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Sample records for 21-cm hydrogen line

  1. Discovery and First Observations of the 21-cm Hydrogen Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. T.

    2005-08-01

    Unlike most of the great discoveries in the first decade of radio astronomy after World War II, the 21 cm hydrogen line was first predicted theoretically and then purposely sought. The story is familiar of graduate student Henk van de Hulst's prediction in occupied Holland in 1944 and the nearly simultaneous detection of the line by teams at Harvard, Leiden, and Sydney in 1951. But in this paper I will describe various aspects that are little known: (1) In van de Hulst's original paper he not only worked out possible intensities for the 21 cm line, but also for radio hydrogen recombination lines (not detected until the early 1960s), (2) in that same paper he also used Jansky's and Reber's observations of a radio background to make cosmological conclusions, (3) there was no "race" between the Dutch, Americans, and Australians to detect the line, (4) a fire that destroyed the Dutch team's equipment in March 1950 ironically did not hinder their progress, but actually speeded it up (because it led to a change of their chief engineer, bringing in the talented Lex Muller). The scientific and technical styles of the three groups will also be discussed as results of the vastly differing environments in which they operated.

  2. De-coding the Neutral Hydrogen (21cm) Line Profiles of Disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moak, Sandy; Madore, Barry; Khatami, David

    2017-01-01

    Neutral hydrogen is the most abundant element in the interstellar medium, and it has long lent astronomers insight into galaxy structure, galactic interactions, and even dark matter prevalence. It is necessary to implement a detailed coding scheme that characterizes the 21-cm HI line profiles which exist in abundance throughout literature. We have utilized a new computer simulation program that exposes the internal architecture of a galaxy by way of mapping the one-dimensional line profile on to the three-dimensional parameters of a given galaxy. We have created a naming system to classify HI line profiles, which represents a kinematic description of the galaxy simply by considering its classification within the coding scheme.

  3. How Ewen and Purcell discovered the 21-cm interstellar hydrogen line.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephan, K. D.

    1999-02-01

    The story of how Harold Irving Ewen and Edward Mills Purcell detected the first spectral line ever observed in radio astronomy, in 1951, has been told for general audiences by Robert Buderi (1996). The present article has a different purpose. The technical roots of Ewen and Purcell's achievement reveal much about the way science often depends upon "borrowed" technologies, which were not developed with the needs of science in mind. The design and construction of the equipment is described in detail. As Ewen's photographs, records, and recollections show, he and Purcell had access to an unusual combination of scientific knowledge, engineering know-how, critical hardware, and technical assistance at Harvard, in 1950 and 1951. This combination gave them a competitive edge over similar research groups in Holland and Australia, who were also striving to detect the hydrogen line, and who succeeded only weeks after the Harvard researchers did. The story also shows that Ewen and Purcell did their groundbreaking scientific work in the "small-science" style that prevailed before World War II, while receiving substantial indirect help from one of the first big-science projects at Harvard.

  4. Studying topological structure of 21-cm line fluctuations with 3D Minkowski functionals before reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiura, Shintaro; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro; Matsubara, Takahiko

    2017-02-01

    The brightness temperature of the redshifted 21-cm line brings rich information about the intergalactic medium (IGM) from the cosmic dawn and epoch of reionization (EoR). While the power spectrum is a useful tool to investigate the 21-cm signal statistically, the 21-cm brightness temperature field is highly non-Gaussian and the power spectrum is inadequate to characterize the non-Gaussianity. Minkowski functionals (MFs) are promising tools to extract non-Gaussian features of the 21-cm signal and give topological information, such as morphology of ionized bubbles. In this work, we study the 21-cm line signal in detail with MFs. To promote understanding of basic features of the 21-cm signal, we calculate the MFs of not only the hydrogen neutral fraction but also the matter density and spin temperature, which contribute to brightness-temperature fluctuations. We find that the structure of the brightness temperature depends mainly on the ionized fraction and the spin temperature at late and early stages of the EoR, respectively. Further, we investigate the redshift evolution of MFs at 7 < z < 20. We find that, after the onset of reionization, MFs mainly reflect the ionized bubble property. In addition, MFs are sensitive to model parameters related to the topology of ionized bubbles and we consider the possibility of constraining the parameters using future 21-cm signal observations.

  5. Unveiling the nature of dark matter with high redshift 21 cm line experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Evoli, C.; Mesinger, A.; Ferrara, A. E-mail: andrei.mesinger@sns.it

    2014-11-01

    Observations of the redshifted 21 cm line from neutral hydrogen will open a new window on the early Universe. By influencing the thermal and ionization history of the intergalactic medium (IGM), annihilating dark matter (DM) can leave a detectable imprint in the 21 cm signal. Building on the publicly available 21cmFAST code, we compute the 21 cm signal for a 10 GeV WIMP DM candidate. The most pronounced role of DM annihilations is in heating the IGM earlier and more uniformly than astrophysical sources of X-rays. This leaves several unambiguous, qualitative signatures in the redshift evolution of the large-scale (k ≅ 0.1 Mpc{sup -1}) 21 cm power amplitude: (i) the local maximum (peak) associated with IGM heating can be lower than the other maxima; (ii) the heating peak can occur while the IGM is in emission against the cosmic microwave background (CMB); (iii) there can be a dramatic drop in power (a global minimum) corresponding to the epoch when the IGM temperature is comparable to the CMB temperature. These signatures are robust to astrophysical uncertainties, and will be easily detectable with second generation interferometers. We also briefly show that decaying warm dark matter has a negligible role in heating the IGM.

  6. Redshifted 21cm Line Absorption by Intervening Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, F. H.

    The present generation of radio telescopes, combined with powerful new spectrometers, is opening a new age of redshifted radio absorption-line studies. Out-fitting of arrays of antennas, such as the European VLBI Network and the upgraded VLA, with flexibly tuned receivers, will measure sizes and kinematics of intervening galaxies as a function of cosmic time.

  7. An intensity map of hydrogen 21-cm emission at redshift z approximately 0.8.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tzu-Ching; Pen, Ue-Li; Bandura, Kevin; Peterson, Jeffrey B

    2010-07-22

    Observations of 21-cm radio emission by neutral hydrogen at redshifts z approximately 0.5 to approximately 2.5 are expected to provide a sensitive probe of cosmic dark energy. This is particularly true around the onset of acceleration at z approximately 1, where traditional optical cosmology becomes very difficult because of the infrared opacity of the atmosphere. Hitherto, 21-cm emission has been detected only to z = 0.24. More distant galaxies generally are too faint for individual detections but it is possible to measure the aggregate emission from many unresolved galaxies in the 'cosmic web'. Here we report a three-dimensional 21-cm intensity field at z = 0.53 to 1.12. We then co-add neutral-hydrogen (H i) emission from the volumes surrounding about 10,000 galaxies (from the DEEP2 optical galaxy redshift survey). We detect the aggregate 21-cm glow at a significance of approximately 4sigma.

  8. Intensity Mapping with Carbon Monoxide Emission Lines and the Redshifted 21 cm Line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidz, Adam; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Oh, S. Peng; Aguirre, James; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Doré, Olivier; Pritchard, Jonathan R.

    2011-11-01

    We quantify the prospects for using emission lines from rotational transitions of the CO molecule to perform an "intensity mapping" observation at high redshift during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). The aim of CO intensity mapping is to observe the combined CO emission from many unresolved galaxies, to measure the spatial fluctuations in this emission, and to use this as a tracer of large-scale structure at very early times in the history of our universe. This measurement would help determine the properties of molecular clouds—the sites of star formation—in the very galaxies that reionize the universe. We further consider the possibility of cross-correlating CO intensity maps with future observations of the redshifted 21 cm line. The cross spectrum is less sensitive to foreground contamination than the auto power spectra, and can therefore help confirm the high-redshift origin of each signal. Furthermore, the cross spectrum measurement would help extract key information about the EoR, especially regarding the size distribution of ionized regions. We discuss uncertainties in predicting the CO signal at high redshift, and discuss strategies for improving these predictions. Under favorable assumptions and feasible specifications for a CO survey mapping the CO(2-1) and CO(1-0) lines, the power spectrum of CO emission fluctuations and its cross spectrum with future 21 cm measurements from the Murchison Widefield Array are detectable at high significance.

  9. New Evidence for Mass Loss from δ Cephei from H I 21 cm Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L. D.; Marengo, M.; Evans, N. R.; Bono, G.

    2012-01-01

    Recently published Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the classical Cepheid archetype δ Cephei revealed an extended dusty nebula surrounding this star and its hot companion HD 213307. At far-infrared wavelengths, the emission resembles a bow shock aligned with the direction of space motion of the star, indicating that δ Cephei is undergoing mass loss through a stellar wind. Here we report H I 21 cm line observations with the Very Large Array (VLA) to search for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with this wind. Our VLA data reveal a spatially extended H I nebula (~13' or 1 pc across) surrounding the position of δ Cephei. The nebula has a head-tail morphology, consistent with circumstellar ejecta shaped by the interaction between a stellar wind and the interstellar medium (ISM). We directly measure a mass of circumstellar atomic hydrogen M_H I ≈ 0.07 M_{⊙}, although the total H I mass may be larger, depending on the fraction of circumstellar material that is hidden by Galactic contamination within our band or that is present on angular scales too large to be detected by the VLA. It appears that the bulk of the circumstellar gas has originated directly from the star, although it may be augmented by material swept from the surrounding ISM. The H I data are consistent with a stellar wind with an outflow velocity V o = 35.6 ± 1.2 km s-1 and a mass-loss rate of {\\dot{M}}≈ (1.0+/- 0.8)× 10^{-6} M_{⊙} yr-1. We have computed theoretical evolutionary tracks that include mass loss across the instability strip and show that a mass-loss rate of this magnitude, sustained over the preceding Cepheid lifetime of δ Cephei, could be sufficient to resolve a significant fraction of the discrepancy between the pulsation and evolutionary masses for this star.

  10. Hydrogen and the First Stars: First Results from the SCI-HI 21-cm all-sky spectrum experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, Tabitha; Peterson, Jeffrey; Lopez-Cruz, Omar; Jauregui-Garcia, Jose-Miguel; SCI-HI Experiment Team

    2015-01-01

    The 'Sonda Cosmologica de las Islas para la Deteccion de Hidrogeno Neutro' (SCI-HI) experiment is an all-sky 21-cm brightness temperature spectrum experiment studying the cosmic dawn (z~15-35). The experiment is a collaboration between Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) in Mexico. Initial deployment of the SCI-HI experiment occurred in June 2013 on Guadalupe; a small island about 250 km off of the Pacific coast of Baja California in Mexico. Preliminary measurements from this deployment have placed the first observational constraints on the 21-cm all-sky spectrum around 70 MHz (z~20), see Voytek et al (2014).Neutral Hydrogen (HI) is found throughout the universe in the cold gas that makes up the intergalactic medium (IGM). HI can be observed through the spectral line at 21 cm (1.4 GHz) due to hyperfine structure. Expansion of the universe causes the wavelength of this spectral line to stretch at a rate defined by the redshift z, leading to a signal which can be followed through time.Now the strength of the 21-cm signal in the IGM is dependent only on a small number of variables; the temperature and density of the IGM, the amount of HI in the IGM, the UV energy density in the IGM, and the redshift. This means that 21-cm measurements teach us about the history and structure of the IGM. The SCI-HI experiment focuses on the spatially averaged 21-cm spectrum, looking at the temporal evolution of the IGM during the cosmic dawn before reionization.Although the SCI-HI experiment placed first constraints with preliminary data, this data was limited to a narrow frequency regime around 60-85 MHz. This limitation was caused by instrumental difficulties and the presence of residual radio frequency interference (RFI) in the FM radio band (~88-108 MHz). The SCI-HI experiment is currently undergoing improvements and we plan to have another deployment soon. This deployment would be to Socorro and Clarion, two

  11. Constraints on the neutrino parameters by future cosmological 21 cm line and precise CMB polarization observations

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Yoshihiko; Kohri, Kazunori; Hazumi, Masashi E-mail: kohri@post.kek.jp

    2016-02-01

    Observations of the 21 cm line radiation coming from the epoch of reionization have a great capacity to study the cosmological growth of the Universe. Besides, CMB polarization produced by gravitational lensing has a large amount of information about the growth of matter fluctuations at late time. In this paper, we investigate their sensitivities to the impact of neutrino property on the growth of density fluctuations, such as the total neutrino mass, the effective number of neutrino species (extra radiation), and the neutrino mass hierarchy. We show that by combining a precise CMB polarization observation such as Simons Array with a 21 cm line observation such as Square kilometer Array (SKA) phase 1 and a baryon acoustic oscillation observation (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument:DESI) we can measure effects of non-zero neutrino mass on the growth of density fluctuation if the total neutrino mass is larger than 0.1 eV. Additionally, the combinations can strongly improve errors of the bounds on the effective number of neutrino species σ (N{sub ν}) ∼ 0.06−0.09 at 95 % C.L.. Finally, by using SKA phase 2, we can determine the neutrino mass hierarchy at 95 % C.L. if the total neutrino mass is similar to or smaller than 0.1 eV.

  12. SENSITIVE 21 cm OBSERVATIONS OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN THE LOCAL GROUP NEAR M31

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, Spencer A.; Pisano, D. J.; Lockman, Felix J. E-mail: DJPisano@mail.wvu.edu

    2016-01-10

    Very sensitive 21 cm H i measurements have been made at several locations around the Local Group galaxy M31 using the Green Bank Telescope at an angular resolution of 9.′1, with a 5σ detection level of N{sub H} {sub i} = 3.9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2} for a 30 km s{sup −1} line. Most of the H i in a 12 square-degree area almost equidistant between M31 and M33 is contained in nine discrete clouds that have a typical size of a few kpc and a H i mass of 10{sup 5}M{sub ⊙}. Their velocities in the Local Group Standard of Rest lie between −100 and +40 km s{sup −1}, comparable to the systemic velocities of M31 and M33. The clouds appear to be isolated kinematically and spatially from each other. The total H i mass of all nine clouds is 1.4 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} for an adopted distance of 800 kpc, with perhaps another 0.2 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} in smaller clouds or more diffuse emission. The H i mass of each cloud is typically three orders of magnitude less than the dynamical (virial) mass needed to bind the cloud gravitationally. Although they have the size and H i mass of dwarf galaxies, the clouds are unlikely to be part of the satellite system of the Local Group, as they lack stars. To the north of M31, sensitive H i measurements on a coarse grid find emission that may be associated with an extension of the M31 high-velocity cloud (HVC) population to projected distances of ∼100 kpc. An extension of the M31 HVC population at a similar distance to the southeast, toward M33, is not observed.

  13. Mapping Cosmic Structure Using 21-cm Hydrogen Signal at Green Bank Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voytek, Tabitha; GBT 21-cm Intensity Mapping Group

    2011-05-01

    We are using the Green Bank Telescope to make 21-cm intensity maps of cosmic structure in a 0.15 Gpc^3 box at redshift of z 1. The intensity mapping technique combines the flux from many galaxies in each pixel, allowing much greater mapping speed than the traditional redshift survey. Measurement is being made at z 1 to take advantage of a window in frequency around 700 MHz where terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI) is currently at a minimum. This minimum is due to a reallocation of this frequency band from analog television to wide area wireless internet and public service usage. We will report progress of our attempt to detect autocorrelation of the 21-cm signal. The ultimate goal of this mapping is to use Baryon Acoustic Oscillations to provide more precise constraints to dark energy models.

  14. Effects of Antenna Beam Chromaticity on Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectrum and Implications for Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Parsons, Aaron R.; DeBoer, David R.; Bowman, Judd D.; Ewall-Wice, Aaron M.; Neben, Abraham R.; Patra, Nipanjana

    2016-07-01

    Unaccounted for systematics from foregrounds and instruments can severely limit the sensitivity of current experiments from detecting redshifted 21 cm signals from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Upcoming experiments are faced with a challenge to deliver more collecting area per antenna element without degrading the data with systematics. This paper and its companions show that dishes are viable for achieving this balance using the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an example. Here, we specifically identify spectral systematics associated with the antenna power pattern as a significant detriment to all EoR experiments which causes the already bright foreground power to leak well beyond ideal limits and contaminate the otherwise clean EoR signal modes. A primary source of this chromaticity is reflections in the antenna-feed assembly and between structures in neighboring antennas. Using precise foreground simulations taking wide-field effects into account, we provide a generic framework to set cosmologically motivated design specifications on these reflections to prevent further EoR signal degradation. We show that HERA will not be impeded by such spectral systematics and demonstrate that even in a conservative scenario that does not perform removal of foregrounds, HERA will detect the EoR signal in line-of-sight k-modes, {k}\\parallel ≳ 0.2 h Mpc-1, with high significance. Under these conditions, all baselines in a 19-element HERA layout are capable of detecting EoR over a substantial observing window on the sky.

  15. Tracing the Milky Way Nuclear Wind with 21cm Atomic Hydrogen Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockman, Felix J.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence in 21 cm H i emission for voids several kiloparsecs in size centered approximately on the Galactic center, both above and below the Galactic plane. These appear to map the boundaries of the Galactic nuclear wind. An analysis of H i at the tangent points, where the distance to the gas can be estimated with reasonable accuracy, shows a sharp transition at Galactic radii R ≲ 2.4 kpc from the extended neutral gas layer characteristic of much of the Galactic disk, to a thin Gaussian layer with FWHM ˜ 125 pc. An anti-correlation between H i and γ-ray emission at latitudes 10^\\circ ≤slant | b| ≤slant 20^\\circ suggests that the boundary of the extended H i layer marks the walls of the Fermi Bubbles. With H i, we are able to trace the edges of the voids from | z| \\gt 2 {{kpc}} down to z ≈ 0, where they have a radius ˜2 kpc. The extended Hi layer likely results from star formation in the disk, which is limited largely to R ≳ 3 kpc, so the wind may be expanding into an area of relatively little H i. Because the H i kinematics can discriminate between gas in the Galactic center and foreground material, 21 cm H i emission may be the best probe of the extent of the nuclear wind near the Galactic plane.

  16. Limits on variations in fundamental constants from 21-cm and ultraviolet Quasar absorption lines.

    PubMed

    Tzanavaris, P; Webb, J K; Murphy, M T; Flambaum, V V; Curran, S J

    2005-07-22

    Quasar absorption spectra at 21-cm and UV rest wavelengths are used to estimate the time variation of x [triple-bond] alpha(2)g(p)mu, where alpha is the fine structure constant, g(p) the proton g factor, and m(e)/m(p) [triple-bond] mu the electron/proton mass ratio. Over a redshift range 0.24 < or = zeta(abs) < or = 2.04, (Deltax/x)(weighted)(total) = (1.17 +/- 1.01) x 10(-5). A linear fit gives x/x = (-1.43 +/- 1.27) x 10(-15) yr(-1). Two previous results on varying alpha yield the strong limits Deltamu/mu = (2.31 +/- 1.03) x 10(-5) and Deltamu/mu=(1.29 +/- 1.01) x10(-5). Our sample, 8 x larger than any previous, provides the first direct estimate of the intrinsic 21-cm and UV velocity differences 6 km s(-1).

  17. COMPLETE IONIZATION OF THE NEUTRAL GAS: WHY THERE ARE SO FEW DETECTIONS OF 21 cm HYDROGEN IN HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXIES AND QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2012-11-10

    From the first published z {approx}> 3 survey of 21 cm absorption within the hosts of radio galaxies and quasars, Curran et al. found an apparent dearth of cool neutral gas at high redshift. From a detailed analysis of the photometry, each object is found to have a {lambda} = 1216 A continuum luminosity in excess of L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}, a critical value above which 21 cm has never been detected at any redshift. At these wavelengths, and below, hydrogen is excited above the ground state so that it cannot absorb in 21 cm. In order to apply the equation of photoionization equilibrium, we demonstrate that this critical value also applies to the ionizing ({lambda} {<=} 912 A) radiation. We use this to show, for a variety of gas density distributions, that upon placing a quasar within a galaxy of gas, there is always an ultraviolet luminosity above which all of the large-scale atomic gas is ionized. While in this state, the hydrogen cannot be detected or engage in star formation. Applying the mean ionizing photon rate of all of the sources searched, we find, using canonical values for the gas density and recombination rate coefficient, that the observed critical luminosity gives a scale length (3 kpc) similar that of the neutral hydrogen (H I) in the Milky Way, a large spiral galaxy. Thus, this simple yet physically motivated model can explain the critical luminosity (L {sub 912} {approx} L {sub 1216} {approx} 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1}), above which neutral gas is not detected. This indicates that the non-detection of 21 cm absorption is not due to the sensitivity limits of current radio telescopes, but rather that the lines of sight to the quasars, and probably the bulk of the host galaxies, are devoid of neutral gas.

  18. Line-of-Sight Anisotropies in the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization 21-cm Power Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, Suman; Datta, Kanan K.; Ghara, Raghunath; Mondal, Rajesh; Choudhury, T. Roy; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Ali, Sk. Saiyad; Datta, Abhirup

    2016-12-01

    The line-of-sight direction in the redshifted 21-cm signal coming from the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization is quite unique in many ways compared to any other cosmological signal. Different unique effects, such as the evolution history of the signal, non-linear peculiar velocities of the matter etc. will imprint their signature along the line-of-sight axis of the observed signal. One of the major goals of the future SKA-LOW radio interferometer is to observe the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization through this 21-cm signal. It is thus important to understand how these various effects affect the signal for its actual detection and proper interpretation. For more than one and half decades, various groups in India have been actively trying to understand and quantify the different line-of-sight effects that are present in this signal through analytical models and simulations. In many ways the importance of this sub-field under 21-cm cosmology have been identified, highlighted and pushed forward by the Indian community. In this article, we briefly describe their contribution and implication of these effects in the context of the future surveys of the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization that will be conducted by the SKA-LOW.

  19. INVISIBLE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. II. RADIO MORPHOLOGIES AND FIVE NEW H i 21 cm ABSORPTION LINE DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Ting; Stocke, John T.; Darling, Jeremy; Momjian, Emmanuel; Sharma, Soniya; Kanekar, Nissim

    2016-03-15

    This is the second paper directed toward finding new highly redshifted atomic and molecular absorption lines at radio frequencies. To this end, we selected a sample of 80 candidates for obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and presented their basic optical/near-infrared (NIR) properties in Paper I. In this paper, we present both high-resolution radio continuum images for all of these sources and H i 21 cm absorption spectroscopy for a few selected sources in this sample. A-configuration 4.9 and 8.5 GHz Very Large Array continuum observations find that 52 sources are compact or have substantial compact components with size <0.″5 and flux densities >0.1 Jy at 4.9 GHz. The 36 most compact sources were then observed with the Very Long Baseline Array at 1.4 GHz. One definite and 10 candidate Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs) are newly identified, which is a detection rate of CSOs ∼three times higher than the detection rate previously found in purely flux-limited samples. Based on possessing compact components with high flux densities, 60 of these sources are good candidates for absorption-line searches. Twenty-seven sources were observed for H i 21 cm absorption at their photometric or spectroscopic redshifts with only six detections (five definite and one tentative). However, five of these were from a small subset of six CSOs with pure galaxy optical/NIR spectra (i.e., any AGN emission is obscured) and for which accurate spectroscopic redshifts place the redshifted 21 cm line in a radio frequency intereference (RFI)-free spectral “window” (i.e., the percentage of H i 21 cm absorption-line detections could be as high as ∼90% in this sample). It is likely that the presence of ubiquitous RFI and the absence of accurate spectroscopic redshifts preclude H i detections in similar sources (only 1 detection out of the remaining 22 sources observed, 13 of which have only photometric redshifts); that is, H i absorption may well be present but is masked by

  20. Cosmology on ultralarge scales with intensity mapping of the neutral hydrogen 21 cm emission: limits on primordial non-Gaussianity.

    PubMed

    Camera, Stefano; Santos, Mário G; Ferreira, Pedro G; Ferramacho, Luís

    2013-10-25

    The large-scale structure of the Universe supplies crucial information about the physical processes at play at early times. Unresolved maps of the intensity of 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen HI at redshifts z=/~1-5 are the best hope of accessing the ultralarge-scale information, directly related to the early Universe. A purpose-built HI intensity experiment may be used to detect the large scale effects of primordial non-Gaussianity, placing stringent bounds on different models of inflation. We argue that it may be possible to place tight constraints on the non-Gaussianity parameter f(NL), with an error close to σ(f(NL))~1.

  1. Expected constraints on models of the epoch of reionization with the variance and skewness in redshifted 21 cm-line fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Kenji; Yoshiura, Shintaro; Shimabukuro, Hayato; Takahashi, Keitaro

    2016-08-01

    The redshifted 21 cm-line signal from neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) gives a direct probe of the epoch of reionization (EoR). In this paper, we investigate the potential of the variance and skewness of the probability distribution function of the 21 cm brightness temperature for constraining EoR models. These statistical quantities are simple, easy to calculate from the observed visibility, and thus suitable for the early exploration of the EoR with current telescopes such as the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR). We show, by performing Fisher analysis, that the variance and skewness at z = 7-9 are complementary to each other to constrain the EoR model parameters such as the minimum virial temperature of halos which host luminous objects, ionizing efficiency, and mean free path of ionizing photons in the IGM. Quantitatively, the constraining power highly depends on the quality of the foreground subtraction and calibration. We give a best case estimate of the constraints on the parameters, neglecting the systematics other than the thermal noise.

  2. A Search for Mass Loss on the Cepheid Instability Strip using H i 21 cm Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, L. D.; Marengo, M.; Evans, N. R.

    2016-12-01

    We present the results of a search for H i 21 cm line emission from the circumstellar environments of four Galactic Cepheids (RS Pup, X Cyg, ζ Gem, and T Mon) based on observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. The observations were aimed at detecting gas associated with previous or ongoing mass loss. Near the long-period Cepheid T Mon, we report the detection of a partial shell-like structure whose properties appear consistent with originating from an earlier epoch of Cepheid mass loss. At the distance of T Mon, the nebula would have a mass (H i+He) of ˜ 0.5{M}⊙ , or ˜6% of the stellar mass. Assuming that one-third of the nebular mass comprises swept-up interstellar gas, we estimate an implied mass-loss rate of \\dot{M}˜ (0.6{--}2)× {10}-5 {M}⊙ yr-1. No clear signatures of circumstellar emission were found toward ζ Gem, RS Pup, or X Cyg, although in each case, line-of-sight confusion compromised portions of the spectral band. For the undetected stars, we derive model-dependent 3σ upper limits on the mass-loss rates, averaged over their lifetimes on the instability strip, of ≲ (0.3{--}6)× {10}-6 {M}⊙ yr-1 and estimate the total amount of mass lost to be less than a few percent of the stellar mass.

  3. From Darkness to Light: Observing the First Stars and Galaxies with the Redshifted 21-cm Line using the Dark Ages Radio Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Lazio, Joseph; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Datta, Abhirup; Furlanetto, Steven; Jones, Dayton L.; Kasper, Justin; Loeb, Abraham; Harker, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) will reveal when the first stars, black holes, and galaxies formed in the early Universe and will define their characteristics, from the Dark Ages (z=35) to the Cosmic Dawn (z=11). This epoch of the Universe has never been directly observed. The DARE science instrument is composed of electrically-short bi-conical dipole antennas, a correlation receiver, and a digital spectrometer that measures the sky-averaged, low frequency (40-120 MHz) spectral features from the highly redshifted 21-cm HI line that surrounds the first objects. These observations are possible because DARE will orbit the Moon at an altitude of 125 km and takes data when it is above the radio-quiet, ionosphere-free, solar-shielded lunar farside. DARE executes the small-scale mission described in the NASA Astrophysics Roadmap (p. 83): 'mapping the Universe's hydrogen clouds using 21-cm radio wavelengths via lunar orbiter from the farside of the Moon'. This mission will address four key science questions: (1) When did the first stars form and what were their characteristics? (2) When did the first accreting black holes form and what was their characteristic mass? (3) When did reionization begin? (4) What surprises emerged from the Dark Ages (e.g., Dark Matter decay). DARE uniquely complements other major telescopes including Planck, JWST, and ALMA by bridging the gap between the smooth Universe seen via the CMB and rich web of galaxy structures seen with optical/IR/mm telescopes. Support for the development of this mission concept was provided by the Office of the Director, NASA Ames Research Center and by JPL/Caltech.

  4. Data Simulation for 21 cm Cosmology Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    21 cm cosmologists seek a measurement of the hyperfine line of neutral hydrogen from very high redshifts. While this signal has the potential to provide an unprecedented view into the early universe, it is also buried under exceedingly bright foreground emission. Over the last several years, 21 cm cosmology research has led to an improved understanding of how low frequency radio interferometers will affect the separation of cosmological signal from foregrounds. This talk will describe new efforts to incorporate this understanding into simulations of the most realistic data sets for the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER), the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA). These high fidelity simulations are essential for robust algorithm design and validation of early results from these experiments.

  5. The 21-cm Signal from the cosmological epoch of recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Fialkov, A.; Loeb, A. E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2013-11-01

    The redshifted 21-cm emission by neutral hydrogen offers a unique tool for mapping structure formation in the early universe in three dimensions. Here we provide the first detailed calculation of the 21-cm emission signal during and after the epoch of hydrogen recombination in the redshift range of z ∼ 500–1,100, corresponding to observed wavelengths of 100–230 meters. The 21-cm line deviates from thermal equilibrium with the cosmic microwave background (CMB) due to the excess Lyα radiation from hydrogen and helium recombinations. The resulting 21-cm signal reaches a brightness temperature of a milli-Kelvin, orders of magnitude larger than previously estimated. Its detection by a future lunar or space-based observatory could improve dramatically the statistical constraints on the cosmological initial conditions compared to existing two-dimensional maps of the CMB anisotropies.

  6. A Fourth H I 21 cm Absorption System in the Sight Line of MG J0414+0534: A Record for Intervening Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanna, A.; Curran, S. J.; Whiting, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Bignell, C.

    2013-08-01

    We report the detection of a strong H I 21 cm absorption system at z = 0.5344, as well as a candidate system at z = 0.3389, in the sight line toward the z = 2.64 quasar MG J0414+0534. This, in addition to the absorption at the host redshift and the other two intervening absorbers, takes the total to four (possibly five). The previous maximum number of 21 cm absorbers detected along a single sight line is two and so we suspect that this number of gas-rich absorbers is in some way related to the very red color of the background source. Despite this, no molecular gas (through OH absorption) has yet been detected at any of the 21 cm redshifts, although, from the population of 21 cm absorbers as a whole, there is evidence for a weak correlation between the atomic line strength and the optical-near-infrared color. In either case, the fact that so many gas-rich galaxies (likely to be damped Lyα absorption systems) have been found along a single sight line toward a highly obscured source may have far-reaching implications for the population of faint galaxies not detected in optical surveys, a possibility which could be addressed through future wide-field absorption line surveys with the Square Kilometer Array.

  7. Factor analysis as a tool for spectral line component separation 21cm emission in the direction of L1780

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, L. V.; Mattila, K.; Haikala, L.; Balazs, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    The spectra of the 21cm HI radiation from the direction of L1780, a small high-galactic latitude dark/molecular cloud, were analyzed by multivariate methods. Factor analysis was performed on HI (21cm) spectra in order to separate the different components responsible for the spectral features. The rotated, orthogonal factors explain the spectra as a sum of radiation from the background (an extended HI emission layer), and from the L1780 dark cloud. The coefficients of the cloud-indicator factors were used to locate the HI 'halo' of the molecular cloud. Our statistically derived 'background' and 'cloud' spectral profiles, as well as the spatial distribution of the HI halo emission distribution were compared to the results of a previous study which used conventional methods analyzing nearly the same data set.

  8. Upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum at z = 5.9 from quasar absorption line spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Greig, Bradley; Mesinger, Andrei

    2016-11-01

    We present upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum at z = 5.9 calculated from the model-independent limit on the neutral fraction of the intergalactic medium of x_{H I} < 0.06 + 0.05 (1σ ) derived from dark pixel statistics of quasar absorption spectra. Using 21CMMC, a Markov chain Monte Carlo Epoch of Reionization analysis code, we explore the probability distribution of 21 cm power spectra consistent with this constraint on the neutral fraction. We present 99 per cent confidence upper limits of Δ2(k) < 10-20 mK2 over a range of k from 0.5 to 2.0 h Mpc-1, with the exact limit dependent on the sampled k mode. This limit can be used as a null test for 21 cm experiments: a detection of power at z = 5.9 in excess of this value is highly suggestive of residual foreground contamination or other systematic errors affecting the analysis.

  9. Foregrounds for observations of the cosmological 21 cm line. II. Westerbork observations of the fields around 3C 196 and the North Celestial Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, G.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Harker, G.; Brentjens, M. A.; Ciardi, B.; Jelić, V.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Labropoulos, P.; Offringa, A.; Pandey, V. N.; Schaye, J.; Thomas, R. M.; Yatawatta, S.; Zaroubi, S.

    2010-11-01

    Context. In the coming years a new insight into galaxy formation and the thermal history of the Universe is expected to come from the detection of the highly redshifted cosmological 21 cm line. Aims: The cosmological 21 cm line signal is buried under Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds which are likely to be a few orders of magnitude brighter. Strategies and techniques for effective subtraction of these foreground sources require a detailed knowledge of their structure in both intensity and polarization on the relevant angular scales of 1-30 arcmin. Methods: We present results from observations conducted with the Westerbork telescope in the 140-160 MHz range with 2 arcmin resolution in two fields located at intermediate Galactic latitude, centred around the bright quasar 3C 196 and the North Celestial Pole. They were observed with the purpose of characterizing the foreground properties in sky areas where actual observations of the cosmological 21 cm line could be carried out. The polarization data were analysed through the rotation measure synthesis technique. We have computed total intensity and polarization angular power spectra. Results: Total intensity maps were carefully calibrated, reaching a high dynamic range, 150 000:1 in the case of the 3C 196 field. No evidence of diffuse Galactic emission was found in the angular power spectrum analysis on scales smaller than ~10 arcmin in either of the two fields. On these angular scales the signal is consistent with the classical confusion noise of ~3 mJy beam-1. On scales greater than 30 arcmin we found an excess of power attributed to the Galactic foreground with an rms of 3.4 K and 5.5 K for the 3C 196 and the NCP field respectively. The intermediate angular scales suffered from systematic errors which prevented any detection. Patchy polarized emission was found only in the 3C 196 field whereas the polarization in the NCP area was essentially due to radio frequency interference. The polarized signal in the 3C

  10. Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic Simulations of Multiphase Galactic Disks with Star Formation Feedback. II. Synthetic H I 21 cm Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Goo; Ostriker, Eve C.; Kim, Woong-Tae

    2014-05-01

    We use three-dimensional numerical hydrodynamic simulations of the turbulent, multiphase atomic interstellar medium (ISM) to construct and analyze synthetic H I 21 cm emission and absorption lines. Our analysis provides detailed tests of 21 cm observables as physical diagnostics of the atomic ISM. In particular, we construct (1) the "observed" spin temperature, T_{s, obs}(v_ch)≡ T_B(v_ch)/[1-e^{-τ (v_ch)}], and its optical-depth weighted mean T s, obs; (2) the absorption-corrected "observed" column density, N_H,obs∝ ∫ dv_chT_B(v_ch) τ (v_ch)/[1-e^{-τ (v_ch)}]; and (3) the "observed" fraction of cold neutral medium (CNM), f c, obs ≡ Tc /T s, obs for Tc the CNM temperature; we compare each observed parameter with true values obtained from line-of-sight (LOS) averages in the simulation. Within individual velocity channels, T s, obs(v ch) is within a factor 1.5 of the true value up to τ(v ch) ~ 10. As a consequence, N H, obs and T s, obs are, respectively, within 5% and 12% of the true values for 90% and 99% of LOSs. The optically thin approximation significantly underestimates N H for τ > 1. Provided that Tc is constrained, an accurate observational estimate of the CNM mass fraction can be obtained down to 20%. We show that T s, obs cannot be used to distinguish the relative proportions of warm and thermally unstable atomic gas, although the presence of thermally unstable gas can be discerned from 21 cm lines with 200 K <~ T s, obs(v ch) <~ 1000 K. Our mock observations successfully reproduce and explain the observed distribution of the brightness temperature, optical depth, and spin temperature in Roy et al. The threshold column density for CNM seen in observations is also reproduced by our mock observations. We explain this observed threshold behavior in terms of vertical equilibrium in the local Milky Way's ISM disk.

  11. Probing lepton asymmetry with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: oyamayo@post.kek.jp E-mail: tomot@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2014-09-01

    We investigate the issue of how accurately we can constrain the lepton number asymmetry ξ{sub ν}=μ{sub ν}/T{sub ν} in the Universe by using future observations of 21 cm line fluctuations and cosmic microwave background (CMB). We find that combinations of the 21 cm line and the CMB observations can constrain the lepton asymmetry better than big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). Additionally, we also discuss constraints on ξ{sub ν} in the presence of some extra radiation, and show that the 21 cm line observations can substantially improve the constraints obtained by CMB alone, and allow us to distinguish the effects of the lepton asymmetry from the ones of extra radiation.

  12. Precision measurement of cosmic magnification from 21 cm emitting galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Pengjie; Pen, Ue-Li; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.

    2005-04-01

    We show how precision lensing measurements can be obtained through the lensing magnification effect in high redshift 21cm emission from galaxies. Normally, cosmic magnification measurements have been seriously complicated by galaxy clustering. With precise redshifts obtained from 21cm emission line wavelength, one can correlate galaxies at different source planes, or exclude close pairs to eliminate such contaminations. We provide forecasts for future surveys, specifically the SKA and CLAR. SKA can achieve percent precision on the dark matter power spectrum and the galaxy dark matter cross correlation power spectrum, while CLAR can measure an accurate cross correlation power spectrum. The neutral hydrogen fraction was most likely significantly higher at high redshifts, which improves the number of observed galaxies significantly, such that also CLAR can measure the dark matter lensing power spectrum. SKA can also allow precise measurement of lensing bispectrum.

  13. Kinematics of the Local Universe. XIV. Measurements from the 21 cm line and the HI mass function from a homogeneous catalog gathered with the Nançay radio telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theureau, G.; Coudreau, N.; Hallet, N.; Hanski, M. O.; Poulain, M.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: This paper presents 828 new 21 cm neutral hydrogen line measurements carried out with the FORT receiver of the meridian transit Nançay radio telescope (NRT) in the years 2000-2007. Methods: This observational program was part of a larger project aimed at collecting an exhaustive and magnitude-complete HI extragalactic catalog for Tully-Fisher applications. Through five massive data releases, the KLUN series has collected a homogeneous sample of 4876 HI-spectra of spiral galaxies, complete down to a flux of 5 Jy km s-1 and with declination δ > -40°. Results: We publish here the last release of the KLUN HI observational program, corresponding to the faint end of the survey, with HI masses ranging from 5 × 108 to 5 × 1010 solar masses. The size of this final sample is comparable to the catalogs based on the Arecibo and Parkes radio telescope campaigns, and it allows general HI mass distribution studies from a set of homogeneous radio measurements. Full Tables 2 and 3, together with HI profiles in ascii format, are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A104

  14. Interpreting Sky-Averaged 21-cm Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirocha, Jordan

    2015-01-01

    Within the first ~billion years after the Big Bang, the intergalactic medium (IGM) underwent a remarkable transformation, from a uniform sea of cold neutral hydrogen gas to a fully ionized, metal-enriched plasma. Three milestones during this epoch of reionization -- the emergence of the first stars, black holes (BHs), and full-fledged galaxies -- are expected to manifest themselves as extrema in sky-averaged ("global") measurements of the redshifted 21-cm background. However, interpreting these measurements will be complicated by the presence of strong foregrounds and non-trivialities in the radiative transfer (RT) modeling required to make robust predictions.I have developed numerical models that efficiently solve the frequency-dependent radiative transfer equation, which has led to two advances in studies of the global 21-cm signal. First, frequency-dependent solutions facilitate studies of how the global 21-cm signal may be used to constrain the detailed spectral properties of the first stars, BHs, and galaxies, rather than just the timing of their formation. And second, the speed of these calculations allows one to search vast expanses of a currently unconstrained parameter space, while simultaneously characterizing the degeneracies between parameters of interest. I find principally that (1) physical properties of the IGM, such as its temperature and ionization state, can be constrained robustly from observations of the global 21-cm signal without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves, (2) translating IGM properties to galaxy properties is challenging, in large part due to frequency-dependent effects. For instance, evolution in the characteristic spectrum of accreting BHs can modify the 21-cm absorption signal at levels accessible to first generation instruments, but could easily be confused with evolution in the X-ray luminosity star-formation rate relation. Finally, (3) the independent constraints most likely to aide in the interpretation

  15. Mapmaking for precision 21 cm cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Tegmark, Max; Liu, Adrian; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Morales, Miguel F.; Neben, Abraham R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the "Cosmic Dawn" and the Epoch of Reionization with 21 cm tomography, we need to statistically separate the cosmological signal from foregrounds known to be orders of magnitude brighter. Over the last few years, we have learned much about the role our telescopes play in creating a putatively foreground-free region called the "EoR window." In this work, we examine how an interferometer's effects can be taken into account in a way that allows for the rigorous estimation of 21 cm power spectra from interferometric maps while mitigating foreground contamination and thus increasing sensitivity. This requires a precise understanding of the statistical relationship between the maps we make and the underlying true sky. While some of these calculations would be computationally infeasible if performed exactly, we explore several well-controlled approximations that make mapmaking and the calculation of map statistics much faster, especially for compact and highly redundant interferometers designed specifically for 21 cm cosmology. We demonstrate the utility of these methods and the parametrized trade-offs between accuracy and speed using one such telescope, the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, as a case study.

  16. How accurately can 21cm tomography constrain cosmology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yi; Tegmark, Max; McQuinn, Matthew; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Zahn, Oliver

    2008-07-01

    There is growing interest in using 3-dimensional neutral hydrogen mapping with the redshifted 21 cm line as a cosmological probe. However, its utility depends on many assumptions. To aid experimental planning and design, we quantify how the precision with which cosmological parameters can be measured depends on a broad range of assumptions, focusing on the 21 cm signal from 621 cm tomography measured the matter power spectrum directly. A future square kilometer array optimized for 21 cm tomography could improve the sensitivity to spatial curvature and neutrino masses by up to 2 orders of magnitude, to ΔΩk≈0.0002 and Δmν≈0.007eV, and give a 4σ detection of the spectral index running predicted by the simplest inflation models.

  17. RESEARCH PAPER: Foreground removal of 21 cm fluctuation with multifrequency fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Li-Ping

    2009-06-01

    The 21 centimeter (21 cm) line emission from neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshifts is strongly contaminated by foreground sources such as the diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission and free-free emission from the Galaxy, as well as emission from extragalactic radio sources, thus making its observation very complicated. However, the 21 cm signal can be recovered through its structure in frequency space, as the power spectrum of the foreground contamination is expected to be smooth over a wide band in frequency space while the 21 cm fluctuations vary significantly. We use a simple polynomial fitting to reconstruct the 21 cm signal around four frequencies 50, 100, 150 and 200MHz with an especially small channel width of 20 kHz. Our calculations show that this multifrequency fitting approach can effectively recover the 21 cm signal in the frequency range 100 ~ 200 MHz. However, this method doesn't work well around 50 MHz because of the low intensity of the 21 cm signal at this frequency. We also show that the fluctuation of detector noise can be suppressed to a very low level by taking long integration times, which means that we can reach a sensitivity of approx10 mK at 150 MHz with 40 antennas in 120 hours of observations.

  18. A correlation between the H I 21-cm absorption strength and impact parameter in external galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, S. J.; Reeves, S. N.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    By combining the data from surveys for H I 21-cm absorption at various impact parameters in near-by galaxies, we report an anti-correlation between the 21-cm absorption strength (velocity integrated optical depth) and the impact parameter. Also, by combining the 21-cm absorption strength with that of the emission, giving the neutral hydrogen column density, N_{H I}, we find no evidence that the spin temperature of the gas (degenerate with the covering factor) varies significantly across the disc. This is consistent with the uniformity of spin temperature measured across the Galactic disc. Furthermore, comparison with the Galactic N_{H I} distribution suggests that intervening 21-cm absorption preferentially arises in discs of high inclinations (near face-on). We also investigate the hypothesis that 21-cm absorption is favourably detected towards compact radio sources. Although there is insufficient data to determine whether there is a higher detection rate towards quasar, rather than radio galaxy, sight-lines, the 21-cm detections intervene objects with a mean turnover frequency of < ν _{_TO}rangle ≈ 5× 108 Hz, compared to < ν _{_TO}rangle ≈ 1× 108 Hz for the non-detections. Since the turnover frequency is anti-correlated with radio source size, this does indicate a preferential bias for detection towards compact background radio sources.

  19. Redundant Array Configurations for 21 cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Parsons, Aaron R.

    2016-08-01

    Realizing the potential of 21 cm tomography to statistically probe the intergalactic medium before and during the Epoch of Reionization requires large telescopes and precise control of systematics. Next-generation telescopes are now being designed and built to meet these challenges, drawing lessons from first-generation experiments that showed the benefits of densely packed, highly redundant arrays—in which the same mode on the sky is sampled by many antenna pairs—for achieving high sensitivity, precise calibration, and robust foreground mitigation. In this work, we focus on the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) as an interferometer with a dense, redundant core designed following these lessons to be optimized for 21 cm cosmology. We show how modestly supplementing or modifying a compact design like HERA’s can still deliver high sensitivity while enhancing strategies for calibration and foreground mitigation. In particular, we compare the imaging capability of several array configurations, both instantaneously (to address instrumental and ionospheric effects) and with rotation synthesis (for foreground removal). We also examine the effects that configuration has on calibratability using instantaneous redundancy. We find that improved imaging with sub-aperture sampling via “off-grid” antennas and increased angular resolution via far-flung “outrigger” antennas is possible with a redundantly calibratable array configuration.

  20. Detailed modelling of the 21-cm forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semelin, B.

    2016-01-01

    The 21-cm forest is a promising probe of the Epoch of Reionization. The local state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is encoded in the spectrum of a background source (radio-loud quasars or gamma-ray burst afterglow) by absorption at the local 21-cm wavelength, resulting in a continuous and fluctuating absorption level. Small-scale structures (filaments and minihaloes) in the IGM are responsible for the strongest absorption features. The absorption can also be modulated on large scales by inhomogeneous heating and Wouthuysen-Field coupling. We present the results from a simulation that attempts to preserve the cosmological environment while resolving some of the small-scale structures (a few kpc resolution in a 50 h-1 Mpc box). The simulation couples the dynamics and the ionizing radiative transfer and includes X-ray and Lyman lines radiative transfer for a detailed physical modelling. As a result we find that soft X-ray self-shielding, Ly α self-shielding and shock heating all have an impact on the predicted values of the 21-cm optical depth of moderately overdense structures like filaments. A correct treatment of the peculiar velocities is also critical. Modelling these processes seems necessary for accurate predictions and can be done only at high enough resolution. As a result, based on our fiducial model, we estimate that LOFAR should be able to detect a few (strong) absorptions features in a frequency range of a few tens of MHz for a 20 mJy source located at z = 10, while the SKA would extract a large fraction of the absorption information for the same source.

  1. Reionization on large scales. IV. Predictions for the 21 cm signal incorporating the light cone effect

    SciTech Connect

    La Plante, P.; Battaglia, N.; Natarajan, A.; Peterson, J. B.; Trac, H.; Cen, R.; Loeb, A.

    2014-07-01

    We present predictions for the 21 cm brightness temperature power spectrum during the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). We discuss the implications of the 'light cone' effect, which incorporates evolution of the neutral hydrogen fraction and 21 cm brightness temperature along the line of sight. Using a novel method calibrated against radiation-hydrodynamic simulations, we model the neutral hydrogen density field and 21 cm signal in large volumes (L = 2 Gpc h {sup –1}). The inclusion of the light cone effect leads to a relative decrease of about 50% in the 21 cm power spectrum on all scales. We also find that the effect is more prominent at the midpoint of reionization and later. The light cone effect can also introduce an anisotropy along the line of sight. By decomposing the 3D power spectrum into components perpendicular to and along the line of sight, we find that in our fiducial reionization model, there is no significant anisotropy. However, parallel modes can contribute up to 40% more power for shorter reionization scenarios. The scales on which the light cone effect is relevant are comparable to scales where one measures the baryon acoustic oscillation. We argue that due to its large comoving scale and introduction of anisotropy, the light cone effect is important when considering redshift space distortions and future application to the Alcock-Paczyński test for the determination of cosmological parameters.

  2. The rise of the first stars: Supersonic streaming, radiative feedback, and 21-cm cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkana, Rennan

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the formation and evolution of the first stars and galaxies represents one of the most exciting frontiers in astronomy. Since the universe was filled with hydrogen atoms at early times, the most promising method for observing the epoch of the first stars is to use the prominent 21-cm spectral line of hydrogen. Current observational efforts are focused on the cosmic reionization era, but observations of the pre-reionization cosmic dawn are also beginning and promise exciting discoveries. While observationally unexplored, theoretical studies predict a rich variety of observational signatures from the astrophysics of the early galaxies that formed during cosmic dawn. As the first stars formed, their radiation (plus that from stellar remnants) produced feedback that radically affected both the intergalactic medium and the character of newly-forming stars. Lyman- α radiation from stars generated a strong 21-cm absorption signal, observation of which is currently the only feasible method of detecting the dominant population of galaxies at redshifts as early as z ∼ 25. Another major player is cosmic heating; if due to soft X-rays, then it occurred fairly early (z ∼ 15) and produced the strongest pre-reionization signal, while if it is due to hard X-rays, as now seems more likely, then it occurred later and may have dramatically affected the 21-cm sky even during reionization. In terms of analysis, much focus has gone to studying the angle-averaged power spectrum of 21-cm fluctuations, a rich dataset that can be used to reconstruct the astrophysical information of greatest interest. This does not, however, diminish the importance of finding additional probes that are complementary or amenable to a more model-independent analysis. Examples include the global (sky-averaged) 21-cm spectrum, and the line-of-sight anisotropy of the 21-cm power spectrum. Another striking feature may result from a recently recognized effect of a supersonic relative velocity

  3. 21 cm radiation: A new probe of fundamental physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2010-11-01

    New low frequency radio telescopes currently being built open up the possibility of observing the 21 cm radiation from redshifts 200 > z > 30, also known as the dark ages, see Furlanetto, Oh, & Briggs(2006) for a review. At these high redshifts, Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation is absorbed by neutral hydrogen at its 21 cm hyperfine transition. This redshifted 21 cm signal thus carries information about the state of the early Universe and can be used to test fundamental physics. The 21 cm radiation probes a volume of the early Universe on kpc scales in contrast with CMB which probes a surface (of some finite thickness) on Mpc scales. Thus there is many orders of more information available, in principle, from the 21 cm observations of dark ages. We have studied the constraints these observations can put on the variation of fundamental constants (Khatri & Wandelt(2007)). Since the 21 cm signal depends on atomic physics it is very sensitive to the variations in the fine structure constant and can place constraints comparable to or better than the other astrophysical experiments (Δα/α= < 10-5) as shown in Figure 1. Making such observations will require radio telescopes of collecting area 10 - 106 km2 compared to ~ 1 km2 of current telescopes, for example LOFAR. We should also expect similar sensitivity to the electron to proton mass ratio. One of the challenges in observing this 21 cm cosmological signal is the presence of the synchrotron foregrounds which is many orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal but the two can be separated because of their different statistical nature (Zaldarriaga, Furlanetto, & Hernquist(2004)). Terrestrial EM interference from radio/TV etc. and Earth's ionosphere poses problems for telescopes on ground which may be solved by going to the Moon and there are proposals for doing so, one of which is the Dark Ages Lunar Interferometer (DALI). In conclusion 21 cm cosmology promises a large wealth of data and provides

  4. Intensity Mapping During Reionization: 21 cm and Cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, James E.; HERA Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The first generation of 21 cm epoch of reionization (EoR) experiments are now reaching the sensitivities necessary for a detection of the power spectrum of plausible reionization models, and with the advent of next-generation capabilities (e.g. the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometer Array Phase I Low) will move beyond the power spectrum to imaging of the EoR intergalactic medium. Such datasets provide context to galaxy evolution studies for the earliest galaxies on scales of tens of Mpc, but at present wide, deep galaxy surveys are lacking, and attaining the depth to survey the bulk of galaxies responsible for reionization will be challenging even for JWST. Thus we seek useful cross-correlations with other more direct tracers of the galaxy population. I review near-term prospects for cross-correlation studies with 21 cm and CO and CII emission, as well as future far-infrared misions suchas CALISTO.

  5. The imprint of the cosmic supermassive black hole growth history on the 21 cm background radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; O'Leary, Ryan M.; Perna, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    The redshifted 21 cm transition line of hydrogen tracks the thermal evolution of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) at `cosmic dawn', during the emergence of the first luminous astrophysical objects (˜100 Myr after the big bang) but before these objects ionized the IGM (˜400-800 Myr after the big bang). Because X-rays, in particular, are likely to be the chief energy courier for heating the IGM, measurements of the 21 cm signature can be used to infer knowledge about the first astrophysical X-ray sources. Using analytic arguments and a numerical population synthesis algorithm, we argue that the progenitors of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) should be the dominant source of hard astrophysical X-rays - and thus the primary driver of IGM heating and the 21 cm signature - at redshifts z ≳ 20, if (i) they grow readily from the remnants of Population III stars and (ii) produce X-rays in quantities comparable to what is observed from active galactic nuclei and high-mass X-ray binaries. We show that models satisfying these assumptions dominate over contributions to IGM heating from stellar populations, and cause the 21 cm brightness temperature to rise at z ≳ 20. An absence of such a signature in the forthcoming observational data would imply that SMBH formation occurred later (e.g. via so-called direct collapse scenarios), that it was not a common occurrence in early galaxies and protogalaxies, or that it produced far fewer X-rays than empirical trends at lower redshifts, either due to intrinsic dimness (radiative inefficiency) or Compton-thick obscuration close to the source.

  6. Probing patchy reionization through τ-21 cm correlation statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Meerburg, P. Daniel; Spergel, David N.; Dvorkin, Cora E-mail: dns@astro.princeton.edu

    2013-12-20

    We consider the cross-correlation between free electrons and neutral hydrogen during the epoch of reionization (EoR). The free electrons are traced by the optical depth to reionization τ, while the neutral hydrogen can be observed through 21 cm photon emission. As expected, this correlation is sensitive to the detailed physics of reionization. Foremost, if reionization occurs through the merger of relatively large halos hosting an ionizing source, the free electrons and neutral hydrogen are anticorrelated for most of the reionization history. A positive contribution to the correlation can occur when the halos that can form an ionizing source are small. A measurement of this sign change in the cross-correlation could help disentangle the bias and the ionization history. We estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of the cross-correlation using the estimator for inhomogeneous reionization τ-hat {sub ℓm} proposed by Dvorkin and Smith. We find that with upcoming radio interferometers and cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments, the cross-correlation is measurable going up to multipoles ℓ ∼ 1000. We also derive parameter constraints and conclude that, despite the foregrounds, the cross-correlation provides a complementary measurement of the EoR parameters to the 21 cm and CMB polarization autocorrelations expected to be observed in the coming decade.

  7. Identifying Ionized Regions in Noisy Redshifted 21 cm Data Sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matthew; Lidz, Adam

    2013-04-01

    One of the most promising approaches for studying reionization is to use the redshifted 21 cm line. Early generations of redshifted 21 cm surveys will not, however, have the sensitivity to make detailed maps of the reionization process, and will instead focus on statistical measurements. Here, we show that it may nonetheless be possible to directly identify ionized regions in upcoming data sets by applying suitable filters to the noisy data. The locations of prominent minima in the filtered data correspond well with the positions of ionized regions. In particular, we corrupt semi-numeric simulations of the redshifted 21 cm signal during reionization with thermal noise at the level expected for a 500 antenna tile version of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), and mimic the degrading effects of foreground cleaning. Using a matched filter technique, we find that the MWA should be able to directly identify ionized regions despite the large thermal noise. In a plausible fiducial model in which ~20% of the volume of the universe is neutral at z ~ 7, we find that a 500-tile MWA may directly identify as many as ~150 ionized regions in a 6 MHz portion of its survey volume and roughly determine the size of each of these regions. This may, in turn, allow interesting multi-wavelength follow-up observations, comparing galaxy properties inside and outside of ionized regions. We discuss how the optimal configuration of radio antenna tiles for detecting ionized regions with a matched filter technique differs from the optimal design for measuring power spectra. These considerations have potentially important implications for the design of future redshifted 21 cm surveys.

  8. Exploring 21cm-Lyman Alpha Emitter Synergies for SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Anne; Dayal, Pratika; Müller, Volker; Trott, Cathryn M.

    2017-02-01

    We study the signatures of reionization and ionizing properties of early galaxies in the cross-correlations between the 21 cm emission from the spin-flip transition of neutral hydrogen (H i) and the underlying galaxy population. In particular, we focus on a sub-population of galaxies visible as Lyα Emitters (LAEs). With both observables simultaneously derived from a z≃ 6.6 hydrodynamical simulation (GADGET-2) snapshot post-processed with a radiative transfer code (pCRASH) and a dust model, we perform a parameter study and aim to constrain both the average intergalactic medium (IGM) ionization state (1-< {χ }{{H}{{I}}}> ) and the reionization topology (outside-in versus inside-out). We find that, in our model, LAEs occupy the densest and most-ionized regions resulting in a very strong anti-correlation between the LAEs and the 21 cm emission. A 1000 hr Square Kilometer Array (SKA)-LOW1—Subaru Hyper Suprime-Cam experiment can provide constraints on < {χ }{{H}{{I}}}> , allowing us to distinguish between IGM ionization levels of 50%, 25%, 10%, and fully ionized at scales r≲ 10 comoving Mpc (assuming foreground avoidance for SKA). Our results support the inside-out reionization scenario where the densest knots (under-dense voids) are ionized first (last) for < {χ }{{H}{{I}}}> ≳ 0.1. Further, 1000 hr SKA-LOW1 observations should be able to confirm the inside-out scenario by detecting a lower 21 cm brightness temperature (by about 2–10 mK) in the densest regions (≳2 arcmin scales) hosting LAEs, compared to lower-density regions devoid of them.

  9. A Low-cost 21 cm Horn-antenna Radio Telescope for Education and Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Nimesh A.; Patel, Rishi N; Kimberk, Robert S; Test, John H; Krolewski, Alex; Ryan, James; Karkare, Kirit S; Kovac, John M; Dame, Thomas M.

    2014-06-01

    Small radio telescopes (1-3m) for observations of the 21 cm hydrogen line are widely used for education and outreach. A pyramidal horn was used by Ewen & Purcell (1951) to first detect the 21cm line at Harvard. Such a horn is simple to design and build, compared to a parabolic antenna which is usually purchased ready-made. Here we present a design of a horn antenna radio telescope that can be built entirely by students, using simple components costing less than $300. The horn has an aperture of 75 cm along the H-plane, 59 cm along the E-plane, and gain of about 20 dB. The receiver system consists of low noise amplifiers, band-pass filters and a software-defined-radio USB receiver that provides digitized samples for spectral processing in a computer. Starting from construction of the horn antenna, and ending with the measurement of the Galactic rotation curve, took about 6 weeks, as part of an undergraduate course at Harvard University. The project can also grow towards building a two-element interferometer for follow-up studies.

