were examined upon combinational treatment. The cell viability assay data show that addition of 10nM calcitriol to aPPD significantly lowered its IC50 values from the range of 41-53μM to 13-23μM, in LNCaP and C4-2 prostate cancer cells. The cell proliferation rate was significantly lower for combination treatments compared to the cells treated with aPPD alone. Similarly, Western blot results indicate that aPPD significantly upregulated Vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression, while calcitriol further enhanced the ability of aPPD to induce pro-apoptotic BAX, increased cleaved caspase-3 and downregulate cdk2 protein levels. Thus, the pharmacodynamic interaction between aPPD and calcitriol in impacting growth inhibition and apoptosis appears to be synergistic in nature. In conclusion, calcitriol sensitizes PCa

  19. Characterization of peptidyl boronic acid inhibitors of mammalian 20 S and 26 S proteasomes and their inhibition of proteasomes in cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, R C; Assinder, S J; Christie, G; Mason, G G; Markwell, R; Wadsworth, H; McLaughlin, M; King, R; Chabot-Fletcher, M C; Breton, J J; Allsop, D; Rivett, A J

    2000-01-01

    Proteasomes are large multisubunit proteinases which have several distinct catalytic sites. In this study a series of di- and tri-peptidyl boronic acids have been tested on the chymotrypsin-like activity of purified mammalian 20 S and 26 S proteasomes assayed with succinyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-amidomethylcoumarin (suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC) as substrate. The inhibition of 20 S proteasomes is competitive but only slowly reversible. The K(i) values for the best inhibitors were in the range 10-100 nM with suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC as substrate, but the compounds tested were much less effective on other proteasome activities measured with other substrates. Free boronic acid inhibitors exhibited equivalent potency to their pinacol esters. Both benzoyl (Bz)-Phe-boroLeu and benzyloxycarbonyl (Cbz)-Leu-Leu-boroLeu pinacol ester inhibited 20 S and 26 S proteasomes with non-ideal behaviour, differences in inhibition of the two forms of proteasomes becoming apparent at high inhibitor concentrations (above 3xK(i)). Both of these compounds were also potent inhibitors of 20 S and 26 S proteasomes in cultured cells. However, gel filtration of cell extracts prepared from cells treated with radiolabelled phenacetyl-Leu-Leu-boroLeu showed that only 20 S proteasomes were strongly labelled, demonstrating differences in the characteristics of inhibition of 20 S and 26 S proteasomes. The usefulness of peptidyl boronic acid inhibitors for investigations of proteasome-mediated protein degradation was confirmed by the observation that Bz-Phe-boroLeu and Cbz-Leu-Leu-boroLeu pinacol ester inhibited NFkappaB activation with IC(50) values comparable to their K(i) values for purified proteasomes. The latter result supports the view that the chymotrypsin-like activity of proteasomes assayed with suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-AMC is a critical one for protein degradation in cells. PMID:10677365

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of ginsenoside Rg1 and its metabolites ginsenoside Rh1 and 20(S)-protopanaxatriol in mice with TNBS-induced colitis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Eun, Su-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Ginsenoside Rg1, one of the main constituents of Panax ginseng, exhibits anti-inflammatory effect. In a preliminary study, it was observed that ginsenoside Rg1 was metabolized to 20(S)-protopanaxtriol via ginsenosides Rh1 and F1 by gut microbiota. We further investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of ginsenoside Rg1 and its metabolites in vitro and in vivo. Ginsenosides Rg1, Rh1, and 20(S)-protopanaxtriol inhibited the activation of NF-κB activation, phosphorylation of transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor-associated kinase, and expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and IL-1β in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. They also inhibited the binding of LPS to toll-like receptor 4 on the macrophages. Orally administered ginsenoside Rg1, Rh1, or 20(S)-protopanaxtriol inhibited 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colon shortening, myeloperoxidase activity, and expression of IL-1β, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor-α in mice with TNBS-induced colitis. They did not only inhibit TNBS-induced NF-κB activation, but also restored TNBS-induced Th17/Treg imbalance. They restored IL-10 and Foxp3 expression. Moreover, they inhibited Th17 cell differentiation in vitro. Of these metabolites, in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of 20(S)-protopanaxtriol was the most potent, followed by Rh1. These findings suggest that ginsenoside Rg1 is metabolized to 20(S)-protopanaxtriol via ginsenosides Rh1 and F1 and these metabolites particularly 20(S)-protopanaxtriol, may ameliorate inflammatory disease such as colitis by inhibiting the binding of LPS to TLR4 on macrophages and restoring the Th17/Treg imbalance. PMID:26054809

  1. Potential role of 20S proteasome in maintaining stem cell integrity of human bone marrow stromal cells in prolonged culture expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Li; Song, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Liu, Xue-Qin; Zhu, Qian; Cheng, Xiao-Long; Yang, Gui-Jiao; Li, Ang; Xiao, Zhi-Cheng

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prolonged culture expansion retards proliferation and induces senescence of hBMSCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced 20S proteasomal activity and expression potentially contribute to cell aging. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MG132-mediated 20S proteasomal inhibition induces senescence-like phenotype. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA stimulates proteasomal activity and restores replicative senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 18{alpha}-GA retains differentiation without affecting stem cell characterizations. -- Abstract: Human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) could be used in clinics as precursors of multiple cell lineages following proper induction. Such application is impeded by their characteristically short lifespan, together with the increasing loss of proliferation capability and progressive reduction of differentiation potential after the prolonged culture expansion. In the current study, we addressed the possible role of 20S proteasomes in this process. Consistent with prior reports, long-term in vitro expansion of hBMSCs decreased cell proliferation and increased replicative senescence, accompanied by reduced activity and expression of the catalytic subunits PSMB5 and PSMB1, and the 20S proteasome overall. Application of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 produced a senescence-like phenotype in early passages, whereas treating late-passage cells with 18{alpha}-glycyrrhetinic acid (18{alpha}-GA), an agonist of 20S proteasomes, delayed the senescence progress, enhancing the proliferation and recovering the capability of differentiation. The data demonstrate that activation of 20S proteasomes assists in counteracting replicative senescence of hBMSCs expanded in vitro.

  2. Elastase-like Activity Is Dominant to Chymotrypsin-like Activity in 20S Proteasome's β5 Catalytic Subunit.

    PubMed

    Bensinger, Dennis; Neumann, Theresa; Scholz, Christoph; Voss, Constantin; Knorr, Sabine; Kuckelkorn, Ulrike; Hamacher, Kay; Kloetzel, Peter-Michael; Schmidt, Boris

    2016-07-15

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system is the major protein degradation pathway in eukaryotes with several key catalytic cores. Targeting the β5 subunit with small-molecule inhibitors is an established therapeutic strategy for hematologic cancers. Herein, we report a mouse-trap-like conformational change that influences molecular recognition depending on the substitution pattern of a bound ligand. Variation of the size of P1 residues from the highly β5-selective proteasome inhibitor BSc2118 allows for discrimination between inhibitory strength and substrate conversion. We found that increasing molecular size strengthens inhibition, whereas decreasing P1 size accelerates substrate conversion. Evaluation of substrate hydrolysis after silencing of β5 activity reveals significant residual activity for large residues exclusively. Thus, classification of the β5 subunit as chymotrypsin-like and the use of the standard tyrosine-containing substrate should be reconsidered. PMID:27111844

  3. Hybrid particles and associated methods

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Robert V; Rodriguez, Rene; Pak, Joshua J; Sun, Chivin

    2015-02-10

    Hybrid particles that comprise a coating surrounding a chalcopyrite material, the coating comprising a metal, a semiconductive material, or a polymer; a core comprising a chalcopyrite material and a shell comprising a functionalized chalcopyrite material, the shell enveloping the core; or a reaction product of a chalcopyrite material and at least one of a reagent, heat, and radiation. Methods of forming the hybrid particles are also disclosed.

  4. Common subtypes of idiopathic generalized epilepsies: Lack of linkage to D20S19 close to candidate loci (EBN1, EEGV1) on chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, T.; Schmitz, B.; Janz, D.

    1996-02-16

    Hereditary factors play a major role in the etiology of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). A trait locus (EBN1) for a rare subtype of IGEs, the benign neonatal familial convulsions, and a susceptibility gene (EEGV1) for the common human low-voltage electroencephalogram have been mapped close together with D20S19 to the chromosomal region 20q13.2. Both loci are potential candidates for the susceptibility to IGE spectra with age-related onset beyond the neonatal period. The present study tested the hypothesis that a putative susceptibility locus linked to D20S19 predisposes to spectra of IGEs with age-related onset from childhood to adolescence. Linkage analyses were conducted in 60 families ascertained through IGE patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy or childhood absence epilepsy. Our results provide evidence against linkage of a putative susceptibility gene for four hierarchically broadened IGE spectra with D20S19 assuming tentative single-locus genetic models. The extent of an {open_quotes}exclusion region{close_quotes} (lod scores below -2) varied from 0.5 cM up to 22 cM on either side of D2OSl9 depending on the trait assumed. These results are contrary to the expectation that a susceptibility gene in vicinity to D20S19 confers a common major gene effect to the expression of IGE spectra with age-related onset from childhood to adolescence. 50 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. cDNA cloning, characterization, and developmental expression of the 20S proteasome alpha5 subunit in the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata.

    PubMed

    Verras, Meletios; Gourzi, Polyxeni; Kalosaka, Katerina; Zacharopoulou, Antigone; Mintzas, Anastassios C

    2008-03-01

    In the present study, we report the cDNA cloning, characterization, and developmental expression of the 20S proteasome alpha5 subunit from the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (medfly). Using an RT-PCR fragment that corresponds to the amino-terminal region of the Drosophila melanogaster 20S proteasome alpha5 subunit, we isolated a 987-bp cDNA that encodes the complete coding region of the medfly ortholog, which was named CcPSMA5. CcPSMA5 consists of 241 amino acids and has a predicted molecular weight of 26.4 kDa and pI 4.75. Comparison of the CcPSMA5 amino acid sequence with the sequences of all known 20S proteasome alpha5 subunits from different organisms indicated that the medfly 20S proteasome alpha5 subunit has the strongest homology to that of Drosophila. In situ hybridization showed that the CcPSMA5 gene is mapped in the region 44B of chromosome 4. Northern blot hybridization analysis showed that the CcPSMA5 mRNA has a size of approximately 1.2 kb. High levels of the CcPSMA5 mRNA were detected in freshly laid eggs, indicating that they were maternally deposited. The mRNA expression pattern during medfly development suggests that the CcPSMA5 gene is upregulated before mid-embryogenesis and at the onset of metamorphosis. PMID:18163525

  6. The immunoproteasome, the 20S proteasome and the PA28αβ proteasome regulator are oxidative-stress-adaptive proteolytic complexes.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Andrew M; Koop, Alison L; Teoh, Cheryl Y; Ermak, Gennady; Grune, Tilman; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2010-12-15

    Oxidized cytoplasmic and nuclear proteins are normally degraded by the proteasome, but accumulate with age and disease. We demonstrate the importance of various forms of the proteasome during transient (reversible) adaptation (hormesis), to oxidative stress in murine embryonic fibroblasts. Adaptation was achieved by 'pre-treatment' with very low concentrations of H2O2, and tested by measuring inducible resistance to a subsequent much higher 'challenge' dose of H2O2. Following an initial direct physical activation of pre-existing proteasomes, the 20S proteasome, immunoproteasome and PA28αβ regulator all exhibited substantially increased de novo synthesis during adaptation over 24 h. Cellular capacity to degrade oxidatively damaged proteins increased with 20S proteasome, immunoproteasome and PA28αβ synthesis, and was mostly blocked by the 20S proteasome, immunoproteasome and PA28 siRNA (short interfering RNA) knockdown treatments. Additionally, PA28αβ-knockout mutants achieved only half of the H2O2-induced adaptive increase in proteolytic capacity of wild-type controls. Direct comparison of purified 20S proteasome and immunoproteasome demonstrated that the immunoproteasome can selectively degrade oxidized proteins. Cell proliferation and DNA replication both decreased, and oxidized proteins accumulated, during high H2O2 challenge, but prior H2O2 adaptation was protective. Importantly, siRNA knockdown of the 20S proteasome, immunoproteasome or PA28αβ regulator blocked 50-100% of these adaptive increases in cell division and DNA replication, and immunoproteasome knockdown largely abolished protection against protein oxidation. PMID:20919990

  7. Synthesis and characterization of monodisperse spherical SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles with core-shell structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Yang, J.; Zhang, C.M.; Lin, J.

    2009-10-15

    Spherical SiO{sub 2} particles have been coated with rare earth oxide layers by a Pechini sol-gel process, leading to the formation of core-shell structured SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu, Tb, Dy, Sm, Er, Ho) particles. X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence spectra as well as lifetimes were used to characterize the resulting SiO{sub 2}-RE{sub 2}O{sub 3} (RE=rare earth elements) and SiO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) samples. The obtained core-shell phosphors have perfect spherical shape with narrow size distribution (average size ca. 380 nm), smooth surface and non-agglomeration. The thickness of shells could be easily controlled by changing the number of deposition cycles (40 nm for two deposition cycles). Under the excitation of ultraviolet, the Ln{sup 3+} ion mainly shows its characteristic emissions in the core-shell particles from Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Ln{sup 3+} (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Sm{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}, Ho{sup 3+}) shells. - Graphical abstract: The advantages of core-shell phosphors are the easy availability of homogeneous spherical morphology in different size, and its corresponding luminescence color can change from red, yellow to green.

  8. Biomimetic Particles as Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Green, Jordan J.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there have been major advances in the development of novel nanoparticle and microparticle-based therapeutics. An emerging paradigm is the incorporation of biomimetic features into these synthetic therapeutic constructs to enable them to better interface with biological systems. Through the control of size, shape, and material consistency, particle cores have been generated that better mimic natural cells and viruses. In addition, there have been significant advances in biomimetic surface functionalization of particles through the integration of bio-inspired artificial cell membranes and naturally derived cell membranes. Biomimetic technologies enable therapeutic particles to have increased potency to benefit human health. PMID:26277289

  9. Dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuesong; Fan, Zhongwei; Shi, Zhaohui; Ma, Yunfeng; Yu, Jin; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-25

    In this work, dual-core antiresonant hollow core fibers (AR-HCFs) are numerically demonstrated, based on our knowledge, for the first time. Two fiber structures are proposed. One is a composite of two single-core nested nodeless AR-HCFs, exhibiting low confinement loss and a circular mode profile in each core. The other has a relatively simple structure, with a whole elliptical outer jacket, presenting a uniform and wide transmission band. The modal couplings of the dual-core AR-HCFs rely on a unique mechanism that transfers power through the air. The core separation and the gap between the two cores influence the modal coupling strength. With proper designs, both of the dual-core fibers can have low phase birefringence and short modal coupling lengths of several centimeters. PMID:27464191

  10. Novel 20(S)-sulfonylamidine derivatives of camptothecin and the use thereof as a potent antitumor agent: a patent evaluation of WO2015048365 (A1).

    PubMed

    Beretta, Giovanni Luca; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Varchi, Greta

    2016-05-01

    A series of camptothecin (CPT) derivatives featuring acyl-esterification of the 20(S)-hydroxyl group with a residue containing a sulfonylamidine moiety is synthesized via a Cu catalyzed three-component reaction. The compounds show remarkable cytotoxicity against a panel of tumor cells, including a cell line exhibiting Multi-Drug Resistant (MDR) phenotype. The patent develops 9a, the best derivative of the series, that i) selectively poisons DNA Topoisomerase I (TopoI); ii) induces cell-cycle S-phase arrest with activation of the DNA damage response pathway and apoptosis induction and iii) shows considerable in vivo antitumor potency. We envision that the peculiar modification of the 20(S)-hydroxyl group of CPT with a sulfonylamidine residue will play a continuing role in affording new TopoI poison drug candidates for therapeutic applications. PMID:26814056

  11. Simultaneous enantiomer determination of 20 (R)- and 20 (S)-ginsenoside-Rg2 in rat plasma after intravenous administration using HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Gui, Fang-Jin; Yang, Xiu-Wei; Li, Long-Yun; Tian, Jian-Ming

    2007-05-01

    20 (R,S)-Ginsenoside-Rg2, an anti-shock agent, is prescribed as a racemate. To analyze simultaneously the enantiomers of 20 (R)-ginsenoside-Rg2 and 20 (S)-ginsenoside-Rg2 in plasma, a simple and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method has been developed. The enantiomeric separation and determination were successfully achieved using a Diamonsil ODS C18 reversed-phase column (5 microm, 250 mm x 4.6 mm) with an RP18 (5 microm) guard column and a mobile phase of MeOH-aq. 4% H3PO4 (65:35, v/v, pH 5.1) with UV detection at 203 nm. Both enantiomers, 20 (R)-ginsenoside-Rg2 and 20 (S)-ginsenoside-Rg2, were well separated at 14.5 min and 13.6 min, respectively. The linear ranges of the standard curves were 2.0-250 microg/ml. The intra- and inter-day precision (R.S.D.) were 20 (S)-ginsenoside-Rg2 in rat plasma, respectively. The limits of detection and quantification were 2.0 microg/ml and 7.8 microg/ml (S/N=3:1) for 20 (R)-ginsenoside-Rg2, and 2.0 microg/ml and 3.9 microg/ml (S/N=3:1) for 20 (S)-ginsenoside-Rg2, respectively. This validated method was applicable to pharmacokinetic studies in rat plasma after intravenous administration of 20 (R,S)-ginsenoside-Rg2. A pharmacokinetic study in rat plasma indicated that the enantiomers were rapidly absorbed and eliminated. These assay results are necessary for the evaluation of the metabolism of ginsenoside-Rg2 in vivo. PMID:17113840

  12. Development of a candidate influenza vaccine based on virus-like particles displaying influenza M2e peptide into the immunodominant loop region of hepatitis B core antigen: Insertion of multiple copies of M2e increases immunogenicity and protective efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ravin, Nikolai V; Blokhina, Elena A; Kuprianov, Victor V; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Shaldjan, Aram A; Kovaleva, Anna A; Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Skryabin, Konstantin G

    2015-06-26

    The extracellular domain of the transmembrane protein M2 (M2e) of influenza A virus is a promising target for the development of "universal" vaccines against influenza. M2e is a poor immunogen by itself; however, when M2e is linked to an appropriate carrier, such as hepatitis B virus core (HBc) particles, it becomes highly immunogenic. Insertions of target peptides into the surface-exposed major immunodominant loop region (MIR) of the HBc antigen are especially immunogenic, but such insertions often affect the protein folding and formation of recombinant virus-like particles. To facilitate an appropriate conformation of the M2e insert, we introduced flexible linkers at the junction points between the insert and flanking HBc sequences. This approach allowed the construction of recombinant HBc particles carrying 1, 2 and 4 copies of M2e in the MIR region. These particles were produced in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The immune response and protective activity of hybrid HBc particles in mice correlated with the number of inserted M2e peptides: the highest immunogenicity and complete protection of mice against the lethal challenge by influenza virus was observed with particles carrying four copies of M2e. The possibility of the simultaneous presentation of M2e peptides from several important influenza strains on a single HBc particle could also facilitate the development of a broad-specificity vaccine efficient not only against influenza A strains of human origin but also for newly emerging strains of animal origin, such as the avian influenza. PMID:25937448

  13. Docking of the Proteasomal ATPases’ C-termini in the 20S Proteasomes alpha Ring Opens the Gate for Substrate Entry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, David M.; Chang, Shih-Chung; Park, Soyeon; Finley, Daniel; Cheng, Yifan; Goldberg, Alfred

    2007-01-01

    Summary The 20S proteasome functions in protein degradation in eukaryotes together with the 19S ATPases or in archaea with the homologous PAN ATPase complex. PAN and the 19S ATPases contain a conserved C-terminal hydrophobic-tyrosine-X motif (HbYX). We show that these residues are essential for PAN to associate with the 20S and open its gated-channel for substrate entry. Upon ATP binding, these C-terminal residues bind to pockets between the 20S’s α-subunits. Furthermore, seven-residue peptides from PAN’s C-terminus that contain the HbYX motif also bind to these sites and induce gate-opening in both archaeal and mammalian 20S proteasomes. Gate-opening could be induced by short C-terminal peptides from the 19S ATPase subunits, Rpt2 and Rpt5, but not by ones from PA28/26, which lack the HbYX motif and cause gate-opening by distinct mechanism. The C-terminal YX residues in the 19S ATPases were also shown to be critical for gating and stability of mammalian and yeast 26S proteasomes. Thus, the C-termini of the proteasomal ATPases function like a “key-in-a-lock” to induce gate-opening and allow substrate entry. PMID:17803938

  14. In vitro studies on the oxidative metabolism of 20(s)-ginsenoside Rh2 in human, monkey, dog, rat, and mouse liver microsomes, and human liver s9.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Jialan; Zhong, Dafang

    2012-10-01

    20(S)-Ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2)-containing products are widely used in Asia, Europe, and North America. However, extremely limited metabolism information greatly impedes the complete understanding of its clinical safety and effectiveness. The present study aims to systematically investigate the oxidative metabolism of Rh2 using a complementary set of in vitro models. Twenty-five oxidative metabolites were found using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization ion-trap mass spectrometry. Six metabolites and a metabolic intermediate were synthesized. The metabolites were structurally identified as 26-hydroxy Rh2 (M1-1), (20S,24S)-epoxydammarane-12,25-diol-3-β-d-glucopyranoside (M1-3), (20S,24R)-epoxydammarane-12,25-diol-3-β-d-glucopyranoside (M1-5), 26,27-dihydroxy Rh2 (M3-6), (20S,24S)-epoxydammarane-12,25,26-triol-3-β-d-glucopyranoside (M3-10), (20S,24R)-epoxydammarane-12,25,26-triol-3-β-d-glucopyranoside (M3-11), and 26-aldehyde Rh2 on the basis of detailed mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance data analysis. Double-bond epoxidation followed by rearrangement and vinyl-methyl group hydroxylation represent the initial metabolic pathways generating monooxygenated metabolites M1-1 to M1-5. Further sequential metabolites (M2-M5) from the dehydrogenation and/or oxygenation of M1 were also detected. CYP3A4 was the predominant enzyme involved in the oxidative metabolism of Rh2, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase mainly catalyzed the metabolic conversion of alcohol to the corresponding carboxylic acid. No significant differences were observed in the phase I metabolite profiles of Rh2 among the five species tested. Reactive epoxide metabolite formation in both humans and animals was evident. However, GSH conjugate M6 was detected only in cynomolgus monkey liver microsomal incubations. In conclusion, Rh2 is a good substrate for CYP3A4 and could undergo extensive oxidative metabolism under the catalysis of CYP3A4. PMID:22829543

  15. Core-core and core-valence correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of (1s) core correlation on properties and energy separations was analyzed using full configuration-interaction (FCI) calculations. The Be 1 S - 1 P, the C 3 P - 5 S and CH+ 1 Sigma + or - 1 Pi separations, and CH+ spectroscopic constants, dipole moment and 1 Sigma + - 1 Pi transition dipole moment were studied. The results of the FCI calculations are compared to those obtained using approximate methods. In addition, the generation of atomic natural orbital (ANO) basis sets, as a method for contracting a primitive basis set for both valence and core correlation, is discussed. When both core-core and core-valence correlation are included in the calculation, no suitable truncated CI approach consistently reproduces the FCI, and contraction of the basis set is very difficult. If the (nearly constant) core-core correlation is eliminated, and only the core-valence correlation is included, CASSCF/MRCI approached reproduce the FCI results and basis set contraction is significantly easier.

  16. Interactive Terascale Particle Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellsworth, David; Green, Bryan; Moran, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the methods used to produce an interactive visualization of a 2 TB computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data set using particle tracing (streaklines). We use the method introduced by Bruckschen et al. [2001] that pre-computes a large number of particles, stores them on disk using a space-filling curve ordering that minimizes seeks, and then retrieves and displays the particles according to the user's command. We describe how the particle computation can be performed using a PC cluster, how the algorithm can be adapted to work with a multi-block curvilinear mesh, and how the out-of-core visualization can be scaled to 296 billion particles while still achieving interactive performance on PG hardware. Compared to the earlier work, our data set size and total number of particles are an order of magnitude larger. We also describe a new compression technique that allows the lossless compression of the particles by 41% and speeds the particle retrieval by about 30%.

  17. Surface functionalized hydrophobic porous particles toward water treatment application.

    PubMed

    Abbaspourrad, Alireza; Carroll, Nick J; Kim, Shin-Hyun; Weitz, David A

    2013-06-18

    A microfluidic-based approach for the fabrication of organic contaminants absorbing core-shell particles is demonstrated. The hydrophobic porous core absorbs oil while the hydrophilic surface enables the particles to be well-dispersed in aqueous solutions. These particles can uptake oil from aqueous solution saturated with oil or via direct contact with oil blobs as depicted in the figure. PMID:23649837

  18. Porous Core-Shell Nanostructures for Catalytic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewers, Trevor David

    Porous core-shell nanostructures have recently received much attention for their enhanced thermal stability. They show great potential in the field of catalysis, as reactant gases can diffuse in and out of the porous shell while the core particle is protected from sintering, a process in which particles coalesce to form larger particles. Sintering is a large problem in industry and is the primary cause of irreversible deactivation. Despite the obvious advantages of high thermal stability, porous core-shell nanoparticles can be developed to have additional interactive properties from the combination of the core and shell together, rather than just the core particle alone. This dissertation focuses on developing new porous core-shell systems in which both the core and shell take part in catalysis. Two types of systems are explored; (1) yolk-shell nanostructures with reducible oxide shells formed using the Kirkendall effect and (2) ceramic-based porous oxide shells formed using sol-gel chemistry. Of the Kirkendall-based systems, Au FexOy and Cu CoO were synthesized and studied for catalytic applications. Additionally, ZnO was explored as a potential shelling material. Sol-gel work focused on optimizing synthetic methods to allow for coating of small gold particles, which remains a challenge today. Mixed metal oxides were explored as a shelling material to make dual catalysts in which the product of a reaction on the core particle becomes a reactant within the shell.

  19. Single Domain SmCo5@Co Exchange-coupled Magnets Prepared from Core/shell Sm[Co(CN)6]·4H2O@GO Particles: A Novel Chemical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ce; Jia, Lihui; Wang, Shouguo; Gao, Chen; Shi, Dawei; Hou, Yanglong; Gao, Song

    2013-01-01

    SmCo5 based magnets with smaller size and larger maximum energy product have been long desired in various fields such as renewable energy technology, electronic industry and aerospace science. However, conventional relatively rough synthetic strategies will lead to either diminished magnetic properties or irregular morphology, which hindered their wide applications. In this article, we present a facile chemical approach to prepare 200 nm single domain SmCo5@Co core/shell magnets with coercivity of 20.7 kOe and saturation magnetization of 82 emu/g. We found that the incorporation of GO sheets is responsible for the generation of the unique structure. The single domain SmCo5 core contributes to the large coercivity of the magnets and the exchange-coupled Co shell enhances the magnetization. This method can be further utilized in the synthesis other Sm-Co based exchange-coupled magnets. PMID:24356309

  20. Ice Core Dating Software for Interactive Dating of Ice Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Mayewski, P. A.; Abdul Jawad, B. S.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists involved in ice core dating are well familiar with the problem of identification and recording the depth of annual signals using stable isotopes, glaciochemistry, ECM (electrical conductivity), DEP (dielectric properties) and particle counter data. Traditionally all parameters used for ice core dating were plotted as a function of depth, printed and after years were marked on the paper, converted to depth vs. age time scale. To expedite this tedious and manual process we developed interactive computer software, Ice core Dating (ICD) program. ICD is written in Java programming language, and uses GPL and GPL site licensed graphic libraries. The same 3.5 Mb in size pre-compiled single jar file, that includes all libraries and application code, was successfully tested on WinOS, Mac OSX, Linux, and Solaris operating systems running Java VM version 1.4. We have followed the modular design philosophy in our source code so potential integration with other software modules, data bases and server side distributed computer environments can be easily implemented. We expect to continue development of new suites of tools for easy integration of ice core data with other available time proxies. ICD is thoroughly documented and comes with a technical reference and cookbook that explains the purpose of the software and its many features, and provides examples to help new users quickly become familiar with the operation and philosophy of the software. ICD is available as a free download from the Climate Change Institute web site ( under the terms of GNU GPL public license.

  1. Biochemical and Physical Properties of the Methanococcus jannaschii 20S Proteasome and PAN, a Homolog of the ATPase (Rpt) Subunits of the Eucaryal 26S Proteasome†

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Heather L.; Ou, Mark S.; Aldrich, Henry C.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2000-01-01

    The 20S proteasome is a self-compartmentalized protease which degrades unfolded polypeptides and has been purified from eucaryotes, gram-positive actinomycetes, and archaea. Energy-dependent complexes, such as the 19S cap of the eucaryal 26S proteasome, are assumed to be responsible for the recognition and/or unfolding of substrate proteins which are then translocated into the central chamber of the 20S proteasome and hydrolyzed to polypeptide products of 3 to 30 residues. All archaeal genomes which have been sequenced are predicted to encode proteins with up to ∼50% identity to the six ATPase subunits of the 19S cap. In this study, one of these archaeal homologs which has been named PAN for proteasome-activating nucleotidase was characterized from the hyperthermophile Methanococcus jannaschii. In addition, the M. jannaschii 20S proteasome was purified as a 700-kDa complex by in vitro assembly of the α and β subunits and has an unusually high rate of peptide and unfolded-polypeptide hydrolysis at 100°C. The 550-kDa PAN complex was required for CTP- or ATP-dependent degradation of β-casein by archaeal 20S proteasomes. A 500-kDa complex of PAN(Δ1–73), which has a deletion of residues 1 to 73 of the deduced protein and disrupts the predicted N-terminal coiled-coil, also facilitated this energy-dependent proteolysis. However, this deletion increased the types of nucleotides hydrolyzed to include not only ATP and CTP but also ITP, GTP, TTP, and UTP. The temperature optimum for nucleotide (ATP) hydrolysis was reduced from 80°C for the full-length protein to 65°C for PAN(Δ1–73). Both PAN protein complexes were stable in the absence of ATP and were inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and p-chloromercuriphenyl-sulfonic acid. Kinetic analysis reveals that the PAN protein has a relatively high Vmax for ATP and CTP hydrolysis of 3.5 and 5.8 μmol of Pi per min per mg of protein as well as a relatively low affinity for CTP and ATP with Km values of 307 and 497

  2. Core-nucleus distortation in hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, A.R.; Usmani, Q.N.

    1995-08-01

    We are completing a study of the effects of the spherical distortion of the {open_quotes}core{close_quotes} nucleus by the {Lambda} in a hypernucleus. The response of the core was determined by an appropriately chosen energy-density functional which depends, in particular, on the nuclear compressibility. The forcing action of the A is determined by the nuclear density dependence of the {Lambda} binding in nuclear matter which is obtained from our work on the {Lambda} single-particle energies. Because of the strongly repulsive {Lambda}NN forces, this {Lambda} binding {open_quotes}saturates{close_quotes} at a density close to the central density of nuclei, and results in a reduced core-nucleus distortion much less than would otherwise be obtained. The effects of the core distortion then turn out to be very small even for quite light hypernuclei. This result justifies the assumption that spherical core nuclei are effectively undistorted in a hypernucleus.

  3. Academic Rigor: The Core of the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunner, Judy

    2013-01-01

    Some educators see the Common Core State Standards as reason for stress, most recognize the positive possibilities associated with them and are willing to make the professional commitment to implementing them so that academic rigor for all students will increase. But business leaders, parents, and the authors of the Common Core are not the only…

  4. Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C; Manna, Liberato

    2013-12-17

    Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making shaped nanocrystal particles are disclosed. One embodiment includes a method for forming a branched, nanocrystal particle. It includes (a) forming a core having a first crystal structure in a solution, (b) forming a first arm extending from the core having a second crystal structure in the solution, and (c) forming a second arm extending from the core having the second crystal structure in the solution.

  5. Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making the same

    DOEpatents

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Scher, Erik C.; Manna, Liberato

    2011-11-22

    Shaped nanocrystal particles and methods for making shaped nanocrystal particles are disclosed. One embodiment includes a method for forming a branched, nanocrystal particle. It includes (a) forming a core having a first crystal structure in a solution, (b) forming a first arm extending from the core having a second crystal structure in the solution, and (c) forming a second arm extending from the core having the second crystal structure in the solution.