  10. Cosmological signatures of tilted isocurvature perturbations: reionization and 21cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Sugiyama, Naoshi; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Silk, Joseph E-mail: hiroyuki.tashiro@asu.edu E-mail: naoshi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-03-01

    We investigate cosmological signatures of uncorrelated isocurvature perturbations whose power spectrum is blue-tilted with spectral index 2∼21cm line fluctuations due to neutral hydrogens in minihalos. Combination of measurements of the reionization optical depth and 21cm line fluctuations will provide complementary probes of a highly blue-tilted isocurvature power spectrum.

  11. High redshift signatures in the 21 cm forest due to cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Silk, Joseph E-mail: toyokazu.sekiguchi@nagoya-u.jp

    2014-01-01

    Cosmic strings induce minihalo formation in the early universe. The resultant minihalos cluster in string wakes and create a ''21 cm forest'' against the cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum. Such a 21 cm forest can contribute to angular fluctuations of redshifted 21 cm signals integrated along the line of sight. We calculate the root-mean-square amplitude of the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings and show that these fluctuations can dominate signals from minihalos due to primordial density fluctuations at high redshift (z∼>10), even if the string tension is below the current upper bound, Gμ < 1.5 × 10{sup −7}. Our results also predict that the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) can potentially detect the 21 cm fluctuations due to strings with Gμ ≈ 7.5 × 10{sup −8} for the single frequency band case and 4.0 × 10{sup −8} for the multi-frequency band case.

  12. The Murchison Widefield Array 21 cm Power Spectrum Analysis Methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Hazelton, B. J.; Trott, C. M.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Pindor, B.; Sullivan, I. S.; Pober, J. C.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, HS; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Thyagarajan, N.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-07-01

    We present the 21 cm power spectrum analysis approach of the Murchison Widefield Array Epoch of Reionization project. In this paper, we compare the outputs of multiple pipelines for the purpose of validating statistical limits cosmological hydrogen at redshifts between 6 and 12. Multiple independent data calibration and reduction pipelines are used to make power spectrum limits on a fiducial night of data. Comparing the outputs of imaging and power spectrum stages highlights differences in calibration, foreground subtraction, and power spectrum calculation. The power spectra found using these different methods span a space defined by the various tradeoffs between speed, accuracy, and systematic control. Lessons learned from comparing the pipelines range from the algorithmic to the prosaically mundane; all demonstrate the many pitfalls of neglecting reproducibility. We briefly discuss the way these different methods attempt to handle the question of evaluating a significant detection in the presence of foregrounds.

  13. FOREGROUND MODEL AND ANTENNA CALIBRATION ERRORS IN THE MEASUREMENT OF THE SKY-AVERAGED λ21 cm SIGNAL AT z∼ 20

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardi, G.; McQuinn, M.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2015-01-20

    The most promising near-term observable of the cosmic dark age prior to widespread reionization (z ∼ 15-200) is the sky-averaged λ21 cm background arising from hydrogen in the intergalactic medium. Though an individual antenna could in principle detect the line signature, data analysis must separate foregrounds that are orders of magnitude brighter than the λ21 cm background (but that are anticipated to vary monotonically and gradually with frequency, e.g., they are considered {sup s}pectrally smooth{sup )}. Using more physically motivated models for foregrounds than in previous studies, we show that the intrinsic spectral smoothness of the foregrounds is likely not a concern, and that data analysis for an ideal antenna should be able to detect the λ21 cm signal after subtracting a ∼fifth-order polynomial in log ν. However, we find that the foreground signal is corrupted by the angular and frequency-dependent response of a real antenna. The frequency dependence complicates modeling of foregrounds commonly based on the assumption of spectral smoothness. Our calculations focus on the Large-aperture Experiment to detect the Dark Age, which combines both radiometric and interferometric measurements. We show that statistical uncertainty remaining after fitting antenna gain patterns to interferometric measurements is not anticipated to compromise extraction of the λ21 cm signal for a range of cosmological models after fitting a seventh-order polynomial to radiometric data. Our results generalize to most efforts to measure the sky-averaged spectrum.

  14. Differentiating CDM and baryon isocurvature models with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: sekiguti@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-10-01

    We discuss how one can discriminate models with cold dark matter (CDM) and baryon isocurvature fluctuations. Although current observations such as cosmic microwave background (CMB) can severely constrain the fraction of such isocurvature modes in the total density fluctuations, CMB cannot differentiate CDM and baryon ones by the shapes of their power spectra. However, the evolution of CDM and baryon density fluctuations are different for each model, thus it would be possible to discriminate those isocurvature modes by extracting information on the fluctuations of CDM/baryon itself. We discuss that observations of 21 cm fluctuations can in principle differentiate these modes and demonstrate to what extent we can distinguish them with future 21 cm surveys. We show that, when the isocurvature mode has a large blue-tilted initial spectrum, 21 cm surveys can clearly probe the difference.

  15. From Darkness to Light: Signatures of the Universe's First Galaxies in the Cosmic 21-cm Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirocha, Jordan

    Within the first billion years after the Big Bang, the intergalactic medium (IGM) underwent a remarkable transformation, from a uniform sea of cold neutral hydrogen gas to a fully ionized, metal-enriched plasma. Three milestones during this Epoch of Reionization -- the emergence of the first stars, black holes, and full-fledged galaxies -- are expected to manifest as spectral "turning points" in the sky-averaged ("global") 21-cm background. However, interpreting these measurements will be complicated by the presence of strong foregrounds and non-trivialities in the radiative transfer (RT) required to model the signal. In this thesis, I make the first attempt to build the final piece of a global 21-cm data analysis pipeline: an inference tool capable of extracting the properties of the IGM and the Universe's first galaxies from the recovered signal. Such a framework is valuable even prior to a detection of the global 21-cm signal as it enables end-to-end simulations of 21-cm observations that can be used to optimize the design of upcoming instruments, their observing strategies, and their signal extraction algorithms. En route to a complete pipeline, I found that (1) robust limits on the physical properties of the IGM, such as its temperature and ionization state, can be derived analytically from the 21-cm turning points within two-zone models for the IGM, (2) improved constraints on the IGM properties can be obtained through simultaneous fitting of the global 21-cm signal and foregrounds, though biases can emerge depending on the parameterized form of the signal one adopts, (3) a simple four-parameter galaxy formation model can be constrained in only 100 hours of integration provided a stable instrumental response over a broad frequency range (~80 MHz), and (4) frequency-dependent RT solutions in physical models for the global 21-cm signal will be required to properly interpret the 21-cm absorption minimum, as the IGM thermal history is highly sensitive to the

  16. PAPER-128 Status Update: Towards a 21cm Power Spectrum Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Carina; Jacobs, Danny; Aryeh Kohn, Saul; Parsons, Aaron; PAPER Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The Epoch of Reionization (EoR) represents an unexplored phase in cosmic history when UV photons from the first galaxies ionized the majority of the hydrogen in the intergalactic medium. The Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) is a dedicated experiment that aims to measure EoR fluctuations by mapping the red-shifted 21cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen. While PAPER-64 put the most constraining upper limits on the 21cm power spectrum to date, PAPER-128 is forecast to offer a factor of 4 increase in sensitivity, putting it in the range of plausible predicted signal levels. We present a status update of our ongoing PAPER-128 data analysis efforts, including new insights into data quality assessment, calibration, and foreground removal. As we continue our pursuit of the cosmological signal, the lessons we have learned with PAPER are an integral component for next generation 21cm experiments like the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA).

  17. The 21 cm signal and the interplay between dark matter annihilations and astrophysical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Honorez, Laura; Mena, Olga; Moliné, Ángeles; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Vincent, Aaron C.

    2016-08-01

    Future dedicated radio interferometers, including HERA and SKA, are very promising tools that aim to study the epoch of reionization and beyond via measurements of the 21 cm signal from neutral hydrogen. Dark matter (DM) annihilations into charged particles change the thermal history of the Universe and, as a consequence, affect the 21 cm signal. Accurately predicting the effect of DM strongly relies on the modeling of annihilations inside halos. In this work, we use up-to-date computations of the energy deposition rates by the products from DM annihilations, a proper treatment of the contribution from DM annihilations in halos, as well as values of the annihilation cross section allowed by the most recent cosmological measurements from the Planck satellite. Given current uncertainties on the description of the astrophysical processes driving the epochs of reionization, X-ray heating and Lyman-α pumping, we find that disentangling DM signatures from purely astrophysical effects, related to early-time star formation processes or late-time galaxy X-ray emissions, will be a challenging task. We conclude that only annihilations of DM particles with masses of ~100 MeV, could leave an unambiguous imprint on the 21 cm signal and, in particular, on the 21 cm power spectrum. This is in contrast to previous, more optimistic results in the literature, which have claimed that strong signatures might also be present even for much higher DM masses. Additional measurements of the 21 cm signal at different cosmic epochs will be crucial in order to break the strong parameter degeneracies between DM annihilations and astrophysical effects and undoubtedly single out a DM imprint for masses different from ~100 MeV.

  18. Cross-correlating 21cm intensity maps with Lyman Break Galaxies in the post-reionization era

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Alonso, David; Datta, Kanan K.; Santos, Mário G. E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it E-mail: kanan@ncra.tifr.res.in E-mail: mgrsantos@uwc.ac.za

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the cross-correlation between the spatial distribution of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) and the 21cm intensity mapping signal at z∼[3–5]. At these redshifts, galactic feedback is supposed to only marginally affect the matter power spectrum, and the neutral hydrogen distribution is independently constrained by quasar spectra. Using a high resolution N-body simulation, populated with neutral hydrogen a posteriori, we forecast for the expected LBG-21cm cross-spectrum and its error for a 21cm field observed by the Square Kilometre Array (SKA1-LOW and SKA1-MID), combined with a spectroscopic LBG survey with the same volume. The cross power can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) up to ∼10 times higher (and down to ∼ 4 times smaller scales) than the 21cm auto-spectrum for this set-up, with the SNR depending only very weakly on redshift and the LBG population. We also show that while both the 21cm auto- and LBG-21cm cross-spectra can be reliably recovered after the cleaning of smooth-spectrum foreground contamination, only the cross-power is robust to problematic non-smooth foregrounds like polarized synchrotron emission.

  19. Cross-correlating 21cm intensity maps with Lyman Break Galaxies in the post-reionization era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Alonso, David; Datta, Kanan K.; Bull, Philip; Santos, Mário G.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the cross-correlation between the spatial distribution of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) and the 21cm intensity mapping signal at z~[3-5]. At these redshifts, galactic feedback is supposed to only marginally affect the matter power spectrum, and the neutral hydrogen distribution is independently constrained by quasar spectra. Using a high resolution N-body simulation, populated with neutral hydrogen a posteriori, we forecast for the expected LBG-21cm cross-spectrum and its error for a 21cm field observed by the Square Kilometre Array (SKA1-LOW and SKA1-MID), combined with a spectroscopic LBG survey with the same volume. The cross power can be detected with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) up to ~10 times higher (and down to ~ 4 times smaller scales) than the 21cm auto-spectrum for this set-up, with the SNR depending only very weakly on redshift and the LBG population. We also show that while both the 21cm auto- and LBG-21cm cross-spectra can be reliably recovered after the cleaning of smooth-spectrum foreground contamination, only the cross-power is robust to problematic non-smooth foregrounds like polarized synchrotron emission.

  20. Lensing of 21-cm fluctuations by primordial gravitational waves.

    PubMed

    Book, Laura; Kamionkowski, Marc; Schmidt, Fabian

    2012-05-25

    Weak-gravitational-lensing distortions to the intensity pattern of 21-cm radiation from the dark ages can be decomposed geometrically into curl and curl-free components. Lensing by primordial gravitational waves induces a curl component, while the contribution from lensing by density fluctuations is strongly suppressed. Angular fluctuations in the 21-cm background extend to very small angular scales, and measurements at different frequencies probe different shells in redshift space. There is thus a huge trove of information with which to reconstruct the curl component of the lensing field, allowing tensor-to-scalar ratios conceivably as small as r~10(-9)-far smaller than those currently accessible-to be probed.

  1. Bayesian constraints on the global 21-cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, G.; Zwart, J. T. L.; Price, D.; Greenhill, L. J.; Mesinger, A.; Dowell, J.; Eftekhari, T.; Ellingson, S. W.; Kocz, J.; Schinzel, F.

    2016-09-01

    The birth of the first luminous sources and the ensuing epoch of reionization are best studied via the redshifted 21-cm emission line, the signature of the first two imprinting the last. In this work, we present a fully Bayesian method, HIBAYES, for extracting the faint, global (sky-averaged) 21-cm signal from the much brighter foreground emission. We show that a simplified (but plausible) Gaussian model of the 21-cm emission from the Cosmic Dawn epoch (15 ≲ z ≲ 30), parametrized by an amplitude A_{H I}, a frequency peak ν _{H I} and a width σ _{H I}, can be extracted even in the presence of a structured foreground frequency spectrum (parametrized as a seventh-order polynomial), provided sufficient signal-to-noise (400 h of observation with a single dipole). We apply our method to an early, 19-min-long observation from the Large aperture Experiment to detect the Dark Ages, constraining the 21-cm signal amplitude and width to be -890 < A_{H I} < 0 mK and σ _{H I} > 6.5 MHz (corresponding to Δz > 1.9 at redshift z ≃ 20) respectively at the 95-per cent confidence level in the range 13.2 < z < 27.4 (100 > ν > 50 MHz).

  2. The future of primordial features with 21 cm tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xingang; Meerburg, P. Daniel; Münchmeyer, Moritz

    2016-09-01

    Detecting a deviation from a featureless primordial power spectrum of fluctuations would give profound insight into the physics of the primordial Universe. Depending on their nature, primordial features can either provide direct evidence for the inflation scenario or pin down details of the inflation model. Thus far, using the cosmic microwave background (CMB) we have only been able to put stringent constraints on the amplitude of features, but no significant evidence has been found for such signals. Here we explore the limit of the experimental reach in constraining such features using 21 cm tomography at high redshift. A measurement of the 21 cm power spectrum from the Dark Ages is generally considered as the ideal experiment for early Universe physics, with potentially access to a large number of modes. We consider three different categories of theoretically motivated models: the sharp feature models, resonance models, and standard clock models. We study the improvements on bounds on features as a function of the total number of observed modes and identify parameter degeneracies. The detectability depends critically on the amplitude, frequency and scale-location of the features, as well as the angular and redshift resolution of the experiment. We quantify these effects by considering different fiducial models. Our forecast shows that a cosmic variance limited 21 cm experiment measuring fluctuations in the redshift range 30 <= z <= 100 with a 0.01-MHz bandwidth and sub-arcminute angular resolution could potentially improve bounds by several orders of magnitude for most features compared to current Planck bounds. At the same time, 21 cm tomography also opens up a unique window into features that are located on very small scales.

  3. Incidence of H I 21-cm absorption in strong Fe II systems at 0.5 < z < 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R.; Srianand, R.; Gupta, N.; Joshi, R.; Petitjean, P.; Noterdaeme, P.; Ge, J.; Krogager, J.-K.

    2017-03-01

    We present the results from our search for H I 21-cm absorption in a sample of 16 strong Fe II systems [Wr(Mg II λ2796) ≥ 1.0 Å and Wr(Fe II λ2600) or W_{Fe II} ≥ 1 Å] at 0.5 < z < 1.5 using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Green Bank Telescope. We report six new H I 21-cm absorption detections from our sample, which have increased the known number of detections in strong Mg II systems at this redshift range by ∼50 per cent. Combining our measurements with those in the literature, we find that the detection rate of H I 21-cm absorption increases with W_{Fe II}, being four times higher in systems with W_{Fe II} ≥ 1 Å compared to systems with W_{Fe II} < 1 Å. The N(H I) associated with the H I 21-cm absorbers would be ≥2 × 1020 cm-2, assuming a spin temperature of ∼500 K (based on H I 21-cm absorption measurements of damped Lyman α systems at this redshift range) and unit covering factor. We find that H I 21-cm absorption arises on an average in systems with stronger metal absorption. We also find that quasars with H I 21-cm absorption detected towards them have systematically higher E(B - V) values than those which do not. Further, by comparing the velocity widths of H I 21-cm absorption lines detected in absorption- and galaxy-selected samples, we find that they show an increasing trend (significant at 3.8σ) with redshift at z < 3.5, which could imply that the absorption originates from more massive galaxy haloes at high z. Increasing the number of H I 21-cm absorption detections at these redshifts is important to confirm various trends noted here with higher statistical significance.

  4. Constraining the population of radio-loud active galactic nuclei at high redshift with the power spectrum of the 21 cm Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Dillon, Joshua S.; Mesinger, Andrei; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.

    2014-06-01

    The 21 cm forest, the absorption by the intergalactic medium (IGM) towards a high redshift radio-loud source, is a probe of the thermal state of the IGM. To date, the literature has focused on line-of-sight spectral studies of a single quasar known to have a large redshift. We instead examine many sources in a wide field of view, and show that the imprint from the 21 cm forest absorption of these sources is detectible in the power spectrum. The properties of the power spectrum can reveal information on the population of the earliest radio loud sources that may have existed during the pre-reionization epoch at z>10.Using semi-numerical simulations of the IGM and a semi-empirical source population, we show that the 21 cm forest dominates, in a distinctive region of Fourier space, the brightness temperature power spectrum that many contemporary experiments aim to measure. In particular, the forest dominates the diffuse emission on smaller spatial scales along the line of sight. Exploiting this separation, one may constrain the IGM thermal history, such as heating by the first X-ray sources, on large spatial scales and the absorption of radio loud active galactic nuclei on small ones.Using realistic simulations of noise and foregrounds, we show that planned instruments on the scale of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) with a collecting area of one tenth of a square kilometer can detect the 21cm forest in this small spatial scale region with high signal to noise. We develop an analytic toy model for the signal and explore its detectability over a large range of thermal histories and potential high redshift source scenarios.

  5. Cosmic reionization on computers. Mean and fluctuating redshifted 21 CM signal

    DOE PAGES

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-06-20

    We explore the mean and fluctuating redshifted 21 cm signal in numerical simulations from the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project. We find that the mean signal varies between about ±25 mK. Most significantly, we find that the negative pre-reionization dip at z ~ 10–15 only extends tomore » $$\\langle {\\rm{\\Delta }}{T}_{B}\\rangle \\sim -25\\,{\\rm{mK}}$$, requiring substantially higher sensitivity from global signal experiments that operate in this redshift range (EDGES-II, LEDA, SCI-HI, and DARE) than has often been assumed previously. We also explore the role of dense substructure (filaments and embedded galaxies) in the formation of the 21 cm power spectrum. We find that by neglecting the semi-neutral substructure inside ionized bubbles, the power spectrum can be misestimated by 25%–50% at scales k ~ 0.1–1h Mpc–1. Furthermore, this scale range is of particular interest, because the upcoming 21 cm experiments (Murchison Widefield Array, Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization, Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array) are expected to be most sensitive within it.« less

  6. Z > 6 Galaxy Signatures in the Infrared Background and the 21-cm background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, A.

    2006-08-01

    We will discuss the signatures of the high-redshift galaxy formation in the near-infrared background. Ionizing sources at high redshift generically imprint a distinctive Lyman-cutoff feature and a unique spatial anisotropy signature to the IRB, both of which may be detectable in a short rocket flight. We will discuss the Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER), a rocket-borne instrument to probe the absolute spectrum and spatial anisotropy of the extragalactic InfraRed Background (IRB) optimized for detection of the integrated spatial anisotropies in the IR background from high-redshift galaxies. We will also discuss the signatures of first galaxies in the low radio frequency 21-cm background from the neutral Hydrogen distribution at z > 6; When combined with arcminute-scale temperature anisotropy and the polarization of the cosmic microwave background, the 21-cm background will allow a determination of inhomogeneous distribution of Lyman-alpha photons from first galaxies. We will discuss these and other possibilities to understand the first galaxy population with IR, 21-cm, and CMB backgrounds.

  7. Cosmic reionization on computers. Mean and fluctuating redshifted 21 CM signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kaurov, Alexander A.; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2016-06-20

    We explore the mean and fluctuating redshifted 21 cm signal in numerical simulations from the Cosmic Reionization On Computers project. We find that the mean signal varies between about ±25 mK. Most significantly, we find that the negative pre-reionization dip at z ~ 10–15 only extends to $\\langle {\\rm{\\Delta }}{T}_{B}\\rangle \\sim -25\\,{\\rm{mK}}$, requiring substantially higher sensitivity from global signal experiments that operate in this redshift range (EDGES-II, LEDA, SCI-HI, and DARE) than has often been assumed previously. We also explore the role of dense substructure (filaments and embedded galaxies) in the formation of the 21 cm power spectrum. We find that by neglecting the semi-neutral substructure inside ionized bubbles, the power spectrum can be misestimated by 25%–50% at scales k ~ 0.1–1h Mpc–1. Furthermore, this scale range is of particular interest, because the upcoming 21 cm experiments (Murchison Widefield Array, Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization, Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array) are expected to be most sensitive within it.

  8. Measuring the Cosmological 21 cm Monopole with an Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presley, Morgan E.; Liu, Adrian; Parsons, Aaron R.

    2015-08-01

    A measurement of the cosmological 21 {cm} signal remains a promising but as-of-yet unattained ambition of radio astronomy. A positive detection would provide direct observations of key unexplored epochs of our cosmic history, including the cosmic dark ages and reionization. In this paper, we concentrate on measurements of the spatial monopole of the 21 {cm} brightness temperature as a function of redshift (the “global signal”). Most global experiments to date have been single-element experiments. In this paper, we show how an interferometer can be designed to be sensitive to the monopole mode of the sky, thus providing an alternate approach to accessing the global signature. We provide simple rules of thumb for designing a global signal interferometer and use numerical simulations to show that a modest array of tightly packed antenna elements with moderately sized primary beams (FWHM of ∼ 40^\\circ ) can compete with typical single-element experiments in their ability to constrain phenomenological parameters pertaining to reionization and the pre-reionization era. We also provide a general data analysis framework for extracting the global signal from interferometric measurements (with analysis of single-element experiments arising as a special case) and discuss trade-offs with various data analysis choices. Given that interferometric measurements are able to avoid a number of systematics inherent in single-element experiments, our results suggest that interferometry ought to be explored as a complementary way to probe the global signal.

  9. Modelling the 21-cm Signal from the Epoch of Reionization and Cosmic Dawn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, T. Roy; Datta, Kanan; Majumdar, Suman; Ghara, Raghunath; Paranjape, Aseem; Mondal, Rajesh; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Samui, Saumyadip

    2016-12-01

    Studying the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization through the redshifted 21-cm line are among the major science goals of the SKA1. Their significance lies in the fact that they are closely related to the very first stars in the Universe. Interpreting the upcoming data would require detailed modelling of the relevant physical processes. In this article, we focus on the theoretical models of reionization that have been worked out by various groups working in India with the upcoming SKA in mind. These models include purely analytical and semi-numerical calculations as well as fully numerical radiative transfer simulations. The predictions of the 21-cm signal from these models would be useful in constraining the properties of the early galaxies using the SKA data.

  10. Simulating the z = 3.35 HI 21-cm Visibility Signal for the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Suman; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Marthi, Visweshwar Ram

    2017-03-01

    The upcoming Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA) will operate at 326.5 MHz which corresponds to the redshifted 21-cm signal from neutral hydrogen (HI) at z = 3.35. We present two different prescriptions to simulate this signal and calculate the visibilities expected in radio-interferometric observations with OWFA. In the first method we use an input model for the expected 21-cm power spectrum to directly simulate different random realizations of the brightness temperature fluctuations and calculate the visibilities. This method, which models the HI signal entirely as a diffuse radiation, is completely oblivious to the discrete nature of the astrophysical sources which host the HI. While each discrete source subtends an angle that is much smaller than the angular resolution of OWFA, the velocity structure of the HI inside the individual sources is well within the reach of OWFA's frequency resolution and this is expected to have an impact on the observed HI signal. The second prescription is based on cosmological N-body simulations. Here we identify each simulation particle with a source that hosts the HI, and we have the freedom to implement any desired line profile for the HI emission from the individual sources. Implementing a simple model for the line profile, we have generated several random realizations of the complex visibilities. Correlations between the visibilities measured at different baselines and channels provides an unique method to quantify the statistical properties of the HI signal. We have used this to quantify the results of our simulations, and explore the relation between the expected visibility correlations and the underlying HI power spectrum.

  11. Models of the cosmological 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization calibrated with Ly α and CMB data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Girish; Choudhury, Tirthankar Roy; Puchwein, Ewald; Haehnelt, Martin G.

    2016-12-01

    We present here 21 cm predictions from high dynamic range simulations for a range of reionization histories that have been tested against available Ly α and cosmic microwave background (CMB) data. We assess the observability of the predicted spatial 21 cm fluctuations by ongoing and upcoming experiments in the late stages of reionization in the limit in which the hydrogen spin temperature is significantly larger than the CMB temperature. Models consistent with the available Ly α data and CMB measurement of the Thomson optical depth predict typical values of 10-20 mK2 for the variance of the 21 cm brightness temperature at redshifts z = 7-10 at scales accessible to ongoing and upcoming experiments (k ≲ 1 cMpc-1h). This is within a factor of a few magnitude of the sensitivity claimed to have been already reached by ongoing experiments in the signal rms value. Our different models for the reionization history make markedly different predictions for the redshift evolution and thus frequency dependence of the 21 cm power spectrum and should be easily discernible by Low-Frequency Array (and later Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and Square Kilometre Array1) at their design sensitivity. Our simulations have sufficient resolution to assess the effect of high-density Lyman limit systems that can self-shield against ionizing radiation and stay 21 cm bright even if the hydrogen in their surroundings is highly ionized. Our simulations predict that including the effect of the self-shielded gas in highly ionized regions reduces the large-scale 21 cm power by about 30 per cent.

  12. Smith's Cloud (HVC) in 21 cm HI emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heroux, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    In studying the continuing formation of the Milky Way, we have used the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of the NRAO to measure the 21 cm HI emission from a specific high velocity cloud known as “Smith’s Cloud”. This cloud is likely within the bounds of the galaxy and appears to be actively plunging into the disk. Our map covers an area about 10x14 degrees, with data taken every 3’ over this range. Most of the emission is concentrated into a single large structure with an unusual cometary morphology, which displays signs of interaction between the cloud and the Galactic halo. We will present an analysis of the cloud, along with information on possible FIR emission with information gained from the IRAS data, kinematics and likely orbits and paths for the origin and future of the cloud. This research was funded through an NSF REU Grant.

  13. Cosmic (Super)String Constraints from 21 cm Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2008-03-07

    We calculate the contribution of cosmic strings arising from a phase transition in the early Universe, or cosmic superstrings arising from brane inflation, to the cosmic 21 cm power spectrum at redshifts z{>=}30. Future experiments can exploit this effect to constrain the cosmic string tension G{mu} and probe virtually the entire brane inflation model space allowed by current observations. Although current experiments with a collecting area of {approx}1 km{sup 2} will not provide any useful constraints, future experiments with a collecting area of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} km{sup 2} covering the cleanest 10% of the sky can, in principle, constrain cosmic strings with tension G{mu} > or approx. 10{sup -10}-10{sup -12} (superstring/phase transition mass scale >10{sup 13} GeV)

  14. Signatures of modified gravity on the 21 cm power spectrum at reionisation

    SciTech Connect

    Brax, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Scalar modifications of gravity have an impact on the growth of structure. Baryon and Cold Dark Matter (CDM) perturbations grow anomalously for scales within the Compton wavelength of the scalar field. In the late time Universe when reionisation occurs, the spectrum of the 21 cm brightness temperature is thus affected. We study this effect for chameleon-f(R) models, dilatons and symmetrons. Although the f(R) models are more tightly constrained by solar system bounds, and effects on dilaton models are negligible, we find that symmetrons where the phase transition occurs before z{sub *} ∼ 12 could be detectable for a scalar field range as low as 5kpc. For all these models, the detection prospects of modified gravity effects are higher when considering modes parallel to the line of sight where very small scales can be probed. The study of the 21 cm spectrum thus offers a complementary approach to testing modified gravity with large scale structure surveys. Short scales, which would be highly non-linear in the very late time Universe when structure forms and where modified gravity effects are screened, appear in the linear spectrum of 21 cm physics, hence deviating from General Relativity in a maximal way.

  15. EXPLORING THE COSMIC REIONIZATION EPOCH IN FREQUENCY SPACE: AN IMPROVED APPROACH TO REMOVE THE FOREGROUND IN 21 cm TOMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingying; Xu, Haiguang; Guo, Xueying; Li, Weitian; Liu, Chengze; An, Tao; Wang, Yu; Gu, Junhua; Martineau-Huynh, Olivier; Wu, Xiang-Ping E-mail: zishi@sjtu.edu.cn

    2013-02-15

    With the intent of correctly restoring the redshifted 21 cm signals emitted by neutral hydrogen during the cosmic reionization processes, we re-examine the separation approaches based on the quadratic polynomial fitting technique in frequency space in order to investigate whether they work satisfactorily with complex foreground by quantitatively evaluating the quality of restored 21 cm signals in terms of sample statistics. We construct the foreground model to characterize both spatial and spectral substructures of the real sky, and use it to simulate the observed radio spectra. By comparing between different separation approaches through statistical analysis of restored 21 cm spectra and corresponding power spectra, as well as their constraints on the mean halo bias b and average ionization fraction x{sub e} of the reionization processes, at z = 8 and the noise level of 60 mK we find that although the complex foreground can be well approximated with quadratic polynomial expansion, a significant part of the Mpc-scale components of the 21 cm signals (75% for {approx}> 6 h {sup -1} Mpc scales and 34% for {approx}> 1 h {sup -1} Mpc scales) is lost because it tends to be misidentified as part of the foreground when the single-narrow-segment separation approach is applied. The best restoration of the 21 cm signals and the tightest determination of b and x{sub e} can be obtained with the three-narrow-segment fitting technique as proposed in this paper. Similar results can be obtained at other redshifts.

  16. Foregrounds in Wide-field Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd D.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P.; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-05-01

    Detection of 21 cm emission of H i from the epoch of reionization, at redshifts z\\gt 6, is limited primarily by foreground emission. We investigate the signatures of wide-field measurements and an all-sky foreground model using the delay spectrum technique that maps the measurements to foreground object locations through signal delays between antenna pairs. We demonstrate interferometric measurements are inherently sensitive to all scales, including the largest angular scales, owing to the nature of wide-field measurements. These wide-field effects are generic to all observations but antenna shapes impact their amplitudes substantially. A dish-shaped antenna yields the most desirable features from a foreground contamination viewpoint, relative to a dipole or a phased array. Comparing data from recent Murchison Widefield Array observations, we demonstrate that the foreground signatures that have the largest impact on the H i signal arise from power received far away from the primary field of view. We identify diffuse emission near the horizon as a significant contributing factor, even on wide antenna spacings that usually represent structures on small scales. For signals entering through the primary field of view, compact emission dominates the foreground contamination. These two mechanisms imprint a characteristic pitchfork signature on the “foreground wedge” in Fourier delay space. Based on these results, we propose that selective down-weighting of data based on antenna spacing and time can mitigate foreground contamination substantially by a factor of ∼100 with negligible loss of sensitivity.

  17. Warm dark matter signatures on the 21cm power spectrum: intensity mapping forecasts for SKA

    SciTech Connect

    Carucci, Isabella P.; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Lapi, Andrea E-mail: villaescusa@oats.inaf.it E-mail: lapi@sissa.it

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the impact that warm dark matter (WDM) has in terms of 21 cm intensity mapping in the post-reionization Universe at z=3−5. We perform hydrodynamic simulations for 5 different models: cold dark matter and WDM with 1,2,3,4 keV (thermal relic) mass and assign the neutral hydrogen a-posteriori using two different methods that both reproduce observations in terms of column density distribution function of neutral hydrogen systems. Contrary to naive expectations, the suppression of power present in the linear and non-linear matter power spectra, results in an increase of power in terms of neutral hydrogen and 21 cm power spectra. This is due to the fact that there is a lack of small mass halos in WDM models with respect to cold dark matter: in order to distribute a total amount of neutral hydrogen within the two cosmological models, a larger quantity has to be placed in the most massive halos, that are more biased compared to the cold dark matter cosmology. We quantify this effect and address significance for the telescope SKA1-LOW, including a realistic noise modeling. The results indicate that we will be able to rule out a 4 keV WDM model with 5000 hours of observations at z>3, with a statistical significance of >3 σ, while a smaller mass of 3 keV, comparable to present day constraints, can be ruled out at more than 2 σ confidence level with 1000 hours of observations at z>5.

  18. Warm dark matter signatures on the 21cm power spectrum: intensity mapping forecasts for SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carucci, Isabella P.; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Lapi, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the impact that warm dark matter (WDM) has in terms of 21 cm intensity mapping in the post-reionization Universe at z=3-5. We perform hydrodynamic simulations for 5 different models: cold dark matter and WDM with 1,2,3,4 keV (thermal relic) mass and assign the neutral hydrogen a-posteriori using two different methods that both reproduce observations in terms of column density distribution function of neutral hydrogen systems. Contrary to naive expectations, the suppression of power present in the linear and non-linear matter power spectra, results in an increase of power in terms of neutral hydrogen and 21 cm power spectra. This is due to the fact that there is a lack of small mass halos in WDM models with respect to cold dark matter: in order to distribute a total amount of neutral hydrogen within the two cosmological models, a larger quantity has to be placed in the most massive halos, that are more biased compared to the cold dark matter cosmology. We quantify this effect and address significance for the telescope SKA1-LOW, including a realistic noise modeling. The results indicate that we will be able to rule out a 4 keV WDM model with 5000 hours of observations at z>3, with a statistical significance of >3 σ, while a smaller mass of 3 keV, comparable to present day constraints, can be ruled out at more than 2 σ confidence level with 1000 hours of observations at z>5.

  19. Extracting Physical Parameters for the First Galaxies from the Cosmic Dawn Global 21-cm Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Mirocha, Jordan; harker, geraint; Tauscher, Keith; Datta, Abhirup

    2016-01-01

    The all-sky or global redshifted 21-cm HI signal is a potentially powerful probe of the first luminous objects and their environs during the transition from the Dark Ages to Cosmic Dawn (35 > z > 6). The first stars, black holes, and galaxies heat and ionize the surrounding intergalactic medium, composed mainly of neutral hydrogen, so the hyperfine 21-cm transition can be used to indirectly study these early radiation sources. The properties of these objects can be examined via the broad absorption and emission features that are expected in the spectrum. The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is proposed to conduct these observations at low radio astronomy frequencies, 40-120 MHz, in a 125 km orbit about the Moon. The Moon occults both the Earth and the Sun as DARE makes observations above the lunar farside, thus eliminating the corrupting effects from Earth's ionosphere, radio frequency interference, and solar nanoflares. The signal is extracted from the galactic/extragalactic foreground employing Bayesian methods, including Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Theory indicates that the 21-cm signal is well described by a model in which the evolution of various physical quantities follows a hyperbolic tangent (tanh) function of redshift. We show that this approach accurately captures degeneracies and covariances between parameters, including those related to the signal, foreground, and the instrument. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that MCMC fits will set meaningful constraints on the Ly-α, ionizing, and X-ray backgrounds along with the minimum virial temperature of the first star-forming halos.

  20. The Evolution Of 21 cm Structure (EOS): public, large-scale simulations of Cosmic Dawn and reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesinger, Andrei; Greig, Bradley; Sobacchi, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the Evolution Of 21 cm Structure (EOS) project: providing periodic, public releases of the latest cosmological 21 cm simulations. 21 cm interferometry is set to revolutionize studies of the Cosmic Dawn (CD) and Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Progress will depend on sophisticated data analysis pipelines, initially tested on large-scale mock observations. Here we present the 2016 EOS release: 10243, 1.6 Gpc, 21 cm simulations of the CD and EoR, calibrated to the Planck 2015 measurements. We include calibrated, sub-grid prescriptions for inhomogeneous recombinations and photoheating suppression of star formation in small-mass galaxies. Leaving the efficiency of supernovae feedback as a free parameter, we present two runs which bracket the contribution from faint unseen galaxies. From these two extremes, we predict that the duration of reionization (defined as a change in the mean neutral fraction from 0.9 to 0.1) should be between 2.7 ≲ Δzre ≲ 5.7. The large-scale 21 cm power during the advanced EoR stages can be different by up to a factor of ˜10, depending on the model. This difference has a comparable contribution from (i) the typical bias of sources and (ii) a more efficient negative feedback in models with an extended EoR driven by faint galaxies. We also present detectability forecasts. With a 1000 h integration, Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and (Square Kilometre Array phase 1) SKA1 should achieve a signal-to-noise of ˜few to hundreds throughout the EoR/CD. We caution that our ability to clean foregrounds determines the relative performance of narrow/deep versus wide/shallow surveys expected with SKA1. Our 21-cm power spectra, simulation outputs and visualizations are publicly available.

  1. Signatures of clumpy dark matter in the global 21 cm background signal

    SciTech Connect

    Cumberbatch, Daniel T.; Lattanzi, Massimiliano; Silk, Joseph

    2010-11-15

    We examine the extent to which the self-annihilation of supersymmetric neutralino dark matter, as well as light dark matter, influences the rate of heating, ionization, and Lyman-{alpha} pumping of interstellar hydrogen and helium and the extent to which this is manifested in the 21 cm global background signal. We fully consider the enhancements to the annihilation rate from dark matter halos and substructures within them. We find that the influence of such structures can result in significant changes in the differential brightness temperature, {delta}T{sub b}. The changes at redshifts z<25 are likely to be undetectable due to the presence of the astrophysical signal; however, in the most favorable cases, deviations in {delta}T{sub b}, relative to its value in the absence of self-annihilating dark matter, of up to {approx_equal}20 mK at z=30 can occur. Thus we conclude that, in order to exclude these models, experiments measuring the global 21 cm signal, such as EDGES and CORE, will need to reduce the systematics at 50 MHz to below 20 mK.

  2. Method for direct measurement of cosmic acceleration by 21-cm absorption systems.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li

    2014-07-25

    So far there is only indirect evidence that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21-cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the same objects separated by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a ΛCDM universe with 5σ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing and cannot be recovered retroactively.

  3. Method for Direct Measurement of Cosmic Acceleration by 21-cm Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Zhang, Tong-Jie; Pen, Ue-Li

    2014-07-01

    So far there is only indirect evidence that the Universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21-cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the same objects separated by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a ΛCDM universe with 5σ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing and cannot be recovered retroactively.

  4. Prospects of Detecting HI using Redshifted 21-cm Radiation at z˜3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlot, Bharat Kumar; Bagla, J. S.

    2017-03-01

    Distribution of cold gas in the post-reionization era provides an important link between distribution of galaxies and the process of star formation. Redshifted 21-cm radiation from the hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen allows us to probe the neutral component of cold gas, most of which is to be found in the interstellar medium of galaxies. Existing and upcoming radio telescopes can probe the large scale distribution of neutral hydrogen via HI intensity mapping. In this paper, we use an estimate of the HI power spectrum derived using an ansatz to compute the expected signal from the large scale HI distribution at z˜3. We find that the scale dependence of bias at small scales makes a significant difference to the expected signal even at large angular scales. We compare the predicted signal strength with the sensitivity of radio telescopes that can observe such radiation and calculate the observation time required for detecting neutral hydrogen at these redshifts. We find that OWFA (Ooty Wide Field Array) offers the best possibility to detect neutral hydrogen at z˜3 before the SKA (Square Kilometer Array) becomes operational. We find that the OWFA should be able to make a 3 σ or a more significant detection in 2000 hours of observations at several angular scales. Calculations done using the Fisher matrix approach indicate that a 5 σ detection of the binned HI power spectrum via measurement of the amplitude of the HI power spectrum is possible in 1000 h (Sarkar et al. 2017).

  5. 21 cm signal from cosmic dawn - II. Imprints of the light-cone effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghara, Raghunath; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy

    2015-11-01

    Details of various unknown physical processes during the cosmic dawn and the epoch of reionization can be extracted from observations of the redshifted 21 cm signal. These observations, however, will be affected by the evolution of the signal along the line of sight which is known as the `light-cone effect'. We model this effect by post-processing a dark matter N-body simulation with an 1D radiative transfer code. We find that the effect is much stronger and dramatic in presence of inhomogeneous heating and Ly α coupling compared to the case where these processes are not accounted for. One finds increase (decrease) in the spherically averaged power spectrum up to a factor of 3 (0.6) at large scales (k ˜ 0.05 Mpc- 1) when the light-cone effect is included, though these numbers are highly dependent on the source model. The effect is particularly significant near the peak and dip-like features seen in the power spectrum. The peaks and dips are suppressed and thus the power spectrum can be smoothed out to a large extent if the width of the frequency band used in the experiment is large. We argue that it is important to account for the light-cone effect for any 21-cm signal prediction during cosmic dawn.

  6. Empirical covariance modeling for 21 cm power spectrum estimation: A method demonstration and new limits from early Murchison Widefield Array 128-tile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Neben, Abraham R.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Tegmark, Max; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Carroll, P.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hernquist, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D. C.; Kim, H. S.; Kittiwisit, P.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; McKinley, B.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Offringa, A. R.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Sethi, S.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Wyithe, S.; Bernardi, G.; Cappallo, R. J.; Deshpande, A. A.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Morgan, E.; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Srivani, K. S.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.

    2015-06-01

    The separation of the faint cosmological background signal from bright astrophysical foregrounds remains one of the most daunting challenges of mapping the high-redshift intergalactic medium with the redshifted 21 cm line of neutral hydrogen. Advances in mapping and modeling of diffuse and point source foregrounds have improved subtraction accuracy, but no subtraction scheme is perfect. Precisely quantifying the errors and error correlations due to missubtracted foregrounds allows for both the rigorous analysis of the 21 cm power spectrum and for the maximal isolation of the "EoR window" from foreground contamination. We present a method to infer the covariance of foreground residuals from the data itself in contrast to previous attempts at a priori modeling. We demonstrate our method by setting limits on the power spectrum using a 3 h integration from the 128-tile Murchison Widefield Array. Observing between 167 and 198 MHz, we find at 95% confidence a best limit of Δ2(k )<3.7 ×104 mK2 at comoving scale k =0.18 h Mpc-1 and at z =6.8 , consistent with existing limits.

  7. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  8. The cross correlation between the 21-cm radiation and the CMB lensing field: a new cosmological signal

    SciTech Connect

    Vallinotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through the 21-cm intensity mapping technique at redshift z {<=} 4 has the potential to tightly constrain the evolution of dark energy. Crucial to this experimental effort is the determination of the biasing relation connecting fluctuations in the density of neutral hydrogen (HI) with the ones of the underlying dark matter field. In this work I show how the HI bias relevant to these 21-cm intensity mapping experiments can successfully be measured by cross-correlating their signal with the lensing signal obtained from CMB observations. In particular I show that combining CMB lensing maps from Planck with 21-cm field measurements carried out with an instrument similar to the Cylindrical Radio Telescope, this cross-correlation signal can be detected with a signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of more than 5. Breaking down the signal arising from different redshift bins of thickness {Delta}z = 0.1, this signal leads to constraining the large scale neutral hydrogen bias and its evolution to 4{sigma} level.

  9. Probing Individual Sources during Reionization and Cosmic Dawn using Square Kilometre Array HI 21-cm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Kanan K.; Ghara, Raghunath; Majumdar, Suman; Choudhury, T. Roy; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Roy, Himadri; Datta, Abhirup

    2016-12-01

    Detection of individual luminous sources during the reionization epoch and cosmic dawn through their signatures in the HI 21-cm signal is one of the direct approaches to probe the epoch. Here, we summarize our previous works on this and present preliminary results on the prospects of detecting such sources using the SKA1-low experiment. We first discuss the expected HI 21-cm signal around luminous sources at different stages of reionization and cosmic dawn. We then introduce two visibility based estimators for detecting such signals: one based on the matched filtering technique and the other relies on simply combing the visibility signal from different baselines and frequency channels. We find that the SKA1-low should be able to detect ionized bubbles of radius Rb ≳ 10 Mpc with ˜100 h of observations at redshift z˜8 provided that the mean outside neutral hydrogen fraction x_{ {HI}} ≳ 0.5. We also investigate the possibility of detecting HII regions around known bright QSOs such as around ULASJ1120+0641 discovered by Mortlock et al. ( Nature 474, 7353 (2011)). We find that a 5 σ detection is possible with 600 h of SKA1-low observations if the QSO age and the outside xHI are at least ˜2×107 Myr and ˜0.2 respectively. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting the very first X-ray and Ly- α sources during the cosmic dawn. We consider mini-QSOs like sources which emits in X-ray frequency band. We find that with a total ˜ 1000 h of observations, SKA1-low should be able to detect those sources individually with a ˜ 9 σ significance at redshift z=15. We summarize how the SNR changes with various parameters related to the source properties.

  10. The Properties of Primordial Stars and Galaxies measured from the 21-cm Global Spectrum using the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Fialkov, Anastasia; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Jones, Dayton L.; Kasper, Justin; Loeb, Abraham; Mirocha, Jordan; Monsalve, Raul A.; Rapetti, David; Tauscher, Keith; Wollack, Edward

    2017-01-01

    DARE is a mission concept designed to observe the formation of primordial stars, black holes, and galaxies (z=11-35) by measuring their spectral effects on the redshifted 21-cm hydrogen line. The UV and X-ray radiation emitted by these first objects ionized and heated the intergalactic medium and imprinted characteristic features in the 21-cm spectrum. The 1.4 GHz signal is redshifted into the radio band 40-120 MHz. DARE will take advantage of the quietest RF environment in the inner solar system by using the Moon as a shield from human radio frequency interference and solar emissions via observations on the lunar farside. DARE’s science objectives are to determine: when the first stars turned on and their properties, when the first black holes began accreting and their masses, the reionization history of the early Universe, and if evidence exists for exotic physics in the Dark Ages such as Dark Matter decay. Wideband crossed-dipole antennas, pilot tone stablized radiometric receivers, a polarimeter, and a digital spectrometer constitute the science instrument. DARE’s radiometer is precisely calibrated with a featureless spectral response, controlled systematics, and heritage from CMB missions. Models for the instrument main beam and sidelobes, antenna reflection coefficient, gain variations, and calibrations will be validated with electromagnetic simulations, laboratory and anechoic chamber measurements, and verified on-orbit. The unique frequency structure of the 21-cm spectrum, its uniformity over large angular scales, and its unpolarized state are unlike the spectrally featureless, spatially-varying, polarized emission of the bright Galactic foreground, allowing the signal to be cleanly separated from the foreground. The 21-cm signal will be extracted in the presence of foregrounds using a Bayesian framework with a Markov Chain Monto Carlo (MCMC) numerical inference technique. The DARE data analysis pipeline enables efficient, simultaneous, and self

  11. Spin Changing Collisions of Hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zygelman, Bernard

    2006-01-01

    We discuss spin changing collisions of hydrogen atoms. Employing a fully quantal theory we calculate and present new collision data. We discuss the respective roles of spin exchange and long range magnetic interactions in collisonal redistribution of sub-level populations. The calculated atomic data is needed for accurate modeling of 21 cm line emission/absorption by primordial hydrogen in the early universe.

  12. Using 21 cm absorption surveys to measure the average H I spin temperature in distant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Zwaan, M. A.; Duchesne, S. W.; Curran, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    We present a statistical method for measuring the average H I spin temperature in distant galaxies using the expected detection yields from future wide-field 21 cm absorption surveys. As a demonstrative case study, we consider an all-southern-sky simulated survey of 2-h per pointing with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder for intervening H I absorbers at intermediate cosmological redshifts between z = 0.4 and 1. For example, if such a survey yielded 1000 absorbers, we would infer a harmonic-mean spin temperature of overline{T}_spin ˜ 100 K for the population of damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) at these redshifts, indicating that more than 50 per cent of the neutral gas in these systems is in a cold neutral medium (CNM). Conversely, a lower yield of only 100 detections would imply overline{T}_spin ˜ 1000 K and a CNM fraction less than 10 per cent. We propose that this method can be used to provide independent verification of the spin temperature evolution reported in recent 21 cm surveys of known DLAs at high redshift and for measuring the spin temperature at intermediate redshifts below z ≈ 1.7, where the Lyman α line is inaccessible using ground-based observatories. Increasingly more sensitive and larger surveys with the Square Kilometre Array should provide stronger statistical constraints on the average spin temperature. However, these will ultimately be limited by the accuracy to which we can determine the H I column density frequency distribution, the covering factor and the redshift distribution of the background radio source population.

  13. 21cm bispectrum as method to measure cosmic dawn and EoR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimabukuro, H.

    2016-12-01

    Cosmological 21cm signal is a promising tool to investigate the state of the Inter Galactic Medium (IGM) during cosmic dawn (CD) and Epoch of Reionization (EoR). Ongoing telescopes such as MWA,LOFAR,PAPER and future telescopes like SKA are expected to detect cosmological 21cm signal. Statistical analysis of the 21cm signal is very important to extract information of the IGM which is related to nature of galaxies and first generation stars. We expect that cosmological 21cm signal follows non-gaussian distribution because various astrophysical processes deviate the distribution from gaussian. In order to evaluate the non-gaussian features, we introduce the bispectrum of the 21cm signal and discuss the property of the 21cm bispectrum such as redshift dependence and configuration dependence. We found that the we can see correlation between large scales and small scales via the 21cm bispectrum and also found that the 21cm bispectrum can give the information of matter fluctuation, neural fraction fluctuation and spin temperature fluctuation by means of its configure dependence.

  14. PRECISE MEASUREMENT OF THE REIONIZATION OPTICAL DEPTH FROM THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL ACCOUNTING FOR COSMIC HEATING

    SciTech Connect

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham E-mail: aloeb@cfa.harvard.edu

    2016-04-10

    As a result of our limited data on reionization, the total optical depth for electron scattering, τ, limits precision measurements of cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It was recently shown that the predicted 21 cm signal of neutral hydrogen contains enough information to reconstruct τ with sub-percent accuracy, assuming that the neutral gas was much hotter than the CMB throughout the entire epoch of reionization (EoR). Here we relax this assumption and use the global 21 cm signal alone to extract τ for realistic X-ray heating scenarios. We test our model-independent approach using mock data for a wide range of ionization and heating histories and show that an accurate measurement of the reionization optical depth at a sub-percent level is possible in most of the considered scenarios even when heating is not saturated during the EoR, assuming that the foregrounds are mitigated. However, we find that in cases where heating sources had hard X-ray spectra and their luminosity was close to or lower than what is predicted based on low-redshift observations, the global 21 cm signal alone is not a good tracer of the reionization history.

  15. Precise Measurement of the Reionization Optical Depth from the Global 21 cm Signal Accounting for Cosmic Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    As a result of our limited data on reionization, the total optical depth for electron scattering, τ, limits precision measurements of cosmological parameters from the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). It was recently shown that the predicted 21 cm signal of neutral hydrogen contains enough information to reconstruct τ with sub-percent accuracy, assuming that the neutral gas was much hotter than the CMB throughout the entire epoch of reionization (EoR). Here we relax this assumption and use the global 21 cm signal alone to extract τ for realistic X-ray heating scenarios. We test our model-independent approach using mock data for a wide range of ionization and heating histories and show that an accurate measurement of the reionization optical depth at a sub-percent level is possible in most of the considered scenarios even when heating is not saturated during the EoR, assuming that the foregrounds are mitigated. However, we find that in cases where heating sources had hard X-ray spectra and their luminosity was close to or lower than what is predicted based on low-redshift observations, the global 21 cm signal alone is not a good tracer of the reionization history.

  16. LOFAR insights into the epoch of reionization from the cross-power spectrum of 21 cm emission and galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiersma, R. P. C.; Ciardi, B.; Thomas, R. M.; Harker, G. J. A.; Zaroubi, S.; Bernardi, G.; Brentjens, M.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Daiboo, S.; Jelic, V.; Kazemi, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Labropoulos, P.; Martinez, O.; Mellema, G.; Offringa, A.; Pandey, V. N.; Schaye, J.; Veligatla, V.; Vedantham, H.; Yatawatta, S.

    2013-07-01

    Using a combination of N-body simulations, semi-analytic models and radiative transfer calculations, we have estimated the theoretical cross-power spectrum between galaxies and the 21 cm emission from neutral hydrogen during the epoch of reionization. In accordance with previous studies, we find that the 21 cm emission is initially correlated with haloes on large scales (≳30 Mpc), anticorrelated on intermediate (˜5 Mpc) and uncorrelated on small (≲3 Mpc) scales. This picture quickly changes as reionization proceeds and the two fields become anticorrelated on large scales. The normalization of the cross-power spectrum can be used to set constraints on the average neutral fraction in the intergalactic medium and its shape can be a powerful tool to study the topology of reionization. When we apply a drop-out technique to select galaxies and add to the 21 cm signal the noise expected from the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) telescope, we find that while the normalization of the cross-power spectrum remains a useful tool for probing reionization, its shape becomes too noisy to be informative. On the other hand, for an Lyα Emitter (LAE) survey both the normalization and the shape of the cross-power spectrum are suitable probes of reionization. A closer look at a specific planned LAE observing program using Subaru Hyper-Suprime Cam reveals concerns about the strength of the 21 cm signal at the planned redshifts. If the ionized fraction at z ˜ 7 is lower than the one estimated here, then using the cross-power spectrum may be a useful exercise given that at higher redshifts and neutral fractions it is able to distinguish between two toy models with different topologies.

  17. Probing Reionization with the Cross-power Spectrum of 21 cm and Near-infrared Radiation Backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Xiao-Chun

    2014-08-01

    The cross-correlation between the 21 cm emission from the high-redshift intergalactic medium and the near-infrared (NIR) background light from high-redshift galaxies promises to be a powerful probe of cosmic reionization. In this paper, we investigate the cross-power spectrum during the epoch of reionization. We employ an improved halo approach to derive the distribution of the density field and consider two stellar populations in the star formation model: metal-free stars and metal-poor stars. The reionization history is further generated to be consistent with the electron-scattering optical depth from cosmic microwave background measurements. Then, the intensity of the NIR background is estimated by collecting emission from stars in first-light galaxies. On large scales, we find that the 21 cm and NIR radiation backgrounds are positively correlated during the very early stages of reionization. However, these two radiation backgrounds quickly become anti-correlated as reionization proceeds. The maximum absolute value of the cross-power spectrum is |\\Delta ^2_{21,NIR}|\\sim 10^{-4} mK nW m-2 sr-1, reached at l ~ 1000 when the mean fraction of ionized hydrogen is \\bar{x}_{i}\\sim 0.9. We find that Square Kilometer Array can measure the 21 cm-NIR cross-power spectrum in conjunction with mild extensions to the existing CIBER survey, provided that the integration time independently adds up to 1000 and 1 hr for 21 cm and NIR observations, and that the sky coverage fraction of the CIBER survey is extended from 4 × 10-4 to 0.1. Measuring the cross-correlation signal as a function of redshift provides valuable information on reionization and helps confirm the origin of the "missing" NIR background.

  18. Probing reionization with the cross-power spectrum of 21 cm and near-infrared radiation backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Xiao-Chun

    2014-08-01

    The cross-correlation between the 21 cm emission from the high-redshift intergalactic medium and the near-infrared (NIR) background light from high-redshift galaxies promises to be a powerful probe of cosmic reionization. In this paper, we investigate the cross-power spectrum during the epoch of reionization. We employ an improved halo approach to derive the distribution of the density field and consider two stellar populations in the star formation model: metal-free stars and metal-poor stars. The reionization history is further generated to be consistent with the electron-scattering optical depth from cosmic microwave background measurements. Then, the intensity of the NIR background is estimated by collecting emission from stars in first-light galaxies. On large scales, we find that the 21 cm and NIR radiation backgrounds are positively correlated during the very early stages of reionization. However, these two radiation backgrounds quickly become anti-correlated as reionization proceeds. The maximum absolute value of the cross-power spectrum is |Δ{sub 21,NIR}{sup 2}|∼10{sup −4} mK nW m{sup –2} sr{sup –1}, reached at ℓ ∼ 1000 when the mean fraction of ionized hydrogen is x-bar{sub i}∼0.9. We find that Square Kilometer Array can measure the 21 cm-NIR cross-power spectrum in conjunction with mild extensions to the existing CIBER survey, provided that the integration time independently adds up to 1000 and 1 hr for 21 cm and NIR observations, and that the sky coverage fraction of the CIBER survey is extended from 4 × 10{sup –4} to 0.1. Measuring the cross-correlation signal as a function of redshift provides valuable information on reionization and helps confirm the origin of the 'missing' NIR background.

  19. Scintillation noise power spectrum and its impact on high-redshift 21-cm observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedantham, H. K.; Koopmans, L. V. E.

    2016-05-01

    Visibility scintillation resulting from wave propagation through the turbulent ionosphere can be an important source of noise at low radio frequencies (ν ≲ 200 MHz). Many low-frequency experiments are underway to detect the power spectrum of brightness temperature fluctuations of the neutral-hydrogen 21-cm signal from the Epoch of Reionization (EoR: 12 ≳ z ≳ 7, 100 ≲ ν ≲ 175 MHz). In this paper, we derive scintillation noise power spectra in such experiments while taking into account the effects of typical data processing operations such as self-calibration and Fourier synthesis. We find that for minimally redundant arrays such as LOFAR and MWA, scintillation noise is of the same order of magnitude as thermal noise, has a spectral coherence dictated by stretching of the snapshot uv-coverage with frequency, and thus is confined to the well-known wedge-like structure in the cylindrical (two-dimensional) power spectrum space. Compact, fully redundant (dcore ≲ rF ≈ 300 m at 150 MHz) arrays such as HERA and SKA-LOW (core) will be scintillation noise dominated at all baselines, but the spatial and frequency coherence of this noise will allow it to be removed along with spectrally smooth foregrounds.

  20. MITEoR: a scalable interferometer for precision 21 cm cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, H.; Tegmark, M.; Buza, V.; Dillon, J. S.; Gharibyan, H.; Hickish, J.; Kunz, E.; Liu, A.; Losh, J.; Lutomirski, A.; Morrison, S.; Narayanan, S.; Perko, A.; Rosner, D.; Sanchez, N.; Schutz, K.; Tribiano, S. M.; Valdez, M.; Yang, H.; Adami, K. Zarb; Zelko, I.; Zheng, K.; Armstrong, R. P.; Bradley, R. F.; Dexter, M. R.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Magro, A.; Matejek, M.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Pan, Q.; Penna, R. F.; Peterson, C. M.; Su, M.; Villasenor, J.; Williams, C. L.; Zhu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    We report on the MIT Epoch of Reionization (MITEoR) experiment, a pathfinder low-frequency radio interferometer whose goal is to test technologies that improve the calibration precision and reduce the cost of the high-sensitivity 3D mapping required for 21 cm cosmology. MITEoR accomplishes this by using massive baseline redundancy, which enables both automated precision calibration and correlator cost reduction. We demonstrate and quantify the power and robustness of redundancy for scalability and precision. We find that the calibration parameters precisely describe the effect of the instrument upon our measurements, allowing us to form a model that is consistent with χ2 per degree of freedom <1.2 for as much as 80 per cent of the observations. We use these results to develop an optimal estimator of calibration parameters using Wiener filtering, and explore the question of how often and how finely in frequency visibilities must be reliably measured to solve for calibration coefficients. The success of MITEoR with its 64 dual-polarization elements bodes well for the more ambitious Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array project and other next-generation instruments, which would incorporate many identical or similar technologies.