  6. Final report on key comparison CCQM-K92: Electrolytic conductivity at 0.05 S m-1 and 20 S m-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyskočil, L.; Máriássy, M.; Reyes, Adrian; Monroy, Marcela; Vospělová, Alena; Magnusson, Bertil; Pyykkö, Rauno; Kardash, Elena; Barbieri Gonzaga, Fabiano; Fraga, I. C. S.; Lopes, J. C.; Silva, W. B., Jr.; Borges, P. P.; Rocha, W. F. C.; Durbiano, Francesca; Orrù, E.; Pratt, Kenneth W.; Tønnes Jakobsen, Pia; Dalsgaard Jensen, Hans; Avnskjold, Jørgen; Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Suvorov, V. I.; Xiaoping, Song; Hai, Wang; Seitz, Steffen; Spitzer, Petra; Gavrilkin, Vladimir; Prokopenko, Leonid; Stennik, Oleksiy; Kozlowski, Wladyslaw; Dumanska-Kulpa, Joanna; Grzybowska, Izabela; Ovchinnikov, Yury A.; Nagyné Szilágyi, Zsófia; Fükö, Judit

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the key comparison CCQM-K92 was to demonstrate the capabilities of the participating NMIs to measure electrolytic conductivity of an unknown sample. Two samples with nominal electrolytic conductivity values of 0.05 S m-1 and 20 S m-1 have been prepared for comparison. For the first time a conductivity value larger than those given in the IUPAC document [1] was measured in a CCQM comparison. Thus no calibration standards with similar conductivity value were available. The comparison was an activity of the Electrochemical Working Group (EAWG) of the CCQM and was coordinated by SMU. In the comparison NMIs from fifteen countries took part. The higher conductivity (20 S m-1) was measured by ten participants. Good agreement of the results was observed for the majority of participants. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCQM, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  7. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  8. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  9. One-pot aerosol synthesis of ordered hierarchical mesoporous core-shell silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Areva, S; Boissière, C; Grosso, D; Asakawa, T; Sanchez, C; Lindén, M

    2004-07-21

    A mixed surfactant approach has been successfully employed in an aerosol-based synthesis of spherical silica particles exhibiting a new core-shell structure where the shell and the core exhibit different ordered mesoporosity and pore sizes. PMID:15263952

  10. Core labeling of adenovirus with EGFP

    SciTech Connect

    Le, Long P.; Le, Helen N.; Nelson, Amy R.; Matthews, David A.; Yamamoto, Masato; Curiel, David T. . E-mail: curiel@uab.edu

    2006-08-01

    The study of adenovirus could greatly benefit from diverse methods of virus detection. Recently, it has been demonstrated that carboxy-terminal EGFP fusions of adenovirus core proteins Mu, V, and VII properly localize to the nucleus and display novel function in the cell. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that the core proteins may serve as targets for labeling the adenovirus core with fluorescent proteins. To this end, we constructed various chimeric expression vectors with fusion core genes (Mu-EGFP, V-EGFP, preVII-EGFP, and matVII-EGFP) while maintaining expression of the native proteins. Expression of the fusion core proteins was suboptimal using E1 expression vectors with both conventional CMV and modified (with adenovirus tripartite leader sequence) CMV5 promoters, resulting in non-labeled viral particles. However, robust expression equivalent to the native protein was observed when the fusion genes were placed in the deleted E3 region. The efficient Ad-wt-E3-V-EGFP and Ad-wt-E3-preVII-EGFP expression vectors were labeled allowing visualization of purified virus and tracking of the viral core during early infection. The vectors maintained their viral function, including viral DNA replication, viral DNA encapsidation, cytopathic effect, and thermostability. Core labeling offers a means to track the adenovirus core in vector targeting studies as well as basic adenovirus virology.

  11. Coring Sample Acquisition Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Nicolas E.; Murray, Saben D.; Walkemeyer, Phillip E.; Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kriechbaum, Kristopher L.; Richardson, Megan; Klein, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    A sample acquisition tool (SAT) has been developed that can be used autonomously to sample drill and capture rock cores. The tool is designed to accommodate core transfer using a sample tube to the IMSAH (integrated Mars sample acquisition and handling) SHEC (sample handling, encapsulation, and containerization) without ever touching the pristine core sample in the transfer process.

  12. The Core Skills Initiative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    A British initiative that aims to identify, develop, and assess core skills in post-16 courses and qualifications is summarized in this bulletin. The first section discusses expectations regarding what core skills can achieve. The following section focuses on other purposes to which core skills could contribute, such as broadening the post-16…

  13. Core Competence and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gary; Hooper, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the concept of core competence and applies it to postcompulsory education in the United Kingdom. Adopts an educational perspective that suggests accreditation as the core competence of universities. This economic approach suggests that the market trend toward lifetime learning might best be met by institutions developing a core competence…

  14. Core Design Applications

    1995-07-12

    CORD-2 is intended for core desigh applications of pressurized water reactors. The main objective was to assemble a core design system which could be used for simple calculations (such as frequently required for fuel management) as well as for accurate calculations (for example, core design after refueling).

  15. Stereoselective Property of 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol Ocotillol Type Epimers Affects Its Absorption and Also the Inhibition of P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyan; Wu, Xiangmeng; Wang, Li; Meng, Qingguo; Liu, Wanhui

    2014-01-01

    Stereoselectivity has been proved to be tightly related to drug action including pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. (20S,24R)-epoxy-dammarane-3,12,25-triol (24R-epimer) and (20S,24S)-epoxy-dammarane-3,12,25-triol (24S-epimer), a pair of 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD) ocotillol type epimers, were the main metabolites of PPD. Previous studies have shown that 24R-epimer and 24S-epimer had stereoselectivity in pharmacological action and pharmacokinetics. In the present study, the aim was to further study the pharmacokinetic characteristics of both epimers, investigate their absorption mechanism and analyze the selectivity effects of ocotillol type side chain and C24 stereo-configuration on P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in vivo and in vitro. Results showed that the absolute bioavailability of 24R-epimer was about 14-fold higher than that of 24S-epimer, and a linear kinetic characteristic was acquired in doses of 5–20 mg/kg for both epimers after oral administration. Furthermore, the apparent permeability coefficients of 24R-epimer were 5–7 folds higher than that of 24S-epimer having lower efflux ratios in Caco-2 cell models. Moreover, both 24R-epimer and 24S-epimer had similar inhibitory effects on P-gp by increasing cellular retention of rhodamine 123 in Caco-2 cells and decreasing efflux of digoxin across Caco-2 cell monolayers. In situ in vivo experiments showed that the inhibition of 24R-epimer on P-gp was stronger than that of 24S-epimer by single-pass intestinal perfusion of rhodamine 123 in rats. Western blot analyses demonstrated that both epimers had no action on P-gp expression in Caco-2 cells. In conclusion, with respect to the stereoselectivity, C24 S-configuration of the ocotillol type epimers processed a poor transmembrane permeability and could be distinguished by P-gp. Sharing a dammarane skeleton, both 24R-epimer and 24S-epimer were potent inhibitors of P-gp. This study provides a new case of stereoselective pharmacokinetics of chiral compounds which

  16. Electrocatalysts having gold monolayers on platinum nanoparticle cores, and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Adzic, Radoslav; Zhang, Junliang

    2010-04-27

    The invention relates to gold-coated particles useful as fuel cell electrocatalysts. The particles are composed of an electrocatalytically active core at least partially encapsulated by an outer shell of gold or gold alloy. The invention more particularly relates to such particles having a noble metal-containing core, and more particularly, a platinum or platinum alloy core. In other embodiments, the invention relates to fuel cells containing these electrocatalysts and methods for generating electrical energy therefrom.

  17. Alpha Particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Term that is sometimes used to describe a helium nucleus, a positively charged particle that consists of two protons and two neutrons, bound together. Alpha particles, which were discovered by Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) in 1898, are emitted by atomic nuclei that are undergoing alpha radioactivity. During this process, an unstable heavy nucleus spontaneously emits an alpha particle and transmut...

  18. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  19. Banded transformer cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W. T. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A banded transformer core formed by positioning a pair of mated, similar core halves on a supporting pedestal. The core halves are encircled with a strap, selectively applying tension whereby a compressive force is applied to the core edge for reducing the innate air gap. A dc magnetic field is employed in supporting the core halves during initial phases of the banding operation, while an ac magnetic field subsequently is employed for detecting dimension changes occurring in the air gaps as tension is applied to the strap.

  20. "Snowing" Core in Earth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Chen, B.; Cormier, V.; Gao, L.; Gubbins, D.; Kharlamova, S. A.; He, K.; Yang, H.

    2008-12-01

    As a planet cools, an initially molten core gradually solidifies. Solidification occurs at shallow depths in the form of "snow", if the liquidus temperature gradient of the core composition is smaller than the adiabatic temperature gradient in the core. Experimental data on the melting behavior of iron-sulfur binary system suggest that the cores of Mercury and Ganymede are probably snowing at the present time. The Martian core is predicted to snow in the future, provided that the sulfur content falls into the range of 10 to 14 weight percent. Is the Earth's core snowing? If so, what are the surface manifestations? If the Earth's core snowed in the past, how did it affect the formation of the solid inner core and the geodynamo? Here, we evaluate the likelihood and consequences of a snowing core throughout the Earth's history, on the basis of mineral physics data describing the melting behavior, equation-of-state, and thermodynamic properties of iron-rich alloys at high pressures. We discuss if snowing in the present-day Earth can reproduce the shallow gradients of compressional wave velocity above the inner-core boundary, and whether or not snowing in the early Earth may reconcile the apparent young age of the solid inner core with a long-lived geodynamo.

  1. Identification of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1A4 as the Major Isozyme Responsible for the Glucuronidation of 20(S)-Protopanaxadiol in Human Liver Microsomes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; He, Chunyong; Fang, Lianxiang; Yang, Li; Wang, Zhengtao

    2016-01-01

    20(S)-protopanaxadiol (PPD), one of the representative aglycones of ginsenosides, has a broad spectrum of pharmacological activities. Although phase I metabolism has been investigated extensively, information regarding phase II metabolism of this compound remains to be elucidated. Here, a glucuronidated metabolite of PPD in human liver microsomes (HLMs) and rat liver microsomes (RLMs) was unambiguously identified as PPD-3-O-β-d-glucuronide by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and high resolution mass spectrometry. The chemical inhibition and recombinant human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) isoforms assay showed that the PPD glucuronidation was mainly catalyzed by UGT1A4 in HLM, whereas UGT1A3 showed weak catalytic activity. In conclusion, PPD-3-O-β-d-glucuronide was first identified as the principal glucuronidation metabolite of PPD in HLMs, which was catalyzed by UGT1A4. PMID:27005621

  2. Continuous coring drill bit

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, G.A.

    1987-09-22

    A continuous coring drill bit is described comprising: (a) body means defining a vertical axis and adapted for connection to drill pipe and forming an internal body cavity disposed in eccentric relation with the vertical axis and a generally circular throat in communication with the body cavity for conducting drilling fluid. The throat defining a throat axis coincident with the vertical axis and being of a configuration permitting passage of a formation core into the body cavity; (b) a generally cylindrical tubular core breaker being rotatably mounted within the body cavity and defining a vertical axis of rotation of generally parallel and offset relation with the vertical axis of the body means; and (c) a buttress element extending inwardly from the core breaker and adapted to contact the formation core. Upon each rotation of the drill bit the buttress element applying transverse force to the core for fracturing of the core into sections sufficiently small for transport by the drilling fluid.

  3. Method of cold smoke generation for vortex core tagging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, R. C.; Ng, T. T.; Visser, K. D.

    1988-01-01

    Attention is given to the flow-visualization problem posed by the 'dark-core' region of the vortices formed on the upper side of a delta wing; the low particle density in the core region minimizes the density of tracing particles whose presence is essential in LDV measurements. An effort is presently undertaken using TiCl4 smoke in subsonic wind tunnel tests of a 70-deg sweep delta wing model.

  4. Influence of particle surface roughness on creeping granular motion.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Li-Tsung; Chang, Wei-Ching; Hsiau, Shu-San

    2016-07-01

    A core is formed at the center of a quasi-two-dimensional rotating drum filled more than half with granular material. The core rotates slightly faster than the drum (precession) and decreases in radius over time (erosion) due to the granular creeping motion that occurs below the freely flowing layer. This paper focuses on the effect of the surface roughness of particles on core dynamics, core precession, and core erosion. Two different surface roughness of glass particles having the same diameter were used in the experiments. The surface structures of the particles were quantitatively compared by measuring the coefficients of friction and using a simple image contrast method. The experiments were performed with five different filling levels in a 50-cm-diameter rotating drum. According to the results, core precession and core erosion are both dependent on the particle surface roughness. Core precession becomes weaker and erosion becomes stronger when using particles having a rough surface in the experiments. To explain the physics of core dynamics, the particles' surface roughness effect on the freely flowing layer and the creeping motion region were also investigated. The granular bed velocity field, maximum flowing layer depth δ, shear rate in the flowing layer γ[over ̇], and the creeping region decay constant y_{0} were also calculated in this paper. The effect of the particles' surface roughness on these physical variables well illustrates the physics of core dynamics and creeping granular motion. PMID:27575202

  5. Influence of particle surface roughness on creeping granular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Li-Tsung; Chang, Wei-Ching; Hsiau, Shu-San

    2016-07-01

    A core is formed at the center of a quasi-two-dimensional rotating drum filled more than half with granular material. The core rotates slightly faster than the drum (precession) and decreases in radius over time (erosion) due to the granular creeping motion that occurs below the freely flowing layer. This paper focuses on the effect of the surface roughness of particles on core dynamics, core precession, and core erosion. Two different surface roughness of glass particles having the same diameter were used in the experiments. The surface structures of the particles were quantitatively compared by measuring the coefficients of friction and using a simple image contrast method. The experiments were performed with five different filling levels in a 50-cm-diameter rotating drum. According to the results, core precession and core erosion are both dependent on the particle surface roughness. Core precession becomes weaker and erosion becomes stronger when using particles having a rough surface in the experiments. To explain the physics of core dynamics, the particles' surface roughness effect on the freely flowing layer and the creeping motion region were also investigated. The granular bed velocity field, maximum flowing layer depth δ , shear rate in the flowing layer γ ˙, and the creeping region decay constant y0 were also calculated in this paper. The effect of the particles' surface roughness on these physical variables well illustrates the physics of core dynamics and creeping granular motion.

  6. Particle Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupen, Claus; Shwartz, Boris

    2011-09-01

    Preface to the first edition; Preface to the second edition; Introduction; 1. Interactions of particles and radiation with matter; 2. Characteristic properties of detectors; 3. Units of radiation measurements and radiation sources; 4. Accelerators; 5. Main physical phenomena used for particle detection and basic counter types; 6. Historical track detectors; 7. Track detectors; 8. Calorimetry; 9. Particle identification; 10. Neutrino detectors; 11. Momentum measurement and muon detection; 12. Ageing and radiation effects; 13. Example of a general-purpose detector: Belle; 14. Electronics; 15. Data analysis; 16. Applications of particle detectors outside particle physics; 17. Glossary; 18. Solutions; 19. Resumé; Appendixes; Index.

  7. GRAVITATIONAL ACCRETION OF PARTICLES ONTO MOONLETS EMBEDDED IN SATURN's RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Yuki; Ohtsuki, Keiji; Daisaka, Hiroshi E-mail: ohtsuki@tiger.kobe-u.ac.jp

    2014-12-20

    Using a local N-body simulation, we examine gravitational accretion of ring particles onto moonlet cores in Saturn's rings. We find that gravitational accretion of particles onto moonlet cores is unlikely to occur in the C ring and probably difficult in the inner B ring as well provided that the cores are rigid water ice. Dependence of particle accretion on ring thickness changes when the radial distance from the planet and/or the density of particles is varied: the former determines the size of the core's Hill radius relative to its physical size, while the latter changes the effect of self-gravity of accreted particles. We find that particle accretion onto high-latitude regions of the core surface can occur even if the rings' vertical thickness is much smaller than the core radius, although redistribution of particles onto the high-latitude regions would not be perfectly efficient in outer regions of the rings such as the outer A ring, where the size of the core's Hill sphere in the vertical direction is significantly larger than the core's physical radius. Our results suggest that large boulders recently inferred from observations of transparent holes in the C ring are not formed locally by gravitational accretion, while propeller moonlets in the A ring would be gravitational aggregates formed by particle accretion onto dense cores. Our results also imply that the main bodies of small satellites near the outer edge of Saturn's rings may have been formed in rather thin rings.

  8. HYDRATE CORE DRILLING TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    John H. Cohen; Thomas E. Williams; Ali G. Kadaster; Bill V. Liddell

    2002-11-01

    The ''Methane Hydrate Production from Alaskan Permafrost'' project is a three-year endeavor being conducted by Maurer Technology Inc. (MTI), Noble, and Anadarko Petroleum, in partnership with the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The project's goal is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition. The project team plans to design and implement a program to safely and economically drill, core and produce gas from arctic hydrates. The current work scope includes drilling and coring one well on Anadarko leases in FY 2003 during the winter drilling season. A specially built on-site core analysis laboratory will be used to determine some of the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. Prior to going to the field, the project team designed and conducted a controlled series of coring tests for simulating coring of hydrate formations. A variety of equipment and procedures were tested and modified to develop a practical solution for this special application. This Topical Report summarizes these coring tests. A special facility was designed and installed at MTI's Drilling Research Center (DRC) in Houston and used to conduct coring tests. Equipment and procedures were tested by cutting cores from frozen mixtures of sand and water supported by casing and designed to simulate hydrate formations. Tests were conducted with chilled drilling fluids. Tests showed that frozen core can be washed out and reduced in size by the action of the drilling fluid. Washing of the core by the drilling fluid caused a reduction in core diameter, making core recovery very difficult (if not impossible). One successful solution was to drill the last 6 inches of core dry (without fluid circulation). These tests demonstrated that it will be difficult to capture core when drilling in permafrost or hydrates without implementing certain safeguards. Among the coring tests was a simulated hydrate formation comprised of coarse, large

  9. Ferrofluid-based Stretchable Magnetic Core Inductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic materials are commonly used in inductor and transformer cores to increase inductance density. The emerging field of stretchable electronics poses a new challenge since typical magnetic cores are bulky, rigid and often brittle. This paper presents, for the first time, stretchable inductors incorporating ferrofluid as a liquid magnetic core. Ferrofluids, suspensions of nanoscale magnetic particles in a carrier liquid, provide enhanced magnetic permeability without changing the mechanical properties of the surrounding elastomer. The inductor tested in this work consisted of a liquid metal solenoid wrapped around a ferrofluid core in separate channels. The low frequency inductance was found to increase from 255 nH before fill to 390 nH after fill with ferrofluid, an increase of 52%. The inductor was also shown to survive uniaxial strains of up to 100%.

  10. 23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A COREBLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CORE WORKER OPERATING A CORE-BLOWER THAT PNEUMATICALLY FILLED CORE BOXES WITH RESIGN IMPREGNATED SAND AND CREATED A CORE THAT THEN REQUIRED BAKING, CA. 1950. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  11. Optimizing a ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry approach using a novel sub-2μm core-shell particle for in depth lipidomic profiling of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Witting, Michael; Maier, Tanja Verena; Garvis, Steve; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2014-09-12

    Lipid profiling or lipidomics is currently applied in many different research fields. It refers to the global analysis of a samples lipid content using different analytical chemistry methods, with mass spectrometry as the mostly employed technology. We developed a comprehensive in-depth analysis method for the lipidome of the soil-dwelling nematode Caenorhabitis elegans, a widely used model organism. Four different columns were compared with a generic gradient and a novel sub-2-μm core-shell column, Waters Cortecs C18, showed superior performance in case of chromatographic peak characteristics, e.g. plate numbers and number of detected lipid features. Retention time deviation was generally less than 1% within one column and below 5% for columns from different batches. Intensity variation was lower than 30% for most detected features. Improved chromatographic separation showed enhanced resolution for isomeric lipids and allowed collection of highly detailed MS/MS spectra for lipid identification. In total 1304 lipid features were detected in positive ionization mode and 265 in negative mode. Lipids from different classes were annotated and MS/MS spectra obtained by data dependent fragmentation were used for identification purposes. PMID:25074420

  12. Lunar core: occam's razor?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    Whether or not the earth's moon has a core is a much bandied question. Like many notions about the properties of the moon, ideas of a lunar core changed drastically after the Apollo studies. A review of the development of these ideas was given a scholarly treatment by S.K. Runcorn recently (Nature, 304, 589-596, 1983). In contrast, L.L. Hood, C.P. Sonett, and L.J. Srnka have questioned the concept in serious detail (Nature, 307, 661-662, 1984).Whether or not the moon actually has or has had a fluid metallic core is of great consequence for a number of geophysical theories about the solar system. Most investigators concede that the possible existence of a lunar core remains one of the major unanswered, and yet most critical, questions about the moon. A lot rides on the answer: Can a lunar-sized body have a core? Is the core metallic? How is the core related to lunar magnetism and its paleomagnetism? Is or was a lunar core related to lunar volcanism? If the moon can have a core, is planetary core formation in the solar system a simple matter of gravitationally segregating metallic fragments that were formed elsewhere? Implications of the questions are without limit. There is, perhaps, no more valid issue about the moon to explore scientifically.

  13. Core sample extractor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, James; Cobb, Billy; Hart, Steve; Leaptrotte, Jeff; Milhollin, James; Pernik, Mark

    1989-01-01

    The problem of retrieving and storing core samples from a hole drilled on the lunar surface is addressed. The total depth of the hole in question is 50 meters with a maximum diameter of 100 millimeters. The core sample itself has a diameter of 60 millimeters and will be two meters in length. It is therefore necessary to retrieve and store 25 core samples per hole. The design utilizes a control system that will stop the mechanism at a certain depth, a cam-linkage system that will fracture the core, and a storage system that will save and catalogue the cores to be extracted. The Rod Changer and Storage Design Group will provide the necessary tooling to get into the hole as well as to the core. The mechanical design for the cam-linkage system as well as the conceptual design of the storage device are described.

  14. The core paradox.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, G. C.; Higgins, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Rebuttal of suggestions from various critics attempting to provide an escape from the seeming paradox originated by Higgins and Kennedy's (1971) proposed possibility that the liquid in the outer core was thermally stably stratified and that this stratification might prove a powerful inhibitor to circulation of the outer core fluid of the kind postulated for the generation of the earth's magnetic field. These suggestions are examined and shown to provide no reasonable escape from the core paradox.

  15. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  16. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  17. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  18. Capture of soft particles on electrostatically heterogeneous collectors: brushy particles.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yicun; Guo, Xuhong; Kalasin, Surachate; Santore, Maria M

    2014-03-01

    This work investigated how particle softness can influence the initial adhesive capture of submicrometer colloidal particles from flow onto collecting surfaces. The study focused on the case dominated by potential attractions at the particle periphery (rather than, for instance, steric stabilization, requiring entropically costly deformations to access shorter-range van der Waals attractions.) The particles, "spherical polyelectrolyte brushes" with diameters in the range of 150-200 nm depending on the ionic strength, consisted of a polystyrene core and a corona of grafted poly(acrylic acid) chains, producing a relatively thick (20-40 nm) negative brushy layer. The adhesion of these particles was studied on electrostatically heterogeneous collecting surfaces: negatively charged substrates carrying flat polycationic patches made by irreversibly adsorbing the poly-l-lysine (PLL) polyelectrolyte. Variation in the amount of adsorbed PLL changed the net collector charge from completely negatively charged (repulsive) to positively charged (attractive). Adjustments in ionic strength varied the range of the electrostatic interactions. Comparing capture kinetics of soft brushy particles to those of similarly sized and similarly charged silica particles revealed nearly identical particle capture kinetics over the full range of collecting surface compositions at high ionic strengths. Even though the brushy particles contained an average of 5 vol % PAA in the brushy shell, with the rest being water under these conditions, their capture was indistinguishable from that of similarly charged rigid spheres. The brushy particles were, however, considerably less adherent at low ionic strengths where the brush was more extended, suggesting an influence of particle deformability or reduced interfacial charge. These findings, that the short time adhesion of brushy particles can resemble that of rigid particles, suggest that for bacteria and cell capture, modeling the cells as rigid

  19. AN Core Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarino, Andrea; Tomatis, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    Several alternative approximations of neutron transport have been proposed in years to move around the known limitations imposed by neutron diffusion in the modeling of nuclear cores. However, only a few complied with the industrial requirements of fast numerical computation, concentrating more on physical accuracy. In this work, the AN transport methodology is discussed with particular interest in core performance calculations. The implementation of the methodology in full core codes is discussed with particular attention to numerical issues and to the integration within the entire simulation process. Finally, first results from core studies in AN transport are analyzed in detail and compared to standard results of neutron diffusion.

  20. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-07-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  1. Helicopter engine core noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonglahn, U. H.

    1982-01-01

    Calculated engine core noise levels, based on NASA Lewis prediction procedures, for five representative helicopter engines are compared with measured total helicopter noise levels and ICAO helicopter noise certification requirements. Comparisons are made for level flyover and approach procedures. The measured noise levels are generally significantly greater than those predicted for the core noise levels, except for the Sikorsky S-61 and S-64 helicopters. However, the predicted engine core noise levels are generally at or within 3 dB of the ICAO noise rules. Consequently, helicopter engine core noise can be a significant contributor to the overall helicopter noise signature.

  2. Core Research Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  3. Formation of Bidisperse Particle Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Er, Jenn Wei; Zhao, Bing; Law, Adrian W. K.; Adams, E. Eric

    2014-11-01

    When a group of dense particles is released instantaneously into water, their motion has been conceptualized as a circulating particle thermal (Ruggerber 2000). However, Wen and Nacamuli (1996) observed the formation of particle clumps characterized by a narrow, fast moving core shedding particles into wakes. They observed the clump formation even for particles in the non-cohesive range as long as the source Rayleigh number was large (Ra > 1E3) or equivalently the source cloud number (Nc) was small (Nc < 3.2E2). This physical phenomenon has been investigated by Zhao et al. (2014) through physical experiments. They proposed the theoretical support for Nc dependence and categorized the formation processes into cloud formation, transitional regime and clump formation. Previous works focused mainly on the behavior of monodisperse particles. The present study further extends the experimental investigation to the formation process of bidisperse particles. Experiments are conducted in a glass tank with a water depth of 90 cm. Finite amounts of sediments with various weight proportions between coarser and finer particles are released from a cylindrical tube. The Nc being tested ranges from 6E-3 to 9.9E-2, which covers all the three formation regimes. The experimental results showed that the introduction of coarse particles promotes cloud formation and reduce the losses of finer particles into the wake. More quantitative descriptions of the effects of source conditions on the formation processes will be presented during the conference.

  4. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  5. Silica-metal core-shell nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Jankiewicz, B J; Jamiola, D; Choma, J; Jaroniec, M

    2012-01-15

    Silica-metal nanostructures consisting of silica cores and metal nanoshells attract a lot of attention because of their unique properties and potential applications ranging from catalysis and biosensing to optical devices and medicine. The important feature of these nanostructures is the possibility of controlling their properties by the variation of their geometry, shell morphology and shell material. This review is devoted to silica-noble metal core-shell nanostructures; specifically, it outlines the main methods used for the preparation and surface modification of silica particles and presents the major strategies for the formation of metal nanoshells on the modified silica particles. A special emphasis is given to the Stöber method, which is relatively simple, effective and well verified for the synthesis of large and highly uniform silica particles (with diameters from 100 nm to a few microns). Next, the surface chemistry of these particles is discussed with a special focus on the attachment of specific organic groups such as aminopropyl or mercaptopropyl groups, which interact strongly with metal species. Finally, the synthesis, characterization and application of various silica-metal core-shell nanostructures are reviewed, especially in relation to the siliceous cores with gold or silver nanoshells. Nowadays, gold is most often used metal for the formation of nanoshells due to its beneficial properties for many applications. However, other metals such as silver, platinum, palladium, nickel and copper were also used for fabrication of core-shell nanostructures. Silica-metal nanostructures can be prepared using various methods, for instance, (i) growth of metal nanoshells on the siliceous cores with deposited metal nanoparticles, (ii) reduction of metal species accompanied by precipitation of metal nanoparticles on the modified silica cores, and (iii) formation of metal nanoshells under ultrasonic conditions. A special emphasis is given to the seed

  6. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, Robert W.; Dobelbower, M. Christian

    1995-01-01

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  7. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  8. Particle transport inferences from density sawteeth

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.; Li, Q.; Zhuang, G.; Liao, K.; Gentle, K. W.

    2014-05-15

    Sawtooth oscillations in tokamaks are defined by their effect on electron temperature: a rapid flattening of the core profile followed by an outward heat pulse and a slow core recovery caused by central heating. Recent high-resolution, multi-chord interferometer measurements on JTEXT extend these studies to particle transport. Sawteeth only partially flatten the core density profile, but enhanced particle diffusion on the time scale of the thermal crash occurs over much of the profile, relevant for impurities. Recovery between crashes implies an inward pinch velocity extending to the center.

  9. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  10. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  11. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  12. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  13. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  14. The ginsenoside 20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol induces autophagy and apoptosis in human melanoma via AMPK/JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soouk; Kim, Jong-Eun; Song, Nu Ry; Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Mee Hyun; Park, Jun Seong; Yeom, Myeong-Hun; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Ki Won

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that a major metabolite of the red ginseng ginsenoside Rb1, called 20-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-20(S)-protopanaxadiol (GPD), exhibits anticancer properties. However, the chemotherapeutic effects and molecular mechanisms behind GPD action in human melanoma have not been previously investigated. Here we report the anticancer activity of GPD and its mechanism of action in melanoma cells. GPD, but not its parent compound Rb1, inhibited melanoma cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Further investigation revealed that GPD treatment achieved this inhibition through the induction of autophagy and apoptosis, while Rb1 failed to show significant effect at the same concentrations. The inhibitory effect of GPD appears to be mediated through the induction of AMPK and the subsequent attenuation of mTOR phosphorylation. In addition, GPD activated c-Jun by inducing JNK phosphorylation. Our findings suggest that GPD suppresses melanoma growth by inducing autophagic cell death and apoptosis via AMPK/JNK pathway activation. GPD therefore has the potential to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of human melanoma. PMID:25137374

  15. A 20(S)-protopanoxadiol derivative overcomes multi-drug resistance by antagonizing ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 transporter function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wantao; Xu, Qin; Xiao, Meng; Hu, Lihong; Mao, Li; Wang, Xu

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, failure of chemotherapy is often caused by the ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 1 (ABCB1), and few drugs have been successfully developed to overcome ABCB1-mediated multi-drug resistance (MDR). To suppress ABCB1 activity, we previously designed and synthesized a new series of derivatives based on 20(S)-protopanoxadiol (PPD). In the present study, we investigated the role of PPD derivatives in the function of ABC transporters. Non-toxic concentrations of the PPD derivative PPD12 sensitized ABCB1-overexpressing cells to their anti-cancer substrates better than either the parental PPD or inactive PPD11. PPD12 increased intracellular accumulation of adriamycin and rhodamine123 in resistant cancer cells. Although PPD12 did not suppress the expression of ABCB1 mRNA or protein, it stimulated the activity of ABCB1 ATPase. Because PPD12 is a competitive inhibitor, it was predicted to bind to the large hydrophobic cavity of homology-modeled human ABCB1. PPD12 also enhanced the efficacy of adriamycin against ABCB1-overexpressing KB/VCR xenografts in nude mice. In conclusion, PPD12 enhances the efficacy of substrate drugs in ABCB1-overexpressing cancer cells. These findings suggest that a combination therapy consisting of PPD12 with conventional chemotherapeutic agents may be an effective treatment for ABCB1-mediated MDR cancer patients. PMID:26824187

  16. Effects of a functional foot orthosis on the knee angle in the sagittal plane of college students in their 20s with flatfoot

    PubMed Central

    Park, KwangYong; Seo, KyoChul

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a functional foot orthosis on the knee angle in the sagittal plane of college students in their 20s who had flatfoot. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 college students diagnosed as having flatfoot. The variations of their knee angle (Q-angle) in the sagittal plane during the stance phase were measured using the VICON Motion System (Vicon, Hansung, Korea) before and while wearing a foot orthosis. The experimental data were analyzed using SPSS 12.0 for Windows. [Results] The Q-angle in the test group during the stance phase showed statistically significant declines on the right and left sides while wearing the foot orthosis during the gait-phases of loading response and midstance. During initial contact, terminal stance, and preswing, the Q-angle also decreased on the right and left sides after wearing the foot orthosis, but the changes were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] The college students with flatfoot exhibited declines in the Q-angle in the sagittal plane while wearing a foot orthosis. In this regard, the application of active gait training using orthotic shoes for long hours is likely to help individuals with flatfoot to achieve normal gait. PMID:25995591