  1. Confirmation of Wide-field Signatures in Redshifted 21 cm Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd D.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Deshpande, A. A.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hernquist, L.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tegmark, M.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2015-07-01

    We confirm our recent prediction of the “pitchfork” foreground signature in power spectra of high-redshift 21 cm measurements where the interferometer is sensitive to large-scale structure on all baselines. This is due to the inherent response of a wide-field instrument and is characterized by enhanced power from foreground emission in Fourier modes adjacent to those considered to be the most sensitive to the cosmological H i signal. In our recent paper, many signatures from the simulation that predicted this feature were validated against Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) data, but this key pitchfork signature was close to the noise level. In this paper, we improve the data sensitivity through the coherent averaging of 12 independent snapshots with identical instrument settings and provide the first confirmation of the prediction with a signal-to-noise ratio \\gt 10. This wide-field effect can be mitigated by careful antenna designs that suppress sensitivity near the horizon. Simple models for antenna apertures that have been proposed for future instruments such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array and the Square Kilometre Array indicate they should suppress foreground leakage from the pitchfork by ∼40 dB relative to the MWA and significantly increase the likelihood of cosmological signal detection in these critical Fourier modes in the three-dimensional power spectrum.

  2. Constraining high-redshift X-ray sources with next generation 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Mesinger, Andrei; Dillon, Joshua S.; Liu, Adrian; Pober, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We use the Fisher matrix formalism and seminumerical simulations to derive quantitative predictions of the constraints that power spectrum measurements on next-generation interferometers, such as the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will place on the characteristics of the X-ray sources that heated the high-redshift intergalactic medium. Incorporating observations between z = 5 and 25, we find that the proposed 331 element HERA and SKA phase 1 will be capable of placing ≲ 10 per cent constraints on the spectral properties of these first X-ray sources, even if one is unable to perform measurements within the foreground contaminated `wedge' or the FM band. When accounting for the enhancement in power spectrum amplitude from spin temperature fluctuations, we find that the observable signatures of reionization extend well beyond the peak in the power spectrum usually associated with it. We also find that lower redshift degeneracies between the signatures of heating and reionization physics lead to errors on reionization parameters that are significantly greater than previously predicted. Observations over the heating epoch are able to break these degeneracies and improve our constraints considerably. For these two reasons, 21-cm observations during the heating epoch significantly enhance our understanding of reionization as well.

  3. Measuring cosmic velocities with 21 cm intensity mapping and galaxy redshift survey cross-correlation dipoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Alex; Bonvin, Camille

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the feasibility of measuring the effects of peculiar velocities in large-scale structure using the dipole of the redshift-space cross-correlation function. We combine number counts of galaxies with brightness-temperature fluctuations from 21 cm intensity mapping, demonstrating that the dipole may be measured at modest significance (≲2 σ ) by combining the upcoming radio survey Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment with the future redshift surveys of Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) and Euclid. More significant measurements (≲10 σ ) will be possible by combining intensity maps from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) with these of DESI or Euclid, and an even higher significance measurement (≲100 σ ) may be made by combining observables completely internally to the SKA. We account for effects such as contamination by wide-angle terms, interferometer noise and beams in the intensity maps, nonlinear enhancements to the power spectrum, stacking multiple populations, sensitivity to the magnification slope, and the possibility that number counts and intensity maps probe the same tracers. We also derive a new expression for the covariance matrix of multitracer redshift-space correlation function estimators with arbitrary orientation weights, which may be useful for upcoming surveys aiming at measuring redshift-space clustering with multiple tracers.

  4. Tests of the Tully-Fisher relation. 1: Scatter in infrared magnitude versus 21 cm width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Gary M.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Raychaudhury, Somak; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P.; Herter, Terry; Vogt, Nicole P.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the precision of the Tully-Fisher relation (TFR) using a sample of galaxies in the Coma region of the sky, and find that it is good to 5% or better in measuring relative distances. Total magnitudes and disk axis ratios are derived from H and I band surface photometry, and Arecibo 21 cm profiles define the rotation speeds of the galaxies. Using 25 galaxies for which the disk inclination and 21 cm width are well defined, we find an rms deviation of 0.10 mag from a linear TFR with dI/d(log W(sub c)) = -5.6. Each galaxy is assumed to be at a distance proportional to its redshift, and an extinction correction of 1.4(1-b/a) mag is applied to the total I magnitude. The measured scatter is less than 0.15 mag using milder extinction laws from the literature. The I band TFR scatter is consistent with measurement error, and the 95% CL limits on the intrinsic scatter are 0-0.10 mag. The rms scatter using H band magnitudes is 0.20 mag (N = 17). The low width galaxies have scatter in H significantly in excess of known measurement error, but the higher width half of the galaxies have scatter consistent with measurement error. The H band TFR slope may be as steep as the I band slope. As the first applications of this tight correlation, we note the following: (1) the data for the particular spirals commonly used to define the TFR distance to the Coma cluster are inconsistent with being at a common distance and are in fact in free Hubble expansion, with an upper limit of 300 km/s on the rms peculiar line-of-sight velocity of these gas-rich spirals; and (2) the gravitational potential in the disks of these galaxies has typical ellipticity less than 5%. The published data for three nearby spiral galaxies with Cepheid distance determinations are inconsistent with our Coma TFR, suggesting that these local calibrators are either ill-measured or peculiar relative to the Coma Supercluster spirals, or that the TFR has a varying form in different locales.

  5. Erasing the Variable: Empirical Foreground Discovery for Global 21 cm Spectrum Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Liu, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Spectral measurements of the 21 cm monopole background have the promise of revealing the bulk energetic properties and ionization state of our universe from z approx. 6 - 30. Synchrotron foregrounds are orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal, and are the principal challenge faced by these experiments. While synchrotron radiation is thought to be spectrally smooth and described by relatively few degrees of freedom, the instrumental response to bright foregrounds may be much more complex. To deal with such complexities, we develop an approach that discovers contaminated spectral modes using spatial fluctuations of the measured data. This approach exploits the fact that foregrounds vary across the sky while the signal does not. The discovered modes are projected out of each line-of-sight of a data cube. An angular weighting then optimizes the cosmological signal amplitude estimate by giving preference to lower-noise regions. Using this method, we show that it is essential for the passband to be stable to at least approx. 10(exp -4). In contrast, the constraints on the spectral smoothness of the absolute calibration are mainly aesthetic if one is able to take advantage of spatial information. To the extent it is understood, controlling polarization to intensity leakage at the approx. 10(exp -2) level will also be essential to rejecting Faraday rotation of the polarized synchrotron emission. Subject headings: dark ages, reionization, first stars - methods: data analysis - methods: statistical

  6. Erasing the Variable: Empirical Foreground Discovery for Global 21 cm Spectrum Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Liu, Adrian

    2014-10-01

    Spectral measurements of the 21 cm monopole background have the promise of revealing the bulk energetic properties and ionization state of our universe from z ~ 6-30. Synchrotron foregrounds are orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal and are the principal challenge faced by these experiments. While synchrotron radiation is thought to be spectrally smooth and described by relatively few degrees of freedom, the instrumental response to bright foregrounds may be much more complex. To deal with such complexities, we develop an approach that discovers contaminated spectral modes using spatial fluctuations of the measured data. This approach exploits the fact that foregrounds vary across the sky while the signal does not. The discovered modes are projected out of each line of sight of a data cube. An angular weighting then optimizes the cosmological signal amplitude estimate by giving preference to lower-noise regions. Using this method, we show that it is essential for the passband to be stable to at least ~10-4. In contrast, the constraints on the spectral smoothness of the absolute calibration are mainly aesthetic if one is able to take advantage of spatial information. To the extent it is understood, controlling polarization to intensity leakage at the ~10-2 level will also be essential to rejecting Faraday rotation of the polarized synchrotron emission.

  7. Erasing the variable: empirical foreground discovery for global 21 cm spectrum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Switzer, Eric R.; Liu, Adrian

    2014-10-01

    Spectral measurements of the 21 cm monopole background have the promise of revealing the bulk energetic properties and ionization state of our universe from z ∼ 6-30. Synchrotron foregrounds are orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal and are the principal challenge faced by these experiments. While synchrotron radiation is thought to be spectrally smooth and described by relatively few degrees of freedom, the instrumental response to bright foregrounds may be much more complex. To deal with such complexities, we develop an approach that discovers contaminated spectral modes using spatial fluctuations of the measured data. This approach exploits the fact that foregrounds vary across the sky while the signal does not. The discovered modes are projected out of each line of sight of a data cube. An angular weighting then optimizes the cosmological signal amplitude estimate by giving preference to lower-noise regions. Using this method, we show that it is essential for the passband to be stable to at least ∼10{sup –4}. In contrast, the constraints on the spectral smoothness of the absolute calibration are mainly aesthetic if one is able to take advantage of spatial information. To the extent it is understood, controlling polarization to intensity leakage at the ∼10{sup –2} level will also be essential to rejecting Faraday rotation of the polarized synchrotron emission.

  8. 21 cm signals from ionized and heated regions around first stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Li-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    The 21 cm signals from the UV photon sources of reionization epoch is investigated with solving the radiative transfer equation by the WENO algorithm. The results show that a spherical shell of 21 cm emission and absorption will develop around a point source once the speed of the ionization front (I-front) is significantly lower than the speed of light. The 21 cm shell extends from the I-front to the front of light; its inner part is the emission region and its outer part is the absorption region. The 21 cm emission region depends strongly on the intensity, frequency-spectrum and life-time of the UV ionizing source. At redshift 1+z = 20, for a UV ionizing source with an intensity Ė~=1045 erg s-1 and a power law spectrum ν-α with α = 2, the emission region has a comoving size of 1-3 Mpc at the age of the source to be ~=2 Myr. However, the emission regions are very small, and would even be erased by thermal broadening if the source satisfies one of the following conditions: 1. the intensity is less than Ė~=1043 erg s-1 2. the frequency spectrum is thermal at temperature T~=105 K, and 3. the frequency spectrum is a power law with α>=3. On the other hand, the 21 cm absorption regions are developed in all these cases. For a source of short life-time, no 21 cm emission region can be formed if the source dies out before the I-front speed is significantly lower than the speed of light. Yet, a 21 cm absorption region can form and develop even after the emission of the source ceases.

  9. The multifrequency angular power spectrum of the epoch of reionization 21-cm signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy; Bharadwaj, Somnath

    2007-06-01

    Observations of redshifted 21-cm radiation from neutral hydrogen (HI) at high redshifts is an important future probe of reionization. We consider the multifrequency angular power spectrum (MAPS) to quantify the statistics of the HI signal as a joint function of the angular multipole l and frequency separation Δν. The signal at two different frequencies is expected to decorrelate as Δν is increased, and quantifying this is particularly important in deciding the frequency resolution for future HI observations. This is also expected to play a very crucial role in extracting the signal from foregrounds as the signal is expected to decorrelate much faster than the foregrounds (which are largely continuum sources) with increasing Δν. In this paper, we develop formulae relating MAPS to different components of the 3D HI power spectrum taking into account HI peculiar velocities. We show that the flat-sky approximation provides a very good representation over the angular scales of interest, and a final expression which is very simple to calculate and interpret. We present results for z = 10 assuming a neutral hydrogen fraction of 0.6 considering two models for the HI distribution, namely, (i) DM: where HI traces the dark matter and (ii) PR: where the effects of patchy reionization are incorporated through two parameters which are the bubble size and the clustering of the bubble centres relative to the dark matter (bias), respectively. We find that while the DM signal is largely featureless, the PR signal peaks at the angular scales of the individual bubbles where it is Poisson fluctuation dominated, and the signal is considerably enhanced for large bubble size. For most cases of interest at l ~ 100 the signal is uncorrelated beyond Δν ~ 1MHz or even less, whereas this occurs around ~0.1MHz at l ~ 103. The Δν dependence also carries an imprint of the bubble size and the bias, and is expected to be an important probe of the reionization scenario. Finally, we find

  10. Contributions of dark matter annihilation within ultracompact minihalos to the 21 cm background signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yupeng

    2016-12-01

    In the dark age of the Universe, any exotic sources, e.g. the dark matter annihilation, which inject the energy into the intergalactic medium (IGM) will left some imprint on the 21cm background signal. Recently, one new kind of dark matter structure named ultracompact dark matter minihalos (UCMHs) was proposed. Near the inner part of UCMHs, the distribution of dark matter particles is steeper than that of the general dark matter halos, ρ_{UCMHs}(r) ˜ r^{-2.25}, and the formation time of UCMHs is earlier, zc ˜ 1000. Therefore, it is excepted that the dark matter annihilation within UCMHs can effect the 21cm background signal. In this paper, we investigated the contributions of the dark matter annihilation within UCMHs to the 21cm background signal.

  11. Extraction of global 21-cm signal from simulated data for the Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) using an MCMC pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauscher, Keith A.; Burns, Jack O.; Rapetti, David; Mirocha, Jordan; Monsalve, Raul A.

    2017-01-01

    The Dark Ages Radio Explorer (DARE) is a mission concept proposed to NASA in which a crossed dipole antenna collects low frequency (40-120 MHz) radio measurements above the farside of the Moon to detect and characterize the global 21-cm signal from the early (z~35-11) Universe's neutral hydrogen. Simulated data for DARE includes: 1) the global signal modeled using the ares code, 2) spectrally smooth Galactic foregrounds with spatial structure taken from multiple radio foreground maps averaged over a large, well characterized beam, 3) systematics introduced in the data by antenna/receiver reflections, and 4) the Moon. This simulated data is fed into a signal extraction pipeline. As the signal is 4-5 orders of magnitude below the Galactic synchrotron contribution, it is best extracted from the data using Bayesian techniques which take full advantage of prior knowledge of the instrument and foregrounds. For the DARE pipeline, we use the affine-invariant MCMC algorithm implemented in the Python package, emcee. The pipeline also employs singular value decomposition to use known spectral features of the antenna and receiver to form a natural basis with which to fit instrumental systematics. Taking advantage of high-fidelity measurements of the antenna beam (to ~20 ppm) and precise calibration of the instrument, the pipeline extracts the global 21-cm signal with an average RMS error of 10-15 mK for multiple signal models.

  12. Constraining the redshifted 21-cm signal with the unresolved soft X-ray background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkov, Anastasia; Cohen, Aviad; Barkana, Rennan; Silk, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    We use the observed unresolved cosmic X-ray background (CXRB) in the 0.5-2 keV band and existing upper limits on the 21-cm power spectrum to constrain the high-redshift population of X-ray sources, focusing on their effect on the thermal history of the Universe and the cosmic 21-cm signal. Because the properties of these sources are poorly constrained, we consider hot gas, X-ray binaries and mini-quasars (i.e. sources with soft or hard X-ray spectra) as possible candidates. We find that (1) the soft-band CXRB sets an upper limit on the X-ray efficiency of sources that existed before the end of reionization, which is one-to-two orders of magnitude higher than typically assumed efficiencies, (2) hard sources are more effective in generating the CXRB than the soft ones, (3) the commonly assumed limit of saturated heating is not valid during the first half of reionization in the case of hard sources, with any allowed value of X-ray efficiency, (4) the maximal allowed X-ray efficiency sets a lower limit on the depth of the absorption trough in the global 21-cm signal and an upper limit on the height of the emission peak, while in the 21-cm power spectrum it sets a minimum amplitude and frequency for the high-redshift peaks, and (5) the existing upper limit on the 21-cm power spectrum sets a lower limit on the X-ray efficiency for each model. When combined with the 21-cm global signal, the CXRB will be useful for breaking degeneracies and helping constrain the nature of high-redshift heating sources.

  13. A Polarimetric Approach for Constraining the Dynamic Foreground Spectrum for Cosmological Global 21 cm Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nhan, Bang D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Burns, Jack O.

    2017-02-01

    The cosmological global (sky-averaged) 21 cm signal is a powerful tool to probe the evolution of the intergalactic medium in high-redshift universe (z≤slant 6). One of the biggest observational challenges is to remove the foreground spectrum which is at least four orders of magnitude brighter than the cosmological 21 cm emission. Conventional global 21 cm experiments rely on the spectral smoothness of the foreground synchrotron emission to separate it from the unique 21 cm spectral structures in a single total-power spectrum. However, frequency-dependent instrumental and observational effects are known to corrupt such smoothness and complicate the foreground subtraction. We introduce a polarimetric approach to measure the projection-induced polarization of the anisotropic foreground onto a stationary dual-polarized antenna. Due to Earth rotation, when pointing the antenna at a celestial pole, the revolving foreground will modulate this polarization with a unique frequency-dependent sinusoidal signature as a function of time. In our simulations, by harmonic decomposing this dynamic polarization, our technique produces two separate spectra in parallel from the same observation: (i) a total sky power consisting both the foreground and the 21 cm background and (ii) a model-independent measurement of the foreground spectrum at a harmonic consistent to twice the sky rotation rate. In the absence of any instrumental effects, by scaling and subtracting the latter from the former, we recover the injected global 21 cm model within the assumed uncertainty. We further discuss several limiting factors and potential remedies for future implementation.

  14. BAYESIAN SEMI-BLIND COMPONENT SEPARATION FOR FOREGROUND REMOVAL IN INTERFEROMETRIC 21 cm OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Le; Timbie, Peter T.; Bunn, Emory F.; Karakci, Ata; Korotkov, Andrei; Tucker, Gregory S.; Sutter, P. M.; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we present a new Bayesian semi-blind approach for foreground removal in observations of the 21 cm signal measured by interferometers. The technique, which we call H i Expectation–Maximization Independent Component Analysis (HIEMICA), is an extension of the Independent Component Analysis technique developed for two-dimensional (2D) cosmic microwave background maps to three-dimensional (3D) 21 cm cosmological signals measured by interferometers. This technique provides a fully Bayesian inference of power spectra and maps and separates the foregrounds from the signal based on the diversity of their power spectra. Relying only on the statistical independence of the components, this approach can jointly estimate the 3D power spectrum of the 21 cm signal, as well as the 2D angular power spectrum and the frequency dependence of each foreground component, without any prior assumptions about the foregrounds. This approach has been tested extensively by applying it to mock data from interferometric 21 cm intensity mapping observations under idealized assumptions of instrumental effects. We also discuss the impact when the noise properties are not known completely. As a first step toward solving the 21 cm power spectrum analysis problem, we compare the semi-blind HIEMICA technique to the commonly used Principal Component Analysis. Under the same idealized circumstances, the proposed technique provides significantly improved recovery of the power spectrum. This technique can be applied in a straightforward manner to all 21 cm interferometric observations, including epoch of reionization measurements, and can be extended to single-dish observations as well.

  15. Elucidating dark energy with future 21 cm observations at the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohri, Kazunori; Oyama, Yoshihiko; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo

    2017-02-01

    We investigate how precisely we can determine the nature of dark energy such as the equation of state (EoS) and its time dependence by using future observations of 21 cm fluctuations at the epoch of reionization (06.8lesssim zlesssim1) such as Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and Omniscope in combination with those from cosmic microwave background, baryon acoustic oscillation, type Ia supernovae and direct measurement of the Hubble constant. We consider several parametrizations for the EoS and find that future 21 cm observations will be powerful in constraining models of dark energy, especially when its EoS varies at high redshifts.

  16. MAPPING THE DYNAMICS OF COLD GAS AROUND SGR A* THROUGH 21 cm ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, Pierre; Loeb, Abraham

    2015-11-20

    The presence of a circumnuclear stellar disk around Sgr A* and megamaser systems near other black holes indicates that dense neutral disks can be found in galactic nuclei. We show that depending on their inclination angle, optical depth, and spin temperature, these disks could be observed spectroscopically through 21 cm absorption. Related spectroscopic observations of Sgr A* can determine its HI disk parameters and the possible presence of gaps in the disk. Clumps of dense gas similar to the G2 could could also be detected in 21 cm absorption against Sgr A* radio emission.

  17. A SENSITIVITY AND ARRAY-CONFIGURATION STUDY FOR MEASURING THE POWER SPECTRUM OF 21 cm EMISSION FROM REIONIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Aaron; Pober, Jonathan; McQuinn, Matthew; Jacobs, Daniel; Aguirre, James

    2012-07-01

    Telescopes aiming to measure 21 cm emission from the Epoch of Reionization must toe a careful line, balancing the need for raw sensitivity against the stringent calibration requirements for removing bright foregrounds. It is unclear what the optimal design is for achieving both of these goals. Via a pedagogical derivation of an interferometer's response to the power spectrum of 21 cm reionization fluctuations, we show that even under optimistic scenarios first-generation arrays will yield low-signal-to-noise detections, and that different compact array configurations can substantially alter sensitivity. We explore the sensitivity gains of array configurations that yield high redundancy in the uv-plane-configurations that have been largely ignored since the advent of self-calibration for high-dynamic-range imaging. We first introduce a mathematical framework to generate optimal minimum-redundancy configurations for imaging. We contrast the sensitivity of such configurations with high-redundancy configurations, finding that high-redundancy configurations can improve power-spectrum sensitivity by more than an order of magnitude. We explore how high-redundancy array configurations can be tuned to various angular scales, enabling array sensitivity to be directed away from regions of the uv-plane (such as the origin) where foregrounds are brighter and instrumental systematics are more problematic. We demonstrate that a 132 antenna deployment of the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization observing for 120 days in a high-redundancy configuration will, under ideal conditions, have the requisite sensitivity to detect the power spectrum of the 21 cm signal from reionization at a 3{sigma} level at k < 0.25 h Mpc{sup -1} in a bin of {Delta}ln k = 1. We discuss the tradeoffs of low- versus high-redundancy configurations.

  18. INTERPRETING THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL FROM HIGH REDSHIFTS. I. MODEL-INDEPENDENT CONSTRAINTS

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, Jordan; Harker, Geraint J. A.; Burns, Jack O.

    2013-11-10

    The sky-averaged (global) 21 cm signal is a powerful probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) prior to the completion of reionization. However, so far it has been unclear whether it will provide more than crude estimates of when the universe's first stars and black holes formed, even in the best case scenario in which the signal is accurately extracted from the foregrounds. In contrast to previous work, which has focused on predicting the 21 cm signatures of the first luminous objects, we investigate an arbitrary realization of the signal and attempt to translate its features to the physical properties of the IGM. Within a simplified global framework, the 21 cm signal yields quantitative constraints on the Lyα background intensity, net heat deposition, ionized fraction, and their time derivatives without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves. The 21 cm absorption signal is most easily interpreted, setting strong limits on the heating rate density of the universe with a measurement of its redshift alone, independent of the ionization history or details of the Lyα background evolution. In a companion paper, we extend these results, focusing on the confidence with which one can infer source emissivities from IGM properties.

  19. Light-cone anisotropy in the 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zawada, Karolina; Semelin, Benoît; Vonlanthen, Patrick; Baek, Sunghye; Revaz, Yves

    2014-04-01

    Using a suite of detailed numerical simulations, we estimate the level of anisotropy generated by the time evolution along the light cone of the 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization. Our simulations include the physics necessary to model the signal during both the late emission regime and the early absorption regime, namely X-ray and Lyman band 3D radiative transfer in addition to the usual dynamics and ionizing UV transfer. The signal is analysed using correlation functions perpendicular and parallel to the line of sight. We reproduce general findings from previous theoretical studies: the overall amplitude of the correlations and the fact that the light-cone anisotropy is visible only on large scales (100 comoving Mpc). However, the detailed behaviour is different. We find that, at three different epochs, the amplitudes of the correlations along and perpendicular to the line of sight differ from each other, indicating anisotropy. We show that these three epochs are associated with three events of the global reionization history: the overlap of ionized bubbles, the onset of mild heating by X-rays in regions around the sources, and the onset of efficient Lyman α coupling in regions around the sources. We find that a 20 × 20 deg2 survey area may be necessary to mitigate sample variance when we use the directional correlation functions. On a 100 Mpc (comoving) scale, we show that the light-cone anisotropy dominates over the anisotropy generated by peculiar velocity gradients computed in the linear regime. By modelling instrumental noise and limited resolution, we find that the anisotropy should be easily detectable by the Square Kilometre Array, assuming perfect foreground removal, the limiting factor being a large enough survey size. In the case of the Low-Frequency Array for radio astronomy, it is likely that only one anisotropy episode (ionized bubble overlap) will fall in the observing frequency range. This episode will be detectable only if sample

  20. Baryonic acoustic oscillations from 21 cm intensity mapping: the Square Kilometre Array case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Alonso, David; Viel, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    We quantitatively investigate the possibility of detecting baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) using single-dish 21 cm intensity mapping observations in the post-reionization era. We show that the telescope beam smears out the isotropic BAO signature and, in the case of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) instrument, makes it undetectable at redshifts z ≳ 1. We however demonstrate that the BAO peak can still be detected in the radial 21 cm power spectrum and describe a method to make this type of measurements. By means of numerical simulations, containing the 21 cm cosmological signal as well as the most relevant Galactic and extra-Galactic foregrounds and basic instrumental effect, we quantify the precision with which the radial BAO scale can be measured in the 21 cm power spectrum. We systematically investigate the signal to noise and the precision of the recovered BAO signal as a function of cosmic variance, instrumental noise, angular resolution and foreground contamination. We find that the expected noise levels of SKA would degrade the final BAO errors by ∼5 per cent with respect to the cosmic-variance limited case at low redshifts, but that the effect grows up to ∼65 per cent at z ∼ 2-3. Furthermore, we find that the radial BAO signature is robust against foreground systematics, and that the main effect is an increase of ∼20 per cent in the final uncertainty on the standard ruler caused by the contribution of foreground residuals as well as the reduction in sky area needed to avoid high-foreground regions. We also find that it should be possible to detect the radial BAO signature with high significance in the full redshift range. We conclude that a 21 cm experiment carried out by the SKA should be able to make direct measurements of the expansion rate H(z) with measure the expansion with competitive per cent level precision on redshifts z ≲ 2.5.

  1. Simulating the 21 cm signal from reionization including non-linear ionizations and inhomogeneous recombinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Sultan; Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian; Santos, Mario G.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the impact of incorporating physically motivated ionization and recombination rates on the history and topology of cosmic reionization and the resulting 21 cm power spectrum, by incorporating inputs from small-volume hydrodynamic simulations into our semi-numerical code, SIMFAST21, that evolves reionization on large scales. We employ radiative hydrodynamic simulations to parametrize the ionization rate Rion and recombination rate Rrec as functions of halo mass, overdensity and redshift. We find that Rion scales superlinearly with halo mass ({R_ion}∝ M_h^{1.41}), in contrast to previous assumptions. Implementing these scalings into SIMFAST21, we tune our one free parameter, the escape fraction fesc, to simultaneously reproduce recent observations of the Thomson optical depth, ionizing emissivity and volume-averaged neutral fraction by the end of reionization. This yields f_esc=4^{+7}_{-2} per cent averaged over our 0.375 h-1 Mpc cells, independent of halo mass or redshift, increasing to 6 per cent if we also constrain to match the observed z = 7 star formation rate function. Introducing superlinear Rion increases the duration of reionization and boosts small-scale 21 cm power by two to three times at intermediate phases of reionization, while inhomogeneous recombinations reduce ionized bubble sizes and suppress large-scale 21 cm power by two to three times. Gas clumping on sub-cell scales has a minimal effect on the 21 cm power. Superlinear Rion also significantly increases the median halo mass scale for ionizing photon output to ˜ 1010 M⊙, making the majority of reionizing sources more accessible to next-generation facilities. These results highlight the importance of accurately treating ionizing sources and recombinations for modelling reionization and its 21 cm power spectrum.

  2. The cross-correlation between 21 cm intensity mapping maps and the Lyα forest in the post-reionization era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carucci, Isabella P.; Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the cross-correlation signal between 21cm intensity mapping maps and the Lyα forest in the fully non-linear regime using state-of-the-art hydrodynamic simulations. The cross-correlation signal between the Lyα forest and 21cm maps can provide a coherent and comprehensive picture of the neutral hydrogen (HI) content of our Universe in the post-reionization era, probing both its mass content and volume distribution. We compute the auto-power spectra of both fields together with their cross-power spectrum at z = 2.4 and find that on large scales the fields are completely anti-correlated. This anti-correlation arises because regions with high (low) 21cm emission, such as those with a large (low) concentration of damped Lyα systems, will show up as regions with low (high) transmitted flux. We find that on scales smaller than k simeq 0.2 hMpc‑1 the cross-correlation coefficient departs from ‑1, at a scale where non-linearities show up. We use the anisotropy of the power spectra in redshift-space to determine the values of the bias and of the redshift-space distortion parameters of both fields. We find that the errors on the value of the cosmological and astrophysical parameters could decrease by 30% when adding data from the cross-power spectrum, in a conservative analysis. Our results point out that linear theory is capable of reproducing the shape and amplitude of the cross-power up to rather non-linear scales. Finally, we find that the 21cm-Lyα cross-power spectrum can be detected by combining data from a BOSS-like survey together with 21cm intensity mapping observations by SKA1-MID with a S/N ratio higher than 3 in kin[0.06,1] hMpc‑1. We emphasize that while the shape and amplitude of the 21cm auto-power spectrum can be severely affected by residual foreground contamination, cross-power spectra will be less sensitive to that and therefore can be used to identify systematics in the 21cm maps.

  3. A Green Bank Telescope 21cm survey of HI clouds in the Milky Way's nuclear wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denbo, Sara; Endsley, Ryan; Lockman, Felix J.; Ford, Alyson

    2015-01-01

    Feedback processes such as large-scale galactic winds are thought to be responsible for distributing enriched gas throughout a galaxy and even into the IGM. Such winds have been found in many galaxies with active star formation near their center, and the Fermi bubbles provide evidence for such a nuclear wind in our own Milky Way. A recent 21 cm HI survey by the Australia Telescope Compact Array discovered a population of compact, isolated clouds surrounding the Galactic Center that may be entrained in the Fermi bubble wind. We present data from a survey of 21cm HI over an extended region around the Galactic Center using the Green Bank Telescope. These observations provide more strict constraints on neutral clouds in the Fermi bubble wind, and a more robust description of the parameters of HI clouds (i.e., mass, column density, and lifetime) near the Galactic Center.

  4. The Application of Continuous Wavelet Transform Based Foreground Subtraction Method in 21 cm Sky Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Junhua; Xu, Haiguang; Wang, Jingying; An, Tao; Chen, Wen

    2013-08-01

    We propose a continuous wavelet transform based non-parametric foreground subtraction method for the detection of redshifted 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization. This method works based on the assumption that the foreground spectra are smooth in frequency domain, while the 21 cm signal spectrum is full of saw-tooth-like structures, thus their characteristic scales are significantly different. We can distinguish them in the wavelet coefficient space easily and perform the foreground subtraction. Compared with the traditional spectral fitting based method, our method is more tolerant to complex foregrounds. Furthermore, we also find that when the instrument has uncorrected response error, our method can also work significantly better than the spectral fitting based method. Our method can obtain similar results with the Wp smoothing method, which is also a non-parametric method, but our method consumes much less computing time.

  5. Detecting the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect with high-redshift 21-cm surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccanelli, Alvise; Kovetz, Ely; Dai, Liang; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect by cross-correlating 21-cm surveys at high redshifts with galaxies in a way similar to the usual CMB-galaxy cross-correlation. The high-redshift 21-cm signal is dominated by CMB photons that travel freely without interacting with the intervening matter, and hence its late-time ISW signature should correlate extremely well with that of the CMB at its peak frequencies. Using the 21-cm temperature brightness instead of the CMB would thus be a further check of the detection of the ISW effect, measured by different instruments at different frequencies and suffering from different systematics. We also study the ISW effect on the photons that are scattered by HI clouds. We show that a detection of the unscattered photons is achievable with planned radio arrays, while one using scattered photons will require advanced radio interferometers, either an extended version of the planned Square Kilometre Array or futuristic experiments such as a lunar radio array.

  6. Prospects of probing quintessence with H I 21-cm intensity mapping survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Azam; Thakur, Shruti; Guha Sarkar, Tapomoy; Sen, Anjan A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the prospect of constraining scalar field dark energy models using H I 21-cm intensity mapping surveys. We consider a wide class of coupled scalar field dark energy models whose predictions about the background cosmological evolution are different from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) predictions by a few per cent. We find that these models can be statistically distinguished from ΛCDM through their imprint on the 21-cm angular power spectrum. At the fiducial z = 1.5, corresponding to a radio interferometric observation of the post-reionization H I 21-cm observation at frequency 568 MHz, these models can in fact be distinguished from the ΛCDM model at signal-to-noise ratio >3σ level using a 10 000 h radio observation distributed over 40 pointings of a SKA1-mid-like radio telescope. We also show that tracker models are more likely to be ruled out in comparison with ΛCDM than the thawer models. Future radio observations can be instrumental in obtaining tighter constraints on the parameter space of dark energy models and supplement the bounds obtained from background studies.

  7. OPENING THE 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION WINDOW: MEASUREMENTS OF FOREGROUND ISOLATION WITH PAPER

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Ali, Zaki; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F.; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, Dave; Dexter, Matthew; MacMahon, Dave; Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Klima, Patricia J.; Manley, Jason; Walbrugh, William P.; Stefan, Irina I.

    2013-05-10

    We present new observations with the Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization with the aim of measuring the properties of foreground emission for 21 cm epoch of reionization (EoR) experiments at 150 MHz. We focus on the footprint of the foregrounds in cosmological Fourier space to understand which modes of the 21 cm power spectrum will most likely be compromised by foreground emission. These observations confirm predictions that foregrounds can be isolated to a {sup w}edge{sup -}like region of two-dimensional (k , k{sub Parallel-To })-space, creating a window for cosmological studies at higher k{sub Parallel-To} values. We also find that the emission extends past the nominal edge of this wedge due to spectral structure in the foregrounds, with this feature most prominent on the shortest baselines. Finally, we filter the data to retain only this ''unsmooth'' emission and image its specific k{sub Parallel-To} modes. The resultant images show an excess of power at the lowest modes, but no emission can be clearly localized to any one region of the sky. This image is highly suggestive that the most problematic foregrounds for 21 cm EoR studies will not be easily identifiable bright sources, but rather an aggregate of fainter emission.

  8. What next-generation 21 cm power spectrum measurements can teach us about the epoch of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, Jonathan C.; Morales, Miguel F.; Liu, Adrian; McQuinn, Matthew; Parsons, Aaron R.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Tegmark, Max; Aguirre, James E.; Bowman, Judd D.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, David R.; Werthimer, Dan J.

    2014-02-20

    A number of experiments are currently working toward a measurement of the 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization (EoR). Whether or not these experiments deliver a detection of cosmological emission, their limited sensitivity will prevent them from providing detailed information about the astrophysics of reionization. In this work, we consider what types of measurements will be enabled by the next generation of larger 21 cm EoR telescopes. To calculate the type of constraints that will be possible with such arrays, we use simple models for the instrument, foreground emission, and the reionization history. We focus primarily on an instrument modeled after the ∼0.1 km{sup 2} collecting area Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array concept design and parameterize the uncertainties with regard to foreground emission by considering different limits to the recently described 'wedge' footprint in k space. Uncertainties in the reionization history are accounted for using a series of simulations that vary the ionizing efficiency and minimum virial temperature of the galaxies responsible for reionization, as well as the mean free path of ionizing photons through the intergalactic medium. Given various combinations of models, we consider the significance of the possible power spectrum detections, the ability to trace the power spectrum evolution versus redshift, the detectability of salient power spectrum features, and the achievable level of quantitative constraints on astrophysical parameters. Ultimately, we find that 0.1 km{sup 2} of collecting area is enough to ensure a very high significance (≳ 30σ) detection of the reionization power spectrum in even the most pessimistic scenarios. This sensitivity should allow for meaningful constraints on the reionization history and astrophysical parameters, especially if foreground subtraction techniques can be improved and successfully implemented.

  9. Hydrogen in diffuse molecular clouds in the Milky Way. Atomic column densities and molecular fraction along prominent lines of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, B.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Menten, K. M.; Sato, M.; Brunthaler, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Neufeld, D.; Gerin, M.; Indriolo, N.

    2017-03-01

    Context. Recent submillimeter and far-infrared wavelength observations of absorption in the rotational ground-state lines of various simple molecules against distant Galactic continuum sources have opened the possibility of studying the chemistry of diffuse molecular clouds throughout the Milky Way. In order to calculate abundances, the column densities of molecular and atomic hydrogen, H i, must be known. Aims: We aim at determining the atomic hydrogen column densities for diffuse clouds located on the sight lines toward a sample of prominent high-mass star-forming regions that were intensely studied with the HIFI instrument onboard Herschel. Methods: Based on Jansky Very Large Array data, we employ the 21 cm H i absorption-line technique to construct profiles of the H i opacity versus radial velocity toward our target sources. These profiles are combined with lower resolution archival data of extended H i emission to calculate the H i column densities of the individual clouds along the sight lines. We employ Bayesian inference to estimate the uncertainties of the derived quantities. Results: Our study delivers reliable estimates of the atomic hydrogen column density for a large number of diffuse molecular clouds at various Galactocentric distances. Together with column densities of molecular hydrogen derived from its surrogates observed with HIFI, the measurements can be used to characterize the clouds and investigate the dependence of their chemistry on the molecular fraction, for example. The data sets are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/600/A2

  10. Design of hydrogen vent line for the cryogenic hydrogen system in J-PARC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatsumoto, Hideki; Aso, Tomokazu; Kato, Takashi; Ohtsu, Kiichi; Hasegawa, Shoichi; Maekawa, Fujio; Futakawa, Masatoshi

    2009-02-01

    As one of the main experimental facilities in J-PARC, an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a 1-MW proton beam selected supercritical hydrogen at a temperature of 20 K and a pressure of 1.5 MPa as a moderator material. Moderators are controlled by a cryogenic hydrogen system that has a hydrogen relief system, which consists of high and low pressure stage of manifolds, a hydrogen vent line and a stack, in order to release hydrogen to the outside safely. The design of the hydrogen vent line should be considered to prevent purge nitrogen gas in the vent line from freezing when releasing the cryogenic hydrogen, to prevent moisture in the stack placed in an outdoor location from freezing, and to inhibit large piping temperature reduction at a building wall penetration. In this work, temperature change behaviors in the hydrogen vent line were analyzed by using a CFD code, STAR-CD. We determined required sizes of the vent line based on the analytical results and its layout in the building.

  11. ON THE DETECTION OF GLOBAL 21-cm SIGNAL FROM REIONIZATION USING INTERFEROMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Saurabh; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Shankar, N. Udaya; Raghunathan, A.

    2015-12-20

    Detection of the global redshifted 21-cm signal is an excellent means of deciphering the physical processes during the Dark Ages and subsequent Epoch of Reionization (EoR). However, detection of this faint monopole is challenging due to the high precision required in instrumental calibration and modeling of substantially brighter foregrounds and instrumental systematics. In particular, modeling of receiver noise with mK accuracy and its separation remains a formidable task in experiments aiming to detect the global signal using single-element spectral radiometers. Interferometers do not respond to receiver noise; therefore, here we explore the theory of the response of interferometers to global signals. In other words, we discuss the spatial coherence in the electric field arising from the monopole component of the 21-cm signal and methods for its detection using sensor arrays. We proceed by first deriving the response to uniform sky of two-element interferometers made of unit dipole and resonant loop antennas, then extend the analysis to interferometers made of one-dimensional arrays and also consider two-dimensional aperture antennas. Finally, we describe methods by which the coherence might be enhanced so that the interferometer measurements yield improved sensitivity to the monopole component. We conclude (a) that it is indeed possible to measure the global 21-cm from EoR using interferometers, (b) that a practically useful configuration is with omnidirectional antennas as interferometer elements, and (c) that the spatial coherence may be enhanced using, for example, a space beam splitter between the interferometer elements.

  12. A comparative study of intervening and associated H I 21-cm absorption profiles in redshifted galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, S. J.; Duchesne, S. W.; Divoli, A.; Allison, J. R.

    2016-11-01

    The star-forming reservoir in the distant Universe can be detected through H I 21-cm absorption arising from either cool gas associated with a radio source or from within a galaxy intervening the sightline to the continuum source. In order to test whether the nature of the absorber can be predicted from the profile shape, we have compiled and analysed all of the known redshifted (z ≥ 0.1) H I 21-cm absorption profiles. Although between individual spectra there is too much variation to assign a typical spectral profile, we confirm that associated absorption profiles are, on average, wider than their intervening counterparts. It is widely hypothesized that this is due to high-velocity nuclear gas feeding the central engine, absent in the more quiescent intervening absorbers. Modelling the column density distribution of the mean associated and intervening spectra, we confirm that the additional low optical depth, wide dispersion component, typical of associated absorbers, arises from gas within the inner parsec. With regard to the potential of predicting the absorber type in the absence of optical spectroscopy, we have implemented machine learning techniques to the 55 associated and 43 intervening spectra, with each of the tested models giving a ≳ 80 per cent accuracy in the prediction of the absorber type. Given the impracticability of follow-up optical spectroscopy of the large number of 21-cm detections expected from the next generation of large radio telescopes, this could provide a powerful new technique with which to determine the nature of the absorbing galaxy.

  13. The global 21-cm signal in the context of the high- z galaxy luminosity function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirocha, Jordan; Furlanetto, Steven R.; Sun, Guochao

    2017-01-01

    We build a new model for the global 21-cm signal that is calibrated to measurements of the high-z galaxy luminosity function (LF) and further tuned to match the Thomson scattering optical depth of the cosmic microwave background, τe. Assuming that the z ≲ 8 galaxy population can be smoothly extrapolated to higher redshifts, the recent decline in best-fitting values of τe and the inefficient heating induced by X-ray binaries (the presumptive sources of the high-z X-ray background) imply that the entirety of cosmic reionization and reheating occurs at z ≲ 12. In contrast to past global 21-cm models, whose z ˜ 20 (ν ˜ 70 MHz) absorption features and strong ˜25 mK emission features were driven largely by the assumption of efficient early star formation and X-ray heating, our new models peak in absorption at ν ˜ 110 MHz at depths ˜-160 mK and have negligible emission components. Current uncertainties in the faint-end of the LF, binary populations in star-forming galaxies, and UV and X-ray escape fractions introduce ˜20 MHz (˜50 mK) deviations in the trough's frequency (amplitude), while emission signals remain weak (≲10 mK) and are confined to ν ≳ 140 MHz. These predictions, which are intentionally conservative, suggest that the detection of a 21-cm absorption minimum at frequencies below ˜90 MHz and/or emission signals stronger than ˜10mK at ν ≲ 140 MHz would provide strong evidence for `new' sources at high redshifts, such as Population III stars and their remnants.

  14. On the Detection of Global 21-cm Signal from Reionization Using Interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Saurabh; Subrahmanyan, Ravi; Udaya Shankar, N.; Raghunathan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Detection of the global redshifted 21-cm signal is an excellent means of deciphering the physical processes during the Dark Ages and subsequent Epoch of Reionization (EoR). However, detection of this faint monopole is challenging due to the high precision required in instrumental calibration and modeling of substantially brighter foregrounds and instrumental systematics. In particular, modeling of receiver noise with mK accuracy and its separation remains a formidable task in experiments aiming to detect the global signal using single-element spectral radiometers. Interferometers do not respond to receiver noise; therefore, here we explore the theory of the response of interferometers to global signals. In other words, we discuss the spatial coherence in the electric field arising from the monopole component of the 21-cm signal and methods for its detection using sensor arrays. We proceed by first deriving the response to uniform sky of two-element interferometers made of unit dipole and resonant loop antennas, then extend the analysis to interferometers made of one-dimensional arrays and also consider two-dimensional aperture antennas. Finally, we describe methods by which the coherence might be enhanced so that the interferometer measurements yield improved sensitivity to the monopole component. We conclude (a) that it is indeed possible to measure the global 21-cm from EoR using interferometers, (b) that a practically useful configuration is with omnidirectional antennas as interferometer elements, and (c) that the spatial coherence may be enhanced using, for example, a space beam splitter between the interferometer elements.

  15. 21-cm lensing and the cold spot in the cosmic microwave background.

    PubMed

    Kovetz, Ely D; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2013-04-26

    An extremely large void and a cosmic texture are two possible explanations for the cold spot seen in the cosmic microwave background. We investigate how well these two hypotheses can be tested with weak lensing of 21-cm fluctuations from the epoch of reionization measured with the Square Kilometer Array. While the void explanation for the cold spot can be tested with Square Kilometer Array, given enough observation time, the texture scenario requires significantly prolonged observations, at the highest frequencies that correspond to the epoch of reionization, over the field of view containing the cold spot.

  16. Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope detection of associated H I 21-cm absorption at z = 1.2230 towards TXS 1954+513

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditya, J. N. H. S.; Kanekar, Nissim; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Day, Brandon; Lynam, Paul; Cruz, Jocelyn

    2017-03-01

    We have used the 610-MHz receivers of the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to detect associated H I 21-cm absorption from the z = 1.2230 blazar TXS 1954+513. The GMRT H I 21-cm absorption is likely to arise against either the milliarcsecond-scale core or the one-sided milliarcsecond-scale radio jet, and is blueshifted by ≈328 km s-1 from the blazar redshift. This is consistent with a scenario in which the H I cloud giving rise to the absorption is being driven outwards by the radio jet. The integrated H I 21-cm optical depth is (0.716 ± 0.037) km s-1, implying a high H I column density, N_{H I} = (1.305 ± 0.067) × ({ T_s/100 K}) × 10^{20} cm-2, for an assumed H I spin temperature of 100 K. We use Nickel Telescope photometry of TXS 1954+513 to infer a high rest-frame 1216 Å luminosity of (4.1 ± 1.2) × 1023 W Hz-1. The z = 1.2230 absorber towards TXS 1954+513 is only the fifth case of a detection of associated H I 21-cm absorption at z > 1, and is also the first case of such a detection towards an active galactic nucleus (AGN) with a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity ≫1023 W Hz-1, demonstrating that neutral hydrogen can survive in AGN environments in the presence of high UV luminosities.

  17. Velocity profiles of high-excitation molecular hydrogen lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhouse, A.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    Profiles of three lines of molecular hydrogen near 2.2 microns, originating from widely spaced energy levels, have been measured at a resolution of 32 km/s at Peak 1 in the Orion molecular outflow. The three lines, 1 - 0 S(1), 2 - 1 S(1), and 3 - 2 S(3), are found to have identical profiles. This result rules out any significant contribution to the population of the higher energy levels of molecular hydrogen at Peak 1 by fluorescence, and is generally consistent with emission from multiple J-type shocks.

  18. The hydrogen line spectra of narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Osterbrock, D. E.

    1985-02-01

    The results of the first detection of Ly-alpha in a narrow-line radio galaxy are reported. Nearly simultaneous optical and UV observations of 3C 192 and 3C 223 allow the measurement of both Balmer and Lyman decrements. These line ratios are approximate functions of the interstellar reddening and of a parameter which is proportional to the amount of H I collisional excitation present. The reddening of 3C 192 is slightly larger than that due to the Galaxy, although 3C 223 may have a larger value. Both galaxies have intrinsic Balmer and Lyman decrements which are significantly steeper than case B, suggesting that the gas is photoionized by a fairly hard X-ray continuum. The deduced values of L-alpha/H-beta and H-alpha/H-beta compare favorably with predictions of recent models.

  19. The hydrogen line spectra of narrow-line radio galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferland, G. J.; Osterbrock, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The results of the first detection of Ly-alpha in a narrow-line radio galaxy are reported. Nearly simultaneous optical and UV observations of 3C 192 and 3C 223 allow the measurement of both Balmer and Lyman decrements. These line ratios are approximate functions of the interstellar reddening and of a parameter which is proportional to the amount of H I collisional excitation present. The reddening of 3C 192 is slightly larger than that due to the Galaxy, although 3C 223 may have a larger value. Both galaxies have intrinsic Balmer and Lyman decrements which are significantly steeper than case B, suggesting that the gas is photoionized by a fairly hard X-ray continuum. The deduced values of L-alpha/H-beta and H-alpha/H-beta compare favorably with predictions of recent models.

  20. The 21 cm signature of shock heated and diffuse cosmic string wakes

    SciTech Connect

    Hernández, Oscar F.; Brandenberger, Robert H. E-mail: rhb@physics.mcgill.ca

    2012-07-01

    The analysis of the 21 cm signature of cosmic string wakes is extended in several ways. First we consider the constraints on Gμ from the absorption signal of shock heated wakes laid down much later than matter radiation equality. Secondly we analyze the signal of diffuse wake, that is those wakes in which there is a baryon overdensity but which have not shock heated. Finally we compare the size of these signals to the expected thermal noise per pixel which dominates over the background cosmic gas brightness temperature and find that the cosmic string signal will exceed the thermal noise of an individual pixel in the Square Kilometre Array for string tensions Gμ > 2.5 × 10{sup −8}.

  1. On Asymmetry of Hydrogen Spectral Lines in Nonequlibrium Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Demura, A. V.; Demchenko, G. V.; Nikolic, D.

    2008-10-22

    The Standard Theory (ST) of hydrogen spectral lines Stark broadening is applied within many-body approach to detailed description of profile asymmetry simultaneously accounting for the quadrupole interaction, quadratic Stark effect shifts and corrections to oscillator strengths. The influence of electronic collision shifts and impact widths, trivial asymmetry, the Boltzmann and dipole intensity scaling factors are studied as well. The consistent inclusion of the latter two factors in ST frames requests the line contour redefinition to avoid divergence. It is demonstrated that the asymmetry of hydrogen spectral lines is the many-parametric sensitive function of broadening mechanisms. The comparison with the precision experiment on stabilized arc data for H{sub {beta}} line has shown good coincidence within assumption of nonequilibrium between electrons and heavy neutral particles.

  2. Non-LTE hydrogen-line formation in moving prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinzel, P.; Rompolt, B.

    1986-01-01

    The behavior of hydrogen-line brightness variations, depending on the prominence-velocity changes were investigated. By solving the NON-Local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) problem for hydrogen researchers determine quantitatively the effect of Doppler brightening and/or Doppler dimming (DBE, DDE) in the lines of Lyman and Balmer series. It is demonstrated that in low-density prominence plasmas, DBE in H alpha and H beta lines can reach a factor of three for velocities around 160 km/sec, while the L alpha line exhibits typical DDE. L beta brightness variations follow from a combined DBE in the H alpha and DDE in L alpha and L beta itself, providing that all relevant multilevel interlocking processes are taken into account.

  3. PROBING STELLAR ACCRETION WITH MID-INFRARED HYDROGEN LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Rigliaco, Elisabetta; Pascucci, I.; Mulders, G. D.; Duchene, G.; Edwards, S.; Ardila, D. R.; Grady, C.; Mendigutía, I.; Montesinos, B.; Najita, J. R.; Carpenter, J.; Furlan, E.; Gorti, U.; Meijerink, R.; Meyer, M. R. E-mail: elisabetta.rigliaco@phys.ethz.ch

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the origin of the mid-infrared (IR) hydrogen recombination lines for a sample of 114 disks in different evolutionary stages (full, transitional, and debris disks) collected from the Spitzer archive. We focus on the two brighter H I lines observed in the Spitzer spectra, the H I (7-6) at 12.37 μm and the H I (9-7) at 11.32 μm. We detect the H I (7-6) line in 46 objects, and the H I (9-7) in 11. We compare these lines with the other most common gas line detected in Spitzer spectra, the [Ne II] at 12.81 μm. We argue that it is unlikely that the H I emission originates from the photoevaporating upper surface layers of the disk, as has been found for the [Ne II] lines toward low-accreting stars. Using the H I (9-7)/H I (7-6) line ratios we find these gas lines are likely probing gas with hydrogen column densities of 10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} cm{sup –3}. The subsample of objects surrounded by full and transitional disks show a positive correlation between the accretion luminosity and the H I line luminosity. These two results suggest that the observed mid-IR H I lines trace gas accreting onto the star in the same way as other hydrogen recombination lines at shorter wavelengths. A pure chromospheric origin of these lines can be excluded for the vast majority of full and transitional disks. We report for the first time the detection of the H I (7-6) line in eight young (<20 Myr) debris disks. A pure chromospheric origin cannot be ruled out in these objects. If the H I (7-6) line traces accretion in these older systems, as in the case of full and transitional disks, the strength of the emission implies accretion rates lower than 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We discuss some advantages of extending accretion indicators to longer wavelengths, and the next steps required pinning down the origin of mid-IR hydrogen lines.

  4. First limits on the 21 cm power spectrum during the Epoch of X-ray heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, A.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Hewitt, J. N.; Loeb, A.; Mesinger, A.; Neben, A. R.; Offringa, A. R.; Tegmark, M.; Barry, N.; Beardsley, A. P.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, Judd D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Emrich, D.; Feng, L.; Gaensler, B. M.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, HS; Kratzenberg, E.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Oberoi, D.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, S.; Pindor, B.; Pober, J. C.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Shankar, N. Udaya; Sethi, Shiv K.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Sullivan, I. S.; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-08-01

    We present first results from radio observations with the Murchison Widefield Array seeking to constrain the power spectrum of 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations between the redshifts of 11.6 and 17.9 (113 and 75 MHz). 3 h of observations were conducted over two nights with significantly different levels of ionospheric activity. We use these data to assess the impact of systematic errors at low frequency, including the ionosphere and radio-frequency interference, on a power spectrum measurement. We find that after the 1-3 h of integration presented here, our measurements at the Murchison Radio Observatory are not limited by RFI, even within the FM band, and that the ionosphere does not appear to affect the level of power in the modes that we expect to be sensitive to cosmology. Power spectrum detections, inconsistent with noise, due to fine spectral structure imprinted on the foregrounds by reflections in the signal-chain, occupy the spatial Fourier modes where we would otherwise be most sensitive to the cosmological signal. We are able to reduce this contamination using calibration solutions derived from autocorrelations so that we achieve an sensitivity of 104 mK on comoving scales k ≲ 0.5 h Mpc-1. This represents the first upper limits on the 21 cm power spectrum fluctuations at redshifts 12 ≲ z ≲ 18 but is still limited by calibration systematics. While calibration improvements may allow us to further remove this contamination, our results emphasize that future experiments should consider carefully the existence of and their ability to calibrate out any spectral structure within the EoR window.

  5. A 21 cm Spectral and Continuum Study of IC 443 Using the Very Large Array and the Arecibo Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Joon; Koo, Bon-Chul; Yun, Min S.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Heiles, Carl; Heyer, Mark

    2008-03-01

    We report 21 cm spectral-line and continuum observations of the Galactic supernova remnant IC 443 using the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Arecibo telescope. By combining the VLA and Arecibo data, both covering the full extent of IC 443, we have achieved an unprecedented combination of sensitivity and angular resolution, over the continuous range of angular scales from ~40'' to ~1°. Our new radio observations not only reveal previously unknown features of IC 443 but also show the details of the remnant more clearly. The radio morphology of IC 443 consists of two nearly concentric shells. Our 21 cm radio continuum data show that the two shells have distinctly different radial intensity distributions. This morphology supports the scenario whereby the western shell is a breakout portion of the remnant into a rarefied medium. We have developed a dynamical model accounting for the breakout, which provides an estimate for the remnant age of ~2 × 104 yr. The southeastern boundary of the remnant shows interesting features, seen in our observations for the first time: a faint radio continuum halo and numerous "spurs." These features are mainly found in the region where IC 443 overlaps with another remnant, G189.6+3.3. These features most likely originate from the interactions of IC 443 with the surrounding medium. The H I emission associated with IC 443 appears over the velocity range between -100 km s-1 and 50 km s-1. The strongest absorption is seen around v LSR ~ -5 km s-1, which corresponds to the systemic velocity of IC 443. We identify a broad, extended lane of H I gas near the systemic velocity as preshock gas in the southern part of the remnant. Most of the shocked H I gas is located along the southern supernova remnant (SNR) boundary and is blueshifted. We derive an accurate mass of the shocked H I gas using template HCO+ (1-0) spectra, which is 493 ± 56 M ⊙. Our high-resolution H I data enable us to resolve the shocked H I in the northeastern region into a

  6. From Enormous 3D Maps of the Universe to Astrophysical and Cosmological Constraints: Statistical Tools for Realizing the Promise of 21 cm Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dillon, Joshua S.; Tegmark, Max

    2015-01-01

    21 cm cosmology promises to provide an exquisite probe of astrophysics and cosmology during the cosmic dark ages and the epoch of reionization. An enormous volume of the universe, previously inaccessible, can be directly mapped by looking for the faint signal from hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen. One day, 21 cm tomography could even eclipse the CMB as the most precise test of our cosmological models. Realizing that promise, however, has proven extremely challenging. We're looking for a small signal buried under foregrounds orders of magnitude stronger. We know that we're going to need very sensitive, and thus very large, low frequency interferometers. Those large interferometers produce vast quantities data, which must be carefully analyzed. In talk, I will present my Ph.D. work at MIT on the development and application of rigorous, fast, and robust statistical tools for extracting that cosmological signal while maintaining a thorough understanding of the error properties of those measurements. These tools reduce vast quanities of interferometric data into the statistics like the power spectrum that can be directly compared with theory and simulation, all while minimizing the amount of cosmological information lost. I will also present results from applying those techniques to data from the the Murchison Widefield Array and will discuss the exciting science they will enable with the upcoming Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array.

  7. 21 cm intensity mapping with the Five hundred metre Aperture Spherical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoot, George F.; Debono, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a programme to map large-scale cosmic structures on the largest possible scales by using the Five hundred metre Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST) to make a 21 cm (red-shifted) intensity map of the sky for the range 0.5 < z < 2.5. The goal is to map to the angular and spectral resolution of FAST a large swath of the sky by simple drift scans with a transverse set of beams. This approach would be complementary to galaxy surveys and could be completed before the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) could begin a more detailed and precise effort. The science would be to measure the large-scale structure on the size of the baryon acoustic oscillations and larger scale, and the results would be complementary to its contemporary observations and significant. The survey would be uniquely sensitive to the potential very large-scale features from inflation at the Grand Unified Theory (GUT) scale and complementary to observations of the cosmic microwave background.

  8. Radio frequency interference at Jodrell Bank Observatory within the protected 21 cm band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarter, J.

    1989-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) will provide one of the most difficult challenges to systematic Searches for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) at microwave frequencies. The SETI-specific equipment is being optimized for the detection of signals generated by a technology rather than those generated by natural processes in the universe. If this equipment performs as expected, then it will inevitably detect many signals originating from terrestrial technology. If these terrestrial signals are too numerous and/or strong, the equipment will effectively be blinded to the (presumably) weaker extraterrestrial signals being sought. It is very difficult to assess how much of a problem RFI will actually represent to future observations, without employing the equipment and beginning the search. In 1983 a very high resolution spectrometer was placed at the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories at Jodrell Bank, England. This equipment permitted an investigation of the interference environment at Jodrell Bank, at that epoch, and at frequencies within the 21 cm band. This band was chosen because it has long been "protected" by international agreement; no transmitters should have been operating at those frequencies. The data collected at Jodrell Bank were expected to serve as a "best case" interference scenario and provide the minimum design requirements for SETI equipment that must function in the real and noisy environment. This paper describes the data collection and analysis along with some preliminary conclusions concerning the nature of the interference environment at Jodrell Bank.

  9. Radio frequency interference at Jodrell Bank Observatory within the protected 21 cm band.

    PubMed

    Tarter, J

    1989-01-01

    Radio frequency interference (RFI) will provide one of the most difficult challenges to systematic Searches for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) at microwave frequencies. The SETI-specific equipment is being optimized for the detection of signals generated by a technology rather than those generated by natural processes in the universe. If this equipment performs as expected, then it will inevitably detect many signals originating from terrestrial technology. If these terrestrial signals are too numerous and/or strong, the equipment will effectively be blinded to the (presumably) weaker extraterrestrial signals being sought. It is very difficult to assess how much of a problem RFI will actually represent to future observations, without employing the equipment and beginning the search. In 1983 a very high resolution spectrometer was placed at the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories at Jodrell Bank, England. This equipment permitted an investigation of the interference environment at Jodrell Bank, at that epoch, and at frequencies within the 21 cm band. This band was chosen because it has long been "protected" by international agreement; no transmitters should have been operating at those frequencies. The data collected at Jodrell Bank were expected to serve as a "best case" interference scenario and provide the minimum design requirements for SETI equipment that must function in the real and noisy environment. This paper describes the data collection and analysis along with some preliminary conclusions concerning the nature of the interference environment at Jodrell Bank.