  17. 20(S)-ginsenoside Rh2 inhibits the proliferation and induces the apoptosis of KG-1a cells through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi; Liu, Ze-Hong; Xia, Jing; Li, Xiao-Peng; Li, Ke-Qiong; Xiong, Wei; Li, Jing; Chen, Di-Long

    2016-07-01

    Previous research has shown that total saponins of Panax ginseng (TSPG) and other ginsenoside monomers inhibit the proliferation of leukemia cells. However, the effect has not been compared among them. Cell viability was determined by Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, and ultra-structural characteristics were observed under transmission electron microscopy. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry (FCM). Real-time fluorescence quantitative‑PCR, western blotting and immunofluorescence were used to measure the expression of β-catenin, TCF4, cyclin D1 and NF-κBp65. β-catenin/TCF4 target gene transcription were observed by ChIP-PCR assay. We found that 20(S)-ginsenoside Rh2 [(S)Rh2] inhibited the proliferation of KG-1a cells more efficiently than the other monomers. Moreover, (S)Rh2 arrested KG-1a cells in the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis. In addition, the levels of β-catenin, TCF4, cyclin D1 mRNA and protein were decreased. The ChIP-PCR showed that (S)Rh2 downregulated the transcription of β-catenin/TCF4 target genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc. These results indicated that (S)Rh2 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, demonstrating its potential as a chemotherapeutic agent for leukemia therapy. PMID:27121661

  18. Oxidation and interaction of DJ-1 with 20S proteasome in the erythrocytes of early stage Parkinson’s disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yoshiro; Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Matsumura, Akihiro; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Itoh, Sayoko; Sutou, Kenta; Kobayashi, Mayuka; Mita, Yuichiro; Shichiri, Mototada; Hisahara, Shin; Hara, Yasuo; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Hamakubo, Takao; Kusunoki, Susumu; Shimohama, Shun; Noguchi, Noriko

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive, age-related, neurodegenerative disorder, and oxidative stress is an important mediator in its pathogenesis. DJ-1, the product of the causative gene of a familial form of PD, plays a significant role in anti-oxidative defence to protect cells from oxidative stress. DJ-1 undergoes preferential oxidation at the cysteine residue at position 106 (Cys-106) under oxidative stress. Here, using specific antibodies against Cys-106-oxidized DJ-1 (oxDJ-1), it was found that the levels of oxDJ-1 in the erythrocytes of unmedicated PD patients (n = 88) were higher than in those of medicated PD patients (n = 62) and healthy control subjects (n = 33). Elevated oxDJ-1 levels were also observed in a non-human primate PD model. Biochemical analysis of oxDJ-1 in erythrocyte lysates showed that oxDJ-1 formed dimer and polymer forms, and that the latter interacts with 20S proteasome. These results clearly indicate a biochemical alteration in the blood of PD patients, which could be utilized as an early diagnosis marker for PD. PMID:27470541

  19. Reconceptualising Core Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Roy

    2007-01-01

    The paper provides an analysis of Core Skill policy and practice in the UK. The author presents a conceptual basis for re-thinking generic Core Skills within educational approaches in teaching and learning. The discussion looks at whether universal notions of generic skills are appropriate when considering post-compulsory pedagogic approaches to…

  20. The Common Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Ernest L.

    Current curricula in institutions of higher education are criticized in this speech for their lack of a common core of education. Several possibilities for developing such a common core include education centered around our common heritage and the challenges of the present. It is suggested that all students must be introduced to the events,…

  1. Making an Ice Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  2. Iowa Core Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    One central component of a great school system is a clear set of expectations, or standards, that educators help all students reach. In Iowa, that effort is known as the Iowa Core. The Iowa Core represents the statewide academic standards, which describe what students should know and be able to do in math, science, English language arts, and…

  3. CORE - Performance Feedback System

    2009-10-02

    CORE is an architecture to bridge the gaps between disparate data integration and delivery of disparate information visualization. The CORE Technology Program includes a suite of tools and user-centered staff that can facilitate rapid delivery of a deployable integrated information to users.

  4. Core Skills in Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Further Education Unit, London (England).

    This bulletin provides an update on current developments in core skills in further education. Section 1 contains information about the Further Education Unit's (FEU's) Core Skills Post-16 project, in which colleges are testing principles that underpin all good quality learning programs. Important findings and examples are outlined under the five…

  5. NFE Core Bibliographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Inst. for International Studies in Education.

    This collection of core bibliographies, which expands on an initial bibliography published in 1979 of the core resources housed in the Non-Formal Education Information Center at Michigan State University, comprises a basic stock of materials on nonformal education and women in development that have been contributed by development planners,…

  6. Ice Core Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krim, Jessica; Brody, Michael

    2008-01-01

    What can glaciers tell us about volcanoes and atmospheric conditions? How does this information relate to our understanding of climate change? Ice Core Investigations is an original and innovative activity that explores these types of questions. It brings together popular science issues such as research, climate change, ice core drilling, and air…

  7. Chemical Models of Star-Forming Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.

    2013-10-01

    We review chemical models of low-mass star forming cores including our own work. Chemistry in molecular clouds are not in equilibrium. Molecular abundances in star forming cores change not only with physical conditions in cores but also with time. In prestellar cores, temperature stays almost constant ˜ 10 K, while the gas density increases as the core collapses. Three chemical phenomena are observed in this cold phase: molecular depletion, chemical fractionation, and deuterium enrichment. They are reproduced by chemical models combined with isothermal gravitational collapse. The collapse timescale of prestellar cores depends on the initial ratios of thermal, turbulent and magnetic pressure to gravitational energy. Since the chemical timescales, such as adsorption timescale of gas particle onto grains, are comparable to the collapse timescale, molecular abundances in cores should vary depending on the collapse timescale. Observations found that molecular abundances in some cores deviate from those in other cores, in spite of their similar central densities; it could originate in the pressure to gravity ratio in the cores. As the core contraction proceeds, compressional heating eventually overwhelms radiative cooling, and the core starts to warm up. Temperature of the infalling gas rises, as it approaches the central region. Grain-surface reactions of adsorbed molecules occur in this warm-up phase, as well as in prestellar phase. Hydrogenation is efficient at T ≤ 20 K, whereas radicals can migrate on grain surface and react with each other to form complex organic molecules (COMs) at T ≥ 30 K. Grain-surface species are sublimated to the gas phase and re-start gas-phase reactions; e.g. unsaturated carbon chains are formed from sublimated methane. Our model calculation predicts that COMs increases as the warm region extends outwards and the abundances of unsaturated carbon chains depend on the gas density in the CH4 sublimation zone. Recent detection of COMs in

  8. Particle bed reactor modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sapyta, Joe; Reid, Hank; Walton, Lew

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: particle bed reactor (PBR) core cross section; PBR bleed cycle; fuel and moderator flow paths; PBR modeling requirements; characteristics of PBR and nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) modeling; challenges for PBR and NTP modeling; thermal hydraulic computer codes; capabilities for PBR/reactor application; thermal/hydralic codes; limitations; physical correlations; comparison of predicted friction factor and experimental data; frit pressure drop testing; cold frit mask factor; decay heat flow rate; startup transient simulation; and philosophy of systems modeling.

  9. Lunar Core and Tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  10. Internal core tightener

    DOEpatents

    Brynsvold, Glen V.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1976-06-22

    An internal core tightener which is a linear actuated (vertical actuation motion) expanding device utilizing a minimum of moving parts to perform the lateral tightening function. The key features are: (1) large contact areas to transmit loads during reactor operation; (2) actuation cam surfaces loaded only during clamping and unclamping operation; (3) separation of the parts and internal operation involved in the holding function from those involved in the actuation function; and (4) preloaded pads with compliant travel at each face of the hexagonal assembly at the two clamping planes to accommodate thermal expansion and irradiation induced swelling. The latter feature enables use of a "fixed" outer core boundary, and thus eliminates the uncertainty in gross core dimensions, and potential for rapid core reactivity changes as a result of core dimensional change.

  11. Character of energy flow in air shower core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizushima, K.; Asakimori, K.; Maeda, T.; Kameda, T.; Misaki, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Energy per charged particle near the core of air showers was measured by 9 energy flow detectors, which were the combination of Cerenkov counters and scintillators. Energy per particle of each detector was normalized to energy at 2m from the core. The following results were obtained as to the energy flow: (1) integral frequency distribution of mean energy per particle (averaged over 9 detectors) is composed of two groups separated distinctly; and (2) showers contained in one group show an anisotropy of arrival direction.

  12. Radiation Effects: Core Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, John F.

    1999-01-01

    The risks to personnel in space from the naturally occurring radiations are generally considered to be one of the most serious limitations to human space missions, as noted in two recent reports of the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences. The Core Project of the Radiation Effects Team for the National Space Biomedical Research Institute is the consequences of radiations in space in order to develop countermeasure, both physical and pharmaceutical, to reduce the risks of cancer and other diseases associated with such exposures. During interplanetary missions, personnel in space will be exposed to galactic cosmic rays, including high-energy protons and energetic ions with atomic masses of iron or higher. In addition, solar events will produce radiation fields of high intensity for short but irregular durations. The level of intensity of these radiations is considerably higher than that on Earth's surface, and the biological risks to astronauts is consequently increased, including increased risks of carcinogenesis and other diseases. This group is examining the risk of cancers resulting from low-dose, low-dose rate exposures of model systems to photons, protons, and iron by using ground-based accelerators which are capable of producing beams of protons, iron, and other heavy ions at energies comparable to those encountered in space. They have begun the first series of experiments using a 1-GeV iron beam at the Brookhaven National Laboratory and 250-MeV protons at Loma Linda University Medical Center's proton synchrotron facility. As part of these studies, this group will be investigating the potential for the pharmaceutical, Tamoxifen, to reduce the risk of breast cancer in astronauts exposed to the level of doses and particle types expected in space. Theoretical studies are being carried out in a collaboration between scientists at NASA's Johnson Space Center and Johns Hopkins University in parallel with the experimental program have provided

  13. Characterization of insoluble nanoparticles in Antarctic ice cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, A.; Edwards, R.; Van Riessen, A.; Saunders, M.; Smith, A. M.; Curran, M. A.; Goodwin, I. D.; Feiteng, W.

    2013-12-01

    Insoluble nanoparticles in the form of aerosols have significant effects on climate and biogeochemical cycles. Records of these aerosols are essential for understanding paleoclimate forcing and future climate change. These particles and their precursors are emitted to the atmosphere from a variety of primary and secondary sources including biomass burning as well as biogenic, anthropogenic, volcanic, extraterrestrial, and terrestrial mineral emissions. While a large body of research exists with respect to mineral dust particles (on the micrometer scale) derived from ice and sediment cores, very little is known with regards to the history of insoluble particles on the nano scale. Ice core records are the only reliable way to study the past history of these particles. Here, we will present new data regarding the physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles found in ice cores from East Antarctica.

  14. 34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. DESPATCH CORE OVENS, GREY IRON FOUNDRY CORE ROOM, BAKES CORES THAT ARE NOT MADE ON HEATED OR COLD BOX CORE MACHINES, TO SET BINDING AGENTS MIXED WITH THE SAND CREATING CORES HARD ENOUGH TO WITHSTAND THE FLOW OF MOLTEN IRON INSIDE A MOLD. - Stockham Pipe & Fittings Company, Grey Iron Foundry, 4000 Tenth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Soft template synthesis of yolk/silica shell particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Jun; Xu, Dongsheng

    2010-04-01

    Yolk/shell particles possess a unique structure that is composed of hollow shells that encapsulate other particles but with an interstitial space between them. These structures are different from core/shell particles in that the core particles are freely movable in the shell. Yolk/shell particles combine the properties of each component, and can find potential applications in catalysis, lithium ion batteries, and biosensors. In this Research News article, a soft-template-assisted method for the preparation of yolk/silica shell particles is presented. The demonstrated method is simple and general, and can produce hollow silica spheres incorporated with different particles independent of their diameters, geometry, and composition. Furthermore, yolk/mesoporous silica shell particles and multishelled particles are also prepared through optimization of the experimental conditions. Finally, potential applications of these particles are discussed. PMID:20437501

  16. Multiple Core Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R.H.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Nuclei of galaxies often show complicated density structures and perplexing kinematic signatures. In the past we have reported numerical experiments indicating a natural tendency for galaxies to show nuclei offset with respect to nearby isophotes and for the nucleus to have a radial velocity different from the galaxy's systemic velocity. Other experiments show normal mode oscillations in galaxies with large amplitudes. These oscillations do not damp appreciably over a Hubble time. The common thread running through all these is that galaxies often show evidence of ringing, bouncing, or sloshing around in unexpected ways, even though they have not been disturbed by any external event. Recent observational evidence shows yet another phenomenon indicating the dynamical complexity of central regions of galaxies: multiple cores (M31, Markarian 315 and 463 for example). These systems can hardly be static. We noted long-lived multiple core systems in galaxies in numerical experiments some years ago, and we have more recently followed up with a series of experiments on multiple core galaxies, starting with two cores. The relevant parameters are the energy in the orbiting clumps, their relative.masses, the (local) strength of the potential well representing the parent galaxy, and the number of cores. We have studied the dependence of the merger rates and the nature of the final merger product on these parameters. Individual cores survive much longer in stronger background potentials. Cores can survive for a substantial fraction of a Hubble time if they travel on reasonable orbits.

  17. Boson core compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorramzadeh, Y.; Lin, Fei; Scarola, V. W.

    2012-04-01

    Strongly interacting atoms trapped in optical lattices can be used to explore phase diagrams of Hubbard models. Spatial inhomogeneity due to trapping typically obscures distinguishing observables. We propose that measures using boson double occupancy avoid trapping effects to reveal two key correlation functions. We define a boson core compressibility and core superfluid stiffness in terms of double occupancy. We use quantum Monte Carlo on the Bose-Hubbard model to empirically show that these quantities intrinsically eliminate edge effects to reveal correlations near the trap center. The boson core compressibility offers a generally applicable tool that can be used to experimentally map out phase transitions between compressible and incompressible states.

  18. Global Core Plasma Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Dennis L.; Craven, P. D.; Comfort, R. H.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract. The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) provides, empirically derived, core plasma density as a function of geomagnetic and solar conditions throughout the inner magnetosphere. It is continuous in value and gradient and is composed of separate models for the ionosphere, the plasmasphere, the plasmapause, the trough, and the polar cap. The relative composition of plasmaspheric H+, He+, and O+ is included in the GCPM. A blunt plasmaspheric bulge and rotation of the bulge with changing geomagnetic conditions is included. The GCPM is an amalgam of density models, intended to serve as a framework for continued improvement as new measurements become available and are used to characterize core plasma density, composition, and temperature.

  19. Core shroud corner joints

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  20. A Bowman-Birk inhibitor induces apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma through mitochondrial impairment and oxidative damage following proteasome 20S inhibition.

    PubMed

    Mehdad, A; Brumana, G; Souza, A A; Barbosa, Jarg; Ventura, M M; de Freitas, S M

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors are emerging as a new class of chemopreventive agents and have gained huge importance as potential pharmacological tools in breast cancer treatment. Improved understanding of the role played by proteases and their specific inhibitors in humans offers novel and challenging opportunities for preventive and therapeutic intervention. In this study, we demonstrated that the Bowman-Birk protease inhibitor from Vigna unguiculata seeds, named black-eyed pea trypsin/chymotrypsin Inhibitor (BTCI), potently suppresses human breast adenocarcinoma cell viability by inhibiting the activity of proteasome 20S. BTCI induced a negative growth effect against a panel of breast cancer cells, with a concomitant cytostatic effect at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and an increase in apoptosis, as observed by an augmented number of cells at the sub-G1 phase and annexin V-fluorescin isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) staining. In contrast, BTCI exhibited no cytotoxic effect on normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, the increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential in cells treated with BTCI indicated mitochondrial damage as a crucial cellular event responsible for the apoptotic process. The higher activity of caspase in tumoral cells treated with BTCI in comparison with untreated cells suggests that BTCI induces apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. BTCI affected NF-kB target gene expression in both non invasive and invasive breast cancer cell lines, with the effect highly pronounced in the invasive cells. An increased expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in both cell lines was also observed. Taken together, these results suggest that BTCI promotes apoptosis through ROS-induced mitochondrial damage following proteasome inhibition. These findings highlight the pharmacological potential and benefit of BTCI in breast cancer treatment. PMID:27551492

  1. A Bowman–Birk inhibitor induces apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma through mitochondrial impairment and oxidative damage following proteasome 20S inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Mehdad, A; Brumana, G; Souza, AA; Barbosa, JARG; Ventura, MM; de Freitas, SM

    2016-01-01

    Proteasome inhibitors are emerging as a new class of chemopreventive agents and have gained huge importance as potential pharmacological tools in breast cancer treatment. Improved understanding of the role played by proteases and their specific inhibitors in humans offers novel and challenging opportunities for preventive and therapeutic intervention. In this study, we demonstrated that the Bowman–Birk protease inhibitor from Vigna unguiculata seeds, named black-eyed pea trypsin/chymotrypsin Inhibitor (BTCI), potently suppresses human breast adenocarcinoma cell viability by inhibiting the activity of proteasome 20S. BTCI induced a negative growth effect against a panel of breast cancer cells, with a concomitant cytostatic effect at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and an increase in apoptosis, as observed by an augmented number of cells at the sub-G1 phase and annexin V-fluorescin isothiocyanate (FITC)/propidium iodide (PI) staining. In contrast, BTCI exhibited no cytotoxic effect on normal mammary epithelial cells. Moreover, the increased levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential in cells treated with BTCI indicated mitochondrial damage as a crucial cellular event responsible for the apoptotic process. The higher activity of caspase in tumoral cells treated with BTCI in comparison with untreated cells suggests that BTCI induces apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner. BTCI affected NF-kB target gene expression in both non invasive and invasive breast cancer cell lines, with the effect highly pronounced in the invasive cells. An increased expression of interleukin-8 (IL-8) in both cell lines was also observed. Taken together, these results suggest that BTCI promotes apoptosis through ROS-induced mitochondrial damage following proteasome inhibition. These findings highlight the pharmacological potential and benefit of BTCI in breast cancer treatment. PMID:27551492

  2. Remanent magnetization stratigraphy of lunar cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banerjee, S. K.; Gingrich, D.; Marvin, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Depth dependent fluctuations have been observed in the natural remanent magnetizations (NRM) of drive cores and drill strings from Apollo 16 and 17 missions. Partial demagnetization of unstable secondary magnetizations and identification of characteristic error signals from a core which is known to have been recently disturbed allow us to identify and isolate the stable NRM stratigraphy in double drive core 60010/60009 and drill strings 60002-60004. The observed magnetization fluctuations persist after normalization to take into account depth dependent variations in the carriers of stable NRM. We tentatively ascribe the stable NRM stratigraphy to instantaneous records of past magnetic fields at the lunar surface and suggest that the stable NRM stratigraphy technique could develop as a new relative time-stratigraphic tool, to be used with other physical measurements such as relative intensity of ferromagnetic resonance and charged particle track density to study the evolution of the lunar regolith.

  3. Stretchable inductor with liquid magnetic core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarus, N.; Meyer, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    Adding magnetic materials is a well-established method for improving performance of inductors. However, traditional magnetic cores are rigid and poorly suited for the emerging field of stretchable electronics, where highly deformable inductors are used to wirelessly couple power and data signals. In this work, stretchable inductors are demonstrated based on the use of ferrofluids, magnetic liquids based on distributed magnetic particles, to create a compliant magnetic core. Using a silicone molding technique to create multi-layer fluidic channels, a liquid metal solenoid is fabricated around a ferrofluid channel. An analytical model is developed for the effects of mechanical strain, followed by experimental verification using two different ferrofluids with different permeabilities. Adding ferrofluid was found to increase the unstrained inductance by up to 280% relative to a similar inductor with a non-magnetic silicone core, while retaining the ability to survive uniaxial strains up to 100%.

  4. The Apollo 16 deep drill core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, H. O. A.; Mccallister, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    Numerous investigations have been undertaken on samples from the Apollo 16 deep drill core. These studies are diverse in character and range from grain size analyses, through chemical and mineralogical studies to investigations of nuclear particle tracks, rare gases, and isotopic abundances. In order to comprehend the significance of the studies of the mineral chemistry of the clasts below 1 mm in size in several samples with respect to other studies, it became obvious that a review of all previous works was desireable. After reviewing the available literature it can be concluded that only four major stratigraphic divisions exist in the core section. Whether these represent four single events or multi-stage events within one unit is uncertain; however, it appears that accumulation of the material in the core has taken place during a period of 1 billion years, and that the material is predominantly of locally derived Highlands origin.

  5. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  6. Elementary Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parham, R.

    1974-01-01

    Presents the text of a speech given to a conference of physics teachers in which the full spectrum of elementary particles is given, along with their classification. Also includes some teaching materials available on this topic. (PEB)

  7. Elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzsch, Harald; Heusch, Karin

    Introduction -- Electrons and atomic nuclei -- Quantum properties of atoms and particles -- The knives of Democritus -- Quarks inside atomic nuclei -- Quantum electrodynamics -- Quantum chromodynamics -- Mesons, baryons, and quarks -- Electroweak interactions -- Grand unification -- Conclusion.

  8. TMI-2 core damage: a summary of present knowledge

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, D.E.; Mason, R.E.; Meininger, R.D.; Franz, W.A.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive fuel damage (oxidation and fragmentation) has occurred and the top approx. 1.5 m of the center portion of the TMI-2 core has relocated. The fuel fragmentation extends outward to slightly beyond one-half the core radius in the direction examined by the CCTV camera. While the radial extent of core fragmentation in other directions was not directly observed, control and spider drop data and in-core instrument data suggest that the core void is roughly symmetrical, although there are a few indications of severe fuel damage extending to the core periphery. The core material fragmented into a broad range of particle sizes, extending down to a few microns. APSR movement data, the observation of damaged fuel assemblies hanging unsupported from the bottom of the reactor upper plenum structure, and the observation of once-molten stainless steel immediately above the active core indicate high temperatures (up to at least 1720 K) extended to the very top of the core. The relative lack of damage to the underside of the plenum structure implies a sharp temperature demarcation at the core/plenum interface. Filter debris and leadscrew deposit analyses indicate extensive high temperature core materials interaction, melting of the Ag-In-Cd control material, and transport of particulate control material to the plenum and out of the vessel.

  9. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  10. Magnetorotational iron core collapse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symbalisty, E. M. D.

    1984-01-01

    During its final evolutionary stages, a massive star, as considered in current astrophysical theory, undergoes rapid collapse, thereby triggering a sequence of a catastrophic event which results in a Type II supernova explosion. A remnant neutron star or a black hole is left after the explosion. Stellar collapse occurs, when thermonuclear fusion has consumed the lighter elements present. At this stage, the core consists of iron. Difficulties arise regarding an appropriate model with respect to the core collapse. The present investigation is concerned with the evolution of a Type II supernova core including the effects of rotation and magnetic fields. A simple neutrino model is developed which reproduced the spherically symmetric results of Bowers and Wilson (1982). Several two-dimensional computational models of stellar collapse are studied, taking into account a case in which a 15 solar masses iron core was artificially given rotational and magnetic energy.

  11. Contaminated Sediment Core Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluating the environmental risk of sites containing contaminated sediments often poses major challenges due in part to the absence of detailed information available for a given location. Sediment core profiling is often utilized during preliminary environmental investigations ...

  12. Core assembly storage structure

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jr., Charles E.; Brunings, Jay E.

    1988-01-01

    A structure for the storage of core assemblies from a liquid metal-cooled nuclear reactor. The structure comprises an enclosed housing having a substantially flat horizontal top plate, a bottom plate and substantially vertical wall members extending therebetween. A plurality of thimble members extend downwardly through the top plate. Each thimble member is closed at its bottom end and has an open end adjacent said top plate. Each thimble member has a length and diameter greater than that of the core assembly to be stored therein. The housing is provided with an inlet duct for the admission of cooling air and an exhaust duct for the discharge of air therefrom, such that when hot core assemblies are placed in the thimbles, the heat generated will by convection cause air to flow from the inlet duct around the thimbles and out the exhaust duct maintaining the core assemblies at a safe temperature without the necessity of auxiliary powered cooling equipment.

  13. Geophysics: Earth's core problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobson, David

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of the electrical resistance and thermal conductivity of iron at extreme pressures and temperatures cast fresh light on controversial numerical simulations of the properties of Earth's outer core. See Letters p.95 & 99

  14. Biospecimen Core Resource - TCGA

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Biospecimen Core Resource centralized laboratory reviews and processes blood and tissue samples and their associated data using optimized standard operating procedures for the entire TCGA Research Network.

  15. Core-Noise Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015 (N+1), 2020 (N+2), and 2025 (N+3) timeframes; SFW strategic thrusts and technical challenges; SFW advanced subsystems that are broadly applicable to N+3 vehicle concepts, with an indication where further noise research is needed; the components of core noise (compressor, combustor and turbine noise) and a rationale for NASA's current emphasis on the combustor-noise component; the increase in the relative importance of core noise due to turbofan design trends; the need to understand and mitigate core-noise sources for high-efficiency small gas generators; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about forthcoming updates to NASA's Aircraft Noise Prediction Program (ANOPP) core-noise prediction capabilities, two NRA efforts (Honeywell International, Phoenix, AZ and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, respectively) to improve the understanding of core-noise sources and noise propagation through the engine core, and an effort to develop oxide/oxide ceramic-matrix-composite (CMC) liners for broadband noise attenuation suitable for turbofan-core application. Core noise must be addressed to ensure that the N+3 noise goals are met. Focused, but long-term, core-noise research is carried out to enable the advanced high-efficiency small gas-generator subsystem, common to several N+3 conceptual designs, needed to meet NASA's technical challenges. Intermediate updates to prediction tools are implemented as the understanding of the source structure and engine-internal propagation effects is improved. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The

  16. Micro coring apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, David; Brooks, Marshall; Chen, Paul; Dwelle, Paul; Fischer, Ben

    1989-01-01

    A micro-coring apparatus for lunar exploration applications, that is compatible with the other components of the Walking Mobile Platform, was designed. The primary purpose of core sampling is to gain an understanding of the geological composition and properties of the prescribed environment. This procedure has been used extensively for Earth studies and in limited applications during lunar explorations. The corer is described and analyzed for effectiveness.

  17. Nuclear core positioning system

    DOEpatents

    Garkisch, Hans D.; Yant, Howard W.; Patterson, John F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural support system for the core of a nuclear reactor which achieves relatively restricted clearances at operating conditions and yet allows sufficient clearance between fuel assemblies at refueling temperatures. Axially displaced spacer pads having variable between pad spacing and a temperature compensated radial restraint system are utilized to maintain clearances between the fuel elements. The core support plates are constructed of metals specially chosen such that differential thermal expansion produces positive restraint at operating temperatures.

  18. Core bounce supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Cooperstein, J.

    1987-01-01

    The gravitational collapse mechanism for Type II supernovae is considered, concentrating on the direct implosion - core bounce - hydrodynamic explosion picture. We examine the influence of the stiffness of the dense matter equation of state and discuss how the shock wave is formed. Its chances of success are determined by the equation of state, general relativistic effects, neutrino transport, and the size of presupernova iron core. 12 refs., 1 tab.

  19. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  20. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  1. Core-Shell Composite Nanoparticles: Synthesis, Characterization, and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanyal, Sriya

    Nanoparticles are ubiquitous in various fields due to their unique properties not seen in similar bulk materials. Among them, core-shell composite nanoparticles are an important class of materials which are attractive for their applications in catalysis, sensing, electromagnetic shielding, drug delivery, and environmental remediation. This dissertation focuses on the study of core-shell type of nanoparticles where a polymer serves as the core and inorganic nanoparticles are the shell. This is an interesting class of supramolecular building blocks and can "exhibit unusual, possibly unique, properties which cannot be obtained simply by co-mixing polymer and inorganic particles". The one-step Pickering emulsion polymerization method was successfully developed and applied to synthesize polystyrene-silica core-shell composite particles. Possible mechanisms of the Pickering emulsion polymerization were also explored. The silica nanoparticles were thermodynamically favorable to self-assemble at liquid-liquid interfaces at the initial stage of polymerization and remained at the interface to finally form the shells of the composite particles. More importantly, Pickering emulsion polymerization was employed to synthesize polystyrene/poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm)-silica core-shell nanoparticles with N-isopropylacrylamide incorporated into the core as a co-monomer. The composite nanoparticles were temperature sensitive and could be up-taken by human prostate cancer cells and demonstrated effectiveness in drug delivery and cancer therapy. Similarly, by incorporating poly-2-(N,N)-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PDMA) into the core, pH sensitive core-shell composite nanoparticles were synthesized and applied as effective carriers to release a rheological modifier upon a pH change. Finally, the research focuses on facile approaches to engineer the transition of the temperature-sensitive particles and develop composite core-shell nanoparticles with a metallic shell.

  2. Lunar Regolith Particle Shape Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiekhaefer, Rebecca; Hardy, Sandra; Rickman, Douglas; Edmunson, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Future engineering of structures and equipment on the lunar surface requires significant understanding of particle characteristics of the lunar regolith. Nearly all sediment characteristics are influenced by particle shape; therefore a method of quantifying particle shape is useful both in lunar and terrestrial applications. We have created a method to quantify particle shape, specifically for lunar regolith, using image processing. Photomicrographs of thin sections of lunar core material were obtained under reflected light. Three photomicrographs were analyzed using ImageJ and MATLAB. From the image analysis measurements for area, perimeter, Feret diameter, orthogonal Feret diameter, Heywood factor, aspect ratio, sieve diameter, and sieve number were recorded. Probability distribution functions were created from the measurements of Heywood factor and aspect ratio.

  3. Core-Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2010-01-01

    This presentation is a technical progress report and near-term outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external work on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge; the current research activities in the core-noise area, with some additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustion-noise prediction capability; the need for a core-noise diagnostic capability to generate benchmark data for validation of both high-fidelity work and improved models, as well as testing of future noise-reduction technologies; relevant existing core-noise tests using real engines and auxiliary power units; and examples of possible scenarios for a future diagnostic facility. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Noise-Aircraft Technical Challenge aims to enable concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical for enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor designs could increase

  4. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  5. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  6. Core Noise - Increasing Importance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core-noise area, with additional details given about the development of a high-fidelity combustor-noise prediction capability as well as activities supporting the development of improved reduced-order, physics-based models for combustor-noise prediction. The need for benchmark data for validation of high-fidelity and modeling work and the value of a potential future diagnostic facility for testing of core-noise-reduction concepts are indicated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The SFW Reduced-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries. This reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. Noise generated in the jet engine core, by sources such as the compressor, combustor, and turbine, can be a significant contribution to the overall noise signature at low-power conditions, typical of approach flight. At high engine power during takeoff, jet and fan noise have traditionally dominated over core noise. However, current design trends and expected technological advances in engine-cycle design as well as noise-reduction methods are likely to reduce non-core noise even at engine-power points higher than approach. In addition, future low-emission combustor

  7. Core Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hultgren, Lennart S.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation is a technical summary of and outlook for NASA-internal and NASA-sponsored external research on core (combustor and turbine) noise funded by the Fundamental Aeronautics Program Subsonic Fixed Wing (SFW) Project. Sections of the presentation cover: the SFW system-level noise metrics for the 2015, 2020, and 2025 timeframes; turbofan design trends and their aeroacoustic implications; the emerging importance of core noise and its relevance to the SFW Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge; and the current research activities in the core noise area. Recent work1 on the turbine-transmission loss of combustor noise is briefly described, two2,3 new NRA efforts in the core-noise area are outlined, and an effort to develop CMC-based acoustic liners for broadband noise reduction suitable for turbofan-core application is delineated. The NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program has the principal objective of overcoming today's national challenges in air transportation. The reduction of aircraft noise is critical to enabling the anticipated large increase in future air traffic. The Subsonic Fixed Wing Project's Reduce-Perceived-Noise Technical Challenge aims to develop concepts and technologies to dramatically reduce the perceived aircraft noise outside of airport boundaries.

  8. Pressure Core Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santamarina, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas hydrates form under high fluid pressure and low temperature, and are found in permafrost, deep lakes or ocean sediments. Hydrate dissociation by depressurization and/or heating is accompanied by a multifold hydrate volume expansion and host sediments with low permeability experience massive destructuration. Proper characterization requires coring, recovery, manipulation and testing under P-T conditions within the stability field. Pressure core technology allows for the reliable characterization of hydrate bearing sediments within the stability field in order to address scientific and engineering needs, including the measurement of parameters used in hydro-thermo-mechanical analyses, and the monitoring of hydrate dissociation under controlled pressure, temperature, effective stress and chemical conditions. Inherent sampling effects remain and need to be addressed in test protocols and data interpretation. Pressure core technology has been deployed to study hydrate bearing sediments at several locations around the world. In addition to pressure core testing, a comprehensive characterization program should include sediment analysis, testing of reconstituted specimens (with and without synthetic hydrate), and in situ testing. Pressure core characterization technology can be used to study other gas-charged formations such as deep sea sediments, coal bed methane and gas shales.