  10. Foregrounds for redshifted 21-cm studies of reionization: Giant Meter Wave Radio Telescope 153-MHz observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Sk. Saiyad; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2008-04-01

    Foreground subtraction is the biggest challenge for future redshifted 21-cm observations to probe reionization. We use a short Giant Meter Wave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observation at 153MHz to characterize the statistical properties of the background radiation across ~1° to subarcmin angular scales, and across a frequency band of 5MHz with 62.5kHz resolution. The statistic we use is the visibility correlation function, or equivalently the angular power spectrum Cl. We present the results obtained from using relatively unsophisticated, conventional data calibration procedures. We find that even fairly simple-minded calibration allows one to estimate the visibility correlation function at a given frequency V2(U, 0). From our observations, we find that V2(U, 0) is consistent with foreground model predictions at all angular scales except the largest ones probed by our observations where the model predictions are somewhat in excess. On the other hand, the visibility correlation between different frequencies κ(U, Δν) seems to be much more sensitive to calibration errors. We find a rapid decline in κ(U, Δν), in contrast with the prediction of less than 1 per cent variation across 2.5MHz. In this case, however, it seems likely that a substantial part of the discrepancy may be due to limitations of data reduction procedures.

  11. Upper Limits on the 21 cm Epoch of Reionization Power Spectrum from One Night with LOFAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, A. H.; Yatawatta, S.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; de Bruyn, A. G.; Brentjens, M. A.; Zaroubi, S.; Asad, K. M. B.; Hatef, M.; Jelić, V.; Mevius, M.; Offringa, A. R.; Pandey, V. N.; Vedantham, H.; Abdalla, F. B.; Brouw, W. N.; Chapman, E.; Ciardi, B.; Gehlot, B. K.; Ghosh, A.; Harker, G.; Iliev, I. T.; Kakiichi, K.; Majumdar, S.; Mellema, G.; Silva, M. B.; Schaye, J.; Vrbanec, D.; Wijnholds, S. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present the first limits on the Epoch of Reionization 21 cm H i power spectra, in the redshift range z = 7.9–10.6, using the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) High-Band Antenna (HBA). In total, 13.0 hr of data were used from observations centered on the North Celestial Pole. After subtraction of the sky model and the noise bias, we detect a non-zero {{{Δ }}}{{I}}2={(56+/- 13{mK})}2 (1-σ) excess variance and a best 2-σ upper limit of {{{Δ }}}212< {(79.6{mK})}2 at k = 0.053 h cMpc‑1 in the range z = 9.6–10.6. The excess variance decreases when optimizing the smoothness of the direction- and frequency-dependent gain calibration, and with increasing the completeness of the sky model. It is likely caused by (i) residual side-lobe noise on calibration baselines, (ii) leverage due to nonlinear effects, (iii) noise and ionosphere-induced gain errors, or a combination thereof. Further analyses of the excess variance will be discussed in forthcoming publications.

  12. Eliminating Polarized Leakage as a Systematic for 21 cm Epoch of Reionization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, James E.; HERA Collaboration, PAPER Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Because of the extreme brightness of foreground emission relative to the desired signal, experiments seeking the 21 cm HI signal from the epoch of reionization must employ foreground removal or avoidance strategies with high dynamic range. Almost all of these techniques rely on the spectral smoothness of the foreground emission, which is dominated by synchrotron emission. The polarized component of such emission can suffer Faraday rotation through the interstellar medium of the Milky Way, thereby inducing frequency structure which can be mistaken for real reionization signal. Therefore, it is of great importance for such experiments to eliminate leakage of Faraday-rotated, polarized emission into the unpolarized (Stokes I) component where the reionization signal lives. We discuss a number of approaches under investigation for mitigating this leakage in the PAPER and HERA experiments, including calibration and careful instrument design. Importantly, however, we show that the ionosphere may provide a very strong suppression of the polarized signal, when averaged over the integration times required for EoR experiments, by scrambling the phase of polarized sources. Moreover, this attenuation comes with very little suppression of the desired unpolarized signal. We consider the implications of this strategy for PAPER and HERA.

  13. The visibility-based tapered gridded estimator (TGE) for the redshifted 21-cm power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhuri, Samir; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Chatterjee, Suman; Ali, Sk. Saiyad; Roy, Nirupam; Ghosh, Abhik

    2016-12-01

    We present an improved visibility-based tapered gridded estimator (TGE) for the power spectrum of the diffuse sky signal. The visibilities are gridded to reduce the total computation time for the calculation, and tapered through a convolution to suppress the contribution from the outer regions of the telescope's field of view. The TGE also internally estimates the noise bias, and subtracts this out to give an unbiased estimate of the power spectrum. An earlier version of the 2D TGE for the angular power spectrum Cℓ is improved and then extended to obtain the 3D TGE for the power spectrum P(k) of the 21-cm brightness temperature fluctuations. Analytic formulas are also presented for predicting the variance of the binned power spectrum. The estimator and its variance predictions are validated using simulations of 150-MHz Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations. We find that the estimator accurately recovers the input model for the 1D spherical power spectrum P(k) and the 2D cylindrical power spectrum P(k⊥, k∥), and that the predicted variance is in reasonably good agreement with the simulations.

  14. Improved foreground removal in GMRT 610 MHz observations towards redshifted 21-cm tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Abhik; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Ali, Sk. Saiyad; Chengalur, Jayaram N.

    2011-12-01

    Foreground removal is a challenge for 21-cm tomography of the high-redshift Universe. We use archival Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) data (obtained for completely different astronomical goals) to estimate the foregrounds at a redshift of ˜1. The statistic we use is the cross power spectrum between two frequencies separated by Δν at the angular multipole ℓ, or equivalently the multi-frequency angular power spectrum Cℓ(Δν). An earlier measurement of Cℓ(Δν) using these data had revealed the presence of oscillatory patterns along Δν, which turned out to be a severe impediment for foreground removal. Using the same data, in this paper we show that it is possible to considerably reduce these oscillations by suppressing the sidelobe response of the primary antenna elements. The suppression works best at the angular multipoles ℓ for which there is a dense sampling of the u-v plane. For three angular multipoles ℓ= 1405, 1602 and 1876, this sidelobe suppression along with a low order polynomial fitting completely results in residuals of (≤ 0.02 mK2), consistent with the noise at the 3σ level. Since the polynomial fitting is done after estimation of the power spectrum it can be ensured that the estimation of the H I signal is not biased. The corresponding 99 per cent upper limit on the H I signal is ?, where ? is the mean neutral fraction and b is the bias.

  15. Coaxing cosmic 21 cm fluctuations from the polarized sky using m -mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, J. Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Michael; Stebbins, Albert; Pen, Ue-Li

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we continue to develop the m -mode formalism, a technique for efficient and optimal analysis of wide-field transit radio telescopes, targeted at 21 cm cosmology. We extend this formalism to give an accurate treatment of the polarized sky, fully accounting for the effects of polarization leakage and cross polarization. We use the geometry of the measured set of visibilities to project down to pure temperature modes on the sky, serving as a significant compression, and an effective first filter of polarized contaminants. As in our previous work, we use the m -mode formalism with the Karhunen-Loève transform to give a highly efficient method for foreground cleaning, and demonstrate its success in cleaning realistic polarized skies observed with an instrument suffering from substantial off axis polarization leakage. We develop an optimal quadratic estimator in the m -mode formalism which can be efficiently calculated using a Monte Carlo technique. This is used to assess the implications of foreground removal for power spectrum constraints where we find that our method can clean foregrounds well below the foreground wedge, rendering only scales k∥<0.02 h Mpc-1 inaccessible. As this approach assumes perfect knowledge of the telescope, we perform a conservative test of how essential this is by simulating and analyzing data sets with deviations about our assumed telescope. Assuming no other techniques to mitigate bias are applied, we find we recover unbiased power spectra when the per-feed beamwidth to be measured to 0.1%, and amplifier gains to be known to 1% within each minute. Finally, as an example application, we extend our forecasts to a wideband 400-800 MHz cosmological observation and consider the implications for probing dark energy, finding a pathfinder-scale medium-sized cylinder telescope improves the Dark Energy Task Force figure of merit by around 70% over Planck and Stage II experiments alone.

  16. A Practical Theorem on Using Interferometry to Measure the Global 21-cm Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venumadhav, Tejaswi; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Doré, Olivier; Hirata, Christopher M.

    2016-08-01

    The sky-averaged, or global, background of redshifted 21 cm radiation is expected to be a rich source of information on cosmological reheating and reionization. However, measuring the signal is technically challenging: one must extract a small, frequency-dependent signal from under much brighter spectrally smooth foregrounds. Traditional approaches to study the global signal have used single antennas, which require one to calibrate out the frequency-dependent structure in the overall system gain (due to internal reflections, for example) as well as remove the noise bias from auto-correlating a single amplifier output. This has motivated proposals to measure the signal using cross-correlations in interferometric setups, where additional calibration techniques are available. In this paper we focus on the general principles driving the sensitivity of the interferometric setups to the global signal. We prove that this sensitivity is directly related to two characteristics of the setup: the cross-talk between readout channels (i.e., the signal picked up at one antenna when the other one is driven) and the correlated noise due to thermal fluctuations of lossy elements (e.g., absorbers or the ground) radiating into both channels. Thus in an interferometric setup, one cannot suppress cross-talk and correlated thermal noise without reducing sensitivity to the global signal by the same factor—instead, the challenge is to characterize these effects and their frequency dependence. We illustrate our general theorem by explicit calculations within toy setups consisting of two short-dipole antennas in free space and above a perfectly reflecting ground surface, as well as two well-separated identical lossless antennas arranged to achieve zero cross-talk.

  17. A Flux Scale for Southern Hemisphere 21 cm Epoch of Reionization Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Aguirre, James E.; Ali, Zaki; Bowman, Judd; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, David R.; Dexter, Matthew R.; Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Klima, Pat; MacMahon, Dave H. E.; Manley, Jason R.; Moore, David F.; Pober, Jonathan C.; Stefan, Irina I.; Walbrugh, William P.

    2013-10-01

    We present a catalog of spectral measurements covering a 100-200 MHz band for 32 sources, derived from observations with a 64 antenna deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. For transit telescopes such as PAPER, calibration of the primary beam is a difficult endeavor and errors in this calibration are a major source of error in the determination of source spectra. In order to decrease our reliance on an accurate beam calibration, we focus on calibrating sources in a narrow declination range from -46° to -40°. Since sources at similar declinations follow nearly identical paths through the primary beam, this restriction greatly reduces errors associated with beam calibration, yielding a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of derived source spectra. Extrapolating from higher frequency catalogs, we derive the flux scale using a Monte Carlo fit across multiple sources that includes uncertainty from both catalog and measurement errors. Fitting spectral models to catalog data and these new PAPER measurements, we derive new flux models for Pictor A and 31 other sources at nearby declinations; 90% are found to confirm and refine a power-law model for flux density. Of particular importance is the new Pictor A flux model, which is accurate to 1.4% and shows that between 100 MHz and 2 GHz, in contrast with previous models, the spectrum of Pictor A is consistent with a single power law given by a flux at 150 MHz of 382 ± 5.4 Jy and a spectral index of -0.76 ± 0.01. This accuracy represents an order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements in this band and is limited by the uncertainty in the catalog measurements used to estimate the absolute flux scale. The simplicity and improved accuracy of Pictor A's spectrum make it an excellent calibrator in a band important for experiments seeking to measure 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization.

  18. Redshifted HI 21-cm Signal from the Post-Reionization Epoch: Cross-Correlations with Other Cosmological Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, T. Guha; Datta, K. K.; Pal, A. K.; Choudhury, T. Roy; Bharadwaj, S.

    2016-12-01

    Tomographic intensity mapping of the HI using the redshifted 21-cm observations opens up a new window towards our understanding of cosmological background evolution and structure formation. This is a key science goal of several upcoming radio telescopes including the Square Kilometer Array (SKA). In this article, we focus on the post-reionization signal and investigate the cross correlating of the 21-cm signal with other tracers of the large scale structure. We consider the cross-correlation of the post-reionization 21-cm signal with the Lyman- α forest, Lyman-break galaxies and late time anisotropies in the CMBR maps like weak lensing and the integrated Sachs Wolfe effect. We study the feasibility of detecting the signal and explore the possibility of obtaining constraints on cosmological models using it.

  19. Fisher Matrix-based Predictions for Measuring the z = 3.35 Binned 21-cm Power Spectrum using the Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Anjan Kumar; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Ali, Sk. Saiyad

    2017-03-01

    We use the Fisher matrix formalism to predict the prospects of measuring the redshifted 21-cm power spectrum in different k-bins using observations with the upcoming Ooty Wide Field Array (OWFA) which will operate at 326.5 MHz. This corresponds to neutral hydrogen (HI) at z = 3.35, and a measurement of the 21-cm power spectrum provides a unique method to probe the large-scale structures at this redshift. Our analysis indicates that a 5 σ detection of the binned power spectrum is possible in the k range 0.05 ≤ k ≤ 0.3 Mpc-1 with 1000 hours of observation. We find that the signal- to-noise ratio (SNR) peaks in the k range 0.1-0.2 Mpc-1 where a 10 σ detection is possible with 2000 hours of observations. Our analysis also indicates that it is not very advantageous to observe beyond 1000 h in a single field-of-view as the SNR increases rather slowly beyond this in many of the small k-bins. The entire analysis reported here assumes that the foregrounds have been completely removed.

  20. A FLUX SCALE FOR SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE 21 cm EPOCH OF REIONIZATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Bowman, Judd; Parsons, Aaron R.; Ali, Zaki; Pober, Jonathan C.; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F.; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, David R.; Dexter, Matthew R.; MacMahon, Dave H. E.; Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Klima, Pat; Manley, Jason R.; Walbrugh, William P.; Stefan, Irina I.

    2013-10-20

    We present a catalog of spectral measurements covering a 100-200 MHz band for 32 sources, derived from observations with a 64 antenna deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER) in South Africa. For transit telescopes such as PAPER, calibration of the primary beam is a difficult endeavor and errors in this calibration are a major source of error in the determination of source spectra. In order to decrease our reliance on an accurate beam calibration, we focus on calibrating sources in a narrow declination range from –46° to –40°. Since sources at similar declinations follow nearly identical paths through the primary beam, this restriction greatly reduces errors associated with beam calibration, yielding a dramatic improvement in the accuracy of derived source spectra. Extrapolating from higher frequency catalogs, we derive the flux scale using a Monte Carlo fit across multiple sources that includes uncertainty from both catalog and measurement errors. Fitting spectral models to catalog data and these new PAPER measurements, we derive new flux models for Pictor A and 31 other sources at nearby declinations; 90% are found to confirm and refine a power-law model for flux density. Of particular importance is the new Pictor A flux model, which is accurate to 1.4% and shows that between 100 MHz and 2 GHz, in contrast with previous models, the spectrum of Pictor A is consistent with a single power law given by a flux at 150 MHz of 382 ± 5.4 Jy and a spectral index of –0.76 ± 0.01. This accuracy represents an order of magnitude improvement over previous measurements in this band and is limited by the uncertainty in the catalog measurements used to estimate the absolute flux scale. The simplicity and improved accuracy of Pictor A's spectrum make it an excellent calibrator in a band important for experiments seeking to measure 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization.

  1. Cascade excitation in the geocoronal hydrogen Balmer α line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, S.; Roesler, F. L.; Coakley, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports high-accuracy measurements of geocoronal Balmer α line profiles and demonstrates that the profiles are well fit with a model which includes cascade excitation by solar Lyman series radiation from n>3 in addition to the direct excitation of n=3 by solar Lyman β. The increase in the signal-to-noise of our data is made possible by the use of the Fabry-Perot annular summing technique implemented at our Fabry-Perot facility at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory. The new sensitivity has allowed us to make a detailed examination of line profile asymmetries and to conclude that they are compatible with predictions that of the order of 10% of the geocoronal Balmer α emission is caused by the cascade process. Cascade excitation alters the observed profile because it produces Balmer α emission along fine structure paths yielding slightly shifted wavelengths not present in direct Lyman β excitation, which is the predominant excitation mechanism for geocoronal Balmer α. We discuss how fine structure excitation affects studies of non-Maxwellian exospheric hydrogen velocity distributions and effective temperatures through Balmer α line profile measurements. In a broader context, we consider how inclusion of the cascade excited emission in future radiation models can enhance their accuracy and their potential for assisting in the isolation in the data of shorter-term solar geophysical effects and longer timescale changes in exospheric hydrogen densities.

  2. Imaging the redshifted 21 cm pattern around the first sources during the cosmic dawn using the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghara, Raghunath; Choudhury, T. Roy; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhuri, Samir

    2017-01-01

    Understanding properties of the first sources in the Universe using the redshifted H I 21 cm signal is one of the major aims of present and upcoming low-frequency experiments. We investigate the possibility of imaging the redshifted 21 cm pattern around the first sources during the cosmic dawn using the SKA1-low. We model the H I 21 cm image maps, appropriate for the SKA1-low, around the first sources consisting of stars and X-ray sources within galaxies. In addition to the system noise, we also account for the astrophysical foregrounds by adding them to the signal maps. We find that after subtracting the foregrounds using a polynomial fit and suppressing the noise by smoothing the maps over 10-30 arcmin angular scale, the isolated sources at z ˜ 15 are detectable with the ˜4σ-9σ confidence level in 2000 h of observation with the SKA1-low. Although the 21 cm profiles around the sources get altered because of the Gaussian smoothing, the images can still be used to extract some of the source properties. We account for overlaps in the patterns of the individual sources by generating realistic H I 21 cm maps of the cosmic dawn that are based on N-body simulations and a one-dimensional radiative transfer code. We find that these sources should be detectable in the SKA1-low images at z = 15 with a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of ˜14(4) in 2000 (200) h of observations. One possible observational strategy thus could be to observe multiple fields for shorter observation times, identify fields with SNR ≳ 3 and observe these fields for much longer duration. Such observations are expected to be useful in constraining the parameters related to the first sources.

  3. Hydrogen Balmer Line Broadening in Solar and Stellar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, Adam F.; Allred, Joel C.; Uitenbroek, Han; Tremblay, Pier-Emmanuel; Brown, Stephen; Carlsson, Mats; Osten, Rachel A.; Wisniewski, John P.; Hawley, Suzanne L.

    2017-03-01

    The broadening of the hydrogen lines during flares is thought to result from increased charge (electron, proton) density in the flare chromosphere. However, disagreements between theory and modeling prescriptions have precluded an accurate diagnostic of the degree of ionization and compression resulting from flare heating in the chromosphere. To resolve this issue, we have incorporated the unified theory of electric pressure broadening of the hydrogen lines into the non-LTE radiative-transfer code RH. This broadening prescription produces a much more realistic spectrum of the quiescent, A0 star Vega compared to the analytic approximations used as a damping parameter in the Voigt profiles. We test recent radiative-hydrodynamic (RHD) simulations of the atmospheric response to high nonthermal electron beam fluxes with the new broadening prescription and find that the Balmer lines are overbroadened at the densest times in the simulations. Adding many simultaneously heated and cooling model loops as a “multithread” model improves the agreement with the observations. We revisit the three-component phenomenological flare model of the YZ CMi Megaflare using recent and new RHD models. The evolution of the broadening, line flux ratios, and continuum flux ratios are well-reproduced by a multithread model with high-flux nonthermal electron beam heating, an extended decay phase model, and a “hot spot” atmosphere heated by an ultrarelativistic electron beam with reasonable filling factors: ∼0.1%, 1%, and 0.1% of the visible stellar hemisphere, respectively. The new modeling motivates future work to understand the origin of the extended gradual phase emission.

  4. Flow Visualization of Liquid Hydrogen Line Chilldown Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Hartwig, Jason W.; McQuillen John B.

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental measurements of wall and fluid temperature during chill-down tests of a warm cryogenic line with liquid hydrogen. Synchronized video and fluid temperature measurements are used to interpret stream temperature profiles versus time. When cold liquid hydrogen starts to flow into the warm line, a sequence of flow regimes, spanning from all-vapor at the outset to bubbly with continuum liquid at the end can be observed at a location far downstream of the cold inlet. In this paper we propose interpretations to the observed flow regimes and fluid temperature histories for two chilldown methods, viz. trickle (i.e. continuous) flow and pulse flow. Calculations of heat flux from the wall to the fluid versus wall temperature indicate the presence of the transition/nucleate boiling regimes only. The present tests, run at typical Reynolds numbers of approx O(10 (exp 5)), are in sharp contrast to similar tests conducted at lower Reynolds numbers where a well-defined film boiling region is observed.

  5. Neutral Hydrogen and Its Emission Lines in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Chane-Yook, Martine

    2016-12-01

    Since the Lyman-α rocket observations of Gabriel ( Solar Phys. 21, 392, 1971), it has been realized that the hydrogen (H) lines could be observed in the corona and that they offer an interesting diagnostic for the temperature, density, and radial velocity of the coronal plasma. Moreover, various space missions have been proposed to measure the coronal magnetic and velocity fields through polarimetry in H lines. A necessary condition for such measurements is to benefit from a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. The aim of this article is to evaluate the emission in three representative lines of H for three different coronal structures. The computations have been performed with a full non-local thermodynamic-equilibrium (non-LTE) code and its simplified version without radiative transfer. Since all collisional and radiative quantities (including incident ionizing and exciting radiation) are taken into account, the ionization is treated exactly. Profiles are presented at two heights (1.05 and 1.9 solar radii, from Sun center) in the corona, and the integrated intensities are computed at heights up to five solar radii. We compare our results with previous computations and observations ( e.g. Lα from Ultraviolet Coronal Spectrometer) and find a rough (model-dependent) agreement. Since the Hα line is a possible candidate for ground-based polarimetry, we show that in order to detect its emission in various coronal structures, it is necessary to use a very narrow (less than 2 Å wide) bandpass filter.

  6. Hydrogen line and continuum emission in young stellar objects. III - Line ratios and physical conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alonso-Costa, Jose L.; Kwan, John

    1990-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the dependence of Br-gamma/Br-alpha and other hydrogen line ratios on nucleon density (over the range 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 12th/cu cm), column density (about 10 to the 18th - 10 to the 24th/sq cm), young stellar object (YSO) luminosity (about 10-10,000 solar luminosities), and distance of the gas cloud from the YSO, r (about 10 to the 12th - 10 to the 14th cm). For a given continuum model, the value of Br-gamma/Br-alpha can provide a constraint on r. The ionization and thermal structures of the emission region are described. The electron fraction is fairly constant and is small (less than 10 percent) in the region where most of the hydrogen line fluxes are produced. The temperature in this region is also quite constant, with a value of 5000-7000 K.

  7. Can 21-cm observations discriminate between high-mass and low-mass galaxies as reionization sources?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliev, Ilian T.; Mellema, Garrelt; Shapiro, Paul R.; Pen, Ue-Li; Mao, Yi; Koda, Jun; Ahn, Kyungjin

    2012-07-01

    The prospect of detecting the first galaxies by observing their impact on the intergalactic medium (IGM) as they reionized it during the first billion years leads us to ask whether such indirect observations are capable of diagnosing which types of galaxies were most responsible for reionization. We attempt to answer this with new large-scale radiative transfer simulations of reionization including the entire mass range of atomically cooling haloes (M > 108 M⊙). We divide these haloes into two groups, high-mass, atomically cooling haloes, or HMACHs (M > 109 M⊙), and low-mass, atomically cooling haloes, or LMACHs (108 < M < 109 M⊙), the latter being susceptible to negative feedback due to Jeans mass filtering in ionized regions, which leads to a process we refer to as self-regulation. We focus here on predictions of the redshifted 21-cm emission, to see if upcoming observations are capable of distinguishing a universe ionized primarily by HMACHs from one in which both HMACHs and LMACHs are responsible, and to see how these results depend upon the uncertain source efficiencies. We find that 21-cm fluctuation power spectra observed by the first-generation Epoch of Reionization 21-cm radio interferometer arrays should be able to distinguish the case of reionization by HMACHs alone from that by both HMACHs and LMACHs, together. Some reionization scenarios, e.g. one with abundant low-efficiency sources versus one with self-regulation, yield very similar power spectra and rms evolution and thus can only be discriminated by their different mean reionization history and 21-cm probability distribution function (PDF) distributions. We also find that the skewness of the 21-cm PDF distribution smoothed with Low Frequency Array (LOFAR)-like resolution shows a clear feature correlated with the rise of the rms due to patchiness. This is independent of the reionization scenario and thus provides a new approach for detecting the rise of large-scale patchiness. The peak epoch

  8. ExoMol line lists - XV. A new hot line list for hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Refaie, Ahmed F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Ovsyannikov, Roman I.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2016-09-01

    A computed line list for hydrogen peroxide, H216O2, applicable to temperatures up to T = 1250 K is presented. A semi-empirical high-accuracy potential energy surface is constructed and used with an ab initio dipole moment surface as input TROVE to compute 7.5 million rotational-vibrational states and around 20 billion transitions with associated Einstein-A coefficients for rotational excitations up to J = 85. The resulting APTY line list is complete for wavenumbers below 6000 cm-1 (λ < 1.67 μm) and temperatures up to 1250 K. Room-temperature spectra are compared with laboratory measurements and data currently available in the HITRAN data base and literature. Our rms with line positions from the literature is 0.152 cm-1 and our absolute intensities agree better than 10 per cent. The full line list is available from the CDS data base as well as at www.exomol.com.

  9. GIANT METREWAVE RADIO TELESCOPE DETECTION OF TWO NEW H I 21 cm ABSORBERS AT z ≈ 2

    SciTech Connect

    Kanekar, N.

    2014-12-20

    I report the detection of H I 21 cm absorption in two high column density damped Lyα absorbers (DLAs) at z ≈ 2 using new wide-band 250-500 MHz receivers on board the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope. The integrated H I 21 cm optical depths are 0.85 ± 0.16 km s{sup –1} (TXS1755+578) and 2.95 ± 0.15 km s{sup –1} (TXS1850+402). For the z = 1.9698 DLA toward TXS1755+578, the difference in H I 21 cm and C I profiles and the weakness of the radio core suggest that the H I 21cm absorption arises toward radio components in the jet, and that the optical and radio sightlines are not the same. This precludes an estimate of the DLA spin temperature. For the z = 1.9888 DLA toward TXS1850+402, the absorber covering factor is likely to be close to unity, as the background source is extremely compact, with the entire 5 GHz emission arising from a region of ≤ 1.4 mas in size. This yields a DLA spin temperature of T{sub s} = (372 ± 18) × (f/1.0) K, lower than typical T{sub s} values in high-z DLAs. This low spin temperature and the relatively high metallicity of the z = 1.9888 DLA ([Zn/H] =(– 0.68 ± 0.04)) are consistent with the anti-correlation between metallicity and spin temperature that has been found earlier in damped Lyα systems.

  10. e-MERLIN 21 cm constraints on the mass-loss rates of OB stars in Cyg OB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morford, J. C.; Fenech, D. M.; Prinja, R. K.; Blomme, R.; Yates, J. A.

    2016-11-01

    We present e-MERLIN 21 cm (L-band) observations of single luminous OB stars in the Cygnus OB2 association, from the Cyg OB2 Radio Survey Legacy programme. The radio observations potentially offer the most straightforward, least model-dependent, determinations of mass-loss rates, and can be used to help resolve current discrepancies in mass-loss rates via clumped and structured hot star winds. We report here that the 21 cm flux densities of O3 to O6 supergiant and giant stars are less than ˜70 μJy. These fluxes may be translated to `smooth' wind mass-loss upper limits of ˜4.4-4.8 × 10-6 M⊙ yr -1 for O3 supergiants and ≲2.9 × 10-6 M⊙ yr -1 for B0 to B1 supergiants. The first ever resolved 21 cm detections of the hypergiant (and luminous blue variable candidate) Cyg OB2 #12 are discussed; for multiple observations separated by 14 d, we detect an ˜69 per cent increase in its flux density. Our constraints on the upper limits for the mass-loss rates of evolved OB stars in Cyg OB2 support the model that the inner wind region close to the stellar surface (where Hα forms) is more clumped than the very extended geometric region sampled by our radio observations.

  11. Low noise parametric amplifiers for radio astronomy observations at 18-21 cm wavelength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanevskiy, B. Z.; Veselov, V. M.; Strukov, I. A.; Etkin, V. S.

    1974-01-01

    The principle characteristics and use of SHF parametric amplifiers for radiometer input devices are explored. Balanced parametric amplifiers (BPA) are considered as the SHF signal amplifiers allowing production of the amplifier circuit without a special filter to achieve decoupling. Formulas to calculate the basic parameters of a BPA are given. A modulator based on coaxial lines is discussed as the input element of the SHF. Results of laboratory tests of the receiver section and long-term stability studies of the SHF sector are presented.

  12. Will nonlinear peculiar velocity and inhomogeneous reionization spoil 21 cm cosmology from the epoch of reionization?

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Paul R; Mao, Yi; Iliev, Ilian T; Mellema, Garrelt; Datta, Kanan K; Ahn, Kyungjin; Koda, Jun

    2013-04-12

    The 21 cm background from the epoch of reionization is a promising cosmological probe: line-of-sight velocity fluctuations distort redshift, so brightness fluctuations in Fourier space depend upon angle, which linear theory shows can separate cosmological from astrophysical information. Nonlinear fluctuations in ionization, density, and velocity change this, however. The validity and accuracy of the separation scheme are tested here for the first time, by detailed reionization simulations. The scheme works reasonably well early in reionization (≲40% ionized), but not late (≳80% ionized).

  13. SunLine Test Drives Hydrogen Bus: Hydrogen Fuel Cell& Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Projects (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Eudy, L.

    2003-08-01

    Fact sheet describes the ThunderPower hydrogen fuel cell bus that was demonstrated at SunLine Transit Agency from November 2002 to February 2003. The bus was evaluated by DOE's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity.

  14. INTERPRETING THE GLOBAL 21-cm SIGNAL FROM HIGH REDSHIFTS. II. PARAMETER ESTIMATION FOR MODELS OF GALAXY FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Mirocha, Jordan; Burns, Jack O.; Harker, Geraint J. A.

    2015-11-01

    Following our previous work, which related generic features in the sky-averaged (global) 21-cm signal to properties of the intergalactic medium, we now investigate the prospects for constraining a simple galaxy formation model with current and near-future experiments. Markov-Chain Monte Carlo fits to our synthetic data set, which includes a realistic galactic foreground, a plausible model for the signal, and noise consistent with 100 hr of integration by an ideal instrument, suggest that a simple four-parameter model that links the production rate of Lyα, Lyman-continuum, and X-ray photons to the growth rate of dark matter halos can be well-constrained (to ∼0.1 dex in each dimension) so long as all three spectral features expected to occur between 40 ≲ ν/MHz ≲ 120 are detected. Several important conclusions follow naturally from this basic numerical result, namely that measurements of the global 21-cm signal can in principle (i) identify the characteristic halo mass threshold for star formation at all redshifts z ≳ 15, (ii) extend z ≲ 4 upper limits on the normalization of the X-ray luminosity star formation rate (L{sub X}–SFR) relation out to z ∼ 20, and (iii) provide joint constraints on stellar spectra and the escape fraction of ionizing radiation at z ∼ 12. Though our approach is general, the importance of a broadband measurement renders our findings most relevant to the proposed Dark Ages Radio Explorer, which will have a clean view of the global 21-cm signal from ∼40 to 120 MHz from its vantage point above the radio-quiet, ionosphere-free lunar far-side.

  15. Multi-redshift limits on the 21cm power spectrum from PAPER 64: XRays in the early universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolopanis, Matthew; Jacobs, Danny; PAPER Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Here we present new constraints on 21cm emission from cosmic reionization from the 64 element deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER). These results extend the single redshift 8.4 result presented in Ali et al 2015 to include redshifts from 7.3 to 10.9. These new limits offer as much as a factor of 4 improvement in sensitivity compared to previous 32 element PAPER results by Jacobs et al (2015). Using these limits we place constraints on a parameterized model of heating due to XRays emitted by early collapsed objects.

  16. Spatially Extended 21 cm Signal from Strongly Clustered Uv and X-Ray Sources in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Kyungjin; Xu, Hao; Norman, Michael L.; Alvarez, Marcelo A.; Wise, John H.

    2015-03-01

    We present our prediction for the local 21 cm differential brightness temperature (δTb) from a set of strongly clustered sources of Population III (Pop III) and II (Pop II) objects in the early universe, by a numerical simulation of their formation and radiative feedback. These objects are located inside a highly biased environment, which is a rare, high-density peak (“Rarepeak”) extending to ∼7 comoving Mpc. We study the impact of ultraviolet and X-ray photons on the intergalactic medium (IGM) and the resulting δTb, when Pop III stars are assumed to emit X-ray photons by forming X-ray binaries very efficiently. We parameterize the rest-frame spectral energy distribution of X-ray photons, which regulates X-ray photon-trapping, IGM-heating, secondary Lyα pumping and the resulting morphology of δTb. A combination of emission (δTb > 0) and absorption (δTb < 0) regions appears in varying amplitudes and angular scales. The boost of the signal by the high-density environment (δ ∼ 0.64) and on a relatively large scale combines to make Rarepeak a discernible, spatially extended (θ ∼ 10‧) object for 21 cm observation at 13 ≲ z ≲ 17, which is found to be detectable as a single object by SKA with integration time of ∼1000 hr. Power spectrum analysis by some of the SKA precursors (Low Frequency Array, Murchison Widefield Array, Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization) of such rare peaks is found to be difficult due to the rarity of these peaks, and the contribution only by these rare peaks to the total power spectrum remains subdominant compared to that by all astrophysical sources.

  17. Interpreting near-infrared hydrogen line ratios in T Tauri stars

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Suzan; Fedorenko, Kristina; Feng, Wanda; Kwan, John; Fischer, William; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Finn, Kimberly E-mail: kwan@astro.umass.edu E-mail: lah@astro.caltech.edu

    2013-12-01

    In accreting young stars, one of the prominent spectral features in the near-infrared is the Paschen and Brackett series in emission. We examine hydrogen line ratios for 16 classical T Tauri stars from SpeX spectra and assess the trends with veiling and accretion. The observed line ratios are compared with two theoretical models for line formation: (1) Baker and Menzel's Case B for radiative ionization and recombination and (2) a set of local line excitation calculations designed to replicate the conditions in T Tauri winds and magnetic accretion columns (KF). While the comparison between Case B and observed line ratios implies a wide range in electron density and temperature among the hydrogen line formation regions in T Tauri stars, the predictions of the local line excitation models give consistent results across multiple diagnostics. Under the assumptions of the local line excitation calculations, we find that n {sub H} in the hydrogen line formation region is constrained to 2 × 10{sup 10}-2 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup –3}, where stars with higher accretion rates have densities at the higher end of this range. Because of uncertainties in extinction, temperature is not well delineated, but falls within the range expected for collisional excitation to produce the line photons. We introduce new diagnostics for assessing extinction based on near-infrared hydrogen line ratios from the local line excitation calculations.

  18. Atomic hydrogen in planetary nebulae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Stephen E.; Silverglate, Peter R.; Altschuler, Daniel R.; Giovanardi, Carlo

    1987-01-01

    The authors searched for neutral atomic hydrogen associated with 22 planetary nebulae and three evolved stars in the 21 cm line at the Arecibo Observatory. Objects whose radial velocities permitted discrimination from Galactic H I were chosen for observation. Hydrogen was detected in absorption from IC 4997. From the measurements new low limits are derived to the mass of atomic hydrogen associated with the undetected nebulae. Radio continuum observations were also made of several of the nebulae at 12.6 cm. The authors reexamine previous measurements of H I in planetary nebulae, and present the data on a consistent footing. The question of planetary nebula distances is considered at length. Finally, implications of the H I measurements for nebular evolution are discussed and it is suggested that atomic hydrogen seen in absorption was expelled from the progenitor star during the final 1000 yr prior to the onset of ionization.

  19. On the line Q degradation in hydrogen masers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernier, L. G.; Busca, Giovanni; Schweda, Hartmut S.

    1990-01-01

    In hydrogen masers, the atomic resonance quality factor is largely determined by the properties of the Teflon coating on the quartz storage bulb. Normally a good Teflon coating will last many years. On the other hand, there may be a relatively fast degradation of the quality factor if the Teflon coating is bad. A series of observations and measurements performed on an hydrogen maser that had successively a bad and a good Teflon coating are discussed.

  20. Comparison of 2.8- and 21-cm microwave radiometer observations over soils with emission model calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, W. J.; Schmugge, T.; Paris, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    An airborne experiment was conducted under NASA auspices to test the feasibility of detecting soil moisture by microwave remote sensing techniques over agricultural fields near Phoenix, Arizona at midday of April 5, 1974 and at dawn of the following day. Extensive ground data were obtained from 96 bare, sixteen hectare fields. Observations made using a scanning (2.8 cm) and a nonscanning (21 cm) radiometer were compared with the predictions of a radiative transfer emission model. It is shown that (1) the emitted intensity at both wavelengths correlates best with the near surface moisture, (2) surface roughness is found to more strongly affect the degree of polarization than the emitted intensity, (3) the slope of the intensity-moisture curves decreases in going from day to dawn, and (4) increased near surface moisture at dawn is characterized by increased polarization of emissions. The results of the experiment indicate that microwave techniques can be used to observe the history of the near surface moisture. The subsurface history must be inferred from soil physics models which use microwave results as boundary conditions.

  1. Calibration of the EDGES High-band Receiver to Observe the Global 21 cm Signature from the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Raul A.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Bowman, Judd D.; Mozdzen, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The EDGES High-Band experiment aims to detect the sky-average brightness temperature of the 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization in the redshift range 14.8≳ z≳ 6.5. To probe this redshifted signal, EDGES High-Band conducts single-antenna measurements in the frequency range 90–190 MHz from the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. In this paper, we describe the current strategy for calibration of the EDGES High-Band receiver and report calibration results for the instrument used in the 2015–2016 observational campaign. We propagate uncertainties in the receiver calibration measurements to the antenna temperature using a Monte Carlo approach. We define a performance objective of 1 mK residual rms after modeling foreground subtraction from a fiducial temperature spectrum using a five-term polynomial. Most of the calibration uncertainties yield residuals of 1 mK or less at 95 % confidence. However, current uncertainties in the antenna and receiver reflection coefficients can lead to residuals of up to 20 mK even in low-foreground sky regions. These dominant residuals could be reduced by (1) improving the accuracy in reflection measurements, especially their phase, (2) improving the impedance match at the antenna-receiver interface, and (3) decreasing the changes with frequency of the antenna reflection phase.

  2. Stark broadening of hydrogen lines in magnetic fusion plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, J.; Godbert-Mouret, L.; Koubiti, M.; Marandet, Y.; Stamm, R.

    2017-03-01

    We report on a Stark line shape model for the diagnostic of tokamak edge plasmas. In specific scenarios, plasma discharges are carried out at high density regimes, sufficiently so that the spectral lines emitted by the neutral atoms present in the edge and in the divertor region are affected by the plasma microscopic electric field (Stark broadening). We present new line shape calculations, carried out for diagnostic purposes in the context of the MST1 (Medium Sized Tokamak) European campaign. The role of the magnetic field (Zeeman effect) on line spectra is discussed.

  3. A Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope search for associated H I 21 cm absorption in high-redshift flat-spectrum sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aditya, J. N. H. S.; Kanekar, Nissim; Kurapati, Sushma

    2016-02-01

    We report results from a Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope search for `associated' redshifted H I 21 cm absorption from 24 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), at 1.1 < z < 3.6, selected from the Caltech-Jodrell Bank Flat-spectrum (CJF) sample. 22 out of 23 sources with usable data showed no evidence of absorption, with typical 3σ optical depth detection limits of ≈0.01 at a velocity resolution of ≈30 km s-1. A single tentative absorption detection was obtained at z ≈ 3.530 towards TXS 0604+728. If confirmed, this would be the highest redshift at which H I 21 cm absorption has ever been detected. Including 29 CJF sources with searches for redshifted H I 21 cm absorption in the literature, mostly at z < 1, we construct a sample of 52 uniformly selected flat-spectrum sources. A Peto-Prentice two-sample test for censored data finds (at ≈3σ significance) that the strength of H I 21 cm absorption is weaker in the high-z sample than in the low-z sample; this is the first statistically significant evidence for redshift evolution in the strength of H I 21 cm absorption in a uniformly selected AGN sample. However, the two-sample test also finds that the H I 21 cm absorption strength is higher in AGNs with low ultraviolet or radio luminosities, at ≈3.4σ significance. The fact that the higher luminosity AGNs of the sample typically lie at high redshifts implies that it is currently not possible to break the degeneracy between AGN luminosity and redshift evolution as the primary cause of the low H I 21 cm opacities in high-redshift, high-luminosity AGNs.

  4. SunLine Leads the Way in Demonstrating Hydrogen-Fueled Bus Technologies (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-01-01

    This brochure describes SunLine Transit Agency's newest advanced technology fuel cell electric bus. SunLine is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program to evaluate the bus in revenue service. This bus represents the sixth generation of hydrogen-fueled buses that the agency has operated since 2000.

  5. Hydrogen Lines in Mira Stars Through Interferometry and Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabas, N.; Chiavassa, A.; Millour, F.; Wittkowski, M.

    2015-12-01

    Balmer lines in emission are the most prominent features in Mira stars spectra and have a strong potential as a proxy to study the lower atmosphere's dynamics. In Fabas et al. ([1]), we accumulated spectropolarimetric observations of Balmer lines in emission. As the shock is propagating outwards, linear polarization rate increases and the angle of this polarization evolves. Assuming that linear polarization arises from anisotropic scattering, it has the potential of telling us about the geometric structure of the shock as it propagates and the study of such atmospheric structures can typically be performed with interferometry. In 2012, AMBER data on the Mira star omicron Ceti were collected in which the Brackett γ line is studied. The data show signatures in the interferometric observables around this line. Olivier Chesneau was in the jury evaluating the PhD thesis of N. Fabas and he was seduced by the idea to study these shock waves with interferometry and use polarimetry as a complementary study.

  6. H I 21-cm absorption survey of quasar-galaxy pairs: distribution of cold gas around z < 0.4 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, R.; Srianand, R.; Gupta, N.; Momjian, E.; Noterdaeme, P.; Petitjean, P.; Rahmani, H.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results from our survey of H I 21-cm absorption, using Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, Very Large Array and Westerbork Radio Synthesis Telescope, in a sample of 55 z < 0.4 galaxies towards radio sources with impact parameters (b) in the range ˜0-35 kpc. In our primary sample (defined for statistical analyses) of 40 quasar-galaxy pairs, probed by 45 sightlines, we have found seven H I 21-cm absorption detections, two of which are reported here for the first time. Combining our primary sample with measurements having similar optical depth sensitivity (∫τdv ≤ 0.3 km s-1) from the literature, we find a weak anti-correlation (rank correlation coefficient = -0.20 at 2.42σ level) between ∫τdv and b, consistent with previous literature results. The covering factor of H I 21-cm absorbers (C21) is estimated to be 0.24^{+0.12}_{-0.08} at b ≤ 15 kpc and 0.06^{+0.09}_{-0.04} at b = 15-35 kpc. ∫τdv and C21 show similar declining trend with radial distance along the galaxy's major axis and distances scaled with the effective H I radius. There is also tentative indication that most of the H I 21-cm absorbers could be co-planar with the extended H I discs. No significant dependence of ∫τdv and C21 on galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, colour and star formation rate is found, though the H I 21-cm absorbing gas cross-section may be larger for the luminous galaxies. The higher detection rate (by a factor of ˜4) of H I 21-cm absorption in z < 1 damped Lyman-α systems compared to the quasar-galaxy pairs indicates towards small covering factor and patchy distribution of cold gas clouds around low-z galaxies.

  7. The Effects of the Ionosphere on Ground-based Detection of the Global 21 cm Signal from the Cosmic Dawn and the Dark Ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Abhirup; Bradley, Richard; Burns, Jack O.; Harker, Geraint; Komjathy, Attila; Lazio, T. Joseph W.

    2016-11-01

    Detection of the global H i 21 cm signal from the Cosmic Dawn and the Epoch of Reionization is the key science driver for several ongoing ground-based and future ground-/space-based experiments. The crucial spectral features in the global 21 cm signal (turning points) occur at low radio frequencies ≲ 100 {{MHz}}. In addition to the human-generated radio frequency interference, Earth’s ionosphere drastically corrupts low-frequency radio observations from the ground. In this paper, we examine the effects of time-varying ionospheric refraction, absorption, and thermal emission at these low radio frequencies and their combined effect on any ground-based global 21 cm experiment. It should be noted that this is the first study of the effect of a dynamic ionosphere on global 21 cm experiments. The fluctuations in the ionosphere are influenced by solar activity with flicker noise characteristics. The same characteristics are reflected in the ionospheric corruption to any radio signal passing through the ionosphere. As a result, any ground-based observations of the faint global 21 cm signal are corrupted by flicker noise (or 1/f noise, where f is the dynamical frequency) which scales as {ν }-2 (where ν is the frequency of radio observation) in the presence of a bright galactic foreground (\\propto {ν }-s, where s is the radio spectral index). Hence, the calibration of the ionosphere for any such experiment is critical. Any attempt to calibrate the ionospheric effects will be subject to the inaccuracies in the current ionospheric measurements using Global Positioning System (GPS) ionospheric measurements, riometer measurements, ionospheric soundings, etc. Even considering an optimistic improvement in the accuracy of GPS-total electron content measurements, we conclude that Earth’s ionosphere poses a significant challenge in the absolute detection of the global 21 cm signal below 100 MHz.

  8. Dust clouds in Orion and the interstellar neutral hydrogen distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bystrova, N. V.

    1989-01-01

    According to published examples of the far IR observations in the Orion and its surroundings, several well defined dust clouds of different sizes and structure are present. For comparison of these clouds with the neutral hydrogen distribution on the area of approx. 1000 sq degs, the data from Pulkovo Sky Survey in the interstellar neutral Hydrogen Radio Line as well as special observations with the RATAN-600 telescope in 21 cm line were used. From the materials of Pulkovo HI Survey, the data were taken near the line emission at ten velocities between -21.8 and +25.6 km/s LSR for the structural component of the interstellar hydrogen emission. The results given concern mainly the Orion's Great Dust Cloud and the Lambda Orionis region where the information about the situation with the dust and interstellar hydrogen is very essential for interpretation.

  9. The contribution of dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines in hydrogen plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunc, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The contribution of molecular dissociative processes to the production of atomic lines is considered for a steady-state hydrogen plasma. If the contribution of dissociative processes is dominant, a substantial simplification in plasma diagnostics can be achieved. Numerical calculations have been performed for the production of Balmer alpha, beta, and gamma lines in hydrogen plasmas with medium and large degrees of ionization (x greater than about 0.0001) and for electron temperatures of 5000-45,000 K and electron densities of 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 16th/cu cm.

  10. Spectral line shapes using the dicenter approach for dense hot plasmas: hydrogen and helium-like lines.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauvan, P.; Leboucher-Dalimier, E.; Angelo, P.; Derfoul, H.; Ceccotti, T.; Poquerusse, A.; Calisti, A.; Talin, B.

    2000-05-01

    This paper reports on the spectral line shape of hydrogen and helium-like lines relevant to the quasi-static dicenter model. This treatment is justified for hot dense, moderate Z plasmas. The code IDEFIX developed for the quasi-static dicenter model involves a self-consistent description of the interactions and of the radiative properties. Strong dependence of the transition energies and of the dipole moments on the interionic separation are pointed out and novel density-dependent spectroscopic features such as asymmetries, satellite-like features, molecular transitions are exhibited. The theoretical spectra presented are discussed in connection with experimental results where these exist.

  11. THE IMPORTANCE OF WIDE-FIELD FOREGROUND REMOVAL FOR 21 cm COSMOLOGY: A DEMONSTRATION WITH EARLY MWA EPOCH OF REIONIZATION OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pober, J. C.; Hazelton, B. J.; Beardsley, A. P.; Barry, N. A.; Martinot, Z. E.; Sullivan, I. S.; Morales, M. F.; Carroll, P.; Bell, M. E.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Emrich, D.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; De Oliveira-Costa, A.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dillon, Joshua S.; Ewall-Wice, A. M.; and others

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that removing a foreground model that includes sources in both the main field of view and the first sidelobes reduces the contamination in high k{sub ∥} modes by several per cent relative to a model that only includes sources in the main field of view, with the completeness of the foreground model setting the principal limitation on the amount of power removed. While small, a percent-level amount of foreground power is in itself more than enough to prevent recovery of any Epoch of Reionization signal from these modes. This result demonstrates that foreground subtraction for redshifted 21 cm experiments is truly a wide-field problem, and algorithms and simulations must extend beyond the instrument’s main field of view to potentially recover the full 21 cm power spectrum.

  12. The Importance of Wide-field Foreground Removal for 21 cm Cosmology: A Demonstration with Early MWA Epoch of Reionization Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pober, J. C.; Hazelton, B. J.; Beardsley, A. P.; Barry, N. A.; Martinot, Z. E.; Sullivan, I. S.; Morales, M. F.; Bell, M. E.; Bernardi, G.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Carroll, P.; Corey, B. E.; de Oliveira-Costa, A.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dillon, Joshua. S.; Emrich, D.; Ewall-Wice, A. M.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hewitt, J. N.; Hindson, L.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Jacobs, D. C.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Kim, Han-Seek; Kittiwisit, P.; Kratzenberg, E.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lenc, E.; Line, J.; Loeb, A.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Lynch, M. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morgan, E.; Neben, A. R.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A. R.; Ord, S. M.; Paul, Sourabh; Pindor, B.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Roshi, A.; Sethi, Shiv K.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tegmark, M.; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Tingay, S. J.; Trott, C. M.; Waterson, M.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Whitney, A. R.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present observations, simulations, and analysis demonstrating the direct connection between the location of foreground emission on the sky and its location in cosmological power spectra from interferometric redshifted 21 cm experiments. We begin with a heuristic formalism for understanding the mapping of sky coordinates into the cylindrically averaged power spectra measurements used by 21 cm experiments, with a focus on the effects of the instrument beam response and the associated sidelobes. We then demonstrate this mapping by analyzing power spectra with both simulated and observed data from the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that removing a foreground model that includes sources in both the main field of view and the first sidelobes reduces the contamination in high k∥ modes by several per cent relative to a model that only includes sources in the main field of view, with the completeness of the foreground model setting the principal limitation on the amount of power removed. While small, a percent-level amount of foreground power is in itself more than enough to prevent recovery of any Epoch of Reionization signal from these modes. This result demonstrates that foreground subtraction for redshifted 21 cm experiments is truly a wide-field problem, and algorithms and simulations must extend beyond the instrument’s main field of view to potentially recover the full 21 cm power spectrum.

  13. Line centers, pressure shift, and pressure broadening of 1530-1560 nm hydrogen cyanide wavelength calibration lines

    SciTech Connect

    Swann, William C.; Gilbert, Sarah L.

    2005-08-01

    We have measured the line centers and pressure-induced shift and broadening of 25 lines in the 2{nu}{sub 3} rotational-vibrational band of hydrogen cyanide H{sup 13}C{sup 14}N. These lines can be used as wavelength references in the optical fiber communication wavelength division multiplexing C-band (approximately 1530-1565 nm). We find that the pressure shift varies with line number from +0.09 pm/kPa to -0.15 pm/kPa (approximately -1.5 to +2.5 MHz/Torr). The pressure broadening also varies with line number and is typically between 1 and 5.4 pm/kPa (17-90 MHz/Torr). We determined the line centers of 21 lines with an expanded uncertainty (2{sigma}) of 0.01 pm ({approx_equal}1 MHz), an improvement of more than 1 order of magnitude over previous line center measurements of this band. We also calculate the molecular constants for the band, yielding improved determination of the band origin frequency and the excited-state molecular constants.

  14. Statistics of the epoch of reionization (EoR) 21-cm signal - II. The evolution of the power-spectrum error-covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Rajesh; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Majumdar, Suman

    2017-01-01

    The epoch of reionization (EoR) 21-cm signal is expected to become highly non-Gaussian as reionization progresses. This severely affects the error-covariance of the EoR 21-cm power spectrum that is important for predicting the prospects of a detection with ongoing and future experiments. Most earlier works have assumed that the EoR 21-cm signal is a Gaussian random field where (1) the error-variance depends only on the power spectrum and the number of Fourier modes in the particular k bin, and (2) the errors in the different k bins are uncorrelated. Here, we use an ensemble of simulated 21-cm maps to analyse the error-covariance at various stages of reionization. We find that even at the very early stages of reionization (bar{x}_{H I}˜ 0.9), the error-variance significantly exceeds the Gaussian predictions at small length-scales (k > 0.5 Mpc-1) while they are consistent at larger scales. The errors in most k bins (both large and small scales) are however found to be correlated. Considering the later stages (bar{x}_{H I}=0.15), the error-variance shows an excess in all k bins within k ≥ 0.1 Mpc-1, and it is around 200 times larger than the Gaussian prediction at k ˜ 1 Mpc-1. The errors in the different k bins are all also highly correlated, barring the two smallest k bins that are anti-correlated with the other bins. Our results imply that the predictions for different 21-cm experiments based on the Gaussian assumption underestimate the errors, and it is necessary to incorporate the non-Gaussianity for more realistic predictions.

  15. Ratios of molecular hydrogen line intensities in shocked gas - Evidence for cooling zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, P. W. J. L.; Moorhouse, A.; Bird, M.; Burton, M. G.; Geballe, T. R.

    1988-01-01

    Column densities of molecular hydrogen have been calculated from 19 infrared vibration-rotation and pure rotational line intensities measured at peak 1 of the Orion molecular outflow. The run of column density with energy level is similar to a simple coolng zone model of the line-emitting region, but is not well fitted by predictions of C-shock models current in the literature.

  16. Standard line broadening impact theory for hydrogen including penetrating collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexiou, S.; Poquérusse, A.

    2005-10-01

    In recent years there has been significant interest in the emission spectra from high-density plasmas, as manifested by a number of experiments. At these high densities short range (small impact parameter) interactions become important and these cannot be adequately handled by the standard theory, whose predictions depend on some cutoffs, necessary to preserve unitarity, the long range approximation, and to ensure the validity of a semiclassical picture. Very recently, as a result of a debate concerning the broadening of isolated ion lines, the importance of penetration of bound electron wave functions by plasma electrons has been realized. By softening the interaction, penetration makes perturbative treatments more valid. The penetration effect has now been included analytically into the standard theory. It turns out that the integrations may be done in closed form in terms of the modified Bessel functions K0 and K1 . This work develops the new theory and applies it to experimental measurements.

  17. Mid Infrared Hydrogen Recombination Line Emission from the Maser Star MWC 349A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Howard A.; Strelnitski, V.; Miles, J. W.; Kelly, D. M.; Lacy, J. H.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected and spectrally resolved the mid-IR hydrogen recombination lines H6(alpha)(12.372 micrometers), H7(alpha)(19.062 micrometers), H7(beta)(l1.309 micrometers) and H8(gamma)(12.385 micrometers) from the star MWC349A. This object has strong hydrogen maser emission (reported in the millimeter and submillimeter hydrogen recombination lines from H36(alpha) to H21(alpha)) and laser emission (reported in the H15(alpha), H12(alpha) and H10(alpha) lines). The lasers/masers are thought to arise predominantly in a Keplerian disk around the star. The mid-IR lines do not show evident signs of lasing, and can be well modeled as arising from the strong stellar wind, with a component arising from a quasi-static atmosphere around the disk, similar to what is hypothesized for the near IR (less than or equal to 4 micrometers) recombination lines. Since populations inversions in the levels producing these mid-IR transitions are expected at densities up to approximately 10(exp 11)/cu cm, these results imply either that the disk does not contain high-density ionized gas over long enough path lengths to produce a gain approximately 1, and/or that any laser emission from such regions is small compared to the spontaneous background emission from the rest of the source as observed with a large beam. The results reinforce the interpretation of the far-IR lines as true lasers.

  18. Carbon and hydrogen radio recombination lines from the cold clouds towards Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oonk, J. B. R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Salas, P.; Salgado, F.; Morabito, L. K.; Toribio, M. C.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Röttgering, H. J. A.

    2017-02-01

    We use the Low Frequency Array to perform a systematic high spectral resolution investigation of the low-frequency 33-78 MHz spectrum along the line of sight to Cassiopeia A. We complement this with a 304-386 MHz Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observation. In this first paper, we focus on the carbon radio recombination lines. We detect Cnα lines at -47 and -38 km s-1 in absorption for quantum numbers n = 438-584 and in emission for n = 257-278 with a high signal-to-noise ratio. These lines are associated with cold clouds in the Perseus spiral arm component. Hnα lines are detected in emission for n = 257-278. In addition, we also detect Cnα lines at 0 km s-1 associated with the Orion arm. We analyse the optical depth of these transitions and their linewidth. Our models show that the carbon line components in the Perseus arm are best fitted with an electron temperature of 85 K and an electron density of 0.04 cm-3 and can be constrained to within 15 per cent. The electron pressure is constrained to within 20 per cent. We argue that most of these carbon radio recombination lines arise in the CO-dark surface layers of molecular clouds, where most of the carbon is ionized, but hydrogen has made the transition from atomic to molecular. The hydrogen lines are clearly associated with the carbon line emitting clouds, but the low-frequency upper limits indicate that they likely do not trace the same gas. Combining the hydrogen and carbon results, we arrive at a firm lower limit to the cosmic-ray ionization rate of 2.5 × 10-18 s-1, but the actual value is likely much larger.

  19. OBSERVATIONAL PROPERTIES OF ROTATIONALLY EXCITED MOLECULAR HYDROGEN IN TRANSLUCENT LINES OF SIGHT

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Adam G.; Sonneborn, George; Snow, Theodore P.; Rachford, Brian L. E-mail: George.Sonneborn@nasa.go E-mail: rachf7ac@erau.ed

    2010-03-10

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) has allowed precise determinations of the column densities of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) in Galactic lines of sight with a wide range of pathlengths and extinction properties. However, survey studies of lines of sight with greater extinction have been mostly restricted to the low-J states (lower total angular momentum) in which most molecular hydrogen is observed. This paper presents a survey of column densities for the molecular hydrogen in states of greater rotational excitation (J >= 2) in Galactic lines of sight with log N(H{sub 2}) {approx}> 20. This study is comprehensive through the highest excited state detectable in each line of sight. J = 5 is observed in every line of sight, and we detect J = 7 in four lines of sight, J = 8 in one line of sight, and vibrationally excited H{sub 2} in two lines of sight. We compared the apparent b-values and velocity offsets of the higher-J states relative to the dominant low-J states and we found no evidence of any trends that might provide insight into the formation of higher-J H{sub 2}, although these results are the most affected by the limits of the FUSE resolution. We also derive excitation temperatures based on the column densities of the different states. We confirm that at least two distinct temperatures are necessary to adequately describe these lines of sight, and that more temperatures are probably necessary. Total H{sub 2} column density is known to be correlated with other molecules; we explore if correlations vary as a function of J for several molecules, most importantly CH and CH{sup +}. Finally, we briefly discuss interpretations of selected lines of sight by comparing them to models computed using the Meudon PDR code.

  20. What sort of standard candle is Orion for studying molecular hydrogen line emission in galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Michael; Puxley, Phil J.

    1990-01-01

    The total shocked and fluorescent molecular hydrogen 1-0 S(1) line luminosities from Orion have been measured to be about 2.5 solar luminosity and about 2.0 solar luminosity, respectively. The implications for using Orion to study the interstellar medium in galaxies is discussed.