  9. Enhanced Magnetic Properties in Antiferromagnetic-Core/Ferrimagnetic-Shell Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Vasilakaki, Marianna; Trohidou, Kalliopi N.; Nogués, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Bi-magnetic core/shell nanoparticles are gaining increasing interest due to their foreseen applications. Inverse antiferromagnetic(AFM)/ferrimagnetic(FiM) core/shell nanoparticles are particularly appealing since they may overcome some of the limitations of conventional FiM/AFM systems. However, virtually no simulations exist on this type of morphology. Here we present systematic Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations of the exchange bias properties of such nanoparticles. The coercivity, HC, and loop shift, Hex, present a non-monotonic dependence with the core diameter and the shell thickness, in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. Additionally, we demonstrate novel unconventional behavior in FiM/AFM particles. Namely, while HC and Hex decrease upon increasing FiM thickness for small AFM cores (as expected), they show the opposite trend for large cores. This presents a counterintuitive FiM size dependence for large AFM cores that is attributed to the competition between core and shell contributions, which expands over a wider range of core diameters leading to non-vanishing Hex even for very large cores. Moreover, the results also hint different possible ways to enhance the experimental performance of inverse core/shell nanoparticles for diverse applications. PMID:25872473

  10. Nanorice Particles: Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hui (Inventor); Brandl, Daniel (Inventor); Le, Fei (Inventor); Nordlander, Peter (Inventor); Halas, Nancy J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid nanoparticle, i.e., a nanorice particle, which combines the intense local fields of nanorods with the highly tunable plasmon resonances of nanoshells, is described herein. This geometry possesses far greater structural tunability than previous nanoparticle geometries, along with much larger local field enhancements and far greater sensitivity as a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) nanosensor than presently known dielectric-conductive material nanostructures. In an embodiment, a nanoparticle comprises a prolate spheroid-shaped core having a first aspect ratio. The nanoparticle also comprises at least one conductive shell surrounding said prolate spheroid-shaped core. The nanoparticle has a surface plasmon resonance sensitivity of at least 600 nm RIU(sup.-1). Methods of making the disclosed nanorice particles are also described herein.

  11. Porous metal oxide particles and their methods of synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fanglin; Liu, Qiang

    2013-03-12

    Methods are generally disclosed for synthesis of porous particles from a solution formed from a leaving agent, a surfactant, and a soluble metal salt in a solvent. The surfactant congregates to form a nanoparticle core such that the metal salt forms about the nanoparticle core to form a plurality of nanoparticles. The solution is heated such that the leaving agent forms gas bubbles in the solution, and the plurality of nanoparticles congregate about the gas bubbles to form a porous particle. The porous particles are also generally disclosed and can include a particle shell formed about a core to define an average diameter from about 0.5 .mu.m to about 50 .mu.m. The particle shell can be formed from a plurality of nanoparticles having an average diameter of from about 1 nm to about 50 nm and defined by a metal salt formed about a surfactant core.

  12. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  13. Greenland ice core evidence of the 79 AD Vesuvius eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbante, C.; Kehrwald, N. M.; Marianelli, P.; Vinther, B. M.; Steffensen, J. P.; Cozzi, G.; Hammer, C. U.; Clausen, H. B.; Siggaard-Andersen, M.-L.

    2013-06-01

    Volcanic tephra are independent age horizons and can synchronize strata of various paleoclimate records including ice and sediment cores. The Holocene section of the Greenland Ice Core Project (GRIP) ice core is dated by multi-parameter annual layer counting, and contains peaks in acidity, SO42- and microparticle concentrations at a depth of 429.1 to 429.3 m, which have not previously been definitively ascribed to a volcanic eruption. Here, we identify tephra particles and determine that volcanic shards extracted from a depth of 429.3 m in the GRIP ice core are likely due to the 79 AD Vesuvius eruption. The chemical composition of the tephra particles is consistent with the K-phonolitic composition of the Vesuvius juvenile ejecta and differs from the chemical composition of other major eruptions (≥ VEI 4) between 50-100 AD.

  14. Earth's core iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geophysicist J. Michael Brown of Texas A & M University noted recently at the Spring AGU Meeting in Baltimore that the structure and phase of metallic iron at pressures of the earth's inner core (approximately 3.3 Mbar) could have great significance in defining geometrical aspects of the core itself. Brown worked at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory with R.B. McQueen to redetermine the phase relations of metallic iron in a series of new shock-wave experiments. They found the melting point of iron at conditions equal to those at the boundary of the earth's outer (liquid) and inner (solid) cores to be 6000°±500°C (Geophysical Research Letters, 7, 533-536, 1980).

  15. Molten core retention assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1976-06-22

    Molten fuel produced in a core overheating accident is caught by a molten core retention assembly consisting of a horizontal baffle plate having a plurality of openings therein, heat exchange tubes having flow holes near the top thereof mounted in the openings, and a cylindrical, imperforate baffle attached to the plate and surrounding the tubes. The baffle assembly is supported from the core support plate of the reactor by a plurality of hanger rods which are welded to radial beams passing under the baffle plate and intermittently welded thereto. Preferably the upper end of the cylindrical baffle terminates in an outwardly facing lip to which are welded a plurality of bearings having slots therein adapted to accept the hanger rods.

  16. Mars' Inner Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This figure shows a cross-section of the planet Mars revealing an inner, high density core buried deep within the interior. Dipole magnetic field lines are drawn in blue, showing the global scale magnetic field that one associates with dynamo generation in the core. Mars must have one day had such a field, but today it is not evident. Perhaps the energy source that powered the early dynamo has shut down. The differentiation of the planet interior - heavy elements like iron sinking towards the center of the planet - can provide energy as can the formation of a solid core from the liquid.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  18. PARTICLE ACCELERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Teng, L.C.

    1960-01-19

    ABS>A combination of two accelerators, a cyclotron and a ring-shaped accelerator which has a portion disposed tangentially to the cyclotron, is described. Means are provided to transfer particles from the cyclotron to the ring accelerator including a magnetic deflector within the cyclotron, a magnetic shield between the ring accelerator and the cyclotron, and a magnetic inflector within the ring accelerator.

  19. Particle astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Sadoulet, B. |

    1992-12-31

    In the last few years, particle astrophysics has emerged as a new field at the frontier between high energy astrophysics, cosmology, and particle physics. Two spectacular achievements of this new field in the last decade have been the establishment of neutrino astronomy with the detection of solar neutrinos by two independent experiments and the spectacular observation of the neutrinos from the supernova SN1987A. In addition, the field has produced tantalizing hints of new physics beyond the standard models of astrophysics and particle physics, generating enthusiastic attempts to confirm these potential effects. This new field involves some two hundred experimentalists and a similar number of theorists, most of them coming from particle and nuclear physics, and as scientist will see, their effort is to a large extent complementary to accelerator based high energy physics. This review attempts, at the beginning of this workshop, to capture the excitement of this new field. Summary talks will describe in more detail some of the topics discussed in the study groups.

  20. Coaxial microreactor for particle synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Bartsch, Michael; Kanouff, Michael P; Ferko, Scott M; Crocker, Robert W; Wally, Karl

    2013-10-22

    A coaxial fluid flow microreactor system disposed on a microfluidic chip utilizing laminar flow for synthesizing particles from solution. Flow geometries produced by the mixing system make use of hydrodynamic focusing to confine a core flow to a small axially-symmetric, centrally positioned and spatially well-defined portion of a flow channel cross-section to provide highly uniform diffusional mixing between a reactant core and sheath flow streams. The microreactor is fabricated in such a way that a substantially planar two-dimensional arrangement of microfluidic channels will produce a three-dimensional core/sheath flow geometry. The microreactor system can comprise one or more coaxial mixing stages that can be arranged singly, in series, in parallel or nested concentrically in parallel.

  1. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  2. Shells Evolution and Core Excitations in Semi-Magic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacki, F.

    2007-04-01

    Recent advances in Large Shell Model calculations allow now to treat extended valence spaces and more complete descriptions of (semi-)magic nuclei can be achieved with inclusion of core excitations. The interplay between shell evolution and core excitations in semi-magic nuclei will be illustrated for tin isotopic chains in the framework of Large Shell Model calculations. pn and nn monopole relative influence will be traced back on Effective Single Particle Energies and B(E2)'s.

  3. Particle-particle random-phase approximation applied to beryllium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchon, G.; Dupuis, M.; Pillet, N.; Mau, N. Vinh; Bonaccorso, A.

    2010-09-15

    This paper is dedicated to the study of even-even {sup 8-14}Be isotopes, which uses the particle-particle random-phase approximation that accounts for two-body correlations in the core nucleus. A better description of energies and two-particle amplitudes is obtained in comparison with models that assume a neutron closed-shell (or subshell) core. A Woods-Saxon potential corrected by a phenomenological particle-vibration coupling term has been used for the neutron-core interaction and the D1S Gogny force for the neutron-neutron interaction. Calculated ground-state properties as well as excited-state ones are discussed and are compared to experimental data. In particular, results suggest the same 2s{sub 1/2}-1p{sub 1/2} shell inversion in {sup 13}Be as in {sup 11}Be.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR CORE DESIGN

    DOEpatents

    Mahlmeister, J.E.; Peck, W.S.; Haberer, W.V.; Williams, A.C.

    1960-03-22

    An improved core design for a sodium-cooled, graphitemoderated nuclear reactor is described. The improved reactor core comprises a number of blocks of moderator material, each block being in the shape of a regular prism. A number of channels, extending the length of each block, are disposed around the periphery. When several blocks are placed in contact to form the reactor core, the channels in adjacent blocks correspond with each other to form closed conduits extending the length of the core. Fuel element clusters are disposed in these closed conduits, and liquid coolant is forced through the annulus between the fuel cluster and the inner surface of the conduit. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the moderator blocks are in the form of hexagonal prisms with longitudinal channels cut into the corners of the hexagon. The main advantage of an "edge-loaded" moderator block is that fewer thermal neutrons are absorbed by the moderator cladding, as compared with a conventional centrally loaded moderator block.

  5. Theory of core excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, J. D.; Hjalmarson, H. P.; Sankey, O. F.; Allen, R. E.; Buettner, H.

    1980-01-01

    The observation of core excitons with binding energies much larger than those of the valence excitons in the same material has posed a long-standing theoretical problem. A proposed solution to this problem is presented, and Frenkel excitons and Wannier excitons are shown to coexist naturally in a single material. (GHT)

  6. Some Core Contested Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chomsky, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Core concepts of language are highly contested. In some cases this is legitimate: real empirical and conceptual issues arise. In other cases, it seems that controversies are based on misunderstanding. A number of crucial cases are reviewed, and an approach to language is outlined that appears to have strong conceptual and empirical motivation, and…

  7. Authentic to the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kukral, Nicole; Spector, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    When educators think about what makes learning relevant to students, often they narrow their thinking to electives or career technical education. While these provide powerful opportunities for students to make relevant connections to their learning, they can also create authentic experiences in the core curriculum. In the San Juan Unified School…

  8. From Context to Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campus Technology, 2008

    2008-01-01

    At Campus Technology 2008, Arizona State University Technology Officer Adrian Sannier mesmerized audiences with his mandate to become more efficient by doing only the "core" tech stuff--and getting someone else to slog through the context. This article presents an excerpt from Sannier's hour-long keynote address at Campus Technology '08. Sannier…

  9. Core Directions in HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1996

    This document consists of four papers presented at a symposium on core directions in human resource development (HRD) moderated by Verna Willis at the 1996 conference of the Academy of Human Resource Development. "Reengineering the Organizational HRD Function: Two Case Studies" (Neal Chalofsky) reports an action research study in which the…

  10. A Multidisciplinary Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Trace

    2002-01-01

    Describes New York University's commitment to general mathematics and science education for undergraduate students, embodied in the College of Arts and Science's core curriculum, the Morse Academic Plan, which includes a three-course sequence, Foundations of Scientific Inquiry, specifically designed for non-majors. (EV)

  11. The Uncommon Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohler, Jason

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that the United States neglects creativity in its education system. To see this, he states, one may look at the Common Core State Standards. If one searches the English Language Arts and Literacy standards for the words "creative," "innovative," and "original"--and any associated terms, one will find scant mention of the words…

  12. EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT FACILITY CORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Exposure Assessment Facility Core will continue to collect environmental measures including personal and indoor air monitoring and repeat collection of dust samples from the home and biologic measures including urine and blood samples collected from the mother during pregn...

  13. University City Core Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Philadelphia City Planning Commission, PA.

    A redevelopment plan for an urban core area of about 300 acres was warranted by--(1) unsuitable building conditions, (2) undesirable land usage, and (3) faulty traffic circulation. The plan includes expansion of two universities and creation of a regional science center, high school, and medical center. Guidelines for proposed land use and zoning…

  14. Ultrasonic Drilling and Coring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    1998-01-01

    A novel drilling and coring device, driven by a combination, of sonic and ultrasonic vibration, was developed. The device is applicable to soft and hard objects using low axial load and potentially operational under extreme conditions. The device has numerous potential planetary applications. Significant potential for commercialization in construction, demining, drilling and medical technologies.

  15. Looking for Core Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2010-01-01

    People who view themselves as leaders, not just managers or teachers, are innovators who focus on clarifying core values and aligning all aspects of the organization with these values to grow their vision. A vision for an organization can't be just one person's idea. Visions grow by involving people in activities that help them name and create…

  16. Life from the core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doglioni, Carlo; Coleman, Max; Pignatti, Johannes; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2010-05-01

    Life on Earth is the result of the chaotic combination of several independent chemical and physical parameters. One of them is the shield from ionizing radiation exerted by the atmosphere and the Earth's magnetic field. We hypothesise that the first few billion years of the Earth's history, dominated by bacteria, were characterized by stronger ionizing radiation. Bacteria can survive under such conditions better than any other organism. During the Archean and early Proterozoic the shield could have been weaker, allowing the development of only a limited number of species, more resistant to the external radiation. The Cambrian explosion of life could have been enhanced by the gradual growth of the solid inner core, which was not existent possibly before 1 Ga. The cooling of the Earth generated the solidification of the iron alloy in the center of the planet. As an hypothesis, before the crystallization of the core, the turbulence in the liquid core could have resulted in a lower or different magnetic field from the one we know today, being absent the relative rotation between inner and external core.

  17. The Earth's Core.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanloz, Raymond

    1983-01-01

    The nature of the earth's core is described. Indirect evidence (such as that determined from seismological data) indicates that it is an iron alloy, solid toward its center but otherwise liquid. Evidence also suggests that it is the turbulent flow of the liquid that generates the earth's magnetic field. (JN)

  18. Navagating the Common Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McShane, Michael Q.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a debate over the Common Core State Standards Initiative as it has rocketed to the forefront of education policy discussions around the country. The author contends that there is value in having clear cross state standards that will clarify the new online and blended learning that the growing use of technology has provided…

  19. Resolving Supercritical Orion Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Chapman, N.; Goldsmith, P.; Velusamy, T.

    2009-01-01

    The theoretical framework for high mass star formation (HMSF) is unclear. Observations reveal a seeming dichotomy between high- and low-mass star formation, with HMSF occurring only in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMC), mostly in clusters, and with higher star formation efficiencies than low-mass star formation. One crucial constraint to any theoretical model is the dynamical state of massive cores, in particular, whether a massive core is in supercritical collapse. Based on the mass-size relation of dust emission, we select likely unstable targets from a sample of massive cores (Li et al. 2007 ApJ 655, 351) in the nearest GMC, Orion. We have obtained N2H+ (1-0) maps using CARMA with resolution ( 2.5", 0.006 pc) significantly better than existing observations. We present observational and modeling results for ORI22. By revealing the dynamic structure down to Jeans scale, CARMA data confirms the dominance of gravity over turbulence in this cores. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  20. Renewing the Core Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Hal A.