  1. ACCRETION RATES OF RED QUASARS FROM THE HYDROGENLINE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Glikman, Eilat; Woo, Jong-Hak; Urrutia, Tanya E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-10-10

    Red quasars are thought to be an intermediate population between merger-driven star-forming galaxies in dust-enshrouded phase and normal quasars. If so, they are expected to have high accretion ratios, but their intrinsic dust extinction hampers reliable determination of Eddington ratios. Here, we compare the accretion rates of 16 red quasars at z ∼ 0.7 to those of normal type 1 quasars at the same redshift range. The red quasars are selected by their red colors in optical through near-infrared (NIR) and radio detection. The accretion rates of the red quasars are derived from the Pβ line in NIR spectra, which is obtained by the SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility in order to avoid the effects of dust extinction. We find that the measured Eddington ratios (L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} ≃ 0.69) of red quasars are significantly higher than those of normal type 1 quasars, which is consistent with a scenario in which red quasars are the intermediate population and the black holes of red quasars grow very rapidly during such a stage.

  2. Emission-line spectra of circumstellar envelopes - Infrared hydrogen line fluxes from Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, S. E.; McGregor, P. J.

    1985-09-01

    Fluxes for eight H I emission lines between 1.28 and 4.67 μm are presented for a sample of seven Be stars. Brα fluxes are given for six additional Be stars. The H I line ratios form the basis for an observational test of models for emission from circumstellar shells that have a range of Brα optical depths well in excess of unity. Enough data on optically thick H I, Ca II, and O I line strengths of circumstellar envelope stars now exist that it should be possible to place detailed radiative-transfer calculations of optically thick envelope emission on a secure observational footing. Comparisons of line ratios with the models by Simon et al. for infrared line emission from stellar winds show promise. The Be star H I line ratios can also be compared with similar data for deeply dust-embedded young stellar objects. These enigmatic objects display stronger H I lines per unit luminosity than the Be stars, but share similar overall envelope physical conditions. Several infrared line ratios are examined to lay the groundwork for extinction determinations and guidelines for radiative-transfer models.

  3. Infrared recombination lines of hydrogen from young objects in the southern Galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Sara C.; Fischer, Jacqueline; Smith, Howard A.

    1991-01-01

    Near infrared recombination lines of hydrogen are observed in twelve young objects in the southern Galactic plane. The sample includes Herbig-Haro objects and IRAS dark-cloud point sources from the 1987 catalog of Persson and Campbell. In four of the IRAS sources two or three infrared lines are measured, and their intensity ratios are consistent with models of optically thick ionized winds. The intrinsic line shapes, retrieved from maximum-entropy deconvolutions, indicate gas velocities of 100 km/s or more as expected from ionized winds. These sources are apparently embedded pre-main-sequence objects with outflows. They include some of the brightest known YSOs.

  4. High-excitation lines of molecular hydrogen: A discriminant between shock models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M.; Brand, P.; Moorhouse, A.; Geballe, T.

    1989-01-01

    The results of column densities of molecular hydrogen, calculated from nineteen infrared line intensities, are discussed. They were measured at peak 1 of the outflow of the Orion molecular cloud OMC-1. The 1-0 O(7) and 0-0 S(13) lines of H2, at 3.8 microns, are mapped over the source. Their intensity ratio is found to be independent of position in the outflow. These observations are well fitted by a simple cooling-flow model of the line emitting region, but seem to be at variance with predictions of C-shocks current in the literature.

  5. Recombination line intensities for hydrogenic ions. III - Effects of finite optical depth and dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hummer, D. G.; Storey, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    The effect on the recombination spectrum of hydrogen arising from: (1) finite optical thickness in the Lyman lines; (2) the overlapping of Lyman lines near the series limit; (3) the absorption of Lyman lines by dust or photoionization, and (4) the long-wave radiation emitted by dust is examined. Full account is taken of electron and heavy particle collisions in redistributing energy and angular momentum. It is seen that each of these deviations from the classical Case B leads to observable effects, and that dust influences the recombination spectrum in characteristic ways that may make possible new observational constraints on dust properties in nebulosities. On the basis of these calculations it is believed that the uncertainty in the determination of the helium-to-hydrogen abundance ratio in the universe may be larger than currently claimed.

  6. Radiolytic hydrogen production from process vessels in HB line - production rates compared to evolution rates and discussion of LASL reviews

    SciTech Connect

    Bibler, N.E.

    1992-11-12

    Hydrogen production from radiolysis of aqueous solutions can create a safety hazard since hydrogen is flammable. At times this production can be significant, especially in HB line where nitric acid solutions containing high concentrations of Pu-238, an intense alpha emitter, are processed. The hydrogen production rates from these solutions are necessary for safety analyses of these process systems. The methods and conclusions of hydrogen production rate tests are provided in this report.

  7. Role of Lorentz-Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines in magnetized plasmas: Applications to magnetic fusion and solar physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Eugene

    2015-05-01

    Broadening of hydrogen spectral lines in plasmas is an important diagnostic tool for many applications (here and below by "hydrogen atoms" and "hydrogen spectral lines" we mean atoms and spectral lines of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium). In magnetized plasmas radiating hydrogen atoms moving with the velocity v across the magnetic field B experience a Lorentz electric field EL=v×B/c in addition to other electric fields. Since the velocity v has a distribution, so does the Lorentz field, thus making an additional contribution to the broadening of spectral lines. Compared to previous studies of this contribution, we cover the following new aspects. First, we consider the Lorentz-Doppler broadening of highly-excited hydrogen lines and produce new analytical results for arbitrary strength of the magnetic field B. We show for the first time that in the high-B case, the π-components of hydrogen lines are significantly suppressed compared to the σ-components. Second, we derive analytically Lorentz-broadened profiles of highly-excited hydrogen lines. We obtain expressions for the principal quantum number nmax of the last observable hydrogen line in the spectral series. These expressions differ very significantly from the corresponding Inglis-Teller result and constitute a new diagnostic method allowing to measure the product T1/2B, where T is the atomic temperature. Third, we consider magnetized plasmas containing a low-frequency electrostatic turbulence. This kind of turbulence causes anomalous transport phenomena (e.g., the anomalous resistivity) and is therefore very important to be diagnosed. We derive analytically distributions of the total electric field and the corresponding Stark profiles of hydrogen lines. We demonstrate that our findings lead to a significantly revised interpretation of the previous and future experimental data in magnetic fusion and the observational data in solar physics.

  8. Broadening and shift of Fe I lines perturbed by atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, M.T.; Marmolino, C.; Roberti, R.; Severino, G.

    1987-01-01

    The broadening and shift parameters for a number of Fe I lines perturbed by atomic hydrogen are computed using the interatomic potential due to Hindmarsh et al (1967, 1970). It is also shown that the rms radius and the effective radius of the radiating atom, which determine the force constants in the interatomic potential, can be simply related to each other depending on the orbital quantum number of the atomic level.

  9. Atomic and ionic spectrum lines below 2000A: hydrogen through argon

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.L.

    1982-10-01

    A critical tabulation of observed spectral lines below 2000 angstroms has been prepared from the published literature up to July 1978. It is intended principally as an aid to those physicists and astronomers who deal with the spectra of highly stripped atoms. This report includes the first 18 elements, from hydrogen (including deuterium) through argon. The tabulation is divided into two main sections: the spectrum lines by spectrum, and a finding list. The entries for each element give the ionization species, ground state term, and ionization potential, as well as the best values of vacuum wavelength, intensity, and classification. A list of the pertinent references is appended at the end.

  10. Fiber Optic Picosecond Laser Pulse Transmission Line for Hydrogen Ion Beam Profile Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Huang, Chunning; Aleksandrov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    We present a fiber optic laser pulse transmission line for non-intrusive longitudinal profile measurement of the hydrogen ion (H-) beam at the front-end of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator. The 80.5 MHz, 2.5 ps, multi-killowatt optical pulses are delivered to the accelerator beam line through a large mode area polarization maintaining optical fiber to ensure a high measurement stability. The transmission efficiency, output laser beam quality, pulse jitter and pulse width broadening over a 100-ft fiber line are experimentally investigated. A successful measurement of the H- beam microbunch (~130 ps) profile is obtained. Our experiment is the first demonstration of particle beam profile diagnostics using fiber optic laser pulse transmission line.

  11. Stark broadening of high-principal-quantum-number n-alpha lines of hydrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasalle, T. R.; Nee, T.-J.; Griem, H. R.

    1973-01-01

    High n-alpha lines (transitions n + 1 to n) with quantum numbers n between 50 and 250 have been observed emanating from galactic H II regions where the electron density and temperature are about 1000/cu cm and 1 eV, respectively. High n-alpha lines have not previously been seen in the laboratory where fairly homogeneous plasmas may be produced and relatively precise measurements of electron densities and temperatures can be made. The present work describes experiments where the first members of the hydrogen line series with lower states n = 10, 11, 12, and 13 have been detected in a laboratory plasma. The width of the 12-alpha line at 88.7 microns could be measured and was consistent with calculated broadening from elastic electron collisions and quasi-static ion effects.

  12. Detection of interstellar recombination lines from emitters of intermediate mass.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaisson, E. J.; Black, J. H.; Dupree, A. K.; Cesarsky, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The 18-cm microwave spectra of Orion B and W3A show evidence of an emission feature to the high-frequency side of the carbon recombination line. Observations at different frequencies establish that this feature results from electronic recombination. In addition, theoretical considerations, results of 21-cm observations, and computer-simulated spectra suggest that the new feature originates in a predominantly neutral hydrogen region and can be explained by a superposition of recombination lines from any or all of the following elements: Mg-24, Si-28, S-32, and Fe-56.

  13. Local burst model of CMB temperature fluctuations: scattering in primordial hydrogen lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovich, V. K.; Grachev, S. I.

    2015-10-01

    The propagation of an instantaneous burst of isotropic radiation from the time of its onset at some redshift z 0 to the time of its detection at the present epoch (at z = 0) is considered within the framework of a flat Universe. Thomson scattering by free electrons and scattering in primordial hydrogen lines (H α, H β, P α, and P β) are believed to be the sources of opacity, with the single-scattering albedo in the lines being calculated by taking into account the deexcitation of the upper levels of the transitions being considered under the action of background blackbody radiation. The profiles of these lines in the burst spectrum at the present epoch have been constructed for various z0 at various distances from the burst center. To a first approximation, these profiles do not depend on the burst radiation spectrum and intensity. It is shown that the lines are purely absorption ones at a sufficiently large distance, but an emission component can appear with decreasing distance, which strengthens as the distance decreases, while the absorption component weakens. The absorption depth in the combined profile can reach 2 ×10-4 for the H α and H β lines and 7 × 10-6 for the P α and P β lines. In this case, the relative amplitude of the temperature fluctuations lies within the range 10-7-10-9. The calculations have been performed for bursts with different characteristic initial sizes. At the same z 0, the hydrogen line profiles essentially coincide for sizes smaller than some value, and the contrast of the lines decreases with increasing burst size for greater ones.

  14. THE 21 cm 'OUTER ARM' AND THE OUTER-GALAXY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS: CONNECTED BY KINEMATICS, METALLICITY, AND DISTANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp, Todd M.; Song Limin

    2012-02-20

    Using high-resolution ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph and the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, we study the metallicity, kinematics, and distance of the gaseous 'outer arm' (OA) and the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the outer Galaxy. We detect the OA in a variety of absorption lines toward two QSOs, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907. We search for OA absorption toward eight Galactic stars and detect it in one case, which constrains the OA Galactocentric radius to 9 kpc lines are composed of multiple narrow components, indicating the presence of several cold clouds and rapid cooling and fragmentation. Some of the highly ionized gas is also surprisingly cool. Accounting for ionization corrections, we find that the OA metallicity is Z = 0.2-0.5 Z{sub Sun }, but nitrogen is underabundant and some species are possibly mildly depleted by dust. The similarity of the OA metallicity, Galactocentric location, and kinematics to those of the adjacent outer-Galaxy HVCs, including high velocities that are not consistent with Galactic rotation, suggests that the OA and outer-Galaxy HVCs could have a common origin.

  15. Polarized foreground removal at low radio frequencies using rotation measure synthesis: uncovering the signature of hydrogen reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geil, Paul M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Wyithe, J. Stuart B.

    2011-11-01

    Measurement of redshifted 21-cm emission from neutral hydrogen promises to be the most effective method for studying the reionization history of hydrogen and, indirectly, the first galaxies. These studies will be limited not by raw sensitivity to the signal, but rather, by bright foreground radiation from Galactic and extragalactic radio sources and the Galactic continuum. In addition, leakage due to gain errors and non-ideal feeds conspire to further contaminate low-frequency radio observations. This leakage leads to a portion of the complex linear polarization signal finding its way into Stokes I, and inhibits the detection of the non-polarized cosmological signal from the epoch of reionization. In this work, we show that rotation measure synthesis can be used to recover the signature of cosmic hydrogen reionization in the presence of contamination by polarized foregrounds. To achieve this, we apply the rotation measure synthesis technique to the Stokes I component of a synthetic data cube containing Galactic foreground emission, the effect of instrumental polarization leakage and redshifted 21-cm emission by neutral hydrogen from the epoch of reionization. This produces an effective Stokes I Faraday dispersion function for each line of sight, from which instrumental polarization leakage can be fitted and subtracted. Our results show that it is possible to recover the signature of reionization in its late stages (z≈ 7) by way of the 21-cm power spectrum, as well as through tomographic imaging of ionized cavities in the intergalactic medium.

  16. Molecular hydrogen line ratios in four regions of shock-excited gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, M. G.; Brand, P. W. J. L.; Geballe, T. R.; Webster, A. S.

    1989-01-01

    Five emission lines of molecular hydrogen, with wavelengths in the ranges of 2.10-2.25 and 3.80-3.85 microns, have been observed in four objects of different type in which the line emission is believed to be excited by shocks. The relative intensities of the lines 1 - 0 S(1):1 - 0 S(O):2 - 1 S(1) are approximately 10.5:2.5:1.0 in all four objects. The 0 - 0 S(13):1 - 0 O(7) line ratio, however, varies from 1.05 in OMC-1 to about 2.3 in the Herbig-Haro object HH 7. The excitation temperature derived from the S(13) and O(7) lines is higher than that derived from the 1 - 0 and 2 - 1 S(1) lines in all four objects, so the shocked gas in these objects cannot be characterized by a single temperature. The constancy of the (1-0)/(2-1) S(1) line ratio between sources suggests that the post-shock gas is 'thermalized' in each source. The S(13)/O(7) ratio is particularly sensitive to the density and temperature conditions in the gas.

  17. The potential of hydrogen lines for the spectropolarimetry of the solar corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, Jean-Claude; Chane-Yook, Martine

    2016-07-01

    Neutral Hydrogen lines have been detected in the hot and ionized solar corona as early as 1970 (Gabriel et al. 1971) and since then with the Spartan and UVCS/SoHO space experiments. Moreover, because of the sensitivity of the Lyman lines to the Hanle effect (Bommier and Sahal-Brechot 1982, Trujillo Bueno et al. 2005), polarization measurements in these lines could lead to the diagnostic of weak magnetic fields in the corona (Derouich et al. 2010), a challenge which has led to various space mission proposals such as LYOT/SMESE or MASC. Our investigation concerns the computation of the emission in 10 selected lines of Hydrogen (Lyman, Balmer, and Paschen) taking into account the proper computation of the NonLTE H ionization and atomic levels populations. We present the results for three different coronal models (streamer, quiet Sun and coronal hole) in terms of profiles and absolute intensities at altitudes varying from 1.05 to 1.9 solar radius. These spectrophotometric results could help for the determination of the space and ground-based polarimetric instrumentation best suited for the measurement of the coronal magnetic field.

  18. The effect of non-Gaussianity on error predictions for the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) 21-cm power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Rajesh; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Majumdar, Suman; Bera, Apurba; Acharyya, Ayan

    2015-04-01

    The Epoch of Reionization (EoR) 21-cm signal is expected to become increasingly non-Gaussian as reionization proceeds. We have used seminumerical simulations to study how this affects the error predictions for the EoR 21-cm power spectrum. We expect SNR=√{N_k} for a Gaussian random field where Nk is the number of Fourier modes in each k bin. We find that non-Gaussianity is important at high SNR where it imposes an upper limit [SNR]l. For a fixed volume V, it is not possible to achieve SNR > [SNR]l even if Nk is increased. The value of [SNR]l falls as reionization proceeds, dropping from ˜500 at bar{x}_{H I} = 0.8-0.9 to ˜10 at bar{x}_{H I} = 0.15 for a [150.08 Mpc]3 simulation. We show that it is possible to interpret [SNR]l in terms of the trispectrum, and we expect [SNR]_l ∝ √{V} if the volume is increased. For SNR ≪ [SNR]l we find SNR= √{N_k}/A with A ˜ 0.95-1.75, roughly consistent with the Gaussian prediction. We present a fitting formula for the SNR as a function of Nk, with two parameters A and [SNR]l that have to be determined using simulations. Our results are relevant for predicting the sensitivity of different instruments to measure the EoR 21-cm power spectrum, which till date have been largely based on the Gaussian assumption.

  19. On using large scale correlation of the Ly-α forest and redshifted 21-cm signal to probe HI distribution during the post reionization era

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Tapomoy Guha; Datta, Kanan K. E-mail: kanan.physics@presiuniv.ac.in

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the possibility of detecting the 3D cross correlation power spectrum of the Ly-α forest and HI 21 cm signal from the post reionization epoch. (The cross-correlation signal is directly dependent on the dark matter power spectrum and is sensitive to the 21-cm brightness temperature and Ly-α forest biases. These bias parameters dictate the strength of anisotropy in redshift space.) We find that the cross-correlation power spectrum can be detected using 400 hrs observation with SKA-mid (phase 1) and a futuristic BOSS like experiment with a quasar (QSO) density of 30 deg{sup −2} at a peak SNR of 15 for a single field experiment at redshift z = 2.5. on large scales using the linear bias model. We also study the possibility of constraining various bias parameters using the cross power spectrum. We find that with the same experiment 1 σ (conditional errors) on the 21-cm linear redshift space distortion parameter β{sub T} and β{sub F} corresponding to the Ly-α  forest are ∼ 2.7 % and ∼ 1.4 % respectively for 01 independent pointings of the SKA-mid (phase 1). This prediction indicates a significant improvement over existing measurements. We claim that the detection of the 3D cross correlation power spectrum will not only ascertain the cosmological origin of the signal in presence of astrophysical foregrounds but will also provide stringent constraints on large scale HI biases. This provides an independent probe towards understanding cosmological structure formation.

  20. New limits on 21 cm epoch of reionization from paper-32 consistent with an x-ray heated intergalactic medium at z = 7.7

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Aaron R.; Liu, Adrian; Ali, Zaki S.; Pober, Jonathan C.; Aguirre, James E.; Moore, David F.; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; DeBoer, David R.; Dexter, Matthew R.; MacMahon, David H. E.; Gugliucci, Nicole E.; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Klima, Pat; Manley, Jason R.; Walbrugh, William P.; Stefan, Irina I.

    2014-06-20

    We present new constraints on the 21 cm Epoch of Reionization (EoR) power spectrum derived from three months of observing with a 32 antenna, dual-polarization deployment of the Donald C. Backer Precision Array for Probing the Epoch of Reionization in South Africa. In this paper, we demonstrate the efficacy of the delay-spectrum approach to avoiding foregrounds, achieving over eight orders of magnitude of foreground suppression (in mK{sup 2}). Combining this approach with a procedure for removing off-diagonal covariances arising from instrumental systematics, we achieve a best 2σ upper limit of (41 mK){sup 2} for k = 0.27 h Mpc{sup –1} at z = 7.7. This limit falls within an order of magnitude of the brighter predictions of the expected 21 cm EoR signal level. Using the upper limits set by these measurements, we generate new constraints on the brightness temperature of 21 cm emission in neutral regions for various reionization models. We show that for several ionization scenarios, our measurements are inconsistent with cold reionization. That is, heating of the neutral intergalactic medium (IGM) is necessary to remain consistent with the constraints we report. Hence, we have suggestive evidence that by z = 7.7, the H I has been warmed from its cold primordial state, probably by X-rays from high-mass X-ray binaries or miniquasars. The strength of this evidence depends on the ionization state of the IGM, which we are not yet able to constrain. This result is consistent with standard predictions for how reionization might have proceeded.

  1. Electron density profile measurements from hydrogen line intensity ratio method in Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, YooSung; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Yang, Jeong-hun; Kim, SeongCheol; Kim, Young-Gi; Dang, Jeong-Jeung; Yang, Seongmoo; Jo, Jungmin; Oh, Soo-Ghee; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Electron density profiles of versatile experiment spherical torus plasmas are measured by using a hydrogen line intensity ratio method. A fast-frame visible camera with appropriate bandpass filters is used to detect images of Balmer line intensities. The unique optical system makes it possible to take images of Hα and Hβ radiation simultaneously, with only one camera. The frame rate is 1000 fps and the spatial resolution of the system is about 0.5 cm. One-dimensional local emissivity profiles have been obtained from the toroidal line of sight with viewing dumps. An initial result for the electron density profile is presented and is in reasonable agreement with values measured by a triple Langmuir probe.

  2. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  3. Probing of the hydrogen melting line at high pressures by dynamic compression

    SciTech Connect

    Grinenko, A; Gericke, D; Glenzer, S H; Vorberger, J

    2008-06-09

    We investigate the capabilities of dynamic compression by intense heavy ion beams to yield information about the high pressure phases of hydrogen. Employing ab initio simulations and experimental data, a new wide range equation of state for hydrogen that covers solid, fluid, gas and plasma phases has been constructed for our hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that the melting line up to its maximum as well as the transition from the molecular fl fluid to the fully ionized, metallic phase can be tested with the beam parameters available at the upcoming FAIR facility at GSI-Darmstadt. Using the structural information from the ab initio simulations, we also demonstrate that x-ray scattering is capable of extracting the information about the structure and the dissociation state.

  4. A SOUTHERN ATLAS OF GALACTIC HYDROGEN (THE REGION 0 degrees \\< Q \\< 12 degrees, -3 degrees >/ B -17 degrees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, M. L.; Poppel, W. G. L.; Vieira, E. R.

    1987-05-01

    RESUMEN Se presentan datos observacionales en la lfnea de 21-cm del hidr6geno neutro obtenidos con el radiotelescopio de 30-rn del lAR. Las observaciones cubren la regi6n 00 < Q 120, 30 > b - 170 en intervalos dell0 tanto en Q como en b. El intervalo de velocidades radiales se extiende desde -100 km 1 hasta + 100 km 1 con una resolucj6n cinematica de 2km 1 ABSTRACT We present observational data in the 21-rn line of neutral hydrogen, which have been obtained with the 30-rn dish of the lAR. The observations cover 00 < Q 120, 30 > b > 170 at intervals of 10 in both Qand b. The radial velocity interval extends from -100 to + 100km 1 with a kinematical resolution of 2 km s- . Key words: GALAXY-STRUCTURE - RADIO LINES-21-cm

  5. Doppler speeds of the hydrogen Lyman lines in solar flares from EVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Stephen A.; Fletcher, Lyndsay; Labrosse, Nicolas

    2016-11-01

    Aims: The hydrogen Lyman lines provide important diagnostic information about the dynamics of the chromosphere, but there have been few systematic studies of their variability during flares. We investigate Doppler shifts in these lines in several flares, and use these to calculate plasma speeds. Methods: We use spectral data from the Multiple EUV Grating Spectrograph B (MEGS-B) detector of the Extreme-Ultraviolet Variability Experiment (EVE) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. MEGS-B obtains full-disk spectra of the Sun at a resolution of 0.1 nm in the range 37-105 nm, which we analyse using three independent methods. The first method performs Gaussian fits to the lines, and compares the quiet-Sun centroids with the flaring ones to obtain the Doppler shifts. The second method uses cross-correlation to detect wavelength shifts between the quiet-Sun and flaring line profiles. The final method calculates the "center-of-mass" of the line profile, and compares the quiet-Sun and flaring centroids to obtain the shift. Results: In a study of 6 flares we find strong signatures of both upflow and downflow in the Lyman lines, with speeds measured in Sun-as-a-Star data of around 10 km s-1, and speeds in the flare excess signal of around 30 km s-1. Conclusions: All events showing upflows in Lyman lines are associated with some kind of eruption or coronal flow in imaging data, which may be responsible for the net blueshifts. Events showing downflows in the Lyman lines may be associated with loop contraction or faint downflows, but it is likely that chromospheric condensation flows are also contributing.

  6. High-response on-line gas analysis system for hydrogen-reaction combustion products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzler, A. J.; Gaugler, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The results of testing an on-line quadrupole gas analyzer system are reported. Gas samples were drawn from the exhaust of a hydrogen-oxygen-nitrogen rocket which simulated the flow composition and dynamics at the combustor exit of a supersonic combustion ramjet engine. System response time of less than 50 milliseconds was demonstrated, with analytical accuracy estimated to be + or - 5 percent. For more complex chemical systems with interfering atom patterns, analysis would be more difficult. A cooled-gas pyrometer probe was evaluated as a total temperature indicator and as the primary mass flow measuring element for the total sample flow rate.

  7. Charge states of a hydrogen defect (3326 cm-1 line) in ZnO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herklotz, F.; Lavrov, E. V.; Weber, J.

    2012-08-01

    The hydrogen defect in ZnO that gives rise to a local vibrational mode at 3326 cm-1 is investigated by means of IR absorption. Sub-band gap illumination results in the appearance of a new line at 3358 cm-1 at the expense of the 3326 cm-1 signal. The measurements identify both IR absorption signals as O-H stretch modes of the same defect in different charge states. The effect of the sub-band gap light strongly suggest that this defect has a deep level in the band gap. Additionally, results on the thermal stability of the 3326 cm-1 feature are presented.

  8. Intensity of Hydrogen Line Emission from Accreting Gas-Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yuhiko; Tanigawa, Takayuki; Ikoma, Masahiro

    2015-12-01

    Planets have been thought to form in circumstellar gaseous disks. Indeed, a number of young stars surrounded by such disks have been already detected. Recently, there are some reports on detection of gap-like structure in circumstellar disks, which suggests that there are forming massive protoplanets embedded in the disks. A challenging issue is how to find forming planets in circumstellar disks directly. In this study, we investigate whether detectable emission occurs from accreting gas-giant planets. In a circumstellar disk, once a solid core becomes massive enough, it captures the surrounding disk gas gravitationally in a runaway manner. Since the disk gas accretion occurs much faster than angular momentum loss, a circumplanetary disk is formed in the mid-plane of the circumstellar disk. Recent three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations by Tanigawa et al. (2012) revealed that the gas flowed from the cicumstellar disk to the circumplanetary disk not horizontally but vertically. According to those simulations, the disk gas falls onto the circumplanetary disk at a speed comparable to the free fall speed, and the local gas temperature reaches up to tens of thousands of kelvin because of shock heating near the planet. Thus, the presence of an accreting gas giant planet may be found by observation of the radiative emission from such hot gas in the circumplanetary disk, which we quantify in this study. In particular, we focus on the intensity of line emission from hydrogen. We have simulated the post-shock gas flow with non-equilibrium chemical reaction and electron transition. Then, we have found that the intensity of some hydrogen lines is proportional to the number density of the surrounding circumstellar disk gas and square of the planet mass, so the protoplanet’s hydrogen-line emission is less intense by a few orders of magnitude relative to the protostar’s emission under some realistic conditions. Also, the duration time is comparable to the dissipation time

  9. Temperatures of quiescent prominences measured from hydrogen Paschen and CaII IR lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engvold, Oddbjorn; Brynildsen, Nils

    1986-01-01

    During 12 to 17 September 1983 a number of prominences were observed with the McMatch solar telescope of National Solar Observatories, using the Fourier transform spectrometer with a InSb detector (Brault 1979). The present study refers to three prominences observed 13 and 14 September. Prominence A: Large quiescent prominence at S28 E90 Prominence B. Stable prominence in weakly enhanced magnetic region at about NO8 E90 Prominence C: Quiescent prominence at N30 E90. Spectra were obtained at a total of 15 different locations in the three prominences in the wavelength range lambda, lambda 7740 to 14,000 Angstroms. The observed differences between T sub exc and T sub kin are hardly significant. Researchers conclude that the two methods for temperature determination when applied to optically thin lines give reasonably consistent results, i.e., the population of the excited levels of hydrogen is collisionally controlled. The well known increase in T and V towards the edge of equiescent prominences (Hirayama 1964) is not corroborated by the present data. One explanation for this could be that prominence A is atypical. The optical thickness of prominence emission lines tends to increase from center to edges as demonstrated by the case of He I lambda 10830 angstroms. If line opacity plays a significant role in earlier center to edge determinations of T and V, a smaller variation would be expected from measurements in optically thin lines, such as in the present case.

  10. Anomalous Doppler broadening caused by exothermic reactions: application to hydrogen Balmer lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loureiro, J.; Amorim, J.

    2011-08-01

    The three- and one-dimensional velocity distributions of a product species created by an exothermic reaction are calculated using the energy conservation, with the aim of evaluating the impact of such processes on the anomalous broadening of Doppler lines. The calculations are performed to the reaction H{2/+} + H2 → H{3/+} + H, in which according to Christoffersen (1964) an amount of 1.56 eV is transferred to the product species. It is shown that the deviations relatively to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions are significant as the internal energy defect ΔE increases, even within energies lower than 1.56 eV, and hence the profiles of excited H∗ atoms, associated with the emission of hydrogen Balmer lines, created in the sequence of H( n = 1) produced by the above reaction are not of Gaussian-type. The profiles are markedly flatter and squarer than Gaussian distributions. The validity of the species temperature determined from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the lines, as well as the fit of the lines by multimodal Gaussian functions, is then analyzed.

  11. Refinement of the semiclassical theory of the Stark broadening of hydrogen spectral lines in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Eugene

    2015-02-01

    Stark broadening (SB) of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium lines (H-lines) is an important diagnostic tool for many applications. The most "user-friendly" are semiclassical theories of the SB of H-lines: their results can be expressed analytically in a relatively simple form for any H-line. The simplest semiclassical theory is the so-called Conventional Theory (CT), which is frequently referred to as Griem's theory. While by now there are several significantly more advanced semiclassical "non-CT" theories of the SB, Griem's CT is still used by a number of groups performing laboratory experiments or astrophysical observations for the comparison with their experimental or observational results. In the present study we engage unexplored capabilities of the CT for creating analytically a more accurate CT. First, we take into account that the perturbing electrons actually do not move as free particles: rather they move in a dipole potential V=·r/r3, where r is the radius-vector of the perturbing electrons and is the mean value of the radius vector of the atomic electron. Second, Griem's definition of the so-called Weisskopf radius was not quite accurate. Third, in his book of year 1974, Griem suggested changing so-called strong collision constant without changing the Weisskopf radius, while in reality the choices of the Weisskopf radius and of the strong collision constant are interrelated. We show that the above refinements of the CT increase the electron broadening - especially for warm dense plasmas emitting H-lines. By comparison with benchmark experiments concerning the Hα line we demonstrate that the effect of the ion dynamics (neglected in any CT) might be slightly smaller than previously thought, while the effect of the acceleration of perturbing electrons by the ion field in the vicinity of the radiating atom (neglected in any CT) might be greater than previously thought.

  12. Quantum-statistical T-matrix approach to line broadening of hydrogen in dense plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzen, Sonja; Wierling, August; Roepke, Gerd; Reinholz, Heidi; Zammit, Mark C.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2010-10-29

    The electronic self-energy {Sigma}{sup e} is an important input in a quantum-statistical theory for spectral line profile calculations. It describes the influence of plasma electrons on bound state properties. In dense plasmas, the effect of strong, i.e. close, electron-emitter collisions can be considered by three-particle T-matrix diagrams. These digrams are approximated with the help of an effective two-particle T-matrix, which is obtained from convergent close-coupling calculations with Debye screening. A comparison with other theories is carried out for the 2p level of hydrogen at k{sub B}T = 1 eV and n{sub e} = 2{center_dot}10{sup 23} m{sup -3}, and results are given for n{sub e} = 1{center_dot}10{sup 25} m{sup -3}.

  13. Plasma density characterization at SPARC_LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC_LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC_LAB is presented.

  14. Hydrogen Balmer alpha intensity distributions and line profiles from multiple scattering theory using realistic geocoronal models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Meier, R. R.; Hodges, R. R., Jr.; Tinsley, B. A.

    1987-01-01

    The H Balmer alpha nightglow is investigated by using Monte Carlo models of asymmetric geocoronal atomic hydrogen distributions as input to a radiative transfer model of solar Lyman-beta radiation in the thermosphere and atmosphere. It is shown that it is essential to include multiple scattering of Lyman-beta radiation in the interpretation of Balmer alpha airglow data. Observations of diurnal variation in the Balmer alpha airglow showing slightly greater intensities in the morning relative to evening are consistent with theory. No evidence is found for anything other than a single sinusoidal diurnal variation of exobase density. Dramatic changes in effective temperature derived from the observed Balmer alpha line profiles are expected on the basis of changing illumination conditions in the thermosphere and exosphere as different regions of the sky are scanned.

  15. Accretion Disks, Magnetospheres, and Disk Winds as Emitters of the Hydrogen Lines in Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambovtseva, L. V.; Grinin, V. P.; Weigelt, G.; Schertl, D.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Caratti o Garatti, A.; Garcia Lopez, R.

    2017-02-01

    Various disk and outflow components of the circumstellar environment of young Herbig Ae/Be stars may contribute to the hydrogen line emission. These are a magnetosphere, a disk wind, and a gaseous accretion disk. Non-LTE modeling was performed to show the influence of the model parameters on the intensity and the line profiles for each emitting region to present the spatial distribution of the brightness for each component and to compare their contributions to the total line emission. The modeling shows that the disk wind is the dominant contributor to the Brγ and Hα lines rather than the magnetospheric accretion and gaseous accretion disk.

  16. Quasicontiguous frequency-fluctuation model for calculation of hydrogen and hydrogenlike Stark-broadened line shapes in plasmas.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2013-05-01

    We present an analytical method for the calculation of shapes of Stark-broadened spectral lines in plasmas, applicable to hydrogen and hydrogenlike transitions (including Rydberg ones) with Δn>1. The method is based on the recently suggested quasicontiguous approximation of the static Stark line shapes, while the dynamical effects are accounted for using the frequency-fluctuation-model approach. Comparisons with accurate computer simulations show excellent agreement.

  17. The Broadening of Spectral Lines by Collisions with Neutral Hydrogen Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, P. S.

    1998-10-01

    In this thesis the theory of collisional broadening by neutral hydrogen of Anstee and O'Mara (1991,1992,1995) for s-p and p-s transitions of neutrals is extended and applied to both p-d, d-p, d-f and f-d transitions of neutral atoms, and the broadening of transitions of ions. The interaction between a ground state hydrogen atom with a generic neutral atom, is considered using Rayleigh-Schrödinger perturbation theory. The usual second order expression for the interaction energy between the two atoms involves an infinite sum over virtual states of the two-atom system, and an energy denominator which is the energy debt incurred when the two atom system makes a transition from the state of interest to a virtual state. Unsöld (1927,1955) showed that the expression for the in teraction energy can be greatly simplified if the variable energy debt incurred in making a transition from the state of interest to a virtual state is replaced by a fixed debt Ep. Closure can then be used to complete the sum over the virtual states leading to an expression for the interaction energy in terms of diagonal matrix elements of V2 (where V is the electrostatic interaction between the two atoms), and Ep. This is commonly referred to as the Unsöld approximation. It is the most important approximation in the development of the treatment of spectral line broadening presented in this thesis. Expressions for the interaction energy between a ground state hydrogen atom and a generic neutral atom in both d- and f-states are presented. Adiabatic potential curves calculated from code written to compute these expressions are presented. For interactions of neutral atoms, the Unsöld value of Ep=-4/9 atomic units is used throughout. Code was written to compute line broadening cross-sections for p-d, d-p, d-f and f-d transitions of neutral atoms, using the semi-classical procedure of Roueff (1974) adapted for these transitions. Firstly, the dependence of cross-sections on regions of the potential

  18. Analysis of H α spectral line profile in a DC hydrogen discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, I.; Iordanova, S.; Pashov, A.

    2016-11-01

    This contribution reports an experimental study of characteristics of the neutrals in a DC hydrogen discharge, designed for production of NiH. The investigations are carried out at gas pressure in the range p  =  (200-1600) mTorr and current I  =  200 mA. Optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics are based on analysis of the H α line profile. The profile is formed from the emission of three energetically distinct groups of atoms in the n  =  3 excited state. The first one is the group of thermalized atoms, with a mean energy of about 0.1 eV, the second—fast atoms, with mean energies about 10 eV and the third—superfast atoms with a mean energy of about 90 eV. The experimental technique leads to accurate values of the relative densities of these atoms and their mean energies for various working conditions.

  19. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Hydrogen lines in red giants directly trace stellar mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergemann, Maria; Serenelli, Aldo; Schönrich, Ralph; Ruchti, Greg; Korn, Andreas; Hekker, Saskia; Kovalev, Mikhail; Mashonkina, Lyudmila; Gilmore, Gerry; Randich, Sofia; Asplund, Martin; Rix, Hans-Walter; Casey, Andrew R.; Jofre, Paula; Pancino, Elena; Recio-Blanco, Alejandra; de Laverny, Patrick; Smiljanic, Rodolfo; Tautvaisiene, Grazina; Bayo, Amelia; Lewis, Jim; Koposov, Sergey; Hourihane, Anna; Worley, Clare; Morbidelli, Lorenzo; Franciosini, Elena; Sacco, Germano; Magrini, Laura; Damiani, Francesco; Bestenlehner, Joachim M.

    2016-10-01

    Red giant stars are perhaps the most important type of stars for Galactic and extra-galactic archaeology: they are luminous, occur in all stellar populations, and their surface temperatures allow precise abundance determinations for many different chemical elements. Yet, the full star formation and enrichment history of a galaxy can be traced directly only if two key observables can be determined for large stellar samples: age and chemical composition. While spectroscopy is a powerful method to analyse the detailed abundances of stars, stellar ages are the missing link in the chain, since they are not a direct observable. However, spectroscopy should be able to estimate stellar masses, which for red giants directly infer ages provided their chemical composition is known. Here we establish a new empirical relation between the shape of the hydrogen line in the observed spectra of red giants and stellar mass determined from asteroseismology. The relation allows determining stellar masses and ages with an accuracy of 10-15%. The method can be used with confidence for stars in the following range of stellar parameters: 4000 < Teff < 5000 K, 0.5 < log g< 3.5, -2.0 < [Fe/H] < 0.3, and luminosities log L/LSun < 2.5. Our analysis provides observational evidence that the Hα spectral characteristics of red giant stars are tightly correlated with their mass and therefore their age. We also show that the method samples well all stellar populations with ages above 1 Gyr. Targeting bright giants, the method allows obtaining simultaneous age and chemical abundance information far deeper than would be possible with asteroseismology, extending the possible survey volume to remote regions of the Milky Way and even to neighbouring galaxies such as Andromeda or the Magellanic Clouds even with current instrumentation, such as the VLT and Keck facilities.

  20. An investigation of satellites to the resonance lines in some hydrogen-like ions. Ph.D. Thesis - Colo. Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation was conducted on the origin of satellite to resonance lines of the hydrogen-like ions of boron, carbon, and nitrogen. A theta pinch was employed with a grazing incidence spectrograph to measure the wavelengths of the satellites. The spectroscopic data also provided an estimate of the satellite/resonance line intensity ratio. Wavelengths of spectral lines due to transition from doubly excited states were calculated by a Hartree-Fock computer program. Wave functions were also calculated and were used to obtain the oscillator strengths of the transitions. Experimental work confirmed that the lines investigated were not satellites but were due to highly ionized argon which was present as an impurity in the filling gas.

  1. ALMA observations of the submillimetre hydrogen recombination line from the type 2 active nucleus of NGC 1068

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Takuma; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Kohno, Kotaro

    2016-07-01

    Hydrogen recombination lines at the submillimetre band (submm-RLs) can serve as probes of ionized gas without dust extinction. One therefore expects to probe the broad-line region (BLR) of an obscured (type 2) active galactic nucleus (AGN) with those lines. However, admitting the large uncertainty in the continuum level, here we report on the non-detection of both broad and narrow H26 α emission line (rest frequency = 353.62 GHz) towards the prototypical type 2 AGN of NGC 1068 with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We also investigate the nature of BLR clouds that can potentially emit submm-RLs with model calculations. As a result, we suggest that clouds with an electron density (Ne) of ˜109 cm-3 can mainly contribute to broad submm-RLs in terms of the line flux. On the other hand, line flux from other density clouds would be insignificant considering their too large or too small line optical depths. However, even for the case of Ne ˜ 109 cm-3 clouds, we also suggest that the expected line flux is extremely low, which is impractical to detect even with ALMA.

  2. The alpha Centauri Line of Sight: D/H Ratio, Physical Properties of Local Interstellar Gas, and Measurement of Heated Hydrogen (The 'Hydrogen Wall') Near the Heliopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-01-01

    We analyze high-resolution spectra of the nearby (1.34 pc) stars alpha Cen A (G2 V) and alpha Cen B (K1 V), which were obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations consist of echelle spectra of the Mg II 2800 A and Fe II 2599 A resonance lines and the Lyman-alpha lines of hydrogen and deuterium. The interstellar gas has a velocity (v = - 18.0 +/- 0.2 km/s) consistent with the local flow vector proposed for this line of sight by Lailement & Berlin (1992). The temperature and nonthermal velocity inferred from the Fe II, Mg II, and D I line profiles are T = 5400 +/- 500 K and xi = 1.20 +/- 0.25 km/s, respectively. However, single-component fits to the H I Lyman-alpha lines yield a Doppler parameter (b(sub HI) = 11.80 km/s) that implies a significantly warmer temperature of 8350 K, and the velocity of the H I absorption (v = - 15.8 +/- 0.2 km/s) is redshifted by about 2.2 km/s with respect to the Fe II, Mg II, and D I lines. The one-component model of the interstellar gas suggests natural logarithm N base HI = 18.03 +/- 0.01 and D/H = (5.7 +/- 0.2) x 10(exp -6) . These parameters lead to a good fit to the observed spectra, but this model does not explain the higher temperature and redshift of H I relative to the other interstellar lines. The most sensible way to resolve the discrepancy between H(I) and the other lines is to add a second absorption component to the H(I) lines. This second component is hotter (T approx. equals 30,000 K), is redshifted relative to the primary component by 2-4 km/s, and has a column density too low to be detected in the Fe(II), Mg(II), and D(I) lines. We propose that the gas responsible for this component is located near the heliopause, consisting of the heated H I gas from the interstellar medium that is compressed by the solar wind. This so-called 'hydrogen wall' is predicted by recent multifluid gasdynamical models of the interstellar gas and solar wind interaction. Our data

  3. The alpha Centauri Line of Sight: D/H Ratio, Physical Properties of Local Interstellar Gas, and Measurement of Heated Hydrogen (The 'Hydrogen Wall') Near the Heliopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.; Wood, Brian E.

    1996-05-01

    We analyze high-resolution spectra of the nearby (1.34 pc) stars alpha Cen A (G2 V) and alpha Cen B (K1 V), which were obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The observations consist of echelle spectra of the Mg II 2800 A and Fe II 2599 A resonance lines and the Lyman-alpha lines of hydrogen and deuterium. The interstellar gas has a velocity (v = - 18.0 +/- 0.2 km/s) consistent with the local flow vector proposed for this line of sight by Lailement & Berlin (1992). The temperature and nonthermal velocity inferred from the Fe II, Mg II, and D I line profiles are T = 5400 +/- 500 K and xi = 1.20 +/- 0.25 km/s, respectively. However, single-component fits to the H I Lyman-alpha lines yield a Doppler parameter (bHI = 11.80 km/s) that implies a significantly warmer temperature of 8350 K, and the velocity of the H I absorption (v = - 15.8 +/- 0.2 km/s) is redshifted by about 2.2 km/s with respect to the Fe II, Mg II, and D I lines. The one-component model of the interstellar gas suggests natural logarithm N base HI = 18.03 +/- 0.01 and D/H = (5.7 +/- 0.2) x 10-6 . These parameters lead to a good fit to the observed spectra, but this model does not explain the higher temperature and redshift of H I relative to the other interstellar lines. The most sensible way to resolve the discrepancy between H(I) and the other lines is to add a second absorption component to the H(I) lines. This second component is hotter (T approx. equals 30,000 K), is redshifted relative to the primary component by 2-4 km/s, and has a column density too low to be detected in the Fe(II), Mg(II), and D(I) lines. We propose that the gas responsible for this component is located near the heliopause, consisting of the heated H I gas from the interstellar medium that is compressed by the solar wind. This so-called 'hydrogen wall' is predicted by recent multifluid gasdynamical models of the interstellar gas and solar wind interaction. Our data provide the

  4. Mobile measurement of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production site fence lines in the Texas Barnett Shale.

    PubMed

    Eapi, Gautam R; Sabnis, Madhu S; Sattler, Melanie L

    2014-08-01

    Production of natural gas from shale formations is bringing drilling and production operations to regions of the United States that have seen little or no similar activity in the past, which has generated considerable interest in potential environmental impacts. This study focused on the Barnett Shale Fort Worth Basin in Texas, which saw the number of gas-producing wells grow from 726 in 2001 to 15,870 in 2011. This study aimed to measure fence line concentrations of methane and hydrogen sulfide at natural gas production sites (wells, liquid storage tanks, and associated equipment) in the four core counties of the Barnett Shale (Denton, Johnson, Tarrant, and Wise). A mobile measurement survey was conducted in the vicinity of 4788 wells near 401 lease sites, representing 35% of gas production volume, 31% of wells, and 38% of condensate production volume in the four-county core area. Methane and hydrogen sulfide concentrations were measured using a Picarro G2204 cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). Since the research team did not have access to lease site interiors, measurements were made by driving on roads on the exterior of the lease sites. Over 150 hr of data were collected from March to July 2012. During two sets of drive-by measurements, it was found that 66 sites (16.5%) had methane concentrations > 3 parts per million (ppm) just beyond the fence line. Thirty-two lease sites (8.0%) had hydrogen sulfide concentrations > 4.7 parts per billion (ppb) (odor recognition threshold) just beyond the fence line. Measured concentrations generally did not correlate well with site characteristics (natural gas production volume, number of wells, or condensate production). t tests showed that for two counties, methane concentrations for dry sites were higher than those for wet sites. Follow-up study is recommended to provide more information at sites identified with high levels of methane and hydrogen sulfide. Implications: Information regarding air emissions from shale gas

  5. Modeling the Scattering Polarization of the Hydrogen Ly-alpha Line Observed by CLASP in a Filament Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepan, J.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Gunar, S.; del Pino Aleman, T.; Heinzel, P.; Kano, R.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, M.; Bando, T.; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, K.; Auchere, F.

    2016-01-01

    The 400 arcsec spectrograph slit of CLASP crossed predominantly quiet regions of the solar chromosphere, from the limb towards the solar disk center. Interestingly, in the CLASP slit-jaw images and in the SDO images of the He I line at 304 A, we can identify a filament channel (FC) extending over more than 60 arcsec crossing the spectrograph slit. In order to interpret the peculiar spatial variation of the Q/1 and U/1 signals observed by CLASP in the hydrogen Ly-alpha line (1216 A) and in the Si Ill line (1206 A) in such a filament channel, it is necessary to perform multi-dimensional radiative transfer modeling. In this contribution, we show the first results of the two-dimensional calculations we are carrying out in given filament models, with the aim of determining the filament thermal and magnetic structure by comparing the theoretical and the observed polarization signals.

  6. A critical compilation of experimental data on spectral lines and energy levels of hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.

    2010-11-01

    For more than 50 years, Charlotte Moore's compilation of atomic energy levels and its subsequent revisions have been the standard source of reference data for the spectra of hydrogen and its isotopes. In those publications, theoretical data based on quantum-electrodynamic calculations have been given. This reflects the fact that the theory of the hydrogen spectrum has been perfected to an extent far exceeding the capabilities of the best measurements. However, rapid advances in the techniques of laser spectroscopy and optical frequency metrology have recently put experiments on a par with theory in terms of precision. This calls for construction of new comprehensive data sets for H, D, and T that summarize the latest experimental work and can be directly compared with the modern theoretical reference data. The present work compiles several tens of recent measurements of the hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium fine and hyperfine structure intervals and presents sets of energy levels and Ritz wavelengths derived from those measurements. Data exist for the fine structure of energy levels of hydrogen and deuterium up to principal quantum number n = 12. For higher lying levels, there are many observed lines with unresolved fine structure. From those observations, level centers (centers of the fine structure) are derived by a least-squares optimization, and Ritz wavelengths of series with upper levels up to n = 40 are obtained. For tritium, the n = 2 and 3 energy level intervals are derived from experimental observations.

  7. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  8. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  9. Hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  10. Doppler shift measurement of Balmer-alpha line spectrum emission from a plasma in a negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, M. Doi, K.; Kisaki, M.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Nishiura, M.

    2015-04-08

    Balmer-α light emission from the extraction region of the LHD one-third ion source has shown a characteristic Doppler broadening in the wavelength spectrum detected by a high resolution spectrometer. The spectrum resembles Gaussian distribution near the wavelength of the intensity peak, while it has an additional component of a broader foot. The measured broadening near the wavelength of the intensity peak corresponds to 0.6 eV hydrogen atom temperature. The spectrum exhibits a larger expansion in the blue wing which becomes smaller when the line of sight is tilted toward the driver region from the original observation axis parallel to the plasma grid. A surface collision simulation model predicts the possibility of hydrogen reflection at the plasma grid surface to form a broad Balmer-α light emission spectrum.

  11. Use of Fabry-Perot annular summing spectroscopy to acquire geocoronal hydrogen Balmer-α line profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossal, Susan M.; Roesler, Fred L.; Coakley, Monica M.; Reynolds, Ronald J.

    1996-10-01

    A Fabry-Perot annular summing spectroscopy technique has been sued at the University of Wisconsin's Pine Bluff Observatory to acquire geocoronal Balmer-(alpha) line profile data with significantly improved precision and height resolution. The double-etalon Fabry-Perot interference pattern is imaged onto a photometrics PM512 CCD chip, thus enabling light to be gathered in multiple spectral bins simultaneously. In comparison with scanning systems we used earlier, the high quantum efficiency of the CCD and the multi-channel detection associated with the Fabry-Perot annular summing technique have enabled us to save a factor of about 10 in the integration time required for studies of the line profile. As a result, we are now able to both more precisely observe the line shape of the very faint Balmer- (alpha) emission and obtain data using shorter integration times. Our data illustrate the scientific potential for using this technique for the study of very faint extended emission line sources. The increase in the signal-to-noise of our data has enabled us to examine Balmer-(alpha) profile asymmetries which we have found to be compatible with predictions that on the order of 10 percent of the geocoronal Balmer-(alpha) excitation arises from cascades due to higher-member solar Lyman series excitation. This fine structure was overlooked in previous Balmer-(alpha) studies aimed at determining non-Maxwellian dynamical properties of exospheric hydrogen; we find that cascade excitation largely masks the expected very small dynamical perturbations to the line profile at low shadow heights, and must be more thoroughly studied before drawing conclusions about exospheric dynamics. Accounting for cascade laos leads to more realistic determinations of exospheric hydrogen temperatures near the exobase.

  12. On the inversion of the scattering polarization and the Hanle effect signals in the hydrogen Lyα line

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, R.; Asensio Ramos, A.; Manso Sainz, R.; Trujillo Bueno, J.; Belluzzi, L.; Štěpán, J.; Goto, M.; Tsuneta, S.

    2014-06-01

    Magnetic field measurements in the upper chromosphere and above, where the gas-to-magnetic pressure ratio β is lower than unity, are essential for understanding the thermal structure and dynamical activity of the solar atmosphere. Recent developments in the theory and numerical modeling of polarization in spectral lines have suggested that information on the magnetic field of the chromosphere-corona transition region could be obtained by measuring the linear polarization of the solar disk radiation at the core of the hydrogen Lyα line at 121.6 nm, which is produced by scattering processes and the Hanle effect. The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter (CLASP) sounding rocket experiment aims to measure the intensity (Stokes I) and the linear polarization profiles (Q/I and U/I) of the hydrogen Lyα line. In this paper, we clarify the information that the Hanle effect can provide by applying a Stokes inversion technique based on a database search. The database contains all theoretical Q/I and U/I profiles calculated in a one-dimensional semi-empirical model of the solar atmosphere for all possible values of the strength, inclination, and azimuth of the magnetic field vector, though this atmospheric region is highly inhomogeneous and dynamic. We focus on understanding the sensitivity of the inversion results to the noise and spectral resolution of the synthetic observations as well as the ambiguities and limitation inherent to the Hanle effect when only the hydrogen Lyα is used. We conclude that spectropolarimetric observations with CLASP can indeed be a suitable diagnostic tool for probing the magnetism of the transition region, especially when complemented with information on the magnetic field azimuth that can be obtained from other instruments.

  13. Centaur feedline dynamics study using power spectral methods. [fundamental mode resonant frequencies of RL-10 oxygen and hydrogen feed lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, C. F.

    1974-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the dynamic characteristics of the Centaur/RL-10 oxygen and hydrogen feedlines. The fundamental-mode resonant frequencies were determined by applying power spectral methods to noise-generated data from hot firings of the RL-10 engine. The effect of net positive suction pressure of the main feed pumps on resonant frequency characteristics was determined to be a straight-line relation. Power spectral methods were also used to determine the dynamic characteristics of the boost pumps.

  14. Performance of sheath electric field measurement by saturation spectroscopy in Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Shusuke; Katayama, Kento; Nakano, Haruhisa; Goto, Motoshi; Sasaki, Koichi

    2017-03-01

    We developed a diode laser-based system for measuring the sheath electric fields in low-temperature plasmas. The Stark spectrum of the Balmer-α line of atomic hydrogen was measured by saturation spectroscopy with a fine spectral resolution. The spectrum observed experimentally was consistent with the theoretical Stark spectrum, and we succeeded in evaluating the electric field strength on the basis of the experimental Stark spectrum. A sensitive detection limit of 10 V/cm was achieved by the developed system.

  15. Discovery of 21-cm absorption in a zabs = 2.289 damped Lyman α system towards TXS 0311+430: the first low spin temperature absorber at z > 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    York, Brian A.; Kanekar, Nissim; Ellison, Sara L.; Pettini, Max

    2007-11-01

    We report the detection of HI 21-cm absorption from the z = 2.289 damped Lyman α system (DLA) towards TXS 0311+430 with the Green Bank Telescope. The 21-cm absorption has a velocity spread (between nulls) of ~110 km s-1 and an integrated optical depth of . We also present new Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope 602-MHz imaging of the radio continuum. TXS 0311+430 is unresolved at this frequency, indicating that the covering factor of the DLA is likely to be high. Combining the integrated optical depth with the DLA HIcolumn density of yields a spin temperature of Ts = (138 +/- 36) K, assuming a covering factor of unity. This is the first case of a low spin temperature (<350 K) in a z > 1 DLA and is among the lowest temperatures ever measured in any DLA. Indeed, the Ts measured for this DLA is similar to values measured in the Milky Way and local disc galaxies. We also determine a lower limit (Si/H) >~ 1/3 solar for the DLA metallicity, amongst the highest abundances measured in DLAs at any redshift. Based on low-redshift correlations, the low Ts, large 21-cm absorption width and high metallicity all suggest that the z ~ 2.289 DLA is likely to arise in a massive, luminous disc galaxy.

  16. THE HANLE EFFECT OF THE HYDROGEN Ly{alpha} LINE FOR PROBING THE MAGNETISM OF THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Stepan, JirI; Casini, Roberto E-mail: stepan@iac.es

    2011-09-01

    We present some theoretical predictions concerning the amplitude and magnetic sensitivity of the linear-polarization signals produced by scattering processes in the hydrogen Ly{alpha} line of the solar transition region. To this end, we have calculated the atomic-level polarization (population imbalances and quantum coherences) induced by anisotropic radiation pumping in semiempirical and hydrodynamical models of the solar atmosphere, taking into account radiative transfer and the Hanle effect caused by the presence of organized and random magnetic fields. The line-center amplitudes of the emergent linear-polarization signals are found to vary typically between 0.1% and 1%, depending on the scattering geometry and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field. The results shown here encourage the development of UV polarimeters for sounding rockets and space telescopes with the aim of opening up a diagnostic window for magnetic field measurements in the upper chromosphere and transition region of the Sun.

  17. Chromospheric Line Blanketing and the Hydrogen Spectrum of dM Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, C. I.; Doyle, J. G.

    1996-12-01

    We present non-LTE calculations of the Hi spectrum in a grid of chromospheric models that represents a dM0 star in which the activity level ranges from quiescent to very active. We investigate three different treatments of the background opacity: 1) continuous opacity only, 2) blanketing due to lines that form in the photosphere below Tmin, and 3) blanketing by lines that form throughout the entire outer atmosphere. We show that the predicted W_lambda of Lyalpha in all models, and of Hα in very active (dMe) stars, is reduced by as much as a factor of ~ 4 by the inclusion of background line opacity. A consistent treatment of line blanketing that includes the effect of the chromospheric and transition region temperature structure in the calculation of background line opacity is necessary for the accurate calculation of Lyalpha , and in some cases Hα , in thes e stars. The Hα line in less active models, and the Pabeta line in all models, is negligibly affected by the treatment of background opacity. We also show that the broad-band continuum flux in regions where lambda < 2000 A is increased by as much as a factor of ~ 3 in some models by the inclusion of chromospheric line blanketing.

  18. Stark spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen balmer-alpha line for electric field measurement in plasmas by saturation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Katayama, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-09-01

    Detailed structures of electric fields in sheath and pre-sheath regions of various plasmas are interested from the viewpoint of basic plasma physics. Several researchers observed Stark spectra of Doppler-broadened Rydberg states to evaluate electric fields in plasmas; however, these measurements needed high-power, expensive tunable lasers. In this study, we carried out another Stark spectroscopy with a low-cost diode laser system. We applied saturation spectroscopy, which achieves a Doppler-free wavelength resolution, to observe the Stark spectrum of the Balmer-alpha line of atomic hydrogen in the sheath region of a low-pressure hydrogen plasma. The hydrogen plasma was generated in an ICP source which was driven by on-off modulated rf power at 20 kHz. A planar electrode was inserted into the plasma. Weak probe and intense pump laser beams were injected into the plasma from the counter directions in parallel to the electrode surface. The laser beams crossed with a small angle above the electrode. The observed fine-structure spectra showed shifts, deformations, and/or splits when varying the distance between the observation position and the electrode surface. The detection limit for the electric field was estimated to be several tens of V/cm.

  19. Space charge compensation in the Linac4 low energy beam transport line with negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Valerio-Lizarraga, Cristhian A; Lallement, Jean-Baptiste; Leon-Monzon, Ildefonso; Lettry, Jacques; Midttun, Øystein; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    The space charge effect of low energy, unbunched ion beams can be compensated by the trapping of ions or electrons into the beam potential. This has been studied for the 45 keV negative hydrogen ion beam in the CERN Linac4 Low Energy Beam Transport using the package IBSimu [T. Kalvas et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 02B703 (2010)], which allows the space charge calculation of the particle trajectories. The results of the beam simulations will be compared to emittance measurements of an H(-) beam at the CERN Linac4 3 MeV test stand, where the injection of hydrogen gas directly into the beam transport region has been used to modify the space charge compensation degree.

  20. On the role of atomic metastability in the production of Balmer line radiation from ‘cold’ atomic hydrogen, deuterium and hydrogenic ion impurities in fusion edge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2012-03-01

    Published arguments, which assign an important role to atomic metastability in the production of ‘narrow’ Zeeman component radiation from the boundary region of fusion plasmas, are examined critically in relation to l-redistribution by proton and electron collisions, and mixing of unperturbed atomic states by the ion microfield and microfield gradient. It is concluded that these important processes indeed severely constrain the contribution from ‘metastable’ states to the generation of the hydrogen Balmer spectra, for electron concentrations above 1012 cm-3, as pointed out before by the present author (Hey et al 1999 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 32 3555). The analysis of collision-induced l-redistribution represents an extension of that used previously (Hey et al 1996 Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36 583), applicable up to higher electron densities. For comparison purposes, we also consider the question of metastability of ionized helium in a low-temperature plasma, and that of some common hydrogenic impurities (C5+ and Ne9+) in a hydrogen (deuterium) fusion plasma. While for low nuclear charge Z the metastability of 2s1/2 levels is quenched by the plasma environment, it is much reduced in high-Z ions owing to the rapid increase with Z of the two-photon electric dipole (2E1) and magnetic dipole (M1) spontaneous transition rates to the ground state, whereas the role of the plasma in these cases is less important. The main new principle elaborated in this work is the sensitivity of atomic line strengths, and hence collision strengths, to perturbation by the plasma environment for transitions between fine-structure sublevels of the same principal quantum number. As the plasma microfield strength grows, ‘allowed’ transitions diminish in strength, while ‘forbidden’ transitions grow. However, owing to violation of the parity selection rule, there is an overall loss of collision strength available to transitions, resulting from the appearance of significant

  1. Nuclear magnetic resonance wide-line study of hydrogen in the yttrium-yttrium dihydride system

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D.L.

    1980-03-01

    The /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance was studied in the yttrium-hydrogen system YH/sub x/ in the composition range 0.20 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.98 and temperature range 77 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 490/sup 0/K. Both ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-phases of YH/sub x/ were investigated in polycrystalline (powdered) specimens. Rigid lattice proton resonance second moments were obtained for both ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-phase samples. Analysis of the second moment for ..cap alpha..-YH/sub x/ (..cap alpha..-phase) indicates that the hydrogen resides in both the tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites of the hcp Y lattice. Second moment values for ..beta..-YH/sub x/ (..beta..-phase) indicate that a sizeable fraction of the octahedral interstitial sites in the fcc yttrium metal lattice are occupied by hydrogen, while a nonnegligible fraction of the tetrahedral interstitial sites are vacant. For example, in YH/sub 1.98/, 28% of the octahedral sites are occupied, while 15% of the tetrahedral sites are vacant. The results for ..beta..-YH/sub x/ also indicate that as the H concentration increases, the probability of H occupation of octahedral sites increases.

  2. LINE IDENTIFICATIONS OF TYPE I SUPERNOVAE: ON THE DETECTION OF Si II FOR THESE HYDROGEN-POOR EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Parrent, J. T.; Milisavljevic, D.; Soderberg, A. M.; Parthasarathy, M.

    2016-03-20

    Here we revisit line identifications of type I supernovae (SNe I) and highlight trace amounts of unburned hydrogen as an important free parameter for the composition of the progenitor. Most one-dimensional stripped-envelope models of supernovae indicate that observed features near 6000–6400 Å in type I spectra are due to more than Si ii λ6355. However, while an interpretation of conspicuous Si ii λ6355 can approximate 6150 Å absorption features for all SNe Ia during the first month of free expansion, similar identifications applied to 6250 Å features of SNe Ib and Ic have not been as successful. When the corresponding synthetic spectra are compared with high-quality timeseries observations, the computed spectra are frequently too blue in wavelength. Some improvement can be achieved with Fe ii lines that contribute redward of 6150 Å; however, the computed spectra either remain too blue or the spectrum only reaches a fair agreement when the rise-time to peak brightness of the model conflicts with observations by a factor of two. This degree of disagreement brings into question the proposed explosion scenario. Similarly, a detection of strong Si ii λ6355 in the spectra of broadlined Ic and super-luminous events of type I/R is less convincing despite numerous model spectra used to show otherwise. Alternatively, we suggest 6000–6400 Å features are possibly influenced by either trace amounts of hydrogen or blueshifted absorption and emission in Hα, the latter being an effect which is frequently observed in the spectra of hydrogen-rich, SNe II.

  3. Near infrared hydrogen lines as diagnostic of accretion and winds in T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folha, D. F. M.; Emerson, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    From a sample of 50 T Tauri stars, mostly from the Taurus-Auriga complex, Pa beta line profiles were obtained for 49 of the stars and Br gamma profiles for 37 of the stars. Emission at Pa beta was observed for 42 stars and emission at Br gamma was found for 30 stars. The most conspicuous features in the line profiles is the almost complete absence of blueshifted absorption components and the relatively high frequency of inverse P Cygni profiles (IPC). At Pa beta, 34% of the profiles are IPC while at Br gamma 20% are IPC. The redshifted absorption features indicate infall at velocities of about 200 km s-1, compatible with free fall from a few radii out. In general, line profiles are broad centrally peaked with slightly blueshifted line peaks. Existing wind and accretion models fail, in quantitative terms, to explain the shape of the observed profiles. Magnetospheric accretion models, being the currently preferred ones, produce lines too narrow (by ~ 100 km s-1 FWHM), wings extending to velocities too low (by at least ~ 100 km s-1) and with maximum normalized intensities too high by factors of a few. A qualitative agreement between some of the accretion model predicted profiles and some observations hint that emission in these lines might, at least partially, arise from infalling material. Definite claims regarding the origin of the emission in these lines cannot be made until models match observations much better than they currently do. Tables 4 and 5 are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strastg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strastg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/365/90 Tables 6 and 7 are also available in electronic form at the CDS

  4. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang; Li, Gongping

    2014-04-28

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500 ± 100 K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13 000 ± 400 K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM = FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, the reference reduced mass μ{sub 0} pair of (3.30 ± 0.82 and 1.65 ± 0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900 ± 1800 K.

  5. Hydrogen isotope composition of leaf wax n-alkanes in Arabidopsis lines with different transpiration rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedentchouk, N.; Lawson, T.; Eley, Y.; McAusland, L.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions of oxygen and hydrogen are used widely to investigate modern and ancient water cycles. The D/H composition of organic compounds derived from terrestrial plants has recently attracted significant attention as a proxy for palaeohydrology. However, the role of various plant physiological and biochemical factors in controlling the D/H signature of leaf wax lipids in extant plants remains unclear. The focus of this study is to investigate the effect of plant transpiration on the D/H composition of n-alkanes in terrestrial plants. This experiment includes 4 varieties of Arabidopsis thaliana that differ with respect to stomatal density and stomatal geometry. All 4 varieties were grown indoors under identical temperature, relative humidity, light and watering regimes and then sampled for leaf wax and leaf water stable isotopic measurements. During growth, stomatal conductance to carbon dioxide and water vapour were also determined. We found that the plants varied significantly in terms of their transpiration rates. Transpiration rates were significantly higher in Arabidopsis ost1 and ost1-1 varieties (2.4 and 3.2 mmol m-2 s-1, respectively) than in Arabidopsis RbohD and Col-0 (1.5 and 1.4). However, hydrogen isotope measurements of n-alkanes extracted from leaf waxes revealed a very different pattern. Varieties ost1, ost1-1, and RbohD have very similar deltaD values of n-C29 alkane (-125, -128, and -127 per mil), whereas the deltaD value of Col-0 is more negative (-137 per mil). The initial results of this work suggest that plant transpiration is decoupled from the D/H composition of n-alkanes. In other words, physical processes that affect water vapour movement between the plant and its environment apparently cannot account for the stable hydrogen isotope composition of organic compounds that comprise leaf waxes. Additional, perhaps biochemical, processes that affect hydrogen isotope fractionation during photosynthesis might need to be invoked

  6. Broadening and shift of the spectral lines of hydrogen atoms and silicon ions in laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kask, N E; Leksina, E G; Michurin, S V; Fedorov, G M; Chopornyak, D B

    2015-06-30

    We report an experimental investigation of the broadening and shift of discrete lines in the plasma spectrum produced in the laser ablation of silicon in a broad pressure range (10{sup 2} – 10{sup 7} Pa) of the ambient gas (Ar, He, H{sub 2}). The broadening and line shifts are measured in relation to the distance from the target and initial gas pressure. The threshold nature of the resulting dependences is found to be related to the formation of virtual percolation clusters proceeding in the hot dense plasma. (laser plasma)

  7. Communication: Visible line intensities of the triatomic hydrogen ion from experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H.; Grussie, Florian; Wolf, Andreas; Mizus, Irina I.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-12-28

    The visible spectrum of H{sub 3}{sup +} is studied using high-sensitivity action spectroscopy in a cryogenic radiofrequency multipole trap. Advances are made to measure the weak ro-vibrational transitions from the lowest rotational states of H{sub 3}{sup +} up to high excitation energies providing visible line intensities and, after normalisation to an infrared calibration line, the corresponding Einstein B coefficients. Ab initio predictions for the Einstein B coefficients are obtained from a highly precise dipole moment surface of H{sub 3}{sup +} and found to be in excellent agreement, even in the region where states have been classified as chaotic.

  8. Communication: Visible line intensities of the triatomic hydrogen ion from experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrignani, Annemieke; Berg, Max H.; Grussie, Florian; Wolf, Andreas; Mizus, Irina I.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Pavanello, Michele; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-12-01

    The visible spectrum of H3 + is studied using high-sensitivity action spectroscopy in a cryogenic radiofrequency multipole trap. Advances are made to measure the weak ro-vibrational transitions from the lowest rotational states of H3 + up to high excitation energies providing visible line intensities and, after normalisation to an infrared calibration line, the corresponding Einstein B coefficients. Ab initio predictions for the Einstein B coefficients are obtained from a highly precise dipole moment surface of H3 + and found to be in excellent agreement, even in the region where states have been classified as chaotic.

  9. He II Raman Scattered Line by Neutral Hydrogen in the Bipolar Platenary Nebula M2-9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hee-Won; Kang, Young Woon

    2001-06-01

    In the spectrum of the young bipolar planetary nebula M2-9 obtained from the 1.5 m telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory, we detected the He~II feature at 6545 Å that are proposed to be formed via Raman scattering by atomic hydrogen. However, in the same spectrum, the He~II emission lines at 6527 Å and 6560 Å are absent, which implies that the He~II emission region is hidden from our line of sight and that the H~I scattering region is pretty much extended not to be obscured entirely. We performed photoionization computations to estimate the physical size of the He~II emission line region to be 1016 cm, from which the location and dimension of the obscuring circumstellar region are inferred and the temperature of the central star must exceed 105 K. The angular size of the circumstellar region responsible for the obscuration of the He~II emission region is ~ 1'' with the assumption of the distance 01 kpc to M2-9, which is consistent with the recent image of M2-9 obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  10. A probabilistic approach to radiative energy loss calculations for optically thick atmospheres - Hydrogen lines and continua

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, R. C.; Ricchiazzi, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    An approximate probabilistic radiative transfer equation and the statistical equilibrium equations are simultaneously solved for a model hydrogen atom consisting of three bound levels and ionization continuum. The transfer equation for L-alpha, L-beta, H-alpha, and the Lyman continuum is explicitly solved assuming complete redistribution. The accuracy of this approach is tested by comparing source functions and radiative loss rates to values obtained with a method that solves the exact transfer equation. Two recent model solar-flare chromospheres are used for this test. It is shown that for the test atmospheres the probabilistic method gives values of the radiative loss rate that are characteristically good to a factor of 2. The advantage of this probabilistic approach is that it retains a description of the dominant physical processes of radiative transfer in the complete redistribution case, yet it achieves a major reduction in computational requirements.

  11. Comparing 3D Solar Model Atmospheres with Observations: Hydrogen Lines and Centre-to-limb Variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tiago M. D.; Asplund, Martin; Trampedach, Regner

    Three dimensional hydrodynamical stellar model atmospheres represent a major step forward in stellar spectroscopy. Making use of radiative-hydrodynamical convection simulations that contain no adjustable free parameters, the model atmospheres provide a robust and realistic treatment of convection. These models have been applied to several lines in the Sun and other stars, yielding an excellent agreement with observations (e.g., Asplund et al. (2000) [1]).

  12. Evaluation of Antimicrobial-Antibiofilm Activity of a Hydrogen Peroxide Decontaminating System Used in Dental Unit Water Lines

    PubMed Central

    Orrù, Germano; Del Nero, Susanna; Tuveri, Enrica; Laura Ciusa, Maria; Pilia, Francesca; Erriu, Matteo; Orrù, Ginevra; Liciardi, Manuele; Piras, Vincenzo; Denotti, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    A dental unit water line (DUWL) equipped with a device designed to automatically and continually flush a bacteriostatic solution of hydrogen peroxide (WHE) and a discontinuous disinfecting system (BIOSTER) was evaluated. In the first instance a preliminary sensitivity test on a large number of microorganisms (bacteria and fungi) was tried with a H2O2 range from 100 to 800 ppm. The bacteria frequently reported in DUWL (including Pseudomonas spp, Streptococcus spp., Staphylococcus spp., E. coli) and some periodontal pathogens showed a minimum inhibitory concentration from 100 to 300 H2O2 ppm (also including M. marinum and C. albicans). However, H2O2 did not show any inhibitory effects against: A. actinomycetemcomitans, C. glabrata C. parapsilos, F. nucleatum, M. micros. In a second step, the DUWL was experimentally infected with S. faecalis, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, S. aureus. After disinfection steps with 3% H2O2, the inhibitory effect on planktonic forms and on sessile biofilm was measured. In a third step, the count of 16S rRNA gene copies by real time PCR at different points of the DUWL described an accrue of bacterial slime in “hot spot” regions characterized by irregular/slow water flux (valves, elbows). However these results suggest that hydrogen peroxide is not only able to inhibit bursts of planktonic bacteria inside the DUWL, but that it could also be effective against sessile biofilm containing heterotrophic microorganisms derived from domestic water line contamination. In addition some oral pathogens could be contaminating and surviving in DUWL. PMID:21113279

  13. Integral field spectroscopy of planetary nebulae: mapping the line diagnostics and hydrogen-poor zones with VLT FLAMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsamis, Y. G.; Walsh, J. R.; Péquignot, D.; Barlow, M. J.; Danziger, I. J.; Liu, X.-W.

    2008-05-01

    Results from the first dedicated study of Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) by means of optical integral field spectroscopy with the Very Large Telescope Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph Argus integral field unit are presented. Three typical Galactic disc PNe have been mapped with the 11.5 × 7.2-arcsec2 Argus array: 2D spectral maps of the main shell of NGC5882 and of large areas of NGC 6153 and NGC 7009 with 297 spatial pixels per target were obtained at subarcsec resolutions. A corresponding number of 297 spectra per target were obtained in the 396.4-507.8nm range. Spatially resolved maps of emission lines and of nebular physical properties such as electron temperatures, densities and ionic abundances were produced. The abundances of helium and of doubly ionized carbon and oxygen, relative to hydrogen, were derived from optical recombination lines (ORLs), while those of O2+ were also derived from the classic collisionally excited lines (CELs). The occurrence of the abundance discrepancy problem, pertaining to oxygen, was investigated by mapping the ratio of ORL/CEL abundances for O2+ [the abundance discrepancy factor (ADF)] across the face of the PNe. The ADF varies between targets and also with position within the targets, attaining values of ~40 in the case of NGC 6153 and ~30 in the case of NGC 7009. Correlations of the ADF with geometric distance from the central star and plasma surface brightness (for NGC 6153), as well as with [OIII] electron temperature, plasma ionization state and other physical properties of the targets are established. Very small values of the temperature fluctuation parameter in the plane of the sky, t2A(O2+), are found in all cases. It is argued that these results provide further evidence for the existence in run-of-the-mill PNe of a distinct nebular component consisting of hydrogen-deficient, super-metal-rich plasma. The zones containing this posited component appear as undulations in the CII and OII ORL abundance

  14. Simultaneous K- and L-band Spectroscopy of Be Stars: Circumstellar Envelope Properties from Hydrogen Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, A.; Arias, M. L.; Cidale, L. S.

    2010-05-01

    We present medium-resolution K- and L-band spectra of a sample of eight Be stars, obtained with Gemini/NIRI. The IR K and L bands contain many lines of different hydrogen series that are used as a diagnosis to the physical conditions in the circumstellar environments. We make an analysis on the optical depths of the line-forming regions based on the intensity ratios of Pfγ and Brα lines, the behavior of Humphreys' series, and the fluxes of Brα and Brγ lines. All our targets show spectroscopic and photometric long-term variability; thus, time-resolved K- and L-band spectroscopy is an ideal tool for studying the structure and evolution of the innermost regions of the envelope and to test models on the disk-forming mechanism. We note that the instrumental configuration used allowed us to obtain good quality IR observations and to take profit of Gemini band 3 observing time (allocation time for ranked programs in which the observing conditions are relaxed). Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (USA), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (UK), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina).

  15. Hydrogen Atom Collision Processes in Cool Stellar Atmospheres: Effects on Spectral Line Strengths and Measured Chemical Abundances in Old Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barklem, Paul S.

    2012-12-01

    The precise measurement of the chemical composition of stars is a fundamental problem relevant to many areas of astrophysics. State-of-the-art approaches attempt to unite accurate descriptions of microphysics, non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) line formation and 3D hydrodynamical model atmospheres. In this paper I review progress in understanding inelastic collisions of hydrogen atoms with other species and their influence on spectral line formation and derived abundances in stellar atmospheres. These collisions are a major source of uncertainty in non-LTE modelling of spectral lines and abundance determinations, especially for old, metal-poor stars, which are unique tracers of the early evolution of our galaxy. Full quantum scattering calculations of direct excitation processes X(nl) + H leftrightarrow X(n'l') + H and charge transfer processes X(nl) + H leftrightarrow X+ + H- have been done for Li, Na and Mg [1,2,3] based on detailed quantum chemical data, e.g. [4]. Rate coefficients have been calculated and applied to non-LTE modelling of spectral lines in stellar atmospheres [5,6,7,8,9]. In all cases we find that charge transfer processes from the first excited S-state are very important, and the processes affect measured abundances for Li, Na and Mg in some stars by as much as 60%. Effects vary with stellar parameters (e.g. temperature, luminosity, metal content) and so these processes are important not only for accurate absolute abundances, but also for relative abundances among dissimilar stars.

  16. Spectral shifts of methane lines in collisions with hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, and argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Kenneth; Jennings, Donald E.

    1989-01-01

    Pressure-induced shifts of rotational-vibrational lines in CH4 have been measured at very high spectral resolution in the R-branch of the 3nu(3) overtone. The colliding gases were H2, He, N2, and Ar. Results are presented as functions of rotational and tetrahedral quantum numbers. Mean values (in 0.001/cm per torr) for the R0-R6 multiplets are -0.01109 (CH4-H2), +0.00547 (opposite sense) (CH4-He), -0.01990 (CH4-N2), and -0.02126 (CH4-Ar).

  17. Reverse engineering a spectrum: using fluorescent spectra of molecular hydrogen to recreate the missing Lyman-α line of pre-main sequence stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsky, J. L.; Herczeg, G.; Wood, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    The hydrogen Lyman-α (Lyα) line, a major source of ionization of metals in the circumstellar disks of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars, is usually not observed due to absorption by interstellar and circumstellar hydrogen. We have developed a technique to reconstruct the intrinsic Lyα line using the observed emission in the H2 B-X lines that are fluoresced by Lyα. We describe this technique and the subsequent analysis of the ultraviolet (UV) spectra of the TW Hya, RU Lupi and other PMS stars. We find that the reconstructed Lyα lines are indeed far brighter than any other feature in the UV spectra of these stars and therefore play an important role in the ionization and heating of the outer layers of circumstellar disks.

  18. Developing RCM Strategy for Hydrogen Fuel Cells Utilizing On Line E-Condition Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglee, D.; Knowles, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Fuel cell vehicles are considered to be a viable solution to problems such as carbon emissions and fuel shortages for road transport. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells are mainly used in this purpose because they can run at low temperatures and have a simple structure. Yet high maintenance costs and the inherent dangers of maintaining equipment using hydrogen are two main issues which need to be addressed. The development of appropriate and efficient strategies is currently lacking with regard to fuel cell maintenance. A Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) approach offers considerable benefit to the management of fuel cell maintenance since it includes an identification and consideration of the impact of critical components. Technological developments in e-maintenance systems, radio-frequency identification (RFID) and personal digital assistants (PDAs) have proven to satisfy the increasing demand for improved reliability, efficiency and safety. RFID technology is used to store and remotely retrieve electronic maintenance data in order to provide instant access to up-to-date, accurate and detailed information. The aim is to support fuel cell maintenance decisions by developing and applying a blend of leading-edge communications and sensor technology including RFID. The purpose of this paper is to review and present the state of the art in fuel cell condition monitoring and maintenance utilizing RCM and RFID technologies. Using an RCM analysis critical components and fault modes are identified. RFID tags are used to store the critical information, possible faults and their cause and effect. The relationship between causes, faults, symptoms and long term implications of fault conditions are summarized. Finally conclusions are drawn regarding suggested maintenance strategies and the optimal structure for an integrated, cost effective condition monitoring and maintenance management system.

  19. The quantum dynamics of interfacial hydrogen: Path integral maximum entropy calculation of adsorbate vibrational line shapes for the H/Ni(111) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongsup; Doll, J. D.; Gubernatis, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Vibrational line shapes for a hydrogen atom on an embedded atom model (EAM) of the Ni(111) surface are extracted from path integral Monte Carlo data. Maximum entropy methods are utilized to stabilize this inversion. Our results indicate that anharmonic effects are significant, particularly for vibrational motion parallel to the surface. Unlike their normal mode analogs, calculated quantum line shapes for the EAM potential predict the correct ordering of vibrational features corresponding to parallel and perpendicular adsorbate motion.

  20. First Demonstration of ECHO: an External Calibrator for Hydrogen Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel C.; Burba, Jacob; Bowman, Judd D.; Neben, Abraham R.; Stinnett, Benjamin; Turner, Lauren; Johnson, Kali; Busch, Michael; Allison, Jay; Leatham, Marc; Serrano Rodriguez, Victoria; Denney, Mason; Nelson, David

    2017-03-01

    Multiple instruments are pursuing constraints on dark energy, observing reionization and opening a window on the dark ages through the detection and characterization of the 21 cm hydrogen line for redshifts ranging from ∼1 to 25. These instruments, including CHIME in the sub-meter and HERA in the meter bands, are wide-field arrays with multiple-degree beams, typically operating in transit mode. Accurate knowledge of their primary beams is critical for separation of bright foregrounds from the desired cosmological signals, but difficult to achieve through astronomical observations alone. Previous beam calibration work at low frequencies has focused on model verification and does not address the need of 21 cm experiments for routine beam mapping, to the horizon, of the as-built array. We describe the design and methodology of a drone-mounted calibrator, the External Calibrator for Hydrogen Observatories (ECHO), that aims to address this need. We report on a first set of trials to calibrate low-frequency dipoles at 137 MHz and compare ECHO measurements to an established beam-mapping system based on transmissions from the Orbcomm satellite constellation. We create beam maps of two dipoles at a 9° resolution and find sample noise ranging from 1% at the zenith to 100% in the far sidelobes. Assuming this sample noise represents the error in the measurement, the higher end of this range is not yet consistent with the desired requirement but is an improvement on Orbcomm. The overall performance of ECHO suggests that the desired precision and angular coverage is achievable in practice with modest improvements. We identify the main sources of systematic error and uncertainty in our measurements and describe the steps needed to overcome them.

  1. 21 CM searches for DIM galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Mike; Banks, Gareth

    1997-04-01

    We review very strong selection effects which operate against the detection of dim (i.e. low surface brightness) galaxies. The Parkes multibeam instrument offers a wonderful opportunity to turn up new populations of such galaxies. However, to explore the newly accessible parameter space, it will be necessary to survey both a very deep patch (105 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 1018 cm-2) and a deep patch (104 s/pointing, limiting N hi ˜ 3 × 1018 cm-2) in carefully selected areas, and we outline the case to do this.

  2. DISENTANGLING THE CIRCUMNUCLEAR ENVIRONS OF CENTAURUS A. II. ON THE NATURE OF THE BROAD ABSORPTION LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Espada, D.; Matsushita, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Peck, A. B.; Henkel, C.; Iono, D.; Israel, F. P.; Muller, S.; Petitpas, G.; Pihlstroem, Y.; Taylor, G. B.; Trung, D. V.

    2010-09-01

    We report on atomic gas (H I) and molecular gas (as traced by CO(2-1)) redshifted absorption features toward the nuclear regions of the closest powerful radio galaxy, Centaurus A (NGC 5128). Our H I observations using the Very Long Baseline Array allow us to discern with unprecedented sub-parsec resolution H I absorption profiles toward different positions along the 21 cm continuum jet in the inner 0.''3 (or 5.4 pc). In addition, our CO(2-1) data obtained with the Submillimeter Array probe the bulk of the absorbing molecular gas with little contamination by emission, which was not possible with previous CO single-dish observations. We shed light on the physical properties of the gas in the line of sight with these data, emphasizing the still open debate about the nature of the gas that produces the broad absorption line ({approx}55 km s{sup -1}). First, the broad H I line is more prominent toward the central and brightest 21 cm continuum component than toward a region along the jet at a distance {approx}20 mas (or 0.4 pc) further from the nucleus. This indicates that the broad absorption line arises from gas located close to the nucleus, rather than from diffuse and more distant gas. Second, the different velocity components detected in the CO(2-1) absorption spectrum match well with other molecular lines, such as those of HCO{sup +}(1-0), except the broad absorption line that is detected in HCO{sup +}(1-0) (and most likely related to that of the H I). Dissociation of molecular hydrogen due to the active galactic nucleus seems to be efficient at distances r {approx}< 10 pc, which might contribute to the depth of the broad H I and molecular lines.

  3. Analyzing Hydrogen Recombination Lines in the Infrared and Optical to Determine Extinction and SFRs of Local LIRGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Anna; Inami, Hanae

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements for dust extinction and star formation rates (SFRs) for luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs). We utilized the hydrogen recombination lines Brα, Hα, and Hβ observed in the infrared and optical wavelengths with AKARI and the Lick Observatory's Kast Double spectrograph to produce spectra. By calculating Brα/Hα ratios for the target galaxies, extinction is estimated. A possible correlation between higher LIR, IR/UV, specific SFRs and higher Brα/Hα has been found. Through comparisons with Hα/Hβ, it may be possible to determine if Hα is, in fact, underestimating extinction, since Hα is more strongly affected by extinction compared to longer wavelengths such as Brα. The accuracy of using Hα in extinction corrections is important for SFR studies, and, thus, one goal is to find a more accurate reddening correction factor. Payne was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  4. Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mires, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    National Geography Standards for the middle school years generally stress the teaching of latitude and longitude. There are many creative ways to explain the great grid that encircles our planet, but the author has found that students in his college-level geography courses especially enjoy human-interest stories associated with lines of latitude…

  5. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage.

  6. Caution on the use of NBS 30 biotite for hydrogen-isotope measurements with on-line high-temperature conversion systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Olack, Gerard; Vennemann, Torsten W.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALEThe supply of NBS 30 biotite is nearly exhausted. During measurements of NBS 30 and potential replacements, reproducible δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values could not be obtained by three laboratories using high-temperature conversion (HTC) systems. The cause of this issue has been investigated using the silver-tube technique for hydrogen-isotope measurements of water.METHODSThe δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values of NBS 30 biotite, other biotites, muscovites, and kaolinite with different particle sizes, along with IAEA-CH-7 polyethylene, and reference waters and NBS 22 oil that were sealed in silver-tube segments, were measured. The effect of absorbed water on mineral surfaces was investigated with waters both enriched and depleted in 2H. The quantitative conversion of hydrogen from biotite into gaseous hydrogen as a function of mass and particle size was also investigated.RESULTSThe δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values of NBS 30 obtained by three laboratories were as much as 21 ‰ too high compared with the accepted value of −65.7 ‰, determined by conventional off-line measurements. The experiments showed a strong correlation between grain size and the δ2HVSMOW-SLAP value of NBS 30 biotite, but not of biotites with lower iron content. The δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values of NBS 30 as a function of particle size show a clear trend toward −65.7 ‰ with finer grain size.CONCLUSIONSDetermination of the δ2HVSMOW-SLAP values of hydrous minerals and of NBS 30 biotite by on-line HTC systems coupled to isotope-ratio mass spectrometers may be unreliable because hydrogen in this biotite may not be converted quantitatively into molecular hydrogen. Extreme caution in the use and interpretation of δ2HVSMOW-SLAP on-line measurements of hydrous minerals is recommended.

  7. Asymmetry of the Balmer-alpha line shape and recovery of the effective hydrogen temperature in the tokamak scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Neverov, V. S. Kukushkin, A. B.; Lisgo, S. W. Kukushkin, A. S.; Alekseev, A. G.

    2015-02-15

    An algorithm for recovering the effective temperature of atoms of hydrogen (and its isotopes) in the tokamak scrape-off layer from the asymmetry of the Balmer-alpha line shape is proposed. The algorithm is based on the parametrization of the asymmetry of the line shape caused by the nonlocal character of neutral hydrogen flux from the wall into the tokamak plasma. The accuracy of the algorithm is tested against the results of simulations of the velocity distribution function of deuterium neutrals in the scrape-off layer by the EIRENE code with the use of the source data on the main plasma component in the quasi-stationary stage of the inductive mode of ITER operation calculated by the SOLPS4.3 (B2-EIRENE) code.

  8. Modeling the temporal and spatial variations of the vertical structure of Jupiter's atmosphere using observations of the 3-0 hydrogen quadrupole lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, C. C.; Hunten, D. M.; Tomasko, M. G.

    1986-01-01

    An observational program was established in 1983 to monitor the spatial and temporal variations in the Jovian atmosphere over short and long time scales. The program involves tracking several different longitudes as they rotate around the planet from one limb to another. This tracking experiment was done at many different wavelengths including the 3-0 S(1) and S(0) hydrogen quadrupole lines as well as several broad band methane absorptions. The June 1983 hydrogen quadrupole data was reduced and equivalent widths were measured for approximately 25 east-west positions across the planet at 7 different latitudes for both wavelengths. The data for the South Tropical Zone (20 deg. S) was modeled extensively and the effects of the various model parameters on the value of the calculated equivalent widths of both lines was measured as a longitude rotated from the east (or morning) limb to the west (or evening) limb. The value of the equivalent width is also quite sensitive to the height of the NH3 cloud top and to the value used for the single scattering albedo. A combination of these parameters changing on a diurnal time scale could also explain these observations. This gradual increase from one limb to the other appears in the data for both the North and South Equatorial Belts as well as the equatorial region and the North Tropical Zone. Models that used only normal hydrogen and models that used only equilibrium hydrogen were studied.

  9. Applicability of fiber-optic-based Raman probes for on-line reaction monitoring of high-pressure catalytic hydrogenation reactions.

    PubMed

    Hamminga, Gerben M; Mul, Guido; Moulijn, Jacob A

    2007-05-01

    This study evaluates the applicability of fiber-optic-based Raman probes for on-line reaction monitoring of high-pressure catalytic hydrogenation reactions in batch autoclaves. First, based on trends in the strong intensity of the 945 cm(-1) C-O-C vibration of 1,3-dioxolane, the effect of various experimental parameters on sensitivity was evaluated and can be summarized as follows: (1) above 500 rpm a linear increase in stirring speed induces a linear decrease in Raman intensity; (2) a linear increase in hydrogen pressure also leads to a linear decrease of the Raman signal; (3) linear temperature elevation exponentially decreases the Raman intensity; and (4) increasing the catalyst particle concentration results in a steep nonlinear decrease of the Raman signal. Light scattering by gas bubbles, or combined scattering and absorption by (black) catalyst particles, reducing the amount of light collected by the optical fiber probe, explain the observed experimental trends. Second, the sensitivity of Raman spectroscopy was directly compared with attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FT-IR) spectroscopy in the analysis of three different hydrogenation reactions over a Cu-ZnO catalyst. From the applied target molecules, diethyl maleate hydrogenation could be very well analyzed by Raman spectroscopy due to the high Raman scattering efficiency of the C=C bond, while for analysis of the hydrogenation of gamma-butyrolactone or 1-butanal, ATR-FT-IR is the technique of choice.

  10. Estimating Noise in the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englund Mathieu, Philip; HERA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a radio telescope dedicated to observing large scale structure during and prior to the epoch of reionization. Once completed, HERA will have unprecedented sensitivity to the 21-cm signal from hydrogen reionization. This poster will present time- and frequency-subtraction methods and results from a preliminary analysis of the noise characteristics of the nineteen-element pathfinder array.

  11. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: an extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques.

    PubMed

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B; Meijer, Harro A J; Brand, Willi A; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ(2)H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ(2)H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  12. On-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples using elemental chromium: An extension for high temperature elemental-analyzer techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Gilevska, Tetyana; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Meijer, Harro A.J.; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2015-01-01

    The high temperature conversion (HTC) technique using an elemental analyzer with a glassy carbon tube and filling (temperature conversion/elemental analysis, TC/EA) is a widely used method for hydrogen isotopic analysis of water and many solid and liquid organic samples with analysis by isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). However, the TC/EA IRMS method may produce inaccurate δ2H results, with values deviating by more than 20 mUr (milliurey = 0.001 = 1‰) from the true value for some materials. We show that a single-oven, chromium-filled elemental analyzer coupled to an IRMS substantially improves the measurement quality and reliability for hydrogen isotopic compositions of organic substances (Cr-EA method). Hot chromium maximizes the yield of molecular hydrogen in a helium carrier gas by irreversibly and quantitatively scavenging all reactive elements except hydrogen. In contrast, under TC/EA conditions, heteroelements like nitrogen or chlorine (and other halogens) can form hydrogen cyanide (HCN) or hydrogen chloride (HCl) and this can cause isotopic fractionation. The Cr-EA technique thus expands the analytical possibilities for on-line hydrogen-isotope measurements of organic samples significantly. This method yielded reproducibility values (1-sigma) for δ2H measurements on water and caffeine samples of better than 1.0 and 0.5 mUr, respectively. To overcome handling problems with water as the principal calibration anchor for hydrogen isotopic measurements, we have employed an effective and simple strategy using reference waters or other liquids sealed in silver-tube segments. These crimped silver tubes can be employed in both the Cr-EA and TC/EA techniques. They simplify considerably the normalization of hydrogen-isotope measurement data to the VSMOW-SLAP (Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water-Standard Light Antarctic Precipitation) scale, and their use improves accuracy of the data by eliminating evaporative loss and associated isotopic fractionation while

  13. Emission lines from shocks: water, molecular hydrogen, and low-excitation ions in the Cep A East and HH 7-11 outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnick, Gary; Watson, Dan

    2004-09-01

    Emission lines from shocks: water, molecular hydrogen, and low-excitation ions in the Cep A East and HH 7-11 outflows PI: Gary Melnick, Center for Astrophysics Co-Is: Ted Bergin, Center for Astrophysics David Neufeld, Johns Hopkins U. Dan Watson, U. Rochester SIRTF and the IRS offer access, at moderate spectral and spatial resolution, to some of the best molecular and atomic probes of the outflows and shocks associated with recent star formation. Here we intend to use IRS for emission-line imaging of Cepheus A East and HH 7-11, two well-known star-formation regions that were studied in detail by SWAS. The maps we obtain will include extended emission by molecular hydrogen (v = 0 S(0)-S(5)) and water (several pure rotational lines), as well as numerous transitions of low-excitation atomic and ionic species associated with jets and shocks. We will use these data, combined with SWAS observations of thermal water-line emission and shorter-wavelength H2 and [Fe II] images, in models of the excitation, energetics and chemistry of the shocked gas.

  14. Detection of Broad Hα Emission Lines in the Late-time Spectra of a Hydrogen-poor Superluminous Supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lin; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; de Cia, A.; Masci, F.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.; Yaron, O.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83-148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ˜1.3 × 1044 erg s-1, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day-1. The measured ejecta velocity is ˜ 13,000 km s-1. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70-220 M⊙), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (Erad ˜ 1051 erg, Ekin ˜ 2 × 1053 erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ˜4500 km s-1 and a ˜300 km s-1 blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ˜2 × 1041 erg s-1 as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ˜4 × 1016 cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M⊙. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M⊙ H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95-150) M⊙ about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ˜15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  15. DETECTION OF BROAD Hα EMISSION LINES IN THE LATE-TIME SPECTRA OF A HYDROGEN-POOR SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin; Masci, F.; Quimby, R.; Ofek, E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Cia, A. de; Yaron, O.; Mazzali, P.; Perley, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, P. E.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Woźniak, P. R.

    2015-12-01

    iPTF13ehe is a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at z = 0.3434, with a slow-evolving light curve and spectral features similar to SN2007bi. It rises in 83–148 days to reach a peak bolometric luminosity of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup −1}, then decays slowly at 0.015 mag day{sup −1}. The measured ejecta velocity is ∼ 13,000 km s{sup −1}. The inferred explosion characteristics, such as the ejecta mass (70–220 M{sub ⊙}), and the total radiative and kinetic energy (E{sub rad} ∼ 10{sup 51} erg, E{sub kin} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 53} erg), are typical of slow-evolving H-poor SLSN events. However, the late-time spectrum taken at +251 days (rest, post-peak) reveals a Balmer Hα emission feature with broad and narrow components, which has never been detected before among other H-poor SLSNe. The broad component has a velocity width of ∼4500 km s{sup −1} and a ∼300 km s{sup −1} blueward shift relative to the narrow component. We interpret this broad Hα emission with a luminosity of ∼2 × 10{sup 41} erg s{sup −1} as resulting from the interaction between the supernova ejecta and a discrete H-rich shell, located at a distance of ∼4 × 10{sup 16} cm from the explosion site. This interaction causes the rest-frame r-band LC to brighten at late times. The fact that the late-time spectra are not completely absorbed by the shock-ionized H-shell implies that its Thomson scattering optical depth is likely ≤1, thus setting upper limits on the shell mass ≤30 M{sub ⊙}. Of the existing models, a Pulsational Pair Instability supernova model can naturally explain the observed 30 M{sub ⊙} H-shell, ejected from a progenitor star with an initial mass of (95–150) M{sub ⊙} about 40 years ago. We estimate that at least ∼15% of all SLSNe-I may have late-time Balmer emission lines.

  16. DISCOVERY OF CARBON RADIO RECOMBINATION LINES IN M82

    SciTech Connect

    Morabito, Leah K.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Salgado, Francisco; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Toribio, M. Carmen; Heald, George; Beck, Rainer; Adebahr, Björn; Best, Philip; Beswick, Robert; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brüggen, Marcus; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Chyży, Krzysztof T.; Conway, J. E.; Horellou, Cathy; Van Driel, Wim; Gregson, Jonathan; and others

    2014-11-10

    Carbon radio recombination lines (RRLs) at low frequencies (≲ 500 MHz) trace the cold, diffuse phase of the interstellar medium, which is otherwise difficult to observe. We present the detection of carbon RRLs in absorption in M82 with the Low Frequency Array in the frequency range of 48-64 MHz. This is the first extragalactic detection of RRLs from a species other than hydrogen, and below 1 GHz. Since the carbon RRLs are not detected individually, we cross-correlated the observed spectrum with a template spectrum of carbon RRLs to determine a radial velocity of 219 km s{sup –1}. Using this radial velocity, we stack 22 carbon-α transitions from quantum levels n = 468-508 to achieve an 8.5σ detection. The absorption line profile exhibits a narrow feature with peak optical depth of 3 × 10{sup –3} and FWHM of 31 km s{sup –1}. Closer inspection suggests that the narrow feature is superimposed on a broad, shallow component. The total line profile appears to be correlated with the 21 cm H I line profile reconstructed from H I absorption in the direction of supernova remnants in the nucleus. The narrow width and centroid velocity of the feature suggests that it is associated with the nuclear starburst region. It is therefore likely that the carbon RRLs are associated with cold atomic gas in the direction of the nucleus of M82.

  17. Discovery of Carbon Radio Recombination Lines in M82

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, Leah K.; Oonk, J. B. R.; Salgado, Francisco; Toribio, M. Carmen; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Beck, Rainer; Adebahr, Björn; Best, Philip; Beswick, Robert; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Brüggen, Marcus; Chyży, Krzysztof T.; Conway, J. E.; van Driel, Wim; Gregson, Jonathan; Haverkorn, Marijke; Heald, George; Horellou, Cathy; Horneffer, Andreas; Iacobelli, Marco; Jarvis, Matt J.; Marti-Vidal, Ivan; Miley, George; Mulcahy, D. D.; Orrú, Emanuela; Pizzo, Roberto; Scaife, A. M. M.; Varenius, Eskil; van Weeren, Reinout J.; White, Glenn J.; Wise, Michael W.

    2014-11-01

    Carbon radio recombination lines (RRLs) at low frequencies (lsim 500 MHz) trace the cold, diffuse phase of the interstellar medium, which is otherwise difficult to observe. We present the detection of carbon RRLs in absorption in M82 with the Low Frequency Array in the frequency range of 48-64 MHz. This is the first extragalactic detection of RRLs from a species other than hydrogen, and below 1 GHz. Since the carbon RRLs are not detected individually, we cross-correlated the observed spectrum with a template spectrum of carbon RRLs to determine a radial velocity of 219 km s-1. Using this radial velocity, we stack 22 carbon-α transitions from quantum levels n = 468-508 to achieve an 8.5σ detection. The absorption line profile exhibits a narrow feature with peak optical depth of 3 × 10-3 and FWHM of 31 km s-1. Closer inspection suggests that the narrow feature is superimposed on a broad, shallow component. The total line profile appears to be correlated with the 21 cm H I line profile reconstructed from H I absorption in the direction of supernova remnants in the nucleus. The narrow width and centroid velocity of the feature suggests that it is associated with the nuclear starburst region. It is therefore likely that the carbon RRLs are associated with cold atomic gas in the direction of the nucleus of M82.

  18. Constraining a halo model for cosmological neutral hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Hamsa; Refregier, Alexandre

    2017-02-01

    We describe a combined halo model to constrain the distribution of neutral hydrogen (H I) in the post-reionization universe. We combine constraints from the various probes of H I at different redshifts: the low-redshift 21-cm emission line surveys, intensity mapping experiments at intermediate redshifts, and the Damped Lyman-Alpha (DLA) observations at higher redshifts. We use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach to combine the observations and place constraints on the free parameters in the model. Our best-fitting model involves a relation between neutral hydrogen mass M_{H I} and halo mass M with a non-unit slope, and an upper and a lower cutoff. We find that the model fits all the observables but leads to an underprediction of the bias parameter of DLAs at z ˜ 2.3. We also find indications of a possible tension between the H I column density distribution and the mass function of H I-selected galaxies at z ˜ 0. We provide the central values of the parameters of the best-fitting model so derived. We also provide a fitting form for the derived evolution of the concentration parameter of H I in dark matter haloes, and discuss the implications for the redshift evolution of the H I-halo mass relation.

  19. Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; Parsons, Aaron R.; Aguirre, James E.; Alexander, Paul; Ali, Zaki S.; Beardsley, Adam P.; Bernardi, Gianni; Bowman, Judd D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Carilli, Chris L.; Cheng, Carina; de Lera Acedo, Eloy; Dillon, Joshua S.; Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Fadana, Gcobisa; Fagnoni, Nicolas; Fritz, Randall; Furlanetto, Steve R.; Glendenning, Brian; Greig, Bradley; Grobbelaar, Jasper; Hazelton, Bryna J.; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Hickish, Jack; Jacobs, Daniel C.; Julius, Austin; Kariseb, MacCalvin; Kohn, Saul A.; Lekalake, Telalo; Liu, Adrian; Loots, Anita; MacMahon, David; Malan, Lourence; Malgas, Cresshim; Maree, Matthys; Martinot, Zachary; Mathison, Nathan; Matsetela, Eunice; Mesinger, Andrei; Morales, Miguel F.; Neben, Abraham R.; Patra, Nipanjana; Pieterse, Samantha; Pober, Jonathan C.; Razavi-Ghods, Nima; Ringuette, Jon; Robnett, James; Rosie, Kathryn; Sell, Raddwine; Smith, Craig; Syce, Angelo; Tegmark, Max; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Williams, Peter K. G.; Zheng, Haoxuan

    2017-04-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a staged experiment to measure 21 cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM) throughout cosmic reionization (z = 6–12), and to explore earlier epochs of our Cosmic Dawn (z ∼ 30). During these epochs, early stars and black holes heated and ionized the IGM, introducing fluctuations in 21 cm emission. HERA is designed to characterize the evolution of the 21 cm power spectrum to constrain the timing and morphology of reionization, the properties of the first galaxies, the evolution of large-scale structure, and the early sources of heating. The full HERA instrument will be a 350-element interferometer in South Africa consisting of 14 m parabolic dishes observing from 50 to 250 MHz. Currently, 19 dishes have been deployed on site and the next 18 are under construction. HERA has been designated as an SKA Precursor instrument. In this paper, we summarize HERA’s scientific context and provide forecasts for its key science results. After reviewing the current state of the art in foreground mitigation, we use the delay-spectrum technique to motivate high-level performance requirements for the HERA instrument. Next, we present the HERA instrument design, along with the subsystem specifications that ensure that HERA meets its performance requirements. Finally, we summarize the schedule and status of the project. We conclude by suggesting that, given the realities of foreground contamination, current-generation 21 cm instruments are approaching their sensitivity limits. HERA is designed to bring both the sensitivity and the precision to deliver its primary science on the basis of proven foreground filtering techniques, while developing new subtraction techniques to unlock new capabilities. The result will be a major step toward realizing the widely recognized scientific potential of 21 cm cosmology.

  20. HYDROGEN CHLORIDE IN DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS ALONG THE LINE OF SIGHT TO W31C (G10.6-0.4)

    SciTech Connect

    Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G.; Roueff, E.; Gerin, M.; De Luca, M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Godard, B.

    2013-04-10

    We report the detection of hydrogen chloride, HCl, in diffuse molecular clouds on the line of sight toward the star-forming region W31C (G10.6-0.4). The J = 1-0 lines of the two stable HCl isotopologues, H{sup 35}Cl and H{sup 37}Cl, are observed using the 1b receiver of the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The HCl line is detected in absorption, over a wide range of velocities associated with diffuse clouds along the line of sight to W31C. The analysis of the absorption strength yields a total HCl column density of a few 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, implying that HCl accounts for {approx}0.6% of the total gas-phase chlorine, which exceeds the theoretical model predictions by a factor of {approx}6. This result is comparable to those obtained from the chemically related species H{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and HCl{sup +}, for which large column densities have also been reported on the same line of sight. The source of discrepancy between models and observations is still unknown; however, the detection of these Cl-bearing molecules provides key constraints for the chlorine chemistry in the diffuse gas.

  1. The Balmer Lines of He ii in the Blue Wing of the Hydrogen Lyman α Line Observed in a Quiescent Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vial, J.-C.; Eurin, G.; Curdt, W.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the prominence observations in the Lyman α line of Curdt et al. ( Astron. Astrophys. 511, L4, 2010) and focus on the bump in the blue wing of the line, which we identify with He ii Balmer lines. We determine the transition candidates, derive an upper limit for the width of the profile and an associated non-thermal velocity close to 0 km s-1, with the assumption that the kinetic temperature is equal to the formation temperature. We compare the total intensity with the corresponding H Lyman α intensity and find a ratio much lower than that measured by Ebadi, Vial, and Ajabshirizadeh ( Solar Phys. 257, 91, 2009) in other Lyman lines. We confirm this result with observations performed by Schwartz et al. (private communication, 2014), we discuss a possible interpretation, and suggest that this issue needs to be addressed closely in future observations.

  2. Clouds of neutral hydrogen between M31 and M33 and around the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfe, Spencer A.; Pisano, D. J.; Lockman, F. J.; McGaugh, S. S.; Shaya, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    Large spiral galaxies like our own Milky Way must acquire fresh gas to continue forming new stars. The gas that resides between galaxies may be a source of this material, but we know little about the gas’ structure or extent. I will present my thesis research, which attempts to answer these questions, based on our Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of the very faint M31-M33 neutral hydrogen (HI) stream that was first discovered a decade ago using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. Our spectral line observations have over five times higher spatial resolution and roughly three times higher velocity resolution than the Westerbork data. These are the most sensitive observations of the 21 cm line conducted with the GBT. I will discuss our observing and reduction techniques used to reach the sensitivities needed to study the HI stream in detail. We find that the gas is actually composed of small clouds only a few kiloparsecs in diameter. The kinematics of the clouds also suggests that they are associated with M31 and M33 and not each galaxy’s respective High Velocity Cloud (HVC) population. Most, if not all, of the clouds do not appear to have stars associated with them. Thus, we believe that these clouds are part of a condensing intergalactic filament and may be a source of future star formation for M31 and M33. In addition, I will briefly present my research on the High Velocity and Intermediate Velocity Clouds around our Milky Way using the Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS) at 21 cm that was conducted with the Parkes 64m radio telescope. I will discuss the basic properties of this gas and some interesting features seen in the survey.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide generation from l-cysteine in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma U-87 MG and neuroblastoma SHSY5Y cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bronowicka-Adamska, Patrycja; Bentke, Anna; Wróbel, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is endogenously synthesized from l-cysteine in reactions catalyzed by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS, EC 4.2.1.22) and gamma-cystathionase (CSE, EC 4.4.1.1). The role of 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MPST, EC 2.8.1.2) in H2S generation is also considered; it could be important for tissues with low CTH activity, e.g. cells of the nervous system. The expression and activity of CBS, CTH, and MPST were detected in the human glioblastoma-astrocytoma (U-87 MG) and neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y) cell lines. In both cell lines, the expression and activity of MPST were the highest among the investigated enzymes, suggesting its possible role in the generation of H2S. The RP-HPLC method was used to determine the concentration of cystathionine and alpha-ketobutyrate, products of the CBS- and CTH-catalyzed reactions. The difference in cystathionine levels between cell homogenates treated with totally CTH-inhibiting concentrations of dl-propargylglycine and without the inhibitor was used to evaluate the activity of CBS. The higher expression and activity of CBS, CTH and MPST in the neuroblastoma cells were associated with more intensive generation of H2S in the presence of 2 mM cysteine. A threefold higher level of sulfane sulfur, a potential source of hydrogen sulfide, was detected in the astrocytoma cells in comparison to the neuroblastoma cells.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide overload increases adriamycin-induced apoptosis of SaOS(2)FM, a manganese superoxide dismutase-overexpressing human osteosarcoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yadi; Kuroda, Masahiro; Gao, Xian-Shu; Asaumi, Jun-Ichi; Shibuya, Kohichi; Kawasaki, Shoji; Akaki, Shiro; St Clair, Daret; Hiraki, Yoshio; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2005-05-01

    We previously developed a new microscopic observation system that enables time-lapse quantitative analysis of apoptosis and necrosis. With this system we quantitatively analyzed adriamycin (ADR)-induced cell death using manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)- and wild-type p53-gene transfectants on SaOS(2), a p53-deficient human osteosarcoma cell line. A highly MnSOD-overexpressing cell line, SaOS(2)FM(H), acquired ADR-tolerance compared to the parent cell line SaOS(2). The ADR-tolerance of SaOS(2)FM(H) diminished by L-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO), which did not change ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2), to the similar ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2). A wild-type p53-expressing cell line, SaOS(2)wtp53, significantly increased in ADR-sensitivity compared to SaOS(2). This ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2)wtp53 was enhanced by BSO. When isosorbide 5-mononitrate was combined with BSO, isosorbide 5-mononitrate increased ADR sensitivity of a moderately MnSOD-overexpressing cell line, SaOS(2)FM(L), decreased that of SaOS(2) FM(H), and did not change those of SaOS(2) and SaOS(2)wtp53 compared to BSO alone. Time-lapse microscopic observations during ADR treatment for 24 h indicated that the most cells of each cell line underwent apoptosis, and a few cells (less than 11%) died by necrosis. When cells were treated with iso-concentration of ADR, apoptosis of SaOS(2)FM(H) was less than that of SaOS(2). BSO, which did not change ADR-sensitivity of SaOS(2), increased appearance rate of ADR-induced apoptosis, but not necrosis of MnSOD-overexpressing cell lines. When iso-survival dose of ADR, which reduced surviving fraction to 0.01, was given for each cell line, no difference was observed in appearance of either apoptosis or necrosis between SaOS(2) and MnSOD-overexpressing cell lines. On the other hands, appearance of both apoptosis and the following secondary necrosis of SaOS(2) wtp53 was significantly accelerated compared to those of SaOS(2). These findings indicate that hydrogen peroxide

  5. UNSHIFTED METASTABLE He I* MINI-BROAD ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEM IN THE NARROW-LINE TYPE 1 QUASAR SDSS J080248.18+551328.9

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Tuo; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Tinggui; Wang, Huiyuan; Liu, Wenjuan; Yang, Chenwei; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Komossa, S.; Yuan, Weimin; Zuther, Jens; Lu, Honglin; Zuo, Wenwen

    2015-02-10

    We report the identification of an unusual absorption-line system in the quasar SDSS J080248.18+551328.9 and present a detailed study of the system, incorporating follow-up optical and near-IR spectroscopy. A few tens of absorption lines are detected, including He I*, Fe II*, and Ni II*, which arise from metastable or excited levels, as well as resonant lines in Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, Mn II, and Ca II. All of the isolated absorption lines show the same profile of width Δv ∼ 1500 km s{sup –1} centered at a common redshift as that of the quasar emission lines, such as [O II], [S II], and hydrogen Paschen and Balmer series. With narrow Balmer lines, strong optical Fe II multiplets, and weak [O III] doublets, its emission-line spectrum is typical for that of a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1). We have derived reliable measurements of the gas-phase column densities of the absorbing ions/levels. Photoionization modeling indicates that the absorber has a density of n {sub H} ∼ (1.0-2.5) × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} and a column density of N {sub H} ∼ (1.0-3.2) × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} and is located at R ∼100-250 pc from the central supermassive black hole. The location of the absorber, the symmetric profile of the absorption lines, and the coincidence of the absorption- and emission-line centroid jointly suggest that the absorption gas originates from the host galaxy and is plausibly accelerated by stellar processes, such as stellar winds and/or supernova explosions. The implications for the detection of such a peculiar absorption-line system in an NLS1 are discussed in the context of coevolution between supermassive black hole growth and host galaxy buildup.

  6. Association of the supernova remnant G 65.3+5.7 with ambient neutral hydrogen and a possible nature of the remnant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosachinskii, I. V.

    2010-04-01

    The neutral hydrogen at 21 cm has been investigated with the RATAN-600 radio telescope around the supernova remnant G 65.3+5.7, which has the largest angular sizes in the group of shell remnants. An expanding HI shell left after an old supernova explosion with an energy of ˜1051 erg and an age of 440 000 yr coincident in coordinates with the radio and optical remnant has been discovered. Since an X-ray emission from a much younger (27 000 yr) supernova remnant is observed in the same region and the shells detected by nebular lines have probably intermediate ages, we suggest that several successive supernova explosions have occurred here.

  7. The case for cases B and C: intrinsic hydrogen line ratios of the broad-line region of active galactic nuclei, reddenings, and accretion disc sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaskell, C. Martin

    2017-01-01

    Low-redshift active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with extremely blue optical spectral indices are shown to have a mean, velocity-averaged, broad-line Hα/Hβ ratio of ≈2.72 ± 0.04, consistent with a Baker-Menzel Case B value. Comparison of a wide range of properties of the very bluest AGNs with those of a luminosity-matched subset of the Dong et al. blue AGN sample indicates that the only difference is the internal reddening. Ultraviolet fluxes are brighter for the bluest AGNs by an amount consistent with the flat AGN reddening curve of Gaskell et al. (2004). The lack of a significant difference in the GALEX (FUV-NUV) colour index strongly rules out a steep SMC-like reddening curve and also argues against an intrinsically harder spectrum for the bluest AGNs. For very blue AGNs the Lyα/Hβ ratio is also consistent with being the Case B value. The Case B ratios provide strong support for the self-shielded broad-line model of Gaskell, Klimek & Nazarova. It is proposed that the greatly enhanced Lyα/Hβ ratio at very high velocities is a consequence of continuum fluorescence in the Lyman lines (Case C). Reddenings of AGNs mean that the far-UV luminosity is often underestimated by up to an order of magnitude. This is a major factor causing the discrepancies between measured accretion disc sizes and the predictions of simple accretion disc theory. Dust covering fractions for most AGNs are lower than has been estimated. The total mass in lower mass supermassive black holes must be greater than hitherto estimated.

  8. The constancy of the ratio of the molecular hydrogen lines at 3.8 microns in Orion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brand, P. W. J. L.; Toner, M. P.; Geballe, T. R.; Webster, A. S.; Williams, P. M.; Burton, M. G.

    1989-01-01

    The 1-0 O(7) and 0-0 S(13) lines of H2, at 3.807 and 3.846 microns, have been mapped over the region of the Orion molecular outflow. The intensity ratio of these lines is found to be independent of position in the outflow. From this it is inferred that the structure of the shocks and their cooling flows in Orion may be more akin to hydrodynamic shocks than the low-temperature C-shocks that are currently favored.

  9. Measurements of argon-, helium-, hydrogen-, and nitrogen-broadened widths of methane lines near 9000 per cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Kenneth; Jennings, Donald E.; Stern, Elizabeth A.; Hubbard, Rob

    1988-01-01

    Pressure-broadened widths of rotational-vibrational lines in CH4 have been measured at very high spectral resolution in the R-branch of the 3nu3 overtone. The broadening gases were Ar, He, H2, and N2. Results are presented as averages for J-multiplets at ambient temperature. The overall values (per cm per atm) for these R-branch lines are 0.0651 (CH4-Ar), 0.0508 (CH4-He), 0.0728 (CH4-H2), and 0.0715 (CH4-N2).

  10. Spectroscopic Line Parameters of - and Hydrogen-Broadened 12C16O Transitions in the 3-0 Band from 6270 wn to 6402 wn.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Zachary; Hodges, Joseph T.

    2016-06-01

    We present helium- and hydrogen-broadened linewidths, pressure-induced shifts, and collisional narrowing coefficients for selected lines in the P- and R- branch of the second overtone (3-0) band of CO, spanning from 6270 wn to 6402 wn. The contribution of speed dependent effects and partial correlation between velocity-changing and dephasing collisions on the foreign broadened line shapes are also discussed. The data were obtained using the frequency-stabilized cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique. Spectra were collected at room temperature over a pressure range from 13.3 kPa to 100 kPa. The spectrum frequency axis is referenced via an optical frequency comb to a Cs clock, which provides pressure shifting values with uncertainties as low as 100 kHz/atm. The spectra exhibited signal-to-noise ratios as high as 20,000:1, which enables rigorous tests of theoretical line profiles through multi-spectrum least squares data analysis. The partially correlated, quadratic-speed-dependent Nelkin Ghatak profile gives a quality of fit mostly commensurate with the high spectrum signal-to-noise and minimizes structural residuals.