    2007-01-01

    The core curriculum accompanied the development of the academic discipline with multiple names such as Kinesiology, Exercise and Sport Science, and Health and Human Performance. It provides commonalties for undergraduate majors. It is timely to renew this curriculum. Renewal involves strategic reappraisals. It may stimulate change or reaffirm the…

  1. A World Core Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Robert Muller's "World Core Curriculum" is designed to give children: a good picture of planet Earth and the universe; a correct picture of the commonalities and diversity of the human family; an accurate picture of the time period into which they are born; and a sense of their own importance and the role that they can play in society. (MDM)

  2. Core Competencies. SPEC Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Beth, Comp.

    2002-01-01

    This SPEC (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center) Kit presents the results of a survey of Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries designed to investigate the status of core competencies (i.e., the skills, knowledge, abilities, and attributes that employees across an organization are expected to have to contribute successfully…

  3. The ADNI PET Core

    PubMed Central

    Jagust, William J.; Bandy, Dan; Chen, Kewei; Foster, Norman L.; Landau, Susan M.; Mathis, Chester A.; Price, Julie C.; Reiman, Eric M.; Skovronsky, Daniel; Koeppe, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Background This is a progress report of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) PET Core. Methods The Core has supervised the acquisition, quality control, and analysis of longitudinal [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose PET (FDG-PET) data in approximately half of the ADNI cohort. In an “add on” study, approximately 100 subjects also underwent scanning with [11C]PIB-PET for amyloid imaging. The Core developed quality control procedures and standardized image acquisition by developing an imaging protocol that has been widely adopted in academic and pharmaceutical industry studies. Data processing provides users with scans that have identical orientation and resolution characteristics despite acquisition on multiple scanner models. The Core labs have used a number of different approaches to characterize differences between subject groups (AD, MCI, controls), to examine longitudinal change over time in glucose metabolism and amyloid deposition, and to assess the use of FDG-PET as a potential outcome measure in clinical trials. Results ADNI data indicate that FDG-PET increases statistical power over traditional cognitive measures, might aid subject selection, and could substantially reduce the sample size in a clinical trial. PIB-PET data showed expected group differences, and identified subjects with significant annual increases in amyloid load across the subject groups. The next activities of the PET core in ADNI will entail developing standardized protocols for amyloid imaging using the [18F]-labeled amyloid imaging agent AV45, which can be delivered to virtually all ADNI sites. Conclusions ADNI has demonstrated the feasibility and utility of multicenter PET studies and is helping to clarify the role of biomarkers in the study of aging and dementia. PMID:20451870

  4. Lunar Polar Coring Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angell, David; Bealmear, David; Benarroche, Patrice; Henry, Alan; Hudson, Raymond; Rivellini, Tommaso; Tolmachoff, Alex

    1990-01-01

    Plans to build a lunar base are presently being studied with a number of considerations. One of the most important considerations is qualifying the presence of water on the Moon. The existence of water on the Moon implies that future lunar settlements may be able to use this resource to produce things such as drinking water and rocket fuel. Due to the very high cost of transporting these materials to the Moon, in situ production could save billions of dollars in operating costs of the lunar base. Scientists have suggested that the polar regions of the Moon may contain some amounts of water ice in the regolith. Six possible mission scenarios are suggested which would allow lunar polar soil samples to be collected for analysis. The options presented are: remote sensing satellite, two unmanned robotic lunar coring missions (one is a sample return and one is a data return only), two combined manned and robotic polar coring missions, and one fully manned core retrieval mission. One of the combined manned and robotic missions has been singled out for detailed analysis. This mission proposes sending at least three unmanned robotic landers to the lunar pole to take core samples as deep as 15 meters. Upon successful completion of the coring operations, a manned mission would be sent to retrieve the samples and perform extensive experiments of the polar region. Man's first step in returning to the Moon is recommended to investigate the issue of lunar polar water. The potential benefits of lunar water more than warrant sending either astronauts, robots or both to the Moon before any permanent facility is constructed.

  5. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  6. Core-halo issues for a very high intensity beam

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, P. A. P.; Chauvin, N.; Uriot, D.

    2014-02-17

    The relevance of classical parameters like beam emittance and envelope used to describe a particle beam is questioned in case of a high intensity accelerator. In the presence of strong space charge effects that affect the beam differently following its density, the much less dense halo part behaves differently from the much denser core part. A method for precisely determining the core-halo limit is proposed, that allows characterizing the halo and the core independently. Results in 1D case are given and discussed. Expected developments extending the method to 2D, 4D, or 6D phase spaces are examined.

  7. Single optical tweezers based on elliptical core fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Li; Chen, Yunhao; Liu, Zhihai; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2016-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate a new single optical tweezers based on an elliptical core fiber, which can realize the trapped yeast cell rotation with a precise and simple control. Due to the elliptical shape of the fiber core, the LP11 mode beam can propagate stably. When we rotate the fiber tip, the LP11 mode beam will also rotate along with the fiber tip, which helps to realize the trapped micro-particle rotation. By using this method, we can easily realize the rotation of the trapped yeast cells, the rotating angle of the yeast cell is same as the elliptical core fiber tip.

  8. Growth of Gas-giant Cores in Protoplanetary Discs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrechts, Michiel

    2011-09-01

    The core accretion scenario is the most successful theoretical model for gas-giant formation. However, the initial growth of the core depends on arbitrary assumptions on planetesimal sizes. Growing the solid core before gas dissipation is problematic due to the long time-scale for run-away accretion, especially in the outer distant regions of a protoplanetary disc. We have studied the dynamics of gas-coupled cm-sized pebbles, gravitationally interacting with larger than km-sized cores. The Pencil Code is used to correctly model the gas drag hydrodynamics. Interestingly, the presence of pebbles in the gaseous disc influences both the dynamics (through dynamical friction) and growth rate of the gas-giant core. Under favourable conditions, i.e. unity mid-plane dust-to-gas ratio and particle growth to mm and cm sizes, pebble accretion turns out to be significantly faster than run-away accretion of planetesimals.

  9. Description, dissection, and subsampling of Apollo 14 core sample 14230

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fryxell, R.; Heiken, G.

    1971-01-01

    Core sample 14230, collected at Triplet Crater near the Fra Mauro landing site of the Apollo 14 mission, was dissected in greater detail than any previous core. Sediment from the actual lunar surface was missing, and 6.7 grams of sediment were removed from the base of the core for a portion of the biotest prime sample. Upper and lower portions of the original 70.7-gram core (12.5 centimeters long) were fractured excessively but not mixed stratigraphically. Three major morphologic units and 11 subdivisions were recognized. Dissection provided 55 subsamples in addition to three others made by removing longitudinal sections of the core impregnated with n-butyl methacrylate for use as a permanent documentary record and for studies requiring particles of known orientation.

  10. RADIATION MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATIONS OF PROTOSTELLAR COLLAPSE: PROTOSTELLAR CORE FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Tomida, Kengo; Tomisaka, Kohji; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Hori, Yasunori; Saigo, Kazuya; Okuzumi, Satoshi; Machida, Masahiro N. E-mail: tomisaka@th.nao.ac.jp E-mail: saigo.kazuya@nao.ac.jp E-mail: okuzumi@nagoya-u.jp

    2013-01-20

    We report the first three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) simulations of protostellar collapse with and without Ohmic dissipation. We take into account many physical processes required to study star formation processes, including a realistic equation of state. We follow the evolution from molecular cloud cores until protostellar cores are formed with sufficiently high resolutions without introducing a sink particle. The physical processes involved in the simulations and adopted numerical methods are described in detail. We can calculate only about one year after the formation of the protostellar cores with our direct three-dimensional RMHD simulations because of the extremely short timescale in the deep interior of the formed protostellar cores, but successfully describe the early phase of star formation processes. The thermal evolution and the structure of the first and second (protostellar) cores are consistent with previous one-dimensional simulations using full radiation transfer, but differ considerably from preceding multi-dimensional studies with the barotropic approximation. The protostellar cores evolve virtually spherically symmetric in the ideal MHD models because of efficient angular momentum transport by magnetic fields, but Ohmic dissipation enables the formation of the circumstellar disks in the vicinity of the protostellar cores as in previous MHD studies with the barotropic approximation. The formed disks are still small (less than 0.35 AU) because we simulate only the earliest evolution. We also confirm that two different types of outflows are naturally launched by magnetic fields from the first cores and protostellar cores in the resistive MHD models.

  11. Dark matter cores all the way down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, J. I.; Agertz, O.; Collins, M. L. M.

    2016-07-01

    We use high-resolution simulations of isolated dwarf galaxies to study the physics of dark matter cusp-core transformations at the edge of galaxy formation: M200 = 107-109 M⊙. We work at a resolution (˜4 pc minimum cell size; ˜250 M⊙ per particle) at which the impact from individual supernovae explosions can be resolved, becoming insensitive to even large changes in our numerical `sub-grid' parameters. We find that our dwarf galaxies give a remarkable match to the stellar light profile; star formation history; metallicity distribution function; and star/gas kinematics of isolated dwarf irregular galaxies. Our key result is that dark matter cores of size comparable to the stellar half-mass radius r1/2 always form if star formation proceeds for long enough. Cores fully form in less than 4 Gyr for the M200 = 108 M⊙ and ˜14 Gyr for the 109 M⊙ dwarf. We provide a convenient two parameter `CORENFW' fitting function that captures this dark matter core growth as a function of star formation time and the projected stellar half-mass radius. Our results have several implications: (i) we make a strong prediction that if Λcold dark matter is correct, then `pristine' dark matter cusps will be found either in systems that have truncated star formation and/or at radii r > r1/2; (ii) complete core formation lowers the projected velocity dispersion at r1/2 by a factor of ˜2, which is sufficient to fully explain the `too-big-to-fail problem'; and (iii) cored dwarfs will be much more susceptible to tides, leading to a dramatic scouring of the sub-halo mass function inside galaxies and groups.

  12. Rotationally induced fragmentation in the prestellar core L1544

    SciTech Connect

    Klapp, Jaime; Zavala, Miguel; Sigalotti, Leonardo Di G.; Peña-Polo, Franklin; Troconis, Jorge

    2014-01-10

    Recent observations indicate that there is no correlation between the level of turbulence and fragmentation in detected protostellar cores, suggesting that turbulence works mainly before gravitationally bound prestellar cores form and that their inner parts are likely to be velocity coherent. Based on this evidence, we simulate the collapse and fragmentation of an isolated, initially centrally condensed, uniformly rotating core of total mass M = 5.4 M {sub ☉}, using the smoothed particle hydrodynamics code GADGET-2 modified with the inclusion of sink particles, in order to compare the statistical properties of the resulting stellar ensembles with previous gravoturbulent fragmentation models. The initial conditions are intended to fit the observed properties of the prestellar core L1544. We find that for ratios of the rotational to the gravitational energy β ≥ 0.05, a massive disk is formed at the core center from which a central primary condenses after ∼50 kyr. Soon thereafter the disk fragments into secondary protostars, consistent with an intermediate mode of star formation in which groups of 10-100 stars form from a single core. The models predict peak accretion rates between ∼10{sup –5} and 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} for all stars and reproduce many of the statistical properties predicted from gravoturbulent fragmentation, suggesting that on the small scales of low-mass, dense cores these are independent of whether the contracting gas is turbulent or purely rotating.

  13. Measurement of magnetic fluctuation-induced particle flux (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.; Yates, T. Y.

    2008-10-15

    Magnetic field fluctuation-induced particle transport has been directly measured in the high-temperature core of the MST reversed field pinch plasma. Measurement of radial particle transport is achieved by combining various interferometry techniques, including Faraday rotation, conventional interferometry, and differential interferometry. It is observed that electron convective particle flux and its divergence exhibit a significant increase during a sawtooth crash. In this paper, we describe the basic techniques employed to determine the particle flux.

  14. IMAGING HIGH SPEED PARTICLES IN EXPLOSIVE DRIVEN BLAST WAVES

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, C. M.; Horie, Y.; Ripley, R. C.; Wu, C.-Y.

    2009-12-28

    This research describes a new application of a commercially available particle image velocimetry (PIV) instrument adapted for imaging particles in a blast wave. Powder was dispersed through the PIV light sheet using a right circular cylindrical charge containing aluminum powder filled in the annular space between the explosive core and exterior paper tube wall of the charge. Images acquired from each shot showed particle agglomeration and unique structures with the smaller particle diameters having developed structured appearances.

  15. Experimental Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Carl; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Purohit, Milind V.

    2014-08-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Profs. S.R. Mishra, R. Petti, M.V. Purohit, J.R. Wilson (co-PI's), and C. Rosenfeld (PI), engaged in studies in "Experimental Particle Physics." The group collaborated with similar groups at other universities and at national laboratories to conduct experimental studies of elementary particle properties. We utilized the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. Mishra, Rosenfeld, and Petti worked predominantly on neutrino experiments. Experiments conducted in the last fifteen years that used cosmic rays and the core of the sun as a source of neutrinos showed conclusively that, contrary to the former conventional wisdom, the "flavor" of a neutrino is not immutable. A neutrino of flavor "e," "mu," or "tau," as determined from its provenance, may swap its identity with one of the other flavors -- in our jargon, they "oscillate." The oscillation phenomenon is extraordinarily difficult to study because neutrino interactions with our instruments are exceedingly rare -- they travel through the earth mostly unimpeded -- and because they must travel great distances before a substantial proportion have made the identity swap. Three of the experiments that we worked on, MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE utilize a beam of neutrinos from an accelerator at Fermilab to determine the parameters governing the oscillation. Two other experiments that we worked on, NOMAD and MIPP, provide measurements supportive of the oscillation experiments. Good measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters may constitute a "low energy window" on related phenomena that are otherwise unobservable because they would occur only at energies way above the reach of conceivable accelerators. Purohit and Wilson participated in the BaBar experiment

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Monodisperse Core-Shell Nanoparticle Fractions.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni; Carney, Randy P; Stellacci, Francesco; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Isa, Lucio

    2015-10-20

    Monodispersity is a key property to control the self-assembly of colloidal particles, and is typically reached after fine-tuning of the synthesis conditions. Monodisperse particle fractions can also be separated from polydisperse suspensions via ultracentrifugation. This paper demonstrates the capability of isolating and characterizing suspensions of core-shell iron oxide-polymer nanoparticles with extremely low polydispersity (p < 0.01) and, thus, of complementing nanoparticle synthetic approaches in the pursuit of highly monodisperse materials. PMID:26406563

  17. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  18. PEG functionalized luminescent lipid particles for cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Suman; Barick, K. C.; Shetake, Neena G.; Verma, Gunjan; Aswal, V. K.; Panicker, Lata; Pandey, B. N.; Hassan, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We report here the synthesis, characterization and cellular uptake of luminescent micelle-like particles with phospholipid core and non-ionic PEG based surfactant polysorbate 80 shell. The adsorption of polysorbate 80 at the interface of lipid containing microemulsion droplets and its solidification upon removal of solvent leads to anchoring of PEG chain to the lipid particles. Hydrophobic partitioning of luminescent molecules, sodium 3-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid to the phospholipid core offers additional functionality to these particles. Thus, the cooperative assembly of lipid, non-ionic amphiphile and organic luminescent probe leads to the formation of multifunctional biocompatible particles which are useful for simultaneous imaging and therapy.

  19. Toward quantitative core-loss EFTEM tomography.

    PubMed

    Jin-Phillipp, N Y; Koch, C T; van Aken, P A

    2011-07-01

    Core-loss EFTEM tomography provides three-dimensional structural and chemical information. Multiple inelastic scattering occurring in thick specimens as well as orientation-dependent diffraction contrast due to multiple elastic scattering, however, often limit its applications. After demonstrating the capability of core-loss EFTEM tomography to reconstruct just a few monolayers thin carbon layer covering a Fe catalyst particle we discuss its application to thicker samples. We propose an approximate multiple-scattering correction method based on the use of zero-loss images and apply it successfully to copper whiskers, providing a significant improvement of the reconstructed 3D elemental distribution. We conclude this paper by a general discussion on experimental parameters affecting the accuracy of EFTEM 3D elemental mapping. PMID:21864765

  20. Long Valley Coring Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, John; Finger, John; McConnel, Vicki

    1998-01-01

    In December 1997, the California Energy Commission (CEC) agreed to provide funding for Phase III continued drilling of the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) near Mammoth Lakes, CA, from its present depth. The CEC contribution of $1 million completes a funding package of $2 million from a variety of sources, which will allow the well to be cored continuously to a depth of between 11,500 and 12,500 feet. The core recovered from Phase III will be crucial to understanding the origin and history of the hydrothermal systems responsible for the filling of fractures in the basement rock. The borehole may penetrate the metamorphic roof of the large magmatic complex that has fed the volcanism responsible for the caldera and subsequent activity.