  11. Inhibition of cellular proliferation and enhancement of hydrogen peroxide production in fibrosarcoma cell line by weak radio frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Castello, Pablo R; Hill, Iain; Sivo, Frank; Portelli, Lucas; Barnes, Frank; Usselman, Robert; Martino, Carlos F

    2014-12-01

    This study presents experimental data for the effects of weak radio frequency (RF) magnetic fields on hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and cellular growth rates of fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells in vitro. Cells were exposed either to 45 µT static magnetic fields (SMFs)-oriented vertical to the plane of growth or to SMFs combined with weak 5 and 10 MHz RF magnetic fields of 10 µTRMS intensity perpendicular to the static field. Cell numbers were reduced up to 30% on Day 2 for the cells exposed to the combination of SMF and a 10 MHz RF magnetic field compared with the SMF control cells. In addition, cells exposed to 10 MHz RF magnetic fields for 8 h increased H2O2 production by 55%. The results demonstrate an overall magnetic field-induced biological effect that shows elevated H2O2 levels with accompanying decrease in cellular growth rates.

  12. Reducing Line Edge Roughness of PS-b-PMMA pattern by inducing hydrogen bonding at the interface of the block copolymer microdomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu Seong; Han, Sung Hyun; Jang, Sangshin; Park, Jicheol; Kwak, Jongheon; Kim, Jin Kon

    Sharp interface between two blocks in block copolymer nano pattern is one of the important issues in industrial applications to nano-patterning. We utilized hydrogen bonding between N-(4-aminomethyl-benzyl)-4-hydroxymethyl-bezamide (BA) and urea (U) at the interface of polystyrene-block-poly(methyl methacrylate) copolymer (PS-PMMA). For this purpose, we first synthesized PS by ATRP, then the end group was converted to amino group. Next, it was reacted with BA, followed by reaction with 4-pentynoic acid, resulting in alkyne-terminated group (PS-U-BA-alkyne). Also, azide-terminated PMMA was prepared by anionic polymerization followed by end functionalization. Finally, by the azide-alkyne click reaction between PS-U-BA-alkyne and PMMA-azide, PS-U-BA-PMMA was synthesized. We prepared vertical oriented lamellar nanopatterns on pre-patterned wafers and investigated line edge roughness (LER) after removing PMMA block by dry etching process. We found that LER was reduced compared with PS-PMMA without hydrogen bonding.

  13. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy of Hydrogen in the 784-852 NM Region and Corresponding Line Shape Implementation Into HITRAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yan; Wang, Jin; Cheng, Cunfeng; Liu, An-Wen; Hu, Shui-Ming; Wcislo, Piotr; Kochanov, Roman V.; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S.

    2016-06-01

    The hydrogen molecule as the most abundant neutral molecule in the universe is an important object of studies in different areas of science, especially astrophysics. The precision spectroscopy of the hydrogen molecule is particularly useful to verify the quantum electrodynamics theory (QED) in a molecular system. The electric quadrupole transitions of the second overtone of H_2 have been recorded with a high precision cavity ring-down spectrometer. A total of eight lines including the extremely weak S3(5) line in the 784-852 nm range have been observed. The line positions have been determined to an accuracy of 3 × 10-4 cm-1 and the line intensities were determined with a relative accuracy of about 1%. The deviations between the experimental and theoretical frequencies are less than 5 × 10-4 cm-1, which is much smaller than the claimed theoretical uncertainty of 0.0025cm-1. The data from this experiment along with other high-quality H_2 spectra have also been analyzed by the Hartmann-Tran profile as a test case for incorporating parametrization of this profile in the HITRAN database. It was incorporated in the new relational structure of the HITRAN database (www.hitran.org) and into the HITRAN Application Programming Interface (HAPI) for the case of H_2 spectra. Tan Y, Wang J, Cheng C-F, Zhao X-Q, Liu A-W, Hu S-M, J Mol Spectrosc 2014;300:60-4; Tran H, Ngo NH, Hartmann J-M, J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;129:199-203; Wcislo P, Gordon IE, Tran H, Tan Y, Hu S-M, Campargue A, et al., Accepted J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf HighRus Special Issue, 2015 Rothman LS, Gordon IE, Babikov Y, Barbe A, Chris Benner D, Bernath PF, et al., J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf 2013;130:4-50; Kochanov RV, Gordon IE, Rothman LS, Wcislo P, Hill C, Wilzewski JS, Submitted to J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transf HighRus Special Issue, 2015.

  14. On Production Mechanisms For Balmer Line Radiation From 'Cold' Atomic Hydrogen and Deuterium In Fusion Edge Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hey, John Douglas

    2010-10-29

    Published arguments, which assign dominant roles to atomic metastability and molecular ion dissociation in the production of 'narrow' Zeeman component Balmer line radiation from the tokamak edge plasma, have been examined critically in relation to: l-redistribution by proton collisions, molecular ion-proton equipartition, and ion acceleration by the plasma sheath (scrape-off layer) potential. These processes are found to constrain the contributions from metastable atoms and from dissociative excitation of molecular ions to 'narrow' Balmer spectra emitted from the plasma edge, in relation to the corresponding contributions from electron impact-induced dissociative excitation of neutral molecules.

  15. Cold atomic hydrogen in the inner galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickey, J. M.; Garwood, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The VLA is used to measure 21 cm absorption in directions with the absolute value of b less than 1 deg., the absolute value of 1 less than 25 deg. to probe the cool atomic gas in the inner galaxy. Abundant H I absorption is detected; typical lines are deep and narrow, sometimes blending in velocity with adjacent features. Unlike 21 cm emission not all allowed velocities are covered: large portions of the l-v diagram are optically thin. Although not similar to H I emission, the absorption shows a striking correspondence with CO emission in the inner galaxy: essentially every strong feature detected in one survey is seen in the other. The provisional conclusion is that in the inner galaxy most cool atomic gas is associated with molecular cloud complexes. There are few or no cold atomic clouds devoid of molecules in the inner galaxy, although these are common in the outer galaxy.

  16. Development and characterization of a hydrogen peroxide-resistant cholangiocyte cell line: A novel model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis

    SciTech Connect

    Thanan, Raynoo; Techasen, Anchalee; Hou, Bo; Jamnongkan, Wassana; Armartmuntree, Napat; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Murata, Mariko

    2015-08-14

    Oxidative stress is a cause of inflammation–related diseases, including cancers. Cholangiocarcinoma is a liver cancer with bile duct epithelial cell phenotypes. Our previous studies in animal and human models indicated that oxidative stress is a major cause of cholangiocarcinoma development. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) can generate hydroxyl radicals, which damage lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, leading to cell death. However, some cells can survive by adapting to oxidative stress conditions, and selective clonal expansion of these resistant cells would be involved in oxidative stress-related carcinogenesis. The present study aimed to establish H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell line from an immortal cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1) by chronic treatment with low-concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (25 μM). After 72 days of induction, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cell lines (ox-MMNK1-L) were obtained. The ox-MMNK1-L cell line showed H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant properties, increasing the expression of the anti-oxidant genes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), and superoxide dismutase-3 (SOD3) and the enzyme activities of CAT and intracellular SODs. Furthermore, the resistant cells showed increased expression levels of an epigenetics-related gene, DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), when compared to the parental cells. Interestingly, the ox-MMNK1-L cell line had a significantly higher cell proliferation rate than the MMNK1 normal cell line. Moreover, ox-MMNK1-L cells showed pseudopodia formation and the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion (multi-layers) under additional oxidative stress (100 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). These findings suggest that H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant cells can be used as a model of oxidative stress-related cholangiocarcinoma genesis through molecular changes such as alteration of gene expression and epigenetic changes. - Highlights: • An H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-resistant ox-MMNK1-L cells was established from

  17. Distribution of hot stars and hydrogen in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Page, T.; Carruthers, G. R.

    1981-01-01

    Imagery of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), in the wavelength ranges 1050 to 1600 A and 1250 to 1600 A, was obtained by the S201 far ultraviolet camera during the Apollo 16 mission. These images were reduced to absolute far-UV intensity distributions over the area of the LMC, with 3 to 5 arc min angular resolution. Comparison of these far-UV measurements in the LMC with H sub alpha and 21 cm surveys reveals that interstellar hydrogen in the LMC is often concentrated in 100 pc clouds within 500 pc clouds. Furthermore, at least 25 associations of O-B stars in the LMC are outside the interstellar hydrogen clouds; four of them appear to be on the far side. Far-UV and mid-UV spectra were obtained of stars in 12 of these associations, using the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Equivalent widths of L alpha and six other lines, and relative intensities of the continuum at seven wavelength from 1300 A to 2900 A, were measured. These spectra are also discussed.

  18. Differential susceptibility to hydrogen sulfide-induced apoptosis between PHLDA1-overexpressing oral cancer cell lines and oral keratinocytes: role of PHLDA1 as an apoptosis suppressor.

    PubMed

    Murata, Takatoshi; Sato, Tsutomu; Kamoda, Takeshi; Moriyama, Hiromitsu; Kumazawa, Yasuo; Hanada, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-15

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a novel gasotransmitter that plays multiple biological roles in various body systems. In addition to its endogenous production, H2S is produced by bacteria colonizing digestive organs, including the oral cavity. H2S was previously shown to enhance pro-apoptotic effects in cancer cell lines, although the mechanisms involved remain unclear. To properly assess the anti-cancer effects of H2S, however, investigations of apoptotic effects in normal cells are also necessary. The aims of this study were (1) to compare the susceptibility to H2S-induced apoptosis between the oral cancer cell line Ca9-22 and oral keratinocytes that were derived from healthy gingiva, and (2) to identify candidate genes involved in the induction of apoptosis by H2S. The susceptibility to H2S-induced apoptosis in Ca9-22 cells was significantly higher than that in keratinocytes. H2S exposure in Ca9-22 cells, but not keratinocytes, enhanced the expression of pleckstrin homology-like domain, family A, member 1 (PHLDA1), which was identified through a differential display method. In addition, PHLDA1 expression increased during actinomycin D-induced apoptosis in Ca9-22 cells. Knockdown of PHLDA1 expression by small interfering RNA in Ca9-22 cells led to expression of active caspase 3, thus indicating apoptosis induction. The tongue cancer cell line SCC-25, which expresses PHLDA1 at a high level, showed similar effects. Our data indicate that H2S is an anti-cancer compound that may contribute to the low incidence of oral cancer. Furthermore, we demonstrated the role of PHLDA1 as an apoptosis suppressor.

  19. In-line near infrared spectroscopy during freeze-drying as a tool to measure efficiency of hydrogen bond formation between protein and sugar, predictive of protein storage stability.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Maarten A; Van Bockstal, Pieter-Jan; Pieters, Sigrid; De Meyer, Laurens; Frijlink, Henderik W; van der Voort Maarschalk, Kees; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; De Beer, Thomas

    2015-12-30

    Sugars are often used as stabilizers of protein formulations during freeze-drying. However, not all sugars are equally suitable for this purpose. Using in-line near-infrared spectroscopy during freeze-drying, it is shown here that hydrogen bond formation during freeze-drying, under secondary drying conditions in particular, can be related to the preservation of the functionality and structure of proteins during storage. The disaccharide trehalose was best capable of forming hydrogen bonds with the model protein, lactate dehydrogenase, thereby stabilizing it, followed by the molecularly flexible oligosaccharide inulin 4kDa. The molecularly rigid oligo- and polysaccharides dextran 5kDa and 70kDa, respectively, formed the least amount of hydrogen bonds and provided least stabilization of the protein. It is concluded that smaller and molecularly more flexible sugars are less affected by steric hindrance, allowing them to form more hydrogen bonds with the protein, thereby stabilizing it better.

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Hydrogen in diffuse molecular clouds (Winkel+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkel, B.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Menten, K. M.; Sato, M.; Brunthaler, A.; Wyrowski, F.; Neufeld, D.; Gerin, M.; Indriolo, N.

    2017-01-01

    To study the Hydrogen in diffuse molecular clouds in the Milky Way, eight sources were observed with the Jansky Very Large Array in spectral line mode at 21-cm. The targets have bright continuum emission and were used as background sources for HI absorption spectroscopy. The brightest positions in the background continuum images were used to define several sight lines per source and to extract associated HI absorption spectra. To obtain spin temperatures and corrected HI column densities, suitable Off-position spectra were acquired, making use of the three Galactic plane surveys: Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS, Taylor et al., 2003AJ....125.3145T), Southern Galactic Plane Survey (SGPS, McClure-Griffiths et al., 2005ApJS..158..178M), and VLA Galactic Plane Survey (VGPS, Stil et al., 2006AJ....132.1158S). Furthermore, for some of the sight lines 550-GHz HF spectra are available, observed with the Herschel space telescope. With these, the molecular hydrogen column density can be estimated, and in combination with the HI column densities, the molecular fraction is determined. The calculation of all result spectra was done with Bayesian Markov-Chain Monte Carlo using the Python PyMC3 framework (Patil, Huard, and Fonnesbeck, DOI: 10.18637/jss.v035.i04). In the FITS binary tables, provided here, the results of our Bayes sampling are contained. For each sight line, we provide seven spectra per quantity (i.e, the -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, and 3 confidence levels) plus the full Bayes chains (1000 steps) for the following variables: Tcsou, Tcbg, tau, Tspin, NHI, NH2, and F{H2/H}, because the latter are not Normal distributed. (3 data files).

  1. Cystathionine β-synthase-derived hydrogen sulfide regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced apoptosis of the BRL rat hepatic cell line in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jun; Teng, Feixiang; Chen, Weiwei; Ji, Yinglei; Gu, Zhenyong

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), is a member of the novel family of endogenous gaseous transmitters, termed "gasotransmitters exhibiting diverse physiological activities, and is generated in mammalian tissues mainly by cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3MST) in conjunction with cysteine (aspartate) aminotranferase (CAT). The distributions of these enzymes are species- and tissue-specific. The liver, as the main organ that generates H(2)S in vivo, functions in biotransformation and metabolism. However, the liver is vulnerable to damage from internal and external factors, including inflammatory mediators, drugs and poisons. The present study evaluated the endogenous CBS-H(2)S synthesis regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced apoptosis of hepatic cells. The rat hepatic cell line, BRL, was incubated with LPS for various time periods to establish a cell-damage model. Incubation with LPS resulted in a significant increase in CBS expression and H(2)S production. It also stimulated apoptosis and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential. Pretreatment with the CBS inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid (AOAA) or CBS small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased LPS-enhanced H(2)S production. Notably, apoptosis increased for a short period and then decreased gradually, while the mitochondrial membrane potential demonstrated the opposite trend. These results showed that endogenous CBS-H(2)S synthesis demonstrated early anti-apoptotic activity and subsequent pro-apoptotic activity in LPS-induced apoptosis. These results suggest a new approach for developing novel drugs for this condition.

  2. On the calculation of line strengths, oscillator strengths and lifetimes for very large principal quantum numbers in hydrogenic atoms and ions by the McLean-Watson formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    As a sequel to an earlier study (Hey 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 125701), we consider further the application of the line strength formula derived by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 L291) to transitions arising from states of very high principal quantum number in hydrogenic atoms and ions (Rydberg-Rydberg transitions, n > 1000). It is shown how apparent difficulties associated with the use of recurrence relations, derived (Hey 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641) by the ladder operator technique of Infeld and Hull (1951 Rev. Mod. Phys. 23 21), may be eliminated by a very simple numerical device, whereby this method may readily be applied up to n ≈ 10 000. Beyond this range, programming of the method may entail greater care and complexity. The use of the numerically efficient McLean-Watson formula for such cases is again illustrated by the determination of radiative lifetimes and comparison of present results with those from an asymptotic formula. The question of the influence on the results of the omission or inclusion of fine structure is considered by comparison with calculations based on the standard Condon-Shortley line strength formula. Interest in this work on the radial matrix elements for large n and n‧ is related to measurements of radio recombination lines from tenuous space plasmas, e.g. Stepkin et al (2007 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 374 852), Bell et al (2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 333 377), to the calculation of electron impact broadening parameters for such spectra (Watson 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889) and comparison with other theoretical methods (Peach 2014 Adv. Space Res. in press), to the modelling of physical processes in H II regions (Roshi et al 2012 Astrophys. J. 749 49), and the evaluation bound-bound transitions from states of high n during primordial cosmological recombination (Grin and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 81 083005, Ali-Haïmoud and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 82 063521, Ali

  3. Prediction of the Statistical Robustness of the Measurement of Neutral Hydrogen Mass Functions in the COSMOS H i Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Barrantes, Monica; Henning, Patricia A.; Van Gorkom, Jacqueline H.; Maddox, Natasha; Hess, Kelley M.; CHILES Team

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is the fuel for star formation, but relatively little is known about the role of cold gas in galaxy evolution. The COSMOS H I Large Extragalactic Survey (CHILES) is an on-going deep H I survey being conducted with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array, probing a 0.5 degree region within the COSMOS field in the 21cm line of neutral hydrogen. CHILES is the first survey to observe H I in emission from z=0 to z~0.5, which corresponds to a look-back time of ~ 5 Gyr. This allows us to observe the content, morphology and kinematics of H I in relation to stellar disks, and how it may have evolved over this period. Here, we present a simulation of the galaxy detections that could be made by the survey, based on multi-wavelength data from the COSMOS dataset in the VLA field of view.We use the simulated data to calculate the Neutral Hydrogen Mass Function (HIMF), which describes the space density of galaxies as a function of their H I mass. The HIMF has been studied in the local universe, but seeing how it changes in redshift and environment can constrain current models of galaxy formation. We show the robustness of the HIMF we are capable of deriving for the entire survey and as a function of redshift and environment.

  4. Intensity Mapping of Hα, Hβ, [OII], and [OIII] Lines at z < 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yan; Cooray, Asantha; Silva, Marta B.; Zemcov, Michael; Feng, Chang; Santos, Mario G.; Dore, Olivier; Chen, Xuelei

    2017-02-01

    Intensity mapping is becoming a useful tool to study the large-scale structure of the universe through spatial variations in the integrated emission from galaxies and the intergalactic medium. We study intensity mapping of the {{H}}α 6563 \\mathringA , [O iii] 5007 Å, [O ii] 3727 Å, and {{H}}β 4861 \\mathringA lines at 0.8≤slant z≤slant 5.2. The mean intensities of these four emission lines are estimated using the observed luminosity functions (LFs), cosmological simulations, and the star formation rate density (SFRD) derived from observations at z≲ 5. We calculate the intensity power spectra and consider the foreground contamination of other lines at lower redshifts. We use the proposed NASA small explorer SPHEREx (the Spectro-Photometer for the History of the universe, Epoch of Reionization, and Ices Explorer) as a case study for the detectability of the intensity power spectra of the four emission lines. We also investigate the cross-correlation with the 21 cm line probed by the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME), Tianlai experiment and the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) at 0.8≤slant z≤slant 2.4. We find both the auto and cross power spectra can be well measured for the Hα, [O iii] and [O ii] lines at z≲ 3, while it is more challenging for the Hβ line. Finally, we estimate the constraint on the SFRD from intensity mapping, and find we can reach an accuracy higher than 7% at z≲ 4, which is better than with the usual method of measurements using the LFs of galaxies.

  5. Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeBoer, David R.; HERA

    2015-01-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA - reionization.org) roadmap uses the unique properties of the neutral hydrogen (HI) 21cm line to probe our cosmic dawn: from the birth of the first stars and black holes, through the full reionization of the primordial intergalactic medium (IGM). HERA is a collaboration between the Precision Array Probing the Epoch of Reionization (PAPER - eor.berkeley.edu), the US-based Murchison Widefield Array (MWA - mwatelescope.org), and MIT Epoch of Reionization (MITEOR) teams along with the South African SKA-SA, University of KwaZulu Natal and the University of Cambridge Cavendish Laborabory. HERA has recently been awarded a National Science Foundation Mid-Scale Innovation Program grant to begin the next phase.HERA leverages the operation of the PAPER and MWA telescopes to explore techniques and designs required to detect the primordial HI signal in the presence of systematics and radio continuum foreground emission some four orders of magnitude brighter. With this understanding, we are now able to remove foregrounds to the limits of our sensitivity, culminating in the first physically meaningful upper limits. A redundant calibration algorithm from MITEOR improves the sensitivity of the approach.Building on this, the next stage of HERA incorporates a 14m diameter antenna element that is optimized both for sensitivity and for minimizing foreground systematics. Arranging these elements in a compact hexagonal grid yields an array that facilitates calibration, leverages proven foreground removal techniques, and is scalable to large collecting areas. HERA will be located in the radio quiet environment of the SKA site in the Karoo region of South Africa (where PAPER is currently located). It will have a sensitivity close to two orders of magnitude better than PAPER and the MWA to ensure a robust detection. With its sensitivity and broader frequency coverage, HERA can paint an uninterrupted picture through reionization, back to the

  6. Optimization of on-line hydrogen stable isotope ratio measurements of halogen- and sulfur-bearing organic compounds using elemental analyzer–chromium/high-temperature conversion isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gehre, Matthias; Renpenning, Julian; Geilmann, Heike; Qi, Haiping; Coplen, Tyler B.; Kümmel, Steffen; Ivdra, Natalija; Brand, Willi A.; Schimmelmann, Arndt

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The optimized EA-Cr/HTC reactor design can be implemented in existing analytical equipment using commercially available material and is universally applicable for both heteroelement-bearing and heteroelement-free organic-compound classes. The sensitivity and simplicity of the on-line EA-Cr/HTC-IRMS technique provide a much needed tool for routine hydrogen-isotope source tracing of organic contaminants in the environment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  8. Hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, C.; Chirivella, J. E.; Fujita, T.; Jeffe, R. E.; Lawson, D.; Manvi, R.

    1975-01-01

    The state of hydrogen production technology is evaluated. Specific areas discussed include: hydrogen production fossil fuels; coal gasification processes; electrolysis of water; thermochemical production of hydrogen; production of hydrogen by solar energy; and biological production of hydrogen. Supply options are considered along with costs of hydrogen production.

  9. Radiation-damped profiles of extremely high column density neutral hydrogen: implications of cosmic reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2017-01-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line of sight mainly affects the far off-centre region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line centre can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half-maximum) as an effective line width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N_{H I}≲ 10^{21} { cm^{-2}}, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7 per cent errors. However, as the local column density reaches N_{H I}˜ 10^{22.3} { cm^{-2}}, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10 per cent overestimation in the red wing and a 20 per cent underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  10. Hydrogen systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N.; Zhu, Y.; Bao, D.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on hydrogen fuels. Topics considered at the symposium included hydrogen from fossil fuels, electrolysis, photolytic hydrogen generation, thermochemical and photochemical methods of hydrogen production, catalysts, hydrogen biosynthesis, novel and hybrid methods of hydrogen production, storage and handling, metal hydrides and their characteristics, utilization, hydrogen fueled internal combustion engines, hydrogen gas turbines, hydrogen flow and heat transfer, fuel cells, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, thermal energy transfer, hydrogen purification, research programs, economics, primary energy sources, environmental impacts, and safety.

  11. The L-histidine-mediated enhancement of hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity is a general response in cultured mammalian cell lines and is always associated with the formation of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Cantoni, O; Sestili, P; Brandi, G; Cattabeni, F

    1994-10-10

    Micromolar concentrations of L-histidine increase the cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide in a number of cell lines including CHO (hamster), EAHY, McCoy's, U937 and CCRF-CEM (human), Vero (monkey) and SC-1 (mouse). Importantly, these cell lines displayed different degrees of sensitivity to H2O2 alone and the extent of enhancement elicited by the amino acid was more pronounced in resistant cell lines. The increased cytotoxicity was invariably associated with the formation of DNA DSBs and a remarkable correlation was found by plotting the level of DNA DSBs against the cytotoxic response. These results strongly support the hypothesis that the mechanism whereby L-histidine increases the toxicity elicited by H2O2 involves the formation of DNA DSBs and are consistent with the possibility that the amino acid might participate in the regulation of the physio-pathological response to oxidative stress in mammals.

  12. The Redshifted Hydrogen Balmer and Metastable He 1 Absorption Line System in Mini-FeLoBAL Quasar SDSS J112526.12+002901.3: A Parsec-scale Accretion Inflow?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xi-Heng; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Hui-Yuan; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Ji, Tuo; Liu, Wen-Juan; Zhou, Hong-Yan

    2016-10-01

    The accretion of the interstellar medium onto central super-massive black holes is widely accepted as the source of the gigantic energy released by the active galactic nuclei. However, few pieces of observational evidence have been confirmed directly demonstrating the existence of the inflows. The absorption line system in the spectra of quasar SDSS J112526.12+002901.3 presents an interesting example in which the rarely detected hydrogen Balmer and metastable He i absorption lines are found redshifted to the quasar's rest frame along with the low-ionization metal absorption lines Mg ii, Fe ii, etc. The repeated SDSS spectroscopic observations suggest a transverse velocity smaller than the radial velocity. The motion of the absorbing medium is thus dominated by infall. The He i* lines present a powerful probe to the strength of ionizing flux, while the Balmer lines imply a dense environment. With the help of photoionization simulations, we find that the absorbing medium is exposed to the radiation with ionization parameter U ≈ 10-1.8, and the density is n({{H}})≈ {10}9 {{cm}}-3. Thus the absorbing medium is located ˜4 pc away from the central engine. According to the similarity in the distance and physical conditions between the absorbing medium and the torus, we strongly propose the absorption line system as a candidate for the accretion inflow, which originates in the inner surface of the torus.

  13. Optimizing the deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on suspended semiconductor particles using on-line photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions.

    PubMed

    Busser, G Wilma; Mei, Bastian; Muhler, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on photocatalysts is a crucial step in the multistep process of synthesizing a catalyst that is active for overall photocatalytic water splitting. An alternative approach to conventional photodeposition was developed, applying the photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions to deposit metal particles on semiconductor materials such as Ga₂O₃ and (Ga₀.₆ Zn₀.₄)(N₀.₆O₀.₄). The method allows optimizing the loading of the co-catalysts based on the stepwise addition of their precursors and the continuous online monitoring of the evolved hydrogen. Moreover, a synergetic effect between different co-catalysts can be directly established.

  14. The abundances of methane and ortho/para hydrogen on Uranus and Neptune: Implications of New Laboratory 4-0 H2 quadrupole line parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Mickelson, M. E.; Larson, Lee E.; Ferguson, David W.

    1995-01-01

    The tropospheric methane molar fraction (f(sub CH4, t) and the ortho/para hydrogen ratio are derived for Uranus and Neptune based on new determinations of spectroscopic parameters for key hydrogen features as reported by D. W./ Ferguson et al. (1993). For each planet, the relatively weak laboratory linestrengths (approximately 30 and 15% less than the theoretical 4-0 S(0) and S(1) linestrengths, respectively) results, when compared to analyses adopting theroetical values, in a approximately 30% decrease in the tropospheric methane ratio and a comparable increase in the pressure level of the optically thick cloudtop marking the bottom of the visible atmosphere (P(sub c/d)). The increase in the ratio of S(1)/S(0) linestrengths from 4.4 (theoretical) to approximately 5.9 (measured) results in a decrease in the range of viable ortho/para ratios; an equilibrium hydrogen distribution is now the best fit for both planets. The methane mixing ratios reported here are in agreement with the value of 0.023 derived by the Voyager Radio Occultation Experiment (G. F. Lindal, 1992) for Neptune, but slightly lower than the Voyager Uranus measurement of 0.023 reported by G. F. LIndel et al. (1987). The relative carbon-to-hydrogen abundances for Uranus and Neptune support planetary formation mechanisms involving the dissolution of carbon-bearing planetesimals in the atmospheres of both planets during their early stages of formation (e.g., J. B. Pollack et al., 1986).

  15. Response of the antioxidant defense system to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2).

    PubMed

    Alía, Mario; Ramos, Sonia; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the response of the antioxidant defense system to two oxidative stressors, hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide, in HepG2 cells in culture. The parameters evaluated included enzyme activity and gene expression of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and activity of glutathione reductase. Besides, markers of the cell damage and oxidative stress evoked by the stressors such as cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, malondialdehyde levels, and reduced glutathione concentration were evaluated. Both stressors, hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide, enhanced cell damage and reactive oxygen species generation at doses above 50 microM. The concentration of reduced glutathione decreased, and levels of malondialdehyde and activity of the antioxidant enzymes consistently increased only when HepG2 cells were treated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide but not when hydrogen peroxide was used. A slight increase in the gene expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase with 500 microM tert-butyl hydroperoxide and of catalase with 200 microM hydrogen peroxide was observed. The response of the components of the antioxidant defense system evaluated in this study indicates that tert-butyl hydroperoxide evokes a consistent cellular stress in HepG2.

  16. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  17. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Joseph [Encino, CA; Oberg, Carl L [Canoga Park, CA; Russell, Larry H [Agoura, CA

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1100.degree. to 1900.degree. C., while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products.

  18. Quantitative X-ray - UV Line and Continuum Spectroscopy with Application to AGN: State-Specific Hydrogenic Recombination Cooling Coefficients for a Wide Range of Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaMothe, J.; Ferland, Gary J.

    2002-01-01

    Recombination cooling, in which a free electron emits light while being captured to an ion, is an important cooling process in photoionized clouds that are optically thick or have low metallicity. State specific rather than total recombination cooling rates are needed since the hydrogen atom tends to become optically thick in high-density regimes such as Active Galactic Nuclei. This paper builds upon previous work to derive the cooling rate over the full temperature range where the process can be a significant contributor in a photoionized plasma. We exploit the fact that the recombination and cooling rates are given by intrinsically similar formulae to express the cooling rate in terms of the closely related radiative recombination rate. We give an especially simple but accurate approximation that works for any high hydrogenic level and can be conveniently employed in large-scale numerical simulations.

  19. The Abundances of Methane and Ortho/Para Hydrogen in Uranus and Neptune: Implications of New Laboratory 4-0 H(sub 2) Quadrapole Line Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baines, K.; Mickelson, M.; Larson, L.; Ferguson, D.

    1994-01-01

    The tropospheric methane molar fraction (f(sub ch4,t)) and the ortho/para hydrogen ratio are derived for Uranus and Neptune based on new determinations of spectroscopic parameters for key hydrogen features as reported by Ferguson et al. (1993, J. Mol. Spec 160, 315-325). For each planet, the relatively weak laboratory linestrengths (approximately 30% and 15% less than the theoretical 4-0 S(0) and S(1) linestrengths, respectively) results, when compared to analyses adopting theoretical values, in a 30% decrease in the tropospheric methane ratio and a comparable increase in the pressure level of the optically-thick cloudtop marking the bottom of the visible atmosphere (P(sub cld)).

  20. Discovery of Broad Molecular Lines and of Shocked Molecular Hydrogen from the Supernova Remnant G357.7+0.3: HHSMT, APEX, Spitzer, and SOFIA Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, J.; Hewitt, J. W.; Bieging, J.; Reach, W. T.; Andersen, M.; Güsten, R.

    2017-01-01

    We report a discovery of shocked gas from the supernova remnant (SNR) G357.7+0.3. Our millimeter and submillimeter observations reveal broad molecular lines of CO(2-1), CO(3-2), CO(4-3), 13CO (2-1), and 13CO (3-2), HCO+, and HCN using the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope, the Arizona 12 m Telescope, APEX, and the MOPRA Telescope. The widths of the broad lines are 15–30 km s‑1, and the detection of such broad lines is unambiguous, dynamic evidence showing that the SNR G357.7+0.3 is interacting with molecular clouds. The broad lines appear in extended regions (>4.‧5 × 5‧). We also present the detection of shocked H2 emission in the mid-infrared but lacking ionic lines using Spitzer/IRS observations to map a few-arcminute area. The H2 excitation diagram shows a best fit with a two-temperature local thermal equilibrium model with the temperatures of ∼200 and 660 K. We observed [C ii] at 158 μm and high-J CO(11-10) with the German Receiver for Astronomy at Terahertz Frequencies (GREAT) on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy. The GREAT spectrum of [C ii], a 3σ detection, shows a broad line profile with a width of 15.7 km‑1 that is similar to those of broad CO molecular lines. The line width of [C ii] implies that ionic lines can come from a low-velocity C-shock. Comparison of H2 emission with shock models shows that a combination of two C-shock models is favored over a combination of C- and J-shocks or a single shock. We estimate the CO density, column density, and temperature using a RADEX model. The best-fit model with n(H2) = 1.7 × 104 cm‑3, N(CO) = 5.6 × 1016 cm‑2, and T = 75 K can reproduce the observed millimeter CO brightnesses.

  1. Measurements of neutral hydrogen profiles on the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch from time-resolved ? line emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallander, J.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew-Källne, E.

    1998-09-01

    The investigations of the radial distributions of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission from the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma show that the emission profile varies a lot, even during one plasma discharge. At central electron temperatures of about 150 eV it was expected that the 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission should emerge from the plasma centre. In comparison, 0953-4075/31/17/015/img4 is always observed to radiate from the centre. Our measurements of 0953-4075/31/17/015/img2 emission have, however, shown that this is not always the case, the emission often comes from the plasma edge. The analysis of the measurements has led us to conclude that the edge emission comes from charge-exchange recombination with neutral hydrogen near the carbon first wall. These observations provide a way to estimate the change in neutral hydrogen density during local plasma-wall interaction.

  2. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Adlhart, O. J.

    1985-04-23

    This disclosure relates to a replaceable cartridge hydrogen generator of the type which relies at least partially on the process of anodic corrosion to produce hydrogen. A drum contains a plurality of the cartridges.

  3. Hydrogen Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  4. Flow line sampler

    DOEpatents

    Nicholls, Colin I.

    1992-07-14

    An on-line product sampling apparatus and method for measuring product samples from a product stream (12) in a flow line (14) having a sampling aperture (11), includes a sampling tube (18) for containing product samples removed from flow line (14). A piston (22) removes product samples from the product stream (12) through the sampling aperture (11) and returns samples to product stream (12). A sensor (20) communicates with sample tube (18), and senses physical properties of samples while the samples are within sample tube (18). In one embodiment, sensor (20) comprises a hydrogen transient nuclear magnetic resonance sensor for measuring physical properties of hydrogen molecules.

  5. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  6. Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well as the technical challenges and research goals for storing hydrogen on board a vehicle.

  7. Measurements of Excitation Functions and Line Polarizations for Electron Impact Excitation of the n = 2, 3 States of Atomic Hydrogen in the Energy Range 11 - 2000 eV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Kanik, I.; Slevin, J.; Franklin, B.; Shemansky, D.

    1993-01-01

    The electron-atomic hydrogen scattering system is an important testing ground for theoretical models and has received a great deal of attention from experimentalists and theoreticians alike over the years. A complete description of the excitation process requires a knowledge of many different parameters, and experimental measurements of these parameters have been performed in various laboratories around the world. As far as total cross section data are concerned it has been noted that the discrepancy between the data of Long et al. and Williams for n = 2 excitations needs to be resolved in the interests of any further refinement of theory. We report new measurements of total cross sections and atomic line polarizations for both n=2 and n=3 excitations at energies from threshold to 2000 eV...

  8. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

    1981-06-23

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

  9. Methanol extracts from Cystoseira tamariscifolia and Cystoseira nodicaulis are able to inhibit cholinesterases and protect a human dopaminergic cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Custódio, Luísa; Silvestre, Laura; Rocha, Maria Isabel; Rodrigues, Maria João; Vizetto-Duarte, Catarina; Pereira, Hugo; Barreira, Luísa; Varela, João

    2016-09-01

    Context Marine macroalgae contain several bioactive molecules that may be developed as functional foods, but information about their neuroprotective potential is scarce. Objective The objective of this study is to determine the in vitro antioxidant and neuroprotective features of marine algae from the southern coast of Portugal and to assess the total content of different types of bioactives. Materials and methods Methanol extracts from 21 macroalgal species from the southern Portugal were evaluated for in vitro antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Active extracts were further evaluated for inhibitory activity against butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and tyrosinase (TYRO), and for their ability to attenuate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced toxicity in SH-SY5Y cells. The total contents of different phenolic groups were determined for the most active extracts. Results Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Hudson) Papenfuss (Sargassaceae) had the highest antiradical activity (92%, 1 mg/mL). Cystoseira nodicaulis (Withering) M. Roberts (Sargassaceae) (75%) and Cystoseira humilis Schousboe ex Kützing (Sargassaceae) (70%) had the highest iron-chelating activity at 10 mg/mL. Cystoseira baccata (S.G. Gmelin) P.C. Silva (Sargassaceae) was more active towards copper (66%, 10 mg/mL). Cystoseira tamariscifolia had the highest AChE inhibitory capacity (85%, 10 mg/mL). Cystoseira tamariscifolia and C. nodicaulis were also active against BuChE and TYRO, and were able to protect SH-SY5Y cells against oxidative stress induced by H2O2. Cystoseira tamariscifolia had the highest content of all the groups of phenolics, and was particularly enriched in hydroxycinnamic acids (106 mg CAE/g DW). Discussion and conclusion Results indicate that C. tamariscifolia and C. nodicaulis are important sources of nutraceutical compounds and may be considered functional foods that could improve cognitive functions.

  10. Vacuum ultraviolet absorption in a hydrogen arcjet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David H.; Cappelli, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    Atomic absorption spectroscopy was utilized to measure the ground state atomic hydrogen number density in the plasma produced in a low power hydrogen arcjet. A microwave driven hydrogen plasma was used as the source of radiation resonant with the vacuum ultraviolet Lyman alpha transition. The suitability of this radiation source is discussed. The optical depth of this transition prevented measurements at locations where the ground state atomic hydrogen number density was larger than 3 x 10 exp 19/cu m. These results indicate that other single-photon optical diagnostic techniques are equally ineffective in locations of higher hydrogen number density unless the spectral line shape of the atomic hydrogen absorbers is known.

  11. Protective effect of enzymatic hydrolysates from highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line.

    PubMed

    Senevirathne, Mahinda; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Jeon, You-Jin

    2010-06-01

    Blueberry was enzymatically hydrolyzed using selected commercial food grade carbohydrases (AMG, Celluclast, Termamyl, Ultraflo and Viscozyme) and proteases (Alcalase, Flavourzyme, Kojizyme, Neutrase and Protamex) to obtain water soluble compounds, and their protective effect was investigated against H(2)O(2)-induced damage in Chinese hamster lung fibroblast cell line (V79-4) via various published methods. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates showed higher total phenolic content as well as higher cell viability and ROS scavenging activities, and hence, selected for further antioxidant assays. Both AMG and Alcalase hydrolysates also showed higher protective effects against lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptotic body formation in a dose-dependent fashion. Thus, the results indicated that water soluble compounds obtained by enzymatic hydrolysis of blueberry possess good antioxidant activity against H(2)O(2)-induced cell damage in vitro.

  12. Hydrogen energy progress 5678

    SciTech Connect

    Veziroglu, T.N. )

    1990-01-01

    This book covers the proceedings of the 8th World Hydrogen Energy Conference, and includes: international hydrogen energy programs; hydrogen production; storage of hydrogen; hydrogen transmission and distribution; combustion systems/hydrogen engines; fuel cells; and synfuel production.

  13. Discovery of neutral hydrogen 21 centimeter absorption at redshift 0.25 toward PKS 1413+135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Perlman, Eric S.; Stocke, John T.

    1992-01-01

    A strong H I 21-cm absorption line is identified toward PKS 1413+135 at the redshift of the host galaxy and argued to indicate that the IR-optical cutoff of the BL Lac object's spectrum is caused by extinction. The BL Lac object is shown to have strong neutral 21-cm absorption at the redshift range z = 0.24671 +/- 0.00001, and the implied H I column density is derived. The H I covering factor is assumed to be not more than 0.1, suggesting that a high degree of extinction exists in the galaxy. The host galaxy is theorized to be a spiral of type later than S0 based on the redshift of the H I absorption line and the host. The statistical and observational conclusions are found to support the theories of Stock et al. (1992) regarding the red spectrum of the object.

  14. Hydrogen generator

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, J.R.

    1984-06-19

    A hydrogen generator decomposes water into hydrogen and oxygen, and includes an induction coil which is electrically heated to a temperature sufficient to decompose water passing therethrough. A generator coil is connected in communicating relation to the induction coil, and is positioned in a fire resistant crucible containing ferrous oxide pellets. Oxygen and hydrogen produced by decomposition of water pass through the ferrous oxide pellets where the oxygen reacts with the ferrous oxide and the hydrogen is burned to produce heat for heating a building, such as a conventional home.

  15. Identification of MicroRNAs Involved in Growth Arrest and Apoptosis in Hydrogen Peroxide-Treated Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Xinyu; Wang, Ling; Gao, Jing; Wang, Zi; Zhang, Chunyan; Zhang, Pengjun; Lu, Chengrong

    2016-01-01

    Although both oxidative stress and microRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in physiological and pathological processes, little is known about the interactions between them. In this study, we first described the regulation of H2O2 in cell viability, proliferation, cycle, and apoptosis of human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2. Then, miRNAs expression was profiled after H2O2 treatment. The results showed that high concentration of H2O2 (600 μM) could decrease cell viability, inhibit cell proliferation, induce cell cycle arrest, and finally promote cell apoptosis. Conversely, no significant effects could be found under treatment with low concentration (30 μM). miRNAs array analysis identified 131 differentially expressed miRNAs (125 were upregulated and 6 were downregulated) and predicted 13504 putative target genes of the deregulated miRNAs. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the putative target genes were associated with H2O2-induced cell growth arrest and apoptosis. The subsequent bioinformatics analysis indicated that H2O2-response pathways, including MAPK signaling pathway, apoptosis, and pathways in cancer and cell cycle, were significantly affected. Overall, these results provided comprehensive information on the biological function of H2O2 treatment in HepG2 cells. The identification of miRNAs and their putative targets may offer new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for liver cancer. PMID:27597883

  16. Hydrogen Bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  17. Hydrogen carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  18. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderlinde, Keith; Chime Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    Hydrogen Intensity (HI) mapping uses redshifted 21cm emission from neutral hydrogen as a 3D tracer of Large Scale Structure (LSS) in the Universe. Imprinted in the LSS is a remnant of the acoustic waves which propagated through the primordial plasma. This feature, the Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO), has a characteristic scale of ~150 co-moving Mpc, which appears in the spatial correlation of LSS. By charting the evolution of this scale over cosmic time, we trace the expansion history of the Universe, constraining the Dark Energy equation of state as it becomes a significant component, particularly at redshifts poorly probed by current BAO surveys. In this talk I will introduce CHIME, a transit radio interferometer designed specifically for this purpose. CHIME is an ambitious new telescope, being built in British Columbia, Canada, and composed of five 20m x 100m parabolic reflectors which focus radiation in one direction (east-west) while interferometry is used to resolve beams in the other (north-south). Earth rotation sweeps them across the sky, resulting in complete daily coverage of the northern celestial hemisphere. Commissioning is underway on the 40 x 37m "Pathfinder" telescope, and the full sized 100m x 100m instrument is funded and under development.

  19. Metallic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Dias, Ranga; Noked, Ori; Salamat, Ashkan; Zaghoo, Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    One of the great challenges in condensed matter physics has been to produce metallic hydrogen (MH) in the laboratory. There are two approaches: solid molecular hydrogen can be compressed to high density at extreme pressures of order 5-6 megabars. The transition to MH should take place at low temperatures and is expected to occur as a structural first-order phase transition with dissociation of molecules into atoms, rather than the closing of a gap. A second approach is to produce dense molecular hydrogen at pressures of order 1-2 megabars and heat the sample. With increasing temperature, it was predicted that molecular hydrogen first melts and then dissociates to atomic metallic liquid hydrogen as a first-order phase transition. We have observed this liquid-liquid phase transition to metallic hydrogen, also called the plasma phase transition. In low-temperature studies, we have pressurized HD to over 3 megabars and observed two new phases. Molecular hydrogen has been pressurized to 4.2 megabars. A new phase transition has been observed at 3.55 megabars, but it is not yet metallic.

  20. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring

  1. Dedicated nuclear facilities for electrolytic hydrogen production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foh, S. E.; Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.

    1979-01-01

    An advanced technology, fully dedicated nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen production facility is presented. This plant will produce hydrogen and oxygen only and no electrical power will be generated for off-plant use. The conceptual design was based on hydrogen production to fill a pipeline at 1000 psi and a 3000 MW nuclear base, and the base-line facility nuclear-to-shaftpower and shaftpower-to-electricity subsystems, the water treatment subsystem, electricity-to-hydrogen subsystem, hydrogen compression, efficiency, and hydrogen production cost are discussed. The final conceptual design integrates a 3000 MWth high-temperature gas-cooled reactor operating at 980 C helium reactor-out temperature, direct dc electricity generation via acyclic generators, and high-current density, high-pressure electrolyzers based on the solid polymer electrolyte approach. All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced and pipeline hydrogen is produced at 1000 psi. Hydrogen costs were about half of the conventional nuclear electrolysis process.

  2. Interstellar H I and H2 in the Magellanic Clouds: An Expanded Sample Based on Ultraviolet Absorption-line Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welty, Daniel E.; Xue, Rui; Wong, Tony

    2012-02-01

    We have determined column densities of H I and/or H2 for sight lines in the Magellanic Clouds from archival Hubble Space Telescope and Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectra of H I Lyα and H2 Lyman-band absorption. Together with some similar data from the literature, we now have absorption-based N(H I) and/or N(H2) for 285 Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) sight lines (114 with a detection or limit for both species)—enabling more extensive, direct, and accurate determinations of molecular fractions, gas-to-dust ratios, and elemental depletions in these two nearby, low-metallicity galaxies. For sight lines where the N(H I) estimated from 21 cm emission is significantly higher than the value derived from Lyα absorption (presumably due to emission from gas beyond the target stars), integration of the 21 cm profile only over the velocity range seen in Na I or H2 absorption generally yields much better agreement. Conversely, N(21 cm) can be lower than N(Lyα) by factors of 2-3 in some LMC sight lines—suggestive of small-scale structure within the 21 cm beam(s) and/or some saturation in the emission. The mean gas-to-dust ratios obtained from N(Htot)/E(B - V) are larger than in our Galaxy, by factors of 2.8-2.9 in the LMC and 4.1-5.2 in the SMC—i.e., factors similar to the differences in metallicity. The N(H2)/E(B - V) ratios are more similar in the three galaxies, but with considerable scatter within each galaxy. These data may be used to test models of the atomic-to-molecular transition at low metallicities and predictions of N(H2) based on comparisons of 21 cm emission and the IR emission from dust. ), the MAST archive at STScI (FUSE data), and the University of Bonn (LAB and GASS 21 cm surveys).

  3. The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array Dish. II. Characterization of Spectral Structure with Electromagnetic Simulations and Its Science Implications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewall-Wice, Aaron; Bradley, Richard; Deboer, David; Hewitt, Jacqueline; Parsons, Aaron; Aguirre, James; Ali, Zaki S.; Bowman, Judd; Cheng, Carina; Neben, Abraham R.; Patra, Nipanjana; Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Venter, Mariet; de Lera Acedo, Eloy; Dillon, Joshua S.; Dickenson, Roger; Doolittle, Phillip; Egan, Dennis; Hedrick, Mike; Klima, Patricia; Kohn, Saul; Schaffner, Patrick; Shelton, John; Saliwanchik, Benjamin; Taylor, H. A.; Taylor, Rusty; Tegmark, Max; Wirt, Butch

    2016-11-01

    We use time-domain electromagnetic simulations to determine the spectral characteristics of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Arrays (HERA) antenna. These simulations are part of a multi-faceted campaign to determine the effectiveness of the dish’s design for obtaining a detection of redshifted 21 cm emission from the epoch of reionization. Our simulations show the existence of reflections between HERA’s suspended feed and its parabolic dish reflector that fall below -40 dB at 150 ns and, for reasonable impedance matches, have a negligible impact on HERA’s ability to constrain EoR parameters. It follows that despite the reflections they introduce, dishes are effective for increasing the sensitivity of EoR experiments at a relatively low cost. We find that electromagnetic resonances in the HERA feed’s cylindrical skirt, which is intended to reduce cross coupling and beam ellipticity, introduces significant power at large delays (-40 dB at 200 ns), which can lead to some loss of measurable Fourier modes and a modest reduction in sensitivity. Even in the presence of this structure, we find that the spectral response of the antenna is sufficiently smooth for delay filtering to contain foreground emission at line-of-sight wave numbers below k ∥ ≲ 0.2 h Mpc-1, in the region where the current PAPER experiment operates. Incorporating these results into a Fisher Matrix analysis, we find that the spectral structure observed in our simulations has only a small effect on the tight constraints HERA can achieve on parameters associated with the astrophysics of reionization.

  4. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  5. Upregulation of glutathione peroxidase-1 expression and activity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes high-level protection of PC12 cells against 6-hydroxydopamine and hydrogen peroxide toxicities.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Ehsan; Gardaneh, Mossa; Shojaei, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    We examined the impact of strong co-presence and function of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX-1) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on protecting the rat dopaminergic pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) toxicities. Primarily, GPX-1 over-expression by PC12 cells infected with pLV-GPX1 lentivirus vectors significantly increased cell survival against 6-OHDA toxicity (p<0.01). Addition of conditioned medium collected from growing wild-type astrocytes (Control astro-CM) increased survival rate of pLV-GPX1 infectants by 10% compared to their un-treated counterparts (p<0.05) and 20% compared to their treated empty vector control (p<0.01). Treatment of pLV-GPX1 cells with astro-CM of GDNF-over-secreting astrocytes (Test astro-CM) significantly induced GPX-1 expression, peroxidase enzymatic activity, and intra-cellular glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes paralleled with protection of 90% of GDNF⁺/GPX1⁺ PC12 cells against toxicity, a rate that was 37% up from their un-infected un-treated (GDNF⁻/GPX1⁻) controls (p<0.001), and 12% up from pLV-GPX1 cells that received only Control astro-CM (GPX⁺/GDNF⁻) (p<0.01). GPX-1 over-expression per se suppressed intra-cellular H₂O₂ elevation upon 6-OHDA exposure, and addition of GDNF medium significantly accelerated this suppression (p<0.01). Substitution of 6-OHDA with H₂O₂ induced similar intra-cellular changes and comparable protection levels. In all cell groups, increased cell survival against either compound was further confirmed by increased live cell counts measured by double staining. Following depletion of intra-cellular GSH, only 46% of pLV-GPX1 cells survived 6-OHDA toxicity, whereas over 70% of them were saved upon GDNF treatment (p<0.001). Moreover, capase-3 activation was reduced in pLV-GPX1 cells and maximized by addition of GDNF. Comparison analyses established correlations between GPX-1-GDNF co-presence and both

  6. Hydrogen program overview

    SciTech Connect

    Gronich, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  7. Hydrogen gas purification apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagihara, N.; Gamo, T.; Iwaki, T.; Moriwaki, Y.

    1984-04-24

    A hydrogen gas purification apparatus which includes at least one set of two hydrogen purification containers coupled to each other for heat exchanging therebetween, each of the hydrogen purification containers containing a hydrogen absorbing alloy. The hydrogen gas purification apparatus is so arranged as to cause hydrogen gas to be selectively desorbed from and absorbed into the hydrogen absorbing alloy by the amount of heat produced when the hydrogen gas is selectively absorbed into and desorbed from the hydrogen absorbing alloy.

  8. Hydrogen chloride

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Hydrogen chloride ; CASRN 7647 - 01 - 0 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogeni

  9. Hydrogen sulfide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 03 / 005 www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ( CAS No . 7783 - 06 - 4 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) June 2003 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This document has been revie

  10. Hydrogen technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    To the non-nonsense engineer, any talk of a hydrogen economy may seem like so much hot air. This paper reports that as legislative, safety and environmental issues continue to tighten, they're promoting hydrogen's chances as an energy source and, more immediately, its prospects as a chemical feedstock. Paradoxically, the environmental demands that are stimulating hydrogen demand are also inhibiting the gas's production. Previously, gasoline was made with benzene, which means that H{sub 2} was rejected. But now that the laws mandate lower aromatic and higher oxygenate levels in gasolines, there's less H{sub 2} available as byproduct. At the same time, H{sub 2} demand is rising in hydrodesulfurization units, since the same laws require refiners to cut sulfur levels in fuels. Supplementary sources for the gas are also shrinking. In the chlor-alkali industry, H{sub 2} output is dropping, as demand for its coproduct chlorine weakens. At the same time, H{sub 2} demand for the making of hydrogen peroxide is growing, as that environmentally safer bleach gains chlorine's market share.

  11. Hyperfine interaction in hydrogenated graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Noel; Melle, Manuel; Fernandez-Rossier, Joaquin

    We study the hyperfine interaction of Hydrogen chemisorbed in graphene nanostructures with a gap in their spectrum, such as islands and ribbons. Chemisorption of Hydrogen on graphene results in a bound in-gap state that hosts a single electron localized around the adatom. Using both density functional theory and a four-orbital tight-binding model we study the hyperfine interaction between the hydrogen nuclear spin and the conduction electrons in graphene. We find that the strength of the hyperfine interaction decreases for larger nanostructures for which the energy gap is smaller. We then compare the results of the hyperfine interaction for large nanostructures with those of graphene 2D crystal with a periodic arrangement of chemisorbed Hydrogen atoms, obtaining very similar results. The magnitude of the hyperfine interaction is about 150 MHz, in line with that of Si:P. We acknowledge financial support by Marie-Curie-ITN 607904-SPINOGRAPH.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrogen peroxide is used in these products: Hydrogen peroxide Hair bleach Some contact lens cleaners Note: Household hydrogen peroxide has a 3% concentration. That means it contains 97% water and 3% hydrogen peroxide. Hair ...

  13. Hydrogen forming reaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Marianowski, L.G.; Fleming, D.K.

    1989-03-07

    A hydrogen forming process is described, comprising: conducting in a hydrogen production zone a chemical reaction forming mixed gases comprising molecular hydrogen; contacting one side of a hydrogen ion porous and molecular gas nonporous metallic foil with the mixed gases in the hydrogen production zone; dissociating the molecular hydrogen to ionic hydrogen on the one side of the metallic foil; passing the ionic hydrogen through the metallic foil to its other side; and withdrawing hydrogen from the other side of the metallic foil, thereby removing hydrogen from the hydrogen production zone.

  14. Hydrogen scavengers

    DOEpatents

    Carroll, David W.; Salazar, Kenneth V.; Trkula, Mitchell; Sandoval, Cynthia W.

    2002-01-01

    There has been invented a codeposition process for fabricating hydrogen scavengers. First, a .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is prepared by reacting an allylic transition metal halide with an organic ligand complexed with an alkali metal; and then, in a second step, a vapor of the .pi.-bonded allylic organometallic complex is combined with the vapor of an acetylenic compound, irradiated with UV light, and codeposited on a substrate.

  15. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  16. Hydrogen environment embrittlement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is classified into three types: internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement, hydrogen reaction embrittlement, and hydrogen environment embrittlement. Characteristics of and materials embrittled by these types of hydrogen embrittlement are discussed. Hydrogen environment embrittlement is reviewed in detail. Factors involved in standardizing test methods for detecting the occurrence of and evaluating the severity of hydrogen environment embrittlement are considered. The effect of test technique, hydrogen pressure, purity, strain rate, stress concentration factor, and test temperature are discussed. Additional research is required to determine whether hydrogen environment embrittlement and internal reversible hydrogen embrittlement are similar or distinct types of embrittlement.

  17. Evaluation of potential hydrogen detonation due to postulated hydrogen pipe breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, V. [Gilbert Nesbitt, L.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses a typical deterministic approach to address the hydrogen detonation issues contained in the U.S. NRC`c Commission`s generic letter 93-06. This letter references a General Electric letter reported on under 10 CFR 21 regarding the potential for the rupture of a hydrogen supply line to the generator. Several BWR plants were evaluated.

  18. The morphology and kinematics of neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of z = 0 galaxies with Milky Way masses - a study with the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere; Borthakur, Sanchayeeta; Nelson, Dylan

    2016-11-01

    We analyse the properties of the circumgalactic gas (circumgalactic medium, CGM) around 120 galaxies with stellar and dark matter halo masses similar to that of the Milky Way. We focus on the morphology and kinematics of the neutral hydrogen and how this depends on fg, the ratio of gas-to-stellar mass within the optical radius. In gas-rich galaxies with fg > 0.1, gas temperatures rise slowly from centre of the halo out to the virial radius and average neutral gas column densities remain above 1019 atoms cm-2 out to radii of 50-70 kpc. In gas-poor galaxies with fg < 0.1, gas temperatures rise quickly outside the edge of the disc to ˜106 K, and then remain fixed out to radii of 100 kpc. The column density of neutral gas quickly drops below 1019 atoms cm-2 at radii of 10 kpc. Neutral gas distributions are also more asymmetric in gas-poor galaxies. Most of the differences between gas-poor and gas-rich galaxies in the Illustris simulation can be attributed to the effects of `radio-mode' AGN feedback. In the Illustris simulation, the circumgalactic gas is found to rotate coherently about the centre of the galaxy with a maximum rotational velocity of around 200 km s-1. In gas-rich galaxies, the average coherence length of the rotating gas is 40 kpc, compared to 10 kpc in gas-poor galaxies. In the very most gas-rich systems, the CGM can rotate coherently over scales of 70-100 kpc. We discuss our results in the context of recent observations of the CGM in low-mass galaxies via UV absorption-line spectroscopy and deep 21 cm observations of edge-on spiral galaxies.

  19. The Morphology And Kinematics Of Neutral Hydrogen In The Vicinity Of Z=0 Galaxies With Milky-Way Masses - A Study With The Illustris Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffmann, Guinevere

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the properties of the circumgalactic gas (CGM) around 120 galaxies with stellar and dark matter halo masses similar to that of the Milky Way. We focus on the morphology and kinematics of the neutral hydrogen component of the CGM and how this depends on the ratio of gas-to-stellar mass within the optical radius. In gas-rich galaxies, gas temperatures rise monotonically from center of the halo out to the virial radius. Average neutral gas column densities remain higher than 10**19 atoms cm-2 all the way from the center of the galaxy out to radii of 50-70 kpc. In gas-poor galaxies with fg < 0.1, gas temperatures remain fixed at 10^6 K from the edge of the disk out to radii of 100 kpc. The column density of neutral gas drops below 1019 atoms cm-2 at radii of 10 kpc. The neutral gas distributions are also more asymmetric in gas-poor galaxies. Most of these trends can be explained by the fact that in the Illustris simulation, gas-poor galaxies with Milky Way masses have massive (108Mo) black holes that accrete at few percent of Eddington, and that energy is being dumped into the halo at large (100 kpc) radii in the form of bubbles of hot gas in these systems. We also find that the circumgalactic gas rotates coherently about the center of the galaxy with a maximum rotational velocity of around 200 km/s. In gas-rich galaxies, the average coherence length of the rotating gas is 40 kpc, compared to 10 kpc in gas-poor galaxies. In the most gas-rich systems, the CGM can rotate coherently over scales of 70-100 kpc. We discuss our results in the context of recent observations of the CGM in low mass galaxies via UV absorption-line spectroscopy and deep 21cm observations of edge-on spiral galaxies.

  20. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  1. Components in interstellar molecular hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spitzer, L., Jr.; Morton, W. A.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for precise spectrophotometric measurements of the profiles of selected Lyman absorption lines produced by hydrogen molecules in various rotational levels along the line of sight to 13 stars which have shown some evidence for an increase in line width with increasing rotational quantum number (J). The line profiles were measured by multiple scans with the Copernicus satellite telescope. Based on analysis of the radial velocities, derivations of the column densities, and line-profile fitting, the following conclusions are made: (1) the increase in interstellar H2 line width with increasing J results from the presence of the most shortward component, which is relatively weak at low J but becomes more important at higher J; (2) the relative column densities found for the different J levels in each component may be fitted by a theoretical model in which rotational excitation is due to absorption of UV photons followed by radiative quadrupole spontaneous transitions or collisionally induced downward transitions between different J levels; (3) the atomic hydrogen density is between 300 and 1000 per cu cm in the most shortward component for each of three stars; (4) the approaching gas which produces each shortward component must be in the form of thin sheets; and (5) the sheets are the compressed gas behind a shock front moving through the interstellar medium.

  2. Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Smol, Robert; Farber, Gerald; Naphtali, Leonard M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

  3. Modeling the neutral hydrogen distribution in the post-reionization Universe: intensity mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco; Viel, Matteo; Datta, Kanan K.; Choudhury, T. Roy E-mail: viel@oats.inaf.it E-mail: tirth@ncra.tifr.res.in

    2014-09-01

    We model the distribution of neutral hydrogen (HI) in the post-reionization era and investigate its detectability in 21 cm intensity mapping with future radio telescopes like the Square Kilometer array (SKA). We rely on high resolution hydrodynamical N-body simulations that have a state-of-the-art treatment of the low density photoionized gas in the inter-galactic medium (IGM). The HI is assigned a-posteriori to the gas particles following two different approaches: a halo-based method in which HI is assigned only to gas particles residing within dark matter halos; a particle-based method that assigns HI to all gas particles using a prescription based on the physical properties of the particles. The HI statistical properties are then compared to the observational properties of Damped Lyman-α Absorbers (DLAs) and of lower column density systems and reasonable good agreement is found for all the cases. Among the halo-based method, we further consider two different schemes that aim at reproducing the observed properties of DLAs by distributing HI inside halos: one of this results in a much higher bias for DLAs, in agreement with recent observations, which boosts the 21 cm power spectrum by a factor ∼ 4 with respect to the other recipe. Furthermore, we quantify the contribution of HI in the diffuse IGM to both Ω{sub HI} and the HI power spectrum finding to be subdominant in both cases. We compute the 21 cm power spectrum from the simulated HI distribution and calculate the expected signal for both SKA1-mid and SKA1-low configurations at 2.4 ≤ z ≤ 4. We find that SKA will be able to detect the 21 cm power spectrum, in the non-linear regime, up to k ∼ 1 h/Mpc for SKA1-mid and k ∼ 5 h/Mpc for SKA1-low with 100 hours of observations. We also investigate the perspective of imaging the HI distribution. Our findings indicate that SKA1-low could detect the most massive HI peaks with a signal to noise ratio (SNR) higher than 5 for an observation time of about 1000

  4. Missing Fe: hydrogenated iron nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilalbegović, G.; Maksimović, A.; Mohaček-Grošev, V.

    2017-03-01

    Although it was found that the FeH lines exist in the spectra of some stars, none of the spectral features in the interstellar medium (ISM) have been assigned to this molecule. We suggest that iron atoms interact with hydrogen and produce Fe-H nanoparticles which sometimes contain many H atoms. We calculate infrared spectra of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles using density functional theory methods and find broad, overlapping bands. Desorption of H2 could induce spinning of these small Fe-H dust grains. Some of hydrogenated iron nanoparticles possess magnetic and electric moments and should interact with electromagnetic fields in the ISM. FenHm nanoparticles could contribute to the polarization of the ISM and the anomalous microwave emission. We discuss the conditions required to form FeH and FenHm in the ISM.

  5. 40-fs hydrogen Raman laser

    SciTech Connect

    Didenko, N V; Konyashchenko, A V; Kostryukov, P V; Losev, L L; Pazyuk, V S; Tenyakov, S Yu; Molchanov, V Ya; Chizhikov, S I; Yushkov, K B

    2015-12-31

    40-fs first Stokes pulses at a wavelength of 1.2 μm were generated in a hydrogen SRS-converter pumped by orthogonally polarised double chirped pulses of a Ti : sapphire laser. To obtain a Stokes pulse close to a transform-limited one, a programmed acousto-optic dispersive delay line was placed between the master oscillator and regenerative amplifier. The energy efficiency of Stokes radiation conversion reached 22%. (lasers)

  6. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  7. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of about 3 x 10 (exp -10) relative to H, If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for about 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (about 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 mm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H, that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  8. Surface acoustic wave hydrogen sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhethanabotla, Venkat R. (Inventor); Bhansali, Shekhar (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    The present invention provides a delay line SAW device fabricated on a lithium niobate substrate and coated with a bilayer of nanocrystalline or other nanomaterials such as nanoparticles or nanowires of palladiumn and metal free pthalocyanine which will respond to hydrogen gas in near real time, at low (room) temperature, without being affected by CO, O.sub.2, CH.sub.4 and other gases, in air ambient or controlled ambient, providing sensitivity to low ppm levels.

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Sidney

    1989-01-01

    It was long known that many strong metals can become weakened and brittle as the result of the accumulation of hydrogen within the metal. When the metal is stretched, it does not show normal ductile properties, but fractures prematurely. This problem can occur as the result of a hydrogen evolution reaction such as corrosion or electroplating, or due to hydrogen in the environment at the metal surface. High strength alloys such as steels are especially susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Nickel-hydrogen cells commonly use Inconel 718 alloy for the pressure container, and this also is susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Metals differ in their susceptibility to embrittlement. Hydrogen embrittlement in nickel-hydrogen cells is analyzed and the reasons why it may or may not occur are discussed. Although Inconel 718 can display hydrogen embrittlement, experience has not identified any problem with nickel-hydrogen cells. No hydrogen embrittlement problem is expected with the 718 alloy pressure container used in nickel-hydrogen cells.

  10. PRSA hydrogen tank thermal acoustic oscillation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riemer, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    The power reactant storage assembly (PRSA) hydrogen tank test data were reviewed. Two hundred and nineteen data points illustrating the effect of flow rate, temperature ratio and configuration were identified. The test data were reduced to produce the thermal acoustic oscillation parameters. Frequency and amplitude were determined for model correlation. A comparison of PRSA hydrogen tank test data with the analytical models indicated satisfactory agreement for the supply and poor agreement for the full line.

  11. Spectroscopic detection of stratospheric hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffey, M. T.; Mankin, W. G.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A number of features have been identified as absorption lines of hydrogen cyanide in infrared spectra of stratospheric absorption obtained from a high-altitude aircraft. Column amounts of stratospheric hydrogen cyanide have been derived from spectra recorded on eight flights. The average vertical column amount above 12 kilometers is 7.1 + or - 0.8 x 10 to the 14th molecules per square centimeter, corresponding to an average mixing ratio of 170 parts per trillion by volume.

  12. Hydrogen supply system

    SciTech Connect

    Teitel, R.J.

    1981-11-24

    A system for supplying hydrogen to an apparatus which utilizes hydrogen contains a metal hydride hydrogen supply component and a microcavity hydrogen storage hydrogen supply component which in tandem supply hydrogen for the apparatus. The metal hydride hydrogen supply component includes a first storage tank filled with a composition which is capable of forming a metal hydride of such a nature that the hydride will release hydrogen when heated but will absorb hydrogen when cooled. This first storage tank is equipped with a heat exchanger for both adding heat to and extracting heat from the composition to regulate the absorption/deabsorption of hydrogen from the composition. The microcavity hydrogen storage hydrogen supply component includes a second tank containing the microcavity hydrogen supply. The microcavity hydrogen storage contains hydrogen held under high pressure within individual microcavities. The hydrogen is released from the microcavities by heating the cavities. This heating is accomplished by including within the tank for the microcavity hydrogen storage a heating element.

  13. Hydrogen sulphide.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, T L

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the primary chemical hazard in natural gas production in 'sour' gas fields. It is also a hazard in sewage treatment and manure-containment operations, construction in wetlands, pelt processing, certain types of pulp and paper production, and any situation in which organic material decays or inorganic sulphides exist under reducing conditions. H2S dissociates into free sulphide in the circulation. Sulphide binds to many macromolecules, among them cytochrome oxidase. Although this is undoubtedly an important mechanism of toxicity due to H2S, there may be others H2S provides little opportunity for escape at high concentrations because of the olfactory paralysis it causes, the steep exposure-response relationships, and the characteristically sudden loss of consciousness it can cause which is colloquially termed 'knockdown.' Other effects may include mucosal irritation, which is associated at lower concentrations with a keratoconjunctivitis called 'gas eye' and at higher concentrations with risk of pulmonary oedema. Chronic central nervous system sequelae may possibly follow repeated knockdowns: this is controversial and the primary effects of H2S may be confounded by anoxia or head trauma. Treatment is currently empirical, with a combination of nitrite and hyperbaric oxygen preferred. The treatment regimen is not ideal and carries some risk.

  14. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  15. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  16. 21 cm maps of Jupiter's radiation belts from all rotational aspects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Pater, I.

    1980-01-01

    Two-dimensional maps of the radio emission from Jupiter were made in December 1977 at a frequency of 1,412 MHz using the Westerbork telescope. Pictures in all four Stokes parameters have been obtained every 15 deg in longitude, each smeared over 15 deg of the planet's rotation. The maps have an E-W resolution of about 1/3 of the diameter of the disk and a N-S resolution 3 times less. The total intensity and linear polarization maps are accurate to 0.5% and the circularly polarized maps to 0.1% of the maximum intensities in I. The whole set of maps clearly shows the existence of higher order terms in the magnetic field of Jupiter.

  17. Adding Context to James Webb Space Telescope Surveys with Current and Future 21 cm Radio Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, A. P.; Morales, M. F.; Lidz, A.; Malloy, M.; Sutter, P. M.

    2015-02-01

    Infrared and radio observations of the Epoch of Reionization promise to revolutionize our understanding of the cosmic dawn, and major efforts with the JWST, MWA, and HERA are underway. While measurements of the ionizing sources with infrared telescopes and the effect of these sources on the intergalactic medium with radio telescopes should be complementary, to date the wildly disparate angular resolutions and survey speeds have made connecting proposed observations difficult. In this paper we develop a method to bridge the gap between radio and infrared studies. While the radio images may not have the sensitivity and resolution to identify individual bubbles with high fidelity, by leveraging knowledge of the measured power spectrum we are able to separate regions that are likely ionized from largely neutral, providing context for the JWST observations of galaxy counts and properties in each. By providing the ionization context for infrared galaxy observations, this method can significantly enhance the science returns of JWST and other infrared observations.

  18. New algorithm for computing the ablation of hydrogenic pellets in hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Milora, S.L.

    1983-04-01

    A method is presented for calculating the evaporation rate of hydrogenic pellets immersed in an unmagnetized plasma with a suprathermal particle component of arbitrary distribution function. The computational procedure is based on hydrodynamic solutions for the expansion of the gaseous cloud, obtained in a previous treatment that considered the effects of thermal particles only. The appropriate heat source terms, derived from the stopping power of the gaseous shield, are worked out for energetic ions produced by neutral beam injection heating. The model predicts 27-cm penetration in a Poloidal Divertor Experiment (PDX) plasma, compared with experimentally measured values in the range of 29 to 32 cm. An application to the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) gives an estimated 21-cm penetration for a 2.5-mm-diam tritium pellet injection at 2000 m/s into a 55-cm-bore plasma heated to a central electron temperature of 4 keV by 34 MW of neutral injection.

  19. A Few Facts about Hydrogen [and] Hydrogen Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, H. Roger

    Divided into two sections, this publication presents facts about and the characteristics of hydrogen and a bibliography on hydrogen. The first section lists nine facts on what hydrogen is, four on where hydrogen is found, nine on how hydrogen is used, nine on how hydrogen can be used, and 14 on how hydrogen is made. Also included are nine…

  20. Efficacy of a Low Dose of Hydrogen Peroxide (Peroxy Ag⁺) for Continuous Treatment of Dental Unit Water Lines: Challenge Test with Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in a Simulated Dental Unit Waterline.

    PubMed

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M

    2016-07-22

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro bactericidal activity of hydrogen peroxide against Legionella. We tested hydrogen peroxide (Peroxy Ag⁺) at 600 ppm to evaluate Legionella survival in a simulated dental treatment water system equipped with Water Hygienization Equipment (W.H.E.) device that was artificially contaminated. When Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1 was exposed to Peroxy Ag⁺ for 60 min we obtained a two decimal log reduction. High antimicrobial efficacy was obtained with extended periods of exposure: four decimal log reduction at 75 min and five decimal log reduction at 15 h of exposure. Involving a simulation device (Peroxy Ag⁺ is flushed into the simulation dental unit waterlines (DUWL)) we obtained an average reduction of 85% of Legionella load. The product is effective in reducing the number of Legionella cells after 75 min of contact time (99.997%) in the simulator device under test conditions. The Peroxy Ag⁺ treatment is safe for continuous use in the dental water supply system (i.e., it is safe for patient contact), so it could be used as a preventive option, and it may be useful in long-term treatments, alone or coupled with a daily or periodic shock treatment.

  1. Efficacy of a Low Dose of Hydrogen Peroxide (Peroxy Ag+) for Continuous Treatment of Dental Unit Water Lines: Challenge Test with Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 1 in a Simulated Dental Unit Waterline

    PubMed Central

    Ditommaso, Savina; Giacomuzzi, Monica; Ricciardi, Elisa; Zotti, Carla M.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the in vitro bactericidal activity of hydrogen peroxide against Legionella. We tested hydrogen peroxide (Peroxy Ag+) at 600 ppm to evaluate Legionella survival in a simulated dental treatment water system equipped with Water Hygienization Equipment (W.H.E.) device that was artificially contaminated. When Legionella pneumophila serogroup (sg) 1 was exposed to Peroxy Ag+ for 60 min we obtained a two decimal log reduction. High antimicrobial efficacy was obtained with extended periods of exposure: four decimal log reduction at 75 min and five decimal log reduction at 15 h of exposure. Involving a simulation device (Peroxy Ag+ is flushed into the simulation dental unit waterlines (DUWL)) we obtained an average reduction of 85% of Legionella load. The product is effective in reducing the number of Legionella cells after 75 min of contact time (99.997%) in the simulator device under test conditions. The Peroxy Ag+ treatment is safe for continuous use in the dental water supply system (i.e., it is safe for patient contact), so it could be used as a preventive option, and it may be useful in long-term treatments, alone or coupled with a daily or periodic shock treatment. PMID:27455299

  2. The spatial distribution of neutral hydrogen as traced by low H I mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Han-Seek; Wyithe, J. Stuart. B.; Baugh, C. M.; Lagos, C. d. P.; Power, C.; Park, Jaehong

    2017-02-01

    The formation and evolution of galaxies with low neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) masses, M_{H I} < 108 h-2 M⊙, are affected by host dark matter halo mass and photoionization feedback from the UV background after the end of reionization. We study how the physical processes governing the formation of galaxies with low H I mass are imprinted on the distribution of neutral hydrogen in the Universe using the hierarchical galaxy formation model, GALFORM. We calculate the effect on the correlation function of changing the H I mass detection threshold at redshifts 0 ≤ z ≤ 0.5. We parametrize the clustering as ξ(r) = (r/r0)-γ and we find that including galaxies with M_{H I} < 108 h-2 M⊙ increases the clustering amplitude r0 and slope γ compared to samples of higher H I masses. This is due to these galaxies with low H I masses typically being hosted by haloes with masses greater than 1012 h-1 M⊙, and is in contrast to optically selected surveys for which the inclusion of faint, blue galaxies lowers the clustering amplitude. We show the H I mass function for different host dark matter halo masses and galaxy types (central or satellite) to interpret the values of r0 and γ of the clustering of H I-selected galaxies. We also predict the contribution of low H I mass galaxies to the 21 cm intensity mapping signal. We calculate that a dark matter halo mass resolution better than ˜1010 h-1 M⊙ at redshifts higher than 0.5 is required in order to predict converged 21 cm brightness temperature fluctuations.

  3. Radiofrequency recombination lines from the interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dupree, A. K.

    1971-01-01

    Observations of recombination lines form normal H II regions, extended H II regions, nonthermal sources, and the H I medium are discussed. Detection of recombination lines from elements other than hydrogen may provide a means of identifying fossil Stromgren spheres at high temperature.

  4. Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

    2008-02-01

    . The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines

  5. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  6. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  7. Hydrogen conference: Workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Serfass, J.; Bugel, L. )

    1989-10-01

    This meeting was designed to encourage discussion of today's US industrial, utility, space and environmental interests in hydrogen and tommorrow's use of hydrogen as an energy system. The meeting began with a general session during which speakers gave presentations on a variety of hydrogen topics. Discussion following each presentation was lively. Some of the major points of discussion were: interpretation of global warming evidence; relevance of global warming to the interest in hydrogen; cost of hydrogen derived from fossil fuels vs. nuclear vs. solar; likely future importance of hydrogen -- major energy system vs. niche player. A number of interesting points were raised and data presented by speakers and participants. Highlights are presented.

  8. Oxygen recombination in individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A metal-hydrogen cell is described which avoids damage and retards flooding of the hydrogen electrodes by providing for chemical recombination of oxygen and hydrogen in areas or sites remote from the hydrogen electrodes. In the metal-hydrogen cell, a plurality of electrical cell units are place in a back to back relationship. The cells may be lined with a wick, having one or more catalyzed sites on the inner surface of the cell. Separators disposed between the respective metal and hydrogen electrodes of each cell unit are provided with gas directing notches around their peripheries to facilitate the desired movement of gasses within the metal-hydrogen cell. Any two metal electrodes separated by a gas screen are provided with gas tight sealing means between the electrodes at each aperature. The sealing means may be a fing of rubber or elastomeric material which is somewhat compressible but nonreactive with other materials in the cell.

  9. Chemical/hydrogen energy systems analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, M.

    1982-12-01

    Four hydrogen energy technologies are addressed including: hydrogen recovery from hydrogen separation using hydride technology, photochemical hydrogen production, anode depolarization in electrolytic hydrogen production.

  10. Spectral Line Shapes as a Diagnostic Tool in Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Stamm, R; Capes, H; Demura, A; Godbert-Mouret, L; Koubiti, M; Marandet, Y; Mattioli, M; Rosato, J; Rosmej, F; Fournier, K B

    2006-07-22

    Spectral line shapes and intensities are used for obtaining information on the various regions of magnetic fusion devices. Emission from low principal quantum numbers of hydrogen isotopes is analyzed for understanding the complex recycling mechanism. Lines emitted from high principal quantum numbers of hydrogen and helium are dominated by Stark effect, allowing an electronic density diagnostic in the divertor. Intensities of lines emitted by impurities are fitted for a better knowledge of ion transport in the confined plasma.

  11. Hydrogen Stark broadening by different kinds of model microfields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, J.

    1980-07-01

    A new model microfield is defined (the theta process) which in conjunction with the kangaroo process, is used to demonstrate the effects of different model microfields on hydrogen line profiles. The differences in the statistical features of the models give an estimate of the uncertainties associated with the method of model microfields. Stark broadening of hydrogen Lyman lines by either electrons or ions is investigated specifically.

  12. Project H - A Complete Spaceport Hydrogen Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notardonato, William

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews Project H, and its importance in the development of Kennedy Space Center (KSC) as a Spaceport capable of multiple launches. It is known that current KSC cryogenic technology results in only approximately 55 % of purchased hydrogen being used. The rest is lost at various points in the process: transfer from transporting vehicle to tank, storage tank boil off, and from the tank to the intended propulsion tanks. Project H's goals would be to have local hydrogen production and liquifaction capability, and to increase the efficiency of hydrogen operations to greater than 80 %. The project envisions two phases: Phase 1 will build a smaller scale demonstration system, and phase 2 will build a full scale spaceport system. This initial project has proposed ideas for local hydrogen production, gaseous distribution, integrated refrigeration and storage, and high efficiency transfer lines that merit further investigation.

  13. Design of the cryogenic hydrogen release laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Hecht, Ethan S.; Zimmerman, Mark D.; LaFleur, Angela Christine; Ciotti, Michael

    2015-09-01

    A cooperative research and development agreement was made between Linde, LLC and Sandia to develop a plan for modifying the Turbulent Combustion Laboratory (TCL) with the necessary infrastructure to produce a cold (near liquid temperature) hydrogen jet. A three-stage heat exchanger will be used to cool gaseous hydrogen using liquid nitrogen, gaseous helium, and liquid helium. A cryogenic line from the heat exchanger into the lab will allow high-fidelity diagnostics already in place in the lab to be applied to cold hydrogen jets. Data from these experiments will be used to develop and validate models that inform codes and standards which specify protection criteria for unintended releases from liquid hydrogen storage, transport, and delivery infrastructure.

  14. Ionic model for highly compressed solid hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakub, E. S.

    2013-05-01

    We propose a simple ionic model for high-pressure conducting phase IV of solid hydrogen observed recently at room temperature. It is based on an assumption of dissociative ionization of hydrogen molecules 3H2=2H2(+)+2H(-) induced by high compression. The proposed model predicts the first order transition of molecular hydrogen solid into partly ionic conducting phase at megabar pressures and describes the temperature dependence of resistivity at room temperature. Its predictions are consistent with high temperature shock-compression experiments which exhibit conductivity of multiply shocked hydrogen. The location of phase transition line, the volume change, and the ionization degree in solid phase IV are estimated.

  15. Investigation of low temperature atomic hydrogen spin-exchange collisions using a cryogenic hydrogen maser

    SciTech Connect

    Walsworth, R.L.; Mattison, E.M.; Vessot, R.F.C.; Silvera, I.F.

    1993-05-01

    We have used a cryogenic hydrogen maser to study ground state atomic hydrogen spin-exchange collisions at temperatures near 0.5 K. Recent quantum-mechanical treatments of low energy atomic collisions predict that hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shifts will become large at low temperatures, and will affect the performance of new atomic frequency standards such as the cryogenic hydrogen maser and the cesium fountain. We have measured the effects of low temperature spin-exchange collisions on maser line-broadening and frequency, and in particular the hyperfine-induced frequency shift.

  16. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  17. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debajyoti; De, Debojyoti; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-01-01

    The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical), Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source. PMID:16371161

  18. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debajyoti; De, Debojyoti; Chaudhuri, Surabhi; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K

    2005-12-21

    The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical), Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  19. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps, and packers. The...

  20. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps, and packers. The...

  1. 30 CFR 250.504 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.504 Section 250.504 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps, and packers. The...

  2. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps and packers. The...

  3. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps and packers. The...

  4. 30 CFR 250.604 - Hydrogen sulfide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen sulfide. 250.604 Section 250.604 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL... equipment and flow lines, circulating the well, swabbing, and pulling tubing, pumps and packers. The...

  5. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Rivkin, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  6. World lines.

    PubMed

    Waser, Jürgen; Fuchs, Raphael; Ribicić, Hrvoje; Schindler, Benjamin; Blöschl, Günther; Gröller, Eduard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present World Lines as a novel interactive visualization that provides complete control over multiple heterogeneous simulation runs. In many application areas, decisions can only be made by exploring alternative scenarios. The goal of the suggested approach is to support users in this decision making process. In this setting, the data domain is extended to a set of alternative worlds where only one outcome will actually happen. World Lines integrate simulation, visualization and computational steering into a single unified system that is capable of dealing with the extended solution space. World Lines represent simulation runs as causally connected tracks that share a common time axis. This setup enables users to interfere and add new information quickly. A World Line is introduced as a visual combination of user events and their effects in order to present a possible future. To quickly find the most attractive outcome, we suggest World Lines as the governing component in a system of multiple linked views and a simulation component. World Lines employ linking and brushing to enable comparative visual analysis of multiple simulations in linked views. Analysis results can be mapped to various visual variables that World Lines provide in order to highlight the most compelling solutions. To demonstrate this technique we present a flooding scenario and show the usefulness of the integrated approach to support informed decision making.

  7. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  8. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Nemoto, Y.

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  9. Purification of Hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Newton, A S

    1950-12-05

    Disclosed is a process for purifying hydrogen containing various gaseous impurities by passing the hydrogen over a large surface of uranium metal at a temperature above the decomposition temperature of uranium hydride, and below the decomposition temperature of the compounds formed by the combination of the uranium with the impurities in the hydrogen.

  10. N Reactor hydrogen control

    SciTech Connect

    Shuford, D.H.; Kripps, L.J.

    1988-08-01

    Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power reactor in the Soviet Union, a number of reviews were conducted of the N Reactor. Hydrogen generation during postulates severe accidents and the possibility of resulting hydrogen deflagrations/detonations that could affect confinement integrity were issues raised in several reviews, along with recommendations for adding hydrogen mitigation features. To respond to these reviews, an N Reactor Safety Enhancement Program and a subsequent Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program were initiated to address all post-Chernobyl N Reactor review findings. The Safety Enhancement Program and Accelerated Safety Enhancement Program efforts involving hydrogen control included the following: Calculate the potential hydrogen source for a range of severe accidents at the N Reactor to establish an acceptable design basis for the hydrogen mitigation system; Analyze the N Reactor confinement hydrogen mixing capability to identify areas of concern and to the verify effectiveness of the hydrogen mitigation system; Select, design, and construct a hydrogen mitigation system to enhance the N Reactor capability to accommodate possible hydrogen generation from postulated severe accidents; Provide post-accident hydrogen monitoring as an operator aid in assessing confinement conditions. In additions, it was necessary to verify that incorporation of the hydrogen mitigation system had no adverse impact N Reactor safety (e.g., radiological consequence analyses). 77 refs., 25 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Liquid metal hydrogen barriers

    DOEpatents

    Grover, George M.; Frank, Thurman G.; Keddy, Edward S.

    1976-01-01

    Hydrogen barriers which comprise liquid metals in which the solubility of hydrogen is low and which have good thermal conductivities at operating temperatures of interest. Such barriers are useful in nuclear fuel elements containing a metal hydride moderator which has a substantial hydrogen dissociation pressure at reactor operating temperatures.

  12. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  13. Flash hydrogenation of coal

    DOEpatents

    Manowitz, Bernard; Steinberg, Meyer; Sheehan, Thomas V.; Winsche, Warren E.; Raseman, Chad J.

    1976-01-01

    A process for the hydrogenation of coal comprising the contacting of powdered coal with hydrogen in a rotating fluidized bed reactor. A rotating fluidized bed reactor suitable for use in this process is also disclosed. The coal residence time in the reactor is limited to less than 5 seconds while the hydrogen contact time is not in excess of 0.2 seconds.

  14. Modelling the post-reionization neutral hydrogen (H I ) bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Anathpindika, S.

    2016-08-01

    Observations of the neutral hydrogen (H I) 21-cm signal hold the potential of allowing us to map out the cosmological large-scale structures (LSS) across the entire post-reionization era (z ≤ 6). Several experiments are planned to map the LSS over a large range of redshifts and angular scales, many of these targeting the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations. It is important to model the H I distribution in order to correctly predict the expected signal, and more so to correctly interpret the results after the signal is detected. In this paper we have carried out semi-numerical simulations to model the H I distribution and study the H I power spectrum P_{H I}(k,z) across the redshift range 1 ≤ z ≤ 6. We have modelled the H I bias as a complex quantity tilde{b}(k,z) whose modulus squared b2(k, z) relates P_{H I}(k,z) to the matter power spectrum P(k, z), and whose real part br(k, z) quantifies the cross-correlation between the H I and the matter distribution. We study the z and k dependence of the bias, and present polynomial fits which can be used to predict the bias across 0 ≤ z ≤ 6 and 0.01 ≤ k ≤ 10 Mpc-1. We also present results for the stochasticity r = br/b which is important for cross-correlation studies.

  15. The Dark Ages of the Universe and hydrogen reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Aravind; Yoshida, Naoki

    2014-06-01

    One of the milestones in cosmic history is the formation of the first luminous objects and hydrogen reionization. The standard theory of cosmic structure formation predicts that the first generation of stars were born about a few hundred million years after the Big Bang. The dark Universe was then lit up once again, and eventually filled with ultraviolet photons emitted from stars, galaxies, and quasars. The exact epoch of the cosmic reionization and the details of the process, even the dominant sources, are not known, except for the fact that the Universe was reionized early on. Signatures of reionization are expected to be imprinted in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, especially in its large-scale polarization. Future CMB experiments, together with other probes such as the H i 21 cm surveys, will provide rich information on the process of reionization. We review recent studies on reionization. The implications from available observations over a wide range of wavelengths are discussed. Results from state-of-the-art computer simulations are presented. Finally, we discuss the prospects for exploring the first few hundred million years of the cosmic history.

  16. Measuring the neutral hydrogen mass of galaxy cluster A262

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mohd Shaiful Rizal; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Ibrahim, Ungku Ferwani Salwa Ungku; Hashim, Norsiah

    2013-05-01

    The total neutral hydrogen mass of galaxy cluster, MHI is measured using spectra taken by a 7 meter single dish radio telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory. This have been done by using a concept introduced by R. A. Bettye which is make use of small single radio telescope for findings MHI as a whole. MHI is calculated by using simple relationship involving parameter distance of the object from the observer, D and radiated flux of continuum radio source, Sν. A262 is chosen as our test subject since it is compatible with the capability of our instrument. It is a spiral rich galaxy cluster and a fragment of Pisces in the Perseus supercluster, located approximately at 62 - 77 Mpc. It is a part of Local Group Supercluster that is centered at giant elliptical galaxy, NGC 708, and it is also called `cluster dominant' because of its strongly X-ray source concentrated. A262 is chosen as our candidate in this study because of its relatively low redshift, z = 0.0156, observed in 21 cm emission as their tracer. We calculate MHI of A262 according to some analysis from previous studies. Preliminary detection of A262 showed some degree of success.

  17. Early Science from the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Daniel; HERA Team

    2017-01-01

    The Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA) is a radio interferometer targeting 21cm emission from the primordial intergalactic medium. Observing across a broad redshift range HERA will directly measure the IGM as it is heated and ionized by the first galaxies and black holes. HERA is tuned to make a precision measurement of the HI power spectrum through redshifts 6 to 12, capturing, at high significance, the spatial and temporal pattern of fluctuations imprinted by early objects and will explore beyond to redshift 20 to epochs driven by the very first objects. When completed, the array will have 250 14m dishes packed into a regular hexagonal pattern for roughly 10 times the sensitivity of previous such arrays. HERA is an official Square Kilometer Array precursor operated out of the South African SKA site. It is a staged experimental program that is building out in steps; 19 dishes are operating at the , the next expansion to 37 is under way in parallel with commissioning experiments. Here we report on these tests which have focused on optimizing feed design and calibration techniques and discuss their impact on isolation of foreground emission.

  18. Nickel-hydrogen separator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1986-01-01

    The separator technology is a critical element in the nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) systems. Previous research and development work carried out at NASA Lewis Research Center has determined that separators made from zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and potassium titanate (PKT) fibers will function satisfactorily in Ni-H2 cells without exhibiting the problems associated with the asbestos separators. These separators and their characteristics were previously discussed. A program was established to transfer the separator technology into a commercial production line. A detailed plan of this program will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  19. Nickel-hydrogen separator development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1986-01-01

    The separator technology is a critical element in the nickel-hydrogen (Ni-H2) systems. Previous research and development work carried out at NASA Lewis Research Center has determined that separators made from zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and potassium titanate (PKT) fibers will function satisfactorily in Ni-H2 cells without exhibiting the problems associated with the asbestos separators. A program has been established to transfer the separator technology into a commercial production line. A detailed plan of this program will be presented and the preliminary results will be discussed.

  20. Hydrogen separation process

    DOEpatents

    Mundschau, Michael; Xie, Xiaobing; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul; Wright, Harold

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  1. Safe venting of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Nanoplasmonic hydrogen sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-09-01

    In this review we discuss the evolution of surface plasmon resonance and localized surface plasmon resonance based hydrogen sensors. We put particular focus on how they are used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and the single nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes. However, nanoplasmonic hydrogen sensors are not only of academic interest but may also find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier.

  3. Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Baker, J.D.; Meikrantz, D.H.; Tuggle, D.G.

    1997-09-23

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the purification and collection of hydrogen isotopes in a flowing inert gaseous mixture containing impurities, wherein metal alloy getters having the capability of sorbing non-hydrogen impurities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more efficiently collected. A plurality of parallel process lines utilizing metal getter alloys can be used to provide for the continuous purification and collection of the hydrogen isotopes. 15 figs.

  4. Method for the purification of noble gases, nitrogen and hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Baker, John D.; Meikrantz, David H.; Tuggle, Dale G.

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the purification and collection of hydrogen isotopes in a flowing inert gaseous mixture containing impurities, wherein metal alloy getters having the capability of sorbing non-hydrogen impurities such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, ammonia, nitrogen and water vapor are utilized to purify the gaseous mixture of impurities. After purification hydrogen isotopes may be more efficiently collected. A plurality of parallel process lines utilizing metal getter alloys can be used to provide for the continuous purification and collection of the hydrogen isotopes.

  5. Hydrogen storage methods.

    PubMed

    Züttel, Andreas

    2004-04-01

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at T<100 K), (4) absorbed on interstitial sites in a host metal (at ambient pressure and temperature), (5) chemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m(-3), approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen

  6. Hydrogen storage methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Züttel, Andreas

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at T<100 K), (4) absorbed on interstitial sites in a host metal (at ambient pressure and temperature), (5) chemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m-3, approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is

  7. Far-Infrared [CII] Line Observation of the Galactic Plane by IRTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiuti, Sin'itirou; Shibai, Hiroshi; Okuda, Haruyuki; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Hiromoto, Norihisa; Okumura, Ken'ichi

    1996-10-01

    A detailed map of the distribution of the [CII] 158 mu m line intensity from the galactic plane around l = 50(deg) was obtained by the Far-Infrared Line Mapper (FILM) on board the Infrared Telescope in Space (IRTS). The distribution of the [CII] emission is similar to that of the far-infrared continuum emission. There are a number of discrete sources, most of which correspond to known objects, such as compact HII regions and molecular clouds, near to the galactic plane. Moreover, an extended component concentrated in the galactic plane was found, and its distribution does not clearly depend on the galactic longitude in the observed area. This extended component decreases rapidly as the galactic latitude increases. The FWHM of this component is about 2.(deg) 6 in the galactic latitude. This is larger than that of the CO (J=1 -> 0) intensity, but is much smaller than that of the HI 21 cm intensity.

  8. The Beam Line X NdFe-steel hybrid wiggler for SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Halbach, K.; Humphries, D.; Marks, S.; Plate, D.; Shuman, D.; Karpenko, V.P.; Kulkarni, S.; Tirsell, K.G.

    1987-03-10

    A wiggler magnet with 15 periods, each 12.85 cm long, which achieves 1.40 T at a 2.1 cm gap (2.26T at 0.8 cm) has been designed and is now in fabrication at LBL. This wiggler will be the radiation source of the high intensity synchrotron radiation beam line for the Beam Line X PRT facility at SSRL. The magnet utilizes Neodymium-Iron (NdFe) material and Vanadium Permendur (steel) in the hybrid configuration to achieve simultaneously a high magnetic field and short period. Magnetic field adjustment is with a driven chain and ball screw drive system. The magnetic structure is external to an s.s. vacuum chamber which has thin walls, 0.76 mm thickness, at each pole tip for higher field operation. Magnetic design, construction details and magnetic measurements are presented.

  9. Radiative transfer effects in primordial hydrogen recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Ali-Haiemoud, Yacine; Hirata, Christopher M.; Grin, Daniel

    2010-12-15

    The calculation of a highly accurate cosmological recombination history has been the object of particular attention recently, as it constitutes the major theoretical uncertainty when predicting the angular power spectrum of cosmic microwave background anisotropies. Lyman transitions, in particular the Lyman-{alpha} line, have long been recognized as one of the bottlenecks of recombination, due to their very low escape probabilities. The Sobolev approximation does not describe radiative transfer in the vicinity of Lyman lines to a sufficient degree of accuracy, and several corrections have already been computed in other works. In this paper, we compute the impact of some radiative transfer effects that were previously ignored, or for which previous treatments were incomplete. First, the effect of Thomson scattering in the vicinity of the Lyman-{alpha} line is evaluated, using a full redistribution kernel incorporated into a radiative transfer code. The effect of feedback of distortions generated by the optically thick deuterium Lyman-{alpha} line blueward of the hydrogen line is investigated with an analytic approximation. It is shown that both effects are negligible during cosmological hydrogen recombination. Second, the importance of high-lying, nonoverlapping Lyman transitions is assessed. It is shown that escape from lines above Ly{gamma} and frequency diffusion in Ly{beta} and higher lines can be neglected without loss of accuracy. Third, a formalism generalizing the Sobolev approximation is developed to account for the overlap of the high-lying Lyman lines, which is shown to lead to negligible changes to the recombination history. Finally, the possibility of a cosmological hydrogen recombination maser is investigated. It is shown that there is no such maser in the purely radiative treatment presented here.

  10. Hydrogen Filling Station

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  11. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T.

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  12. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Iver E.; Ellis, Timothy W.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Ting, Jason; Terpstra, Robert; Bowman, Robert C.; Witham, Charles K.; Fultz, Brent T.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  13. Hydrogen interactions with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclellan, R. B.; Harkins, C. G.

    1975-01-01

    Review of the literature on the nature and extent of hydrogen interactions with metals and the role of hydrogen in metal failure. The classification of hydrogen-containing systems is discussed, including such categories as covalent hydrides, volatile hydrides, polymeric hydrides, and transition metal hydride complexes. The use of electronegativity as a correlating parameter in determining hydride type is evaluated. A detailed study is made of the thermodynamics of metal-hydrogen systems, touching upon such aspects as hydrogen solubility, the positions occupied by hydrogen atoms within the solvent metal lattice, the derivation of thermodynamic functions of solid solutions from solubility data, and the construction of statistical models for hydrogen-metal solutions. A number of theories of hydrogen-metal bonding are reviewed, including the rigid-band model, the screened-proton model, and an approach employing the augmented plane wave method to solve the one-electron energy band problem. Finally, the mechanism of hydrogen embrittlement is investigated on the basis of literature data concerning stress effects and the kinetics of hydrogen transport to critical sites.

  14. A microBio reactor for hydrogen production.

    SciTech Connect

    Volponi, Joanne V.; Walker, Andrew William

    2003-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore the potential of developing a microfluidic reactor capable of enzymatically converting glucose and other carbohydrates to hydrogen. This aggressive project was motivated by work in enzymatic hydrogen production done by Woodward et al. at OWL. The work reported here demonstrated that hydrogen could be produced from the enzymatic oxidation of glucose. Attempts at immobilizing the enzymes resulted in reduced hydrogen production rates, probably due to buffer compatibility issues. A novel in-line sensor was also developed to monitor hydrogen production in real time at levels below 1 ppm. Finally, a theoretical design for the microfluidic reactor was developed but never produced due to the low production rates of hydrogen from the immobilized enzymes. However, this work demonstrated the potential of mimicking biological systems to create energy on the microscale.

  15. Evaluation of insulated pressure vessels for cryogenic hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Garcia-Villazana, O; Martinez-Frias, J

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents an analytical and experimental evaluation of the applicability of insulated pressure vessels for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH?) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The purpose of this work is to verify that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber- wrapped vessels can be used for cryogenic hydrogen storage. The paper reports on previous and ongoing tests and analyses that have the purpose of improving the system design and assure its safety.

  16. Proton NMR studies of PECVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and HWCVD hydrogenated amorphous silicon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herberg, Julie Lynn

    This dissertation discusses a new understanding of the internal structure of hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Recent research in our group has included nuclear spin echo double resonance (SEDOR) measurements on device quality hydrogenated amorphous silicon photovoltaic films. Using the SEDOR pulse sequence with and without the perturbing 29Si pulse, we obtain Fourier transform spectra for film at 80K that allows us to distinguish between molecular hydrogen and hydrogen bonded to silicon. Using such an approach, we have demonstrated that high quality a-Si:H films produced by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) from SiH 4 contains about ten atomic percent hydrogen, nearly 40% of which is molecular hydrogen, individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of tetragonal sites (T-sites). The main objective of this dissertation is to examine the difference between a-Si:H made by PECVD techniques and a-Si:H made by Hot Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HWCVD) techniques. Proton NMR and 1H- 29Si SEDOR NMR are used to examine the hydrogen structure of HWCVD a-Si:H films prepared at the University of Utrecht and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Past NMR studies have shown that high quality PECVD a-Si:H films have geometries in which 40% of the contained hydrogen is present as H2 molecules individually trapped in the amorphous equivalent of T-sites. A much smaller H2 fraction sometimes is physisorbed on internal surfaces. In this dissertation, similar NMR methods are used to perform structural studies of the two HWCVD aSi:H samples. The 3kHz resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole-burn behavior similar to that found for PECVD a-Si:H films as does the 24kHz FWHM line from clustered hydrogen bonded to silicon. Radio frequency hole-burning is a tool to distinguish between inhomogenous and homogeneous broadening. In the hole-burn experiments, the 3kHz FWHM resonance line from T-site-trapped H2 molecules shows a hole

  17. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOEpatents

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  18. Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

  19. Hydrogenation of carbonaceous materials

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Joseph; Oberg, Carl L.; Russell, Larry H.

    1980-01-01

    A method for reacting pulverized coal with heated hydrogen-rich gas to form hydrocarbon liquids suitable for conversion to fuels wherein the reaction involves injection of pulverized coal entrained in a minimum amount of gas and mixing the entrained coal at ambient temperature with a separate source of heated hydrogen. In accordance with the present invention, the hydrogen is heated by reacting a small portion of the hydrogen-rich gas with oxygen in a first reaction zone to form a gas stream having a temperature in excess of about 1000.degree. C. and comprising a major amount of hydrogen and a minor amount of water vapor. The coal particles then are reacted with the hydrogen in a second reaction zone downstream of the first reaction zone. The products of reaction may be rapidly quenched as they exit the second reaction zone and are subsequently collected.

  20. HYDROGEN ATOM THERMAL PARAMETERS.

    PubMed

    JENSEN, L H; SUNDARALINGAM, M

    1964-09-11

    Isotropic hydrogen atom thermal parameters for N,N'- hexamethylenebispropionamide have been determined. They show a definite trend and vary from approximately the same as the mean thermal parameters for atoms other than hydrogen near the center of the molecule to appreciably greater for atoms near the end. The indicated trend for this compound, along with other results, provides the basis for a possible explanation of the anomolous values that have been obtained for hydrogen atom thermal parameters.

  1. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  2. Hydrogen storage container

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jy-An John; Feng, Zhili; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-07

    An apparatus and system is described for storing high-pressure fluids such as hydrogen. An inner tank and pre-stressed concrete pressure vessel share the structural and/or pressure load on the inner tank. The system and apparatus provide a high performance and low cost container while mitigating hydrogen embrittlement of the metal tank. System is useful for distributing hydrogen to a power grid or to a vehicle refueling station.

  3. Hydrogen rich gas generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houseman, J. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process and apparatus is described for producing a hydrogen rich gas by introducing a liquid hydrocarbon fuel in the form of a spray into a partial oxidation region and mixing with a mixture of steam and air that is preheated by indirect heat exchange with the formed hydrogen rich gas, igniting the hydrocarbon fuel spray mixed with the preheated mixture of steam and air within the partial oxidation region to form a hydrogen rich gas.

  4. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E.

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  5. Hydrogen powered bus

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-07

    Take a ride on a new type of bus, fueled by hydrogen. These hydrogen taxis are part of a Department of Energy-funded deployment of hydrogen powered vehicles and fueling infrastructure at nine federal facilities across the country to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced and leased by Ford Motor Company , they consist of one 12- passenger bus and one nine-passenger bus. More information at: http://go.usa.gov/Tgr

  6. HYDROGEN ISOTOPE TARGETS

    DOEpatents

    Ashley, R.W.

    1958-08-12

    The design of targets for use in the investigation of nuclear reactions of hydrogen isotopes by bombardment with accelerated particles is described. The target con struction eomprises a backing disc of a metal selected from the group consisting of molybdenunn and tungsten, a eoating of condensed titaniunn on the dise, and a hydrogen isotope selected from the group consisting of deuterium and tritium absorbed in the coatiag. The proeess for preparing these hydrogen isotope targets is described.

  7. Hydrogen powered bus

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Take a ride on a new type of bus, fueled by hydrogen. These hydrogen taxis are part of a Department of Energy-funded deployment of hydrogen powered vehicles and fueling infrastructure at nine federal facilities across the country to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced and leased by Ford Motor Company , they consist of one 12- passenger bus and one nine-passenger bus. More information at: http://go.usa.gov/Tgr

  8. Conductive dense hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Eremets, M I; Troyan, I A

    2011-11-13

    Molecular hydrogen is expected to exhibit metallic properties under megabar pressures. This metal is predicted to be superconducting with a very high critical temperature, T(c), of 200-400 K, and it may acquire a new quantum state as a metallic superfluid and a superconducting superfluid. It may potentially be recovered metastably at ambient pressures. However, experiments carried out at low temperatures, T<100 K, showed that at record pressures of 300 GPa, hydrogen remains in the molecular insulating state. Here we report on the transformation of normal molecular hydrogen at room temperature (295 K) to a conductive and metallic state. At 200 GPa the Raman frequency of the molecular vibron strongly decreased and the spectral width increased, evidencing a strong interaction between molecules. Deuterium behaved similarly. Above 220 GPa, hydrogen became opaque and electrically conductive. At 260-270 GPa, hydrogen transformed into a metal as the conductance of hydrogen sharply increased and changed little on further pressurizing up to 300 GPa or cooling to at least 30 K; and the sample reflected light well. The metallic phase transformed back at 295 K into molecular hydrogen at 200 GPa. This significant hysteresis indicates that the transformation of molecular hydrogen into a metal is accompanied by a first-order structural transition presumably into a monatomic liquid state. Our findings open an avenue for detailed and comprehensive studies of metallic hydrogen.

  9. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Fleming, Pamela H.

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  10. Hydrogen ion microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y. Simon; Deb, Satyen K.

    1990-01-01

    Disclosed is a hydrogen ion microlithography process for use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. The process comprises the steps of providing a single layer of either an amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon material. A pattern is recorded in a selected layer of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon materials by preferentially implanting hydrogen ions therein so as to permit the selected layer to serve as a mask-resist wafer suitable for subsequent development and device fabrication. The layer is developed to provide a surface pattern therein adaptable for subsequent use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing.

  11. Hydrogen ion microlithography

    DOEpatents

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Deb, S.K.

    1990-10-02

    Disclosed is a hydrogen ion microlithography process for use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. The process comprises the steps of providing a single layer of either an amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon material. A pattern is recorded in a selected layer of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon materials by preferentially implanting hydrogen ions therein so as to permit the selected layer to serve as a mask-resist wafer suitable for subsequent development and device fabrication. The layer is developed to provide a surface pattern therein adaptable for subsequent use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. 6 figs.

  12. Hydrogen energy creeps forward

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graff, G.

    1983-05-01

    There have been hopeful forecasts of a 21st centry 'hydrogen economy' in which cheap hydrogen fuel would finally end mankind's dependence on petroleum fuels. The present investigation is concerned with developments related to the possible realization of such forecasts. One vital factor involves the feasibility to provide hydrogen at competitive prices for use as a fuel. Industrial hydrogen is too expensive for applications involving a competition with currently used common fuels. A number of investigations are being conducted in the U.S. and in other countries with the aim to develop an economical process by which hydrogen can be obtained from water. There exist already a great number of feasible different approaches for obtaining hydrogen on the basis of the decomposition of the water molecule. However, problems still to be solved are related to the development of any of these approaches to the point of economic viability. Another crucial factor concerns the strorage of hydrogen. Automakers are testing hydrogen-powered cars in which hydrogen is stored in liquid form or with the aid of metal hydrides.

  13. Conductive dense hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremets, M. I.; Troyan, I. A.

    2011-12-01

    Molecular hydrogen is expected to exhibit metallic properties under megabar pressures. This metal is predicted to be superconducting with a very high critical temperature, Tc, of 200-400 K (ref. ), and it may acquire a new quantum state as a metallic superfluid and a superconducting superfluid. It may potentially be recovered metastably at ambient pressures. However, experiments carried out at low temperatures, T<100 K (refs , ), showed that at record pressures of 300 GPa, hydrogen remains in the molecular insulating state. Here we report on the transformation of normal molecular hydrogen at room temperature (295 K) to a conductive and metallic state. At 200 GPa the Raman frequency of the molecular vibron strongly decreased and the spectral width increased, evidencing a strong interaction between molecules. Deuterium behaved similarly. Above 220 GPa, hydrogen became opaque and electrically conductive. At 260-270 GPa, hydrogen transformed into a metal as the conductance of hydrogen sharply increased and changed little on further pressurizing up to 300 GPa or cooling to at least 30 K and the sample reflected light well. The metallic phase transformed back at 295 K into molecular hydrogen at 200 GPa. This significant hysteresis indicates that the transformation of molecular hydrogen into a metal is accompanied by a first-order structural transition presumably into a monatomic liquid state. Our findings open an avenue for detailed and comprehensive studies of metallic hydrogen.

  14. Sustainable hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

  15. Hydrogen diffusion fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1987-08-04

    This patent describes a fuel cell comprising; an elongate case; a thin, flat separator part of non-porous, di-electric, hydrogen-permeable material between the ends of and extending transverse the case and defining anode and cathode chambers; a thin, flat anode part of non-porous, electric conductive, hydrogen-permeable metallic material in the anode chamber in flat contacting engagement with and co-extensive with the separator part; a flat, porous, catalytic cathode part in the cathode chamber in contacting engagement with the separator part; hydrogen supply means supplying hydrogen to the anode part within the anode chamber; oxidant gas supply means supplying oxidant gas to the cathode part within the cathode chamber; and, an external electric circuit connected with and between the anode and cathode parts. The anode part absorbs and is permeated by hydrogen supplied to it and diffuses the hydrogen to hydrogen ions and free electrons; the free electrons in the anode part are conducted from the anode part into the electric circuit to perform useful work. The hydrogen ions in the anode part move from the anode part through the separator part and into the cathode part. Free electrons are conducted by the electric circuit into the cathode part. The hydrogen ions, oxidant gas and free electrons in the cathode part react and generate waste, heat and water.

  16. Hydrogen as an energy carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Winter, C.J.; Nitsch, J

    1988-01-01

    The book deals with the possibilities of an energetic utilization of hydrogen. This energy carrier can be produced from the unlimited energy sources solar energy, wind energy and hydropower, and from nuclear energy. It is also in a position to one day supplement or supersede the fossil energy carriers oil, coal and gas. Contents: Significance and Use of Hydrogen: Energy Supply Structures and the Importance of Gaseous Energy Carriers. Technologies for the Energetic Use of Hydrogen. Hydrogen as Raw Material. Safety Aspects of Hydrogen Energy. Production of Hydrogen from Nonfossil Primary Energy: Photovoltaic Electricity Generation. Thermo-mechanical Electricity Generation. Water Splitting Methods. Selected Hydrogen Production Systems. Storage, Transport and Distribution of Hydrogen. Design of a Future Hydrogen Energy Economy: Potential and Chances of Hydrogen. Hydrogen in a Future Energy Economy. Concepts for the Introduction of Nonfossil Hydrogen. Energy-economic Conditions and the Cooperation with Hydrogen Producing Countries. Index.

  17. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, L.A.; Mead, K.E.; Smith, H.M.

    1983-09-20

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (1) a solid acetylenic compound and (2) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  18. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Harrah, Larry A.; Mead, Keith E.; Smith, Henry M.

    1983-01-01

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the resultant hydrogen.

  19. Combination moisture and hydrogen getter

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-04-29

    A combination moisture and hydrogen getter comprises (a) a moisture getter comprising a readily oxidizable metal; and (b) a hydrogen getter comprising (i) a solid acetylenic compound and (ii) a hydrogenation catalyst. A method of scavenging moisture from a closed container uses the combination moisture and hydrogen getter to irreversibly chemically reduce the moisture and chemically bind the reusltant hydrogen.

  20. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwel; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  1. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  2. Process for exchanging hydrogen isotopes between gaseous hydrogen and water

    SciTech Connect

    Hindin, Saul G.; Roberts, George W.

    1980-08-12

    A process for exchanging isotopes of hydrogen, particularly tritium, between gaseous hydrogen and water is provided whereby gaseous hydrogen depeleted in tritium and liquid or gaseous water containing tritium are reacted in the presence of a metallic catalyst.

  3. Electronic absorption spectra of hydrogenated protonated naphthalene and proflavine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonaca, A.; Bilalbegović, G.

    2011-09-01

    We study hydrogenated cations of two polycyclic hydrocarbon molecules as models of hydrogenated organic species that form in the interstellar medium. Optical spectra of the hydrogenated naphthalene cation Hn-C10H+8 for n= 1, 2 and 10, as well as the astrobiologically interesting hydrogenated proflavine cation Hn-C13H11N+3 for n= 1 and 14, are calculated. The pseudopotential time-dependent density functional theory is used. It is found that the fully hydrogenated proflavine cation H14-C13H11N+3 shows a broad spectrum in which the positions of individual lines are almost lost. The positions, shapes and intensities of lines change in hydronaphthalene and hydroproflavine cations, showing that hydrogen additions induce substantially different optical spectra in comparison with base polycyclic hydrocarbon cations. One calculated line in the visible spectrum of H10-C10H+8 and one in the visible spectrum of H-C13H11N+3 are close to the measured diffuse interstellar bands. We also present the positions of near-ultraviolet lines.

  4. Isotopic composition of atmospheric hydrogen and methane

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bainbridge, A.E.; Suess, H.E.; Friedman, I.

    1961-01-01

    IN a recent communication, Bishop and Taylor1 express the opinion that the tritium concentration of free hydrogen in the atmosphere has been rising over the past ten years, with a doubling time of approximately 18 months. The authors suspect that artificial tritium was released into the atmosphere several years before the Castle test series in 1954, which is commonly assumed to have led to the first pronounced rise in the tritium concentration of terrestrial surface water. Bishop and Taylor's communication includes a diagram of the logarithms of all the experimentally determined tritium values in free atmospheric hydrogen plotted against time. The plot shows that the values follow a straight line that includes the first value obtained by Faltings and Harteck2 on atmospheric hydrogen collected in 1948. ?? 1961 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Liquid hydrogen flow problems in Kiwi reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Thurston, R.S.

    1992-09-01

    The Kiwi series of reactors were the first ones tested in the US Rover Program in the development of nuclear rocket engines for space propulsion. The early experiments with liquid hydrogen showed that parallel flow systems were prone to uneven flow distributions and violent fluctuations in pressure and flow that were capable of destroying a reactor core. Kiwi flow distribution problems were solved by using multiple feed lines into the nozzle cooling system and carefully balancing impedance among them. The violent pressure and flow fluctuations were eliminated after their cause was identified as resonance phenomena driven by the response to flow disturbances of heat transfer through a superheated hydrogen layer. Smooth flow operations were assured by rapidly bringing operating pressures beyond several times the critical pressure of hydrogen. After this initial rough start, solid core nuclear rocket engines successfully passed milestones of achievements during the remainder of the Rover program.

  6. Membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2007-01-16

    A membrane for hydrogen recovery from streams containing hydrogen sulfide is provided. The membrane comprises a substrate, a hydrogen permeable first membrane layer deposited on the substrate, and a second membrane layer deposited on the first layer. The second layer contains sulfides of transition metals and positioned on the on a feed side of the hydrogen sulfide stream. The present invention also includes a method for the direct decomposition of hydrogen sulfide to hydrogen and sulfur.

  7. Hydrogen production by photoprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, S.R.

    1988-10-01

    The concept of producing hydrogen fuel from sunlight is inherently appealing and has captured the imagination of many scientists, innovators, and decision makers. In fact, there are numerous routes to produce hydrogen from solar energy through photoprocesses. Generally, they can be grouped into four processes: electric conversion, thermal conversion, indirect conversion, and direct photon conversion. 12 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Hydrogen from solar energy

    SciTech Connect

    Nix, R.G.

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes those portions of the Photo/Thermochemical Research Program that possibly apply to the production of hydrogen from sources such as water or hydrogen sulfide. That research centers around understanding high flux solids decomposition reactions and how to best exploit photoreactions so the energy contained in the entire solar spectrum is used. 2 references, 4 figures.

  9. Hydrogen Conference: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is currently a major chemical/fuel with long-term energy system benefits that may impact the industry's physical and economic well-being. EPRI's recent hydrogen conference concluded that to be competitive, the production cost must take into account environmental and end-use efficiency benefits.

  10. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  11. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, Barbara S.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  12. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Hoffheins, B.S.; Lauf, R.J.

    1995-09-19

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors. 8 figs.

  13. Hydrogen in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Peercy, P. S.

    1980-01-01

    The structural aspects of amorphous silicon and the role of hydrogen in this structure are reviewed with emphasis on ion implantation studies. In amorphous silicon produced by Si ion implantation of crystalline silicon, the material reconstructs into a metastable amorphous structure which has optical and electrical properties qualitatively similar to the corresponding properties in high-purity evaporated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen studies further indicate that these structures will accomodate less than or equal to 5 at.% hydrogen and this hydrogen is bonded predominantly in a monohydride (SiH/sub 1/) site. Larger hydrogen concentrations than this can be achieved under certain conditions, but the excess hydrogen may be attributed to defects and voids in the material. Similarly, glow discharge or sputter deposited amorphous silicon has more desirable electrical and optical properties when the material is prepared with low hydrogen concentration and monohydride bonding. Results of structural studies and hydrogen incorporation in amorphous silicon were discussed relative to the different models proposed for amorphous silicon.

  14. Travel with hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, L. J. F. Jo

    2017-03-01

    In the field of transportation, hydrogen does not have a particularly glorious history. Just think of the dozens of hydrogen airships destroyed by fire over the years, with the Hindenburg disaster in 1937 as the most famous example. Now H2 is trying a comeback on the road, often in combination with a fuel cell and an electric motor to power the car.

  15. Hydrogen utilization and alternatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.; Caputo, R.; Fujita, T.

    1975-01-01

    The historical uses of hydrogen are described along with potential new uses which could develop as a result of the diminishing supply of conventional fossil fuels such as natural gas. A perspective view of hydrogen, both as a chemical feedstock and as a fuel, is necessary to understand its relationship to the overall national energy projections. These projections, which show energy usage in terms of use sectors, forms of energy, and sources of energy, do not specifically identify hydrogen as a component of the energy system. By superimposing the traditional roles upon the new opportunities for hydrogen on the energy projections, the role of hydrogen and future projections is developed within the context of the national energy projections. Use, supply, and other factors affecting application are interrelated and are discussed.

  16. Atomic hydrogen rocket engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etters, R. D.; Flurchick, K.

    1981-01-01

    A rocket using atomic hydrogen propellant is discussed. An essential feature of the proposed engine is that the atomic hydrogen fuel is used as it is produced, thus eliminating the necessity of storage. The atomic hydrogen flows into a combustion chamber and recombines, producing high velocity molecular hydrogen which flows out an exhaust port. Standard thermodynamics, kinetic theory and wall recombination cross-sections are used to predict a thrust of approximately 1.4 N for a RF hydrogen flow rate of 4 x 10 to the 22nd/sec. Specific impulses are nominally from 1000 to 2000 sec. It is predicted that thrusts on the order of one Newton and specific impulses of up to 2200 sec are attainable with nominal RF discharge fluxes on the order of 10 to the 22nd atoms/sec; further refinements will probably not alter these predictions by more than a factor of two.

  17. Hydrogen Fuel Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Rockward, Tommy

    2012-07-16

    For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

  18. Challenges in hydrogen storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schüth, F.

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogen is one possible medium for energy storage and transportation in an era beyond oil. Hydrogen appears to be especially promising in connection with electricity generation in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells in cars. However, before such technologies can be implemented on a larger scale, satisfactory solutions for on-board storage of hydrogen are required. This is a difficult task due to the low volumetric and gravimetric storage density on a systems level which can be achieved so far. Possibilities include cryogenic storage as liquid hydrogen, high pressure storage at 70 MPa, (cryo)adsorptive storage, or various chemical methods of binding and releasing hydrogen. This survey discusses the different options and the associated advantages and disadvantages.

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, Ludwig

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).